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Sample records for biceps tendon sheath

  1. Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture Military Medicine Radiology Corner, 2006 Radiology Corner Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture Contributors: CPT Michael...treatment of a 56-year-old man with complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon . The mechanism of injury, symptoms, and findings at physical...be used in pre-operative planning. Introduction Rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a relatively uncommon injury, but delayed diagnosis may

  2. The distal biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christopher C; Jarrett, Claudius D; Brown, Brandon T

    2013-04-01

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures continue to be an important injury seen and treated by upper extremity surgeons. Since the mid-1980s, the emphasis has been placed on techniques that limit complications or improve initial tendon-to-bone fixation strength. Recently, basic science research has expanded the knowledge base regarding the biceps tendon structure, footprint anatomy, and biomechanics. Clinical data have further delineated the results of conservative and surgical management of both partial and complete tears in acute or chronic states. The current literature on the distal biceps tendon is described in detail. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proximal Biceps Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens, biceps tendonitis is usually an overuse injury. Baseball pitchers, swimmers, tennis players, and people who have ... But if you swim or play tennis or baseball, that might not be an option! If your ...

  4. Tendon sheath fibroma in the thigh.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Vincent M; Ashana, Adedayo O; de la Cruz, Michael; Lackman, Richard D

    2012-04-01

    Tendon sheath fibromas are rare, benign soft tissue tumors that are predominantly found in the fingers, hands, and wrists of young adult men. This article describes a tendon sheath fibroma that developed in the thigh of a 70-year-old man, the only known tendon sheath fibroma to form in this location. Similar to tendon sheath fibromas that develop elsewhere, our patient's lesion presented as a painless, slow-growing soft tissue nodule. Physical examination revealed a firm, nontender mass with no other associated signs or symptoms. Although the imaging appearance of tendon sheath fibromas varies, our patient's lesion appeared dark on T1- and bright on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It was well marginated and enhanced with contrast.Histologically, tendon sheath fibromas are composed of dense fibrocollagenous stromas with scattered spindle-shaped fibroblasts and narrow slit-like vascular spaces. Most tendon sheath fibromas can be successfully removed by marginal excision, although 24% of lesions recur. No lesions have metastasized. Our patient's tendon sheath fibroma was removed by marginal excision, and the patient remained disease free 35 months postoperatively. Despite its rarity, tendon sheath fibroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a thigh mass on physical examination or imaging, especially if it is painless, nontender, benign appearing, and present in men. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Surgical treatment of partial biceps tendon ruptures at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Dellaero, David T; Mallon, William J

    2006-01-01

    We present the treatment and results of a consecutive series of 7 patients (mean age, 42.7 years) with partial ruptures of the distal biceps tendon. All injuries occurred as the result of either heavy labor or weightlifting. Diagnosis in all cases was made with magnetic resonance imaging. After failure of conservative therapy, the patients were treated with repair of the distal biceps tendon. Mean follow-up was 30.6 months (range, 25-39 months). Results were uniformly good, with all patients satisfied with the outcome. All patients maintained their preoperative range of motion, with none reporting significant postoperative pain. The only complication was transient neurapraxias of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve in 2 cases. We conclude that patients presenting with chronic pain in the cubital fossa should be evaluated for possible partial biceps tendon tear. If the diagnosis of partial tendon tear is made, surgical repair is a safe and effective method of treatment.

  6. Paralabral rupture of the proximal biceps tendon from light weightlifting.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kyle E; Solomon, Daniel J

    2008-12-01

    Rupture of the long head of the biceps is usually seen in older adults, in conjunction with rotator cuff tears or tenosynovitis secondary to chronic subacromial impingement; it is rarely seen as a result of trauma. We present the case of a young active patient who denied prodromal symptoms but ruptured the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHB) while performing 25-pound biceps curls. Upon examination, the patient was noted to have a readily apparent biceps defect and decreased strength. He was brought to the operating room, where open subpectoral tenodesis of the LHB was performed. At the 6-week follow-up evaluation, the patient had regained full range of motion. By 6 months, he had regained his previous strength. This case demonstrates an unusual presentation of a LHB rupture in a young healthy man with no prodromal symptoms.

  7. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon repair: case report.

    PubMed

    Storti, Thiago Medeiros; Paniago, Alexandre Firmino; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a rare clinical entity, seldom reported in the literature and with unclear therapeutic setting. The authors report the case of a 39-year-old white man who suffered a simultaneous bilateral rupture while working out. When weightlifting with elbows at 90° of flexion, he suddenly felt pain on the anterior aspect of the arms, coming for evaluation after two days. He presented bulging contour of the biceps muscle belly and ecchymosis in the antecubital fossa, extending distally to the medial aspect of the forearm, as well as a marked decrease of supination strength and pain in active elbow flexion. MRI confirmed the rupture with retraction of the distal biceps bilaterally. The authors opted for performing the tendon repairs simultaneously through the double incision technique and fixation to the bicipital tuberosity with anchors. The patient progressed quite well, with full return to labor and sports activities, being satisfied with the result after two years of surgery. In the literature search, few reports of simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps were retrieved, with only one treated in the acute phase of injury. Therefore, the authors consider this procedure to be a good option to solve this complex condition.

  8. Repair of distal biceps tendon rupture with the Biotenodesis screw.

    PubMed

    Khan, W; Agarwal, M; Funk, L

    2004-04-01

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries with only around 300 cases reported in the literature. Current management tends to favour anatomical reinsertion of the tendon into the radial tuberosity, especially in young and active individuals. These injuries are commonly repaired using either a single anterior incision with suture anchors or the Boyd-Anderson dual incision technique. We report the use of a bioabsorbable interference screw for the repair of distal biceps tendon rupture using a minimal incision technique. In this technique the avulsed tendon and a bioabsorbable screw are secured in a drill hole on the radial tuberosity using whip stitch and fibre wire sutures according to Biotenodesis system guidelines. The technique described requires minimal volar dissection that is associated with a reduced number of synostosis and posterior interosseous nerve injuries. The bioabsorbable interference screw has all the advantages of being biodegradable and has been shown to have greater pullout strength than suture anchors. It is also a reasonable alternative to titanium screws in terms of primary fixation strength. The strong fixation provided allows early active motion and return to previous activities as seen in our case.

  9. Arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon: functional outcome and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Drakos, Mark C; Fealy, Stephen; Taylor, Samuel A; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2005-02-01

    Treatment of chronic, refractory biceps tendinitis remains controversial. The authors sought to evaluate clinical and functional outcomes of arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon. In specific cases of refractory biceps tendinitis, site-specific release of the long head of the biceps tendon may yield relief of pain and symptoms. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fifty-four patients diagnosed with biceps tendinitis underwent arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon as an isolated procedure or as part of a concomitant shoulder procedure over a 2-year period. Patients were not excluded for concomitant shoulder abnormality, including degenerative joint disease, rotator cuff tears, Bankart lesions, or instability. Nine of 40 patients had an isolated arthroscopic release of the biceps tendon. At a minimum of 2 years, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons; the University of California, Los Angeles; and the L'Insalata shoulder questionnaires as well as ipsilateral and contralateral metrics were used for evaluation. The L'Insalata; University of California, Los Angeles; and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores were 77.6, 27.6, and 75.6, respectively. Seventy percent had a Popeye sign at rest or during active elbow flexion; 82.7% of men and 36.5% of women had a positive Popeye sign (P < .05); 68% were rated as good, very good, or excellent. No patient reported arm pain at rest distally or proximally; 38% of patients complained of fatigue discomfort (soreness) isolated to the biceps muscle after resisted elbow flexion. Arthroscopic release of the long head of the biceps tendon is an appropriate and reliable intervention for patients with chronic, refractory biceps tendinitis. Cosmetic deformity presenting as a positive Popeye sign and fatigue discomfort were the primary complaints. Although tenotomy is not the ideal intervention for patients of all ages with various shoulder abnormalities, data suggest that it may be an

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the long head of the biceps tendon: benefit of coplanar image.

    PubMed

    Lin, Anderson; Ting, Julius; Lee, Kwo-Whei

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate coplanar imaging of the long head of the biceps tendon. We retrospectively compared coronal oblique magnetic resonance images aligned with the principal supraspinatus tendon and with the intra-articular biceps tendon in 21 patients. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for lesions depicted, including superior labral anteroposterior (SLAP) tears. Arthroscopic findings were reviewed. Coronal oblique images aligned with intra-articular biceps tendon depicted 18 (86%) of 21 coplanar intra-articular biceps tendons. Coplanar images identified 6 cases of tendinosis, 1 tear, 3 intra-articular ruptures, and 20 (95.2%) of 21 exact origins of the tendon. Arthroscopy revealed 18 SLAP tears. The detection of SLAP lesions between both coronal oblique magnetic resonance images was significantly different (P = 0.007). Advantages included imaging of the intra-articular biceps tendon with least partial-volume effects, definition of SLAP lesions and the tendinous origin at the supraglenoid tubercle, depiction of intra-articular bicipital ruptures, and increased sensitivity and specificity for intra-articular lesions.

  11. The role of the bicipital groove in tendopathy of the long biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Pfahler, M; Branner, S; Refior, H J

    1999-01-01

    Long biceps tendon disease is often underrated but plays an important role in anterior shoulder pain. We studied prospectively the anatomy of the bicipital groove and its relationship to clinical symptoms. Sixty-seven consecutive patients were investigated by mutual ultrasonography and radiographs of the intertubercular groove. All images were scrutinized for biceps tendon status (ultrasonography) and groove anatomy (radiography). Thirty-seven patients (21 male, 16 female, average age 48 years) had chronic anterior shoulder pain, and 30 patients (16 male, 14 female, average age 46 years) served as a control group. In 28 shoulders we found sonographic signs of tendovaginitis, and in 14 we found degenerative changes. The mean age of patients with pathologic conditions of the long biceps tendon was 40 years, significantly lower than that of the complete study group. The x-ray films revealed a great variation in the medial and total opening angle of the groove, whereas width, depth, and humeral head diameter showed sex-related differences. Radiologic signs of groove degeneration correlated in 43.6% with biceps tendon disease on the sonogram. Our study revealed statistically significant correlations between groove anatomy and long biceps tendon disease, which should be considered more while shoulder problems are evaluated.

  12. Surgical treatment for partial rupture of the distal biceps tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Wada, Takuro; Iba, Kousuke; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2018-03-08

    We report a case of a partial rupture of the distal biceps tendon that was surgically treated using a palmaris longus tendon graft. A 58-year-old man complained of increasing pain with resisted elbow flexion and supination in the antecubital fossa. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the irregularity of a distal attachment of the biceps brachii and peripheral signal changes. We diagnosed a partial rupture of the distal biceps tendon. Because conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment was performed through a single anterior approach. The insertion of the tendon was partially ruptured at the radial tuberosity. After the involved site was debrided, the palmaris longus tendon was grafted with suture anchors to reinforce the remaining tendon. Postoperative immobilization was not performed, and all moves were freed after 3 weeks. At the 6-year postoperative follow-up, the patient no longer experienced pain and returned to his original job without any limitations. Copyright © 2018 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Re-rupture rate of primarily repaired distal biceps tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Hinchey, John W; Aronowitz, Jessica G; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Morrey, Bernard F

    2014-06-01

    Distal biceps tendon rupture is a common injury, and primary repair results in excellent return of function and strength. Complications resulting from distal biceps tendon repairs are well reported, but the incidence of re-ruptures has never been investigated. A search of the Mayo Clinic's Medical/Surgical Index was performed, and all distal biceps tendon repairs from January 1981 through May 2009 were identified. All patients who completed 12 months or more of follow-up were included. All charts were reviewed and patients contacted as necessary to identify a re-rupture. We also investigated the situation causing the re-rupture. We identified a total of 190 distal biceps tendon ruptures that underwent repair and met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 190 repairs, 172 (90.5%) were performed by the Mayo modification of the Boyd-Anderson 2-incision technique. Bilateral ruptures occurred in 13 patients (7.3%). Six primary ruptures (3.2%) occurred in women, 4 of the 6 being partial ruptures. Partial ruptures were found to be statistically more common than complete ruptures in women (P = .05). We identified 3 re-ruptures (1.5%), all occurring within 3 weeks of the index surgery. The re-rupture rate after primary repair of the distal biceps tendon is low at 1.5% and occurs within 3 weeks of index repair. This appears to be due to patient compliance and excessive force placed on repairs. We also found the incidence of women who sustain a distal biceps tendon tear to be 3.2%, with partial tears being statistically more common than complete ruptures. Level IV, case series, treatment study Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Supraspinatus tendinosis associated with biceps brachii tendon displacement in a dog.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Boel A; Gavin, Patrick R; Lahmers, Kevin K

    2005-11-01

    A 4-year-old spayed female Australian Cattle Dog (Blue Heeler) was evaluated because of right forelimb lameness of 5 months' duration. Orthopedic evaluation revealed signs of pain localized to the cranial aspects of both shoulder joints. Via magnetic resonance imaging, the mass of the supraspinatus tendon insertion in both shoulder joints was increased, compared with findings in cadavers of clinically normal dogs; additional imaging procedures revealed that, compared with clinically normal tendons, the tendon had increased signal intensity that was consistent with increased fluid content. The increased supraspinatus tendon mass in each shoulder joint was associated with medial displacement of the biceps brachii tendon, which was more severe in the right limb. Arthroscopic evaluations of both shoulder joints revealed no abnormalities. The dog underwent surgery, and the abnormal parts of the tendons were resected. The most prominent finding on histologic examination of excised tissues was severe myxomatous degeneration. The lameness resolved, and at 22 months after surgery, the dog was reported to have had no recurrence of lameness. The clinical signs and histologic appearance of the tendons in this dog strongly resemble findings associated with tendinosis in humans. Decompression of the biceps brachii tendon may have contributed to the successful outcome after surgery in this dog. Supraspinatus tendinosis should be considered among the differential diagnoses in dogs with uni- or bilateral forelimb lameness.

  15. Good isometric and isokinetic power restoration after distal biceps tendon repair with anchors.

    PubMed

    Suda, Arnold J; Prajitno, Julia; Grützner, Paul A; Tinelli, Marco

    2017-07-01

    Distal biceps brachii tendon rupture can lead to 30-40% power loss of elbow flexion and up to 50% of forearm supination. Re-fixation of the distal biceps brachii tendon is recommended to warrant an adequate quality of the patient's life. This study reports the isometric and isokinetic results after anchor re-fixation 2.5 years after surgery. Between 2007 and 2010, 69 patients with distal biceps brachii tendon tear underwent a suture anchor reattachment. During the follow-up examination, a questionnaire and DASH score were filled in, the circumferences of the arm were measured, range of motion was collected, and different trials were conducted at the BTE Primus RS™ (Baltimore Therapeutic Equipment) on both arms. 49 patients (71%) were reinvestigated with a follow-up of 32 months (11-58 months). A significant difference was found in the ability of elbow flexion between the affected arm and the opposite side as well as in pronation and supination. In elbow flexion and extension as well as in pronation and supination of the forearm, the strength was significantly diminished. 32 months after surgical re-fixation of the distal biceps brachii tendon rupture, strength in all exercises is marginally reduced in comparison to the opposite arm. Re-fixation of the distal biceps brachii tendon is an adequate method to return the range of motion and the strength in the elbow joint to an almost normal level and that gives rise to a high level of patient satisfaction. Level III, case-control study.

  16. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures repaired using an endobutton technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dacambra, Mark P; Walker, Richard Ea; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2013-08-23

    The simultaneous rupture of both distal biceps tendons is a rare clinical entity that is difficult to treat and can have poor outcomes. A variety of treatment and rehabilitation options exist and have been reported for single sided and staged bilateral repairs, but none have described an approach for acute bilateral ruptures. Repairing distal biceps tendon ruptures using a single anterior incision and a cortical suspensory button technique has become increasingly popular in recent years. We present a report of our surgical approach using an endobutton technique and rehabilitation algorithm for this unusual injury pattern. A 43-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute onset bilateral elbow pain while lifting a large sheet of drywall off the ground. He initially felt a 'pop' on the right and almost immediately felt another on the left after having to quickly shift the weight. He was unable to continue working and sought medical attention. His pain was predominantly in his bilateral antecubital fossae and he had significant swelling and ecchymoses. His clinical examination demonstrated no palpable tendon, a retracted biceps muscle belly, and clear supination weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and showed bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures with retraction on both sides. After discussion with our patient, we decided that both sides would be repaired using a single anterior incision with endobutton fixation, first his right followed by his left six weeks later. Overall, our patient did very well and had returned to full manual work by our last follow-up at 30 months. Although he was never able to return to competitive recreational hockey and was left with mild lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve dysesthesias on his right, he felt he was at 85% of his premorbid level of function. We describe what we believe to be, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures successfully treated with a single

  17. Degeneration of the long biceps tendon: comparison of MRI with gross anatomy and histology.

    PubMed

    Buck, Florian M; Grehn, Holger; Hilbe, Monika; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Manzanell, Silvana; Hodler, Jürg

    2009-11-01

    The objective of our study was to relate alterations in biceps tendon diameter and signal on MR images to gross anatomy and histology. T1-weighted, T2-weighted fat-saturated, and proton density-weighted fat-saturated spin-echo sequences were acquired in 15 cadaveric shoulders. Biceps tendon diameter (normal, flattened, thickened, and partially or completely torn) and signal intensity (compared with bone, fat, muscle, and joint fluid) were graded by two readers independently and in a blinded fashion. The distance of tendon abnormalities from the attachment at the glenoid were noted in millimeters. MRI findings were related to gross anatomic and histologic findings. On the basis of gross anatomy, there were six normal, five flattened, two thickened, and two partially torn tendons. Reader 1 graded nine diameter changes correctly, missed two, and incorrectly graded four. The corresponding values for reader 2 were seven, one, and five, respectively, with kappa = 0.75. Histology showed mucoid degeneration (n = 13), lipoid degeneration (n = 7), and fatty infiltration (n = 6). At least one type of abnormality was found in each single tendon. Mucoid degeneration was hyperintense compared with fatty infiltration on T2-weighted fat-saturated images and hyperintense compared with magic-angle artifacts on proton density-weighted fat-saturated images. MRI-based localization of degeneration agreed well with histologic findings. Diameter changes are specific but not sensitive in diagnosing tendinopathy of the biceps tendon. Increased tendon signal is most typical for mucoid degeneration but should be used with care as a sign of tendon degeneration.

  18. Distal biceps reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft, transosseous EndoButton, and Pulvertaft weave with tendon wrap technique for retracted, irreparable distal biceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Joideep; Flannery, Olivia; Watts, Adam C

    2016-06-01

    Distal biceps ruptures can result in ongoing pain and weakness when treated nonoperatively. If retraction of the tendon renders primary repair impossible, reconstruction using a graft is recommended. The current literature includes a variety of techniques with studies reporting small patient numbers. The aim of this study was to report the results of a larger cohort of patients using a technique modified from those previously described in the literature. Twenty-one consecutive male patients underwent distal biceps reconstruction through 2 small anterior incisions using an Achilles tendon allograft that was fixed distally using a transosseous EndoButton and secured proximally using a Pulvertaft weave and tendon wrap. The mean age was 44 years, and the mean time to surgery was 25 months (range, 2-96 months). Functional outcomes were collected prospectively. The mean preoperative Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) score (11 patients) was 1.9 (range, 0-4.5). The mean postoperative Oxford Elbow Score, QuickDASH score, and Mayo Elbow Performance Score were 44.7 (range, 35-48), 4 (range, 0-20.5), and 92.9 (range, 70-100), respectively, at a mean follow up of 15 months (range, 6-35 months). The mean postoperative QuickDASH score was significantly improved compared with preoperatively (P < .001). All patients were satisfied and all returned to their previous level of activity. There were 2 transient lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve paresthesias, and 2 patients had a 5° extension lag. There were no other complications. Achilles allograft reconstruction of retracted irreparable distal biceps ruptures provides consistently good results with few complications using this technique. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary repair of retracted distal biceps tendon ruptures in extreme flexion.

    PubMed

    Morrey, Mark E; Abdel, Matthew P; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin; Morrey, Bernard F

    2014-05-01

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures may have tendinous retraction, making primary repair difficult and calling into question the need for graft reconstruction. The decision for when to primarily fix or augment high-flexion repairs has not been addressed. We hypothesized high-flexion repairs would have good outcomes without graft augmentation. The purpose of this study was to examine allograft use and outcomes of distal biceps tendon ruptures requiring repair in greater than 60° of flexion. This was a retrospective case-control study 188 distal biceps tendon repairs; of these, 19 chronic and 4 acute cases were identified with repairs of >60° of flexion using a 2-incision technique. Graft need, complications, and Mayo Elbow Performance Score to assess function, were examined with a record review. Patients were surveyed regarding return to work and subjective satisfaction. A control group matched for surgeon, chronicity, and age, but without a high-flexion repair, was compared with cases by using the Student paired t test. Graft augmentation was used in 1 patient with poor tendon quality. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score was 100 for all 23 patients, with extension/flexion range of motion from 3° to 138°. All were subjectively "very satisfied/satisfied," with full work return, yet 3 reported mild fatigability. There were 4 complications: 3 transient lateral antebrachial cutaneous neurapraxias and 1 rerupture at the myotendinous junction after retrauma. Differences between cases and controls were not statistically significant. Contracted distal biceps tendons may be reliably reattached to their anatomic insertion with up to 90° of elbow flexion. This lessens the need for reconstruction in such circumstances. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between chronic pathologies of the supraspinatus tendon and the long head of the biceps tendon: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Alonso, Lucía; Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Jiménez-Rejano, José Jesús; López-Tarrida, Patricio; Ridao-Fernández, Carmen

    2014-11-18

    Chronic supraspinatus tendinopathy is a common clinical problem that causes functional and labor disabilities in the population. It is the most frequent cause of shoulder pain. This pathology may be frequently associated to the affectation of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT), the main stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint together with the supraspinatus. The main aim of this work is to study the prevalence of lesions in LHBT associated to the chronic pathology of the supraspinatus tendon. A systematic review was carried out between May to July 2013 in the electronic databases: CINAHL, WOK, Medline, Scopus, PEDro, IME (CSIC) and Dialnet. The keywords used were: 1) in English: chronic, supraspinatus "long head of the biceps tendon", biceps, rotator cuff, tendinosis, tendinopathy, evaluation, examination; 2) in Spanish: supraespinoso, biceps, tendinopatía. Inclusion criteria of the articles included subjects with a previously diagnosed chronic pathology of rotator cuff (RC) without previous surgery or any other pathologies of the shoulder complex. The total number of articles included in the study were five. The results show an epidemiological relationship between both tendons. The age of the subjects included in the review was between 35 and 80 years, and some of the studies seem to indicate that the tendinopathy is more frequent in men than in women. The sample size of the studies varies according to the design, the highest being composed of 229 subjects, and the minimum of 28. Not all the articles selected specify the diagnostic testing, though the ones most normally used are arthroscopy, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and assessment tests. The percentage of associated lesions of LHBT and supraspinatus tendon is between 78.5% and 22%, with a major prevalence in the studies with a smaller sample. The review of literature corroborates an association between the chronic pathology of the supraspinatus tendon and LHBT due to the epidemiological data. In

  1. The structure of the insertions of the tendons of biceps brachii, triceps and brachialis in elderly dissecting room cadavers.

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M; Newell, R L; Evans, E J; Ralphs, J R; Pemberton, D J

    1992-01-01

    The terminal portions of the tendon of brachialis, and the distal tendons of biceps brachii and triceps, were compared by routine histology. All tendons came from elderly dissecting room cadavers. There were pronounced quantitative differences between the 3 tendons in (1) the thickness of the attachment-zone fibrocartilage, (2) the thickness of cortical calcified tissue, and (3) the percentage of bone to marrow. There was significantly more uncalcified fibrocartilage at the attachment of biceps than at the other sites, reflecting greater range of movement of the tendon at this site. The thickness of cortical calcified tissue and the percentage of bone to marrow were significantly greater at the attachment of brachialis than either biceps or triceps. The large quantities of bone at the attachment of brachialis may be related more to the importance of the coronoid process in buttressing the elbow joint than to any special requirement for large amounts of calcified tissue at the tendon attachment. Near its attachment zone, the biceps tendon splits into superficial and deep laminae that are distinct from the macroscopic subdivision of this tendon. It is suggested that the lamination may facilitate the movements of pronation and supination. In support of this, the deep portion of the superficial lamina contained fibrocartilage where it rubbed against the attachment-zone of the deep lamina. In one body, the fibrocartilage of the biceps attachment-zone was subject to degenerative changes, including cell clumping and matrix fissuring. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1506288

  2. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon rupture during a preacher curl exercise: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rokito, Andrew S; lofin, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a rare injury, the overwhelming majority occurring in the dominant arm of males during the fourth to sixth decades of life. Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps tendon is an extremely rare occurrence, with only three cases reported in the literature. This unusual injury occurred in a recreational weightlifter during a preacher curl exercise. In this particular case, a 6-week delay in presentation necessitated a staged procedure in which a primary repair was feasible in one elbow, while reconstruction using allograft tissue was required in the contralateral elbow. Satisfactory results for both elbows were achieved, with return to weightlifting by one year following surgery.

  3. Multidisciplinary approach to the persistent double distal tendon of the biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Marc; de la Fuente, Javier; Martinoli, Carlo; Blasi, Juan; Pérez-Bellmunt, Albert; Domingo, Tomás; Miguel-Pérez, Maribel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to correlate the ultrasound (US) appearance of the persistent double or bifid distal tendon of the biceps brachii muscle with anatomical and histological data. This will provide a new model to study the pathological distal biceps brachii tendon (DBBT). The DBBT of 20 cadaveric elbows were examined with linear array broadband US transducers (frequency band 14-6 MHz) using an anterior approach. Trypan blue dye was injected underneath the paratenon under US guidance in 16 specimens. After they were dissected, five of them were processed to obtain histological slices stained with hematoxylin-eosin and antiserum to protein S100. At US, the DBBT is a tendon in which the fascicles are organized in two different hyperechoic components separated by a hyperechoic septum related to the endotenon. The endotenon is lax, flexible, and makes folding and gliding of the two portions feasible. The DBBT is surrounded by a hyperechoic paratenon adjacent to the tendon surface, which is only differentiable by US when dye is interposed between such structures. The connective septum of endotenon located between the two main components of the DBBT is responsible for the US image of two separate tendons and functionally enables it to work as two separate entities, thus allowing respective folding and gliding. The paratenon surrounding the lacertus fibrosus and the DBBT plays an important stabilization role, enabling them to change shape and arrangement during joint motion. It is also an important conduit for nerves and blood vessels.

  4. Distal biceps tendon rupture reconstruction using muscle-splitting double-incision approach

    PubMed Central

    Tarallo, Luigi; Mugnai, Raffaele; Zambianchi, Francesco; Adani, Roberto; Catani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical and functional results after repair of distal biceps tendon tears, following the Morrey’s modified double-incision approach. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with distal rupture of biceps brachii treated between 2003 and 2012 in our Orthopedic Department with muscle-splitting double-incision technique. Outcome measures included the Mayo elbow performance, the DASH questionnaire, patient’s satisfaction, elbow and forearm motion, grip strength and complications occurrence. RESULTS: At an average 18 mo follow-up (range, 7 mo-10 years) the average Mayo elbow performance and DASH score were respectively 97.2 and 4.8. The elbow flexion range was 94%, extension was -2°, supination was 93% and pronation 96% compared with the uninjured limb. The mean grip strength, expressed as percentage of respective contralateral limb, was 83%. The average patient satisfaction rating on a Likert scale (from 0 to 10) was 9.4. The following complications were observed: 3 cases of heterotopic ossification (6.4%), one (2.1%) re-rupture of the tendon at the site of reattachment and 2 cases (4.3%) of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. No complication required further surgical treatment. CONCLUSION: This technique allows an anatomic reattachment of distal biceps tendon at the radial tuberosity providing full functional recovery with low complication rate. PMID:25133147

  5. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures repaired using an endobutton technique: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The simultaneous rupture of both distal biceps tendons is a rare clinical entity that is difficult to treat and can have poor outcomes. A variety of treatment and rehabilitation options exist and have been reported for single sided and staged bilateral repairs, but none have described an approach for acute bilateral ruptures. Repairing distal biceps tendon ruptures using a single anterior incision and a cortical suspensory button technique has become increasingly popular in recent years. We present a report of our surgical approach using an endobutton technique and rehabilitation algorithm for this unusual injury pattern. Case presentation A 43-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute onset bilateral elbow pain while lifting a large sheet of drywall off the ground. He initially felt a ‘pop’ on the right and almost immediately felt another on the left after having to quickly shift the weight. He was unable to continue working and sought medical attention. His pain was predominantly in his bilateral antecubital fossae and he had significant swelling and ecchymoses. His clinical examination demonstrated no palpable tendon, a retracted biceps muscle belly, and clear supination weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and showed bilateral distal biceps tendon ruptures with retraction on both sides. After discussion with our patient, we decided that both sides would be repaired using a single anterior incision with endobutton fixation, first his right followed by his left six weeks later. Conclusion Overall, our patient did very well and had returned to full manual work by our last follow-up at 30 months. Although he was never able to return to competitive recreational hockey and was left with mild lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve dysesthesias on his right, he felt he was at 85% of his premorbid level of function. We describe what we believe to be, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of simultaneous bilateral distal biceps

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Tenotomy of Biceps Tendon: Technical Feasibility on Cadavers.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Messina, Carmelo; Aliprandi, Alberto; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro Simone

    2016-10-01

    We tested the technical feasibility of ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) in cadavers. Both shoulders of two fresh cadavers were scanned anteriorly to evaluate the extra-articular portion of the LHBT. Under ultrasound monitoring, a scalpel was advanced obliquely up to touch the superficial medial side of the LHBT, cutting it until the tendon was not visible anymore. Ultrasound evaluation was repeated after the procedure, and anatomic dissection was performed. The procedure was 100% feasible: four cuts were made to completely sever the tendon; the duration was less than 1 min. Skin incision measured 5 mm in two cases and 6 mm in two cases. Anatomic dissection confirmed complete tendon cut in all cases with proximal and distal tendon stumps very close to each other. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous LHBT tenotomy was 100% technically feasible in cadavers with a quick procedure and minimal cutaneous incision. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Delayed repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures is successful: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Haverstock, John; Grewal, Ruby; King, Graham J W; Athwal, George S

    2017-06-01

    The literature has shown an increased complication rate with a delay to surgical repair of acute distal biceps tendon ruptures; however, little has been documented regarding the outcome of delayed repairs. This case-control study compared a study cohort of delayed (>21 days) distal biceps tendon repairs with a control cohort repaired acutely (<21 days). Sixteen delayed repair cases were reviewed and matched with acute controls (1:3) based on repair technique, age, and workers' compensation status. The delayed cohort was reviewed and completed isometric strength testing and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire; Patient-Rated Elbow Evaluation; and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons elbow questionnaire. The time to surgery averaged 37 ± 12 days in the delayed cohort versus 10 ± 6 days in the acute cohort. Complications occurred in 63% of patients in the delayed cohort versus 29% in the acute cohort (P = .04); however, 90% of the delayed cohort's complications consisted of transient paresthesias. Follow-up scores on the Patient-Rated Elbow Evaluation, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons elbow questionnaire were not statistically different between cohorts (P > .37, P > .22, and P > .46, respectively). Despite a high rate of initial complications, patients treated with distal biceps tendon repair after a delay (>21 days) can expect similar functional outcomes to those treated acutely. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rupture Following Biceps-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer in Adolescents and Young Adults With Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Lisa A.; Rutter, Laure; Curran, Kimberly; Kozin, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfer surgery can restore elbow extension in approximately 70% of persons with tetraplegia and often results in antigravity elbow extension strength. However, we have noted an almost 15% rupture/attenuation rate. Objective: This investigation was conducted to analyze potential causes in adolescents/young adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who experienced tendon rupture or attenuation after biceps-to-triceps transfer. Methods: Medical charts of young adults with SCI who underwent biceps-to-triceps transfer and experienced tendon rupture or attenuation were reviewed. Data collected by retrospective chart review included general demographics, surgical procedure(s), use and duration of antibiotic treatment, time from tendon transfer surgery to rupture/attenuation, and method of diagnosis. Results: Twelve subjects with tetraplegia (mean age, 19 years) who underwent biceps-to-triceps reconstruction with subsequent tendon rupture or attenuation were evaluated. Mean age at time of tendon transfer was 18 years (range, 14-21 years). A fluoroquinolone was prescribed for 42% (n=5) of subjects. Tendon rupture was noted in 67% (n=8), and attenuation was noted in 33% (n=4). Average length of time from surgery to tendon rupture/attenuation was 5.7 months (range, 3-10 months). Conclusion: Potential contributing causes of tendon rupture/attenuation after transfer include surgical technique, rehabilitation, co-contraction of the transfer, poor patient compliance, and medications. In this cohort, 5 subjects were prescribed fluoroquinolones that have a US Food and Drug Administration black box concerning tendon ruptures. Currently, all candidates for upper extremity tendon transfer reconstruction are counseled on the effects of fluoroquinolones and the potential risk for tendon rupture. PMID:23459326

  9. The Size of the Radial Tuberosity is Not Related to the Occurrence of Distal Biceps Tendon Ruptures: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kodde, Izaäk F; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Mulder, Paul G H; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic changes at the radial tuberosity have traditionally been related to distal biceps tendon degeneration and rupture. From supination to pronation of the forearm, the space available for the distal biceps tendon between de lateral ulna and radial bicipital tuberosity (RBT) decreases by almost 50%. A hypertrophic change at the radial tuberosity further reduces this space with impingement of the distal biceps tendon as a result. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the size of the RBT plays a role in the pathophysiology of distal biceps tendon ruptures. Twenty-two consecutive patients with a surgically proven distal biceps tendon rupture were matched to controls, in a 1:1 ratio. The size of the RBT was expressed as a ratio of the maximum diameter of the radius at the RBT to the diameter of the diaphysis just distal to the RBT (RD ratio), measured on standard radiographs of the elbow. The RD ratio of patients and matched controls were compared. The mean RD ratio in control group was 1.25 and not significantly different from the mean 1.30 in the group of patients with a distal biceps tendon rupture. Each 0.1 point increase in RD ratio results in an estimated 60% increase of the rupture odds, which was not significant either. Based on the RD ratio on conventional radiographs of the elbow, there was no significant difference in RBT size between patients with a distal biceps tendon rupture and matched controls without biceps tendon pathology.

  10. Augmentation of Distal Biceps Repair With an Acellular Dermal Graft Restores Native Biomechanical Properties in a Tendon-Deficient Model.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Christine; Sethi, Paul; Macken, Craig; Wei, David; Kowalsky, Marc; Mirzayan, Raffy; Pauzenberger, Leo; Dyrna, Felix; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2017-07-01

    The majority of distal biceps tendon injuries can be repaired in a single procedure. In contrast, complete chronic tears with severe tendon substance deficiency and retraction often require tendon graft augmentation. In cases with extensive partial tears of the distal biceps, a human dermal allograft may be used as an alternative to restore tendon thickness and biomechanical integrity. Dermal graft augmentation will improve load to failure compared with nonaugmented repair in a tendon-deficient model. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six matched specimens were organized into 1 of 4 groups: native tendon, native tendon with dermal graft augmentation, tendon with an attritional defect, and tendon with an attritional defect repaired with a graft. To mimic a chronic attritional biceps lesion, a defect was created by a complete tear, leaving 30% of the tendon's width intact. The repair technique in all groups consisted of cortical button and interference screw fixation. All specimens underwent cyclical loading for 3000 cycles and were then tested to failure; gap formation and peak load at failure were documented. The mean (±SD) load to failure (320.9 ± 49.1 N vs 348.8 ± 77.6 N, respectively; P = .38) and gap formation (displacement) (1.8 ± 1.4 mm vs 1.6 ± 1.1 mm, respectively; P = .38) did not differ between the native tendon groups with and without graft augmentation. In the tendon-deficient model, the mean load to failure was significantly improved with graft augmentation compared with no graft augmentation (282.1 ± 83.8 N vs 199.7 ± 45.5 N, respectively; P = .04), while the mean gap formation was significantly reduced (1.2 ± 1.0 mm vs 2.7 ± 1.4 mm, respectively; P = .04). The mean load to failure of the deficient tendon with graft augmentation (282.1 N) compared with the native tendon (348.8 N) was not significantly different ( P = .12). This indicates that the native tendon did not perform differently from the grafted deficient tendon. In a tendon

  11. Relationship between implant use, operative time, and costs associated with distal biceps tendon reattachment.

    PubMed

    Grant, John A; Bissell, Benjamin; Hake, Mark E; Miller, Bruce S; Hughes, Richard E; Carpenter, James E

    2012-11-01

    The suture anchor and transosseous drill hole techniques for reattachment of the distal biceps tendon to the radius have been found to have similar clinical and biomechanical outcomes. However, a comparison of the cost effectiveness of these techniques is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of suture anchors decreases operative time enough to offset the additional cost of the implants. The records of all patients undergoing a distal biceps tendon reattachment were reviewed to determine the method of fixation, operative time, and associated surgical costs. Two surgeons used a technique of fixing the tendon directly to the bone (transosseous group), whereas 3 surgeons used suture anchors. Given the standard nature of the surgical procedure (other than the fixation technique), only the costs that differed between the 2 groups were included. Surgical center costs were obtained from the local outpatient surgical center in 2011 US dollars. Five surgeons treated 70 men (mean age, 45.9±9.2 years). Mean time from injury to surgery was 14 days. Mean operative times for the transosseous and suture anchor groups were 97.6±14.9 and 95.8±25.8 minutes, respectively (P=.74). Two anchors were used in 79% of the anchor cases. The use of anchors cost $474.33 more per patient. However, this value is sensitive to the cost of the individual anchors, intersurgeon variation in operative time, and per-minute value of saved operative time. No operative time was saved with the use of suture anchors. This cost comparison framework can be used to evaluate the balance in surgical resource use due to implant cost vs savings in operative time. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Anatomic findings and complications after surgical treatment of chronic, partial distal biceps tendon tears: a case cohort comparison study.

    PubMed

    Ruch, David S; Watters, Tyler Steven; Wartinbee, Daniel A; Richard, Marc J; Leversedge, Fraser J; Mithani, Suhail K

    2014-08-01

    To describe pertinent anatomic findings during repair of chronic, partial distal biceps tendon tears and to compare the complications of surgery with a similar cohort of acute, complete tears. Group 1 included 14 patients (15 elbows) with partial tears managed operatively an average of 10 months from onset of injury or symptoms. Group 2 included a matched cohort of 16 patients (17 elbows) treated for complete, acute tears an average of 19 days from injury. A retrospective review of all 30 patients focused on demographic data, intraoperative findings, and postoperative complications. A single, anterior incision was used in all cases with multiple suture anchors or a bicortical toggling button for fixation of the repair. We evaluated 27 men and 3 women with an average age of 55 years (group 1) and 48 years (group 2). Intratendinous ganglion formation at the site of rupture of the degenerative tendon was observed in 5 cases of partial tears and none of the complete tears. Partial tears involved the lateral aspect or short head of the biceps tendon insertion in all cases. Postoperative complications included lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve neuritis in 8 group 1 patients and 6 group 2 patients and transient posterior interosseus nerve palsy in 3 group 1 patients. Partial distal biceps tendon ruptures showed a consistent pattern of pathology involving disruption of the lateral side of the tendon insertion involving the small head of the biceps. Degenerative intratendinous ganglion formation was present in one third of cases. Repair of chronic, partial distal biceps tendon injuries may have a higher incidence of posterior interosseous and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve palsies. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rupture of the distal biceps brachii tendon: conservative treatment versus anatomic reinsertion--clinical and radiological evaluation after 2 years.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, Claudio; Marinelli, Mario; De Cupis, Vincenzo

    2007-10-01

    Distal biceps tendon rupture is a relatively rare injury. It commonly occurs in the dominant extremity of middle-aged men during an excessive eccentric tension as the arm is forced from a flexed position, while it is rarely observed during sport activities. Many techniques, including non-operative and surgical option, have been described for the treatment of a ruptured distal biceps tendon, but there is still considerable controversy about the management of choice. Nine patients affected with traumatic distal tendon ruptures of the biceps brachii were followed-up for a minimum of 24 months. Five patients underwent surgery (two-incision technique) and four patients were treated conservatively. Tendon readaptation to its origin was done by a suture metal anchor. Outcome was evaluated based on the physical examination, radiographic analysis and the SECEC elbow score. The SECEC elbow score results show that every single item result is in favour of surgical treatment. On measurements of motion, we found a slight flexion-extension deficit in two patients, but reduced supination in six patients and reduced pronation in four. Two patients had postoperative dysfunction of the deep branch of the radial nerve. Radiographic examination showed heterotopic bone formation on the radial tuberosity around the presumed insertion of the reattached tendon in 2 of 5 patients and ectopic ossification more proximally in the area of the biceps muscle Our findings confirm the view that anatomic repair of distal biceps tendon rupture provides consistently good results and early anatomic reconstruction can restore strength and endurance for the elbow.

  14. REHABILITATION OF A SURGICALLY REPAIRED RUPTURE OF THE DISTAL BICEPS TENDON IN AN ACTIVE MIDDLE AGED MALE: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Stephen P.; LaFontaine, Tom; Scheussler, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background: Complete rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii is relatively rare and there is little information to guide therapists in rehabilitation after this injury. The purposes of this case report are to review the rehabilitation concepts used for treating such an injury, and discuss how to modify exercises during rehabilitation based on patient progression while adhering to physician recommended guidelines and standard treatment protocols. Case Presentation: The patient was an active 38‐year old male experienced in weight‐training. He presented with a surgically repaired right distal biceps tendon following an accident on a trampoline adapted with a bungee suspension harness. The intervention focused on restoring range of motion and strengthening of the supporting muscles of the upper extremity without placing undue stress on the biceps brachii. Outcomes: The patient was able to progress from a moderate restriction in ROM to full AROM two weeks ahead of the physician's post‐operative orders and initiate a re‐strengthening protocol by the eighth week of rehabilitation. At the eighth post‐operative week the patient reported no deficits in functional abilities throughout his normal daily activities with his affected upper extremity. Discussion: The results of this case report strengthen current knowledge regarding physical therapy treatment for a distal biceps tendon repair while at the same time providing new insights for future protocol considerations in active individuals. Most current protocols do not advocate aggressive stretching, AROM, or strengthening of a surgically repaired biceps tendon early in the rehabilitation process due to the fear of a re‐rupture. In the opinion of the authors, if full AROM can be achieved before the 6th week of rehabilitation, initiating a slow transition into light strengthening of the biceps brachii may be possible. Level of evidence: 4‐Single Case report PMID:23316429

  15. Evidence of sympathetic innervation and α1-adrenergic receptors of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon.

    PubMed

    Tosounidis, Theodoros; Hadjileontis, Constantine; Triantafyllou, Christos; Sidiropoulou, Varvara; Kafanas, Antonios; Kontakis, George

    2013-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the sympathetic innervation of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon LHB via immunohistochemical staining for protein S-100 and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in patients with complex proximal humerus fractures, in individuals with chronic biceps tendinosis in the setting of large rotator cuff tears (RC), and in cadaveric samples with no previously reported shoulder pathology. We investigated the presence of sympathetic innervation and α1-adrenergic receptors of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHB) in patients with complex proximal humerus fractures and individuals with chronic biceps tendinosis in the setting of large rotator cuff tears (RC). The correlation of morphological features with immunohistochemical evidence of neural element presence was also investigated. Forty-one LHB tendon specimens were examined. Seventeen were harvested from patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures, 14 were from individuals with biceps tendinosis in the context of a large RC tear, and ten were from cadaveric controls with no previous shoulder pathology. Histologic examination was performed using hematoxylin and eosin. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of the protein S-100, neuropeptide Y, and α1-adrenergic receptors, as well as to characterize the potential neural differentiation of tendon cells. A strong correlation between the expression of NPY/S-100, α1-adrenergic/S-100, and α1-adrenergic/NPY was found. The LHB tendon has sympathetic innervation and α1-adrenergic receptors in acute and chronic pathological conditions. Our results provide useful guidance on the management of tendinosis and the handling of the LHB in hemiarthroplasties for fractures.

  16. Acute distal biceps tendon rupture--a new surgical technique using a de-tensioning suture to brachialis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C J; Bansal, R; Pimpalnerkar, A

    2006-09-01

    Acute distal biceps rupture is a devastating injury in the young athlete and surgical repair offers the only chance of a full recovery. We report a new surgical technique used in 14 cases of acute distal tendon rupture in which the 'suture anchor technique' and a de-tensioning suture was employed. In this procedure the distal end of the biceps is re-attached to the radial tuberosity using a sliding whip stitch suture and the proximal part of the distal tendon repair attached to the underlying brachialis muscle with absorbable sutures. This restores correct anatomical alignment and isometric pull on the distal tendon and de-tensions the repair in the early post-operative period, allowing early rehabilitation and an early return to activity. In all cases patients regained a full pre-injury level of sporting activity at a mean period of 6.2 months (2-9 months).

  17. Distal biceps tendon history, updates, and controversies: from the closed American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons meeting-2015.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christopher C; Savoie, Felix H; Steinmann, Scott P; Hausman, Michael; Voloshin, Ilya; Morrey, Bernard F; Sotereanos, Dean G; Bero, Emily H; Brown, Brandon T

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of the distal biceps anatomy, mechanics, and biology during the last 75 years has greatly improved the physician's ability to advise and to treat patients with ruptured distal tendons. The goal of this paper is to review the past and current advances on complete distal biceps ruptures as well as controversies and future directions that were discussed and debated during the closed American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons meeting in 2015. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphology of the Lesser Tuberosity and Intertubercular Groove in Patients With Arthroscopically Confirmed Subscapularis and Biceps Tendon Pathology.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shaan H; Small, Kirstin M; Sinz, Nathan J; Higgins, Laurence D

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate for an association between the morphology of the lesser tuberosity and intertubercular groove and subscapularis tendon tears and biceps tendon pathology. Sixty-six patients with arthroscopically confirmed subscapularis tendon tears were compared with 59 demographically matched control patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography arthrography examination of the shoulder. Measurements of the lesser tuberosity and intertubercular groove included maximum depth of the intertubercular groove, intertubercular groove depth at the midpoint of the glenoid, lesser tuberosity length, length from the top of the humeral head to the point of maximum depth of the intertubercular groove, length from the top of the humeral head to the top of the lesser tuberosity, and medial wall angle and depth. Patients with subscapularis tears showed a significantly decreased depth of the intertubercular groove at the mid glenoid (P = .01), shorter length of the lesser tuberosity (P = .002), and greater distance from the top of the humeral head to the top of the lesser tuberosity (P = .02). There was a trend toward a decreased medial wall angle (P = .07) and greater distance from the top of the humeral head to the point of maximum intertubercular groove depth (P = .06). Patients with biceps tendon pathology showed a significantly decreased depth of the intertubercular groove at the mid glenoid (P = .001), shorter length of the lesser tuberosity (P = .0003), greater distance from the top of the humeral head to the top of the lesser tuberosity (P = .01), and decreased medial wall angle (P = .01) and depth (P = .03). There are several morphologic factors related to the lesser tuberosity and intertubercular groove that are associated with both subscapularis tendon tears and biceps tendon pathology. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic tenodesis versus tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon in simultaneous rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Meraner, Dominik; Sternberg, Christoph; Vega, Jordi; Hahne, Julia; Kleine, Michael; Leuzinger, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. While the role of the rotator cuff seems to be well known, the clinical significance of the biceps tendon for shoulder function has still been a subject of controversy. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between tenodesis or tenotomy in simultaneous rotator cuff repair. For this retrospective study 53 consecutive patients (25f/28m, Ø age 58 years) undergoing arthroscopic double row rotator cuff reconstruction and suture bridge repair were included. The LHB was treated with tenodesis (n = 24) or tenotomy (n = 29). Clinical examination was carried out for all patients after an average of 34 months (range 27–38) following arthroscopic surgery. The Constant score, level of pain, range of motion in flexion and abduction, and isometric force for the operated and healthy shoulder in flexion and abduction were recorded. Patients in the tenodesis and tenotomy group reached similar good result regarding the Constant score (86.6 ± 11.9 vs. 81.3 ± 12.2; P = 0.120), pain (median 0, range 0–8 vs. Median 0, range 0–10; P = 0.421), and range of motion (flexion: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 90°–180°; P = 0.833; abduction: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 120°–180°; P = 0.472). Postoperative popeye sign was found only in one patient (1.9 %). At the time of postoperative follow-up, no patient reported cramping of the biceps. Isometric forces in abduction of the tenotomy group (mean 4.7 ± 2.9 kg; maximum 5.5 ± 2.8 kg) was significant lower compared to the tenodesis group (mean 6.6 ± 3.0 kg, P = 0.019; maximum 7.7 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.007) and compared to healthy shoulders (mean 6.1 ± 3.0 kg P = 0.004; maximum 7.4 ± 3.1 kg, P = 0.001), all other measurements were similar. According to our results arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and tenotomy are valuable procedures in simultaneous rotator cuff repair regarding function

  20. Spontaneous rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon in a woman with hypothyroidism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, K; Roupas, N D; Panagopoulos, Andreas; Theodoraki, S; Tsintoni, A; Kyriazopoulou, V

    2016-01-13

    Tendinitis can be a presenting complaint in hypothyroidism, with symptomatic relief being obtained by appropriate management of the primary thyroid deficiency. To the best of our knowledge no other cases of spontaneous rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon during uncontrolled hypothyroidism have yet been reported. This case report describes an unusual case of spontaneous rupture of the long head of the biceps tendon in a 48-year-old white woman with severe hypothyroidism. She described experiencing a sudden sharp pain and an audible pop in her right shoulder while using her personal computer. On physical examination she was positive for Yergason's sign and a subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scan showed complete rupture of the long head of her biceps tendon. Laboratory tests revealed significantly elevated thyrotropin levels (>100 μIU/ml) and very low levels of both triiodothyronine (0.17 ng/ml) and free thyroxine (0.18 ng/dl). She was switched to a different thyroxin regimen with a progressive dosage increment. She declined surgical re-anchorage of the tendon but despite the discreet Popeye sign, her overall strength and shoulder function were satisfactory. After 2 months, she was found to be clinically euthyroid, having normal thyroid function tests (thyrotropin 2.95 μIU/mL, free thyroxine 1.07 ng/dl). At her last follow-up visit, 1 year post-injury, she reported nearly normal shoulder function in her daily activities and had a constant shoulder score of 93 points. The role of thyroid hormones in the synthesis and degeneration of collagen and in the proliferation and apoptosis of human tenocytes is discussed, providing a possible mechanism whereby hypothyroidism may lead to tendon tears. This report may have a greater impact among different subspecialties as it presupposes a high degree of awareness from internists, endocrinologists and orthopedic surgeons.

  1. Isolation and characterization of 2 new human rotator cuff and long head of biceps tendon cells possessing stem cell-like self-renewal and multipotential differentiation capacity.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Conforti, Erika; Piccoli, Marco; Ragone, Vincenza; Creo, Pasquale; Cirillo, Federica; Masuzzo, Pamela; Tringali, Cristina; Cabitza, Paolo; Tettamanti, Guido; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Anastasia, Luigi

    2013-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is expected to offer new alternatives to the traditional therapies of rotator cuff tendon tears. In particular, resident, tissue-specific, adult stem cells seem to have a higher regenerative potential for the tissue where they reside. Rotator cuff tendon and long head of the biceps tendon possess a resident stem cell population that, when properly stimulated, may be induced to proliferate, thus being potentially usable for tendon regeneration. Controlled laboratory study. Human tendon samples from the supraspinatus and the long head of the biceps were collected during rotator cuff tendon surgeries from 26 patients, washed with phosphate-buffered saline, cut into small pieces, and digested with collagenase type I and dispase. After centrifugation, cell pellets were resuspended in appropriate culture medium and plated. Adherent cells were cultured, phenotypically characterized, and then compared with human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), as an example of adult stem cells, and human dermal fibroblasts, as normal proliferating cells with no stem cell properties. Two new adult stem cell populations from the supraspinatus and long head of the biceps tendons were isolated, characterized, and cultured in vitro. Cells showed adult stem cell characteristics (ie, they were self-renewing in vitro, clonogenic, and multipotent), as they could be induced to differentiate into different cell types--namely, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle cells. This work demonstrated that human rotator cuff tendon stem cells and human long head of the biceps tendon stem cells can be isolated and possess a high regenerative potential, which is comparable with that of BMSCs. Moreover, comparative analysis of the sphingolipid pattern of isolated cells with that of BMSCs and fibroblasts revealed the possibility of using this class of lipids as new possible markers of the cell differentiation status. Rotator cuff and long head of the biceps tendons contain a stem cell

  2. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and synovial membrane: A review of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Kant, Kumar Shashi; Manav, Ajoy Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Abhinav; Sinha, Vishvendra Kumar; Sharma, Akshat

    2017-11-01

    Aim of our study is to highlight the incidence and benign nature of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and need for complete removal, thus minimizing the chances of recurrence. A total of 26 cases of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath operated in the department of Orthopaedics, Patna Medical College & Hospital, Patna from 2003 to 2010 were included in this study. The surgery was performed after clinical evaluation of the lesion and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC). The tumour underwent en bloc marginal excision. The patients were followed up for minimum two year. Our study population consisted of 18 females and 8 males. The mean age at the time of surgery was 38.3 years (range, 18-62 years). Twenty three cases were found in the 3rd and 4th decade. Twenty two cases involved upper extremity and only 4 cases in lower extremity. MRI was done in 2 cases where diagnosis was in doubt. Bony indentation on X-ray film was found in 7 cases and thorough curettage of cortical shell was done. All the cases were treated by marginal excision. Three cases developed post-operative stiffness but regained full range of movement with physiotherapy. Sensory impairment was seen in 3 cases. Recurrence occurred in 2 case and they were treated by repeat marginal excision. Meticulous en-masse marginal excision of the giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in blood less field using magnification is the treatment of choice.

  3. Ultrasound-guided steroid tendon sheath injections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a 10-year single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Shannon E; Laxer, Ronald M; Connolly, Bairbre L; Parra, Dimitri A

    2017-04-11

    The aims of this study were to: (a) Identify tendon sheaths most commonly treated with steroid injections in a pediatric patient population with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA); (b) Describe technical aspects of the procedure; (c) Characterize sonographic appearance of tenosynovitis in JIA; (d) Assess agreement between clinical request and sites injected. This was a 10 year single-center retrospective study (May 2006-April 2016) of patients with JIA referred by Rheumatology for ultrasound-guided tendon sheath injections. Patient demographics, clinical referral information, sonographic appearance of the tendon sheaths and technical aspects of the procedure were analyzed. There were 308 procedures of 244 patients (75% female, mean age 9.6 years) who underwent a total of 926 tendon sheath injections. Ankle tendons were most commonly injected (84.9%), specifically the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior (22.3%), peroneus longus (20%) and brevis (19.7%). The majority of treated sites (91.9%) showed peritendinous fluid and sheath thickening on ultrasound. There were 2 minor intra-procedure complications without sequelae. A good agreement between clinical request and sites injected was observed. Ultrasound-guided tendon sheath injections with steroids are used frequently to treat patients with JIA. It is a safe intervention with a high technical success rate. The ankle region, specifically the medial compartment, is the site most commonly injected in this group of patients. The most common sonographic finding is peritendinous fluid and sheath thickening. These findings might assist clinicians and radiologists to characterize and more effectively manage tenosynovitis in patients with JIA.

  4. Physical examination tests and imaging studies based on arthroscopic assessment of the long head of biceps tendon are invalid.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Robert W; Saithna, Adnan

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether glenohumeral arthroscopy is an appropriate gold standard for the diagnosis of long head of biceps (LHB) tendon pathology. The objectives were to evaluate whether the length of tendon that can be seen at arthroscopy allows visualisation of areas of predilection of pathology and also to determine the rates of missed diagnoses at arthroscopy when compared to an open approach. A systematic review of cadaveric and clinical studies was performed. The search strategy was applied to MEDLINE, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. All relevant articles were included. Critical appraisal of clinical studies was performed using a validated quality assessment scale. Five articles were identified for inclusion in the review. This included both clinical and cadaveric studies. The overall population comprised 18 cadaveric specimens and 575 patients. Out of the five included studies, three reported the length of LHB tendon visualised during arthroscopy and four reported the rate of missed LHB diagnosis. Cadaveric studies showed that the use of a hook probe allowed arthroscopic visualisation of between 34 and 48 % of the overall length of the LHB. In the clinical series, the rate of missed diagnoses at arthroscopy when compared to open exploration ranged between 33 and 49 %. Arthroscopy allows visualisation of only a small part of the extra-articular LHB tendon. This leads to a high rate of missed pathology in the distal part of the tendon. Published figures for sensitivities and specificities of common physical examination and imaging tests for LHB pathology that are based on arthroscopy as the gold standard are therefore invalid. In clinical practice, it is important to note that a "negative" arthroscopic assessment does not exclude a lesion of the LHB tendon as this technique does not allow visualisation of common sites of distal pathology. IV.

  5. A Rare Case of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear and Biceps Tendon Rupture with Posterior Shoulder Dislocation in a Young Adult - Surgical Decision-making and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soon, En Loong; Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah Bin Abd; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Massive rotator cuff tears (RCTs) in the context of shoulder dislocations are relatively uncommon in the young adult (<40 years) and if reported are more commonly described in association with acute traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocations. They have rarely been described with posterior dislocations, regardless of patient age. This is the 1st case reported in the context of posterior dislocations, where a triad of biceps tendon rupture, posterior dislocation, and RCTs was observed during surgery. It provides an important reminder to readers about certain injuries commonly overlooked during the assessment of an acute traumatic shoulder. Case Report: We report an atypical case of a massive RCT involving a 34-year-old Asian male who landed on his outstretched hand after falling off a bicycle. A tear involving the supraspinatus and subscapularis was visualized during surgery, along with long head of biceps (LHB) tendon rupture. This was after an initial failure to achieve closed reduction of the posteriorly dislocated left shoulder. Conclusion: It is easy to miss the posterior instability, the associated RCTs or the biceps tendon injuries. Biceps tendon rupture should be a consideration when one is unable to reduce a posteriorly dislocated shoulder. The interposed torn LHB tendon trapped within the glenohumeral joint was the likely physical block in the initial failure to achieve closed reduction. With timely diagnosis, prudent physical examination, early imaging and surgery, and excellent results can potentially be achieved to return a young patient to full functionality. PMID:28819610

  6. Computed tomographic contrast tenography of the digital flexor tendon sheath of the equine hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Agass, Rachel; Dixon, Jonathon; Fraser, Barny

    2018-05-01

    Pre-surgical investigation of digital flexor tendon sheath pathology remains challenging with current standard imaging techniques. The aim of this prospective, anatomical, pilot study was to describe the anatomy of the equine hind limb digital flexor tendon sheath using a combination of computed tomography (CT) and computed tomographic contrast tenography in clinically normal cadaver limbs. Ten pairs of hind limbs with no external abnormalities were examined from the level of the tarsometatarsal joint distally. Limbs initially underwent non-contrast CT examination using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, and 1.5 mm slice thickness. Sixty millilitres of ioversol iodinated contrast media and saline (final concentration 100 mg/ml) were injected using a basilar sesamoidean approach. The computed tomographic contrast tenography examination was then repeated, before dissection of the specimens to compare gross and imaging findings. The combined CT and computed tomographic contrast tenography examinations provided excellent anatomical detail of intra-thecal structures. The borders of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, and the manica flexoria were consistently identifiable in all limbs. Detailed anatomy including that of the mesotenons, two of which are previously undescribed, and the plantar annular ligament were also consistently identifiable. Dissection of all 10 pairs of limbs revealed there to be no pathology, in accordance with the imaging findings. In conclusion, the combination of CT and computed tomographic contrast tenography may be useful adjunctive diagnostic techniques to define digital flexor tendon sheath pathology prior to surgical exploration in horses. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  7. Locations of lesser tuberosity cysts and their association with subscapularis, supraspinatus, and long head of the biceps tendon disorders.

    PubMed

    Celikyay, Fatih; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Deniz, Caglar; Inal, Sermet; Gokce, Erkan; Acu, Berat

    2015-12-01

    Humeral head cysts are not uncommon in individuals with rotator cuff disorders. The cysts are usually considered an indicator of rotator cuff pathologies; however, they may have different meanings in different regions. To determine the frequency of cysts within and adjacent to the lesser tuberosity and the relationship between these cysts and subscapularis, supraspinatus, and long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) disorders. We retrospectively reviewed 760 consecutive shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Among these MRIs, we selected a group of patients with cysts located around the lesser tuberosity. The study population was also divided into two subgroups, patients with cysts within the lesser tuberosity and those with cysts adjacent to the lesser tuberosity. In addition to the number and size of cysts, the MRI appearance of the tendons was evaluated. Eighty-one (10.7%) patients had cysts within and/or adjacent to the lesser tuberosity, 34 (42%) patients had cysts within the lesser tuberosity, and 47 (58%) patients had cysts adjacent to it. LHBT and subscapularis tendon disorders were significantly related to more than one cyst. In a univariate analysis, cysts within the lesser tuberosity were significantly associated with LHBT and subscapularis tendon disorders; however, multivariate analyses showed that only LHBT disorders were significantly associated with cysts within the lesser tuberosity. Cysts within the lesser tuberosity were less common than cysts adjacent to it. LHBT and subscapularis tendon disorders were more frequently found in patients with more than one cyst within and/or adjacent to the lesser tuberosity. In addition, cysts within the lesser tuberosity were associated with LHBT disorders. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  8. Joint mice migration into the deep digital flexor tendon sheath in dogs. Clinical cases and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Post, C; Guerrero, T; Ohlerth, S; Hässig, M; Voss, K; Montavon, P M

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the appearance of 'joint mice' in the sheath of the deep digital flexor muscle tendon (DDFT) due to osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions in the talocrural joint of 12 dogs. Surgical excision of all free fragments in the DDFT sheath was performed in five dogs, and their clinical progression was documented. The excision of free fragments from the DDFT sheath, but not arthro-tomy, proved clinically beneficial despite the presence of degenerative joint disease. The anatomical communication between the talocrural joint and the DDFT sheath and its dimensions are further illustrated with the use of contrast media and dissection of cadaver limbs.

  9. Editorial Commentary: A No-Difference Study That May Make a Difference in the Treatment of Disorders of the Shoulder Biceps Brachii Tendon.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2017-01-01

    Biceps tenodesis for disorders of the biceps brachii is frequently performed; nevertheless the optimum procedure, and particularly the level of tenodesis either above the pectoralis major tendon or inferior to the tendon, is yet to be determined. Both have purported advantages. Studies that do not find a difference in outcomes between the 2 groups in the publishing vernacular are sometimes referred to as no-difference investigations and are slightly less likely to be published, known as publication bias. This may be the rare "no-difference" investigation that makes a difference in the treatment of the biceps brachii. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Risk of Achilles or Biceps Tendon Rupture in New Statin Users: A Propensity Score-Matched Sequential Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Spoendlin, Julia; Layton, J Bradley; Mundkur, Mallika; Meier, Christian; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2016-12-01

    Case reports and pharmacovigilance data reported cases of tendon ruptures in statin users, but evidence from observational studies is scarce and inconclusive. We aimed to assess the association between new statin use and tendon rupture. We performed a propensity score (PS)-matched sequential cohort study, using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Patients aged ≥45 years with at least one new statin prescription between 1995 and 2014 were PS-matched within 2-year entry blocks to patients without a statin prescription during the block. We followed patients until they had a recorded Achilles or biceps tendon rupture, completed 5 years of follow-up, or were censored for change in exposure status or another censoring criterion. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), applying Cox proportional hazard analyses in the overall cohort (crude and multivariable) and in the PS-matched cohort. We performed subgroup analyses by sex, age, treatment duration, and statin dose. We observed a crude HR of 1.32 (95 % CI 1.21-1.44) in the overall cohort, which attenuated after multivariable adjustment (HR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.92-1.12) and after PS-matching (HR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.84-1.08). Crude HRs were higher in women than in men, but remained around null in both sexes after multivariable adjustment and PS-matching. Subgroup analyses by age, treatment duration, and statin dose revealed null results across all subgroups. The results of this cohort study suggest that statin use does not increase the risk of tendon rupture, irrespective of gender, age, statin dose, or treatment duration.

  11. Abnormal origins of the long head of the biceps tendon can lead to rotator cuff pathology: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alan L; Gates, Cameron H; Link, Thomas M; Ma, C Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Previous case reports have highlighted various anomalous origins of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) that do not originate from the superior glenoid labrum or supraglenoid tubercle. Yet, these cases were all reported as incidental findings and were not thought to cause any significant shoulder pathology. We present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical treatment of two cases where aberrant intra-articular origins of the long head of the biceps tendon from the anterior edge of the supraspinatus tendon may have contributed to symptomatic rotator cuff pathology. Arthroscopy confirmed MR findings of partial articular-sided supraspinatus lesions in close proximity to the anomalous origins and treatment with tenodesis of the LHBT successfully relieved symptoms. Although rare occurrences with subtle and potentially misleading imaging findings, it is important to be aware of aberrant origins of the LHBT that may contribute to concomitant rotator cuff pathology.

  12. Mapping the articular contact area of the long head of the biceps tendon on the humeral head.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Byram, Ian R; Lathrop, Ray A; Dunn, Warren R; Kuhn, John E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to calculate the contact surface area of the long head of the biceps (LHB) in neutral position and abduction. We sought to determine whether the LHB articulates with the humeral head in a consistent pattern comparing articular contact area in neutral position and abduction. Eleven fresh frozen matched cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. The path of the biceps tendon on the articular surface of the humeral head and the total articular surface were digitized using a MicronTracker 2 H3-60 three-dimensional optical tracker. Contact surface area was significantly less in abduction than in neutral position (P = 0.002) with a median ratio of 41% (36%, 47.5%). Ratios of contact area in neutral position to full articular surface area were consistent between left and right shoulders (rho = 1, P = 0.017) as were ratios of abduction area to full articular surface area (rho = 0.97, P = 0.005). The articular contact surface area is significantly greater in neutral position than abduction. The ratios of articular contact surface areas to total humeral articular surface areas have a narrow range and are consistent between left and right shoulders of the same cadaver.

  13. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Takeshi; Nakase, Junsuke; Numata, Hitoaki; Takata, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC) disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN), which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury. PMID:26064740

  14. Distal biceps brachii tendon repair: a systematic review of patient outcome determination using modified Coleman methodology score criteria.

    PubMed

    Nyland, John; Causey, Brandon; Wera, Jeff; Krupp, Ryan; Tate, David; Gupta, Amit

    2017-07-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the methodological research design quality of studies that evaluated patient outcomes following distal biceps brachii tendon repair and developed evidence-based recommendations for future patient clinical outcomes research. Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses criteria, and using "biceps brachii", "tendon", "repair" and "outcome assessment" search terms, the CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and MEDLINE databases were searched from January 1960-October 2015. The modified Coleman methodology score (MCMS) served as the primary outcome measure. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed for composite and component MCMS and for patient outcome assessment methodology use frequency. A total of 93 studies were evaluated. Overall MCMS was low (57.1 ± 14). Only 12 (12.9 %) had prospective cohort or randomized controlled trial designs. There was a moderate relationship between publication year and MCMS (r = 0.53, P < 0.0001). Although 61 studies (65.6 %) had adequate surgical descriptions, only 3 (3.2 %) had well-described rehabilitation. Of 2253 subjects, only 39 (1.7 %) were women. Studies published after 2008 had higher MCMS scores than studies published earlier (61.3 ± 10 versus 52.9 ± 16, P = 0.003). Although overall research study methodological scores improved on average since 2008, generally low MCMS scores, retrospective designs, lack of eccentric elbow flexor or supinator strength testing, and poorly described surgical and rehabilitation descriptions remain commonplace. These findings decrease clinical study validity and generalizability. III.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of 3T conventional shoulder MRI in the detection of the long head of the biceps tendon tears associated with rotator cuff tendon tears.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ro Woon; Choi, Soo-Jung; Lee, Man Ho; Ahn, Jae Hong; Shin, Dong Rock; Kang, Chae Hoon; Lee, Ki Won

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance (DP) of 3T (3 Tesla field strength) conventional shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) tears in association with rotator cuff tendon tears. This study included 80 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tendon tears. Two radiologists independently evaluated the preoperative 3T shoulder MRI for the presence of LHBT tears. The DP of MRI was evaluated using the results of arthroscopy as the reference standard. We also evaluated the DP of several MR signs of LHBT in detection of partial LHBT tears. Arthroscopic examination revealed 35 partial and 5 complete tears. According to the results of evaluation by reviewers 1 and 2, shoulder MRI exhibited sensitivities of 77.14 and 80 % and specificities of 71.11 and 73.33 % in detection of partial LHBT tears and sensitivities of 80 and 100 % and a specificity of 100% (both) in detection of complete LHBT tears. In detecting partial LHBT tears, increased T2 signal intensity of the LHBT exhibited high sensitivities (reviewers 1 and 2; 82.85 and 80 %, respectively) and the presence of intratendinous defects or C-signs exhibited the highest specificities (reviewers 1 and 2; 95.55 and 93.33 %, respectively), followed by abnormalities in shape and outer margins of the LHBT (reviewers 1 and 2; 91.11 and 82 %; 91.11 and 86.66 %, respectively). Non-contrast-enhanced 3T shoulder MRI is potentially highly accurate in detection of complete LHBT tears, but moderately accurate in detection of partial LHBT tears.

  16. Visualization of the extra-articular portion of the long head of the biceps tendon during intra-articular shoulder arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Festa, Anthony; Allert, Jesse; Issa, Kimona; Tasto, James P; Myer, Jonathan J

    2014-11-01

    To quantify the amount of the extra-articular long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) seen during intra-articular shoulder arthroscopy by pulling the tendon into the joint with a probe through an anterior portal while viewing through a standard posterior portal. Intra-articular shoulder arthroscopy was performed on 10 forequarter cadaveric specimens. The extra-articular portion of the LHBT was evaluated by pulling the tendon into the joint with an arthroscopic probe inserted through an anterior portal. The tendon was marked at the pulley insertion on the humerus with a vascular clip before and after the tendon was pulled into the joint. An open deltopectoral approach was performed, and the amount of extra-articular tendon visualized was calculated as an absolute amount and in relation to nearby anatomic structures. An additional 1.9 cm (range, 1.4 to 2.6 cm) of extra-articular LHBT was viewed by pulling the tendon into the joint with an arthroscopic probe through an anterior portal during shoulder arthroscopy. This represented 30.8% of the extra-articular portion of the tendon, 47.7% of tendon in the bicipital groove, and 76.3% of the tendon that lies under the area from the pulley insertion to the distal edge of the transverse humeral ligament. During intra-articular shoulder arthroscopy, the extra-articular portion of the LHBT is incompletely visualized by pulling the tendon into the joint with a probe placed through an anterior portal while viewing through a standard posterior portal. An additional extra-articular portion of the LHBT may be viewed by pulling the tendon into the joint with an arthroscopic probe during shoulder arthroscopy. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of porcupine quill foreign bodies in the plantar flexor tendon sheath region in a heifer

    PubMed Central

    Mulon, Pierre-Yves; Achard, Damien; Babkine, Marie

    2010-01-01

    A 17-month-old Holstein heifer was presented for persistent enlargement above the right hind fetlock of 1-month’s duration. Diffuse plantar soft tissue swelling was present on the radiographs and ultrasonography revealed the presence of multiple porcupine quill extremities embedded in the subcutaneous tissue within the flexor tendon sheath wall. Surgical removal was performed. PMID:21037892

  18. [New arthroscopic portal for performing tenotomy/tenodesis procedures on the long head of the biceps brachii tendon].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-de la O, Jorge; Espinosa-Uribe, Abraham Guadalupe; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Vílchez-Cavazos, Félix; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is the standard technique for performing procedures involving the intertubercular groove. Current techniques continue to produce excessive soft tissue manipulation and neurovascular injury. A cross-sectional, observational and descriptive study was conducted on a cohort of 24 shoulders following the standard surgical protocol and using punch dissection. The neurovascular structures with risk of damage by the standard lateral portal were evaluated during the study to establish a secure area for a new arthroscopic portal. Finally, the safety of the new proposed site was evaluated. The presence of 24 venous structures, with a mean diameter was 1.05mm (SD: 0.71) was documented. A tendency was observed in locating these structures in the lower half of the dissecting field for the left shoulders and a hypovascular area between the 7 and 10hours circle dissected relative to the right shoulder. The new site was determined at a point 1.5 cm anterolateral to the anterolateral border of the acromion at an angle of 60° degrees to the horizontal axis of the acromion and towards the intertubercular groove of the humerus. The methodology used in this study is innovative, reproducible and applicable for the study of all existing shoulder arthroscopic portals procedures, as well as any joint. The results provided by this study will be helpful for clinicians to improve tenotomy/tendon tenodesis procedures of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath Involving Both Flexor and Extensor Tendons in a Single Digit: A Case Report and Review of the Literatures.

    PubMed

    Min, Hak Jin; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jae Woo; Yeom, Jae Woo

    2018-06-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a common neoplasm of the hand. This tumor is usually solitary. Multi focal origin of the tumor is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported. We report a 48-year-old female patient who presented with three separate painless nodules in same index finger since three years. The two masses located on dorsal aspect, and the other one located on volar aspect. The imaging studies revealed three separated masses without any connection. We performed excisional biopsy and found multiple tumors, attached to flexor and extensor tendon. The final histopathologic diagnosis was GCTTS.

  20. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients With Elbow Flexion Contractures Following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of surgical outcomes of biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients with elbow flexion contractures, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Serial casting and splinting have been shown to be effective in correcting elbow flexion contractures in OBPI. However, the possibilities of radial head dislocations and other complications have been reported in serial casting and splinting. Literature indicates surgical intervention when such nonoperative techniques and range-of-motion exercises fail. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the contractures of the affected elbow and improvement in arm length to more normal after BTL in these patients, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Ten OBPI patients (6 girls and 4 boys) with an average age of 11.2 years (4-17.7 years) had BTL surgery after unsuccessful serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was 40° before and 37° (average) after serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was reduced to 8° (0°-20°) post-BTL surgical procedure with an average follow-up of 11 months. This was 75% improvement and statistically significant (P < .001) when compared to 7% insignificant (P = .08) improvement after serial casting. These OBPI patients in our study had 75% significant reduction in elbow flexion contractures and achieved an improved and more normal length of the affected arm after the BTL surgery when compared to only 7% insignificant reduction and no improvement in arm length after serial casting.

  1. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients With Elbow Flexion Contractures Following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of surgical outcomes of biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients with elbow flexion contractures, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Background: Serial casting and splinting have been shown to be effective in correcting elbow flexion contractures in OBPI. However, the possibilities of radial head dislocations and other complications have been reported in serial casting and splinting. Literature indicates surgical intervention when such nonoperative techniques and range-of-motion exercises fail. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the contractures of the affected elbow and improvement in arm length to more normal after BTL in these patients, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Methods and Patients: Ten OBPI patients (6 girls and 4 boys) with an average age of 11.2 years (4-17.7 years) had BTL surgery after unsuccessful serial casting. Results: Mean elbow flexion contracture was 40° before and 37° (average) after serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was reduced to 8° (0°-20°) post-BTL surgical procedure with an average follow-up of 11 months. This was 75% improvement and statistically significant (P < .001) when compared to 7% insignificant (P = .08) improvement after serial casting. Conclusion: These OBPI patients in our study had 75% significant reduction in elbow flexion contractures and achieved an improved and more normal length of the affected arm after the BTL surgery when compared to only 7% insignificant reduction and no improvement in arm length after serial casting. PMID:27648115

  2. Intracapsular origin of the long head of the biceps tendon with glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Shital N; Bonnaig, Nicolas; Zbojniewicz, Andrew

    2011-11-09

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a history of recurrent glenohumeral dislocations involving her right dominant shoulder. Physical examination suggested physiologic hyperlaxity and anterior instability. Magnetic resonance arthrography demonstrated an anomalous intracapsular origin of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT), with normal-appearing LHBT in the intertubercular groove. Diagnostic arthroscopy confirmed the absence of the LHBT attachment on the superior labrum. Instead, the LHBT originated from the capsule of the shoulder joint. Diagnostic arthroscopy also revealed glenoid avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (GAGL) lesion as a tear in the anterior-inferior capsule near its insertion on the glenoid and labrum. An arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair was performed with rotator interval closure by imbrication of superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments. A retrospective review of the magnetic resonance arthrogram identified irregularity and interposition of contrast between the capsule and the anterior-inferior labrum that was reproduced in the abduction-external rotation view corresponding with the GAGL lesion seen at arthroscopy. At 12 months postoperatively, the patient demonstrated full range of motion and no signs of instability. This case report helps to raise awareness about 2 rare shoulder lesions: the anomalous origin of LHBT and the GAGL lesion. Diagnosing such lesions on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging may aid in operative planning and avoid unexpected intraoperative findings. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Achilles or biceps tendon rupture in women and men with type 2 diabetes: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Spoendlin, Julia; Meier, Christian; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies suggest that diabetes causes alterations in tendon collagen structure, but evidence on how such findings translate into clinical practice is scarce. We aimed to analyze the association between type 2 diabetes and the risk of tendon rupture. We conducted a matched case-control analysis using the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cases (n=7895) were aged 30-89years and had an incident diagnosis of Achilles- or biceps tendon rupture between 1995 and 2013. In multivariable logistic regression analyses we compared the odds of tendon rupture between patients with or without type 2 diabetes, in men and women separately, and taking into account diabetes severity (HbA1c), duration, and antidiabetic drug treatment. Within 165 (7.1%) female cases with type 2 diabetes, odds ratios (ORs) were increased with poorer diabetes control (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.20-3.41, HbA1c ≥9% [≥75mmol/mol]), longer disease duration (OR 1.60, 95% CI 0.93-2.74, ≥10years), and current insulin use (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.30-3.90, ≥20 prescriptions). Among 372 (6.7%) male cases, there was no effect of type 2 diabetes on the risk of tendon rupture. Our results suggest that the risk of tendon ruptures may be increased in women with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, but not in men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost impossible. Achilles tendonitis is a very common running injury. But it can also affect basketball players, dancers, ... Proximal Biceps Tendonitis Safety Tips: Basketball Safety Tips: Running Repetitive Stress Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries ...

  5. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath: A 10-year study from a tertiary care centre.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Bharani, V; Gupta, N; Gupta, K; Dey, P; Srinivasan, R; Rajwanshi, A

    2018-06-01

    Cytology of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is often sufficient to diagnose this lesion and has been previously described in small series. The present study was undertaken to evaluate detailed cytomorphological features and differential diagnostic entities and pitfalls in the diagnosis. All the cases of GCTTS reported on FNAC were retrieved from July 2007 to June 2017. The cases were reviewed for various cytomorphological features, which were correlated with follow-up histopathology wherever available. A total of 72 cases of GCTTS were retrieved, follow-up histopathology was available in 20 cases. The common sites of involvement were fingers and palm followed by wrists, elbow, knee, ankle and shoulder. The characteristic cytomorphology consisted of mononuclear cells, multinucleated giant cells and pigment laden macrophages in variable numbers. There were four discordant cases that were confirmed on histopathology as sarcoidosis, melanoma, fibrous histiocytoma and eumycetoma. GCTTS can be confused cytologically with giant cell rich lesions of bone and soft tissue and pigment containing lesions including melanoma. Ladybird cell is a characteristic feature seen in this lesion. Proper clinicoradiological correlation is essential before offering a diagnosis of GCTTS on cytology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Direct Lentiviral-Cyclooxygenase 2 Application to the Tendon-Bone Interface Promotes Osteointegration and Enhances Return of the Pull-Out Tensile Strength of the Tendon Graft in a Rat Model of Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wergedal, Jon E.; Stiffel, Virginia; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV)-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or βgal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an effective therapy to

  7. Does immediate elbow mobilization after distal biceps tendon repair carry the risk of wound breakdown, failure of repair, or patient dissatisfaction?

    PubMed

    Smith, James R A; Amirfeyz, Rouin

    2016-05-01

    Rehabilitation protocols after distal biceps repair are highly variable, with many surgeons favoring at least 2 weeks of immobilization. Is this conservative approach necessary to protect the repair? This was a consecutive series of 22 distal biceps tendon repairs in which a cortical button system was used. Patients were encouraged to mobilize their elbow actively from the day of surgery. Physiotherapy commenced at 3 weeks, with strengthening exercises when full range of movement (ROM) was achieved. The primary outcome measured was the clinical integrity of the repaired tendon. Secondary outcomes comprised wound or nerve complication, elbow ROM, and patient-reported outcome measures (the 11-item version of the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand, Mayo Elbow Performance Index, and Oxford Elbow Score). All patients were male, and the dominant arm was repaired in 60%. Mean age was 40.6 years (range, 27-62 years), and mean time to surgery was 17 days (range, 5-99 days). Mean follow-up was 16.6 months (range, 3.8-29 months). All tendons were clinically intact at time of review. No wound breakdown occurred. Mean extension was -6° (range, -10° to 10°), and flexion was 144° (range, 135°-150°). All patients achieved full pronosupination. ROM was equivalent to the uninjured arm (P = .7). The mean 11-item version of the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 2.7 (range, 0-15.9), the Mayo Elbow Performance Index was 97.8 (range, 70-100), and the Oxford Elbow Score was 46.9 (range, 43-48) at the latest follow-up. One-third of patients experienced a transient sensory neurapraxia. Immediate mobilization after biceps tendon repair with a cortical button is possible, and in this series was not associated with failure of the repair, wound breakdown, or patient dissatisfaction. However, this series emphasizes the high incidence of nerve complication that can be associated with the single transverse incision technique. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and

  8. [Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath: characteristic findings of the bone scintigraphy and correlation with MRI].

    PubMed

    Mena, E; Martín-Miramon, J C; Bernà, L; Veintemillas, M; Marín, A; Valls, R; Melloni, P

    2009-01-01

    We report 3 cases of an unusual tumor, that is, the giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. The patients consulted due to the appearance of a well-defined, painless, soft tissue mass with mild-to-moderate inflammation located in the thumbs or toes. These clinical data, together with the bone scan findings, oriented the diagnostic suspicion that was confirmed by a pathology study of the tumor after resection. This work has aimed to review the characteristics of the bone scan (BS) image of this tumor and its correlation with the conventional X-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  9. Oral and inhaled glucocorticoid use and risk of Achilles or biceps tendon rupture: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Spoendlin, Julia; Meier, Christian; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2015-01-01

    Tendinotoxicity of glucocorticoids (GC) has been shown, but evidence on how this translates into clinical practice remains scarce. To explore the association between oral or inhaled GC use and the risk of Achilles or biceps tendon rupture (ATR/BTR). We identified patients aged 18 to 89 years with incident ATR or BTR (1995-2013) for a matched (1:4) case-control analysis using the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We stratified oral GC use by indication, timing and duration of use, continuous versus intermittent use, cumulative dose, and average daily dose. We stratified inhaled GC use by timing and number of prescriptions. Among 8,202 cases, we observed increased odds ratios (ORs) around 3.0 for continuous oral GC use, which declined shortly after therapy cessation (similarly across indications). Odds ratios increased with average daily dose (≥ 10 mg/day, OR 4.05, 95% CI 2.32-7.08) and were elevated after one cycle of high-dose oral GC (≥ 20 mg/day). There was no effect of inhaled GC at any level of exposure. Our results provide evidence that oral GC therapy increases the risk of tendon rupture in a dose-response relationship. A single short-term high-dose GC treatment course may be sufficient transiently to increase the risk of tendon rupture.

  10. Nonlinear friction modelling and compensation control of hysteresis phenomena for a pair of tendon-sheath actuated surgical robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T. N.; Tjahjowidodo, T.; Lau, M. W. S.; Phee, S. J.

    2015-08-01

    Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) is a special method that allows surgical operations via natural orifices like mouth, anus, and vagina, without leaving visible scars. The use of flexible tendon-sheath mechanism (TSM) is common in these systems because of its light weight in structure, flexibility, and easy transmission of power. However, nonlinear friction and backlash hysteresis pose many challenges to control of such systems; in addition, they do not provide haptic feedback to assist the surgeon in the operation of the systems. In this paper, we propose a new dynamic friction model and backlash hysteresis nonlinearity for a pair of TSM to deal with these problems. The proposed friction model, unlike current approaches in the literature, is smooth and able to capture the force at near zero velocity when the system is stationary or operates at small motion. This model can be used to estimate the friction force for haptic feedback purpose. To improve the system tracking performances, a backlash hysteresis model will be introduced, which can be used in a feedforward controller scheme. The controller involves a simple computation of the inverse hysteresis model. The proposed models are configuration independent and able to capture the nonlinearities for arbitrary tendon-sheath shapes. A representative experimental setup is used to validate the proposed models and to demonstrate the improvement in position tracking accuracy and the possibility of providing desired force information at the distal end of a pair of TSM slave manipulator for haptic feedback to the surgeons.

  11. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    PubMed

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  12. Radial Artery Coursing Behind the Biceps Brachii Tendon: Significance for the Transradial Catheterization and a Clinically Oriented Classification of the Radial Artery Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jelev, L., E-mail: ljelev@abv.bg; Surchev, L.

    2008-09-15

    In routine clinical practice the variations of the radial artery are the main reason for technical failure during transradial catheterization. If these variations are well documented, however, they do not represent a problem in the transradial approach. Therefore, we report here a rare case of the radial artery which is very strange but potentially valuable for the clinical practice: it arises at a right angle from the brachial artery and passes behind the biceps brachii tendon. Based on our findings and on an extensive literature review, we propose for the first time a clinically oriented classification of the variations ofmore » the radial artery. This classification is related to the catheterization success at the usual access site of the radial artery at the wrist.« less

  13. Hypertrophy of the extra-articular tendon of the long head of biceps correlates with the location and size of a rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Sugaya, H; Matsuki, K; Miyauchi, H; Matsumoto, M; Tokai, M; Onishi, K; Hoshika, S; Ueda, Y

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess hypertrophy of the extra-articular tendon of the long head of biceps (LHB) in patients with a rotator cuff tear. The study involved 638 shoulders in 334 patients (175 men, 159 women, mean age 62.6 years; 25 to 81) with unilateral symptomatic rotator cuff tears. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the LHB tendon in the bicipital groove was measured pre-operatively in both shoulders using ultrasound. There were 154 asymptomatic rotator cuff tears in the contralateral shoulder. Comparisons were made between those with a symptomatic tear, an asymptomatic tear and those with no rotator cuff tear. In the affected shoulders, the CSAs were compared in relation to the location and size of the rotator cuff tear. The mean CSA was 21.0 mm 2 (4 to 71) in those with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear, 19.9 mm 2 (4 to 75) in those with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear and 14.1 mm 2 (5 to 43) in those with no rotator cuff tear. The mean CSA in patients with both symptomatic and asymptomatic rotator cuff tears was significantly larger than in those with no rotator cuff tear (p < 0.001). In the affected shoulders, there were significant differences between patients with more than a medium sized posterosuperior cuff tear and those with an antero-superior cuff tear. Regardless of the symptoms, there was significant hypertrophy of the extra-articular LHB tendon in patients with a rotator cuff tear. The values were significantly related to the size of the tear. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:806-11. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. The use of intrathecal analgesia and contrast radiography as preoperative diagnostic methods for digital flexor tendon sheath pathology.

    PubMed

    Fiske-Jackson, A R; Barker, W H J; Eliashar, E; Foy, K; Smith, R K W

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of manica flexoria (MF) tears within the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) is lower than for diagnosis of marginal tears of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). Additional diagnostic tools would assist in appropriate decision making for either conservative or surgical management. To evaluate the improvement in lameness of horses with MF or DDFT tears following intrathecal analgesia and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of contrast radiography for the diagnosis of these tears. The case records of horses presented to a referral clinic over a 7-year period that underwent intrathecal diagnostic analgesia, or intrathecal analgesia and contrast radiography, of the DFTS with subsequent tenoscopy were examined. Fifty-three limbs had intrathecal diagnostic analgesia performed and 23 contrast tenograms were assessed in horses undergoing DFTS tenoscopy. Horses with DDFT tears were significantly more likely to respond positively to intrathecal diagnostic analgesia than those with MF tears (P = 0.02). Using contrast radiography, tears of the MF were predicted with an overall sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 80%; marginal tears of the DDFT were predicted with an overall sensitivity of 57% and specificity of 84%. The results of intrathecal analgesia of the DFTS in combination with contrast radiography have a high sensitivity for predicting MF tears. The sensitivity of contrast radiography for predicting tears of the DDFT is lower but the specificity remains high. Contrast radiography performed at the same time as intrathecal analgesia provides useful information regarding the presence of MF tears and DDFT tears, which can assist in the decision of whether to manage the lameness conservatively or with tenoscopic evaluation. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Long-term functional results and isokinetic strength evaluation after arthroscopic tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon

    PubMed Central

    The, Bertram; Brutty, Mike; Wang, Allan; Campbell, Peter T.; Halliday, Michael J. C.; Ackland, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to evaluate the biomechanical function of the upper arm after arthroscopic long head of biceps (LHB) tenotomy at long-term follow-up. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five male subjects ranging from 30 to 63 years old were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 7.0 years after tenotomy. Bilateral isokinetic testing was performed to obtain peak torque values, as well as total work done throughout the full range of elbow flexion and supination. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed nine unrecognized LHB ruptures in the contralateral arm, leaving 16 subjects to complete the testing protocol. The mean quickDASH score was 8.1 (standard error [SE] 2.5). The mean oxford elbow score was 97.9 (SE 1.6). The tenotomy arm recorded a decrease in peak flexion torque of 7.0% (confidence interval [CI] 1.2-12.8), and a decrease in the peak supination torque of 9.1% (CI 1.8-16.4) relative to the contralateral arm. The total work carried out through the full range of joint motion was reduced in elbow flexion by 5.1% (CI −1.3-11.4) and in forearm supination by 5.7% (CI-2.4-13.9). Discussion: Maximum strength in elbow flexion and forearm supination is significantly reduced compared with the contralateral arm. However, this impairment is partially compensated for by relatively greater strength sustained through the latter stages of joint motion. This results in comparable total work measurements between the tenotomised and contralateral side, potentially accounting for ongoing high levels of patient satisfaction and clinical function in the long term after LHB tenotomy. Level of Evidence IV: Case series without comparison group. PMID:25258498

  16. Long-term functional results and isokinetic strength evaluation after arthroscopic tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Brutty, Mike; Wang, Allan; Campbell, Peter T; Halliday, Michael J C; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the biomechanical function of the upper arm after arthroscopic long head of biceps (LHB) tenotomy at long-term follow-up. Twenty-five male subjects ranging from 30 to 63 years old were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 7.0 years after tenotomy. Bilateral isokinetic testing was performed to obtain peak torque values, as well as total work done throughout the full range of elbow flexion and supination. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed nine unrecognized LHB ruptures in the contralateral arm, leaving 16 subjects to complete the testing protocol. The mean quickDASH score was 8.1 (standard error [SE] 2.5). The mean oxford elbow score was 97.9 (SE 1.6). The tenotomy arm recorded a decrease in peak flexion torque of 7.0% (confidence interval [CI] 1.2-12.8), and a decrease in the peak supination torque of 9.1% (CI 1.8-16.4) relative to the contralateral arm. The total work carried out through the full range of joint motion was reduced in elbow flexion by 5.1% (CI -1.3-11.4) and in forearm supination by 5.7% (CI-2.4-13.9). Maximum strength in elbow flexion and forearm supination is significantly reduced compared with the contralateral arm. However, this impairment is partially compensated for by relatively greater strength sustained through the latter stages of joint motion. This results in comparable total work measurements between the tenotomised and contralateral side, potentially accounting for ongoing high levels of patient satisfaction and clinical function in the long term after LHB tenotomy. Case series without comparison group.

  17. A Retrospective Evaluation of Anatomical Reinsertion of the Distal Biceps Brachii Tendon Using an ACL TightRope® RT with a Titanium Cortical Button and Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Suture: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Jarosław; Kentel, Maciej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Reichert, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Various surgical techniques for treating distal biceps brachii tendon injury have been described, and to date there is no consensus regarding the preferred fixation method for the anatomic reinsertion of the ruptured tendon. The aim of the study was to clinically and functionally evaluate the upper limb after surgical anatomic reinsertion of the distal biceps brachii tendon using an ACL TightRope® RT with a titanium cortical button and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture, and to assess postoperative complications. The sample comprised 3 patients. Clinical examination (history, measurements of the active range of forearm motion, arm circumference, the maximum isometric forearm supination and flexion muscle torque), pain evaluation (on a visual analogue scale [VAS]) and functional assessment (the Mayo Elbow Performance Index [MEPI] and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand [DASH]) were carried out. Complications were documented. The results of the range of motion measurements, arm circumferences and normalized isometric torque values of the muscle groups being studied were comparable in the involved and uninvolved limbs. The MEPI (x = 95.00 ± 10.42) and Quick DASH (x = 8.66 ± 18.04) scores revealed very good results. The VAS results were close to no pain (x = 3.33 ± 5.77 mm). No complications were noted. The preliminary comprehensive clinical and functional assessment of the upper limb justify the clinical use of the ACL TightRope® RT with a titanium cortical button and UHMWPE suture in surgical anatomic reinsertion of the distal biceps brachii tendon. The early results with a small sample were encouraging, but studies with a larger number of cases and longer follow-up are needed.

  18. Endoscopic-assisted Distal Biceps Footprint Repair.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Joideep; Bain, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures have been treated successfully with a variety of techniques; however, no current technique is able to restore the biceps to its native footprint on the ulnar surface of the radial tuberosity. We describe a technique, using an endobutton that better recreates the anatomic distal biceps footprint. This is likely to better restore absoloute and repetitive supination strength, which is not reliably achieved with current techniques.

  19. Investigation of a robust tendon-sheath mechanism for flexible membrane wing application in mini-UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shian; Tjahjowidodo, Tegoeh; Lee, Hsuchew; Lai, Benedict

    2017-02-01

    Two inherent issues manifest themselves in flying mini-unmanned aerial vehicles (mini-UAV) in the dense area at tropical climate regions, namely disturbances from gusty winds and limited space for deployment tasks. Flexible membrane wing (FMW) UAVs are seen to be potentials to mitigate these problems. FMWs are adaptable to gusty airflow as the wings are able to flex according to the gust load to reduce the effective angle-of-attack, thus, reducing the aerodynamic loads on the wing. On the other hand, the flexible structure is allowing the UAV to fold in a compact package, and later on, the mini-UAV can be deployed instantly from the storage tube, e.g. through a catapult mechanism. This paper discusses the development of an FMW UAV actuated by a tendon-sheath mechanism (TSM). This approach allows the wing to morph to generate a rolling moment, while still allowing the wing to fold. Dynamic characteristics of the mechanism that exhibits the strong nonlinear phenomenon of friction on TSM are modeled and compensated for. A feed-forward controller was implemented based on the identified nonlinear behavior to control the warping position of the wing. The proposed strategy is validated experimentally in a wind tunnel facility by creating a gusty environment that is imitating a realistic gusty condition based upon the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results demonstrate a stable and robust wing-warping actuation, even in gusty conditions. Accurate wing-warping can be achieved via the TSM, while also allowing the wings to fold.

  20. Relationship between subscapularis tears and injuries to the biceps pulley.

    PubMed

    Godenèche, Arnaud; Nové-Josserand, Laurent; Audebert, Stéphane; Toussaint, Bruno; Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the relationship between long head of the biceps brachii (LHBT) lesions and subscapularis tears. The hypothesis was that a bicipital pulley might remain intact, even in the case of a subscapularis tear. Between 2010 and 2011, all patients who had a primary arthroscopic repair of a subscapularis tear were potentially included in this prospective study. The outcome of interest was the prevalence and type of arthroscopic lesions of the LHBT and bicipital pulley. Furthermore, the supposed pathomechanics of injury and the treatment proposed (conservative, pulley repair, tenodesis, tenotomy, etc.) was recorded. The following baseline characteristics were assessed: age, sex, shoulder side, and limb dominance. Of the 218 patients, the superior glenohumeral ligament/coracohumeral ligament (SGHL/CHL) complex was normal in 54 patients (25%), stretched in 84 patients (39%), and absent in 77 patients (35%). Below the SGHL/CHL complex in the bicipital groove, the medial wall of the LHBT sheath was normal in 25%, partially torn in 39%, and completely torn in 35%. In 25 of the 218 patients (11%), a pathologic LHBT with an intact SGHL/CHL complex was observed. In these cases, the medial wall of the bicipital sheath was torn in 92%. The biceps pulley system, including the SGHL/CHL complex and subscapularis tendon, merits recognition as an important anatomical structure, and its lesions contribute to shoulder pathology. The subscapularis tendon is very important for the stability of the LHBT and should be included in the pulley system. In cases of a tear associated with a lesion of the SGHL/CHL complex, the LHBT is nearly always unstable and pathologic. II.

  1. Intra-articular Fibroma of Tendon Sheath in Knee Joint Associated with Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome: Rare Occurrence in a Teenage Girl

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Sameer; Quadri, Vasil; Tapadia, Sanjay; Krishnaiah, K; Krishna, V P Nithin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion with friction syndrome has rarely been reported. Among such nodular lesions around knee, fibroma of tendon sheath (FTS) is a rare occurrence. All the more intra-articular occurrence is extremely rare. Case Report: A 16-year-old female presented with recurrent pain and movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as rare intra-articular FTS on the basis of histopathology findings. Conclusion: When nodular lesions around knee are detected on magnetic resonance imaging, a FTS could be included in the differential diagnosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of ITB friction syndrome should be revised in view of such rare presentations. PMID:28630835

  2. Pain and the pathogenesis of biceps tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raney, Elise B; Thankam, Finosh G; Dilisio, Matthew F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Biceps tendinopathy is a relatively common ailment that typically presents as pain, tenderness, and weakness in the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. Though it is often associated with degenerative processes of the rotator cuff and the joint, this is not always the case, thus, the etiology remains considerably unknown. There has been recent interest in elucidating the pathogenesis of tendinopathy, since it can be an agent of chronic pain, and is difficult to manage. The purpose of this article is to critically evaluate relevant published research that reflects the current understanding of pain and how it relates to biceps tendinopathy. A review of the literature was conducted to create an organized picture of how pain arises and manifests itself, and how the mechanism behind biceps tendinopathy possibly results in pain. Chronic pain is thought to arise from neurogenic inflammation, central pain sensitization, excitatory nerve augmentation, inhibitory nerve loss, and/or dysregulation of supraspinal structures; thus, the connections of these theories to the ones regarding the generation of biceps tendinopathy, particularly the neural theory, are discussed. Pain mediators such as tachykinins, CGRP, and alarmins, in addition to nervous system ion channels, are highlighted as possible avenues for research in tendinopathy pain. Recognition of the nociceptive mechanisms and molecular of biceps tendinopathy might aid in the development of novel treatment strategies for managing anterior shoulder pain due to a symptomatic biceps tendon. PMID:28670360

  3. Effects of analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath on pain originating in the sole, distal interphalangeal joint or navicular bursa of horses.

    PubMed

    Harper, J; Schumacher, John; Degraves, F; Schramme, M; Schumacher, Jim

    2007-11-01

    Specific analgesic techniques are required in diagnosis of lameness to isolate the exact origin of pain to the many structures of the foot that may be involved. To determine if analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) results in anaesthesia of other portions of the foot, such as the sole, distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ), or navicular bursa (NB). Lameness caused by pain in the dorsal margin or heel region of the sole of the foot was induced in 18 horses by: using set-screws to create solar pressure (Trial 1: n = 5); or administering endotoxin intrasynovially into the DIPJ (Trial 2: n = 6) and NB (Trial 3: n = 7). The gait of each horse was evaluated by examining videotape recorded before and after creation of lameness and after administration of mepivacaine hydrochloride into the DFTS. Median lameness scores in Trial 1 at 10 min post injection of the DFTS were not significantly different from those before administration of local anaesthetic solution into the DFTS (P> or =0.05), but median lameness scores were reduced significantly at 20 min (P< or =0.05). In Trials 2 and 3, median lameness scores were not significantly different at observations made at 10 and 20 min post injection of the DFTS. Analgesia of the DFTS has little effect on lameness caused by pain originating in the sole, DIPJ or NB. Improvement of lameness in horses after intrasynovial analgesia of the DFTS is probably caused by attenuation of pain within the structures contained in the DFTS.

  4. Simultaneous acute rotator cuff tear and distal biceps rupture in a strongman competitor.

    PubMed

    George, Michael S

    2010-04-01

    Acute rotator cuff tear is commonly associated with tearing of the proximal biceps tendon, but has never been reported to occur simultaneously with a distal biceps tendon rupture. A 38-year-old right-hand-dominant strongman competitor attempted a 300-pound overhead axle press and experienced immediate pain in the right shoulder and elbow. He had no known systemic risk factors for tendon ruptures including hyperparathyroidism, hemodialysis, alcoholism, rheumatoid arthritis, statin medications, fluoroquinolones, and steroid use.Right shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a full-thickness supraspinatus tear with 3 cm of retraction. There was minimal fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus on the sagittal cuts consistent with acute rupture. The subscapularis was intact. The long head of the biceps tendon had mild medial subluxation but was completely within the bicipital groove. Right elbow MRI showed a complete distal biceps tendon rupture. Thirteen days after his injury, the patient underwent arthroscopic supraspinatus repair and proximal biceps tenodesis. Distal biceps tendon repair was performed using the modified 2-incision muscle-splitting technique. At 24-month follow-up, the patient was pain free and had returned to full activity including weightlifting but had not returned to strongman competition.This is the first report of simultaneous acute full thickness ruptures of the rotator cuff and distal biceps tendon. This case report underscores the importance of a complete physical examination and a high index of suspicion for additional concomitant injuries, particularly in athletes with unusually high stresses to the body. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: a new technique using bioabsorbable interference screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Krishnan, Sumant G; Coste, Jean-Sebastien; Walch, Gilles

    2002-01-01

    To report a new technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using bioabsorbable interference screw fixation and the early results. Prospective, nonrandomized study. The principle of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is simple: after biceps tenotomy, the tendon is exteriorized and doubled on a suture; the biceps tendon is then pulled into a humeral socket (7 or 8 mm x 25 mm) drilled at the top of the bicipital groove, and fixed using a bioabsorbable interference screw (8 or 9 mm x 25 mm) under arthroscopic control. 43 patients treated with this technique between 1997 and 1999 were followed-up for at least 1 year. The technique was indicated in 3 clinical situations: (1) with arthroscopic cuff repair (3 cases), (2) in case of isolated pathology of the biceps tendon with an intact cuff (6 cases), and (3) as an alternative to biceps tenotomy in patients with massive, degenerative and irreparable cuff tears (34 cases). The biceps pathology was tenosynovitis (4 cases), prerupture (15 cases), subluxation (11 cases), and luxation (13 cases). The absolute Constant score improved from 43 points preoperatively to 79 points at review (P <.005). There was no loss of elbow movement and biceps strength was 90% of the strength of the other side. Two patients, operated on early in the series, presented with a rupture of the tenodesis. In both cases the bicipital tendon was very friable and the diameter of the screw proved to be insufficient (7 mm). No neurologic or vascular complications occurred. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis using bioabsorbable screw fixation is technically possible and gives good clinical results. This technique can be used in cases of isolated pathologic biceps tendon or a cuff tear. A very thin, fragile, almost ruptured biceps tendon is the technical limit of this arthroscopic technique.

  6. Acute distal biceps rupture in an adolescent weightlifter on chronic steroid suppression: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ding, David Y; LaMartina, Joey A; Zhang, Alan L; Pandya, Nirav K

    2016-09-01

    Distal biceps tendon ruptures are uncommon events in the adult population and exceedingly rare in the adolescent population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and only report of a distal biceps tendon rupture in an adolescent with a history of chronic corticosteroid suppression. We present a case of a 17-year-old male on chronic corticosteroid suppression who underwent a successful distal biceps tendon repair after an acute rupture following weightlifting. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient reports full range of motion and strength, and is able to return to his preinjury activity level with sports and weightlifting. Acute distal biceps ruptures are uncommon injuries in the pediatric population, but may occur in conjunction with chronic corticosteroid use. Anatomic repair, when possible, can restore function and strength. level IV, case report.

  7. The effect of seprafilm on adhesion formation and tendon healing after flexor tendon repair in chicken.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erhan; Avci, Mustafa; Bulut, Mehmet; Kelestimur, Halidun; Karakurt, Lokman; Ozercan, Ibrahim

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of the tendon, which can occur during healing of tendon repair, is negatively affected by the outcome of surgery. In this experimental study, we sought to prevent adhesion of the tendon, and determined the mechanical stiffness of repair tissue by wrapping sodium hyaluronate and carboxymethylcellulose (Seprafilm; Genzyme, Cambridge, Massachusetts) around the repaired tendon segments. The study group comprised 2 groups of 20 chickens. In group I, the right gastrocnemius tendons of the chickens were cut smoothly, and after tendon and sheath repair, the skin was sutured. In group II, the right gastrocnemius tendons of the chickens were cut, the tendons were repaired, and before skin closure, Seprafilm was wrapped around the repaired tendon segments. Plastic splints were used for holding the chickens' ankles in a neutral position, and they were allowed weight bearing for 8 weeks. In group II, anatomic space between the tendon-sheath and tendon was clear and the tendon-sheath complex was sliding easily around the repaired tendon segment, and this complex was more functional both biomechanically and histologically. Also, the Seprafilm-applied tendons (group II) were observed to be biomechanically more resistant to the tensile forces in group I. Seprafilm is an easily applied interpositional material that can be used safely to prevent adhesion during the tendon healing process. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Tendon injuries of the hand

    PubMed Central

    Schöffl, Volker; Heid, Andreas; Küpper, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tendon injuries are the second most common injuries of the hand and therefore an important topic in trauma and orthopedic patients. Most injuries are open injuries to the flexor or extensor tendons, but less frequent injuries, e.g., damage to the functional system tendon sheath and pulley or dull avulsions, also need to be considered. After clinical examination, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have proved to be important diagnostic tools. Tendon injuries mostly require surgical repair, dull avulsions of the distal phalanges extensor tendon can receive conservative therapy. Injuries of the flexor tendon sheath or single pulley injuries are treated conservatively and multiple pulley injuries receive surgical repair. In the postoperative course of flexor tendon injuries, the principle of early passive movement is important to trigger an “intrinsic” tendon healing to guarantee a good outcome. Many substances were evaluated to see if they improved tendon healing; however, little evidence was found. Nevertheless, hyaluronic acid may improve intrinsic tendon healing. PMID:22720265

  9. Extraarticular variants of the long head of the biceps brachii: a reminder of embryology.

    PubMed

    Audenaert, Emmanuel A; Barbaix, Erik J; Van Hoonacker, Petrus; Berghs, Bart M

    2008-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the long head of the biceps tendon are rare and have been described in the literature mainly dealing with anatomy and embryology. Because most basic embryologic research on this topic was conducted before 1966, a literature search was performed from archived anatomy textbooks and manuscript references. These data were compared with the scarce case descriptions of developmental anomalies of the long head of the biceps tendon. An additional case illustration from our own experience was provided. From the literature, it appears that during the embryologic phase of development, a staged migration of the long head of the biceps tendon occurs from a position between the fibrous capsule and synovial layer to an intraarticular position. Recent anatomic and arthroscopic case reports have shown that interruption of this migration can occur in any of these stages. Given the recent increase in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, anomalies of the long head of the biceps tendon will be encountered more frequently. Knowledge of their existence and origin can help in evaluating unexpected anatomic variations or the absence of the biceps tendon in preoperative medical imaging or during an arthroscopic procedure.

  10. Subscapularis tendon tears

    PubMed Central

    Lenart, Brett A.; Ticker, Jonathan B.

    2017-01-01

    Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been under-recognised until recently. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. A directed physical examination, including the lift-off, belly-press and increased passive external rotation can help identify tears of the subscapularis. All planes on MR imaging should be carefully evaluated to identify tears of the subscapularis, retraction, atrophy and biceps pathology. Due to the tendency of the tendon to retract medially, acute and traumatic full-thickness tears should be repaired. Chronic tears without significant degeneration should be considered for repair if no contraindication exists. Arthroscopic repair can be performed using a 30-degree arthroscope and a laterally-based single row repair; one anchor for full thickness tears ⩽ 50% of tendon length and two anchors for those ⩾ 50% of tendon length. Biceps pathology, which is invariably present, should be addressed by tenotomy or tenodesis. Timing of post-operative rehabilitation is dictated by the size of the repair and the security of the repair construct. The stages of rehabilitation typically involve a period of immobilisation followed by range of movement exercises, with a delay in active internal rotation (IR) and strengthening in IR. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:484–495. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.170015 PMID:29387471

  11. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER DISTAL BICEPS BRACHII REPAIR: A CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Christine L; Morris, Tim; Otto, Charissa; Zerella, Tanisha; Semmler, John G; Human, Taaibos; Phadnis, Joideep; Bain, Gregory I

    2016-12-01

    To investigate outcomes after surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture and the influence of arm dominance on isokinetic flexion and supination results. While relatively uncommon, rupture of the distal biceps tendon can result in significant strength deficits, for which surgical repair is recommended. The purpose of this study was to assess patient reported functional outcomes and muscle performance following surgery. A sample of 23 participants (22 males, 1 female), who had previously undergone surgical repair of the distal biceps tendon, were re-examined at a minimum of one year after surgery. Biodex isokinetic elbow flexion and supination testing was performed to assess strength (as measured by peak torque) and endurance (as measured by total work and work fatigue). The Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Mayo Elbow Performance Scale (MEPS) were used to assess participants' subjectively reported functional recovery. At a mean of 7.6 years after surgical repair, there were no differences between the repaired and uninvolved elbows in peak torque ( p  = 0.47) or total work ( p  = 0.60) for flexion or supination. There was also no difference in elbow flexion work fatigue ( p  = 0.22). However, there was significantly less work fatigue in supination, which was likely influenced by arm dominance, as most repairs were to the dominant arm, F (1,22)=5.67, p  = 0.03. The long-term strength of the repaired elbow was similar to the uninvolved elbow after surgery to the distal biceps tendon. Endurance of the repaired elbow was similar in flexion but greater in supination, probably influenced by arm dominance. Retrospective case series. Level 4.

  12. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER DISTAL BICEPS BRACHII REPAIR: A CASE SERIES

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Tim; Otto, Charissa; Zerella, Tanisha; Semmler, John G; Human, Taaibos; Phadnis, Joideep; Bain, Gregory I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate outcomes after surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture and the influence of arm dominance on isokinetic flexion and supination results. Background/Purpose While relatively uncommon, rupture of the distal biceps tendon can result in significant strength deficits, for which surgical repair is recommended. The purpose of this study was to assess patient reported functional outcomes and muscle performance following surgery. Methods A sample of 23 participants (22 males, 1 female), who had previously undergone surgical repair of the distal biceps tendon, were re-examined at a minimum of one year after surgery. Biodex isokinetic elbow flexion and supination testing was performed to assess strength (as measured by peak torque) and endurance (as measured by total work and work fatigue). The Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Mayo Elbow Performance Scale (MEPS) were used to assess participants' subjectively reported functional recovery. Results At a mean of 7.6 years after surgical repair, there were no differences between the repaired and uninvolved elbows in peak torque (p = 0.47) or total work (p = 0.60) for flexion or supination. There was also no difference in elbow flexion work fatigue (p = 0.22). However, there was significantly less work fatigue in supination, which was likely influenced by arm dominance, as most repairs were to the dominant arm, F(1,22)=5.67, p = 0.03. Conclusion The long-term strength of the repaired elbow was similar to the uninvolved elbow after surgery to the distal biceps tendon. Endurance of the repaired elbow was similar in flexion but greater in supination, probably influenced by arm dominance. Study design Retrospective case series Level of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27904798

  13. Increased muscle belly and tendon stiffness in patients with Parkinson's disease, as measured by myotonometry.

    PubMed

    Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólska, Anna; Budrewicz, Sławomir; Koszewicz, Magdalena; Jaskólski, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Based on Davis's law, greater tonus of the muscle belly in individuals with Parkinson's disease can create greater tension in the tendon, leading to structural adjustment and an increase in tendon stiffness. Our study aimed to separately assess passive stiffness in the muscle belly and tendon in medicated patients with Parkinson's disease, using myotonometry. We tested 12 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 healthy matched controls. Passive stiffness of muscle belly and tendon was estimated by myotonometry, electromyography, and mechanomyography in relaxed biceps and triceps brachii muscles. Compared with controls, patients with Parkinson's disease had higher stiffness in the muscle belly and tendon of the biceps brachii and in the tendon of the triceps brachii. In patients with Parkinson's disease, there was a positive correlation between muscle belly stiffness and parkinsonian rigidity in the biceps brachii. Patients with Parkinson's disease have higher passive stiffness of the muscle belly and tendon than healthy matched controls. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Collagen structure of tendon relates to function.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Trirè, Alessandra; Quaranta, Marilisa; Orsini, Ester; Ottani, Victoria

    2007-03-30

    A tendon is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone, designed to transmit forces and withstand tension during muscle contraction. Tendon may be surrounded by different structures: 1) fibrous sheaths or retinaculae; 2) reflection pulleys; 3) synovial sheaths; 4) peritendon sheaths; 5) tendon bursae. Tendons contain a) few cells, mostly represented by tenoblasts along with endothelial cells and some chondrocytes; b) proteoglycans (PGs), mainly decorin and hyaluronan, and c) collagen, mostly type I. Tendon is a good example of a high ordered extracellular matrix in which collagen molecules assemble into filamentous collagen fibrils (formed by microfibrils) which aggregate to form collagen fibers, the main structural components. It represents a multihierarchical structure as it contains collagen molecules arranged in fibrils then grouped in fibril bundles, fascicles and fiber bundles that are almost parallel to the long axis of the tendon, named as primary, secondary and tertiary bundles. Collagen fibrils in tendons show prevalently large diameter, a D-period of about 67 nm and appear built of collagen molecules lying at a slight angle (< 5 degrees). Under polarized light microscopy the collagen fiber bundles appear crimped with alternative dark and light transverse bands. In recent studies tendon crimps observed via SEM and TEM show that the single collagen fibrils suddenly changing their direction contain knots. These knots of collagen fibrils inside each tendon crimp have been termed "fibrillar crimps", and even if they show different aspects they all may fulfil the same functional role. As integral component of musculoskeletal system, the tendon acts to transmit muscle forces to the skeletal system. There is no complete understanding of the mechanisms in transmitting/absorbing tensional forces within the tendon; however it seems likely that a flattening of tendon crimps may occur at a first stage of tendon stretching. Increasing

  15. Lacertus Fibrosus Versus Achilles Allograft Reconstruction for Distal Biceps Tears: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Murthi, Anand M; Ramirez, Miguel A; Parks, Brent G; Carpenter, Shannon R

    2017-12-01

    The bicipital aponeurosis, or lacertus fibrosus, can potentially be used as a reconstruction graft in chronic distal biceps tendon tears. To evaluate construct stiffness, load to failure, and failure mechanism with lacertus fibrosus versus Achilles allograft for distal biceps tendon reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen matched cadaveric pairs of elbows were used. Three centimeters of the distal biceps tendon was resected. Specimens were randomized to the lacertus fibrosus or Achilles tendon group. In one group, the lacertus fibrosus was released from its distal attachment and then tubularized and repaired intraosseously to the radius. In the other group, an Achilles tendon graft was sutured to the biceps muscle and repaired to the ulna. The prepared radii were rigidly mounted at a 45° angle on a load frame. The proximal biceps muscle was secured in a custom-fabricated cryogenic grip. Displacement was measured using a differential variable reluctance transducer mounted at the radius-soft tissue junction and in the muscle- or muscle allograft-tissue junction proximal to the repair. Specimens were loaded at 20 mm/min until failure, defined as a 3-mm displacement at the radius-soft tissue junction. No significant difference was found in mean load to failure between the lacertus fibrosus and Achilles tendon group (mean ± SD, 20.2 ± 5.5 N vs 16.89 ± 4.54 N; P = .18). Stiffness also did not differ significantly between the lacertus fibrosus and Achilles tendon group (12.3 ± 7.1 kPa vs 10.5 ± 5.7 kPa; P = .34). The primary mode of failure in the lacertus fibrosus group was suture pullout from the tissue at the musculotendinous junction (7 of 10). In the Achilles group, failures were observed at the muscle-allograft interface (3) and the allograft-bone (radial tuberosity) interface (3), and 3 suture failures were observed. The button fixation did not fail in any specimens. The mean stiffness and load-to-failure values were not significantly

  16. Diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy fails to fully evaluate the biceps-labral complex.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel A; Khair, M Michael; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Pearle, Andrew D; Baret, Nikolas J; Newman, Ashley M; Dy, Christopher J; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the limits of diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy and determine the prevalence and frequency of hidden extra-articular "bicipital tunnel" lesions among chronically symptomatic patients. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens underwent diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy with percutaneous tagging of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) during maximal tendon excursion. The percentage of visualized LHBT was calculated relative to the distal margin of subscapularis tendon and the proximal margin of the pectoralis major tendon. Then, a retrospective review of 277 patients who underwent subdeltoid transfer of the LHBT to the conjoint tendon were retrospectively analyzed for lesions of the biceps-labral complex. Lesions were categorized by anatomic location (inside, junctional, or bicipital tunnel). Inside lesions were labral tears. Junctional lesions were LHBT tears visualized during glenohumeral arthroscopy. Bicipital tunnel lesions were extra-articular lesions hidden from view during standard glenohumeral arthroscopy. Seventy-eight percent of LHBT were visualized relative to the distal margin of the subscapularis tendon and only 55% relative to the proximal margin of the pectoralis major tendon. No portion of the LHBT inferior to the subscapularis tendon was visualized. Forty-seven percent of patients had hidden bicipital tunnel lesions. Scarring was most common and accounted for 48% of all such lesions. Thirty-seven percent of patients had multiple lesion locations. Forty-five percent of patients with junctional lesions also had hidden bicipital tunnel lesions. The only offending lesion was in the bicipital tunnel for 18% of patients. Diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy fails to fully evaluate the biceps-labral complex because it visualizes only 55% of the LHBT relative to the proximal margin of the pectoralis major tendon and did not identify extra-articular bicipital tunnel lesions present in 47% of chronically

  17. Stiffening Sheaths for Continuum Robots.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marlene; Amanov, Ernar; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2018-06-01

    Added to their high dexterity and ability to conform to complex shapes, continuum robots can be further improved to provide safer interaction with their environment. Indeed, controlling their stiffness is one of the most challenging yet promising research topics. We propose a tubular stiffening sheath as a replaceable cover for small-diameter continuum robots to temporarily increase the stiffness in a certain configuration. In this article, we assess and compare performances of two different stiffening modalities: granular and layer jamming, provide arguments for material selection and experimental results for stiffness with respect to lateral and axial applied forces. Furthermore, we detected empirically additional effects relating sheath stiffness to material parameters and added to recent investigations in the state of the art, which are based exclusively on material roughness. Finally, we integrated the selected layer jamming material in a miniaturized sheath (13 mm outer diameter, 2.5 mm wall thickness) and covered a tendon-actuated continuum robot with it. Experimental characterization of the behavior with respect to applied external forces was performed via stiffness measurements and proved that the initial tendon-actuated continuum robot stiffness can be improved by a factor up to 24.

  18. Tendon injuries

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Nerlich, Michael; Docheva, Denitsa

    2017-01-01

    Tendons connect muscles to bones, ensuring joint movement. With advanced age, tendons become more prone to degeneration followed by injuries. Tendon repair often requires lengthy periods of rehabilitation, especially in elderly patients. Existing medical and surgical treatments often fail to regain full tendon function. The development of novel treatment methods has been hampered due to limited understanding of basic tendon biology. Recently, it was discovered that tendons, similar to other mesenchymal tissues, contain tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) which possess the common stem cell properties. The current strategies for enhancing tendon repair consist mainly of applying stem cells, growth factors, natural and artificial biomaterials alone or in combination. In this review, we summarise the basic biology of tendon tissues and provide an update on the latest repair proposals for tendon tears. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:332-342. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160075 PMID:28828182

  19. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries.

  20. Ultrasonographic assessment of the equine palmar tendons

    PubMed Central

    Padaliya, N. R.; Ranpariya, J. J.; Kumar, Dharmendra; Javia, C. B.; Barvalia, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the equine palmar tendon by ultrasonography (USG) in standing the position. Materials and Methods: USG of palmar tendons was performed in 40 adult horses using linear transducer having frequency of 10-18 MHz (e-soate, My Lab FIVE) and L52 linear array transducer (Titan, SonoSite) with frequencies ranging from 8 to 10 MHz. Palmar tendon was divided into 7 levels from distal to accessory carpal bone up to ergot in transverse scanning and 3 levels in longitudinal scanning. Results: The USG evaluation was very useful for diagnosis of affections of the conditions such as chronic bowed tendon, suspensory ligament desmitis, carpal sheath tenosynovitis and digital sheath effusions. The mean cross-sectional area (cm2) of affected tendons was significantly increased in affected than normal tendons. The echogenicity was also found reduced in affected tendons and ligaments along with disorganization of fiber alignment depending on the severity of lesion and injury. Conclusion: USG proved ideal diagnostic tool for diagnosis and post-treatment healing assessment of tendon injuries in horses. PMID:27047074

  1. Is nonoperative management of partial distal biceps tears really successful?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Tyler M; Wong, Justin C; Lazarus, Mark D

    2018-04-01

    The current treatment of partial distal biceps tears is a period of nonoperative management, followed by surgery, if symptoms persist. Little is known about the success rate and outcomes of nonoperative management of this illness. We identified 132 patients with partial distal biceps tears through an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code query of our institution's database. Patient records were reviewed to abstract demographic information and confirm partial tears of the distal biceps tendon based on clinical examination findings and confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventy-four patients completed an outcome survey. In our study, 55.7% of the contacted patients who tried a nonoperative course (34 of 61 patients) ultimately underwent surgery, and 13 patients underwent immediate surgery. High-need patients, as defined by occupation, were more likely to report that they recovered ideally if they underwent surgery, as compared with those who did not undergo surgery (odds ratio, 11.58; P = .0138). For low-need patients, the same analysis was not statistically significant (P = .139). There was no difference in satisfaction scores between patients who tried a nonoperative course before surgery and those who underwent immediate surgery (P = .854). An MRI-diagnosed tear of greater than 50% was a predictor of needing surgery (odds ratio, 3.0; P = .006). This study has identified clinically relevant information for the treatment of partial distal biceps tears, including the following: the failure rate of nonoperative treatment, the establishment of MRI percent tear as a predictor of failing nonoperative management, the benefit of surgery for the high-need occupational group, and the finding that nonoperative management does not negatively affect outcome if subsequent surgery is necessary. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biceps muscle fatty infiltration and atrophy. A midterm review after arthroscopic tenotomy of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Brutty, Mike; Wang, Allan; Wambeek, Nicholas D K; Campbell, Peter; Halliday, Michael J C; Ackland, Timothy R

    2015-03-01

    Pathology of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is commonly treated by tenotomy. High levels of clinical function and patient satisfaction are reported in the short-term. The purpose of this study was to investigate the midterm effects of tenotomy on biceps fatty infiltration and atrophy in active working-age male patients. Twenty-five men (mean age, 57 years) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 6.7 years after tenotomy. Bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and fatty infiltration of the biceps was assessed relative to the ipsilateral triceps. Seventeen participants had an intact contralateral LHB tendon. To assess atrophy, anterior muscle compartment volume was measured by serial cross-sectional area measurements on MRI. The tenotomized side was then compared to the healthy side in these 17 participants. Clinical scores were obtained using the QuickDASH and Oxford Elbow Score, and the occurrence of a Popeye sign and residual pain were recorded. Good clinical function was maintained at a mean follow-up time of 6.7 years (range, 4 to 10 years) (QuickDASH score of 7.1; standard error [SE], 1.8) and Oxford Elbow Score of 97.9 [SE 1.2]). Eleven of the 25 participants had a Popeye deformity. Four participants showed signs of fatty infiltration, and all were minor (grade 1). The mean decrease in total volume of the anterior musculature was 3.6%. In participants without a Popeye deformity, it was 3.3%, whereas it was 4.1% in participants with a Popeye sign (P = .8). In the midterm, LHB tenotomy in active men of working age does not result in fatty degeneration or substantial atrophy in the anterior musculature of the arm. Clinical function remains good. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proximal Long Head Biceps Rupture: A Predictor of Rotator Cuff Pathology.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Marcin; Kohut, Kevin; Sabzevari, Soheil; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Lin, Albert

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether acute rupture of the proximal long head biceps is a harbinger of disease of the nearby supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. A retrospective chart review from February 1, 2008, to August 31, 2016, was performed at our institution identifying patients who presented with an acute (<12-week) history of "Popeye" deformity of the distal biceps and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected shoulder. MRI images were then reviewed in duplicate to determine supraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tear incidence, size, chronicity, and depth. The association between rotator cuff status and acute long head biceps rupture as well as patient age, sex, smoking status, hand dominance, and history of diabetes mellitus or trauma was then evaluated. A total of 116 patients were included in this study (mean age: 61.9 ± 10.9 years). A significant proportion (n = 99; incidence: 85%) were found to have some degree of supraspinatus or subscapularis tendon tearing on MRI (P < .001). These patients were also found to be significantly older compared with those with an intact rotator cuff (mean age 63.3 ± 10.7 vs 54.2 ± 9.2; P = .001). Full thickness rotator cuff tears were significantly more likely to involve the supraspinatus as opposed to the subscapularis (incidence: 44% and 21%; P = .002). Despite the expected association of rotator cuff disease with increasing patient age, the results of this study also affirm the hypothesis that inflammation in the rotator cuff interval signaled by rupture of the long head of biceps is a harbinger of rotator cuff disease. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion regarding concomitant anterosuperior rotator cuff pathology in patients presenting with acute long head of biceps rupture. Early evaluation with advanced imaging should be strongly considered. Level IV, case series. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Disorders of the long head of the biceps: tenotomy versus tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Ursolino, André Petry Sandoval; Ramos, Vinicius Ferreira Lima; Takesian, Fernando Hovaguim; Tenor Júnior, Antonio Carlos; Costa, Miguel Pereira da

    2017-01-01

    Disorders of the long head of biceps tendon are common in clinical practice. Their causes could be degenerative, inflammatory, instability (subluxation or luxation) or traumatic. They are generally associated to other diseases of the shoulder, mainly rotator cuff injuries. Currently, there is controversy in the literature regarding the indications for surgical treatment and the choice of the best technique for each case, due to the possibility of esthetic deformity, loss of muscle strength, and residual pain. The objective of this study was to identify the indications for surgical treatment, the best surgical technique, and the advantages and disadvantages of each technique described in the orthopedic literature for the treatment of long head of biceps tendon injuries. A revision of the orthopedic medical literature on the following databases: Biblioteca Regional de Medicina (BIREME), Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar, comprising articles published in the period from 1991 to 2015.

  5. Angiogenesis in healing autogenous flexor-tendon grafts.

    PubMed

    Gelberman, R H; Chu, C R; Williams, C S; Seiler, J G; Amiel, D

    1992-09-01

    On the basis of recent evidence that flexor tendon grafts may heal without the ingrowth of vascular adhesions, eighteen autogenous donor tendons of intrasynovial and extrasynovial origin were transferred to the synovial sheaths in the forepaws of nine dogs, and controlled passive mobilization was instituted early in the postoperative period. The angiogenic responses of the tendon grafts were determined with perfusion studies with India ink followed by cleaing of the tissues with the Spalteholz technique at two, four, and six weeks. A consistent pattern of neovascularization was noted in the donor tendons of extrasynovial origin. Vascular adhesions arising from the flexor digitorum superficialis and the tendon sheath enveloped the tendon grafts by two weeks. By six weeks, the vascularity of the tendon grafts of extrasynovial origin appeared completely integrated with that of the surrounding tissues. Examination of cross sections revealed that the segments of tendon had been completely vascularized by obliquely oriented intratendinous vessels. In contrast, the flexor tendon grafts of intrasynovial origin healed without ingrowth of vascular adhesions. Primary intrinsic neovascularization took place from the proximal and, to a lesser extent, distal sites of the sutures. Examination of cross sections revealed vessels extending through the surface layer of the tendon graft, with small vessels penetrating the interior of the tendons at regular intervals.

  6. BICEP2 III: Instrumental systematics

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.

    2015-11-23

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading ordermore » beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ~10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. Lastly, the contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10 –3.« less

  7. BICEP2 III: Instrumental systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading ordermore » beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ~10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. Lastly, the contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10 –3.« less

  8. Sonographic differentiation of digital tendon rupture from adhesive scarring after primary surgical repair.

    PubMed

    Budovec, Joseph J; Sudakoff, Gary S; Dzwierzynski, William W; Matloub, Hani S; Sanger, James R

    2006-04-01

    After the surgical repair of finger tendons finger range of motion may be limited by tendon rupture or adhesive scarring. Differentiating tendon rupture from adhesive scarring may be difficult clinically. Digital tendon sonography allows the evaluation of tendon integrity in a dynamic setting. Our objective was to determine if sonography could differentiate tendon rupture from adhesive scarring in patients who have had primary tendon repair. A retrospective review was performed of the radiographic, clinical, and surgical records of patients referred for finger sonography over a 2-year period. Twenty-eight digits in 21 patients were evaluated for finger tendon disruption after primary surgical repair. The diagnosis of complete tendon rupture was made when 1 or more of the following was identified: a gap separating the proximal and distal tendon margins, visualization of only the proximal tendon margin, or visualization of only the distal tendon margin. Adhesive scarring was diagnosed if the tendon appeared intact with abnormal peritendinous soft tissue abutting or partially encasing the tendon, with synovial sheath thickening, or with restricted tendon motion during dynamic evaluation. Sonography correctly identified tendon rupture or adhesive scarring in 27 of 28 digits with 1 false-positive case (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 93%; positive-predictive value, 93%; negative-predictive value, 100%; accuracy, 96%). Sonography is an accurate modality for differentiating tendon rupture from adhesive scarring in patients with prior surgical tendon repair. Diagnostic, Level I.

  9. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  10. Structure-function relationships in tendons: a review

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M; Kaiser, E; Milz, S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current review is to highlight the structure-function relationship of tendons and related structures to provide an overview for readers whose interest in tendons needs to be underpinned by anatomy. Because of the availability of several recent reviews on tendon development and entheses, the focus of the current work is primarily directed towards what can best be described as the ‘tendon proper’ or the ‘mid-substance’ of tendons. The review covers all levels of tendon structure from the molecular to the gross and deals both with the extracellular matrix and with tendon cells. The latter are often called ‘tenocytes’ and are increasingly recognized as a defined cell population that is functionally and phenotypically distinct from other fibroblast-like cells. This is illustrated by their response to different types of mechanical stress. However, it is not only tendon cells, but tendons as a whole that exhibit distinct structure-function relationships geared to the changing mechanical stresses to which they are subject. This aspect of tendon biology is considered in some detail. Attention is briefly directed to the blood and nerve supply of tendons, for this is an important issue that relates to the intrinsic healing capacity of tendons. Structures closely related to tendons (joint capsules, tendon sheaths, pulleys, retinacula, fat pads and bursae) are also covered and the concept of a ‘supertendon’ is introduced to describe a collection of tendons in which the function of the whole complex exceeds that of its individual members. Finally, attention is drawn to the important relationship between tendons and fascia, highlighted by Wood Jones in his concept of an ‘ectoskeleton’ over half a century ago – work that is often forgotten today. PMID:18304204

  11. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of themore » tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.« less

  12. Role of tissue-engineered artificial tendon in healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. Tissue engineering is an option. We constructed a collagen-based artificial tendon, covered it with a polydioxanon (PDS) sheath, and studied the role of this bioimplant on experimental tendon healing in vivo. A 2-cm tendon gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of rabbits (n = 120). The animals were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (no implant), treated with tridimensional-collagen, and treated with tridimensional-collagen-bidimensional-PDS implants. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups of 60 and 120 days postinjury (DPI). Another 50 pilot animals were used to study the host-implant interaction. Physical activity of the animals was scored and ultrasonographic and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured tendons were investigated weekly. After euthanasia, macro, micro, and nano morphologies and biophysical and biomechanical characteristics of the healing tendons were studied. Treatment improved function of the animals, time dependently. At 60 and 120 DPI, the treated tendons showed significantly higher maximum load, yield, stiffness, stress, and modulus of elasticity compared with controls. The collagen implant induced inflammation and absorbed the migrating fibroblasts in the defect area. By its unique architecture, it aligned the fibroblasts and guided their proliferation and collagen deposition along the stress line of the tendon and resulted in improved collagen density, micro-amp, micro-ohm, water uptake, and delivery of the regenerated tissue. The PDS-sheath covering amplified these characteristics. The implants were gradually absorbed and replaced by a new tendon. Minimum amounts of peritendinous adhesion, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis were observed in the treated groups. Some remnants of the implants were preserved and accepted as a part of the new tendon. The implants were cytocompatible, biocompatible, biodegradable, and effective in tendon healing and regeneration. This

  13. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B.; Stanton, Tasha R.; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one’s own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both ‘upward-downward’ and ‘towards-away from the elbow’ planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a ‘telescoping’ effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  14. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B; Stanton, Tasha R; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one's own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both 'upward-downward' and 'towards-away from the elbow' planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a 'telescoping' effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Currently Fails to Fully Evaluate the Biceps-Labrum Complex and Bicipital Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel A; Newman, Ashley M; Nguyen, Joseph; Fabricant, Peter D; Baret, Nikolas J; Shorey, Mary; Ramkumar, Prem; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for biceps-labrum complex (BLC) lesions, including the extra-articular bicipital tunnel. A retrospective review of 277 shoulders with chronic refractory BLC symptoms that underwent arthroscopic subdeltoid transfer of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) to the conjoint tendon was conducted. Intraoperative lesions were categorized as "inside" (labral tears and dynamic LHBT incarceration), "junctional" (LHBT partial tears, LHBT subluxation, and biceps chondromalacia), or "bicipital tunnel" (extra-articular bicipital tunnel scar/stenosis, loose bodies, LHBT instability, and LHBT partial tears) based on anatomic location. Attending radiologist-generated MRI reports were graded dichotomously as positive or negative for biceps and labral damage and then compared with intraoperative findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for MRI with respect to intraoperative findings. With regard to inside lesions, MRI had an overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for labrum lesions of 77.3%, 68.2%, 57.3%, and 84.5% respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI for junctional lesions were 43.3%, 55.6%, 73.1%, and 26.0%, respectively. For the bicipital tunnel, MRI had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 50.4%, 61.4%, 48.7%, and 63.0%, respectively. MRI was unreliable for ruling out BLC lesions among chronically symptomatic patients, including when the bicipital tunnel was affected. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  17. Plasma-Sheath Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Karl-Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In typical gas discharges a quasineutral plasma is shielded from a negativ absorbing wall by a thin positive sheath that is nearly planar and collision-free. The subdivision of ``plasma'' and ``sheath'' was introduced by Langmuir and is based on a small ratio of the electron Debye lenghth λD to the dominant competing characteristic plasma length l. Depending on the special conditions, l may represent, e.g., the plasma extension, the ionization length, the ion mean free path, the ion gyro radius, or a geometric length. Strictly speaking, this subdivion is possible only in the asymptotic limit λD/l->0. The asymptotic analysis results in singularities at the ``sheath edge'' closely related to the ``Bohm criterion.'' Due to these singularities a direct smooth matching of the separate plasma and sheath soltions is not possible. To obtain a consistent smooth transition, the singular sheath edge must be bridged by an additinal narrow ``intermediate'' model zone accounting both for plasma processes (e.g., collisions) and for the first build up of space charge. Due to this complexity and to different interpretations of the ``classical'' papers by Langmuir and Bohm, the asymptotic plasma-sheath concept and the definition of the sheath edge were questioned and resulted in controversies during the last two decades. We discuss attempts to re-define the sheath edge, to account for finite values of λD/l in the Bohm criterion, and demonstrate the consistent matching of plasma and sheath. The investigations of the plasma-sheath transition discussed so far are based on a simplified fluid analysis that cannot account for the essential inhomogeneity of the boundary layer and for the dominant role of slow ions in space charge formation. Therefore we give special emphasis to the kinetic theory of the plasma-sheath transition. Unfortunately this approach results in an additional mathematical difficulty caused by ions with zero velocity. We discuss attempts to avoid this singularity by

  18. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-11-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P < .001) and from 53.0 ± 11.8 and 44.3 ± 11.3 preoperatively to 87.4 ± 7.2 and 87.9 ± 7.3 at final follow-up in group B ( P < .001). Overall muscle strength (given as % of the other side's strength) significantly increased from preoperatively to final follow-up in group A (forward flexion [FF]: 62.0 ± 8

  19. Persistence of deep-tendon reflexes during partial cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Barateau, Lucie; Pizza, Fabio; Lopez, Régis; Antelmi, Elena; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2018-05-01

    Deep-tendon reflexes are abolished during generalized cataplexy, but whether this is the case in partial cataplexy currently remains unknown. Partial cataplexy may mimic other neurologic/psychiatric phenomena, and knowledge of the reflexes status may provide information for differential diagnosis. We assessed whether deep-tendon reflexes are persistent during partial cataplexy. Five drug-free patients with typical diagnoses of narcolepsy and clear-cut partial cataplexy were diagnosed in Reference Narcolepsy Centers in France and Italy. Biceps and patellar reflexes were elicited by physicians in charge and video-documented during cataplexy. Reflexes were assessed several times for each patient in different conditions and for various localizations of cataplexy. The absence of tendon reflexes and complete loss of muscle tone during generalized cataplexy was confirmed, but the persistence of those reflexes during several partial cataplectic attacks at different ages, gender, localization of cataplexy (upper limbs, face) and reflexes (biceps, patellar) in drug-naive or withdrawal conditions was documented. The persistence of tendon reflexes during several partial cataplexy episodes contrasts with their absence during generalized cataplexy. This discovery has clinical implications: the persistence of tendon reflexes does not rule out cataplexy diagnosis for partial attacks, whereas their transient abolishment or persistence during generalized attacks indicates cataplexy or pseudocataplexy, respectively. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. New Developments Are Improving Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2018-06-01

    New developments in primary tendon repair in recent decades include stronger core tendon repair techniques, judicious and adequate venting of critical pulleys, followed by a combination of passive and active digital flexion and extension. During repair, core sutures over the tendon should have sufficient suture purchase (no shorter than 0.7 to 1 cm) in each tendon end and must be sufficiently tensioned to resist loosening and gap formation between tendon ends. Slight or even modest bulkiness in the tendon substance at the repair site is not harmful, although marked bulkiness should always be avoided. To expose the tendon ends and reduce restriction to tendon gliding, the longest annular pulley in the fingers (i.e., the A2 pulley) can be vented partially with an incision over its distal or proximal sheath no longer than 1.5 to 2 cm; the annular pulley over the middle phalanx (i.e., the A4 pulley) can be vented entirely. Surgeons have not observed adverse effects on hand function after judicious and limited venting. The digital extension-flexion test to check the quality of the repair during surgery has become increasingly routine. A wide-awake surgical setting allows patient to actively move the digits. After surgery, surgeons and therapists protect patients with a short splint and flexible wrist positioning, and are now moving toward out-of-splint freer early active motion. Improved outcomes have been reported over the past decade with minimal or no rupture during postoperative active motion, along with lower rates of tenolysis.

  1. Biomechanics of the Proximal Radius Following Drilling of the Bicipital Tuberosity to Mimic Cortical Button Distal Biceps Repair Technique.

    PubMed

    Oak, Nikhil R; Lien, John R; Brunfeldt, Alexander; Lawton, Jeffrey N

    2018-05-01

    A fracture through the proximal radius is a theoretical concern after cortical button distal biceps fixation in an active patient. The permanent, nonossified cortical defect and medullary tunnel is at risk during a fall eliciting rotational and compressive forces. We hypothesized that during simulated torsion and compression, in comparison with unaltered specimens, the cortical button distal biceps repair model would have decreased torsional and compressive strength and would fracture in the vicinity of the bicipital tuberosity bone tunnel. Sixteen fourth-generation composite radius Sawbones models were used in this controlled laboratory study. A bone tunnel was created through the bicipital tuberosity to mimic the exact bone tunnel, 8 mm near cortex and 3.2 mm far cortex, made for the BicepsButton distal biceps tendon repair. The radius was then prepared and mounted on either a torsional or compression testing device and compared with undrilled control specimens. Compression tests resulted in average failure loads of 9015.2 N in controls versus 8253.25 N in drilled specimens ( P = .074). Torsional testing resulted in an average failure torque of 27.3 Nm in controls and 19.3 Nm in drilled specimens ( P = .024). Average fracture angle was 35.1° in controls versus 21.1° in drilled. Gross fracture patterns were similar in compression testing; however, in torsional testing all fractures occurred through the bone tunnel in the drilled group. There are weaknesses in the vicinity of the bone tunnel in the proximal radius during biomechanical stress testing which may not be clinically relevant in nature. In cortical button fixation, distal biceps repairs creates a permanent, nonossified cortical defect with tendon interposed in the bone tunnel, which can alter the biomechanical properties of the proximal radius during compressive and torsional loading.

  2. Distal Insertions of the Biceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Eric A.; Anz, Adam W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of the biceps femoris from the fibula and proximal tibia is encountered in clinical practice. While the anatomy of the primary posterolateral corner structures has been qualitatively and quantitatively described, a quantitative analysis regarding the insertions of the biceps femoris on the fibula and proximal tibia is lacking. Purpose: To quantitatively assess the insertions of the biceps femoris, fibular collateral ligament (FCL), and anterolateral ligament (ALL) on the fibula and proximal tibia as well as establish relationships among these structures and to pertinent surgical anatomy. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissections were performed on 12 nonpaired, fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens identifying the biceps femoris, FCL, and ALL, and their insertions on the proximal tibia and fibula. The footprint areas, orientations, and distances from relevant osseous landmarks were measured using a 3-dimensional coordinate measurement device. Results: Dissection produced 6 easily identifiable and reproducible anatomic footprints. Tibial footprints included the insertion of the ALL and an insertion of the biceps femoris (TBF). Fibular footprints included the insertion of the FCL, a distal insertion of the biceps femoris (DBF), a medial footprint of the biceps femoris (MBF), and a proximal footprint of the biceps femoris (PBF). The mean area of these footprints (95% CI) was as follows: ALL, 53.0 mm2 (38.4-67.6); TBF, 93.9 mm2 (72.0-115.8); FCL, 86.8 mm2 (72.3-101.2); DBF, 119 mm2 (91.1-146.9); MBF, 46.8 mm2 (29.0-64.5); and PBF, 215 mm2 (192.4-237.5). The mean distance (95% CI) from the Gerdy tubercle to the center of the ALL footprint was 24.3 mm (21.6-27.0) and to the center of the TBF was 22.5 mm (21.0-24.0). The center of the DBF was 8.68 mm (7.0-10.3) from the anterior border of the fibula, the center of the FCL was 14.6 mm (12.5-16.7) from the anterior border of the fibula and 20.7 mm (19.0-22.4) from the tip of the fibular

  3. Elastic fibres are broadly distributed in tendon and highly localized around tenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Tyler M; Thompson, Mark S; Urban, Jill; Yu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Elastic fibres have the unique ability to withstand large deformations and are found in numerous tissues, but their organization and structure have not been well defined in tendon. The objective of this study was to characterize the organization of elastic fibres in tendon to understand their function. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize elastic fibres in bovine flexor tendon with fibrillin-1, fibrillin-2 and elastin antibodies. Elastic fibres were broadly distributed throughout tendon, and highly localized longitudinally around groups of cells and transversely between collagen fascicles. The close interaction of elastic fibres and cells suggests that elastic fibres are part of the pericellular matrix and therefore affect the mechanical environment of tenocytes. Fibres present between fascicles are likely part of the endotenon sheath, which enhances sliding between adjacent collagen bundles. These results demonstrate that elastic fibres are highly localized in tendon and may play an important role in cellular function and contribute to the tissue mechanics of the endotenon sheath. PMID:23587025

  4. National Rugby League athletes and tendon tap reflex assessment: a matched cohort clinical study.

    PubMed

    Maurini, James; Ohmsen, Paul; Condon, Greg; Pope, Rodney; Hing, Wayne

    2016-11-04

    Limited research suggests elite athletes may differ from non-athletes in clinical tendon tap reflex responses. In this matched cohort study, 25 elite rugby league athletes were compared with 29 non-athletes to examine differences in tendon reflex responses. Relationships between reflex responses and lengths of players' careers were also examined. Biceps, triceps, patellar and Achilles tendon reflexes were clinically assessed. Right and left reflexes were well correlated for each tendon (r S  = 0.7-0.9). The elite rugby league athletes exhibited significantly weaker reflex responses than non-athletes in all four tendons (p < 0.005). Biceps reflexes demonstrated the largest difference and Achilles reflexes the smallest difference. Moderate negative correlations (r S  = -0.3-0.6) were observed between reflex responses and lengths of players' careers. Future research is required to further elucidate mechanisms resulting in the observed differences in tendon reflexes and to ensure clinical tendon tap examinations and findings can be interpreted appropriately in this athletic population.

  5. Effects of sodium hyaluronate on tendon healing and adhesion formation in horses.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, E M; Nixon, A J; Krook, L P; Yeager, A E; Mann, K A; Mohammed, H; Bartel, D L

    1991-05-01

    Sodium hyaluronate reduces adhesions after tendon repair in rodents and dogs, and has been used in limited clinical trials in people. To evaluate its effect on tendon healing and adhesion formation in horses and to compare these effects with those of a compound of similar visco-elastic properties, a study was performed in horses, using a model of collagenase injection in the flexor tendons within the digital sheath. Eight clinically normal horses were randomly allotted to 2 groups. Adhesion formation between the deep digital flexor tendon and the tendon sheath at the pastern region was induced in the forelimbs of all horses. Using tenoscopic control, a 20-gauge needle was inserted into the deep digital flexor tendon of horses under general anesthesia and 0.2 ml of collagenase (2.5 mg/ml) was injected. The procedure was repeated proximally at 2 other sites, spaced 1.5 cm apart. A biopsy forceps was introduced, and a 5-mm tendon defect was created at each injection site. Group-A horses had 120 mg of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) gel injected into the tendon sheath of one limb. Group-B horses had methylcellulose gel injected at the same sites. The contralateral limbs of horses in both groups served as surgical, but noninjected, controls. Horses were euthanatized after 8 weeks of stall rest. Ultrasonographic evaluation revealed improved tendon healing after NaHa injection, but no difference in peritendinous adhesion formation. Tendon sheath fluid volume and hyaluronic acid (HA) content were greater in NaHA-treated limbs. Gross pathologic examination revealed considerably fewer and smaller adhesions when limbs were treated with NaHA. However, significant difference in pull-out strengths was not evident between NaHA-treated and control limbs. Histologically, the deep digital flexor tendon from the NaHA-treated limbs had reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, improved tendon structure, and less intratendinous hemorrhage. Treatment with methylcullulose had no significant

  6. SATELLITE PLASMA SHEATH ANOMALIES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Experimental Studies of the Kraus Effect Plasma Sheath and Screening around a Rapidly Moving Body Plasma Compression EEffects Produced...Kraus Effect Interaction of West Ford Needles with Earth’s Magnetosphere The Generation of Electromagnetic Waves in the Wake of a Satellite

  7. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-16

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations also reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  8. A functional-anatomical approach to the spine-pelvis mechanism: interaction between the biceps femoris muscle and the sacrotuberous ligament.

    PubMed

    van Wingerden, J P; Vleeming, A; Snijders, C J; Stoeckart, R

    1993-10-01

    Summary. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is often overlooked as a possible cause of low back pain. This is due to the use of reductionistic anatomical models. From a kinematic point of view, topographic anatomical models are generally inadequate since they categorize pelvis, lower vertebral column and legs as distinct entities. This functional-anatomical study focuses on the question whether anatomical connections between the biceps femoris muscle and the sacrotuberous ligament are kinematically useful. Forces applied to the tendon of the biceps femoris muscle, simulating biceps femoris muscle force, were shown to influence sacrotuberous ligament tension. Since sacrotuberous ligament tension influences sacroiliac joint kinematics, hamstring training could influence the sacroiliac joint and thus low back kinematics. The clinical implications with respect to 'short' hamstrings, pelvic instability and walking are discussed.

  9. A practical, evidence-based, comprehensive (PEC) physical examination for diagnosing pathology of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Samuel; Krill, Michael K; Amoo-Achampong, Kelms; Kwon, KiHyun; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Clinical examination of the shoulder joint has gained attention as clinicians aim to use an evidence-based examination of the biceps tendon, with the desire for a proper diagnosis while minimizing costly imaging procedures. The purpose of this study is to create a decision tree analysis that enables the development of a clinical algorithm for diagnosing long head of biceps (LHB) pathology. A literature review of Level I and II diagnostic studies was conducted to extract characteristics of clinical tests for LHB pathology through a systematic review of PubMed, Medline, Ovid, and Cochrane Review databases. Tests were combined in series and parallel to determine sensitivities and specificities, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined for each combination using a subjective pretest probability. The "gold standard" for diagnosis in all included studies was arthroscopy or arthrotomy. The optimal testing modality was use of the uppercut test combined with the tenderness to palpation of the biceps tendon test. This combination achieved a sensitivity of 88.4% when performed in parallel and a specificity of 93.8% when performed in series. These tests used in combination optimize post-test probability accuracy greater than any single individual test. Performing the uppercut test and biceps groove tenderness to palpation test together has the highest sensitivity and specificity of known physical examinations maneuvers to aid in the diagnosis of LHB pathology compared with diagnostic arthroscopy (practical, evidence-based, comprehensive examination). A decision tree analysis aides in the practical, evidence-based, comprehensive examination diagnostic accuracy post-testing based on the ordinal scale pretest probability. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon.more » The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.« less

  11. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A; White, Valerie A; Mackenzie, Ian R; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-10-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the University of Amsterdam. Clinical reports, imaging studies, and histopathologic findings were reviewed. The mean age at onset of symptoms was 40.3 years, and most were seen in middle-aged females. Patients typically presented with visual loss, frequently associated with optic atrophy or papilledema and occasionally optociliary shunt vessels. On imaging, the optic nerve demonstrated segmental or diffuse thickening of the sheath or globular growth. Calcification was seen in 31% of cases and was associated with slower tumor growth. Tumors with posterior components in the orbit had more frequent intracranial involvement. Intracranial extension was more frequent and had a greater growth rate in younger patients. Irregular margins in the orbit implied local invasion. A presenting visual acuity better than 20/50 correlated with longer preservation of vision. Patients who underwent radiotherapy showed improvement in their visual acuity, and tumor growth was halted. Optic sheath decompression did not preserve vision. En bloc tumor excision was associated with no detectable recurrence in contrast to debulked tumors that recurred. Meningiomas show characteristic indolent growth. Management therefore should be conservative in most cases. Radiotherapy is indicated in patients with progressive visual deterioration. Surgery, when indicated, should be an en bloc excision.

  12. Central Tendon Injuries of Hamstring Muscles: Case Series of Operative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lempainen, Lasse; Kosola, Jussi; Pruna, Ricard; Puigdellivol, Jordi; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2018-02-01

    As compared with injuries involving muscle only, those involving the central hamstring tendon have a worse prognosis. Limited information is available regarding the surgical treatment of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings. To describe the operative treatment and outcomes of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings among athletes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eight athletes (6 top level, 2 recreational) with central hamstring tendon injuries underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. The indication for surgery was recurrent (n = 6) or acute (n = 2) central hamstring tendon injury. All patients followed the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and return to play was monitored. Magnetic resonance imaging found a central tendon injury in all 3 hamstring muscles (long head of the biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus) with disrupted tendon ends. In acute and recurrent central tendon injuries, full return to play was achieved at 2.5 to 4 months. There were no adverse events during follow-up. Central tendon injuries of the hamstrings can be successfully repaired surgically after acute and recurrent ruptures.

  13. Central Tendon Injuries of Hamstring Muscles: Case Series of Operative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lempainen, Lasse; Kosola, Jussi; Pruna, Ricard; Puigdellivol, Jordi; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2018-01-01

    Background: As compared with injuries involving muscle only, those involving the central hamstring tendon have a worse prognosis. Limited information is available regarding the surgical treatment of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings. Purpose: To describe the operative treatment and outcomes of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings among athletes. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Eight athletes (6 top level, 2 recreational) with central hamstring tendon injuries underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. The indication for surgery was recurrent (n = 6) or acute (n = 2) central hamstring tendon injury. All patients followed the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and return to play was monitored. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging found a central tendon injury in all 3 hamstring muscles (long head of the biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus) with disrupted tendon ends. In acute and recurrent central tendon injuries, full return to play was achieved at 2.5 to 4 months. There were no adverse events during follow-up. Conclusion: Central tendon injuries of the hamstrings can be successfully repaired surgically after acute and recurrent ruptures. PMID:29479545

  14. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  15. Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Alla, Venkata M; Karnam, Showri M.; Kaushik, Manu; Porter, Joann

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal wall pathology is a frequently overlooked cause of acute abdomen. Increasing use of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies has led to an increase in the incidence of spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma (RSH). A high index of suspicion is needed for diagnosis as it can closely mimic other causes of acute abdomen. Herein, we report a case of RSH presenting with abdominal pain in which there was a significant delay in diagnosis. We wish to highlight the need to increase awareness among primary and emergency physicians about considering RSH in the initial differential diagnoses of abdominal pain. PMID:20411082

  16. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Chrysanthou, Chrysanthos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year) after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length) and 67.9% (width) after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention. Key pointsChanges in fascicle orientation after biceps femoris mild tear were reduced after a 28 day intervention and remained similar one year after injury.Tendon/aponeurosis strain per unit of moment of force decreased during the course of the therapeutic intervention.Future studies could utilize ultrasonography to monitor mechanical responses after various types of hamstring injury and interventions in order to improve criteria for a safe return to sport.

  17. Prolonged passive static stretching-induced innervation zone shift in biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W; Wages, Nathan P

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a bout of repeated and prolonged passive static stretching on the innervation zone (IZ) location of the human biceps brachii muscle. Eleven men performed 12 sets of 100-s passive stretches on their biceps brachii. Before (Pre) and immediately after (Post) the stretching intervention, isometric strength was tested during the maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the forearm flexors. The subjects also performed several separate isometric forearm flexion muscle actions at 30%, 50%, and 70% of their predetermined MVCs for examining the locations of the IZ at different contraction intensities. The IZ was identified through multi-channel surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings from a linear electrode array. The stretching intervention induced an average of 10% isometric strength loss for the forearm flexors (mean±SD: Pre-MVC vs. Post-MVC=332.12±59.40 N vs. 299.53±70.51 N; p<0.001). In addition, the average IZ shift was nearly 4.5 mm in average in the proximal direction. However, this shift was not specific to the contraction intensity. We believe that the IZ shift was caused by the elongation of the entire muscle-tendon unit in the proximal direction. Therefore, caution should be taken when using surface EMG technique to examine possible changes in the EMG variables after a stretching protocol, as these variables can be contaminated by the shift of the IZ.

  18. [Rheumatic tendon pathologies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M

    2014-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is found in approximately 2 % of the total population in Europe and the peak incidence of the disease is during the fourth and fifth decades of life. In approximately 15 % the first symptoms of the disease occur at the level of the foot and ankle. If the early stage-dependent therapy with pharmaceuticals fails isolated surgery of the tendons (e.g. tenosynovectomy) and reconstructive surgery including the tendons (e.g. tendon transfer and tendon readaptation) are performed to keep the patient mobile. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the most commonly used interventions in the reconstruction of tendons in rheumatism patients and the corresponding indications. The conservative therapy options for rheumatic foot and ankle alterations with a special emphasis on tendon pathologies have a well-established importance and are also presented. A selective literature search was carried out for therapeutic options of rheumatic tendon pathologies. If possible attempts should be made to preserve functional qualities using tenosynovectomy, tendon sutures or tendon transfer operations. If joints are already destroyed or dislocated, tendon operations should be carried out only as combined interventions with arthrodesis, endoprostheses or resection arthroplasty. The time window in which these interventions are possible should not be missed. Orthotic devices, bandages or even orthopedic shoes provide external support and splinting but do not represent a causal therapy.

  19. Plasma-Sheath-Surface Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Particle Simulations of Cross-Field Plasma Sheaths," Phys. Fluids B, pp 1069- 1082 , May 1990. IJ. Morey and C.K. Birdsall, "Traveling Wave-Tube Simulation...Theilhaber, "Analytic Solutions and Particle Simulations of Cross-Field Plasma Sheaths," Phys. Fluids B, pp 1069- 1082 , May 1990. S.E. Parker, and C.K

  20. Diagnosis of long head of biceps tendinopathy in rotator cuff tear patients: correlation of imaging and arthroscopy data.

    PubMed

    Rol, Morgane; Favard, Luc; Berhouet, Julien

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this prospective study was to assess the reliability of pre-operative cross-sectional imaging for the diagnosis of long head of biceps (LHB) tendinopathy in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Cross-sectional imaging with MRI or CT arthrography data from 25 patients operated upon because of a rotator cuff tear between 1 October 2015 and 1 April 2016 was analysed by one experienced orthopaedic surgeon, one experienced radiologist and one orthopaedic resident. The analysis consisted of determining whether the LHB was present, the extrinsic tendon abnormalities (dislocation, tendon coverage) and intrinsic abnormalities (fraying, inflammation, degeneration). These findings were then compared to intra-operative arthroscopy findings, which were used as the benchmark. The interobserver correlation between the three different examiners for the cross-sectional imaging analysis as well as the correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data were determined. The correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data was the highest (80%) for the determination of LHB dislocation from the bicipital groove. The other diagnostic elements (subluxation, coverage and tendon degeneration) were difficult to discern with preoperative imaging, and correlated poorly with the arthroscopy findings (45% to 65%). The interobserver correlation was moderate to strong for the diagnosis of extrinsic tendon abnormalities. It was low to moderate for intrinsic abnormalities. Except for LHB dislocation, pre-operative imaging is not sufficient to make a reliable diagnosis of LHB tendinopathy. Arthroscopy remains the gold standard for the management of LHB tendinopathy, as diagnosed intra-operatively.

  1. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  2. The biophysical characteristics of human composite flexor tendon allograft for upper extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    DeGeorge, Brent R; Rodeheaver, George T; Drake, David B

    2014-01-01

    Devastating volar hand injuries with significant damage to the skin and soft tissues, pulley structures and fibro-osseous sheath, flexor tendons, and volar plates pose a major problem to the reconstructive hand surgeon. Despite advances in tendon handling, operative technique, and postoperative hand rehabilitation, patients who have undergone flexor tendon reconstruction are often plagued by chronic pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion with resultant decreased ability to work and poor quality of life. In this article, we expand the technique of human composite flexor tendon allografts (CFTAs), pioneered by Dr E.E. Peacock, Jr, which consist of both the intrasynovial and extrasynovial flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus tendons and their respective fibro-osseous sheath consisting of the digital pulley structures, periosteum, and volar plates procured from cadaveric donors with the use of modern tissue processing techniques. Human cadaveric CFTAs were procured and divided into 2 groups-unprocessed CFTAs and processed CFTAs, which are cleansed and sterilized to a sterility assurance level of 10(-6). Physical length and width relationships as well as tensile strength and gliding resistance assessments were recorded pre-tissue and post-tissue processing. The histologic properties of the composite allografts were assessed before and after tissue processing. There was no significant difference with respect to physical properties of the composite allografts before or after tissue processing. The processed composite allografts demonstrated equivalent maximum load to failure and elastic modulus compared to unprocessed tendons. The gliding resistance of the composite tendon allografts was not significantly different between the 2 groups. The use of CFTAs addresses the issues of adhesion formation and lack of suitable donor material by providing a source of intrasynovial tendon in its unaltered fibro-osseous sheath without donor morbidity

  3. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture Military Medicine Radiology Corner, Volume 173, July, 2009...Radiology Corner Bilateral patellar tendon rupture (#37) Guarantor: 2dLt Ramon A. Riojas, USAF, MSC1 Contributors: 2dLt Ramon A. Riojas...with the abbreviated answer in the July 2009 issue. 1 The authors present a case of bilateral patellar tendon rupture in an active duty male exiting

  4. Sheaths: A Comparison of Magnetospheric, ICME, and Heliospheric Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Richardson, J. D.; Liu, W.

    2007-01-01

    When a supersonic flow encounters an obstacles, shocks form to divert the flow around the obstacle. The region between the shock and the obstacle is the sheath, where the supersonic flow is compressed, heated, decelerated, and deflected. Supersonic flows, obstacles, and thus sheaths are observed on many scales throughout the Universe. We compare three examples seen in the heliosphere, illustrating the interaction of the solar wind with obstacles of three very different scales lengths. Magnetosheaths form behind planetary bow shocks on scales ranging from tens to 100 planetary radii. ICME sheath form behind shocks driven by solar disturbances on scale lengths of a few to tens of AU. The heliosheath forms behind the termination shock due to the obstacle presented by the interstellar medium on scale lengths of tens to a hundred AU. Despite this range in scales some common features have been observed. Magnetic holes, possibly due to mirror mode waves, have been observed in all three of these sheaths. Plasma depletion layers are observed in planetary and ICME sheaths. Other features observed in some sheaths are wave activity (ion cyclotron, plasma), energetic particles, transmission of Alfven waves/shocks, tangential discontinuities turbulence behind quasi-parallel shocks, standing slow mode waves, and reconnection on the obstacle boundary. We compare these sheath regions, discussing similarities and differences and how these may relate to the scale lengths of these regions.

  5. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  6. Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Natri, A

    1997-04-01

    Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were

  7. Inflationary tensor perturbations after BICEP2.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Jerod; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2014-05-16

    The measurement of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at large angular scales by the BICEP experiment suggests a stochastic gravitational wave background from early-Universe inflation with a surprisingly large amplitude. The power spectrum of these tensor perturbations can be probed both with further measurements of the microwave background polarization at smaller scales and also directly via interferometry in space. We show that sufficiently sensitive high-resolution B-mode measurements will ultimately have the ability to test the inflationary consistency relation between the amplitude and spectrum of the tensor perturbations, confirming their inflationary origin. Additionally, a precise B-mode measurement of the tensor spectrum will predict the tensor amplitude on solar system scales to 20% accuracy for an exact power-law tensor spectrum, so a direct detection will then measure the running of the tensor spectral index to high precision.

  8. [Bursitis with severe tendon and muscle necrosis on the lateral stifle area in cattle].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Räber, M; Sydler, T; Muggli, E; Hässig, M; Guscetti, F

    2011-11-01

    In 21 animals, chronic swelling on the lateral aspect of the stifle also known as «perigonitis», «stable-syndrome» or «bursitis bicipitalis femoris» were evaluated. Ultrasonography showed increased fluid in the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle and structural changes in the tendons, muscles, subcutis and fasciae. Soft tissue swelling and an irregular contour of the lateral tibial condyle were typical signs on radiographs. Macroscopic changes were found at the insertion of the biceps femoris muscle, the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle, the lateral collateral ligament of the stifle, the origin of muscles on the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle. They mainly consisted of tendon and muscle tissue necrosis with granulation tissue. Histology revealed areas of coagulation necrosis in tendons and ligaments, in which occasionally Onchocerca spp. were seen. The severity of lesions correlated well with the clinical signs, which were associated with a poor prognosis in advanced cases.

  9. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  10. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  11. The study of optical properties and proteoglycan content of tendons by PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Rupani, Asha; Weightman, Alan; Wimpenny, Ian; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Ahearne, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Tendons are load-bearing collagenous tissues consisting mainly of type I collagen and various proteoglycans (PGs) including decorin and versican. It is widely accepted that highly orientated collagen fibers in tendons a play critical role for transferring tensile stress and demonstrate birefringent optical properties. However, the influence that proteoglycans have on the optical properties of tendons is yet to be fully elucidated. Tendinopathy (defined as a syndrome of tendon pain, tenderness and swelling that affects the normal function of the tissue) is a common disease associated with sporting injuries or degeneration. PG's are the essential components of the tendon extracellular matrix; changes in their quantities and compositions have been associated with tendinopathy. In this study, polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been used to reveal the relationship between proteoglycan content/location and birefringent properties of tendons. Tendons dissected from freshly slaughtered chickens were imaged at regular intervals by PS-OCT and polarizing light microscope during the extraction of PGs or glycosaminoglycans using established protocols (guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) or proteinase K solution). The macroscopic and microscopic time lapsed images are complimentary; mutually demonstrating that there was a higher concentration of PG's in the outer sheath region than in the fascicles; and the integrity of the sheath affected extraction process and the OCT birefringence bands. Extraction of PGs using GuHCl disturbed the organization of local collagen bundles, which corresponded to a reduction in the frequency of birefringence bands and the band width by PS-OCT. The feature of OCT penetration depth helped us to define the heterogeneous distribution of PG's in tendon, which was complimented by polarizing light microscopy. The results provide new insight of tendon structure and also demonstrate a great potential for using PS-OCT as a

  12. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  13. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    MedlinePlus

    ... also help the muscle and tendon absorb more force and prevent injury. Vary your exercises. Alternate high-impact sports, such as running, with low-impact sports, such as walking, biking or swimming. Avoid activities that place excessive stress on your Achilles tendons, such as hill ...

  14. Tendon 'turnover lengthening' technique.

    PubMed

    Cerovac, S; Miranda, B H

    2013-11-01

    Tendon defect reconstruction is amongst the most technically challenging areas in hand surgery. Tendon substance deficiency reconstruction techniques include lengthening, grafting, two-stage reconstruction and tendon transfers, however each is associated with unique challenges over and above direct repair. We describe a novel 'turnover lengthening' technique for hand tendons that has successfully been applied to the repair of several cases, including a case of attritional flexor and traumatic extensor tendon rupture in two presented patients where primary tenorrhaphy was not possible. In both cases a good post-operative outcome was achieved, as the patients were happy having returned back to normal activities of daily living such that they were discharged 12 weeks post-operatively. Our technique avoids the additional morbidity and complications associated with grafting, transfers and two stage reconstructions. It is quick, simple and reproducible for defects not exceeding 3-4 cm, provides a means of immediate one stage reconstruction, no secondary donor site morbidity and does not compromise salvage by tendon transfer and/or two-stage reconstruction in cases of failure. To our knowledge no such technique has been previously been described to reconstruct such hand tendon defects. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  16. Peroneal tendon disorders

    PubMed Central

    Davda, Kinner; Malhotra, Karan; O’Donnell, Paul; Singh, Dishan; Cullen, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Pathological abnormality of the peroneal tendons is an under-appreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction that can be difficult to distinguish from lateral ankle ligament injuries. Enclosed within the lateral compartment of the leg, the peroneal tendons are the primary evertors of the foot and function as lateral ankle stabilisers. Pathology of the tendons falls into three broad categories: tendinitis and tenosynovitis, tendon subluxation and dislocation, and tendon splits and tears. These can be associated with ankle instability, hindfoot deformity and anomalous anatomy such as a low lying peroneus brevis or peroneus quartus. A thorough clinical examination should include an assessment of foot type (cavus or planovalgus), palpation of the peronei in the retromalleolar groove on resisted ankle dorsiflexion and eversion as well as testing of lateral ankle ligaments. Imaging including radiographs, ultrasound and MRI will help determine the diagnosis. Treatment recommendations for these disorders are primarily based on case series and expert opinion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current understanding of the anatomy and diagnostic evaluation of the peroneal tendons, and to present both conservative and operative management options of peroneal tendon lesions. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:281-292. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160047 PMID:28736620

  17. Peroneal tendon disorders.

    PubMed

    Davda, Kinner; Malhotra, Karan; O'Donnell, Paul; Singh, Dishan; Cullen, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Pathological abnormality of the peroneal tendons is an under-appreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction that can be difficult to distinguish from lateral ankle ligament injuries.Enclosed within the lateral compartment of the leg, the peroneal tendons are the primary evertors of the foot and function as lateral ankle stabilisers.Pathology of the tendons falls into three broad categories: tendinitis and tenosynovitis, tendon subluxation and dislocation, and tendon splits and tears. These can be associated with ankle instability, hindfoot deformity and anomalous anatomy such as a low lying peroneus brevis or peroneus quartus.A thorough clinical examination should include an assessment of foot type (cavus or planovalgus), palpation of the peronei in the retromalleolar groove on resisted ankle dorsiflexion and eversion as well as testing of lateral ankle ligaments.Imaging including radiographs, ultrasound and MRI will help determine the diagnosis. Treatment recommendations for these disorders are primarily based on case series and expert opinion.The aim of this review is to summarise the current understanding of the anatomy and diagnostic evaluation of the peroneal tendons, and to present both conservative and operative management options of peroneal tendon lesions. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:281-292. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160047.

  18. Mineralization can be an incidental ultrasonographic finding in equine tendons and ligaments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Etienne J O; Smith, Roger K W

    2018-05-18

    Tendon/ligament mineralization is recognized in horses but information regarding its clinical significance is limited. The aims of this observational study were to report the structures most commonly affected by ultrasonographically detectable mineralization and, for these, determine frequency of diagnosis and key clinical features. Cases presented at our hospital in April 1999-April 2013 and September 2014-November 2015 were included: a total of 27 horses (22 retrospective, five prospective). Mineralizations were most common in deep digital flexor tendons (10) and suspensory ligament branches (eight), representing 10% and 7% (estimated), respectively, of horses diagnosed with injuries to these structures during the study. Two deep digital flexor tendon and three suspensory ligament branch cases showed bilateral mineralization. Deep digital flexor tendon mineralization was restricted to the digital flexor tendon sheath, most commonly in the proximal sheath (±sesamoidean canal), and seven of 10 cases involved hindlimbs. Suspensory ligament branch mineralization was visible in the same ultrasound window as the proximal sesamoid bones in 10/11 limbs and six of eight cases involved forelimbs. Previous corticosteroid medication was a feature of one deep digital flexor tendon and one suspensory ligament branch case. Mineralization was associated with lameness in some but not all limbs. Mineralized foci within the deep digital flexor tendon preceded hypoechoic lesion formation in two limbs. Of the cases with deep digital flexor tendon or suspensory ligament branch injury only, one of three and two of three cases, respectively, became sound. Findings indicated that tendon/ligament mineralization can be associated with lameness in some horses, but can also be an incidental finding. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Extensor Tendon Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Hand. Find a hand surgeon near you. Videos Figures Figure 1 - Extensor tendons, located on the ... or "in." Also, avoid using media types like "video," "article," and "picture." Tip 4: Your results can ...

  20. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transfer Surgery Find a hand surgeon near you. Videos Figures Figure 2: Example of Tendon Transfer surgery ... or "in." Also, avoid using media types like "video," "article," and "picture." Tip 4: Your results can ...

  1. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the ... pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  2. Flexor Tendon Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Hand. Find a hand surgeon near you. Videos Figures Figure 1 -The tendons of the hand ... or "in." Also, avoid using media types like "video," "article," and "picture." Tip 4: Your results can ...

  3. The Effects of Bio-Lubricating Molecules on Flexor Tendon Reconstruction in A Canine Allograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Wei, Zhuang; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Using allograft is an attractive alternative for flexor tendon reconstruction because of the lack of donor morbidity, and better matching to the intrasynovial environment. The purpose of this study was to use biolubricant molecules to modify the graft surface to decrease adhesions and improve digit function. Methods 28 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from the 2nd and 5th digits of 14 dogs were first lacerated and repaired to create a model with repair failure and scar digit for tendon reconstruction. Six weeks after the initial surgery, the tendons were reconstructed with FDP allograft tendons obtained from canine cadavers. One graft tendon in each dog was treated with saline as a control and the other was treated with gelatin, carbodiimide derivatized, hyaluronic acid and lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin). Six weeks postoperatively, digit function, graft mechanics, and biology were analyzed. Results Allograft tendons treated with cd-HA-Lubricin had decreased adhesions at the proximal tendon/graft repair and within flexor sheath, improved digit function, and increased graft gliding ability. The treatment also reduced the strength at the distal tendon to bone repair, but the distal attachment rupture rate was similar for both graft types. Histology showed that viable cells migrated to the allograft, but these were limited to the tendon surface. Conclusion cd-HA-Lubricin treatment of tendon allograft improves digit functional outcomes after flexor tendon reconstruction. However, delayed bone-tendon healing should be a caution. Furthermore, the cell infiltration into the allograft tendons substance should be a target for future studies, to shorten the allograft self-regeneration period. PMID:24445876

  4. Functional Consequence of Distal Brachioradialis Tendon Release: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tirrell, Timothy F.; Franko, Orrin I.; Bhola, Siddharth; Hentzen, Eric R.; Abrams, Reid A.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Open reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures often necessitates release of the brachioradialis from the radial styloid. However, this common procedure has the potential to decrease elbow flexion strength. To determine the potential morbidity associated with brachioradialis release, we measured the change in elbow torque as a function of incremental release of the brachioradialis insertion footprint. Methods In 5 upper extremity cadaveric specimens, the brachioradialis tendon was systematically released from the radius, and the resultant effect on brachioradialis elbow flexion torque was measured. Release distance was defined as the distance between the release point and the tip of the radial styloid. Results Brachioradialis elbow flexion torque dropped to 95%, 90% and 86% of its original value at release distances of 27mm, 46mm, and 52mm, respectively. Importantly, brachioradialis torque remained above 80% of its original value at release distances up to 7 centimeters. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that release of the brachioradialis tendon from its insertion has minor effects on its ability to transmit force to the distal radius. Clinical Relevance These data may imply that release of the distal brachioradialis tendon during distal radius open reduction internal fixation can be performed without meaningful functional consequences to elbow flexion torque. Even at large release distances, overall elbow flexion torque loss after brachioradialis release would be expected to be less than 5% due to the much larger contributions of the biceps and brachialis. Use of the brachioradialis as a tendon transfer donor should not be limited by concerns of elbow flexion loss, and the tendon could be considered as an autograft donor. PMID:23528425

  5. Tendon transfer fixation: comparing a tendon to tendon technique vs. bioabsorbable interference-fit screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Sabonghy, Eric Peter; Wood, Robert Michael; Ambrose, Catherine Glauber; McGarvey, William Christopher; Clanton, Thomas Oscar

    2003-03-01

    Tendon transfer techniques in the foot and ankle are used for tendon ruptures, deformities, and instabilities. This fresh cadaver study compares the tendon fixation strength in 10 paired specimens by performing a tendon to tendon fixation technique or using 7 x 20-25 mm bioabsorbable interference-fit screw tendon fixation technique. Load at failure of the tendon to tendon fixation method averaged 279N (Standard Deviation 81N) and the bioabsorbable screw 148N (Standard Deviation 72N) [p = 0.0008]. Bioabsorbable interference-fit screws in these specimens show decreased fixation strength relative to the traditional fixation technique. However, the mean bioabsorbable screw fixation strength of 148N provides physiologic strength at the tendon-bone interface.

  6. bicep2/ KECK ARRAY . IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Barkats, D.

    2015-06-18

    bicep2/KECK ARRAY. IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS P. A. R. Ade1, R. W. Aikin2, D. Barkats3, S. J. Benton4, C. A. Bischoff5, J. J. Bock2,6, K. J. Bradford5, J. A. Brevik2, I. Buder5, E. Bullock7Show full author list Published 2015 June 18 • © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 806, Number 2 Article PDF Figures Tables References Citations 273 Total downloads Cited by 6 articles Turn on MathJax Share this article Get permission to re-use this article Article information Abstract bicep2 and the Keck Array aremore » polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. bicep2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). bicep2 and the Keck Array share a common optical design and employ the field-proven bicep1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of bicep2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.« less

  7. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques.

  8. The quantitative role of flexor sheath incision in correcting Dupuytren proximal interphalangeal joint contractures.

    PubMed

    Blazar, P E; Floyd, E W; Earp, B E

    2016-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding intra-operative treatment of residual proximal interphalangeal joint contractures after Dupuytren's fasciectomy. We test the hypothesis that a simple release of the digital flexor sheath can correct residual fixed flexion contracture after subtotal fasciectomy. We prospectively enrolled 19 patients (22 digits) with Dupuytren's contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint. The average pre-operative extension deficit of the proximal interphalangeal joints was 58° (range 30-90). The flexion contracture of the joint was corrected to an average of 28° after fasciectomy. In most digits (20 of 21), subsequent incision of the flexor sheath further corrected the contracture by an average of 23°, resulting in correction to an average flexion contracture of 4.7° (range 0-40). Our results support that contracture of the tendon sheath is a contributor to Dupuytren's contracture of the joint and that sheath release is a simple, low morbidity addition to correct Dupuytren's contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Additional release of the proximal interphalangeal joint after fasciectomy, after release of the flexor sheath, is not necessary in many patients. IV (Case Series, Therapeutic). © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. bicep2/KECK ARRAY. IV. OPTICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE bicep2 AND KECK ARRAY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.

    2015-06-20

    bicep2 and the Keck Array are polarization-sensitive microwave telescopes that observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the South Pole at degree angular scales in search of a signature of inflation imprinted as B-mode polarization in the CMB. bicep2 was deployed in late 2009, observed for three years until the end of 2012 at 150 GHz with 512 antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers, and has reported a detection of B-mode polarization on degree angular scales. The Keck Array was first deployed in late 2010 and will observe through 2016 with five receivers at several frequencies (95, 150, and 220 GHz). bicep2 and the Keck Array sharemore » a common optical design and employ the field-proven bicep1 strategy of using small-aperture, cold, on-axis refractive optics, providing excellent control of systematics while maintaining a large field of view. This design allows for full characterization of far-field optical performance using microwave sources on the ground. Here we describe the optical design of both instruments and report a full characterization of the optical performance and beams of bicep2 and the Keck Array at 150 GHz.« less

  10. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); hide

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  11. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Kamienski, Mary

    The knee is the most complex and largest joint in the body. Injuries to any part of this joint affect the entire body. There are multiple injuries that can occur to the knee, with the most common being ligament and meniscus tears. A not-so-common injury to the knee is a patellar tendon rupture. A bilateral patellar tendon rupture is extremely rare. A case study of a 43-year-old man who sustained a bilateral patellar tendon rupture while playing softball is used to present this devastating injury. This discussion includes the incidence and diagnosis of the tear, surgical repair, as well as a description of the comprehensive rehabilitation process necessary to allow the patient to return to normal physical activity. Risks and complications of this surgery and the expected outcomes are also presented.

  12. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  13. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spontaneous tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with Jaccoud's arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Alves, E M; Macieira, J C; Borba, E; Chiuchetta, F A; Santiago, M B

    2010-03-01

    Tendon rupture has rarely been described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. From observation of three cases of Jaccoud's arthropathy with tendon rupture, and considering that this arthropathy is more related to an inflammatory process of the tendon sheath than to synovitis per se, the intention of this study was to review the cases of tendon rupture in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, in the hope of determining the frequency of Jaccoud's arthropathy associated with this complication. Systematic review using MEDLINE, Scielo and LILACS databases (1966 to 2009) and the following keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon rupture, Jaccoud's arthropathy. Secondary references were additionally obtained. Additionally, three Brazilian systemic lupus erythematosus patients who developed tendon rupture are described. Only 40 articles obtained fulfilled the previously established criteria. They were all case reports; the number of cases reported was 52 which, together with the three cases presented herein add up to 55 cases. Forty-six patients were women aged between 19 and 71 years, with a mean age of 40.1 +/- 12.4 years, and the average duration of the disease was 10 years. The most frequently observed rupture sites were the patellar and Achilles' tendons. While almost all patients described were on various doses of corticosteroids, 16 patients concomitantly had Jaccoud's arthropathy (29%). In conclusion, the association between Jaccoud's arthropathy and tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus has been underestimated. As almost one-third of the systemic lupus erythematosus patients with tendon rupture also have Jaccoud's arthropathy, this arthropathy may be recognized as risk marker for tendon rupture.

  15. Innervation zone shift at different levels of isometric contraction in the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Piitulainen, Harri; Rantalainen, Timo; Linnamo, Vesa; Komi, Paavo; Avela, Janne

    2009-08-01

    Experiments were carried out to examine whether innervation zone (IZ) location remains stable at different levels of isometric contraction in the biceps brachii muscle (BB), and to determine how the proximity of the IZ affects common surface electromyography (sEMG) parameters. Twelve subjects performed maximal (MVC) and submaximal voluntary isometric contractions at 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 75% of MVC. sEMG signals were recorded with a 13 rows x 5 columns grid of electrodes from the short head of BB. The IZ shifted in the proximal direction by up to 2.4 cm, depending upon the subject and electrode column. The mean shift of all the columns was 0.6+/-0.4 cm (10% vs. 100% MVC, P<0.001). This shift biased the average values of mean frequency (+21.8+/-9.9 Hz, P<0.001), root mean square (-0.16+/-0.15 mV, P<0.05) and conduction velocity (-1.15+/-0.93 m/s, P<0.01) in the channels immediately proximal to the IZ. The shift in IZ could be explained by shortening of the muscle fibers, and thus lengthening of the (distal) tendon due to increasing force. These results underline the importance of individual investigation of IZ locations before the placement of sEMG electrodes, even in isometric contractions.

  16. Novel fiber-based pure chitosan scaffold for tendon augmentation: biomechanical and cell biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, J; Aibibu, D; Farack, J; Nimtschke, U; Hild, M; Gelinsky, M; Kasten, P; Cherif, Ch

    2016-07-01

    One possibility to improve the mechanical properties after tendon ruptures is augmentation with a scaffold. Based on wet spinning technology, chitosan fibres were processed to a novel pure high-grade multifilament yarn with reproducible quality. The fibres were braided to obtain a 3D tendon scaffold. The CS fibres and scaffolds were evaluated biomechanically and compared to human supraspinatus (SSP) tendons. For the cytobiological characterization, in vitro cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were performed. Three types of 3D circular braided scaffolds were fabricated. Significantly, higher ultimate stress values were measured for scaffold with larger filament yarn, compared to scaffold with smaller filament yarn. During cultivation over 28 days, the cells showed in dependence of isolation method and/or donor a doubling or tripling of the cell number or even a six-fold increase on the CS scaffold, which was comparable to the control (polystyrene) or in the case of cells obtained from human biceps tendon even higher proliferation rates. After 14 days, the scaffold surface was covered homogeneously with a cell layer. In summary, the present work demonstrates that braided chitosan scaffolds constitute a straightforward approach for designing tendon analogues, maintaining important flexibility in scaffold design and providing favourable mechanical properties of the resulting construct.

  17. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  18. Modeling of dynamic bipolar plasma sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, J. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1991-08-01

    The behavior of a one dimensional plasma sheath is described in regimes where the sheath is not in equilibrium because it carries current densities that are either time dependent, or larger than the bipolar Child-Langmuir level determined from the injected ion flux. Earlier models of dynamic bipolar sheaths assumed that ions and electrons evolve in a series of quasi-equilibria. In addition, sheath growth was described by the equation Zenoxs = (ji)-Zenouo, where xs is the velocity of the sheath edge, ji is the ion current density, nouo is the injected ion flux density, and Ze is the ion charge. In this paper, a generalization of the bipolar electron-to-ion current density ratio formula is derived to study regimes where ions are not in equilibrium. A generalization of the above sheath growth equation is also developed which is consistent with the ion continuity equation and which reveals new physics of sheath behavior associated with the emitted electrons and their evolution. Based on these findings, two new models of dynamic bipolar sheaths are developed. Larger sheath sizes and potentials than those of earlier models are found. In certain regimes, explosive sheath growth is predicted.

  19. Fixation Strength of Polyetheretherketone Sheath-and-Bullet Device for Soft Tissue Repair in the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jay; Fischer, Brian; Nute, Michael; Rizza, Robert

    Tendon transfers are often performed in the foot and ankle. Recently, interference screws have been a popular choice owing to their ease of use and fixation strength. Considering the benefits, one disadvantage of such devices is laceration of the soft tissues by the implant threads during placement that potentially weaken the structural integrity of the grafts. A shape memory polyetheretherketone bullet-in-sheath tenodesis device uses circumferential compression, eliminating potential damage from thread rotation and maintaining the soft tissue orientation of the graft. The aim of this study was to determine the pullout strength and failure mode for this device in both a synthetic bone analogue and porcine bone models. Thirteen mature bovine extensor tendons were secured into ten 4.0 × 4.0 × 4.0-cm cubes of 15-pound per cubic foot solid rigid polyurethane foam bone analogue models or 3 porcine femoral condyles using the 5 × 20-mm polyetheretherketone soft tissue anchor. The bullet-in-sheath device demonstrated a mean pullout of 280.84 N in the bone analog models and 419.47 N in the porcine bone models. (p = .001). The bullet-in-sheath design preserved the integrity of the tendon graft, and none of the implants dislodged from their original position. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modified tendon stripper for obtaining palmaris longus tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Aköz, T; Altintaş, H; Civelek, B

    1999-04-01

    Tendon graft harvesting is a challenging part of hand surgery. It is not only a time-consuming procedure but also carries the potential complications associated with it. Various alternatives for this procedure are presented in the literature to overcome these difficulties. In this paper, we are presenting a series of cases in which a newly modified tendon stripper was used for tendon graft harvesting.

  1. Effect of Return to Overuse Activity Following an Isolated Supraspinatus Tendon Tear on Adjacent Intact Tendons and Glenoid Cartilage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Katherine E.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients. PMID:23280495

  2. Effect of return to overuse activity following an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear on adjacent intact tendons and glenoid cartilage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Katherine E; Thomas, Stephen J; Sarver, Joseph J; Tucker, Jennica J; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F; Glaser, David L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-05-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  4. Transient sheath overvoltages in armored power cables

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, B.; Sletbak, J.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is concerned with methods of limiting the build-up of transient voltages between sheath and armor in long armored power cables. Calculations by a frequency dependent cable model demonstrate that this voltage can be efficiently limited to an acceptable level by introducing sheath-armor bondings at regular intervals, or by using a semiconductive sheath-armor interlayer. The paper investigates the required minimum length between bondings, as well as the required conductivity of the sheath-armor interlayer if the use of bondings is to be avoided.

  5. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  6. Tendon elasticity and muscle function.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2002-12-01

    Vertebrate animals exploit the elastic properties of their tendons in several different ways. Firstly, metabolic energy can be saved in locomotion if tendons stretch and then recoil, storing and returning elastic strain energy, as the animal loses and regains kinetic energy. Leg tendons save energy in this way when birds and mammals run, and an aponeurosis in the back is also important in galloping mammals. Tendons may have similar energy-saving roles in other modes of locomotion, for example in cetacean swimming. Secondly, tendons can recoil elastically much faster than muscles can shorten, enabling animals to jump further than they otherwise could. Thirdly, tendon elasticity affects the control of muscles, enhancing force control at the expense of position control.

  7. Ultrastructure of the extracellular matrix of bovine dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera.

    PubMed Central

    Raspanti, M; Marchini, M; Della Pasqua, V; Strocchi, R; Ruggeri, A

    1992-01-01

    The sclera, the outermost sheath of the optic nerve and the dura mater have been investigated histologically and ultrastructurally. Although these tissues appear very similar under the light microscope, being dense connective tissues mainly composed of collagen bundles and a limited amount of cells and elastic fibres, they exhibit subtle differences on electron microscopy. In the dura and sclera collagen appears in the form of large, nonuniform fibrils, similar to those commonly found in tendons, while in the optic nerve sheath the fibrils appear smaller and uniform, similar to those commonly observed in reticular tissues, vessel walls and skin. Freeze-fracture also reveals these fibrils to have different subfibrillar architectures, straight or helical, which correspond to 2 distinct forms of collagen fibril previously described (Raspanti et al. 1989). The other extracellular matrix components also vary with the particular collagen fibril structure. Despite their common embryological derivation, the dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera exhibit diversification of their extracellular matrix consistent with the mechanical loads to which these tissues are subjected. Our observations indicate that the outermost sheath of the optic nerve resembles the epineurium of peripheral nerves rather than the dura to which it is commonly likened. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:1295858

  8. Ultrastructure of the extracellular matrix of bovine dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera.

    PubMed

    Raspanti, M; Marchini, M; Della Pasqua, V; Strocchi, R; Ruggeri, A

    1992-10-01

    The sclera, the outermost sheath of the optic nerve and the dura mater have been investigated histologically and ultrastructurally. Although these tissues appear very similar under the light microscope, being dense connective tissues mainly composed of collagen bundles and a limited amount of cells and elastic fibres, they exhibit subtle differences on electron microscopy. In the dura and sclera collagen appears in the form of large, nonuniform fibrils, similar to those commonly found in tendons, while in the optic nerve sheath the fibrils appear smaller and uniform, similar to those commonly observed in reticular tissues, vessel walls and skin. Freeze-fracture also reveals these fibrils to have different subfibrillar architectures, straight or helical, which correspond to 2 distinct forms of collagen fibril previously described (Raspanti et al. 1989). The other extracellular matrix components also vary with the particular collagen fibril structure. Despite their common embryological derivation, the dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera exhibit diversification of their extracellular matrix consistent with the mechanical loads to which these tissues are subjected. Our observations indicate that the outermost sheath of the optic nerve resembles the epineurium of peripheral nerves rather than the dura to which it is commonly likened.

  9. Retroperitoneal and rectus sheath hematomas.

    PubMed

    Kasotakis, George

    2014-02-01

    The retroperitoneum is rich in vascular structures and can harbor large hematomas, traumatic or spontaneous. The management of retroperitoneal hematomas depends on the mechanism of injury and whether they are pulsatile/expanding. Rectus sheath hematomas are uncommon abdominal wall hematomas secondary to trauma to the epigastric arteries of the rectus muscle. The common risk factors include anticoagulation, strenuous exercise, coughing, coagulation disorders, and invasive procedures on/through the abdominal wall. The management is largely supportive, with the reversal of anticoagulation and transfusions; angioembolization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-01-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals’ serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery. PMID:25702535

  11. Bridging Graft in Irreparable Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: Autogenic Biceps Graft versus Allogenic Dermal Patch Graft

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sung Min

    2017-01-01

    Background Few comparative studies have reported on the use of biologic grafts for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of arthroscopic bridging graft in irreparable massive rotator cuff tears using an autogenic long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) or an allogenic dermal patch (ADP). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 24 patients treated using the LHBT (group I) and eight patients with complete rupture of the LHBT treated using an ADP (group II) since 2011. Preoperative Goutallier's fatty degeneration, range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score were assessed and healing failure was evaluated at 1 year after surgery by ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging. Results The mean fatty degeneration in groups I and II was 3.9 and 3.6 for the supraspinatus (p = 0.288), 2.7 and 2.9 for the infraspinatus (p = 0.685), 0.9 and 1.3 for the subscapularis (p = 0.314), and 1.3 and 3.0 for the teres minor (p = 0.005), respectively. Subscapularis tears were found in 8 patients (33.3%) in group I and in 7 patients (87.5%) in group II (p = 0.023). Mean ROMs and functional scores improved significantly in group I (forward flexion: 121.7° to 153.3°, p = 0.010; external rotation: 32.7° to 52.7°, p = 0.001; external rotation at 90°: 63.3° to 74.5°, p = 0.031; internal rotation: T10.5 to T9.3, p = 0.045; VAS: 7.0 to 1.1, p < 0.001; ASES score: 45.4 to 81.6, p = 0.028; and Quick DASH score: 50.0 to 14.2, p = 0.017), whereas only VAS showed significant improvement in group II (from 5.9 to 2.0, p = 0.025) and ROMs and other functional scores increased without statistical significance in the group. Healing failure was found in 13 patients (54.2%) in group I and in 6 patients (75.0%) in group II (p = 0.404). Conclusions The surgeon should prudently choose surgical options for irreparable massive

  12. Bridging Graft in Irreparable Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: Autogenic Biceps Graft versus Allogenic Dermal Patch Graft.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Joo Han

    2017-12-01

    Few comparative studies have reported on the use of biologic grafts for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of arthroscopic bridging graft in irreparable massive rotator cuff tears using an autogenic long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) or an allogenic dermal patch (ADP). We retrospectively reviewed 24 patients treated using the LHBT (group I) and eight patients with complete rupture of the LHBT treated using an ADP (group II) since 2011. Preoperative Goutallier's fatty degeneration, range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score were assessed and healing failure was evaluated at 1 year after surgery by ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging. The mean fatty degeneration in groups I and II was 3.9 and 3.6 for the supraspinatus ( p = 0.288), 2.7 and 2.9 for the infraspinatus ( p = 0.685), 0.9 and 1.3 for the subscapularis ( p = 0.314), and 1.3 and 3.0 for the teres minor ( p = 0.005), respectively. Subscapularis tears were found in 8 patients (33.3%) in group I and in 7 patients (87.5%) in group II ( p = 0.023). Mean ROMs and functional scores improved significantly in group I (forward flexion: 121.7° to 153.3°, p = 0.010; external rotation: 32.7° to 52.7°, p = 0.001; external rotation at 90°: 63.3° to 74.5°, p = 0.031; internal rotation: T10.5 to T9.3, p = 0.045; VAS: 7.0 to 1.1, p < 0.001; ASES score: 45.4 to 81.6, p = 0.028; and Quick DASH score: 50.0 to 14.2, p = 0.017), whereas only VAS showed significant improvement in group II (from 5.9 to 2.0, p = 0.025) and ROMs and other functional scores increased without statistical significance in the group. Healing failure was found in 13 patients (54.2%) in group I and in 6 patients (75.0%) in group II ( p = 0.404). The surgeon should prudently choose surgical options for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears, especially

  13. Electromechanical delay of the knee flexor muscles is impaired after harvesting hamstring tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ristanis, Stavros; Tsepis, Elias; Giotis, Dimitrios; Stergiou, Nicholas; Cerulli, Guiliano; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2009-11-01

    Changes in electromechanical delay during muscle activation are expected when there are substantial alterations in the structural properties of the musculotendinous tissue. In anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, specific tendons are being harvested for grafts. Thus, there is an associated scar tissue development at the tendon that may affect the corresponding electromechanical delay. This study was conducted to investigate whether harvesting of semitendinosus and gracilis tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction will affect the electromechanical delay of the knee flexors. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. The authors evaluated 12 patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus and gracilis autograft, 2 years after the reconstruction, and 12 healthy controls. Each participant performed 4 maximally explosive isometric contractions with a 1-minute break between contractions. The surface electromyographic activity of the biceps femoris and the semitendinosus was recorded from both legs during the contractions. The statistical comparisons revealed significant increases of the electromechanical delay of the anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed knee for both investigated muscles. Specifically, the electromechanical delay values were increased for both the biceps femoris (P = .029) and the semitendinosus (P = .005) of the reconstructed knee when compared with the intact knee. Comparing the anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed knee against healthy controls revealed similar significant differences for both muscles (semitendinosus, P = .011; biceps femoris, P = .024). The results showed that harvesting the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction significantly increased the electromechanical delay of the knee flexors. Increased hamstring electromechanical delay might impair knee safety and performance by modifying the transfer time of muscle tension to the tibia and

  14. Model-independent fit to Planck and BICEP2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Laura; Boubekeur, Lotfi; Mena, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Inflation is the leading theory to describe elegantly the initial conditions that led to structure formation in our Universe. In this paper, we present a novel phenomenological fit to the Planck, WMAP polarization (WP) and the BICEP2 data sets using an alternative parametrization. Instead of starting from inflationary potentials and computing the inflationary observables, we use a phenomenological parametrization due to Mukhanov, describing inflation by an effective equation of state, in terms of the number of e-folds and two phenomenological parameters α and β. Within such a parametrization, which captures the different inflationary models in a model-independent way, the values of the scalar spectral index ns, its running and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r are predicted, given a set of parameters (α ,β). We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of these parameters, and we show that the combined analysis of Planck and WP data favors the Starobinsky and Higgs inflation scenarios. Assuming that the BICEP2 signal is not entirely due to foregrounds, the addition of this last data set prefers instead the ϕ2 chaotic models. The constraint we get from Planck and WP data alone on the derived tensor-to-scalar ratio is r <0.18 at 95% C.L., value which is consistent with the one quoted from the BICEP2 Collaboration analysis, r =0.16-0.05+0-06, after foreground subtraction. This is not necessarily at odds with the 2σ tension found between Planck and BICEP2 measurements when analyzing data in terms of the usual ns and r parameters, given that the parametrization used here, for the preferred value ns≃0.96, allows only for a restricted parameter space in the usual (ns,r) plane.

  15. Cosmological parameter fittings with the BICEP2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, FengQuan; Li, YiChao; Lu, YouJun; Chen, XueLei

    2014-08-01

    Combining the latest Planck, Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data, we exploit the recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode power spectra data released by the BICEP2 collaboration to constrain the cosmological parameters of the LCDM model, especially the primordial power spectra parameters of the scalar and the tensor modes, n s , α s , r, n t . We obtain constraints on the parameters for a lensed LCDM model using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, the marginalized 68% bounds are r = 0.1043{-0.0914/+0.0307}, n s = 0.9617{-0.0061/+0.0061}, α s = -0.0175{-0.0097/+0.0105}, n t = 0.5198{-0.4579/+0.4515}.We find that a blue tilt for n t is favored slightly, but it is still well consistent with flat or even red tilt. Our r value is slightly smaller than the one obtained by the BICEP group, in that we permit n t as a free parameter without imposing the single-field slow roll inflation consistency relation. When we impose this relation, then r = 0.2130{-0.0609/+0.0446}. For most other parameters, the best fit values and measurement errors are not altered significantly by the introduction of the BICEP2 data.

  16. Evidence for Bouncing Evolution Before Inflation After BICEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing; Cai, Yi-Fu; Li, Hong; Zhang, Xinmin

    2014-06-01

    The BICEP2 Collaboration reports a detection of primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) B mode with a tensor-to-scalar ratio r =0.20-0.05+0.07 (68% C.L.). However, this result disagrees with the recent Planck limit r<0.11 (95% C.L.) on constraining inflation models. In this Letter we consider an inflationary cosmology with a preceding nonsingular bounce, which gives rise to observable signatures on primordial perturbations. One interesting phenomenon is that both the primordial scalar and tensor modes can have a step feature on their power spectra, which nicely cancels the tensor excess power on the CMB temperature power spectrum. By performing a global analysis, we obtain the 68% C.L. constraints on the parameters of the model from the Planck+WP and BICEP2 data together: the jump scale log10(kB/Mpc-1)=-2.4±0.2 and the spectrum amplitude ratio of bounce to inflation rB≡Pm/As=0.71±0.09. Our result reveals that the bounce inflation scenario can simultaneously explain the Planck and BICEP2 observations better than the standard cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and can be verified by future CMB polarization measurements.

  17. The influence of superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) repair on restoring baseline glenohumeral translation and increased biceps loading after simulated SLAP tear and the effectiveness of SLAP repair after long head of biceps tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Patzer, Thilo; Habermeyer, Peter; Hurschler, Christof; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Wellmann, Mathias; Kircher, Joern; Schofer, Markus D

    2012-11-01

    Biomechanical studies have shown increased glenohumeral translation and loading of the long head biceps (LHB) tendon after superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears. This may explain some of the typical clinical findings, including the prevalence of humeral chondral lesions, after SLAP lesions. The first hypothesis was that SLAP repair could restore the original glenohumeral translation and reduce the increased LHB load after SLAP lesions. The second hypothesis was that SLAP repair after LHB tenotomy could significantly reduce the increased glenohumeral translation. Biomechanical testing was performed on 21 fresh frozen human cadaveric shoulders with an intact shoulder girdle using a sensor-guided industrial robot to apply 20 N of compression in the joint and 50 N translational force at 0°, 30°, and 60° of abduction. LHB loading was measured by a load-cell with 5 N and 25 N preload. Type IIC SLAP lesions were created arthroscopically, and a standardized SLAP repair was done combined with or without LHB tenotomy. No significant difference of glenohumeral translation and increased LHB load in SLAP repair compared with the intact shoulder was observed under 5 N and 25 LHB preload, except for anterior translation under 25 N LHB preload. After LHB tenotomy after SLAP lesions, no significant difference of translation was observed with or without SLAP repair. SLAP repair without associated LHB tenotomy helps normalize glenohumeral translation and LHB loading. The stabilizing effect of the SLAP complex is dependent on the LHB. After biceps tenotomy, SLAP repair does not affect glenohumeral translation. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tendon Tissue Engineering and Its Role on Healing of the Experimentally Induced Large Tendon Defect Model in Rabbits: A Comprehensive In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (P<0.05). The tissue engineered implants also reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and increased ultrasonographical echogenicity and homogenicity, maturation and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, tissue alignment and volume of the regenerated tissue compared to those of the control lesions (P<0.05). The implants were gradually absorbed and substituted by the new tendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice. PMID

  19. [Rupture of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Ulmar, B; Simon, S; Eschler, A; Mittlmeier, T

    2014-10-01

    The rupture of the Achilles tendon is the most frequent tendon rupture in humans and it is associated with increasing incidence. The main risk factor is intrinsic degeneration of the tendon. During the rupture the person feels a whiplash or dagger thrust-like pain, followed by restricted walking ability and decreased plantar flexion of the ankle. The positive Simmond/Thompson test and a palpable dent above the tendon rupture are pathognomical. Diagnostically, ultrasound of the tendon and lateral x-ray of the calcaneus (bony pull-out of the tendon insertion) are necessary. Regarding correct indication and treatment modalities, most established conservative and surgical therapies realize optimal functional results. Surgical treatment promises better primary stability and slightly earlier better functional results, but there is the potential for surgical complications. Conservative therapy is associated with higher rates of re-rupture and healing of the tendon under elongation. Therefore, therapy planning in Achilles tendon rupture should be determined based on each patient. We recommend surgical treatment in patients with higher sporting demands and in younger patients (< 50 years).

  20. BICEP2/SPUD: Searching for Inflation with Degree Scale Polarimetry from the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hien Trong; Kovac, John; Adec, Peter; Aikin, Randol; Benton, Steve; Bock, Jamie; Brevik, Justus; Carlstrom, John; Dowell, Darren; Duband, Lionel; hide

    2008-01-01

    BICEP2/SPUD is the new powerful upgrade of the existing BICEP1 experiment, a bolometric receiver to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which has been in operation at the South Pole since January 2006. BICEP2 will provide an improvement up to 10 times mapping speed at 150 GHz compared to BICEP1, using the same BICEP telescope mount. SPUD, a series of compact, mechanically-cooled receivers deployed on the DASI mount at the Pole, will provide similar mapping speed in to BICEP2 in three bands, 100, 150, and 220 GHz. The new system will use large TES focal plane arrays to provide unprecedented sensitivity and excellent control of foreground contamination.

  1. Quantitative diagnostic method for biceps long head tendinitis by using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of grayscale quantitative diagnostic method for biceps tendinitis and determine the cut-off points of a quantitative biceps ultrasound (US) method to diagnose biceps tendinitis. Design. Prospective cross-sectional case controlled study. Outpatient rehabilitation service. A total of 336 shoulder pain patients with suspected biceps tendinitis were recruited in this prospective observational study. The grayscale pixel data of the range of interest (ROI) were obtained for both the transverse and longitudinal views of the biceps US. A total of 136 patients were classified with biceps tendinitis, and 200 patients were classified as not having biceps tendinitis based on the diagnostic criteria. Based on the Youden index, the cut-off points were determined as 26.85 for the transverse view and 21.25 for the longitudinal view of the standard deviation (StdDev) of the ROI values, respectively. When the ROI evaluation of the US surpassed the cut-off point, the sensitivity was 68% and the specificity was 90% in the StdDev of the transverse view, and the sensitivity was 81% and the specificity was 73% in the StdDev of the longitudinal view to diagnose biceps tendinitis. For equivocal cases or inexperienced sonographers, our study provides a more objective method for diagnosing biceps tendinitis in shoulder pain patients.

  2. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    DOE PAGES

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; ...

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperaturemore » plasma conditions (T e >> T i), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.« less

  3. Biceps brachii muscle oxygenation in electrical muscle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Millet, Guillaume Y; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Ferrari, Marco; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare between electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) and maximal voluntary (VOL) isometric contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in biceps brachii muscle oxygenation (tissue oxygenation index, TOI) and haemodynamics (total haemoglobin volume, tHb = oxygenated-Hb + deoxygenated-Hb) determined by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The biceps brachii muscle of 10 healthy men (23-39 years) was electrically stimulated at high frequency (75 Hz) via surface electrodes to evoke 50 intermittent (4-s contraction, 15-s relaxation) isometric contractions at maximum tolerated current level (EMS session). The contralateral arm performed 50 intermittent (4-s contraction, 15-s relaxation) maximal voluntary isometric contractions (VOL session) in a counterbalanced order separated by 2-3 weeks. Results indicated that although the torque produced during EMS was approximately 50% of VOL (P<0.05), there was no significant difference in the changes in TOI amplitude or TOI slope between EMS and VOL over the 50 contractions. However, the TOI amplitude divided by peak torque was approximately 50% lower for EMS than VOL (P<0.05), which indicates EMS was less efficient than VOL. This seems likely because of the difference in the muscles involved in the force production between conditions. Mean decrease in tHb amplitude during the contraction phases was significantly (P<0.05) greater for EMS than VOL from the 10th contraction onwards, suggesting that the muscle blood volume was lower in EMS than VOL. It is concluded that local oxygen demand of the biceps brachii sampled by NIRS is similar between VOL and EMS.

  4. Theory of ion-matrix-sheath dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    The time evolution of a one-dimensional, uni-polar ion sheath (an "ion matrix sheath") is investigated. The analytical solutions for the ion-fluid and Poisson's equations are found for an arbitrary time dependence of the wall-applied negative potential. In the case that the wall potential is large and remains constant after its ramp-up application, the explicit time dependencies of the sheath's parameters during the initial stage of the process are given. The characteristic rate of approaching the stationary state, satisfying the Child-Langmuir law, is determined.

  5. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  6. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  7. Dark matter chaotic inflation in light of BICEP2

    SciTech Connect

    Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori, E-mail: mukaida@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We propose an economical model in which a singlet {sub 2}-odd scalar field accounts for the primordial inflation and the present dark matter abundance simultaneously in the light of recent BICEP2 result. Interestingly, the reheating temperature and the thermal dark matter abundance are closely connected by the same interaction between the singlet scalar and the standard model Higgs. In addition, the reheating temperature turns out to be quite high, T{sub R} ∼> 10{sup 12} GeV, and hence the thermal leptogenesis is compatible with this model. Therefore, it can be one of the simplest cosmological scenarios.

  8. Rectus Femoris Tendon Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zini, Raul; Panascì, Manlio; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since it was developed, hip arthroscopy has become the favored treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Due to recent considerable improvements, the indications for this technique have been widely extended. Injuries of the rectus femoris tendon origin, after an acute phase, could result in a chronic tendinopathy with calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition, leading to pain and loss of function. Traditionally, this condition is addressed by local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids or, when conservative measures fail, by open excision of the calcific lesion by an anterior approach. Purpose: To assess whether arthroscopic excision of calcification of the proximal rectus is a safe and effective treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Outcomes were studied from 6 top amateur athletes (age range, 30-43 years; mean, 32.6 years) affected by calcification of the proximal rectus who underwent arthroscopic excision of the calcification. Patients were preoperatively assessed radiographically, and diagnosis was confirmed by a 3-dimensional computed tomography scan. To evaluate the outcome, standardized hip rating scores were used pre- and postoperatively (at 6 and 12 months): the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, and Modified Harris Hip Score. Moreover, visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, sport activity level (SAL), and activities of daily living (ADL) were also used. Results: One year after surgery, all patients reported satisfactory outcomes, with 3 of 6 rating their return-to-sport level as high as preinjury level, and the remaining 3 with a percentage higher than 80%. Five patients ranked their ability to carry on daily activities at 100%. Statistical analysis showed significant improvement of the Oxford Hip Score, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and all 3 VAS subscales (pain, SAL, and ADL) from pre- to latest postoperative assessment (P < .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic excision of

  9. Implantation of a Novel Biologic and Hybridized Tissue Engineered Bioimplant in Large Tendon Defect: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  10. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  11. Supernumerary heads to biceps brachii muscle and Asian population history.

    PubMed

    Techataweewan, N; Toomsan, Y; Maneenin, C; Tungsrithong, N; Tayles, N

    2016-12-01

    Supernumerary heads of biceps brachii are one of the most common anatomic variants in the muscular system and appear to develop under genetic control and vary in prevalence among populations. Variation in prevalence and morphology therefore has the potential to contribute to understanding of human population history. Until now, there has been no publication of the prevalence of the variant in Southeast Asian populations. The aim of this research is to document the prevalence and morphology of the variant in a sample of Thai cadavers and to consider the significance of the findings. The method used was dissection of arms of 162 donated cadavers at Khon Kaen University, Thailand. The sample showed high prevalence of third heads of biceps brachii in 35% of cadavers, compared with the prevalence of up to 25% reported in large samples worldwide. The sample also showed equal prevalence in males and females and one-third present bilaterally. This pattern is similar to that found in East Asia, and very different from the low prevalence found in South Asia. The morphology of the supernumerary heads does not appear to be different from elsewhere in the world based on the minimal comparable data available in the literature. The Southeast-East Asian pattern of prevalence is consistent with current theories of population history in the region and suggests anatomical variation of the postcranial soft tissues may ultimately contribute to understanding of past human migrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... a small amount of corticosteroid and a local anesthetic into the bursa. JOINT Any joint problem, such ... A small amount of corticosteroid and a local anesthetic will be injected into the joint. TENDON A ...

  13. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  14. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  15. Multiple tendon ruptures of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Axibal, Derek P; Anderson, John G

    2013-10-01

    Tendon ruptures are common findings in foot and ankle practice. The etiology of tendon ruptures tends to be multifactorial-usually due to a combination of trauma, effects of systemic diseases, adverse effects of medications, and obesity. We present an unusual case of right Achilles tendinitis, left Achilles tendon rupture, bilateral peroneus longus tendon rupture, and left peroneus brevis tendon rupture of unknown etiology. This case report highlights the need for research for other possible, lesser known etiologies of tendon pathology. Therapeutic, Level IV, Case Study.

  16. Glenohumeral Function of the Long Head of the Biceps Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Peter N.; Cip, Johannes; Trombley, Robert; Cole, Brian J.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Optimal treatment of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears is controversial, in part because the dynamic role of the long head of the biceps muscle (LHBM) in the glenohumeral joint is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine dynamic LHBM behavior during shoulder activity by studying (1) the electromyographic activity of the LHBM during shoulder motion, (2) the effect of elbow immobilization on this activity, and (3) the effect of a load applied to the distal humerus on this activity. Hypothesis: The LHBM would not play a significant role in active glenohumeral range of motion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Thirteen normal volunteers underwent surface electromyography (EMG) measurement of the LHBM, short head biceps muscle (SHBM), deltoid, infraspinatus, and brachioradialis during shoulder motion from the neutral position (0° of rotation, flexion, and abduction) to 45° of flexion, 90° of flexion, 45° of abduction, and 90° of abduction. These motions were repeated both with and without splint immobilization of the forearm and elbow at 100° of flexion and neutral rotation and with and without a 1-kg weight placed on the lateral distal humerus. Results: Mean EMG activity within the LHBM and the SHBM was low (≤11.6% ± 9.1%). LHBM activity was significant increased by flexion and abduction (P < .049 in all cases), while SHBM activity was not. EMG activity from the middle head of the deltoid was significantly increased by loading with the shoulder positioned away from the body (ie, in abduction or flexion). When compared with the unloaded state, the addition of a distal humeral load significantly increased LHBM activity in 45° of abduction (P = .028) and 90° of flexion (P = .033) despite forearm and elbow immobilization. The SHBM showed similar trends. Conclusion: In normal volunteers with forearm and elbow immobilization and application of a load to the distal humerus, LHBM EMG activity is increased by both

  17. Joint analysis of BICEP2/keck array and Planck Data.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Aghanim, N; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barkats, D; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Benton, S J; Bernard, J-P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Brevik, J A; Bucher, M; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Buza, V; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J-F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chary, R-R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Connors, J; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J-M; Désert, F-X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dowell, C D; Duband, L; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Dvorkin, C; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Filippini, J P; Finelli, F; Fliescher, S; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; Golwala, S R; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hasselfield, M; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hristov, V V; Huffenberger, K M; Hui, H; Hurier, G; Irwin, K D; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Karakci, A; Karkare, K S; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Keihänen, E; Kernasovskiy, S A; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kovac, J M; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kuo, C L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J-M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leitch, E M; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Lueker, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Mason, P; Matarrese, S; Megerian, K G; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M-A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Pryke, C; Puget, J-L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Richter, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schwarz, R; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sheehy, C D; Spencer, L D; Staniszewski, Z K; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A-S; Sygnet, J-F; Tauber, J A; Teply, G P; Terenzi, L; Thompson, K L; Toffolatti, L; Tolan, J E; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Turner, A D; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Vieregg, A G; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Weber, A C; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Yoon, K W; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-03-13

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400  deg^{2} patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5°. The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2  μK deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150  GHz to a lensed-ΛCDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r_{0.05}<0.12 at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0σ significance.

  18. The fibrous flexor sheaths of the fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M M; Amis, A A

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the digital fibrous flexor sheath was examined by dissection and histology. The presence of a specific system of named fibrous tissue bands, forming annular and cruciate pulleys, was noted confirming details which are well established in the surgical literature although not detailed by the anatomical texts. These pulleys were linked by thin parts of the sheath. When the inner aspect of the sheath was examined, it was found that it was not a continuous smooth surface, as depicted in both anatomical and surgical texts. The thin parts of the sheath often overlapped the free edges of the pulleys before attaching to their superficial aspects, so that the pulleys possessed free edges within the sheath. Forty eight cadaveric fingers were examined in order to determine the frequency of occurrence and sizes of these overlaps. The largest and most frequent overlap was found at the distal end of the A2 pulley (which attaches to the proximal phalanx). Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 (cont.) Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:3417546

  19. Attic construction with sheathing-applied insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    Two years of study at a building research laboratory have been applied to cathedralized residential attic construction. Cathedralized attics are rafter-framed or truss-framed attics with flat ceilings in which the insulation is placed against the underside of the roof sheathing rather than on top of the ceiling drywall. The potential benefits of sheathing-applied insulation are considerable and are due to the fact that the attic space becomes part of the conditioned volume. Concern is often expressed that moisture damage may occur in the sheathing. The intent of the current study was to address those concerns. This study allowed an assessmentmore » of the performance of cathedralized ceilings, given the following construction variables: (1) ventilation vs. no ventilation, (2) continuous air chute construction vs. stuffed insulation construction, and (3) opens joints in exposed kraft facing vs. taped joints. The results were compared to a concurrent study of the performance of cathedral ceilings with sloped ceiling drywall. The results show that having an air chute that ensures an air gap between the sheathing and the top of the insulation is the critical factor. Ventilation and the taping of joints were minor determinants of the moisture performance of the sheathing. These results are consistent with the results of normal cathedral ceiling construction performance.« less

  20. Illusory movements induced by tendon vibration in right- and left-handed people.

    PubMed

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Fusco, Gabriele; Leonardis, Daniele; Frisoli, Antonio; Bergamasco, Massimo; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-02-01

    Frequency-specific vibratory stimulation of peripheral tendons induces an illusion of limb movement that may be useful for restoring proprioceptive information in people with sensorimotor disability. This potential application may be limited by inter- and intra-subject variability in the susceptibility to such an illusion, which may depend on a variety of factors. To explore the influence of stimulation parameters and participants' handedness on the movement illusion, we vibrated the right and left tendon of the biceps brachii in a group of right- and left-handed people with five stimulation frequencies (from 40 to 120 Hz in step of 20 Hz). We found that all participants reported the expected illusion of elbow extension, especially after 40 and 60 Hz. Left-handers exhibited less variability in reporting the illusion compared to right-handers across the different stimulation frequencies. Moreover, the stimulation of the non-dominant arm elicited a more vivid illusion with faster onset relative to the stimulation of the dominant arm, an effect that was independent from participants' handedness. Overall, our data show that stimulation frequency, handedness and arm dominance influence the tendon vibration movement illusion. The results are discussed in reference to their relevance in linking motor awareness, improving current devices for motor ability recovery after brain or spinal damage and developing prosthetics and virtual embodiment systems.

  1. Rectus Sheath Hematoma Associated with Apixaban.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Kulothungan; Winans, Amanda R McFee; Murthi, Swetha; Ahmad, Mudassar Raees; Kaatz, Scott

    2017-06-07

    Apixaban is an oral anticoagulant that directly inhibits Factor Xa and is indicated for the prophylaxis and treatment of deep venous thrombosis and stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare, life-threatening complication of anticoagulant treatment. We describe a case of an elderly patient on apixaban for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis who developed severe abdominal pain during hospitalization. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed left rectus sheath hematoma. Apixaban was discontinued and the patient was monitored for extension of the hematoma. After 2 days she was discharged home. Outpatient computed tomography 1 month later showed complete resolution of the rectus sheath hematoma. We recommend that clinicians become aware of the potential for rare and serious bleeding complications of anticoagulants and identify the need for early recognition and prompt management.

  2. The effect of a collagen-elastin matrix on adhesion formation after flexor tendon repair in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, Dagmar Alice; Beyersdoerfer, Sascha Tobias; Gierer, Philip; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Th

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of flexor tendon surgery is negatively affected by the formation of adhesions which can occur during the healing of the tendon repair. In this experimental study, we sought to prevent adhesion formation by wrapping a collagen-elastin scaffold around the repaired tendon segment. In 28 rabbit hind legs, the flexor tendons of the third and fourth digits were cut and then repaired using a two-strand suture technique on the fourth digit and a four-strand technique on the third digit. Rabbits were randomly assigned to study and control groups. In the control group, the operation ended by closing the tendon sheath and the skin. In the study group, a collagen-elastin scaffold was wrapped around the repaired tendon segment in both digits. After 3 and 8 weeks, the tendons were harvested and processed histologically. The range of motion of the digits and the gap formation between the repaired tendon ends were measured. The formation of adhesions, infiltration of leucocytes and extracellular inflammatory response were quantified. At the time of tendon harvesting, all joints of the operated toes showed free range of motion. Four-strand core sutures lead to significantly less diastasis between the repaired tendon ends than two-strand core suture repairs. The collagen-elastin scaffold leads to greater gapping after 3 weeks compared to the controls treated without the matrix. Within the tendons treated with the collagen-elastin matrix, a significant boost of cellular and extracellular inflammation could be stated after 3 weeks which was reflected by a higher level of CAE positive cells and more formation of myofibroblasts in the αSMA stain in the study group. The inflammatory response subsided gradually and significantly until the late stage of the study. Both the cellular and extracellular inflammatory response was emphasized with the amount of material used for the repair. The use of a collagen-elastin matrix cannot be advised for the prevention of adhesion

  3. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  4. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningocele: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Halimi, E.; Wavreille, O.; Rosenberg, R.; Bouacha, I.; Lejeune, J.-P.; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Isolated optic nerve sheath meningocele is a rare affection defined as the cystic enlargement of the optic nerve sheath filled with cerebrospinal fluid. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with bilateral meningocele uncovered during a routine examination for headache complaints. A 5-year follow-up validated the lesion’s clinical and imaging stability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of this pathology, alongside characteristic symptoms indicating that the meningocele might have progressively expanded into the orbit. In this case we present a therapeutic approach based on pathophysiological hypotheses and review of the literature. PMID:28163760

  5. Morphologic Characteristics and Strength of the Hamstring Muscles Remain Altered at 2 Years After Use of a Hamstring Tendon Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konrath, Jason M; Vertullo, Christopher J; Kennedy, Ben A; Bush, Hamish S; Barrett, Rod S; Lloyd, David G

    2016-10-01

    The hamstring tendon graft used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been shown to lead to changes to the semitendinosus and gracilis musculature. We hypothesized that (1) loss of donor muscle size would significantly correlate with knee muscle strength deficits, (2) loss of donor muscle size would be greater for muscles that do not experience tendon regeneration, and (3) morphological adaptations would also be evident in nondonor knee muscles. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty participants (14 men and 6 women, mean age 29 ± 7 years, mean body mass 82 ± 15 kg) who had undergone an ACL reconstruction with a hamstring tendon graft at least 2 years previously underwent bilateral magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent strength testing. Muscle and tendon volumes, peak cross-sectional areas (CSAs), and lengths were determined for 12 muscles and 6 functional muscle groups of the surgical and contralateral limbs. Peak isokinetic concentric strength was measured in knee flexion/extension and internal/external tibial rotation. Only 35% of the patients showed regeneration of both the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. The regenerated tendons were longer with larger volume and CSA compared with the contralateral side. Deficits in semitendinosus and gracilis muscle size were greater for muscles in which tendons did not regenerate. In addition, combined hamstring muscles (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris) and combined medial knee muscles (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, gracilis, vastus medialis, medial gastrocnemius, and sartorius) on the surgical side were reduced in volume by 12% and 10%, respectively. A 7% larger volume was observed in the surgical limb for the biceps femoris muscle and corresponded with a lower internal/external tibial rotation strength ratio. The difference in volume, peak CSA, and length of the semitendinosus and gracilis correlated significantly with the deficit in knee flexion strength, with

  6. Muscle-Tendon-Enthesis Unit.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Anthony S; Huang, Brady K; Pathria, Mini N

    2018-07-01

    Injuries to the muscle-tendon-enthesis unit are common and a significant source of pain and loss of function. This article focuses on the important anatomical and biomechanical considerations for each component of the muscle-tendon-enthesis unit. We review normal and pathologic conditions affecting this unit, illustrating the imaging appearance of common disorders on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. Knowledge of the anatomy and biomechanics of these structures is crucial for the radiologist to make accurate diagnoses and provide clinically relevant assessments. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-10

    environment, a Langmuir probe and a Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA). The Langmuir probe could be considered the seminal plasma diagnostic, and a large...plasma-sheath interface. Electric field is normalized by Te/LD (LD is the Debye length) and velocity is normalized by the Bohm speed. Figure 14...studying the interaction of the near-wall plasma sheath with a magnetic field , and modeled the plasma sheath of the GT thick-sheath (~10mm) plasma

  8. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glans sheath. 884.5320 Section 884.5320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5320 Glans...

  9. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glans sheath. 884.5320 Section 884.5320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5320 Glans...

  10. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glans sheath. 884.5320 Section 884.5320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5320 Glans...

  11. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glans sheath. 884.5320 Section 884.5320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5320 Glans...

  12. Bioreactor design for tendon/ligament engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W; Lloyd, David G; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-04-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments.

  13. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  14. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  15. Voluntary activation of biceps-to-triceps and deltoid-to-triceps transfers in quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carrie L; Bednar, Michael S; Bryden, Anne M; Keith, Michael W; Perreault, Eric J; Murray, Wendy M

    2017-01-01

    The biceps or the posterior deltoid can be transferred to improve elbow extension function for many individuals with C5 or C6 quadriplegia. Maximum strength after elbow reconstruction is variable; the patient's ability to voluntarily activate the transferred muscle to extend the elbow may contribute to the variability. We compared voluntary activation during maximum isometric elbow extension following biceps transfer (n = 5) and deltoid transfer (n = 6) in three functional postures. Voluntary activation was computed as the elbow extension moment generated during maximum voluntary effort divided by the moment generated with full activation, which was estimated via electrical stimulation. Voluntary activation was on average 96% after biceps transfer and not affected by posture. Individuals with deltoid transfer demonstrated deficits in voluntary activation, which differed by posture (80% in horizontal plane, 69% in overhead reach, and 70% in weight-relief), suggesting inadequate motor re-education after deltoid transfer. Overall, individuals with a biceps transfer better activated their transferred muscle than those with a deltoid transfer. This difference in neural control augmented the greater force-generating capacity of the biceps leading to increased elbow extension strength after biceps transfer (average 9.37 N-m across postures) relative to deltoid transfer (average 2.76 N-m across postures) in our study cohort.

  16. Voluntary activation of biceps-to-triceps and deltoid-to-triceps transfers in quadriplegia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carrie L.; Bednar, Michael S.; Bryden, Anne M.; Keith, Michael W.; Perreault, Eric J.; Murray, Wendy M.

    2017-01-01

    The biceps or the posterior deltoid can be transferred to improve elbow extension function for many individuals with C5 or C6 quadriplegia. Maximum strength after elbow reconstruction is variable; the patient’s ability to voluntarily activate the transferred muscle to extend the elbow may contribute to the variability. We compared voluntary activation during maximum isometric elbow extension following biceps transfer (n = 5) and deltoid transfer (n = 6) in three functional postures. Voluntary activation was computed as the elbow extension moment generated during maximum voluntary effort divided by the moment generated with full activation, which was estimated via electrical stimulation. Voluntary activation was on average 96% after biceps transfer and not affected by posture. Individuals with deltoid transfer demonstrated deficits in voluntary activation, which differed by posture (80% in horizontal plane, 69% in overhead reach, and 70% in weight-relief), suggesting inadequate motor re-education after deltoid transfer. Overall, individuals with a biceps transfer better activated their transferred muscle than those with a deltoid transfer. This difference in neural control augmented the greater force-generating capacity of the biceps leading to increased elbow extension strength after biceps transfer (average 9.37 N-m across postures) relative to deltoid transfer (average 2.76 N-m across postures) in our study cohort. PMID:28253262

  17. Neurotization to innervate the deltoid and biceps: 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Kitay, Alison; Garg, Rohit; Kang, Lana; Feinberg, Joseph H; Wolfe, Scott W

    2013-02-01

    To describe our experience using direct muscle neurotization as a treatment adjunct during delayed surgical reconstruction for traumatic denervation injuries. Three patients who had direct muscle neurotization were chosen from a consecutive series of patients undergoing reconstruction for brachial plexus injuries. The cases are presented in detail, including long-term clinical follow-up at 2, 5, and 10 years with accompanying postoperative electrodiagnostic studies. Postoperative motor strength using British Medical Research Council grading and active range of motion were retrospectively extracted from the clinical charts. Direct muscle neurotization was performed into the deltoid in 2 cases and into the biceps in 1 case after delays of up to 10 months from injury. Two patients had recovery of M4 strength, and the other patient had recovery of M3 strength. All 3 patients had evidence on electrodiagnostic studies of at least partial muscle reinnervation after neurotization. Direct muscle neurotization has shown promising results in numerous basic science investigations and a limited number of clinical cases. The current series provides additional clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence that direct muscle neurotization can successfully provide reinnervation, even after lengthy delays from injury to surgical treatment. Microsurgeons should consider direct muscle neurotization as a viable adjunct treatment and part of a comprehensive reconstructive plan, especially for injuries associated with avulsion of the distal nerve stump from its insertion into the muscle. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not enhance intra-synovial tendon healing despite engraftment and homing to niches within the synovium.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad R; Dudhia, Jayesh; David, Frederic H; De Godoy, Roberta; Mehra, Vedika; Hughes, Gillian; Dakin, Stephanie G; Carr, Andrew J; Goodship, Allen E; Smith, Roger K W

    2018-06-19

    Intra-synovial tendon injuries display poor healing, which often results in reduced functionality and pain. A lack of effective therapeutic options has led to experimental approaches to augment natural tendon repair with autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) although the effects of the intra-synovial environment on the distribution, engraftment and functionality of implanted MSCs is not known. This study utilised a novel sheep model which, although in an anatomically different location, more accurately mimics the mechanical and synovial environment of the human rotator cuff, to determine the effects of intra-synovial implantation of MSCs. A lesion was made in the lateral border of the lateral branch of the ovine deep digital flexor tendon within the digital sheath and 2 weeks later 5 million autologous bone marrow MSCs were injected under ultrasound guidance into the digital sheath. Tendons were recovered post mortem at 1 day, and 1-2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after MSC injection. For the 1-day and 1-2-week groups, MSCs labelled with fluorescent-conjugated magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) were tracked with MRI, histology and flow cytometry. The 4, 12 and 24-week groups were implanted with non-labelled cells and compared with saline-injected controls for healing. The MSCs displayed no reduced viability in vitro to an uptake of 20.0 ± 4.6 pg MIONs per cell, which was detectable by MRI at minimal density of ~ 3 × 10 4 cells. Treated limbs indicated cellular distribution throughout the tendon synovial sheath but restricted to the synovial tissues, with no MSCs detected in the tendon or surgical lesion. The lesion was associated with negligible morbidity with minimal inflammation post surgery. Evaluation of both treated and control lesions showed no evidence of healing of the lesion at 4, 12 and 24 weeks on gross and histological examination. Unlike other laboratory animal models of tendon injury, this novel model mimics the failed tendon healing

  19. Measurement of plasma sheath overlap above a trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.; Steinberger, Thomas E.

    2017-06-01

    The plasma sheath above a rectangular trench has been experimentally characterized as the trench width is varied in a radio frequency (rf) plasma discharge for two different rf powers giving two different sets of plasma parameters. Measurements were made using the positions and all six normal mode frequencies of two dust particles floating just inside the sheath edge above the center of the trench. We find that sheath overlap occurs when the trench width ≲ 3 s 0 for a trench depth ≈0.7s0, where s0 is the planar sheath width. The electric field gradient inside the sheath edge increases with rf power.

  20. C2 root nerve sheath tumors management.

    PubMed

    El-Sissy, Mohamed H; Mahmoud, Mostafa

    2013-05-01

    Upper cervical nerve sheath tumors (NST) arising mainly from C2 root and to lesser extent from C1 root are not uncommon, they constitute approximately 5-12% of spinal nerve sheath tumors and 18-30% of all cervical nerve sheath tumors, unique in presentation and their relationship to neighbouring structures owing to the discrete anatomy at the upper cervical-craniovertebral region, and have atendency for growth reaching large-sized tumors before manifesting clinically due to the capacious spinal canal at this region; accordingly the surgical approaches to such tumors are modified. The aim of this paper is to discuss the surgical strategies for upper cervical nerve sheath tumors. Eleven patients (8 male and 3 females), age range 28-63 years, with C2 root nerve sheath tumors were operated upon based on their anatomical relations to the spinal cord. The magnetic resonance imaging findings were utilized to determine the surgical approach. The tumors had extra- and intradural components in 10 patients, while in one the tumor was purely intradural. The operative approaches included varied from extreme lateral transcondylar approach(n = 1) to laminectomy, whether complete(n = 3) a or hemilaminectomy(n = 7), with partial facetectomy(n = 7), and with suboccipital craniectomy(n = 2). The clinical picture ranged from spasticity (n = 8, 72,72 %), tingling and numbness below neck (n = 6, 54,54 %), weakness (n = 6, 54,54 %), posterior column involvement (n = 4, 26,36 %), and neck pain (n = 4, 36,36 %). The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 54 months, total excision was performed in 7 patients; while in 3 patients an extraspinal component, and in 1 patient a small intradural component, were left in situ. Eight patients showed improvement of myelopathy; 2 patients maintained their grades. One poor-grade patient was deteriorated. The surgical approaches for the C2 root nerve sheath tumors should be tailored according to the relationship to the spinal cord, determined by magnetic

  1. Benchmarking sheath subgrid boundary conditions for macroscopic-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, T. G.; Smithe, D. N.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of sheaths near metallic or dielectric-coated wall materials in contact with a plasma is ubiquitous, often giving rise to physical phenomena (sputtering, secondary electron emission, etc) which influence plasma properties and dynamics both near and far from the material interface. In this paper, we use first-principles PIC simulations of such interfaces to formulate a subgrid sheath boundary condition which encapsulates fundamental aspects of the sheath behavior at the interface. Such a boundary condition, based on the capacitive behavior of the sheath, is shown to be useful in fluid simulations wherein sheath scale lengths are substantially smaller than scale lengths for other relevant physical processes (e.g. radiofrequency wavelengths), in that it enables kinetic processes associated with the presence of the sheath to be numerically modeled without explicit resolution of spatial and temporal sheath scales such as electron Debye length or plasma frequency.

  2. Mechanisms of tendon injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Parks, William C.; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon disorders are common and lead to significant disability, pain, healthcare cost, and lost productivity. A wide range of injury mechanisms exist leading to tendinopathy or tendon rupture. Tears can occur in healthy tendons that are acutely overloaded (e.g., during a high speed or high impact event) or lacerated (e.g., a knife injury). Tendinitis or tendinosis can occur in tendons exposed to overuse conditions (e.g., an elite swimmer’s training regimen) or intrinsic tissue degeneration (e.g., age-related degeneration). The healing potential of a torn or pathologic tendon varies depending on anatomic location (e.g., Achilles vs. rotator cuff) and local environment (e.g., intrasynovial vs. extrasynovial). Although healing occurs to varying degrees, in general healing of repaired tendons follows the typical wound healing course, including an early inflammatory phase, followed by proliferative and remodeling phases. Numerous treatment approaches have been attempted to improve tendon healing, including growth factor- and cell-based therapies and rehabilitation protocols. This review will describe the current state of knowledge of injury and repair of the three most common tendinopathies-- flexor tendon lacerations, Achilles tendon rupture, and rotator cuff disorders-- with a particular focus on the use of animal models for understanding tendon healing. PMID:25641114

  3. [Secondary tendon reconstruction on the thumb].

    PubMed

    Bickert, B; Kremer, T; Kneser, U

    2016-12-01

    Closed tendon ruptures of the thumb that require secondary reconstruction can affect the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons. Treatment of rupture of the EPB tendon consists of refixation to the bone and temporary transfixation of the joint. In the case of preexisting or posttraumatic arthrosis, definitive arthrodesis of the thumb is the best procedure. Closed ruptures of the EPL and FPL tendons at the wrist joint cannot be treated by direct tendon suture. Rupture of the EPL tendon occurs after distal radius fractures either due to protruding screws or following conservative treatment especially in undisplaced fractures. Transfer of the extensor indicis tendon to the distal EPL stump is a good option and free interposition of the palmaris longus tendon is a possible alternative. The tension should be adjusted to slight overcorrection, which can be checked intraoperatively by performing the tenodesis test. Closed FPL ruptures at the wrist typically occur 3-6 months after osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures with palmar plates and are mostly characterized by crepitation and pain lasting for several weeks. They can be prevented by premature plate removal, synovectomy and carpal tunnel release. For treatment of a ruptured FPL tendon in adult patients the options for tendon reconstruction should be weighed up against the less complicated tenodesis or arthrodesis of the thumb interphalangeal joint.

  4. Magnetotherapy: The quest for tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pesqueira, Tamagno; Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Gomes, Manuela E

    2018-05-09

    Tendons are mechanosensitive tissues that connect and transmit the forces generated by muscles to bones by allowing the conversion of mechanical input into biochemical signals. These physical forces perform the fundamental work of preserving tendon homeostasis assuring body movements. However, overloading causes tissue injuries, which leads us to the field of tendon regeneration. Recently published reviews have broadly shown the use of biomaterials and different strategies to attain tendon regeneration. In this review, our focus is the use of magnetic fields as an alternative therapy, which has demonstrated clinical relevance in tendon medicine because of their ability to modulate cell fate. Yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms still need to be elucidated. While providing a brief outlook about specific signalling pathways and intracellular messengers as framework in play by tendon cells, application of magnetic fields as a subcategory of physical forces is explored, opening up a compelling avenue to enhance tendon regeneration. We outline here useful insights on the effects of magnetic fields both at in vitro and in vivo levels, particularly on the expression of tendon genes and inflammatory cytokines, ultimately involved in tendon regeneration. Subsequently, the potential of using magnetically responsive biomaterials in tendon tissue engineering is highlighted and future directions in magnetotherapy are discussed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Experimental evaluation of multiscale tendon mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-07-01

    Tendon's primary function is a mechanical link between muscle and bone. The hierarchical structure of tendon and specific compositional constituents are believed to be critical for proper mechanical function. With increased appreciation for tendon importance and the development of various technological advances, this review paper summarizes recent experimental approaches that have been used to study multiscale tendon mechanics, includes an overview of studies that have evaluated the role of specific tissue constituents, and also proposes challenges/opportunities facing tendon study. Tendon has been demonstrated to have specific structural characteristics (e.g., multi-level hierarchy, crimp pattern, helix) and complex mechanical properties (e.g., non-linearity, anisotropy, viscoelasticity). Physical mechanisms including uncrimping, fiber sliding, and collagen reorganization have been shown to govern tendon mechanical responses under both static and dynamic loading. Several tendon constituents with relatively small quantities have been suggested to play a role in its mechanics, although some results are conflicting. Further research should be performed to understand the interplay and communication of tendon mechanical properties across levels of the hierarchical structure, and further show how each of these components contribute to tendon mechanics. The studies summarized and discussed in this review have helped elucidate important aspects of multiscale tendon mechanics, which is a prerequisite for analyzing stress/strain transfer between multiple scales and identifying key principles of mechanotransduction. This information could further facilitate interpreting the functional diversity of tendons from different species, different locations, and even different developmental stages, and then better understand and identify fundamental concepts related to tendon degeneration, disease, and healing. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  6. Human tendon behaviour and adaptation, in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S Peter; Narici, Marco V; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Kjaer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tendon properties contribute to the complex interaction of the central nervous system, muscle–tendon unit and bony structures to produce joint movement. Until recently limited information on human tendon behaviour in vivo was available; however, novel methodological advancements have enabled new insights to be gained in this area. The present review summarizes the progress made with respect to human tendon and aponeurosis function in vivo, and how tendons adapt to ageing, loading and unloading conditions. During low tensile loading or with passive lengthening not only the muscle is elongated, but also the tendon undergoes significant length changes, which may have implications for reflex responses. During active loading, the length change of the tendon far exceeds that of the aponeurosis, indicating that the aponeurosis may more effectively transfer force onto the tendon, which lengthens and stores elastic energy subsequently released during unloading, in a spring-like manner. In fact, data recently obtained in vivo confirm that, during walking, the human Achilles tendon provides elastic strain energy that can decrease the energy cost of locomotion. Also, new experimental evidence shows that, contrary to earlier beliefs, the metabolic activity in human tendon is remarkably high and this affords the tendon the ability to adapt to changing demands. With ageing and disuse there is a reduction in tendon stiffness, which can be mitigated with resistance exercises. Such adaptations seem advantageous for maintaining movement rapidity, reducing tendon stress and risk of injury, and possibly, for enabling muscles to operate closer to the optimum region of the length–tension relationship. PMID:17855761

  7. Continuum-kinetic approach to sheath simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, Petr; Hakim, Ammar; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2016-10-01

    Simulations of sheaths are performed using a novel continuum-kinetic model with collisions including ionization/recombination. A discontinuous Galerkin method is used to directly solve the Boltzmann-Poisson system to obtain a particle distribution function. Direct discretization of the distribution function has advantages of being noise-free compared to particle-in-cell methods. The distribution function, which is available at each node of the configuration space, can be readily used to calculate the collision integrals in order to get ionization and recombination operators. Analytical models are used to obtain the cross-sections as a function of energy. Results will be presented incorporating surface physics with a classical sheath in Hall thruster-relevant geometry. This work was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0193.

  8. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  9. The severity of the long head biceps tendinopathy in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears: macroscopic versus microscopic results.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming; Yang, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Yang, Chyun-Yu; Su, Fong-Chin; Su, Wei-Ren

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the histopathology of the long head of biceps (LHB) tendon and correlated the findings with the macroscopic appearances of the LHB and the size of rotator cuff tears (RCTs) in patients with chronic RCTs. We compared biopsy specimens from LHBs in 34 patients with chronic RCTs and grossly normal LHBs in 8 patients undergoing shoulder hemiarthroplasty (controls). Duration of preoperative symptoms, the severity of RCTs, and macroscopic appearance of LHBs were recorded, classified, and compared with the histologic grading and apoptosis index of terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated biotin-deoxy uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays of LHBs. In the RCT group, there were 8 partial-thickness tears with 5 macroscopic LHB lesions, 12 full-thickness tears with 8 macroscopic LHB lesions, and 14 massive tears with 13 macroscopic LHB lesions. There were 6 LHB subluxations. However, the macroscopic grading and the symptom duration were not correlated with the severity of the histology. In patients with massive tears, no matter what the macroscopic appearance of the LHB, the proportion of end-stage (grade 4) histologic LHB tendinopathy significantly increased (85.7%, P < .05) compared with patients with other types of RCTs. There was a consistently high incidence of advanced LHB histology (grade 3 or higher) in each classification of RCTs (75.0%-100.0%). The 8 patients in the control group showed milder histopathology (grade 1 or 2). The apoptosis index significantly increased as the tendinopathy progressed (P < .05). The macroscopic pathology of LHB may not fully reflect the severity of tendinopathy, and the coexisting size of RCTs plays a role in the severity of LHB tendinopathy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatial distribution of surface action potentials generated by individual motor units in the human biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Negro, Francesco; Gonzalez-Izal, Miriam; Farina, Dario

    2013-08-01

    This study analyses the spatial distribution of individual motor unit potentials (MUPs) over the skin surface and the influence of motor unit depth and recording configuration on this distribution. Multichannel surface (13×5 electrode grid) and intramuscular (wire electrodes inserted with needles of lengths 15 and 25mm) electromyographic (EMG) signals were concurrently recorded with monopolar derivations from the biceps brachii muscle of 10 healthy subjects during 60-s isometric contractions at 20% of the maximum torque. Multichannel monopolar MUPs of the target motor unit were obtained by spike-triggered averaging of the surface EMG. Amplitude and frequency characteristics of monopolar and bipolar MUPs were calculated for locations along the fibers' direction (longitudinal), and along the direction perpendicular (transverse) to the fibers. In the longitudinal direction, monopolar and bipolar MUPs exhibited marked amplitude changes that extended for 16-32mm and 16-24mm over the innervation and tendon zones, respectively. The variation of monopolar and bipolar MUP characteristics was not symmetrical about the innervation zone. Motor unit depth had a considerable influence on the relative longitudinal variation of amplitude for monopolar MUPs, but not for bipolar MUPs. The transverse extension of bipolar MUPs ranged between 24 and 32mm, whereas that of monopolar MUPs ranged between 72 and 96mm. The mean power spectral frequency of surface MUPs was highly dependent on the transverse electrode location but not on depth. This study provides a basis for the interpretation of the contribution of individual motor units to the interference surface EMG signal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tenderization effect of soy sauce on beef M. biceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Yun-Sang; Choi, Ji-Hun; Kim, Hack-Youn; Lee, Mi-Ai; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Lim, Yun-Bin; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2013-08-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the tenderization effect of soy sauce on beef M. biceps femoris (BF). Five marinades were prepared with 4% (w/v) sodium chloride and 25% (w/v) soy sauce solutions (4% salt concentration) and mixed with the ratios of 100:0 (S0, pH 6.52), 75:25 (S25, 5.40) 50:50 (S50, 5.24), 25:75 (S75, 5.05), and 0:100 (S100, 4.85), respectively. The BF samples which were obtained from Hanwoo cows at 48 h postmortem (n=24) were marinated with five marinades for 72 h at 4°C (1:4 w/w), and the effects of soy sauce on tenderness were evaluated. Soy sauce marination resulted in a decrease in the pH value of the BF sample. However, there were no significant differences in the water holding capacity (P<0.05). The S100 treatment showed the significant (P<0.05) increase in collagen solubility and myofibrillar fragmentation index, contributing to decreased shear force compared to S0 (control). Reduction in intensity of few myofibrillar protein bands were observed for S100 treatment compared to control using SDS-PAGE. Scanning electron microscopy revealed breakdown of connective tissue surrounding muscle fibers of the S100 treatment. The tenderization effect of soy sauce may attribute various mechanisms such as increased collagen solubility or proteolysis which depend on soy sauce level in marinade. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Ultrastructural observation of tendonization of artificial tendon 109HH in rabbit].

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Cao, Q; Xiao, H

    1995-09-01

    Ten New Zealand rabbits were divided into 5 groups at random. Calcaneal tendons were cut bilaterally, then atificial tendon 109HH was used to connect the two ends of the cut tendon. Ultrastructural changes of control group and experimental groups at 2, 6, 12, 28 weeks after section were observed. The results showed that fibroblast proliferated and a lot of ribosome and RER appeared in plasm during 2 approximately 6 weeks, indicating artificial tendon caused fibroblast proliferation. During this period, fibroblast over synthesized collagenous protein and the synthesis of collagenous fibers peaked. During 12-28 weeks, the number of fibroblasts and the synthesis of collagenous protein decreased. Finally, fibroblasts became inactive tendon cells. With the formation of new tendons, the artificial tendens were degradated and absorbed, and disappeared after 12 weeks. The new tendon fibers became thicker and had the correct direction through reconstruction. The structure and function of new tendons could be restored to be consistent with normal values.

  13. Modeling corona sheath dynamics and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B.; Lehtinen, N. G.

    2016-12-01

    The conductive lightning channel is only a centimeter or so in diameter, but charge deposited along such a narrow channel produces a large electric field that drives corona discharge in nearby air, carrying the charge outward several meters. The formation of this "corona sheath" affects a wide range of observable properties of lightning, including the overall charge carried by the channel, the shape, speed, and attenuation of impulsive currents, and the possibility of x-ray production. Simplified electrostatic and electrodynamic models of the formation of the sheath will be discussed, with results given including regions near the tip of a hypothetical channel. These results suggest that the sheath initially expands very rapidly, limiting the lifetime of the intense fields nearest the channel. The expansion gradually slows as the fields decrease, but under certain circumstances a large-scale streamer-like process can lead to enhancement of electric fields displaced from the tip of the channel, possibly suggesting a mechanism for space stem formation and leader stepping.

  14. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed Central

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  15. Arthroscopic repair of traumatic isolated subscapularis tendon lesions (Lafosse Type III or IV): a prospective magnetic resonance imaging-controlled case series with 1 year of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Patrick; Nikolic, Nikola; Schneider, Joerg; Lattmann, Thomas; Platz, Andreas; Chmiel, Corinne; Meier, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the efficacy of arthroscopic repair of isolated high-grade subscapularis (SSC) tendon lesions by means of clinical follow-up combined with magnetic resonance imaging investigations. Between January 2008 and September 2010, 11 patients (9 men and 2 women; mean age, 45 ± 10 years) with Lafosse type III or IV traumatic isolated SSC tendon lesions underwent arthroscopic repair including tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon. All patients were preoperatively assessed by clinical examination (Constant-Murley score [CMS]) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance arthrography. At 1 year of follow-up, specific clinical SSC tests, the CMS, and the loss of external rotation were evaluated. A native magnetic resonance investigation was performed to assess the structural integrity of the repair. The SSC muscle was compared with its preoperative condition regarding fatty infiltration and size (cross-sectional area). Patient satisfaction was graded from 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent). The mean time interval from trauma to surgery was 3.7 months. A concomitant lesion of the biceps tendon was observed in 10 patients (91%). The mean CMS improved from 44 to 89 points (P < .001). The functional tests showed a significant increase in strength (P < .05) (belly-press test, 4.8 v 2.9; lift-off test, 4.8 v 2.9). The mean loss of external rotation at 0° of abduction was 10° compared with the contralateral side (P < .05). Patient satisfaction was high. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation showed complete structural integrity of the tendon repair in all studies. The SSC showed a significant decrease in fatty infiltration and increase in the cross-sectional area. Arthroscopic repair of higher-grade isolated SSC lesions provides reliable tendon healing accompanied by excellent functional results 1 year after surgery. Level IV, prospective therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published

  16. Investigating tendon mineralisation in the avian hindlimb: a model for tendon ageing, injury and disease

    PubMed Central

    Agabalyan, Natacha A; Evans, Darrell J R; Stanley, Rachael L

    2013-01-01

    Mineralisation of the tendon tissue has been described in various models of injury, ageing and disease. Often resulting in painful and debilitating conditions, the processes underlying this mechanism are poorly understood. To elucidate the progression from healthy tendon to mineralised tendon, an appropriate model is required. In this study, we describe the spontaneous and non-pathological ossification and calcification of tendons of the hindlimb of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The appearance of the ossified avian tendon has been described previously, although there have been no studies investigating the developmental processes and underlying mechanisms leading to the ossified avian tendon. The tissue and cells from three tendons – the ossifying extensor and flexor digitorum longus tendons and the non-ossifying Achilles tendon – were analysed for markers of ageing and mineralisation using histology, immunohistochemistry, cytochemistry and molecular analysis. Histologically, the adult tissue showed a loss of healthy tendon crimp morphology as well as markers of calcium deposits and mineralisation. The tissue showed a lowered expression of collagens inherent to the tendon extracellular matrix and presented proteins expressed by bone. The cells from the ossified tendons showed a chondrogenic and osteogenic phenotype as well as tenogenic phenotype and expressed the same markers of ossification and calcification as the tissue. A molecular analysis of the gene expression of the cells confirmed these results. Tendon ossification within the ossified avian tendon seems to be the result of an endochondral process driven by its cells, although the roles of the different cell populations have yet to be elucidated. Understanding the role of the tenocyte within this tissue and the process behind tendon ossification may help us prevent or treat ossification that occurs in injured, ageing or diseased tendon. PMID:23826786

  17. Fos Promotes Early Stage Teno-Lineage Differentiation of Tendon Stem/Progenitor Cells in Tendon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jialin; Zhang, Erchen; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zeyu; Lu, Ping; Zhu, Ting; Yin, Zi; Backman, Ludvig J; Liu, Huanhuan; Chen, Xiao; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-11-01

    Stem cells have been widely used in tendon tissue engineering. The lack of refined and controlled differentiation strategy hampers the tendon repair and regeneration. This study aimed to find new effective differentiation factors for stepwise tenogenic differentiation. By microarray screening, the transcript factor Fos was found to be expressed in significantly higher amounts in postnatal Achilles tendon tissue derived from 1 day as compared with 7-days-old rats. It was further confirmed that expression of Fos decreased with time in postnatal rat Achilles tendon, which was accompanied with the decreased expression of multiply tendon markers. The expression of Fos also declined during regular in vitro cell culture, which corresponded to the loss of tendon phenotype. In a cell-sheet and a three-dimensional cell culture model, the expression of Fos was upregulated as compared with in regular cell culture, together with the recovery of tendon phenotype. In addition, significant higher expression of tendon markers was found in Fos-overexpressed tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs), and Fos knock-down gave opposite results. In situ rat tendon repair experiments found more normal tendon-like tissue formed and higher tendon markers expression at 4 weeks postimplantation of Fos-overexpressed TSPCs derived nonscaffold engineering tendon (cell-sheet), as compared with the control group. This study identifies Fos as a new marker and functional driver in the early stage teno-lineage differentiation of tendon, which paves the way for effective stepwise tendon differentiation and future tendon regeneration. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2009-2019. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  18. Quadriceps tendon rupture - treatment results.

    PubMed

    Popov, Iva; Ristić, Vladimir; Maljanović, Mirsad; Milankov, Vukadin

    2013-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare but rather serious injury. If this injury is not promptly recognized and early operated, it may lead to disability. This research was aimed at pointing out the results and complications of the quadriceps tendon rupture surgical treatment. This retrospective multicentric study was conducted in a group of 29 patients (mostly elderly men). Lysholm knee scoring scale was used to evaluate the surgical results. The post-operative results were compared in relation to the type of tendon rupture reconstructions (acute or chronic), various surgical techniques, type of injuries (unilateral or bilateral) as well as the presence or absence of comorbid risk factors in the patients. The average value of a Lysholm score was 87.6. Excellent and satisfactory Lysholm score results dominated in our sample of patients. Better post-operative results were recorded in the group of patients without risk factors, in case of a bilateral injury, and in case of an acute injury. The best result was obtained after performing the reconstruction using anchors, and the worst result came after using Codivilla technique. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment are an absolute imperative in management of this injury. We have not proven that a certain surgical technique has an advantage over the others. A comorbid risk factor is related to a lower Lysholm score. Despite a few cases of complications, we can conclude that the surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  19. Lubricin Surface Modification Improves Tendon Gliding After Tendon Repair in a Canine Model in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Manabu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; Cha, Chung-Ja; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of lubricin on the gliding of repaired flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons in vitro. Canine FDP tendons were completely lacerated, repaired with a modified Pennington technique, and treated with one of the following solutions: saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin to which lubricin was added in a second step (cd-gelatin + lubricin), or carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/HA + lubricin (cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin). After treatment, gliding resistance was measured up to 1,000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. The increase in average and peak gliding resistance in cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin tendons was less than the control tendons after 1,000 cycles (p < 0.05). The increase in average gliding resistance of cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons was also less than that of the cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons (p < 0.05). The surfaces of the repaired tendons and associated pulleys were assessed qualitatively with scanning electron microscopy and appeared smooth after 1,000 cycles of tendon motion for the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons, while that of the saline control appeared roughened. These results suggest that tendon surface modification can improve tendon gliding ability, with a trend suggesting that lubricin fixed on the repaired tendon may provide additional improvement over that provided by HA and gelatin alone. PMID:18683890

  20. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore » to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  1. Rat supraspinatus muscle atrophy after tendon detachment.

    PubMed

    Barton, Elisabeth R; Gimbel, Jonathan A; Williams, Gerald R; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2005-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common tendon disorders found in the healthy population. Tendon tears not only affect the biomechanical properties of the tendon, but can also lead to debilitation of the muscles attached to the damaged tendons. The changes that occur in the muscle after tendon detachment are not well understood. A rat rotator cuff model was utilized to determine the time course of changes that occur in the supraspinatus muscle after tendon detachment. It was hypothesized that the lack of load on the supraspinatus muscle would cause a significant decrease in muscle mass and a conversion of muscle fiber properties toward those of fast fiber types. Tendons were detached at the insertion on the humerus without repair. Muscle mass, morphology and fiber properties were measured at one, two, four, eight, and 16 weeks after detachment. Tendon detachment resulted in a rapid loss of muscle mass, an increase in the proportion of fast muscle fibers, and an increase in the fibrotic content of the muscle bed, concomitant with the appearance of adhesions of the tendon to surrounding surfaces. At 16 weeks post-detachment, muscle mass and the fiber properties in the deep muscle layers returned to normal levels. However, the fiber shifts observed in the superficial layers persisted throughout the experiment. These results suggest that load returned to the muscle via adhesions to surrounding surfaces, which may be sufficient to reverse changes in muscle mass.

  2. Treatment of the neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are best managed acutely. Neglected Achilles tendon ruptures are debilitating injuries and the increased complexity of the situation must be appreciated. Surgical management is recommended, and only in the poorest surgical candidate is conservative treatment entertained. Numerous treatment algorithms and surgical techniques have been described. A V-Y advancement flap and flexor halluces longus tendon transfer have been found to be reliable and achieve good clinical outcomes for defects ranging from 2 cm to 8 cm. This article focuses on the treatment options for the neglected Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Design, analysis and control of a novel tendon-driven magnetic resonance-guided robotic system for minimally invasive breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Lou, Jinlong; Yang, Zhiyong; Dai, Jiansheng; Yu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Biopsy and brachytherapy for small core breast cancer are always difficult medical problems in the field of cancer treatment. This research mainly develops a magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-precision robotic system for breast puncture treatment. First, a 5-degree-of-freedom tendon-based surgical robotic system is introduced in detail. What follows are the kinematic analysis and dynamical modeling of the robotic system, where a mathematic dynamic model is established using the Lagrange method and a lumped parameter tendon model is used to identify the nonlinear gain of the tendon-sheath transmission system. Based on the dynamical models, an adaptive proportional-integral-derivative controller with friction compensation is proposed for accurate position control. Through simulations using different sinusoidal input signals, we observe that the sinusoidal tracking error at 1/2π Hz is 0.41 mm. Finally, the experiments on tendon-sheath transmission and needle insertion performance are conducted, which show that the insertion precision is 0.68 mm in laboratory environment. © IMechE 2015.

  4. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  5. The effect of the long head of the biceps on glenohumeral kinematics.

    PubMed

    Youm, Thomas; ElAttrache, Neal S; Tibone, James E; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2009-01-01

    The long head of the biceps has been described as a stabilizing force in the setting of glenohumeral instability. However, data are lacking on the effect of loading the long head of the biceps on glenohumeral kinematics. Six cadaveric shoulders were tested for glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation using a custom shoulder testing system and the Microscribe 3DLX (Immersion, San Jose, CA). The path of glenohumeral articulation (PGA) was measured by calculating the humeral head center with respect to the glenoid articular surface at maximal internal rotation, 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and maximal external rotation. Significant decreases in glenohumeral rotational range of motion and translation were found with 22-N biceps loading vs the unloaded group. With respect to the PGA, the humeral rotation center was shifted posterior with biceps loading at maximal internal rotation, 30 degrees, and 60 degrees of external rotation. Loading the long head of the biceps significantly affects glenohumeral rotational range of motion, translations, and kinematics.

  6. Nerve sheath myxoma: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amoolya; Narasimha, Apaparna; C, Vijaya; Vk, Sundeep

    2015-04-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics.

  7. Nerve Sheath Myxoma: Report of A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; C, Vijaya; VK, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics. PMID:26023558

  8. Nonoperative treatment of distal biceps brachii musculotendinous partial rupture: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    López-Zabala, I; Fernández-Valencia, J A

    2013-01-01

    Musculotendinous ruptures of the distal biceps brachii are extremely rare injuries whose clinical presentation is similar to distal biceps avulsion. We describe two cases of patients who suffered a distal biceps brachii musculotendinous partial rupture. The first patient was playing soccer as goalkeeper and experienced sudden pain while throwing the ball overhead with his left arm. The second patient experienced sudden pain while weightlifting with his right arm. The mechanism of injury was the same in the two cases, as both involved glenohumeral elevation with elbow extension and forearm supination. Neither of these two patients underwent surgical repair or rehabilitation, and both had perfect scores of 100 on the Mayo Clinic Performance Index for the Elbow at one-year followup.

  9. Analysis of electromyographic activity in spastic biceps brachii muscle following neural mobilization.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Jéssica; Ferreira, Luiz Alfredo Braun; Pereira, Wagner Menna; Neto, Hugo Pasini; Morelli, José Geraldo da Silva; Brandalize, Danielle; Kerppers, Ivo Ilvan; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2012-07-01

    Hypertonia is prevalent in anti-gravity muscles, such as the biceps brachii. Neural mobilization is one of the techniques currently used to reduce spasticity. The aim of the present study was to assess electromyographic (EMG) activity in spastic biceps brachii muscles before and after neural mobilization of the upper limb contralateral to the hemiplegia. Repeated pre-test and post-test EMG measurements were performed on six stroke victims with grade 1 or 2 spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale). The Upper Limb Neurodynamic Test (ULNT1) was the mobilization technique employed. After neural mobilization contralateral to the lesion, electromyographic activity in the biceps brachii decreased by 17% and 11% for 90° flexion and complete extension of the elbow, respectively. However, the results were not statistically significant (p gt; 0.05). When performed using contralateral techniques, neural mobilization alters the electrical signal of spastic muscles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-04

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. Finally, these predictions are contrasted in this paper with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  11. Therapeutics for tendon regeneration: a multidisciplinary review of tendon research for improved healing.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J J; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2016-11-01

    Tendon injuries, known as tendinopathies, are common musculoskeletal injuries that affect a wide range of the population. Canonical tendon healing is characterized by fibrosis, scar formation, and the loss of tissue mechanical and structural properties. Understanding the regenerative tendon environment is an area of increasing interest in the field of musculoskeletal research. Previous studies have focused on utilizing individual elements from the fields of biomechanics, developmental biology, cell and growth factor therapy, and tissue engineering in an attempt to develop regenerative tendon therapeutics. Still, the specific mechanism for regenerative healing remains unknown. In this review, we highlight some of the current approaches of tendon therapeutics and elucidate the differences along the tendon midsubstance and enthesis, exhibiting the necessity of location-specific tendon therapeutics. Furthermore, we emphasize the necessity of further interdisciplinary research in order to reach the desired goal of fully understanding the mechanisms underlying regenerative healing. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Structure-mechanics relationships in mineralized tendons.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we review the hierarchical structure and the resulting elastic properties of mineralized tendons as obtained by various multiscale experimental and computational methods spanning from nano- to macroscale. The mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibres are important to understand the mechanics of hard tissues constituted by complex arrangements of these fibres, like in human lamellar bone. The uniaxial mineralized collagen fibre array naturally occurring in avian tendons is a well studied model tissue for investigating various stages of tissue mineralization and the corresponding elastic properties. Some avian tendons mineralize with maturation, which results in a graded structure containing two zones of distinct morphology, circumferential and interstitial. These zones exhibit different amounts of mineral, collagen, pores and a different mineral distribution between collagen fibrillar and extrafibrillar space that lead to distinct elastic properties. Mineralized tendon cells have two phenotypes: elongated tenocytes placed between fibres in the circumferential zone and cuboidal cells with lower aspect ratios in the interstitial zone. Interestingly some regions of avian tendons seem to be predestined to mineralization, which is exhibited as specific collagen cross-linking patterns as well as distribution of minor tendon constituents (like proteoglycans) and loss of collagen crimp. Results of investigations in naturally mineralizing avian tendons may be useful in understanding the pathological mineralization occurring in some human tendons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  14. The characteristics of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths: An analysis of the standard sheath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of radio frequency (RF) modulated plasma boundary sheaths are studied on the basis of the so-called ``standard sheath model.'' This model assumes that the applied radio frequency ωRF is larger than the plasma frequency of the ions but smaller than that of the electrons. It comprises a phase-averaged ion model - consisting of an equation of continuity (with ionization neglected) and an equation of motion (with collisional ion-neutral interaction taken into account) - a phase-resolved electron model - consisting of an equation of continuity and the assumption of Boltzmann equilibrium -, and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Previous investigations have studied the standard sheath model under additional approximations, most notably the assumption of a step-like electron front. This contribution presents an investigation and parameter study of the standard sheath model which avoids any further assumptions. The resulting density profiles and overall charge-voltage characteristics are compared with those of the step-model based theories. The authors gratefully acknowledge Efe Kemaneci for helpful comments and fruitful discussions.

  15. [Conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, T; Gaulke, R; Imrecke, J; Krettek, C; Stübig, T

    2010-09-01

    The conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures has developed further over the last 20 years and is basically possible for 60-80% of patients. The treatment leads to success if the indications obtained by dynamic sonography are correctly interpreted (adaptation of the tendon ends up to 20 degrees plantar flexion), if the patient presents sufficient compliance and the physiotherapy is increasingly intensified depending on tendon healing. Modern ortheses allow an increased equinus position and therefore improved protection of the healing tendon. If these factors are present a relatively low re-rupture rate of only 7% can be achieved. The decisive advantage of conservative functional therapy is the avoidance of specific operative risks, such as infection and injury to the sural nerve. After removal of the orthesis the tendon should continue to be modeled using shoe insoles and raised heels.

  16. [Lesions of the long head of the biceps--their pathogenesis and demonstration by imaging procedures (sonography, x-ray, arthrography and computed tomography)].

    PubMed

    Hannesschläger, G; Riedelberger, W; Neumüller, H; Schwarzl, G

    1989-09-01

    Because of unusual anatomy and function the long head of the biceps brachii (LHB) is often subject to pathologic changes. On reviewing 354 sonographies of the shoulder (7.5 MHz), it was found that 61 (= 17%) abnormal findings of the LHB were reported such as degenerative changes accompanying impingement stadium II and III (atrophy, hypertrophy, effusion), intracapsular ruptures, acute isolated tenosynovitis and bony changes of the sulcus (bony spurs, shallow and dysplastic sulcus with subluxation of the LHB). Each abnormal finding was confirmed by x-ray and arthrography (some via CT) and compared with sonographic report. There seems to be a strikingly high percentage of rotator cuff tears connected with lesions of the LHB and the reduced filling of the sheath of the LHB, if combined lesions were apparent elsewhere in the shoulder. We consider sonography to be the method of choice in the assessment of LHB injuries; in case of verified lesion of the LHB, other pathologic conditions elsewhere in the shoulder are likely.

  17. [Clinical application of peroneal muscles tendon transposition in repair of Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Jin, Rihao; Jin, Yu; Fang, Xiulin

    2006-07-01

    To discuss applied anatomy, biomechanics and surgical procedures of long peroneal muscles tendon transposition in repair of occlusive achilles tendon rupture. The blood supply and the morphology of long peroneal muscles tendon were observed in the lower extremity of 50 sides adult specimens and the mechanical tests which stretch load on the tendon were carried out. The methods were designed on the basis of the anatomical characteristics and morphology. Ten patients suffering occlusive Achilles tendon rupture were treated by using long peroneal muscles tendon transposition from March 2001 to July 2004. Among 10 patients, there were 7 males and 3 females, aging 32 to 54 years including 6 cases of jump injury, 2 cases of bruise, 1 case of step vacancy and 1 case of spontaneity injury. The interval between injury and surgery was 6 hours to 7 days in 7 fresh rupture and 21 days to 3 months in 3 old rupture. All cases belonged to occlusive Achilles tendon rupture (8 cases of complete rupture and 2 cases of incomplete rupture). The origin of long peroneal muscles was proximal tibia and fibular head, the end of them was base of first metatarsal bones and medial cuboid. The length of tendon was 13.5 +/- 2.5 cm. The width of origin tendon was 0.9 +/- 0.2 cm and the thickness was 0.3 +/- 0.1 cm; the width on apex of lateral malleolus was 0.7 +/- 0.1 cm and the thickness was 0.4 +/- 0.1 cm, the width on head of cuboid was 0.7 +/- 0.1 cm and the thickness was 0.3 +/- 0.1 cm. The long peroneal muscles tendon had abundant blood supply. The results of mechanical test showed that the biggest load was 2,292.4 +/- 617.3 N on tendon calcaneus, 1,020.4 +/- 175.4 N on long peroneal muscles tendon, 752.0 +/- 165.4 N on peroneus brevis tendon and 938.2 +/- 216.7 N on tibialis posterior tendon. Ten cases of occlusive Achilles tendon rupture achieved healing by first intention and were followed up 18-24 months. No Achilles tendon re-rupture, necrosis of skin or other complications occurred

  18. Functional tissue engineering of tendon: Establishing biological success criteria for improving tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Gilday, Steven D; Lalley, Andrea L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Gooch, Cynthia; Shearn, Jason T; Butler, David L

    2014-06-27

    Improving tendon repair using Functional Tissue Engineering (FTE) principles has been the focus of our laboratory over the last decade. Although our primary goals were initially focused only on mechanical outcomes, we are now carefully assessing the biological properties of our tissue-engineered tendon repairs so as to link biological influences with mechanics. However, given the complexities of tendon development and healing, it remains challenging to determine which aspects of tendon biology are the most important to focus on in the context of tissue engineering. To address this problem, we have formalized a strategy to identify, prioritize, and evaluate potential biological success criteria for tendon repair. We have defined numerous biological properties of normal tendon relative to cellular phenotype, extracellular matrix and tissue ultra-structure that we would like to reproduce in our tissue-engineered repairs and prioritized these biological criteria by examining their relative importance during both normal development and natural tendon healing. Here, we propose three specific biological criteria which we believe are essential for normal tendon function: (1) scleraxis-expressing cells; (2) well-organized and axially-aligned collagen fibrils having bimodal diameter distribution; and (3) a specialized tendon-to-bone insertion site. Moving forward, these biological success criteria will be used in conjunction with our already established mechanical success criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered tendon repairs. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Increased glenohumeral translation and biceps load after SLAP lesions with potential influence on glenohumeral chondral lesions: a biomechanical study on human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Patzer, T; Habermeyer, P; Hurschler, C; Bobrowitsch, E; Paletta, J R; Fuchs-Winkelmann, S; Schofer, M D

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the stabilizing function of the long head of biceps tendon (LHB) and its tension, both without and with the presence of SLAP lesion to analyze a potentially occurring humeral chondral print of LHB with consecutive glenohumeral chondral lesions in SLAP lesions. Testings were performed on 21 fresh frozen human cadaver shoulders with intact shoulder girdle by a 5 axis industrial robot with a force/moment sensor and 20 N joint compression, 50 N force in anterior, posterior, anterosuperior, and anteroinferior direction, and 0°, 30°, 60° of abduction. LHB was connected over a force measuring sensor with 5 N and 25 N preload. A type IIC SLAP lesion was created arthroscopically. A significant increase in anterior and anteroinferior translation was evaluated, whereas the LHB tension increased significantly in at most anterior and anterosuperior direction. The highest increase in translation and LHB tension after SLAP lesion was measured in anterior translation in at most 60° of abduction. The glenohumeral translation was significantly higher in SLAP lesions without LHB tenotomy than after isolated LHB tenotomy. SLAP lesions lead to increased glenohumeral translation and concurrently LHB tension and load in at most anterior direction. The increased anterior glenohumeral instability and the increased LHB load pressing on the humeral head might cause glenohumeral chondral lesions with a typical chondral print-like lesion on the humeral head underneath the LHB.

  20. Histochemistry profile of the biceps brachii muscle fibres of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella, Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Bortoluci, C H F; Simionato, L H; Rosa Junior, G M; Oliveira, J A; Lauris, J R P; Moraes, L H R; Rodrigues, A C; Andreo, J C

    2014-08-01

    A general analysis of the behaviour of "Cebus" shows that when this primate moves position to feed or perform another activity, it presents different ways of locomotion. This information shows that the brachial biceps muscle of this animal is frequently used in their locomotion activities, but it should also be remembered that this muscle is also used for other development activities like hiding, searching for objects, searching out in the woods, and digging in the soil. Considering the above, it was decided to research the histoenzimologic characteristics of the brachial biceps muscle to observe whether it is better adpted to postural or phasic function. To that end, samples were taken from the superficial and deep regions, the inserts proximal (medial and lateral) and distal brachial biceps six capuchin monkeys male and adult, which were subjected to the reactions of m-ATPase, NADH-Tr. Based on the results of these reactions fibres were classified as in Fast Twitch Glycolitic (FG), Fast Twitch Oxidative Glycolitic (FOG) and Slow Twitc (SO). In general, the results, considering the muscle as a whole, show a trend of frequency FOG> FG> SO. The data on the frequency were studied on three superficial regions FOG=FG>SO; the deep regions of the inserts proximal FOG=FG=SO and inserting the distal FOG>FG=SO. In conclusion, the biceps brachii of the capuchin monkey is well adapted for both postural and phasic activities.

  1. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: BICEP Intercambio de la Cultura.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Marietta Saravia; Nafus, Charles

    This content analysis schedule for BICEP Intercambio de la Cultura (San Bernardino, California), presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the…

  2. Strain sonoelastographic evaluation of biceps muscle intrinsic stiffness after botulinum toxin-A injection.

    PubMed

    Aşkın, Ayhan; Kalaycı, Özlem Tuğçe; Bayram, Korhan Barış; Tosun, Aliye; Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Atar, Emel; İnci, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The most commonly used clinical tools for measuring spasticity are modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and Tardieu scale but both yield subjective rather than objective results. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) provides information on tissue stiffness and allows the qualitative or quantitative measurements of the mechanical properties of tissues. To assess the stiffness of biceps brachialis muscles in stroke patients by strain EUS and to investigate the sonoelastographic changes and its correlations with clinical evaluation parameters after botulinum toxin-A (BTA) injections. This is a prospective study. A total of 48 chronic stroke patients requiring BTA injections to biceps brachialis muscles were included in the study. All patients received injections with BTA to biceps brachialis muscles under ultrasound guidance. MAS, goniometric measurements, and strain EUS assessments were performed at preintervention and at 4-week postintervention. Strain index values of biceps muscle on the affected side were significantly increased compared with those on the unaffected side (p < 0.01). At 4 weeks after BTA injection, significant improvements were observed in MAS grades and goniometric measurements (p < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were also found between the MAS grades and strain index values in both pre-/postintervention period (p < 0.01). No significant correlations were observed between clinical parameters and strain EUS findings. Strain EUS is a promising diagnostic tool for assessing stiffness in spastic muscles, in establishing the treatment plan and monitoring the effectiveness of the therapeutic modality.

  3. Effect of cooling on thixotropic position-sense error in human biceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Sekihara, Chikara; Izumizaki, Masahiko; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takayuki; Atsumi, Takashi; Homma, Ikuo

    2007-06-01

    Muscle temperature affects muscle thixotropy. However, it is unclear whether changes in muscle temperature affect thixotropic position-sense errors. We studied the effect of cooling on thixotropic position-sense errors induced by short-length muscle contraction (hold-short conditioning) in the biceps of 12 healthy men. After hold-short conditioning of the right biceps muscle in a cooled (5.0 degrees C) or control (36.5 degrees C) environment, subjects perceived greater extension of the conditioned forearm at 5.0 degrees C. The angle differences between the two forearms following hold-short conditioning of the right biceps muscle in normal or cooled conditions were significantly different (-3.335 +/- 1.680 degrees at 36.5 degrees C vs. -5.317 +/- 1.096 degrees at 5.0 degrees C; P=0.043). Induction of a tonic vibration reflex in the biceps muscle elicited involuntary forearm elevation, and the angular velocities of the elevation differed significantly between arms conditioned in normal and cooled environments (1.583 +/- 0.326 degrees /s at 36.5 degrees C vs. 3.100 +/- 0.555 degrees /s at 5.0 degrees C, P=0.0039). Thus, a cooled environment impairs a muscle's ability to provide positional information, potentially leading to poor muscle performance.

  4. THE ROLE OF MECHANOBIOLOGY IN TENDON HEALING

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Megan L.; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical cues affect tendon healing, homeostasis, and development in a variety of settings. Alterations in the mechanical environment are known to result in changes in the expression of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, transcription factors, and cytokines that can alter tendon structure and cell viability. Loss of muscle force in utero or in the immediate postnatal period delays tendon and enthesis development. The response of healing tendons to mechanical load varies depending on anatomic location. Flexor tendons require motion to prevent adhesion formation, yet excessive force results in gap formation and subsequent weakening of the repair. Excessive motion in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction causes accumulation of macrophages, which are detrimental to tendon graft healing. Complete removal of load is detrimental to rotator cuff healing, yet large forces are also harmful. Controlled loading can enhance healing in most settings; however, a fine balance must be reached between loads that are too low (leading to a catabolic state) and too high (leading to micro-damage). This review will summarize existing knowledge of the mechanobiology of tendon development, homeostasis, and healing. PMID:22244066

  5. [Anterior dislocation of the popliteus tendon].

    PubMed

    Martinez Molina, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Review the most relevant aspects of the posterolateral corner anatomy of the knee, based on the analysis of papers that throughout the years have made important contributions to the knowledge of these structures. Last et al rejected the idea that the popliteal tendon is an isolated structure, suggesting rather that its variants are closely linked to other anatomical structures. The studies by Tria et al contributed the features of the tendon as it attaches to the lateral condyle, just to mention a couple of examples. This is the case of a 48 year-old female patient with a knee injury caused by an external rotation mechanism. Clinical features included pain, a protruding sensation in the lateral aspect of the knee, and voluntary pseudoblocking resulting from external rotation maneuvers. Knee arthroscopy was performed and dislocation of the popliteal tendon anterior to the lateral condyle was diagnosed, besides a longitudinal tear. The tendon was repositioned, radiofrequency was applied to both the tendon and the popliteal hiatus, and the former was kept in place with a plaster cast worn for 6 weeks. Even though the isolated tear or avulsion of the tendon has already been reported, the dislocation or instability of the popliteal tendon as it relates to the lateral femoral condyle has apparently not been approached yet. As we did in this case, other authors have also confirmed the diagnosis arthroscopically, Naver in 1985, Rose in 1988, and Burstein in 1990.

  6. Spine Patterning Is Guided by Segmentation of the Notochord Sheath.

    PubMed

    Wopat, Susan; Bagwell, Jennifer; Sumigray, Kaelyn D; Dickson, Amy L; Huitema, Leonie F A; Poss, Kenneth D; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Bagnat, Michel

    2018-02-20

    The spine is a segmented axial structure made of alternating vertebral bodies (centra) and intervertebral discs (IVDs) assembled around the notochord. Here, we show that, prior to centra formation, the outer epithelial cell layer of the zebrafish notochord, the sheath, segments into alternating domains corresponding to the prospective centra and IVD areas. This process occurs sequentially in an anteroposterior direction via the activation of Notch signaling in alternating segments of the sheath, which transition from cartilaginous to mineralizing domains. Subsequently, osteoblasts are recruited to the mineralized domains of the notochord sheath to form mature centra. Tissue-specific manipulation of Notch signaling in sheath cells produces notochord segmentation defects that are mirrored in the spine. Together, our findings demonstrate that notochord sheath segmentation provides a template for vertebral patterning in the zebrafish spine. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gas insulated transmission line having low inductance intercalated sheath

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1978-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line including an outer sheath, an inner conductor disposed within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas between the inner conductor and the outer sheath. The outer sheath comprises an insulating tube having first and second ends, and having interior and exterior surfaces. A first electrically conducting foil is secured to the interior surface of the insulating tube, is spirally wound from one tube end to the second tube end, and has a plurality of overlapping turns. A second electrically conducting foil is secured to the exterior surface of the insulating tube, and is spirally wound in the opposite direction from the first electrically conducting foil. By winding the foils in opposite directions, the inductances within the intercalated sheath will cancel each other out.

  8. What is the size of a floating sheath? An answer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Farina; Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-09-01

    The formation of a non-neutral boundary sheath in front of material surfaces is universal plasma phenomenon. Despite several decades of research, however, not all related issues are fully clarified. In a recent paper, Chabert pointed out that this lack of clarity applies even to the seemingly innocuous question ``What the size of a floating sheath?'' This contribution attempts to provide an answer that is not arbitrary: The size of a floating sheath is defined as the plate separation of an equivalent parallel plate capacitor. The consequences of the definition are explored with the help of a self-consistent sheath model, and a comparison is made with other sheath size definitions. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB TR 87.

  9. Effect of collisions on photoelectron sheath in a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the collision of electrons with atoms/molecules on the structure of a photoelectron sheath. Considering the half Fermi-Dirac distribution of photo-emitted electrons, an expression for the electron density in the sheath has been derived in terms of the electric potential and the structure of the sheath has been investigated by incorporating Poisson's equation in the analysis. The method of successive approximations has been used to solve Poisson's equation with the solution for the electric potential in the case of vacuum, obtained earlier [Sodha and Mishra, Phys. Plasmas 21, 093704 (2014)], being used as the zeroth order solution for the present analysis. The inclusion of collisions influences the photoelectron sheath structure significantly; a reduction in the sheath width with increasing collisions is obtained.

  10. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  11. Compensation of the sheath effects in cylindrical floating probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2018-05-01

    In cylindrical floating probe measurements, the plasma density and electron temperature are overestimated due to sheath expansion and oscillation. To reduce these sheath effects, a compensation method based on well-developed floating sheath theories is proposed and applied to the floating harmonic method. The iterative calculation of the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds equation can derive the floating sheath thickness, which can be used to calculate the effective ion collection area; in this way, an accurate ion density is obtained. The Child-Langmuir law is used to calculate the ion harmonic currents caused by sheath oscillation of the alternating-voltage-biased probe tip. Accurate plasma parameters can be obtained by subtracting these ion harmonic currents from the total measured harmonic currents. Herein, the measurement principles and compensation method are discussed in detail and an experimental demonstration is presented.

  12. The biomechanical performance of a new forked knotless biceps tenodesis compared to a knotless and suture anchor tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Lorbach, Olaf; Trennheuser, Christian; Kohn, Dieter; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-01

    Biomechanical comparison of three different fixation techniques for a proximal biceps tenodesis. Eighteen human cadaver specimens were used for the testing. A tenodesis of the proximal biceps tendon was performed using a double-loaded suture anchor (5.5-mm Corkscrew, Arthrex), a knotless anchor (5.5-mm SwiveLock, Arthrex) or a forked knotless anchor (8-mm SwiveLock, Arthrex). Reconstructions were cyclically loaded for 50 cycles from 10-60 to 10-100 N. Cyclic displacement and ultimate failure loads were determined, and mode of failure was evaluated. Cyclic displacement at 60 N revealed a mean of 3.3 ± 1.1 mm for the Corkscrew, 5.4 ± 1.4 mm for the 5.5-mm SwiveLock and 2.9 ± 1.6 mm for the 8-mm forked SwiveLock. At 100 N, 5.1 ± 2.2 mm were seen for the Corkscrew anchor, 8.7 ± 2.5 mm for the 5.5-mm SwiveLock and 4.8 ± 3.3 mm for the 8-mm forked SwiveLock anchor. Significant lower cyclic displacement was seen for the Corkscrew anchor (p < 0.020) as well as the 8-mm SwiveLock anchor (p < 0.023) compared to the 5.5-mm SwiveLock anchor at 60 N. An ultimate load to failure of 109 ± 27 N was found for the Corkscrew anchor, 125 ± 25 N were measured for the 5.5-mm SwiveLock anchor, and 175 ± 42 N were found for the 8-mm forked SwiveLock anchor. Significant differences were seen between the 8-mm SwiveLock compared to the 5.5-mm SwiveLock (p < 0.044) as well as the Corkscrew anchor (p < 0.009). No significant differences were seen between the Corkscrew and the 5.5-mm SwiveLock anchor. The new 8-mm forked SwiveLock anchor significantly enhances construct stability compared to a 5.5-mm double-loaded Corkscrew anchor as well as the 5.5-mm SwiveLock suture anchor. However, a restrictive postoperative rehabilitation seems to be important in all tested reconstructions in order to avoid early failure of the construct.

  13. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  14. One-stage treatment of delayed 'jersey finger' by Z-step lengthening of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon at the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Elias T; Choughri, Hussein; Pelissier, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The authors report the case of a 19-year-old female with delayed presentation of a type II 'jersey finger' of the fourth dominant digit. A surgical approach was performed, revealing a retracted flexor digitorum profundus tendon within a still patent sheath. The resulting loss of tendon length overruled any possibility of direct reinsertion of the tendon. A lengthening "Z-step" tendinoplasty was then performed on the tendon at the wrist, thus enabling reinsertion at the base of the distal phalanx. The patient then underwent conventional splinting and physiotherapy. Total Active Motion was measured at 220° with a 6-month follow-up. Even though there is no clear consensus concerning management of such cases, different techniques have been described, such as one- or two-stage grafting, or tenotomy at the musculotendinous junction. Lengthening tendinoplasties have been applied by certain authors but only to the flexor pollicis longus tendon. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of lengthening Z-step applied to a long digit for the repair of type II 'jersey finger' lesions. The satisfactory functional and cosmetic outcome encourages us to consider this one-stage technique in other select cases, in order to gather more formal evidence. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tendon entheses of the human masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Hems, T; Tillmann, B

    2000-09-01

    Tendons attach to the limb skeleton via chondral-apophysary or periosteal-diaphysary entheses. It was the aim of the present study to investigate the tendon entheses of the temporal, the masseter, as well as the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, considering the biomechanics and the mode of osteogenesis at the attachment sites. The origin and insertion zones of the four masticatory muscles were studied histologically and by polarization light microscopy in six halves of human heads. Contrary to the limb skeleton no causal relationship between the histological structure of the tendon entheses and the osteogenic mode of the bone areas involved was observed in the masticatory muscles that were studied. Based on the histological findings, a purely structural classification of the tendon attachments irrespective of the osteogenesis is therefore proposed that is applicable to the entire skeleton. It is possible to distinguish between tendon entheses inserting into periosteum, into bone or into fibrocartilage. Tendon attachments with periosteal insertion are found at the temporal plane, the retromolar triangle, zygomatic arch, lateral pterygoid plate, in the caudal zone of the pterygoid fovea of the neck of mandible as well as major portions of the ramus and angle of the mandible. The attachment zones in which collagen fibrils of tendons insert into the bone via the periosteum correspond in their structure to plane periosteal-diaphysary insertions into the diaphyses of long bones. Attachment zones to the bone are present at the inferior temporal line, the base of the coronoid process, the caudal surface of the zygomatic arch, the cranial zones of the pterygoid fovea of the neck of the mandible as well as at circumscribed areas of the ramus and angle of the mandible. In these zones the collagen fibers of the tendon insert immediately into the bone without any mediation of other tissues. The entheses resemble those of circumscribed periosteal-diaphysary attachments to

  16. Informing Stem Cell-Based Tendon Tissue Engineering Approaches with Embryonic Tendon Development.

    PubMed

    Okech, William; Kuo, Catherine K

    Adult tendons fail to regenerate normal tissue after injury, and instead form dysfunctional scar tissue with abnormal mechanical properties. Surgical repair with grafts is the current standard to treat injuries, but faces significant limitations including pain and high rates of re-injury. To address this, we aim to regenerate new, normal tendons to replace dysfunctional tendons. A common approach to tendon tissue engineering is to design scaffolds and bioreactors based on adult tendon properties that can direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. Despite significant progress, advances have been limited due, in part, to a need for markers and potent induction cues. Our goal is to develop novel tendon tissue engineering approaches informed by embryonic tendon development. We are characterizing structure-property relationships of embryonic tendon to identify design parameters for three-dimensional scaffolds and bioreactor mechanical loading systems to direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. We will review studies in which we quantified changes in the mechanical and biochemical properties of tendon during embryonic development and elucidated specific mechanisms of functional property elaboration. We then examined the effects of these mechanical and biochemical factors on embryonic tendon cell behavior. Using custom-designed bioreactors, we also examined the effects of dynamic mechanical loading and growth factor treatment on embryonic tendon cells. Our findings have established cues to induce tenogenesis as well as metrics to evaluate differentiation. We finish by discussing how we have evaluated the tenogenic differentiation potential of adult stem cells by comparing their responses to that of embryonic tendon cells in these culture systems.

  17. The Sheath-less Planar Langmuir Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Langmuir probe is one of the oldest plasma diagnostics, provided the plasma density and species temperature from analysis of a current-voltage curve as the voltage is swept over a practically chosen range. The analysis depends on a knowledge or theory of the many factors that influence the current-voltage curve including, probe shape, size, nearby perturbations, and the voltage reference. For applications in Low Earth Orbit, the Planar Langmuir Probe, PLP, is an attractive geometry because the ram ion current is very constant over many Volts of a sweep, allowing the ion density and electron temperature to be determined independently with the same instrument, at different points on the sweep. However, when the physical voltage reference is itself small and electrically floating as with a small spacecraft, the spacecraft and probe system become a double probe where the current collection theory depends on the interaction of the spacecraft with the plasma which is generally not as simple as the probe itself. The Sheath-less PLP, SPLP, interlaces on a single ram facing surface, two variably biased probe elements, broken into many small and intertwined segments on a scale smaller than the plasma Debye length. The SPLP is electrically isolated from the rest of the spacecraft. For relative bias potentials of a few volts, the ion current to all segments of each element will be constant, while the electron currents will vary as a function of the element potential and the electron temperature. Because the segments are small, intertwined, and floating, the assembly will always present the same floating potential to the plasma, with minimal growth as a function of voltage, thus sheath-less and still planar. This concept has been modelled with Nascap, and tested with a physical model inserted into a Low Earth Orbit-like chamber plasma. Results will be presented.

  18. Tendon-Holding Capacities of Two Newly Designed Implants for Tendon Repair: An Experimental Study on the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon of Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ağır, İsmail; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim; Başçı, Onur; Çaypınar, Barış; Erol, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two main factors determine the strength of tendon repair; the tensile strength of material and the gripping capacity of a suture configuration. Different repair techniques and suture materials were developed to increase the strength of repairs but none of techniques and suture materials seem to provide enough tensile strength with safety margins for early active mobilization. In order to overcome this problem tendon suturing implants are being developed. We designed two different suturing implants. The aim of this study was to measure tendon-holding capacities of these implants biomechanically and to compare them with frequently used suture techniques Materials and Methods: In this study we used 64 sheep flexor digitorum profundus tendons. Four study groups were formed and each group had 16 tendons. We applied model 1 and model 2 implant to the first 2 groups and Bunnell and locking-loop techniques to the 3rd and 4th groups respectively by using 5 Ticron sutures. Results: In 13 tendons in group 1 and 15 tendons in group 2 and in all tendons in group 3 and 4, implants and sutures pulled out of the tendon in longitudinal axis at the point of maximum load. The mean tensile strengths were the largest in group 1 and smallest in group 3. Conclusion: In conclusion, the new stainless steel tendon suturing implants applied from outside the tendons using steel wires enable a biomechanically stronger repair with less tendon trauma when compared to previously developed tendon repair implants and the traditional suturing techniques. PMID:25067965

  19. Assessment of Postoperative Tendon Quality in Patients With Achilles Tendon Rupture Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tendon Fiber Tracking.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Atmaca, Halil; Cakir, Ozgur; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Anik, Yonca; Memisoglu, Kaya; Baran, Tuncay; Isik, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Although pre- and postoperative imaging of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been well documented, radiographic evaluations of postoperative intratendinous healing and microstructure are still lacking. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an innovative technique that offers a noninvasive method for describing the microstructure characteristics and organization of tissues. DTI was used in the present study for quantitative assessment of fiber continuity postoperatively in patients with acute ATR. The data from 16 patients with ATR from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The microstructure of ART was evaluated using tendon fiber tracking, tendon continuity, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values by way of DTI. The distal and proximal portions were measured separately in both the ruptured and the healthy extremities of each patient. The mean patient age was 41.56 ± 8.49 (range 26 to 56) years. The median duration of follow-up was 21 (range 6 to 80) months. The tendon fractional anisotropy values of the ruptured Achilles tendon were significantly lower statistically than those of the normal side (p = .001). However, none of the differences between the 2 groups with respect to the distal and proximal apparent diffusion coefficient were statistically significant (p = .358 and p = .899, respectively). In addition, the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient measurements were not significantly different in the proximal and distal regions of the ruptured tendons compared with the healthy tendons. The present study used DTI and fiber tracking to demonstrate the radiologic properties of postoperative Achilles tendons with respect to trajectory and tendinous fiber continuity. Quantifying DTI and fiber tractography offers an innovative and effective tool that might be able to detect microstructural abnormalities not appreciable using conventional radiologic techniques. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle

  20. Phenytoin accelerates tendon healing in a rat model of Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Hajipour, B; Navali, A M; Mohammad, S Ali; Mousavi, G; Akbari, M Gahvechi; Miyandoab, T Maleki; Roshangar, L; Saleh, B Mohammadi; Kermani, T Asvadi; Laleh, F Moutab; Ghabili, M

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are vulnerable to various types of acute or chronic injures. Different methods have been investigated to achieve better healing. Phenytoin is a drug which could stimulate fibroblasts to produce collagen. This experimental study was performed to assess the effect of phenytoin on tendon healing in a rat model of tendon rupture. Thirty healthy rats were divided into 3 groups, 1) Sham group; 2) Tendon rupture; 3) Tendon rupture+phenytoin (100 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 21 days. On 21st day after tendon injury, the rats were anesthetized and tendon tissue was sampled for studying by light and electron microscopy. Qualitative and quantitative microscopic comparisons of the repair tissues of both groups were made on the 21st day. The results obtained from light and electron microscopy studies showed that tendon tissue healing was significantly better in phenytoin group compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Systemic administration of phenytoin may have a positive effect on tendon healing by increasing fibroblast quantity, fibrillar collagen synthesis, vascularity, and suppressing inflammation (Tab. 2, Ref. 25).

  1. Decellularized Tendon Extracellular Matrix—A Valuable Approach for Tendon Reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula; Al-Sadi, Onays; Ertel, Wolfgang; Lohan, Anke

    2012-01-01

    Tendon healing is generally a time-consuming process and often leads to a functionally altered reparative tissue. Using degradable scaffolds for tendon reconstruction still remains a compromise in view of the required high mechanical strength of tendons. Regenerative approaches based on natural decellularized allo- or xenogenic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) have recently started to attract interest. This ECM combines the advantages of its intrinsic mechanical competence with that of providing tenogenic stimuli for immigrating cells mediated, for example, by the growth factors and other mediators entrapped within the natural ECM. A major restriction for their therapeutic application is the mainly cell-associated immunogenicity of xenogenic or allogenic tissues and, in the case of allogenic tissues, also the risk of disease transmission. A survey of approaches for tendon reconstruction using cell-free tendon ECM is presented here, whereby the problems associated with the decellularization procedures, the success of various recellularization strategies, and the applicable cell types will be thoroughly discussed. Encouraging in vivo results using cell-free ECM, as, for instance, in rabbit models, have already been reported. However, in comparison to native tendon, cells remain mostly inhomogeneously distributed in the reseeded ECM and do not align. Hence, future work should focus on the optimization of tendon ECM decellularization and recolonization strategies to restore tendon functionality. PMID:24710540

  2. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  3. [Flexor tendon repair: a short story].

    PubMed

    Moutet, F; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V

    2014-12-01

    This short story of flexor tendon repair aims to illustrate hesitations and wanderings of this surgery. Obviously tendon repair was very early considered, but it developed and diffused rather lately. It became a routine practice only in 20th century. This was due on the one hand, in Occident, to the Galen's dogmatic interdiction, on the other hand, to the repair difficulties of this paradoxical structure. Actually tendon is made of fibroblasts and collagen (sticky substances), and then its only goal is to move. According to this necessity, whatever the used techniques are, gliding is the final purpose. Technical evolutions are illustrated by historical contributions to flexor tendon surgery of several "giants" of hand surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  5. Quadriceps Tendon Autograft Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Steensen, Robert; Gföller, Peter; Lawton, Robert

    2018-06-01

    Critically evaluate the published literature related to quadriceps tendon (QT) medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Hamstring tendon (HT) MPFL reconstruction techniques have been shown to successfully restore patella stability, but complications including patella fracture are reported. Quadriceps tendon (QT) reconstruction techniques with an intact graft pedicle on the patella side have the advantage that patella bone tunnel drilling and fixation are no longer needed, reducing risk of patella fracture. Several QT MPFL reconstruction techniques, including minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches, have been published with promising clinical results and fewer complications than with HT techniques. Parallel laboratory studies have shown macroscopic anatomy and biomechanical properties of QT are more similar to native MPFL than hamstring (HS) HT, suggesting QT may more accurately restore native joint kinematics. Quadriceps tendon MPFL reconstruction, via both open and MIS techniques, have promising clinical results and offer valuable alternatives to HS grafts for primary and revision MPFL reconstruction in both children and adults.

  6. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    PubMed

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids*

    PubMed Central

    Dueholm, Morten S.; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R.; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S.; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. PMID:26109065

  8. Ion Dynamics Model for Collisionless Radio Frequency Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T.R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full scale reactor model based on fluid equations is widely used to analyze high density plasma reactors. It is well known that the submillimeter scale sheath in front of a biased electrode supporting the wafer is difficult to resolve in numerical simulations, and the common practice is to use results for electric field from some form of analytical sheath model as boundary conditions for full scale reactor simulation. There are several sheath models in the literature ranging from Child's law to a recent unified sheath model [P. A. Miller and M. E. Riley, J. Appl. Phys. 82, 3689 (1997)l. In the present work, the cold ion fluid equations in the radio frequency sheath are solved numerically to show that the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux inside the sheath, commonly ignored in analytical models, is important in determining the electric field and ion energy at the electrode. Consequently, a semianalytical model that includes the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux is developed for use as boundary condition in reactor simulations. This semianalytical model is shown to yield results for sheath properties in close agreement with numerical solutions.

  9. Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Jennifer A; Sokol, Jason A; Whittaker, Thomas J; Bernard, Benjamin; Farris, Bradley K

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to introduce the use of the Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. The procedure of optic nerve sheath fenestration was reviewed at our tertiary care teaching hospital, including the use of the Farris-Tang retractor. Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without a clear cause. Surgical treatment can be effective in cases in which medical therapy has failed and disc swelling with visual field loss progresses. Optic nerve sheath decompression surgery (ONDS) involves cutting slits or windows in the optic nerve sheath to allow cerebrospinal fluid to escape, reducing the pressure around the optic nerve. We introduce the Farris-Tang retractor, a retractor that allows for excellent visualization of the optic nerve sheath during this surgery, facilitating the fenestration of the sheath and visualization of the subsequent cerebrospinal fluid egress. Utilizing a medial conjunctival approach, the Farris-Tang retractor allows for easy retraction of the medial orbital tissue and reduces the incidence of orbital fat protrusion through Tenon's capsule. The Farris-Tang retractor allows safe, easy, and effective access to the optic nerve with good visualization in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. This, in turn, allows for greater surgical efficiency and positive patient outcomes.

  10. Morphogenesis of the fibrous sheath in the marsupial spermatozoon

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, M; Breed, WG

    2005-01-01

    The spermatozoon fibrous sheath contains longitudinal columns and circumferential ribs. It surrounds the axoneme of the principal piece of the mammalian sperm tail, and may be important in sperm stability and motility. Here we describe its assembly during spermiogenesis in a marsupial, the brush-tail possum, and compare its structural organization with that of eutherian mammals, birds and reptiles. Transmission electron microscopy showed that possum fibrous sheath assembly is a multistep process extending in a distal-to-proximal direction along the axoneme from steps 4 to 14 of spermiogenesis. For the most part, assembly of the longitudinal columns occurs before that of the circumferential ribs. Immunohistochemical and immunogold labelling showed that fibrous sheath proteins are first present in the spermatid cytoplasm; at least some of the proteins of the sheath precursors differ from those in the mature fibrous sheath. That immunoreactivity develops after initiation of chromatin condensation suggests that fibrous sheath proteins, or their mRNAs, are stored within the spermatid cytoplasmic lobule prior to their assembly along the axoneme. These findings are similar to those in laboratory rats, and thus suggests that the mode of fibrous sheath assembly evolved in a common ancestor over 125 million years ago, prior to the divergence of marsupial and eutherian lineages. PMID:16050902

  11. Extensor tendon injury during cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Fetal laceration is a recognized complication of cesarean delivery; however, major injuries are rare. The case of a healthy newborn who sustained an injury to the extensor pollicis longus tendon during cesarean delivery is reported. The tendon was repaired surgically on the sixth day of life with good recovery of function. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Optimization of human tendon tissue engineering: peracetic acid oxidation for enhanced reseeding of acellularized intrasynovial tendon.

    PubMed

    Woon, Colin Y L; Pridgen, Brian C; Kraus, Armin; Bari, Sina; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2011-03-01

    Tissue engineering of human flexor tendons combines tendon scaffolds with recipient cells to create complete cell-tendon constructs. Allogenic acellularized human flexor tendon has been shown to be a useful natural scaffold. However, there is difficulty repopulating acellularized tendon with recipient cells, as cell penetration is restricted by a tightly woven tendon matrix. The authors evaluated peracetic acid treatment in optimizing intratendinous cell penetration. Cadaveric human flexor tendons were harvested, acellularized, and divided into experimental groups. These groups were treated with peracetic acid in varying concentrations (2%, 5%, and 10%) and for varying time periods (4 and 20 hours) to determine the optimal treatment protocol. Experimental tendons were analyzed for differences in tendon microarchitecture. Additional specimens were reseeded by incubation in a fibroblast cell suspension at 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. This group was then analyzed for reseeding efficacy. A final group underwent biomechanical studies for strength. The optimal treatment protocol comprising peracetic acid at 5% concentration for 4 hours produced increased scaffold porosity, improving cell penetration and migration. Treated scaffolds did not show reduced collagen or glycosaminoglycan content compared with controls (p = 0.37 and p = 0.65, respectively). Treated scaffolds were cytotoxic to neither attached cells nor the surrounding cell suspension. Treated scaffolds also did not show inferior ultimate tensile stress or elastic modulus compared with controls (p = 0.26 and p = 0.28, respectively). Peracetic acid treatment of acellularized tendon scaffolds increases matrix porosity, leading to greater reseeding. It may prove to be an important step in tissue engineering of human flexor tendon using natural scaffolds.

  14. TREM-1, HMGB1 and RAGE in the Shoulder Tendon: Dual Mechanisms for Inflammation Based on the Coincidence of Glenohumeral Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thankam, Finosh G; Dilisio, Matthew F; Dietz, Nicholas E; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff injury (RCI) is a major musculoskeletal disorder in the adult population where inflammation and pain are major contributing factors. Coincidence of other clinical conditions like glenohumeral arthritis aggravates inflammation and delays the healing response. The mechanism and signaling factors underlying the sustenance of inflammation in the rotator cuff joint are largely unknown. The present article aims to elucidate the involvement of inflammatory molecule, TREM-1 (Triggering Receptors Expressed on Myeloid cells-1), and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group protein 1 (HMGB-1) and RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products), in the setting of RCI with respect to the severity of glenohumeral arthritis. Biceps tendons (15 specimens) from the shoulder and blood (11 samples) from patients with glenohumeral arthritis (Group-1, n = 4) and without glenohumeral arthritis (Group-2, n = 11) after RCI surgery were obtained for the study. Molecular and morphological alterations between the groups were compared using histology, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and flow cytometry. MRI and histomorphology assessment revealed severe inflammation in Group-1 patients while in Group-2 ECM disorganization was prominent without any hallmarks of inflammation. A significant increase in TREM-1 expression in circulating neutrophils and monocytes was observed. Elevated levels of TREM-1, HMGB-1 and RAGE in Group-1 patients along with CD68+ and CD16+ cells confirmed DAMP-mediated inflammation. Expression of TREM-1 in the tendon of Group-2 patients even in the absence of immune cells presented a new population of TREM-expressing cells that were confirmed by real-time PCR analysis and immunofluorescence. Expression of HMGB-1 and RAGE in the biceps tendon from the shoulder of patients without glenohumeral arthritis implied TREM-1-mediated inflammation without involving immune cells, whereas in patients with glenohumeral arthritis

  15. [Ultrasound diagnostics of muscle and tendon injuries].

    PubMed

    Stević, Ruza; Masulović, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Sonography is a useful technique for the investigation of a number of musculoskeletal disorders. The most common indication for ultrasonography of muscles and tendons is the diagnosis of traumatic lesions, distinguishing them from other disorders and follow- up of healing process. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of ultrasound in the diagnosis of muscle and tendon injuries. The study included 170 patients (148 male and 22 female), mean age 29.6 years (range 14-60 years). All examinations were performed by linear transducer of 7.5-10 MHz, with longitudinal and transverse scanning. Ultrasound examination followed physical examination. Traumatic lesions of muscles were diagnosed in 113 patients (66.7%) and tendon injuries in 57 cases (33.2%). The muscle changes detected by ultrasonography were the following: 70 (61.9%) partial and two (1.76%) complete ruptures, 22 (19.46%) haematoma, 9 (7.96%) strains grade I, 4 fibroses and 4 ossifying myositis 4 (3.5%, respectively). Complications of muscle injuries were diagnosed in two cases, a muscular hernia and an arteriovenous fistula. Among tendon injuries, 21 (33.8%) ruptures and 36 (66.1%) tendinitis were diagnosed. Accompanying effusion in the bursa of patients with tendon injuries was found in 9 cases. Ultrasonography allowed visualization and objective assessment of the type and the extent of traumatic pathomorphological changes of muscles and tendons. Such diagnostic possibilities of ultrasonography are especially important in the choice of appropriate therapy.

  16. Light microscopic histology of supraspinatus tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Franceschi, Francesco; Ruzzini, Laura; Rabitti, Carla; Morini, Sergio; Maffulli, Nicola; Forriol, Francisco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2007-11-01

    We analysed the morphological features of the human surgical specimens of supraspinatus tendon from patients with rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 31 subjects (21 men and 10 women; mean age 51 years, range 38-64) who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and from five male patients who died of cardiovascular events (mean age, 69.6 years). Histological examination was performed using Haematoxylin and Eosin, Masson's Trichrome and Van Gieson's connective tissue stain. The specimens were examined twice by the same examiner under white light and polarized light microscopy. Particular effort was made to assess any evidence of the changes associated with tendinopathy. Within each specific category of tendon abnormalities, the chi-square test showed significant differences between the control and ruptured tendons (P < 0.05). Using the kappa statistics, the agreement between the two readings ranged from 0.57 to 0.84. We found thinning and disorientation of collagen fibres and chondroid metaplasia to be more pronounced on the articular side of the specimens from patients with rotator cuff tear (P < 0.05). The present study provides a description of the histological architecture of human surgical specimens of normal supraspinatus tendon from patients with rotator cuff tears and demonstrates more frequent tendon changes on the articular side of the rotator cuff.

  17. Tendon rupture associated with excessive smartphone gaming.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Luke; Cage, Dori N; Horn, Adam; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Excessive use of smartphones has been associated with injuries. A 29-year-old, right hand-dominant man presented with chronic left thumb pain and loss of active motion from playing a Match-3 puzzle video game on his smartphone all day for 6 to 8 weeks. On physical examination, the left extensor pollicis longus tendon was not palpable, and no tendon motion was noted with wrist tenodesis. The thumb metacarpophalangeal range of motion was 10° to 80°, and thumb interphalangeal range of motion was 30° to 70°. The clinical diagnosis was rupture of the left extensor pollicis longus tendon. The patient subsequently underwent an extensor indicis proprius (1 of 2 tendons that extend the index finger) to extensor pollicis longus tendon transfer. During surgery, rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon was seen between the metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints. The potential for video games to reduce pain perception raises clinical and social considerations about excessive use, abuse, and addiction. Future research should consider whether pain reduction is a reason some individuals play video games excessively, manifest addiction, or sustain injuries associated with video gaming.

  18. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  19. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath.

    PubMed

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  20. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  1. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise.

    PubMed

    Ooue, Anna; Sato, Kohei; Hirasawa, Ai; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    2012-11-07

    The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB) and without (EX) vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein) and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein) was calculated using both variables. Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P <0.05). Increases in heart rate and mean arterial pressure during exercise at EX + VIB were also lower than those at EX (P <0.05). CSAvein in the resting limb at EX decreased during exercise from baseline (P <0.05), but CSAvein at EX + VIB did not change during exercise. CSAvein during exercise at EX was smaller than that at EX + VIB (P <0.05). However, BFvein did not change during the protocol under either condition. The decreases in circulatory response and RPEs during EX + VIB, despite identical muscle tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a

  2. Evolution of the Achilles tendon: The athlete's Achilles heel?

    PubMed

    Malvankar, S; Khan, W S

    2011-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is believed to have first developed two million years ago enabling humans to run twice as fast. However if the Achilles tendon is so important in terms of evolution, then why is this tendon so prone to injury - especially for those more active like athletes. The Achilles tendon had an integral role in evolving apes from a herbivorous diet to early humans who started hunting for food over longer distances, resulting in bipedal locomotion. Evolutionary advantages of the Achilles tendon includes it being the strongest tendon in the body, having an energy-saving mechanism for fast locomotion, allows humans to jump and run, and additionally is a spring and shock absorber during gait. Considering these benefits it is therefore not surprising that studies have shown athletes have thicker Achilles tendons than subjects who are less active. However, contradictory to these findings that show the importance of the Achilles tendon for athletes, it is well known that obtaining an Achilles tendon injury for an athlete can be career-altering. A disadvantage of the Achilles tendon is that the aetiology of its pathology is complicated. Achilles tendon ruptures are believed to be caused by overloading the tensed tendon, like during sports. However studies have also shown athlete Achilles tendon ruptures to have degenerative changes in the tendon. Other flaws of the Achilles tendon are its non-uniform vascularity and incomplete repair system which may suggest the Achilles tendon is on the edge of evolution. Research has shown that there is a genetic influence on the predisposition a person has towards Achilles tendon injuries. So if this tendon is here to stay in our anatomy, and it probably is due to the slow rate of evolution in humans, research in genetic modification could be used to decrease athletes' predisposition to Achilles tendinopathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of Achilles tendon allograft for latissimus dorsi tendon reconstruction: a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Sabzevari, Soheil; Chao, Tom; Kalawadia, Jay; Lin, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of subacute, retracted latissimus dorsi and teres major tendon ruptures in young overhead athletes is challenging. This case report describes management of a subacute retracted latissimus dorsi and teres major rupture with Achilles tendon allograft reconstruction using a two-incision minimally invasive technique. Level of evidence V.

  4. Posterior rectus sheath hernia causing intermittent small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lenobel, Scott; Lenobel, Robert; Yu, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    A posterior rectus sheath hernia is an abdominal wall hernia that is rarely encountered. Owing to its rarity, it can be easily overlooked in the setting of a patient presenting with abdominal pain. We report a case of a posterior rectus sheath hernia that caused intermittent small bowel obstruction. The unusual aspects of this case are that the defect was large, measuring 6 cm in the transverse diameter, and that it contained small bowel within a large portion of the rectus sheath. Because the defect was large and affected nearly the entire posterior rectus sheath, it was difficult to discern on computed tomography until a small bowel obstruction developed. In this case, a limited awareness of this clinical entity contributed to the delay in diagnosis.

  5. [Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block for upper abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Kashiwagi, Masanori; Nagatsuka, Yukio; Oosaku, Masayoshi; Hirose, Chikako

    2010-08-01

    Upper abdominal surgery leads to severe postoperative pain. Insufficient postoperative analgesia accompanies a high incidence of complications. Therefore, postoperative analgesia is very important. The epidural analgesia has many advantages. However it has a high risk of epidural hematoma in anticoagulated patients. Rectus sheath block provided safer and more reliable analgesia in recent years, by the development of ultrasound tools. We experienced two cases of the rectus sheath block in upper abdominal surgery under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath block can reduce the risk of peritoneal puncture, bleeding, and other complications. Rectus sheath block is very effective to reduce postoperative pain in upper abdominal surgery as an alternative method to epidural anesthesia in anticoagulated patients.

  6. Posterior Rectus Sheath Hernia Causing Intermittent Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lenobel, Scott; Lenobel, Robert; Yu, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A posterior rectus sheath hernia is an abdominal wall hernia that is rarely encountered. Owing to its rarity, it can be easily overlooked in the setting of a patient presenting with abdominal pain. We report a case of a posterior rectus sheath hernia that caused intermittent small bowel obstruction. The unusual aspects of this case are that the defect was large, measuring 6 cm in the transverse diameter, and that it contained small bowel within a large portion of the rectus sheath. Because the defect was large and affected nearly the entire posterior rectus sheath, it was difficult to discern on computed tomography until a small bowel obstruction developed. In this case, a limited awareness of this clinical entity contributed to the delay in diagnosis. PMID:25426248

  7. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-01

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  8. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues weremore » discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.« less

  9. Porous protective solid phase micro-extractor sheath

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Randich, Erik

    2005-03-29

    A porous protective sheath for active extraction media used in solid phase microextraction (SPME). The sheath permits exposure of the media to the environment without the necessity of extending a fragile coated fiber from a protective tube or needle. Subsequently, the sheath can pierce and seal with GC-MS septums, allowing direct injection of samples into inlet ports of analytical equipment. Use of the porous protective sheath, within which the active extraction media is contained, mitigates the problems of: 1) fiber breakage while the fiber is extended during sampling, 2) active media coating loss caused by physical contact of the bare fiber with the sampling environment; and 3) coating slough-off during fiber extension and retraction operations caused by rubbing action between the fiber and protective needle or tube.

  10. Stability of the Tonks–Langmuir discharge pre-sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D.

    The article formulates the stability problem of the plasma sheath in the Tonks–Langmuir discharge. Using the kinetic description of the ion gas, i.e., the stability of the potential shape in the quasi-neutral pre-sheath regarding the high and low frequency, the perturbations are investigated. The electrons are assumed to be Maxwell–Boltzmann distributed. Regarding high-frequency perturbations, the pre-sheath is shown to be stable. The stability problem regarding low-frequency perturbations can be reduced to an analysis of the “diffusion like” equation, which results in the instability of the potential distribution in the pre-sheath. By means of the Particle in Cell simulations, also themore » nonlinear stage of low frequency oscillations is investigated. Comparing the figure obtained with the figure for linear stage, one can find obvious similarity in the spatial-temporal behavior of the potential.« less

  11. Biceps tenodesis is a viable option for salvage of failed SLAP repair.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Pehlivan, Hakan C; Hart, Joseph M; Lyons, Matthew L; Gilmore, C Jan; Garrett, Cara B; Carson, Eric W; Diduch, David R; Miller, Mark D; Brockmeier, Stephen F

    2014-08-01

    Outcomes of arthroscopic superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) repairs have been well reported with generally favorable outcomes. Unfortunately, a percentage of patients remain dissatisfied or suffer further injury after SLAP repair and may seek additional treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of biceps tenodesis for failed SLAP repairs. A retrospective review of all patients undergoing biceps tenodesis was completed. Inclusion criteria were previous SLAP repair and subsequent revision biceps tenodesis. Exclusion criteria were additional shoulder procedures including rotator cuff repair, instability procedures, and preoperative frozen shoulder. Objective outcomes were postoperative assessments with Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, Simple Shoulder Test, and Veterans RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Physical examination was conducted to determine postoperative range of motion and strength compared with the nonoperative shoulder. A cohort of 24 patients was identified, and of these, 17 patients (71%) completed the study at 2 years' follow-up. The average postoperative Constant score was 84.4; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, 75.5; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score, 73.1%; Simple Shoulder Test score, 9.2; and Veterans RAND 36-Item Health Survey score, 76.1. Postoperative range of motion of the operative shoulder returned to near that of the asymptomatic nonoperative shoulder. Workers' compensation status led to inferior results. Options for patients with a failed prior SLAP repair are limited. As a salvage operation for failed SLAP repair, biceps tenodesis serves the majority of patients well, with favorable outcomes by validated measures and excellent shoulder range of motion and elbow strength at 2 years' follow-up. Workers' compensation status may predispose patients to poorer outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board

  12. Management of acute Achilles tendon rupture with tendon-bundle technique

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Guang; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Objective *These authors contributed equally to this work.To explore tendon-bundle technique for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects. Methods Patients with full unilateral Achilles tendon rupture with no defects were included. The Achilles tendon medial edge surgical repair approach was used, revealing horsetail-like rupture bundles. Tendon bundles were anatomically realigned and repaired end-to-end using 5-0 sutures. Patients were followed-up for 1 year, and assessed for differences between the repaired versus healthy limb. Results Out of 24 patients (18 male, 6 female; aged 19–56 years) at 1 year following surgery, mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 92.4 ± 5.9; mean differences between the surgically repaired versus contralateral side in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle were 3.5 ± 2.3° and 5.6 ± 3.2°, respectively; mean difference in calf circumference between the two sides was 0.9 ± 0.5 cm; and mean increase in Achilles tendon width versus the healthy side was 0.8 ± 0.2 cm. By 1 year post-surgery, there were no significant between-side differences in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle, or calf circumference. Conclusions Tendon-bundle surgery resulted in good ankle function restoration and low complication rates. Tendon-bundle surgery may reduce blood supply destruction and maximally preserve Achilles tendon length, and may be effective for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects. PMID:28222622

  13. Properties of leaves particleboard for sheathing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryawan, Arif; Rahmawaty

    2018-03-01

    Manufacturing particleboard (PB) made of leaves was carried out to make non-structural building components, such as insulation, partition, wall, and sheathing. Raw materials used dry leaves originated from plantation (palm oil leaves) and forest plantation (magahony leaves). The adhesive used was interior type thermosetting commercial resins, namely 10% urea-formaldehyde (UF) based on oven dry leaves. Hardener used for UF resin was 1% and 3% ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) 20% (w/w), respectively. Technically, the target density of PB was 0.8 g/cm3 with the dimension’s size of (250 x 250 x 10) mm3. The pressure, temperature, and time of pressing of the hot press were 25 kgf/cm2, 120C, and 10 minutes, respectively. After conditioning for one week, the PB then was evaluated their physical and mechanical properties according to Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Results of this work showed: 1) Both types of PB (palm oil and mahagony leaves) were feasible to be produced for non-structural applications; 2) Addition of hardener enhanced the physical and mechanical properties of PB; 3) It was recommended to enhance the performance of the PB by manipulation of the raw materials and the design.

  14. Plasma sheath effects on ion collection by a pinhole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Snyder, David B.

    1993-01-01

    This work presents tables to assist in the evaluation of pinhole collection effects on spacecraft. These tables summarize results of a computer model which tracks particle trajectories through a simplified electric field in the plasma sheath. A technique is proposed to account for plasma sheath effects in the application of these results and scaling rules are proposed to apply the calculations to specific situations. This model is compared to ion current measurements obtained by another worker, and the agreement is very good.

  15. Composition of the sheath produced by the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Imase, M; Sasaki, K; Ohmura, N; Saiki, H; Tanaka, H

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characterization of the mucilage sheath produced by Chlorella sorokiniana. Algal mucilage sheath was hydrolysed with NaOH, containing EDTA. The purity of the hydrolysed sheath was determined by an ATP assay. The composition of polysaccharide in the sheath was investigated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Sucrose, galacturonic acid, xylitol, inositol, ribose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, rhamnose and fructose were detected in the sheath as sugar components. Magnesium was detected in the sheath as a divalent cation using inductively coupled argon plasma. The sheath matrix also contained protein. It appears that the sheath is composed of sugars and metals. Mucilage sheath contains many kinds of saccharides that are produced as photosynthetic metabolites and divalent cations that are contained in the culture medium. This is the first report on chemical characterization of the sheath matrix produced by C. sorokiniana.

  16. Zebrafish collagen XII is present in embryonic connective tissue sheaths (fascia) and basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Bader, Hannah L; Keene, Douglas R; Charvet, Benjamin; Veit, Guido; Driever, Wolfgang; Koch, Manuel; Ruggiero, Florence

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissues ensure the cohesion of the tissues of the body, but also form specialized structures such as tendon and bone. Collagen XII may enhance the stability of connective tissues by bridging collagen fibrils, but its function is still unclear. Here, we used the zebrafish model to visualize its expression pattern in the whole organism. The zebrafish col12a1 gene is homologous to the small isoform of the tetrapod col12a1 gene. In agreement with the biochemical data reported for the small isoform, the zebrafish collagen XII alpha1 chain was characterized as a collagenase sensitive band migrating at approximately 200 kDa. Using newly generated polyclonal antibodies and anti-sense probes, we performed a comprehensive analysis of its expression in developing zebrafish. Collagen XII exhibited a much broader expression pattern than previously thought: it was ubiquitously expressed in the connective tissue sheaths (fascia) that encase the tissues and organs of the body. For example, it was found in sclera, meninges, epimysia and horizontal and vertical myosepta. Collagen XII was also detected in head mesenchyme, pharyngeal arches and within the spinal cord, where it was first expressed within and then at the lateral borders of the floor plate and at the dorsal midline. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence staining with laminin and immunogold electron microscopy revealed that collagen XII is associated with basement membranes. These data suggest that collagen XII is implicated in tissue cohesion by stabilizing fascia and by linking fascia to basement membranes.

  17. Analysis of the Biceps Brachii Muscle by Varying the Arm Movement Level and Load Resistance Band.

    PubMed

    Burhan, Nuradebah; Kasno, Mohammad 'Afif; Ghazali, Rozaimi; Said, Md Radzai; Abdullah, Shahrum Shah; Jali, Mohd Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    Biceps brachii muscle illness is one of the common physical disabilities that requires rehabilitation exercises in order to build up the strength of the muscle after surgery. It is also important to monitor the condition of the muscle during the rehabilitation exercise through electromyography (EMG) signals. The purpose of this study was to analyse and investigate the selection of the best mother wavelet (MWT) function and depth of the decomposition level in the wavelet denoising EMG signals through the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) method at each decomposition level. In this experimental work, six healthy subjects comprised of males and females (26 ± 3.0 years and BMI of 22 ± 2.0) were selected as a reference for persons with the illness. The experiment was conducted for three sets of resistance band loads, namely, 5 kg, 9 kg, and 16 kg, as a force during the biceps brachii muscle contraction. Each subject was required to perform three levels of the arm angle positions (30°, 90°, and 150°) for each set of resistance band load. The experimental results showed that the Daubechies5 (db5) was the most appropriate DWT method together with a 6-level decomposition with a soft heursure threshold for the biceps brachii EMG signal analysis.

  18. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Scott L; Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-04-01

    Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy.

  19. Analysis of the Biceps Brachii Muscle by Varying the Arm Movement Level and Load Resistance Band

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Shahrum Shah; Jali, Mohd Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    Biceps brachii muscle illness is one of the common physical disabilities that requires rehabilitation exercises in order to build up the strength of the muscle after surgery. It is also important to monitor the condition of the muscle during the rehabilitation exercise through electromyography (EMG) signals. The purpose of this study was to analyse and investigate the selection of the best mother wavelet (MWT) function and depth of the decomposition level in the wavelet denoising EMG signals through the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) method at each decomposition level. In this experimental work, six healthy subjects comprised of males and females (26 ± 3.0 years and BMI of 22 ± 2.0) were selected as a reference for persons with the illness. The experiment was conducted for three sets of resistance band loads, namely, 5 kg, 9 kg, and 16 kg, as a force during the biceps brachii muscle contraction. Each subject was required to perform three levels of the arm angle positions (30°, 90°, and 150°) for each set of resistance band load. The experimental results showed that the Daubechies5 (db5) was the most appropriate DWT method together with a 6-level decomposition with a soft heursure threshold for the biceps brachii EMG signal analysis. PMID:29138687

  20. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Methods Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. Results The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Discussion Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy. PMID:27582965

  1. Inflationary generalized Chaplygin gas and dark energy in light of the Planck and BICEP2 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinda, Bikash R.; Kumar, Sumit; Sen, Anjan A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study an inflationary scenario in the presence of generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG). We show that in Einstein gravity, GCG is not a suitable candidate for inflation; but in a five-dimensional brane-world scenario, it can work as a viable inflationary model. We calculate the relevant quantities such as ns, r, and As related to the primordial scalar and tensor fluctuations, and using their recent bounds from Planck and BICEP2, we constrain the model parameters as well as the five-dimensional Planck mass. But as a slow-roll inflationary model with a power-law type scalar primordial power spectrum, GCG as an inflationary model cannot resolve the tension between results from BICEP2 and Planck with a concordance ΛCDM Universe. We show that by going beyond the concordance ΛCDM model and incorporating more general dark energy behavior, we may ease this tension. We also obtain the constraints on the ns and r and the GCG model parameters using Planck+WP +BICEP2 data considering the CPL dark energy behavior.

  2. Specialization of tendon mechanical properties results from interfascicular differences.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Udeze, Chineye P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2012-11-07

    Tendons transfer force from muscle to bone. Specific tendons, including the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), also store and return energy. For efficient function, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible than positional tendons such as the common digital extensor tendon (CDET), and when tested in vitro have a lower modulus and failure stress, but a higher failure strain. It is not known how differences in matrix organization contribute to distinct mechanical properties in functionally different tendons. We investigated the properties of whole tendons, tendon fascicles and the fascicular interface in the high-strain energy-storing SDFT and low-strain positional CDET. Fascicles failed at lower stresses and strains than tendons. The SDFT was more extensible than the CDET, but SDFT fascicles failed at lower strains than CDET fascicles, resulting in large differences between tendon and fascicle failure strain in the SDFT. At physiological loads, the stiffness at the fascicular interface was lower in the SDFT samples, enabling a greater fascicle sliding that could account for differences in tendon and fascicle failure strain. Sliding between fascicles prior to fascicle extension in the SDFT may allow the large extensions required in energy-storing tendons while protecting fascicles from damage.

  3. Shear load transfer in high and low stress tendons.

    PubMed

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-05-01

    Tendon is an integral part of joint movement and stability, as it functions to transmit load from muscle to bone. It has an anisotropic, fibrous hierarchical structure that is generally loaded in the direction of its fibers/fascicles. Internal load distributions are altered when joint motion rotates an insertion site or when local damage disrupts fibers/fascicles, potentially causing inter-fiber (or inter-fascicular) shear. Tendons with different microstructures (helical versus linear) may redistribute loads differently. This study explored how shear redistributes axial loads in rat tail tendon (low stress tendons with linear microstructure) and porcine flexor tendon (high stress with helical microstructure) by creating lacerations on opposite sides of the tendon, ranging from about 20% to 60% of the tendon width, to create various magnitudes of shear. Differences in fascicular orientation were quantified using polarized light microscopy. Unexpectedly, both tendon types maintained about 20% of pre-laceration stress values after overlapping cuts of 60% of tendon width (no intact fibers end to end) suggesting that shear stress transfer can contribute more to overall tendon strength and stiffness than previously reported. All structural parameters for both tendon types decreased linearly with increasing laceration depth. The tail tendon had a more rapid decline in post-laceration elastic stress and modulus parameters as well as a more linear and less tightly packed fascicular structure, suggesting that positional tendons may be less well suited to redistribute loads via a shear mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Specialization of tendon mechanical properties results from interfascicular differences

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Udeze, Chineye P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Tendons transfer force from muscle to bone. Specific tendons, including the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), also store and return energy. For efficient function, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible than positional tendons such as the common digital extensor tendon (CDET), and when tested in vitro have a lower modulus and failure stress, but a higher failure strain. It is not known how differences in matrix organization contribute to distinct mechanical properties in functionally different tendons. We investigated the properties of whole tendons, tendon fascicles and the fascicular interface in the high-strain energy-storing SDFT and low-strain positional CDET. Fascicles failed at lower stresses and strains than tendons. The SDFT was more extensible than the CDET, but SDFT fascicles failed at lower strains than CDET fascicles, resulting in large differences between tendon and fascicle failure strain in the SDFT. At physiological loads, the stiffness at the fascicular interface was lower in the SDFT samples, enabling a greater fascicle sliding that could account for differences in tendon and fascicle failure strain. Sliding between fascicles prior to fascicle extension in the SDFT may allow the large extensions required in energy-storing tendons while protecting fascicles from damage. PMID:22764132

  5. Shear Load Transfer in High and Low Stress Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon is an integral part of joint movement and stability, as it functions to transmit load from muscle to bone. It has an anisotropic, fibrous hierarchical structure that is generally loaded in the direction of its fibers/fascicles. Internal load distributions are altered when joint motion rotates an insertion site or when local damage disrupts fibers/fascicles, potentially causing inter-fiber (or inter-fascicular) shear. Tendons with different microstructure (helical versus linear) may redistribute loads differently. Method of Approach This study explored how shear redistributes axial loads in rat tail tendon (low stress tendons with linear microstructure) and porcine flexor tendon (high stress with helical microstructure) by creating lacerations on opposite sides of the tendon, ranging from about 20-60% of the tendon width, to create various magnitudes of shear. Differences in fascicular orientation were quantified using polarized light microscopy. Results and Conclusions Unexpectedly, both tendon types maintained about 20% of pre-laceration stress values after overlapping cuts of 60% of tendon width (no intact fibers end to end) suggesting that shear stress transfer can contribute more to overall tendon strength and stiffness than previously reported. All structural parameters for both tendon types decreased linearly with increasing laceration depth. The tail tendon had a more rapid decline in post-laceration elastic stress and modulus parameters as well as a more linear and less tightly packed fascicular structure, suggesting that positional tendons may be less well suited to redistribute loads via a shear mechanism. PMID:25700261

  6. Miniature sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.; Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was made of sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurements. Tests were performed on the Chromel-Alumel sheathed thermocouples with both two-wire and single-wire configurations. Sheath diameters ranged from 0.25 to 0.76 mm, and temperatures ranged from 1080 to 1250 K. Both steady-state and thermal cycling tests were performed for times up to 450 hr. Special-order and commercial-grade thermocouples were tested. The tests showed that special-order single-wire sheathed thermocouples can be obtained that are reliable and accurate with diameters as small as 0.25 mm. However, all samples of 0.25-mm-diameter sheathed commercial-grade two-wire and single-wire thermocouples that were tested showed unacceptable drift rates for long-duration engine testing programs. The drift rates were about 1 percent in 10 hr. A thermocouple drift test is recommended in addition to the normal acceptance tests in order to select reliable miniature sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade applications.

  7. Novel everting urologic access sheath: decreased axial forces during insertion.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Jonathan N; Garcia, Maurice; Camargo, Affonso H L A; Joel, Andrew B; Stoller, Marshall L

    2005-12-01

    Advancement of urologic instruments through the genitourinary tract is associated with significant axial forces that likely contribute to patient discomfort, even after injection of a local anesthetic, and may lead to mucosal trauma, postprocedural dysuria and hematuria, and increased susceptibility to infection and strictures. Placing an everting urethral sheath prior to instrumentation may decrease these problems. Two 7-cm-long, 5-mm diameter urethral luminal models were created, one with and one without an artificial stricture. We measured the forces generated during advancement of a novel everting access sheath (Cystoglide; Percutaneous Systems, Mountain View, CA) through the models in comparison with a representative cystoscope and a urologic dilator simulating a traditional access sheath. The mean force generated during advancement of the everting sheath was significantly less than that of both the representative cystoscope (P<0.01) and the traditional access sheath (P<0.01). This held true for the urethral models both with and without an artificial stricture (P<0.01) and with and without lubrication (P<0.01). This novel introduction sheath markedly decreased the axial forces applied to an artificial urethral luminal wall. It is possible that the clinical use of this technology will decrease the discomfort and potential complications associated with lower urinary-tract endoscopy.

  8. Atomic Structure of Type VI Contractile Sheath from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Salih, Osman; He, Shaoda; Planamente, Sara; Stach, Lasse; MacDonald, James T; Manoli, Eleni; Scheres, Sjors H W; Filloux, Alain; Freemont, Paul S

    2018-02-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs), H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS, each belonging to a distinct group. The two T6SS components, TssB/VipA and TssC/VipB, assemble to form tubules that conserve structural/functional homology with tail sheaths of contractile bacteriophages and pyocins. Here, we used cryoelectron microscopy to solve the structure of the H1-T6SS P. aeruginosa TssB1C1 sheath at 3.3 Å resolution. Our structure allowed us to resolve some features of the T6SS sheath that were not resolved in the Vibrio cholerae VipAB and Francisella tularensis IglAB structures. Comparison with sheath structures from other contractile machines, including T4 phage and R-type pyocins, provides a better understanding of how these systems have conserved similar functions/mechanisms despite evolution. We used the P. aeruginosa R2 pyocin as a structural template to build an atomic model of the TssB1C1 sheath in its extended conformation, allowing us to propose a coiled-spring-like mechanism for T6SS sheath contraction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Using dust as probes to determine sheath extent and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Angela; Land, V.; Qiao, K.; Matthews, L.; Hyde, T.

    2016-08-01

    Two in situ experimental methods are presented in which dust particles are used to determine the extent of the sheath and gain information about the time-averaged electric force profile within a radio frequency (RF) plasma sheath. These methods are advantageous because they are not only simple and quick to carry out, but they also can be performed using standard dusty plasma experimental equipment. In the first method, dust particles are tracked as they fall through the plasma towards the lower electrode. These trajectories are then used to determine the electric force on the particle as a function of height as well as the extent of the sheath. In the second method, dust particle levitation height is measured across a wide range of RF voltages. Similarities were observed between the two experiments, but in order to understand the underlying physics behind these observations, the same conditions were replicated using a self-consistent fluid model. Through comparison of the fluid model and experimental results, it is shown that the particles exhibiting a levitation height that is independent of RF voltage indicate the sheath edge - the boundary between the quasineutral bulk plasma and the sheath. Therefore, both of these simple and inexpensive, yet effective, methods can be applied across a wide range of experimental parameters in any ground-based RF plasma chamber to gain useful information regarding the sheath, which is needed for interpretation of dusty plasma experiments.

  10. Modelling approaches for evaluating multiscale tendon mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon exhibits anisotropic, inhomogeneous and viscoelastic mechanical properties that are determined by its complicated hierarchical structure and varying amounts/organization of different tissue constituents. Although extensive research has been conducted to use modelling approaches to interpret tendon structure–function relationships in combination with experimental data, many issues remain unclear (i.e. the role of minor components such as decorin, aggrecan and elastin), and the integration of mechanical analysis across different length scales has not been well applied to explore stress or strain transfer from macro- to microscale. This review outlines mathematical and computational models that have been used to understand tendon mechanics at different scales of the hierarchical organization. Model representations at the molecular, fibril and tissue levels are discussed, including formulations that follow phenomenological and microstructural approaches (which include evaluations of crimp, helical structure and the interaction between collagen fibrils and proteoglycans). Multiscale modelling approaches incorporating tendon features are suggested to be an advantageous methodology to understand further the physiological mechanical response of tendon and corresponding adaptation of properties owing to unique in vivo loading environments. PMID:26855747

  11. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matt van de Rijn, M.D., Ph.D. Torsten...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 May 2006 –30 Apr 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve...Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0297 Title: Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis

  12. Robot Arm with Tendon Connector Plate and Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Millerman, Alexander (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven end effector, a linear actuator, a flexible tendon, and a plate assembly. The linear actuator assembly has a servo motor and a drive mechanism, the latter of which translates linearly with respect to a drive axis of the servo motor in response to output torque from the servo motor. The tendon connects to the end effector and drive mechanism. The plate assembly is disposed between the linear actuator assembly and the tendon-driven end effector and includes first and second plates. The first plate has a first side that defines a boss with a center opening. The second plate defines an accurate through-slot having tendon guide channels. The first plate defines a through passage for the tendon between the center opening and a second side of the first plate. A looped end of the flexible tendon is received within the tendon guide channels.

  13. Core Muscle Activation During Unstable Bicep Curl Using a Water-Filled Instability Training Tube.

    PubMed

    Glass, Stephen C; Blanchette, Taylor W; Karwan, Lauren A; Pearson, Spencer S; OʼNeil, Allison P; Karlik, Dustin A

    2016-11-01

    Glass, SC, Blanchette, TW, Karwan, LA, Pearson, SS, O'Neil, AP, and Karlik, DA. Core muscle activation during unstable bicep curl using a water-filled instability training tube. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3212-3219, 2016-The purpose of this study was to assess compensatory muscle activation created during a bicep curl using a water-filled, unstable lifting tube. Ten men (age = 21 ± 1.6 years, height = 180.0 ± 3.3 cm, mass = 87.4 ± 15.0 kg) and 10 women (age = 19.6 ± 1.3 years, height = 161.4 ± 12.0 cm, mass = 61.2 ± 7.4 kg) completed bicep curls using an 11.4-kg tube partially filled with water during a 50% open-valve, 100% open, and control setting. Subjects completed 8 repetitions within each condition with integrated electromyographic signal (converted to percent maximal voluntary contraction) of the bicep, deltoid, rectus abdominus, and paraspinal muscles measured. Compensatory activation was determined using the natural log of coefficient of variation across concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions. There were no differences between gender for any condition. Significant variability was seen across treatments for paraspinal muscles for CON and ECC at 50% (CON LnCV = 3.13 ± 0.56%, ECC LnCV = 3.34 ± 0.58%) and 100% (CON = 3.24 ± 0.34%, ECC = 3.46 ± 0.35%) compared with control (CON = 2.59 ± 0.47%, ECC = 2.80 ± 0.61%). Deltoid variability was greater at the 100% open setting (CON = 3.51 ± 0.53%, ECC = 3.56 ± 0.36%) compared with control (CON = 2.98 ± 0.35%, ECC = 2.97 ± 0.45%). The abdominal CON 100% showed variability (3.02 ± 0.47%) compared with control (2.65 ± 0.43%). Bicep activation remained unvaried. Compensatory activation of postural muscles contribute to postural stability. This device may be a useful tool for neuromuscular training leading to improved stability and control.

  14. Tendon Mineralization Is Progressive and Associated with Deterioration of Tendon Biomechanical Properties, and Requires BMP-Smad Signaling in the Mouse Achilles Tendon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Hast, Michael W.; Liu, Min; Usami, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic tendon mineralization can develop following tendon rupture or trauma surgery. The pathogenesis of ectopic tendon mineralization and its clinical impact have not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we utilized a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to determine whether ectopic tendon mineralization alters the biomechanical properties of the tendon and whether BMP signaling is involved in this condition. A complete transverse incision was made at the midpoint of the right Achilles tendon in 8-week-old CD1 mice and the gap was left open. Ectopic cartilaginous mass formation was found in the injured tendon by 4 weeks post-surgery and ectopic mineralization was detected at 8–10 weeks post-surgery. Ectopic mineralization grew over time and volume of the mineralized materials of 25-weeks samples was about 2.5 fold bigger than that of 10-weeks samples, indicating that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive. In vitro mechanical testing showed that max force, max stress and mid-substance modulus in the 25-weeks samples were significantly lower than the 10-weeks samples. We observed substantial increases in expression of bone morphogenetic protein family genes in injured tendons 1 week post-surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that phosphorylation of both Smad1 and Smad3 were highly increased in injured tendons as early as 1 week post-injury and remained high in ectopic chondrogenic lesions 4 weeks post-injury. Treatment with the BMP receptor kinase inhibitor (LDN193189) significantly inhibited injury-induced tendon mineralization. These findings indicate that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive, involves BMP signaling and associated with deterioration of tendon biomechanical properties. PMID:26825318

  15. Rehabilitation of the elbow extension with motor imagery in a patient with quadriplegia after tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Murielle; Guillot, Aymeric; Sancho, Pierre-Olivier; Picot, Marion; Revol, Patrice; Rode, Gilles; Collet, Christian

    2010-07-01

    To test the effect of a postsurgical motor imagery program in the rehabilitation of a patient with quadriplegia. Crossover design with kinematic analysis. Rehabilitation Hospital of Lyon. Study approved by the local Human Research Ethics Committee. C6-level injured patient (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade A) with no voluntary elbow extension (triceps brachialis score 1). The surgical procedure was to transfer the distal insertion of the biceps brachii onto the triceps tendon of both arms. The postsurgical intervention on the left arm included 10 sessions of physical rehabilitation followed by 10 motor imagery sessions of 30 minutes each. The patient underwent 5 sessions a week during 2 consecutive weeks. The motor imagery content included mental representations based on elbow extension involved in goal-directed movements. The rehabilitation period of the right arm was reversed, with motor imagery performed first, followed by physical therapy. The kinematics of upper-limb movements was recorded (movement time and variability) before and after each type of rehabilitation period. A long-term retention test was performed 1 month later. Motor imagery training enhanced motor recovery by reducing hand trajectory variability-that is, improving smoothness. Motor performance then remained stable over 1 month. Motor imagery improved motor recovery when associated with physical therapy, with motor performance remaining stable over the 1-month period. We concluded that motor imagery should be successfully associated with classic rehabilitation procedure after tendon transfer. Physical sessions may thus be shortened if too stressful or painful. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Illusion of arm movement evoked by tendon vibration in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Gabriele; Tidoni, Emmanuele; Barone, Nicola; Pilati, Claudio; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2016-09-21

    Studies in healthy people show that stimulation of muscle spindles through frequency-specific tendon vibration (TV) induces the illusory perception of movement. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), motor and sensory connections between the brain and parts of the body below-the-lesion level are partially or totally impaired. The present investigation is a descriptive study aimed to investigate whether people living with SCI may experience movement illusions comparable to a control group. Healthy and people with SCI were asked to report on three illusion-related features (Vividness, Duration, Illusory Extension) after receiving 70 Hz TV on the biceps brachii tendon of both arms. Two different forces of stimulation were applied: 2.4 N and 4.2 N. Both patients and controls were susceptible to the kinesthetic illusion. However patients presented lower sensitivity to TV than healthy subjects. Participants rated stronger illusions of movement after 4.2 N than 2.4 N stimulation in all the three illusion-related features. Further, patients reported atypical illusory experiences of movement (e.g. as if the arm wanted to extend, or a sensation of pushing against something) that may reflect different reorganization processes following spinal cord injury. The study provides a preliminary evidence of the possible use of the proprioceptive stimulation in the upper limbs of people living with SCI. Results are discussed in the light of recent advancements of brain-computer applications based on motor imagery for the control of neuroprosthetic and robotic devices in patients with severe sensorimotor deficits.

  17. Laser Diagnostic Method for Plasma Sheath Potential Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Sean P.

    Electric propulsion systems are gaining popularity in the aerospace field as a viable option for long term positioning and thrusting applications. In particular, Hall thrusters have shown promise as the primary propulsion engine for space probes during interplanetary journeys. However, the interaction between propellant xenon ions and the ceramic channel wall continues to remain a complex issue. The most significant source of power loss in Hall thrusters is due to electron and ion currents through the sheath to the channel wall. A sheath is a region of high electric field that separates a plasma from a wall or surface in contact. Plasma electrons with enough energy to penetrate the sheath may result emission of a secondary electron from the wall. With significant secondary electron emission (SEE), the sheath voltage is reduced and so too is the electron retarding electric field. Therefore, a lower sheath voltage further increases the particle loss to the wall of a Hall thruster and leads to plasma cooling and lower efficiency. To further understand sheath dynamics, laser-induced fluorescence is employed to provide a non-invasive, in situ, and spatially resolved technique for measuring xenon ion velocity. By scanning the laser wavelength over an electronic transition of singly ionized xenon and collecting the resulting fluorescence, one can determine the ion velocity from the Doppler shifted absorption. Knowing the velocity at multiple points in the sheath, it can be converted to a relative electric potential profile which can reveal a lot about the plasma-wall interaction and the severity of SEE. The challenge of adequately measuring sheath potential profiles is optimizing the experiment to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A strong signal with low noise, enables high resolution measurements and increases the depth of measurement in the sheath, where the signal strength is lowest. Many improvements were made to reduce the background luminosity, increase the

  18. Mechanical Strength of the Side-to-Side Tendon Attachment for Mismatched Tendon Sizes and Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Fridén, Jan; Tirrell, Timothy F.; Bhola, Siddharth; Lieber, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Certain combinations are advised against in tendon transfers due to size or shape mismatches between donor and recipient tendons. In this study, ultimate load, stiffness and Young’s modulus were measured in two tendon-to-tendon attachments with intentionally mismatched donor and recipient tendons - pronator teres (PT)-to-extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU)-to-extensor digitorum communis (EDC). FCU-EDC attachments failed at higher loads than PT-to-ECRB attachments but they had similar modulus and stiffness values. Ultimate tensile strength of the tendon attachments exceeded the maximum predicted contraction force of any of the affected muscles, with safety factors of 4x and 2x for the FCU-to-EDC and PT-to-ECRB constructs, respectively. This implies that size and shape mismatch should not be a contraindication to tendon attachment in transfers. Further, these safety factors strongly suggest that no postoperative immobilization of these attachments is necessary. PMID:24413573

  19. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Ebonie; Kidgell, Dawson; Moseley, G Lorimer; Docking, Sean; Purdam, Craig; Cook, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy can be resistant to treatment and often recurs, implying that current treatment approaches are suboptimal. Rehabilitation programmes that have been successful in terms of pain reduction and return to sport outcomes usually include strength training. Muscle activation can induce analgesia, improving self-efficacy associated with reducing one's own pain. Furthermore, strength training is beneficial for tendon matrix structure, muscle properties and limb biomechanics. However, current tendon rehabilitation may not adequately address the corticospinal control of the muscle, which may result in altered control of muscle recruitment and the consequent tendon load, and this may contribute to recalcitrance or symptom recurrence. Outcomes of interest include the effect of strength training on tendon pain, corticospinal excitability and short interval cortical inhibition. The aims of this concept paper are to: (1) review what is known about changes to the primary motor cortex and motor control in tendinopathy, (2) identify the parameters shown to induce neuroplasticity in strength training and (3) align these principles with tendon rehabilitation loading protocols to introduce a combination approach termed as tendon neuroplastic training. Strength training is a powerful modulator of the central nervous system. In particular, corticospinal inputs are essential for motor unit recruitment and activation; however, specific strength training parameters are important for neuroplasticity. Strength training that is externally paced and akin to a skilled movement task has been shown to not only reduce tendon pain, but modulate excitatory and inhibitory control of the muscle and therefore, potentially tendon load. An improved understanding of the methods that maximise the opportunity for neuroplasticity may be an important progression in how we prescribe exercise-based rehabilitation in tendinopathy for pain modulation and potentially restoration of the corticospinal

  20. Triple Achilles Tendon Rupture: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; Hofer, Deann

    We present a case report with 1-year follow-up data of a 57-year-old male soccer referee who had sustained an acute triple Achilles tendon rupture injury during a game. His triple Achilles tendon rupture consisted of a rupture of the proximal watershed region, a rupture of the main body (mid-watershed area), and an avulsion-type rupture of insertional calcific tendinosis. The patient was treated surgically with primary repair of the tendon, including tenodesis with anchors. Postoperative treatment included non-weightbearing for 4 weeks and protected weightbearing until 10 weeks postoperative, followed by formal physical therapy, which incorporated an "antigravity" treadmill. The patient was able to return to full activity after 26 weeks, including running and refereeing, without limitations. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using the zebrafish to understand tendon development and repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jessica W.; Galloway, Jenna L.

    2017-01-01

    Tendons are important components of our musculoskeletal system. Injuries to these tissues are very common, resulting from occupational-related injuries, sports-related trauma, and age-related degeneration. Unfortunately, there are few treatment options, and current therapies rarely restore injured tendons to their original function. An improved understanding of the pathways regulating their development and repair would have significant impact in stimulating the formulation of regenerative-based approaches for tendon injury. The zebrafish provides an ideal system in which to perform genetic and chemical screens to identify new pathways involved in tendon biology. Until recently, there had been few descriptions of tendons and ligaments in the zebrafish and their similarity to mammalian tendon tissues. In this chapter, we describe the development of the zebrafish tendon and ligament tissues in the context of their gene expression, structure, and interactions with neighboring musculoskeletal tissues. We highlight the similarities with tendon development in higher vertebrates, showing that the craniofacial tendons and ligaments in zebrafish morphologically, molecularly, and structurally resemble mammalian tendons and ligaments from embryonic to adult stages. We detail methods for fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry as an assay to examine morphological changes in the zebrafish musculoskeleton. Staining assays such as these could provide the foundation for screen-based approaches to identify new regulators of tendon development, morphogenesis, and repair. These discoveries would provide new targets and pathways to study in the context of regenerative medicine-based approaches to improve tendon healing. PMID:28129848

  2. An Overview of the Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries still remain a challenging condition to manage to ensure optimal outcome for the patient. Since the first flexor tendon repair was described by Kirchmayr in 1917, several approaches to flexor tendon injury have enabled successful repairs rates of 70-90%. Primary surgical repair results in better functional outcome compared to secondary repair or tendon graft surgery. Flexor tendon injury repair has been extensively researched and the literature demonstrates successful repair requires minimal gapping at the repair site or interference with tendon vascularity, secure suture knots, smooth junction of tendon end and having sufficient strength for healing. However, the exact surgical approach to achieve success being currently used among surgeons is still controversial. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the results of studies demonstrating the current knowledge regarding the optimal approach for flexor tendon repair. Post-operative rehabilitation for flexor tendon surgery is another area, which has caused extensive debate in hand surgery. The trend to more active mobilisation protocols seems to be favoured but further study in this area is needed to find the protocol, which achieves function and gliding but avoids rupture of the tendons. Lastly despite success following surgery complications commonly still occur post surgery, including adhesion formation, tendon rupture and stiffness of the joints. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the appropriate management of these difficulties post surgery. New techniques in management of flexor tendon will also be discussed including external laser devices, addition of growth factors and cytokines. PMID:22431948

  3. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a...

  5. Tendon and ligament injuries: the genetic component

    PubMed Central

    September, Alison V; Schwellnus, Martin P; Collins, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments within the upper and lower limbs are some of the more common sites of musculoskeletal injuries during physical activity. Several extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been shown to be associated with these injuries. More recently, studies have suggested that there is also, at least in part, a genetic component to the Achilles tendon, rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. However, specific genes have not been suggested to be associated with rotator cuff or anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Sequence variants of the tenascin C (TNC) gene, on the other hand, have been shown to be associated with Achilles tendinopathies and Achilles tendon ruptures, whereas a variant of the collagen V α 1 (COL5A1) gene has also been shown to be associated with Achilles tendinopathies. Both genes encode for important structural components of tendons and ligaments. The COL5A1 gene encodes for a component of type V collagen, which has an important role in regulating collagen fibre assembly and fibre diameters. The TNC gene, on the other hand, encodes for TNC, which regulates the tissue's response to mechanical load. To date, only variants in two genes have been shown to be associated with Achilles tendon injuries. In addition, although specific genes have not been identified, investigators have suggested that there is also a genetic component to both rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In future, specific genotypes associated with increased risk of injury to specific tendons and ligaments can prevent these injuries by identifying individuals at higher risk. PMID:17261551

  6. A Biomechanical Comparison of Allograft Tendons for Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremiah E; Russell, Joseph P; Grieshober, Jason; Iacangelo, Abigail; Ellison, Benjamin A; Lease, T Dylan; Kim, Hyunchul; Henn, R Frank; Hsieh, Adam H

    2017-03-01

    Allograft tendons are frequently used for ligament reconstruction about the knee, but they entail availability and cost challenges. The identification of other tissues that demonstrate equivalent performance to preferred tendons would improve limitations. Hypothesis/Purpose: We compared the biomechanical properties of 4 soft tissue allograft tendons: tibialis anterior (TA), tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), and semitendinosus (ST). We hypothesized that allograft properties would be similar when standardized by the looped diameter. Controlled laboratory study. This study consisted of 2 arms evaluating large and small looped-diameter grafts: experiment A consisted of TA, TP, and PL tendons (n = 47 each) with larger looped diameters of 9.0 to 9.5 mm, and experiment B consisted of TA, TP, PL, and ST tendons (n = 53 each) with smaller looped diameters of 7.0 to 7.5 mm. Each specimen underwent mechanical testing to measure the modulus of elasticity (E), ultimate tensile force (UTF), maximal elongation at failure, ultimate tensile stress (UTS), and ultimate tensile strain (UTε). Experiment A: No significant differences were noted among tendons for UTF, maximal elongation at failure, and UTϵ. UTS was significantly higher for the PL (54 MPa) compared with the TA (44 MPa) and TP (43 MPa) tendons. E was significantly higher for the PL (501 MPa) compared with the TP (416 MPa) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TP and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the TA tendons for all outcomes. Experiment B: All groups exhibited a similar E. UTF was again highest in the PL tendons (2294 N) but was significantly different from only the ST tendons (1915 N). UTϵ was significantly higher for the ST (0.22) compared with the TA (0.19) and TP (0.19) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TA, TP, and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the ST tendons. Compared with TA tendons, TP and PL tendons of a given looped

  7. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  8. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Alajoulin, Omar A; Alsbou, Mohammed S; Ja'afreh, Somayya O; Kalbouneh, Heba M

    2015-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations.

  9. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavior of collisional sheath in electronegative plasma with q-nonextensive electron distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgohain, Dima Rani; Saharia, K.

    2018-03-01

    Electronegative plasma sheath is addressed in a collisional unmagnetized plasma consisting of q-nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann distributed negative ions and cold fluid positive ions. Considering the positive ion-neutral collisions and ignoring the effects of ionization and collisions between negative species and positive ions (neutrals), a modified Bohm sheath criterion and hence floating potential are derived by using multifluid model. Using the modified Bohm sheath criterion, the sheath characteristics such as spatial profiles of density, potential and net space charge density have been numerically investigated. It is found that increasing values of q-nonextensivity, electronegativity and collisionality lead to a decrease of the sheath thickness and an increase of the sheath potential and the net space charge density. With increasing values of the electron temperature to negative ion temperature ratio, the sheath thickness increases and the sheath potential as well as the net space charge density in the sheath region decreases.

  11. Effects of Continuous Kinaesthetic Feedback Based on Tendon Vibration on Motor Imagery BCI Performance.

    PubMed

    Barsotti, Michele; Leonardis, Daniele; Vanello, Nicola; Bergamasco, Massimo; Frisoli, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Feedback plays a crucial role for using brain computer interface systems. This paper proposes the use of vibration-evoked kinaesthetic illusions as part of a novel multisensory feedback for a motor imagery (MI)-based BCI and investigates its contributions in terms of BCI performance and electroencephalographic (EEG) correlates. sixteen subjects performed two different right arm MI-BCI sessions: with the visual feedback only and with both visual and vibration-evoked kinaesthetic feedback, conveyed by the stimulation of the biceps brachi tendon. In both conditions, the sensory feedback was driven by the MI-BCI. The rich and more natural multisensory feedback was expected to facilitate the execution of MI, and thus to improve the performance of the BCI. The EEG correlates of the proposed feedback were also investigated with and without the performing of MI. the contribution of vibration-evoked kinaesthetic feedback led to statistically higher BCI performance (Anova, F (1,14) = 18.1, p < .01) and more stable EEG event-related-desynchronization. Obtained results suggest promising application of the proposed method in neuro-rehabilitation scenarios: the advantage of an improved usability could make the MI-BCIs more applicable for those patients having difficulties in performing kinaesthetic imagery.

  12. Hamstring tendon versus patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using biodegradable interference fit fixation: a prospective matched-group analysis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael; Kääb, Max J; Schallock, Jessica; Haas, Norbert P; Weiler, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    There are still controversies about graft selection for primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, especially with respect to knee stability and functional outcome. Biodegradable interference screw fixation of hamstring tendon grafts provides clinical results similar to those achieved with identical fixation of bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. In 1996 and 1997, primary isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft was performed in 72 patients. Since 1998, hamstring tendons were used as routine grafts. Matched patients with a hamstring tendon graft were selected from a database (n = 284). All patients were followed prospectively for a minimum of 2 years with KT-1000 arthrometer testing, International Knee Documentation Committee score, and Lysholm score. In the bone-patellar tendon-bone group, 9 patients were excluded because of bilateral rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, 3 patients (4.2%) had a graft rupture, and 4 patients were lost to follow-up (follow-up rate, 92.1%), leaving 56 patients for a matched-group analysis. In the hamstring tendon database, the graft rupture rate was 5.6% (P = .698). The Lysholm score was 89.7 in the patellar tendon group and 94 in the hamstring tendon group (P = .003). The KT-1000 arthrometer side-to-side difference was 2.6 mm for the patellar tendon group and 2.1 mm for the hamstring tendon group (P = .041). There were significantly less positive pivot-shift test results in the hamstring tendon group (P = .005), and hamstring tendon patients showed lower thigh atrophy (P = .024) and patellofemoral crepitus (P = .003). Overall International Knee Documentation Committee scores were better (P = .001) in the hamstring tendon group (hamstring tendon: 34 x A, 21 x B, 0 x C, 0 x D; bone-patellar tendon-bone: 17 x A, 32 x B, 6 x C, 0 x D). In this comparison of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone and

  13. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, Emilia; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2017-11-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  14. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-03-01

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  15. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all ofmore » these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.« less

  16. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation”more » (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.« less

  17. Ontogeny of the sheathing leaf base in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robyn; Leiboff, Samuel; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Leaves develop from the shoot apical meristem (SAM) via recruitment of leaf founder cells. Unlike eudicots, most monocot leaves display parallel venation and sheathing bases wherein the margins overlap the stem. Here we utilized computed tomography (CT) imaging, localization of PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1) auxin transport proteins, and in situ hybridization of leaf developmental transcripts to analyze the ontogeny of monocot leaf morphology in maize (Zea mays). CT imaging of whole-mounted shoot apices illustrates the plastochron-specific stages during initiation of the basal sheath margins from the tubular disc of insertion (DOI). PIN1 localizations identify basipetal auxin transport in the SAM L1 layer at the site of leaf initiation, a process that continues reiteratively during later recruitment of lateral leaf domains. Refinement of these auxin transport domains results in multiple, parallel provascular strands within the initiating primordium. By contrast, auxin is transported from the L2 toward the L1 at the developing margins of the leaf sheath. Transcripts involved in organ boundary formation and dorsiventral patterning accumulate within the DOI, preceding the outgrowth of the overlapping margins of the sheathing leaf base. We suggest a model wherein sheathing bases and parallel veins are both patterned via the extended recruitment of lateral maize leaf domains from the SAM. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Collagen fibrils in functionally distinct tendons have differing structural responses to tendon rupture and fatigue loading.

    PubMed

    Herod, Tyler W; Chambers, Neil C; Veres, Samuel P

    2016-09-15

    In this study we investigate relationships between the nanoscale structure of collagen fibrils and the macroscale functional response of collagenous tissues. To do so, we study two functionally distinct classes of tendons, positional tendons and energy storing tendons, using a bovine forelimb model. Molecular-level assessment using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), functional crosslink assessment using hydrothermal isometric tension (HIT) analysis, and ultrastructural assessment using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study undamaged, ruptured, and cyclically loaded samples from the two tendon types. HIT indicated differences in both crosslink type and crosslink density, with flexor tendons having more thermally stable crosslinks than the extensor tendons (higher TFmax of >90 vs. 75.1±2.7°C), and greater total crosslink density than the extensor tendons (higher t1/2 of 11.5±1.9 vs. 3.5±1.0h after NaBH4 treatment). Despite having a lower crosslink density than flexor tendons, extensor tendons were significantly stronger (37.6±8.1 vs. 23.1±7.7MPa) and tougher (14.3±3.6 vs. 6.8±3.4MJ/m(3)). SEM showed that collagen fibrils in the tougher, stronger extensor tendons were able to undergo remarkable levels of plastic deformation in the form of discrete plasticity, while those in the flexor tendons were not able to plastically deform. When cyclically loaded, collagen fibrils in extensor tendons accumulated fatigue damage rapidly in the form of kink bands, while those in flexor tendons did not accumulate significant fatigue damage. The results demonstrate that collagen fibrils in functionally distinct tendons respond differently to mechanical loading, and suggests that fibrillar collagens may be subject to a strength vs. fatigue resistance tradeoff. Collagen fibrils-nanoscale biological cables-are the fundamental load-bearing elements of all structural human tissues. While all collagen fibrils share common features, such as being composed of a

  19. The role of animal models in tendon research

    PubMed Central

    Hast, M. W.; Zuskov, A.; Soslowsky, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition which can cause significant pain and lead to complete rupture of the tendon, which often requires surgical repair. Due in part to the large spectrum of tendon pathologies, these disorders continue to be a clinical challenge. Animal models are often used in this field of research as they offer an attractive framework to examine the cascade of processes that occur throughout both tendon pathology and repair. This review discusses the structural, mechanical, and biological changes that occur throughout tendon pathology in animal models, as well as strategies for the improvement of tendon healing. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:193–202. PMID:24958818

  20. Achilles Tendon Rupture: Avoiding Tendon Lengthening during Surgical Repair and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a serious injury for which the best treatment is still controversial. Its primary goal should be to restore normal length and tension, thus obtaining an optimal function. Tendon elongation correlates significantly with clinical outcome; lengthening is an important cause of morbidity and may produce permanent functional impairment. In this article, we review all factors that may influence the repair, including the type of surgical technique, suture material, and rehabilitation program, among many others. PMID:21966048

  1. Surgical repair of chronic patellar tendon rupture in total knee replacement with ipsilateral hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Spoliti, Marco; Giai Via, Alessio; Padulo, Johnny; Oliva, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a serious complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Its reconstruction in patients with chronic ruptures is technically demanding. This article reports the results of surgical reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon rupture in TKA using autologous hamstring tendons. Nine TKA patients (six women and three men) (mean age at index surgery 68 years) with chronic patellar tendon tears underwent reconstruction with ipsilateral hamstrings tendon, leaving the distal insertion in situ. The clinical diagnosis was supported by imaging (anterior-posterior and 30° flexion lateral radiographs). Insall-Salvati index, range of motion, and leg extension test were recorded preoperatively and at last follow-up. The modified Cincinnati rating system and the Kujala score were administered. The patients sustained the patellar tendon tear an average of 8 weeks before the procedure. At final follow-up of 4 years (range 2-8 years), the median of extension lag was 5° (range 0°-15°; DS = 5). The median of post-operative Insall-Salvati index was 1.4 (range 1.3-1.8; SD = 0.15; p = 0.002) compared to the preoperative index of 1.7 (range 1.5-2.2; SD = 0.23). The mean modified Cincinnati and Kujala scores significantly increased compared with the preoperative ones (p < 0.01). At final follow-up, all patients were able to walk without brace or aids, and they were satisfied with the procedure. Based on our retrospective study of nine patients, reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon rupture in TKA with autologous hamstring tendons is feasible and safe, and provides good functional recovery. Case series, Level IV.

  2. Aging Does Not Alter Tendon Mechanical Properties During Homeostasis, but does Impair Flexor Tendon Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Jessica E.; Bah, Ibrahima; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Buckley, Mark R.; Loiselle, Alayna E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging is an important factor in disrupted homeostasis of many tissues. While an increased incidence of tendinopathy and tendon rupture are observed with aging, it is unclear whether this is due to progressive changes in tendon cell function and mechanics over time, or an impaired repair reaction from aged tendons in response to insult or injury. In the present study we examined changes in the mechanical properties of Flexor Digitorum Longus (FDL), Flexor Carpi Ulnaris (FCU), and tail fascicles in both male and female C57Bl/6 mice between 3-27 months of age to better understand the effects of sex and age on tendon homeostasis. No change in max load at failure was observed in any group over the course of aging, although there were significant decreases in toe and linear stiffness in female mice from 3-months to 15, and to 22-27-months. No changes in cell proliferation were observed with aging, although an observable decrease in cellularity occurred in 31-month old tendons. Given that aging did not dramatically alter tendon mechanical homeostasis we hypothesized that a disruption in tendon homeostasis, via acute injury would result in an impaired healing response. Significant decreases in max load, stiffness, and yield load were observed in repairs of 22-month old mice, relative to 4-month old mice. No changes in cell proliferation were observed between young and aged, however a dramatic loss of bridging collagen extracellular matrix was observed in aged repairs suggest that matrix production, but not cell proliferation leads to impaired tendon healing with aging. PMID:28419543

  3. Experimental investigation of plasma sheaths in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhengqi; Wei, Zi-an; Ma, J. X.

    2017-11-01

    Sheath structures near a metal plate in a magnetized plasma were experimentally investigated in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations. Plasma parameters and the sheath potential distributions were probed by a planar and an emissive probe, respectively. The measured sheath profiles in the mirror configuration show that the sheath thickness first decreases and then increases when the magnetic strength is raised. A magnetic flux-tube model was used to explain this result. In the cusp configuration, the measured sheath thickness decreases with the increase of the coil current creating the magnetic cusp. However, when normalized by the electron Debye length, the dependence of the sheath thickness on the coil current is reversed.

  4. Angiopoietin‐like 4 promotes angiogenesis in the tendon and is increased in cyclically loaded tendon fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; Scott, Alex; Lu, Alex; Ardekani, Gholamreza S; Behzad, Hayedeh; Lundgreen, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Mazyar; McCormack, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Key points Angiopoietin‐like 4 (ANGPTL4) modulates tendon neovascularization.Cyclic loading stimulates the activity of transforming growth factor‐β and hypoxia‐inducible factor 1α and thereby increases the expression and release of ANGPTL4 from human tendon cells.Targeting ANGPTL4 and its regulatory pathways is a potential avenue for regulating tendon vascularization to improve tendon healing or adaptation. Abstract The mechanisms that regulate angiogenic activity in injured or mechanically loaded tendons are poorly understood. The present study examined the potential role of angiopoietin‐like 4 (ANGPTL4) in the angiogenic response of tendons subjected to repetitive mechanical loading or injury. Cyclic stretching of human tendon fibroblasts stimulated the expression and release of ANGPTL4 protein via transforming growth factor‐β (TGF‐β) and hypoxia‐inducible factor 1α (HIF‐1α) signalling, and the released ANGPTL4 was pro‐angiogenic. Angiogenic activity was increased following ANGPTL4 injection into mouse patellar tendons, whereas the patellar tendons of ANGPTL4 knockout mice displayed reduced angiogenesis following injury. In human rotator cuff tendons, the expression of ANGPTL4 was correlated with the density of tendon endothelial cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing a role of ANGPTL4 in the tendon. ANGPTL4 may assist in the regulation of vascularity in the injured or mechanically loaded tendon. TGF‐β and HIF‐1α comprise two signalling pathways that modulate the expression of ANGPTL4 by mechanically stimulated tendon fibroblasts and, in the future, these could be manipulated to influence tendon healing or adaptation. PMID:26670924

  5. Angiopoietin-like 4 promotes angiogenesis in the tendon and is increased in cyclically loaded tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; Scott, Alex; Lu, Alex; Ardekani, Gholamreza S; Behzad, Hayedeh; Lundgreen, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Mazyar; McCormack, Robert G; Duronio, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) modulates tendon neovascularization. Cyclic loading stimulates the activity of transforming growth factor-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and thereby increases the expression and release of ANGPTL4 from human tendon cells. Targeting ANGPTL4 and its regulatory pathways is a potential avenue for regulating tendon vascularization to improve tendon healing or adaptation. The mechanisms that regulate angiogenic activity in injured or mechanically loaded tendons are poorly understood. The present study examined the potential role of angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) in the angiogenic response of tendons subjected to repetitive mechanical loading or injury. Cyclic stretching of human tendon fibroblasts stimulated the expression and release of ANGPTL4 protein via transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signalling, and the released ANGPTL4 was pro-angiogenic. Angiogenic activity was increased following ANGPTL4 injection into mouse patellar tendons, whereas the patellar tendons of ANGPTL4 knockout mice displayed reduced angiogenesis following injury. In human rotator cuff tendons, the expression of ANGPTL4 was correlated with the density of tendon endothelial cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing a role of ANGPTL4 in the tendon. ANGPTL4 may assist in the regulation of vascularity in the injured or mechanically loaded tendon. TGF-β and HIF-1α comprise two signalling pathways that modulate the expression of ANGPTL4 by mechanically stimulated tendon fibroblasts and, in the future, these could be manipulated to influence tendon healing or adaptation. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  6. Conditioning of the Achilles tendon via ankle exercise improves correlations between sonographic measures of tendon thickness and body anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Scott C; Grigg, Nicole L; Hooper, Sue L; Smeathers, James E

    2011-05-01

    Although conditioning is routinely used in mechanical tests of tendon in vitro, previous in vivo research evaluating the influence of body anthropometry on Achilles tendon thickness has not considered its potential effects on tendon structure. This study evaluated the relationship between Achilles tendon thickness and body anthropometry in healthy adults both before and after resistive ankle plantarflexion exercise. A convenience sample of 30 healthy male adults underwent sonographic examination of the Achilles tendon in addition to standard anthropometric measures of stature and body weight. A 10-5 MHz linear array transducer was used to acquire longitudinal sonograms of the Achilles tendon, 20 mm proximal to the tendon insertion. Participants then completed a series (90-100 repetitions) of conditioning exercises against an effective resistance between 100% and 150% body weight. Longitudinal sonograms were repeated immediately on completion of the exercise intervention, and anteroposterior Achilles tendon thickness was determined. Achilles tendon thickness was significantly reduced immediately following conditioning exercise (t = 9.71, P < 0.001), resulting in an average transverse strain of -18.8%. In contrast to preexercise measures, Achilles tendon thickness was significantly correlated with body weight (r = 0.72, P < 0.001) and to a lesser extent height (r = 0.45, P = 0.01) and body mass index (r = 0.63, P < 0.001) after exercise. Conditioning of the Achilles tendon via resistive ankle exercises induces alterations in tendon structure that substantially improve correlations between Achilles tendon thickness and body anthropometry. It is recommended that conditioning exercises, which standardize the load history of tendon, are employed before measurements of sonographic tendon thickness in vivo.

  7. Biomechanical Cadaveric Evaluation of Partial Acute Peroneal Tendon Tears.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Emilio; Wagner, Pablo; Ortiz, Cristian; Radkievich, Ruben; Palma, Felipe; Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo

    2018-06-01

    No clear guideline or solid evidence exists for peroneal tendon tears to determine when to repair, resect, or perform a tenodesis on the damaged tendon. The objective of this study was to analyze the mechanical behavior of cadaveric peroneal tendons artificially damaged and tested in a cyclic and failure mode. The hypothesis was that no failure would be observed in the cyclic phase. Eight cadaveric long leg specimens were tested on a specially designed frame. A longitudinal full thickness tendon defect was created, 3 cm in length, behind the tip of the fibula, compromising 66% of the visible width of the peroneal tendons. Cyclic testing was initially performed between 50 and 200 N, followed by a load-to-failure test. Tendon elongation and load to rupture were measured. No tendon failed or lengthened during cyclic testing. The mean load to failure for peroneus brevis was 416 N (95% confidence interval, 351-481 N) and for the peroneus longus was 723 N (95% confidence interval, 578-868 N). All failures were at the level of the defect created. In a cadaveric model of peroneal tendon tears, 33% of remaining peroneal tendon could resist high tensile forces, above the physiologic threshold. Some peroneal tendon tears can be treated conservatively without risking spontaneous ruptures. When surgically treating a symptomatic peroneal tendon tear, increased efforts may be undertaken to repair tears previously considered irreparable.

  8. Partial weight support of the arm affects corticomotor selectivity of biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Runnalls, Keith D; Anson, Greg; Byblow, Winston D

    2015-10-26

    Weight support of the arm (WS) can be used in stroke rehabilitation to facilitate upper limb therapy, but the neurophysiological effects of this technique are not well understood. While an overall reduction in muscle activity is expected, the mechanism by which WS may alter the expression of muscle synergies has not been examined until now. We explored the neurophysiological effect of WS on the selectivity of biceps brachii (BB) activation in healthy adults. Thirteen participants completed counterbalanced movement tasks in a repeated measures design. Three levels of WS (0, 45, and 90 % of full support) were provided to the arm using a commercial device (Saebo Mobile Arm Support). At each level of WS, participants maintained a flexed shoulder posture while performing rhythmic isometric elbow flexion (BB agonist) or forearm pronation (BB antagonist). Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation of primary motor cortex was used to elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in BB 100-300 ms before muscle contraction. Baseline muscle activity and MEP amplitude were the primary dependent measures. Effects of movement TASK and SUPPORT LEVEL were statistically analyzed using linear mixed effects models. As expected, with increased support tonic activity was reduced across all muscles. This effect was greatest in the anti-gravity muscle anterior deltoid, and evident in biceps brachii and pronator teres as well. For BB MEP amplitude, TASK and SUPPORT LEVEL, interacted such that for elbow flexion, MEP amplitudes were smaller with incrementally greater WS whereas, for forearm pronation MEP amplitudes were smaller only at high WS. Weight support of the arm influences corticomotor selectivity of biceps brachii. WS may impact coordination independently of a global reduction in muscle activity. The amount of supportive force applied to the arm influences the neuromechanical control profile for the limb. These findings may inform the application of WS in upper limb stroke

  9. Allometric scaling of biceps strength before and after resistance training in men.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, Robert F; Ryan, Eric D; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Price, Thomas B; Seip, Richard L; Angelopoulos, Theodore J; Moyna, Niall M; Gordon, Paul M; Thompson, Paul D; Hoffman, Eric P

    2007-06-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) derive allometric scaling models of isometric biceps muscle strength using pretraining body mass (BM) and muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) as scaling variables in adult males, 2) test model appropriateness using regression diagnostics, and 3) cross-validate the models before and after 12 wk of resistance training. A subset of FAMuSS (Functional SNP Associated with Muscle Size and Strength) study data (N=136) were randomly split into two groups (A and B). Allometric scaling models using pretraining BM and CSA were derived and tested for group A. The scaling exponents determined from these models were then applied to and tested on group B pretraining data. Finally, these scaling exponents were applied to and tested on group A and B posttraining data. BM and CSA models produced scaling exponents of 0.64 and 0.71, respectively. Regression diagnostics determined both models to be appropriate. Cross-validation of the models to group B showed that the BM model, but not the CSA model, was appropriate. Removal of the largest six subjects (CSA>30 cm) from group B resulted in an appropriate fit for the CSA model. Application of the models to group A posttraining data showed that both models were appropriate, but only the body mass model was successful for group B. These data suggest that the application of scaling exponents of 0.64 and 0.71, using BM and CSA, respectively, are appropriate for scaling isometric biceps strength in adult males. However, the scaling exponent using CSA may not be appropriate for individuals with biceps CSA>30 cm. Finally, 12 wk of resistance training does not alter the relationship between BM, CSA, and muscular strength as assessed by allometric scaling.

  10. Can Grafts Provide Superior Tendon Healing and Clinical Outcomes After Rotator Cuff Repairs?

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yohei; Dávalos Herrera, Diego Alejandro; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Boorman, Richard S.; Thornton, Gail M.; Lo, Ian K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears commonly retear. To improve healing rates, a number of different approaches have been utilized, including the use of grafts, which may enhance the biomechanical and biologic aspects of the repair construct. However, the outcomes after the use of grafts are diverse. Purpose: To systematically review the literature for large to massive rotator cuff tears to determine whether the use of grafts generally provides superior tendon healing and clinical outcomes to the repairs without grafts. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed. Clinical studies comparing the repairs with (graft group) and without grafts (control group) were included and analyzed. The primary outcome was tendon healing on either magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound. The secondary outcome measures included visual analog scale for pain, University of California at Los Angles (UCLA) score, and forward elevation range. Differences between groups in all outcome measures were statistically analyzed. Results: Six comparative studies (level of evidence 2 or 3) with 13 study groups were included. A total of 242 repairs in the graft group (mean age, 62.5 ± 4.6 years) and 185 repairs in the control group (mean age, 62.5 ± 5.0 years) were analyzed. The graft types utilized included autograft (fascia lata) in 1 study, allograft (human dermis) in 2 studies, xenograft (bovine pericardium, porcine small intestine submucosa) in 2 studies, synthetic graft (polypropylene) in 1 study, and a combination of autograft (the long head of biceps) and synthetic graft (polypropylene) in 1 study. The overall mean follow-up time was 28.4 ± 9.0 months. When 1 or 2 studies/study groups were excluded due to practical or statistical reasons, the graft group demonstrated significantly improved healing (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.58-3.90; P < .0001) and all clinical outcome measures at

  11. Biceps-Related Physical Findings Are Useful to Prevent Misdiagnosis of Cervical Spondylotic Amyotrophy as a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Eiichiro; Shigematsu, Hideki; Inoue, Kazuya; Egawa, Takuya; Tanaka, Masato; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Koizumi, Munehisa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2018-02-01

    Case-control study. The aim of the present study was to identify physical findings useful for differentiating between cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) and rotator cuff tears to prevent the misdiagnosis of CSA as a rotator cuff tear. CSA and rotator cuff tears are often confused among patients presenting with difficulty in shoulder elevation. Twenty-five patients with CSA and 27 with rotator cuff tears were enrolled. We included five physical findings specific to CSA that were observed in both CSA and rotator cuff tear patients. The findings were as follows: (1) weakness of the deltoid muscle, (2) weakness of the biceps muscle, (3) atrophy of the deltoid muscle, (4) atrophy of the biceps muscle, and (5) swallow-tail sign (assessment of the posterior fibers of the deltoid). Among 25 CSA patients, 10 (40.0%) were misdiagnosed with a rotator cuff tear on initial diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity of each physical finding were as follows: (1) deltoid weakness (sensitivity, 92.0%; specificity, 55.6%), (2) biceps weakness (sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 100%), (3) deltoid atrophy (sensitivity, 96.0%; specificity, 77.8%), (4) biceps atrophy (sensitivity, 88.8%; specificity, 92.6%), and (5) swallow-tail sign (sensitivity, 56.0%; specificity, 74.1%). There were statistically significant differences in each physical finding. CSA is likely to be misdiagnosed as a rotator cuff tear; however, weakness and atrophy of the biceps are useful findings for differentiating between CSA and rotator cuff tears to prevent misdiagnosis.

  12. Radiographic Features of Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Muhammad Ali; Moonot, Pradeep; Haddad, Fares

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess soft tissue features of acute patellar tendon rupture on lateral knee radiograph that would facilitate early diagnosis. The participants were divided into two groups of 35 patients each. There were 28 men and seven women with a mean age of 46 years in the control group and 26 men and nine women with a mean age of 47 years in the rupture group. The lateral knee radiograph of each patient was evaluated for Insall-Salvati ratio for patella alta, increased density of the infrapatellar fat pad, appearance of the soft tissue margin of the patellar tendon and bony avulsions. In the rupture group there were three consistent soft tissue radiographic features in addition to patellar alta. These were increased density of infrapatellar fat pad; loss of sharp, well-defined linear margins of the patellar tendon and angulated wavy margin of the patellar tendon while in the control group these features were not observed. The soft tissue radiographic features described in the rupture group are consistent and reliable. When coupled with careful clinical assessment, these will aid in early diagnosis and further imaging will be seldom required. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Tendon fatigue in response to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Andarawis-Puri, N.; Flatow, E. L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are commonly attributable to accumulation of sub-rupture fatigue damage from repetitive use. Data is limited to late stage disease from patients undergoing surgery, motivating development of animal models, such as ones utilizing treadmill running or repetitive reaching, to investigate the progression of tendinopathies. We developed an in vivo model using the rat patellar tendon that allows control of the loading directly applied to the tendon. This manuscript discusses the response of tendons to fatigue loading and applications of our model. Briefly, the fatigue life of the tendon was used to define low, moderate and high levels of fatigue loading. Morphological assessment showed a progression from mild kinks to fiber disruption, for low to high level fatigue loading. Collagen expression, 1 and 3 days post loading, showed more modest changes for low and moderate than high level fatigue loading. Protein and mRNA expression of Ineterleukin-1β and MMP-13 were upregulated for moderate but not low level fatigue loading. Moderate level (7200 cycles) and 100 cycles of fatigue loading resulted in a catabolic and anabolic molecular profile respectively, at both 1 and 7 days post loading. Results suggest unique mechanisms for different levels of fatigue loading that are distinct from laceration. PMID:21625047

  14. How tendons buffer energy dissipation by muscle

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas J.; Konow, Nicolai

    2013-01-01

    To decelerate the body and limbs, muscles actively lengthen to dissipate energy. During rapid energy-dissipating events, tendons buffer the work done on muscle by temporarily storing elastic energy, then releasing this energy to do work on the muscle. This elastic mechanism may reduce the risk of muscle damage by reducing peak forces and lengthening rates of active muscle. PMID:23873133

  15. Rectus sheath hematoma of the abdomen. Case report.

    PubMed

    Villena-Tovar, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma in the vast number of cases is due to an inferior epigastric artery tear occasionally due to trauma (not considered serious) or alterations in coagulation or use of anticoagulant therapy. It is an unlikely and difficult to diagnose pathology. We present the case of a 61-year-old female patient. The patient presented in emergency service with sudden abdominal pain caused by coughing as a result of an upper respiratory tract infection. The culmination was a spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. Rectus sheath hematoma is a diagnosis to consider in a previously asymptomatic patient who presents with clinical features of acute pain and appearance of increase of volume in the abdominal wall involving the rectus muscles.

  16. Rectus sheath haematoma: a rare masquerader for abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Saleem, Saad; Ghous, Ghulam

    2017-04-13

    Rectus sheath haematoma is a rare cause of abdominal pain. It can be easily confused for other causes of acute abdomen and may even lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Our patient has the rectus sheath haematoma because of violent coughing and on presentation had no obvious clinical sign pointing to the same. Diagnosis was made by a CT scan of the abdomen, and patient was treated conservatively. Rectus sheath haematomas are usually present on the posterior aspect of the rectus muscles and thus may not be clinically appreciable. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Photovoltaic sheathing element with a flexible connector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Langmaid, Joseph A; Keenihan, James R; Mills, Michael E

    2016-07-12

    The present invention is premised upon an assembly including at least a photovoltaic sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure, the sheathing element including at least: a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly; at least a first and a second connector assembly disposed on opposing sides of the sheathing element and capable of directly or indirectly electrically connecting the photovoltaic cell assembly to at least two adjoining devices that are affixed to the building structure and wherein at least one of the connector assemblies includes amore » flexible portion; one or more connector pockets disposed in the body portion the pockets capable of receiving at least a portion of the connector assembly.« less

  18. An unusual case of an intramuscular lipoma of the biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lahrach, Kamal; el Kadi, Khalid Ibn; Mezzani, Amine; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2013-01-01

    Lipomas are common benign neoplasms consisting of mature fatty tissue. They are usually of roundish or ovoid shape and are situated in a single anatomical region. They most frequently occur on the back and in the extremities. Most lipomas are subcutaneous and require no imaging evaluation. When deep, large and unusual in location, MRI can identify and localise these tumours and is the best exploration to differentiate lipoma and lipo-sarcoma. We describe a case of a patient with an intramuscular lipoma of the biceps brachii. PMID:24062869

  19. Higgs inflation is still alive after the results from BICEP2.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Oda, Kin-Ya; Park, Seong Chan

    2014-06-20

    The observed value of the Higgs boson mass indicates that the Higgs potential becomes small and flat at the scale around 10(17)  GeV. Having this fact in mind, we reconsider the Higgs inflation scenario proposed by Bezrukov and Shaposhnikov. It turns out that the nonminimal coupling ξ of the Higgs squared to the Ricci scalar can be smaller than 10. For example, ξ=7 corresponds to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃0.2, which is consistent with the recent observation by BICEP2.

  20. Amino group in Leptothrix sheath skeleton is responsible for direct deposition of Fe(III) minerals onto the sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Matsumoto, Syuji; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Kanashima, Shoko; Hino, Katsuhiko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Tamura, Katsunori; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2017-07-26

    Leptothrix species produce microtubular organic-inorganic materials that encase the bacterial cells. The skeleton of an immature sheath, consisting of organic exopolymer fibrils of bacterial origin, is formed first, then the sheath becomes encrusted with inorganic material. Functional carboxyl groups of polysaccharides in these fibrils are considered to attract and bind metal cations, including Fe(III) and Fe(III)-mineral phases onto the fibrils, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that NH 2 of the amino-sugar-enriched exopolymer fibrils is involved in interactions with abiotically generated Fe(III) minerals. NH 2 -specific staining of L. cholodnii OUMS1 detected a terminal NH 2 on its sheath skeleton. Masking NH 2 with specific reagents abrogated deposition of Fe(III) minerals onto fibrils. Fe(III) minerals were adsorbed on chitosan and NH 2 -coated polystyrene beads but not on cellulose and beads coated with an acetamide group. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at the N1s edge revealed that the terminal NH 2 of OUMS1 sheaths, chitosan and NH 2 -coated beads binds to Fe(III)-mineral phases, indicating interaction between the Fe(III) minerals and terminal NH 2 . Thus, the terminal NH 2 in the exopolymer fibrils seems critical for Fe encrustation of Leptothrix sheaths. These insights should inform artificial synthesis of highly reactive NH 2 -rich polymers for use as absorbents, catalysts and so on.

  1. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in pregnancy and a systematic anatomical workup of rectus sheath hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, Kerstin; Wedel, Thilo; Both, Marcus; Bas, Kayhan; Maass, Nicolai; Alkatout, Ibrahim

    2016-10-19

    Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare clinical diagnosis, particularly in pregnancy. Due to unspecific symptoms, misdiagnosis is likely and could potentially endanger a patient as well as her fetus. A 26-year-old white woman presented with mild right-sided abdominal pain, which increased during palpation and movement, at 26 + 3 weeks' gestational age. Ultrasound imaging initially showed a round and well-demarcated structure, which appeared to be in contact with her uterine wall, leading to a suspected diagnosis of an infarcted leiomyoma. However, she reported increasing levels of pain and laboratory tests showed a significant drop in her initially normal hemoglobin level. A magnetic resonance imaging scan finally revealed a large type III rectus sheath hematoma on the right side. Because of progressive blood loss into her rectus sheath under conservative therapy, with a significant further decrease in her hemoglobin levels, surgical treatment via right-sided paramedian laparotomy was initiated. During the operation the arterial bleed could be ligated. She eventually achieved complete convalescence and delivered a healthy newborn spontaneously after 40 weeks of gestation. This case report highlights the clinical and diagnostic features of rectus sheath hematoma and shows the anatomical aspects of the rectus sheath, simplifying early and correct diagnosis.

  2. Continuum kinetic and multi-fluid simulations of classical sheaths

    DOE PAGES

    Cagas, P.; Hakim, A.; Juno, J.; ...

    2017-02-21

    The kinetic study of plasma sheaths is critical, among other things, to understand the deposition of heat on walls, the effect of sputtering, and contamination of the plasma with detrimental impurities. The plasma sheath also provides a boundary condition and can often have a significant global impact on the bulk plasma. In this paper, kinetic studies of classical sheaths are performed with the continuum kinetic code, Gkeyll, which directly solves the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The code uses a novel version of the finite-element discontinuous Galerkin scheme that conserves energy in the continuous-time limit. The fields are computed using Maxwell equations. Ionizationmore » and scattering collisions are included; however, surface effects are neglected. The aim of this work is to introduce the continuum kinetic method and compare its results with those obtained from an already established finite-volume multi-fluid model also implemented in Gkeyll. Novel boundary conditions on the fluids allow the sheath to form without specifying wall fluxes, so the fluids and fields adjust self-consistently at the wall. Our work demonstrates that the kinetic and fluid results are in agreement for the momentum flux, showing that in certain regimes, a multifluid model can be a useful approximation for simulating the plasma boundary. There are differences in the electrostatic potential between the fluid and kinetic results. Further, the direct solutions of the distribution function presented here highlight the non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons in the sheath, emphasizing the need for a kinetic model. The densities, velocities, and the potential show a good agreement between the kinetic and fluid results. But, kinetic physics is highlighted through higher moments such as parallel and perpendicular temperatures which provide significant differences from the fluid results in which the temperature is assumed to be isotropic. Besides decompression cooling, the heat flux is shown to

  3. Continuum kinetic and multi-fluid simulations of classical sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Cagas, P.; Hakim, A.; Juno, J.

    The kinetic study of plasma sheaths is critical, among other things, to understand the deposition of heat on walls, the effect of sputtering, and contamination of the plasma with detrimental impurities. The plasma sheath also provides a boundary condition and can often have a significant global impact on the bulk plasma. In this paper, kinetic studies of classical sheaths are performed with the continuum kinetic code, Gkeyll, which directly solves the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The code uses a novel version of the finite-element discontinuous Galerkin scheme that conserves energy in the continuous-time limit. The fields are computed using Maxwell equations. Ionizationmore » and scattering collisions are included; however, surface effects are neglected. The aim of this work is to introduce the continuum kinetic method and compare its results with those obtained from an already established finite-volume multi-fluid model also implemented in Gkeyll. Novel boundary conditions on the fluids allow the sheath to form without specifying wall fluxes, so the fluids and fields adjust self-consistently at the wall. Our work demonstrates that the kinetic and fluid results are in agreement for the momentum flux, showing that in certain regimes, a multifluid model can be a useful approximation for simulating the plasma boundary. There are differences in the electrostatic potential between the fluid and kinetic results. Further, the direct solutions of the distribution function presented here highlight the non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons in the sheath, emphasizing the need for a kinetic model. The densities, velocities, and the potential show a good agreement between the kinetic and fluid results. But, kinetic physics is highlighted through higher moments such as parallel and perpendicular temperatures which provide significant differences from the fluid results in which the temperature is assumed to be isotropic. Besides decompression cooling, the heat flux is shown to

  4. Mineral distributions at the developing tendon enthesis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Andrea G; Pasteris, Jill D; Genin, Guy M; Daulton, Tyrone L; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, "the enthesis". A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A zone (∼20 µm) exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked to endochondral

  5. Abdominal foreign body: late presentation as a rectus sheath abscess.

    PubMed

    Noushif, M; Sivaprasad, S; Prashanth, A

    2011-05-01

    Intra-abdominal ingested foreign bodies are usually an incidental finding, typically encountered in mentally challenged patients. We present the case of a 65-year-old mentally sound woman who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a lump in the hypogastrium. Evaluation revealed a rectus sheath abscess extending to the peritoneum, with a foreign body in situ. On enquiry, the patient revealed that she had accidentally ingested a tailoring needle 17 years ago. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an ingested foreign body as a rectus sheath abscess after a long duration.

  6. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma: The utility of CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Pierro, Antonio; Cilla, Savino; Modugno, Pietro; Centritto, Enrico Maria; De Filippo, Carlo Maria; Sallustio, Giuseppina

    2018-04-01

    We described the utility of computed tomography (CT) angiography in detection of bleeding vessels for a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization of the spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. A 70-year-old woman comes to our attention with acute abdominal pain and a low hemoglobin level. An unenhanced CT was performed demonstrating a large rectus sheath hematoma. A conservative management was initially established. Despite this therapy, the abdominal pain increased together with a further decrease of hemoglobin values. A CT angiography was then performed, demonstrating an active bleeding within the hematoma and addressing the patient to a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization.

  7. Photovoltaic building sheathing element with anti-slide features

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.

    2015-09-08

    The present invention is premised` upon an assembly that includes at least a photovoltaic building sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure, the photovoltaic building sheathing element. The element including a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly; and at feast a first and a second connector assembly capable of directly or indirectly electrically connecting the photovoltaic cell assembly to one or more adjoining devices; wherein the body portion includes one or more geometric features adapted to engage a vertically adjoining device before installation.

  8. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Bisphosphonate therapy start may transiently increase the risk of tendon rupture in patients with glucocorticoid co-medication: a population-based observational study.

    PubMed

    Spoendlin, Julia; Meier, Christian; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2016-10-01

    The effect of bisphosphonates on extra-osseous tissue is rarely investigated. We performed an exploratory analysis on the association of new bisphosphonate use and incident tendon rupture in patients with or without oral glucocorticoid co-medication. We conducted a matched case-control study using data from the UK-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cases were patients aged 30-89 years with an incident diagnosis of Achilles or biceps tendon rupture between 1995 and 2013. We compared new oral bisphosphonate use between cases and controls with or without oral glucocorticoid co-medication, by timing (last prescription tendon rupture of 6.42 (95%CI 4.03-10.22) for short-term bisphosphonate use (≤4 prescriptions), which declined with increasing number of prescriptions. Among people with continuous prednisone use of 5-10 mg/day, bisphosphonate users with <9 prescriptions had an OR of 2.46 (95%CI 1.00-6.03), compared with bisphosphonate non-users. The case-crossover analysis yielded an OR of 4.46 (95%CI 2.76-7.20) for new bisphosphonate treatment in patients with glucocorticoid co-medication, and a null result in glucocorticoid non-users. New bisphosphonate treatment may transiently increase the risk of tendon rupture in oral glucocorticoid users. Further research is needed to establish causality of this yet unreported adverse drug reaction or drug-drug interaction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Reconstruction of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by transposition of the extensor indicis tendon].

    PubMed

    Loos, A; Kalb, K; Van Schoonhoven, J; Landsleitner Dagger, B

    2003-12-01

    Rupture of the extensor pollicis longus-tendon (EPL) is a frequent complication after distal radius fractures. Other traumatic and non-traumatic reasons for this tendon lesion are known, including a theory about a disorder in the blood supply to the tendon itself. We examined 40 patients after reconstruction of the EPL-tendon in a mean follow-up time of 30 months. All patients were clinically examined and a DASH questionnaire was answered by all patients. The method to reconstruct the EPL-tendon was the transposition of the extensor indicis-tendon. After the operations the thumb was put in a splint for four weeks in a "hitch-hiker's-position". 31 ruptures of the tendon (77.5 %) were a result of trauma. In 20 of them (50 %) a distal radius fracture had occurred. Clinical examination included measurements of the movement of the thumb- and index-finger joints, the grip strength and the maximal span of the hand. Significant differences were not found. The isolated extension of the index finger was possible in all patients. But it was reduced in ten cases which represent 25 %. Our results were evaluated by the Geldmacher score to evaluate the reconstruction of the EPL-tendon. 20 % excellent, 65 % good, 12.5 % fair and 2.5 % poor results were reached. The Geldmacher score was used critically. We suggest its modification for the evaluation of thumb abduction. The DASH score reached a functional value of ten points which represents a very good result. In conclusion the extensor indicis-transposition is a safe method to reconstruct the EPL-tendon. Its substantial advantage is taking a healthy muscle as the motor, thereby avoiding the risk of using a degenerated muscle in late tendon reconstruction. A powerful extension of the index finger will be maintained by physical education. Generally, the loss of the extension of the index finger is negligible. It does not disturb the patients. But it has to be discussed with the patient before the operation.

  11. [Results of flexor tendon sutures of the fingers with 2-strand (40 tendons) and 4-strand (64 tendons) core sutures].

    PubMed

    Winkel, R; Kalbhenn, O; Hoffmann, R

    2012-06-01

    This retrospective examination compares the results of finger flexor tendon sutures with 2 strands and 4 strands. It was checked, whether and how 2 more strands influenced the rupture rate, the movement of the finger and the contentment of the patients. From 1996 to 2000 for the core suture of the flexor tendon of fingers we used 2 strands. 35 patients with 40 tendon sutures of 73 patients were examined. From 2001 to 2005 we used for the core suture 2 loop threads. 53 patients with 64 tendon sutures from a total of 111 patients were examined. At least 12 months had passed between operation and the examination. The rupture rate and the range of movement of each finger joint and the total mobility of the affected fingers were evaluated. Each case was compared to the uninjured opposite hand. The functional result was judged according to the score of Buck-Gramcko. The patient's contentment was recorded by the DASH (disability of arm, shoulder and hand) score. Effects of gender, age, accompanying injuries, zone of the injury and their influence on the results were analysed. The Buck-Gramcko score showed in the 2-strand group a distribution from summarised 70% "excellent" and "good" and 30% "fair" and "poor". In the 4-strand-group the relation was 93.7% "excellent" and "good", 6.3% "fair", one "poor". In the 2-strand group 2/40 (5%) of the tendon sutures ruptured, in the 4-strand group 1/64 (1.6%) ruptured. The average DASH value in the 2-strands-group was 16.6/100, in the 4-strands-group 18.1/100 when 0 is the best possible result and 100 the worst. The patient judgement in the 2-strand group was summarised to 70% for "excellent" and "good" and 30% "fair" and "poor". In the 4-strand group the patient's judgment was summarised in 75% "excellent" and "good" and in 25% "fair". The results of flexor tendon sutures with 4-strand core sutures have been superior to the results with 2-strand core suture according to range of motion of the fingers (P <0.005). © Georg Thieme

  12. Changes in plasma enzyme activity after intramuscular injection of bupivacaine into the human biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, K; Sakamoto, K

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the time course of changes in plasma creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity after intramuscular injection of 0.5% bupivacaine (BPVC). A total of 10 mL BPVC was injected into the biceps brachii (two sites, 5 mL per site) of five healthy, male subjects. Blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein before and 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the injection. Affected muscle size was visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was performed 4 days after the injection. Plasma CK activity started to increase 2 h and peaked 12 h after the injection. The peak CK activity (470 +/- 62 IU L-1) was approximately four times the pre-injection value (133 +/- 24 IU L-1), and no additional increase was observed after 24 h. Plasma LDH, AST and ALT activities did not change significantly over time. Muscle around the injection sites showed increased T2 signal intensity using MRI. When smaller (2 mL) or larger (20 mL) amounts of BPVC were injected into the biceps brachii in additional experiments, the amount of increase in plasma CK activity appeared to be related to the size of the affected muscle. It was concluded that CK started to leak from damaged muscle cells shortly after the BPVC injection, and the amount of increase in plasma CK activity appeared to reflect the amount of muscle damage.

  13. Self-unitarization of New Higgs Inflation and compatibility with Planck and BICEP2 data

    SciTech Connect

    Germani, Cristiano; Wintergerst, Nico; Watanabe, Yuki, E-mail: cristiano.germani@lmu.de, E-mail: watanabe@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: nico.wintergerst@physik.lmu.de

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we show that the Germani-Kehagias model of Higgs inflation (or New Higgs Inflation), where the Higgs boson is kinetically non-minimally coupled to the Einstein tensor is in perfect compatibility with the latest Planck and BICEP2 data. Moreover, we show that the tension between the Planck and BICEP2 data can be relieved within the New Higgs inflation scenario by a negative running of the spectral index. Regarding the unitarity of the model, we argue that it is unitary throughout the evolution of the Universe. Weak couplings in the Higgs-Higgs and Higgs-graviton sectors are provided by a large backgroundmore » dependent cut-off scale during inflation. In the same regime, the W and Z gauge bosons acquire a very large mass, thus decouple. On the other hand, if they are also non-minimally coupled to the Higgs boson, their effective masses can be enormously reduced. In this case, the W and Z bosons are no longer decoupled. After inflation, the New Higgs model is well approximated by a quartic Galileon with a renormalizable potential. We argue that this can unitarily create the right conditions for inflation to eventually start.« less

  14. Effect of tendon tensioning: an in vitro study in porcine extensor tendons.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael; Vaisman, Alex; Meleán, Patricio; Figueroa, Francisco

    2010-06-01

    Graft tensioning is a controversial issue in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) that has not achieved consensus between peers. The purpose of this study is to determine if after tensioning tendon length and resistance to maximal load changes. We performed an in vitro study with 50 porcine extensors tendons. The first group (P=25) was tensioned with 80 N (19.97 lb) for 10 min, using an ACL graft preparation board. The second group (C=25) was used as control and was not tensioned. The average initial (groups P and C) and post tensioning tendon length (group C) were measured; the average initial and post tensioning tendon diameter were measured as well. All samples were fixated in a tube-clamp system connected to a tension sensor. The samples were stressed with continuous and progressive tension until ultimate failure at maximum load (UFML) occurs. The initial mean length was: P before tensioning=13.4 mm+/-1.4 mm (range 10.5-16.5); P after tensioning=13.8 mm+/-1.4 mm (range 11.5-16.5); C=13 mm+/-1.35 mm (p=0.005). The mean diameter was: P=5.6 mm (4.5-6); C=5.5 mm (range 4.5-6) (p>0.05). The UFML was: P=189.7 N (114-336); C=229.9 N (143-365) (p=0.029). Tendon tensioning with 80 N for 10 min produced 3% average elongation. These could be beneficial in ACLR since tendon tensioning decreases elongation of the graft after fixation. Regardless, tendon tensioning is not innocuous since it diminishes their resistance when continuously stressed until complete failure occurs.

  15. The effect of long and short head biceps loading on glenohumeral joint rotational range of motion and humeral head position.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Michelle H; Nguyen, Michael L; Quigley, Ryan J; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Gupta, Ranjan; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of loading the long and short heads of the biceps on glenohumeral range of motion and humeral head position. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested in 60° abduction in the scapula and coronal plane. Muscle loading was applied based on cross-sectional area ratios. The short and long head of the biceps were loaded individually followed by combined loading. Range of motion was measured with 2.2 Nm torque, and the humeral head apex position was measured using a MicroScribe. A paired t test with Bonferroni correction was used for statistics. Long head loading decreased internal rotation in both the scapular (17.9 %) and coronal planes (5.7 %) and external rotation in the scapular plane (2.6 %) (P < 0.04). With only short head loading, maximum internal rotation was significantly increased in the scapular and coronal plane. Long head and short head loading shifted the humeral head apex posteriorly in maximum internal rotation in both planes with the long head shift being significantly greater than the short head. Long head loading also shifted the humeral apex inferiorly in internal rotation and inferiorly posteriorly in neutral rotation in the scapular plane. With the long head unloaded, there was a significant superior shift with short head loading in both planes. Loading the long head of the biceps had a much greater effect on glenohumeral range of motion and humeral head shift than the short head of the biceps; however, in the absence of long head loading, with the short head loaded, maximum internal rotation increases and the humeral head shifts superiorly, which may contribute to impingement following tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. These small changes in rotational range of motion and humeral head position with biceps tenodesis may not lead to pathologic conditions in low-demand patients; however, in throwers, biceps tenodesis may lead to increased contact pressures in late-cocking and deceleration that will likely translate

  16. Partial supraspinatus tears are associated with tendon lengthening.

    PubMed

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Buck, Florian M; Farshad, Mazda; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Gerber, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Tendon tear may result in muscular retraction with the loss of contractile amplitude and strength of the rotator cuff muscles. Currently, neither a validated method of measuring supraspinatus tendon length nor normal values are known. It was therefore the purpose of this study to measure the normal length of the supraspinatus tendon and to determine whether partial tears are associated with changes in tendon length. MR examinations of 49 asymptomatic volunteers and 37 patients with arthroscopically proven, isolated partial tears of the supraspinatus tendon were compared. The ratio of the extramuscular tendon length to the distance between the footprint and the glenoid surface was calculated (TL/FG ratio). Tendon length measurements were taken by two independent readers at the bursal and articular surfaces at the anterior, the central and the posterior parts of the tendon. TL/FG ratios at the bursal surface of tendons with partial tears were significantly higher than those in the control group [anterior: 0.78 ± 0.20 vs. 0.66 ± 0.15 (p < 0.05); central: 0.61 ± 0.13 vs. 0.52 ± 0.10 (p < 0.05); posterior: 0.57 ± 0.15 vs. 0.52 ± 0.10 (p < 0.05)]. At the articular surface, differences were significant only anteriorly [0.60 ± 0.13, vs. 0.54 ± 0.10 (p < 0.05)]. A cut-off TL/FG ratio of 0.63 for measurements at the bursal surface in the center of the tendon achieved a sensitivity of 46 % and a specificity of 92 % for the identification of partial cuff tearing. A reproducible method for measurement of extramuscular supraspinatus tendon length is described. Partial tearing of the supraspinatus tendon is associated with significant tendon lengthening, suggesting failure in continuity, and this is most reliably measured on the bursal surface. III.

  17. FDVIBSPC16: Sheath Flow SERS for Chemical Profiling in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Colleen M.; Jacobs, Kevin T.; Negri, Pierre; Schultz, Zachary D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular specificity and sensitivity of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) makes it an attractive method for biomedical diagnostics. Here we present results demonstrating the utility and complications for SERS characterization in urine. The chemical fingerprint characteristic of Raman spectra suggests use as a label free diagnostic; however, the complex composition of biological fluids presents a tremendous challenge. In particular, the limited number of surface sites and competing absorption tend to mask the presence of analytes in solution, particularly when the solution contains multiple analytes. To address these problems and characterize biological fluids we have demonstrated a sheath-flow interface for SERS detection. This sheath-flow SERS interface uses hydrodynamic focusing to confine analyte molecules eluting out of a column onto a planar SERS substrate where the molecules are detected by their intrinsic SERS signal. In this report we compare direct detection of benzoylecgonine in urine using DSERS with chemical profiling by capillary zone electrophoresis and sheath-flow SERS detection. The SERS spectrum from the observed migration peaks can identify benzoylecgonine and other distinct spectra are also observed, suggesting improved chemical diagnostics in urine. With over 2000 reported compounds in urine, identification of each of the detected species is an enormous task. Nonetheless, these samples provide a benchmark to establish the potential clinical utility of sheath-flow SERS detection. PMID:27034996

  18. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  19. Malathion aerial spray controls the pine needle -sheath miner

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Stevens

    1966-01-01

    A water emulsion malathion spray, applied by helicopter at the rate of 1 lb. of insecticide in 25 gallons of water, effectively controlled the pine needle-sheath miner (Zelleria haimbachi Busck). Numbers of insects in the sprayed area were reduced by 98.6 percent 24 hours after treatment.

  20. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75.1314 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... damaged or deteriorated. (d) Except in anthracite mines, rock dust shall be applied to the roof, ribs and...

  1. Effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langendorf, S.; Walker, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this experiment, plasma sheath potential profiles are measured over boron nitride walls in argon plasma and the effect of secondary electron emission is observed. Results are compared to a kinetic model. Plasmas are generated with a number density of 3 × 1012 m-3 at a pressure of 10-4 Torr-Ar, with a 1%-16% fraction of energetic primary electrons. The sheath potential profile at the surface of each sample is measured with emissive probes. The electron number densities and temperatures are measured in the bulk plasma with a planar Langmuir probe. The plasma is non-Maxwellian, with isotropic and directed energetic electron populations from 50 to 200 eV and hot and cold Maxwellian populations from 3.6 to 6.4 eV and 0.3 to 1.3 eV, respectively. Plasma Debye lengths range from 4 to 7 mm and the ion-neutral mean free path is 0.8 m. Sheath thicknesses range from 20 to 50 mm, with the smaller thickness occurring near the critical secondary electron emission yield of the wall material. Measured floating potentials are within 16% of model predictions. Measured sheath potential profiles agree with model predictions within 5 V (˜1 Te), and in four out of six cases deviate less than the measurement uncertainty of 1 V.

  2. Separation system with a sheath-flow supported electrochemical detector

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A [Moraga, CA; Emrich, Charles A [Berkeley, CA; Singhal, Pankaj [Pasadena, CA; Ertl, Peter [Styria, AT

    2008-10-21

    An electrochemical detector including side channels associated with a separation channel of a sample component separation apparatus is provided. The side channels of the detector, in one configuration, provide a sheath-flow for an analyte exiting the separation channel which directs the analyte to the electrically developed electrochemical detector.

  3. Charge of a macroscopic particle in a plasma sheath.

    PubMed

    Samarian, A A; Vladimirov, S V

    2003-06-01

    Charging of a macroscopic body levitating in a rf plasma sheath is studied experimentally and theoretically. The nonlinear charge vs size dependence is obtained. The observed nonlinearity is explained on the basis of an approach taking into account different plasma conditions for the levitation positions of different particles. The importance of suprathermal electrons' contribution to the charging process is demonstrated.

  4. On the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I. A., E-mail: I.A.Kotelnikov@inp.nsk.su; Skovorodin, D. I., E-mail: D.I.Skovorodin@inp.nsk.su

    2016-02-15

    The question is discussed about the existence of an upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion, according to which the Debye sheath at the interface between plasma and a negatively charged electrode is stable only if the ion flow velocity in plasma exceeds the ion sound velocity. It is stated that, with an exception of some artificial ionization models, the Bohm sheath criterion is satisfied as an equality at the lower bound and the ion flow velocity is equal to the speed of sound. In the one-dimensional theory, a supersonic flow appears in an unrealistic model of a localized ionmore » source the size of which is less than the Debye length; however, supersonic flows seem to be possible in the two- and three-dimensional cases. In the available numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources with a plasma emitter, the presence of the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion is not supposed; however, the correspondence with experimental data is usually achieved if the ion flow velocity in plasma is close to the ion sound velocity.« less

  5. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombé, K.; Devaux, S.; D'Inca, R.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Jacquot, J.; Louche, F.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  6. Evolutionary sheath structure in magnetized collisionless plasma with electron inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohain, M.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    A classical hydrodynamic model is methodologically formulated to see the equilibrium properties of a planar plasma sheath in two-component magnetized bounded plasma. It incorporates the weak but finite electron inertia instead of asymptotically inertialess electrons. The effects of the externally applied oblique (relative to the bulk plasma flow) magnetic field are judiciously accented. It is, for the sake of simplicity, assumed that the relevant physical parameters (plasma density, electrostatic potential, and flow velocity) vary only in a direction normal to the confining wall boundary. It is noticed for the first time that the derived Bohm condition for sheath formation is modified conjointly by the electron inertia, magnetic field, and field orientation. It is manifested that the electron inertia in the presence of plasma gyrokinetic effects slightly enhances the ion Mach threshold value (typically, M i0 ≥ 1.139) toward the sheath entrance. This flow supercriticality is in contrast with the heuristic formalism ( M i0 ≥ 1) for the zero-inertia electrons. A numerical illustrative scheme on the parametric sheath features on diverse nontrivial apposite arguments is constructed alongside ameliorative scope.

  7. Maize development: Cell wall changes in leaves and sheaths

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Developmental changes occur in maize (Zea mays L.) as it transitions from juvenile stages to the mature plant. Changes also occur as newly formed cells mature into adult cells. Maize leaf blades, including the midribs and sheaths, undergo cell wall changes as cells transition to fully mature cell ty...

  8. Rice Sheath Rot: An Emerging Ubiquitous Destructive Disease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bigirimana, Vincent de P.; Hua, Gia K. H.; Nyamangyoku, Obedi I.; Höfte, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Around one century ago, a rice disease characterized mainly by rotting of sheaths was reported in Taiwan. The causal agent was identified as Acrocylindrium oryzae, later known as Sarocladium oryzae. Since then it has become clear that various other organisms can cause similar disease symptoms, including Fusarium sp. and fluorescent pseudomonads. These organisms have in common that they produce a range of phytotoxins that induce necrosis in plants. The same agents also cause grain discoloration, chaffiness, and sterility and are all seed-transmitted. Rice sheath rot disease symptoms are found in all rice-growing areas of the world. The disease is now getting momentum and is considered as an important emerging rice production threat. The disease can lead to variable yield losses, which can be as high as 85%. This review aims at improving our understanding of the disease etiology of rice sheath rot and mainly deals with the three most reported rice sheath rot pathogens: S. oryzae, the Fusarium fujikuroi complex, and Pseudomonas fuscovaginae. Causal agents, pathogenicity determinants, interactions among the various pathogens, epidemiology, geographical distribution, and control options will be discussed. PMID:26697031

  9. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7 Section 111.05-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the...

  10. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7 Section 111.05-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the...

  11. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7 Section 111.05-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the...

  12. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7 Section 111.05-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the...

  13. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7 Section 111.05-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the...

  14. Do counts of salivary sheath flanges predict food consumption in herbivorous stink bugs [Hemiptera: Pentatomidae]?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For Pentatomid stink bug agricultural pests, the number of salivary sheaths and sheath flanges—the portion of the sheath visible on the exterior surface of a food item—are good predictors of the loss of crop yield or quality from stink bug feeding. As the often assumed relationship between salivary ...

  15. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  16. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  17. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  18. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  19. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  20. Fibrocartilage associated with human tendons and their pulleys.

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M; Qin, S; Ralphs, J R

    1995-01-01

    The presence of fibrocartilage in tendons that wrap around bony or fibrous pulleys is well known. It is an adaptation to resisting compression or shear, but the extent to which the structure of most human tendons is modified where they contact pulleys is less clear, for there has been no single comprehensive survey of a large number of sites. Less is known of the structure of the corresponding pulleys. In the present study, 38 regions of tendons that wrap around bony pulleys or pass beneath fibrous retinacula have been studied in routine histology sections taken from each of 2 or 3 elderly dissecting room cadavers. Most of the corresponding pulleys have also been examined. Fibrocartilage was present in 22 of the 38 tendon sites and it was most conspicuous where the tendons pressed predominantly against bone rather than retinacula and where they showed a large change in direction. Fibrocartilage was more characteristic of tendons at the ankle than the wrist, probably because the long axis of the foot is at right angles to that of the leg. There was considerable variation in the structure of tendon fibrocartilage. The most fibrocartilaginous tendons had oval or round cells embedded in a highly metachromatic matrix with interwoven or spiralling collagen fibres. At other sites, fibrocartilage cells were arranged in rows between parallel collagen fibres. The differences probably relate to differences in development. A single tendon could be modified at successive points along its length and fibrocartilage could be present in the endotenon and epitenon as well as in the tendon itself. Pathological changes seen in 'wrap around' tendons were fragmentation and partial delamination of the compressed surface, chondrocyte clustering, fatty infiltration and bone formation. Three types of pulleys were described for tendons--bony prominences and grooves, fibrous retinacula and synovial joints. The extent of cartilaginous differentiation on the periosteum of bony pulleys

  1. Deficits in heel-rise height and achilles tendon elongation occur in patients recovering from an Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Steele, Robert; Manal, Kurt

    2012-07-01

    Whether an Achilles tendon rupture is treated surgically or not, complications such as muscle weakness, decrease in heel-rise height, and gait abnormalities persist after injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if side-to-side differences in maximal heel-rise height can be explained by differences in Achilles tendon length. Case series; level of evidence, 4. Eight patients (mean [SD] age of 46 [13] years) with acute Achilles tendon rupture and 10 healthy subjects (mean [SD] age of 28 [8] years) were included in the study. Heel-rise height, Achilles tendon length, and patient-reported outcome were measured 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. Achilles tendon length was evaluated using motion analysis and ultrasound imaging. The Achilles tendon length test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97) was excellent. For the healthy subjects, there were no side-to-side differences in tendon length and heel-rise height. Patients with Achilles tendon ruptures had significant differences between the injured and uninjured side for both tendon length (mean [SD] difference, 2.6-3.1 [1.2-1.4] cm, P = .017-.028) and heel-rise height (mean [SD] difference, -4.1 to -6.1 [1.7-1.8] cm, P = .012-.028). There were significant negative correlations (r = -0.943, P = .002, and r = -0.738, P = .037) between the side-to-side difference in heel-rise height and Achilles tendon length at the 6- and 12-month evaluations, respectively. The side-to-side difference found in maximal heel-rise height can be explained by a difference in Achilles tendon length in patients recovering from an Achilles tendon rupture. Minimizing tendon elongation appears to be an important treatment goal when aiming for full return of function.

  2. Application of biomechanics to tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Hoard, A S; Bell-Krotoski, J A; Mathews, R

    1995-01-01

    This article has focused on considerations important in the application of biomechanics to tendon transfers and has used an example protocol. Different surgeries require different protocols. What is most important is that specific protocols are used, and that they are both safe and effective. The communication among the therapist, surgeon, and patient is essential with the use of any protocol. As Brand has stated, "A hand is a very personal thing. It is the interface between the patient and his or her world. It is an emblem of strength, beauty, skill, sexuality, and sensibility. When it is damaged it becomes a symbol of the vulnerability of the whole person." For the patient who has damage from nerve palsy, paralysis, or injury resulting in a dysfunctional hand, a tendon transfer procedure may prove to be a viable option to restore balance and function, especially if the biomechanics of deformity and correction are considered.

  3. A passive exoskeleton with artificial tendons: design and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Wietse; van der Kooij, Herman; Hekman, Edsko

    2011-01-01

    We developed a passive exoskeleton that was designed to minimize joint work during walking. The exoskeleton makes use of passive structures, called artificial tendons, acting in parallel with the leg. Artificial tendons are elastic elements that are able to store and redistribute energy over the human leg joints. The elastic characteristics of the tendons have been optimized to minimize the mechanical work of the human leg joints. In simulation the maximal reduction was 40 percent. The performance of the exoskeleton was evaluated in an experiment in which nine subjects participated. Energy expenditure and muscle activation were measured during three conditions: Normal walking, walking with the exoskeleton without artificial tendons, and walking with the exoskeleton with the artificial tendons. Normal walking was the most energy efficient. While walking with the exoskeleton, the artificial tendons only resulted in a negligibly small decrease in energy expenditure. © 2011 IEEE

  4. The Achilles tendon: fundamental properties and mechanisms governing healing

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights recent research on Achilles tendon healing, and comments on the current clinical controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of injury. The processes of Achilles tendon healing, as demonstrated through changes in its structure, composition, and biomechanics, are reviewed. Finally, a review of tendon developmental biology and mechano transductive pathways is completed to recognize recent efforts to augment injured Achilles tendons, and to suggest potential future strategies for therapeutic intervention and functional tissue engineering. Despite an abundance of clinical evidence suggesting that current treatments and rehabilitation strategies for Achilles tendon ruptures are equivocal, significant questions remain to fully elucidate the basic science mechanisms governing Achilles tendon injury, healing, treatment, and rehabilitation. PMID:25332943

  5. An Artificial Tendon with Durable Muscle Interface

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler’s performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n=4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in 8 goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days post-surgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 ± 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298±111.3N (mean ± SD)(p<0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. PMID:19639642

  6. Low level laser therapy in healing tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P. T. C.; Batista, Cheila O. C.; Fabíola, C.

    2005-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of AsGa Laser in the scarring of tendon lesion in rats with low nourishment condition and to analyze the ideal light density by means of histopathologic findings highlighted by light microscopy. After the proposed nutritional condition was verified the animals were divided into 3 groups denominated as follows: GI control group, GII laser 1 J/sq.cm. and GIII laser 4 J/sq.cm. The lesions were induced by means of routine surgical process for tendon exposure: There was a crushing process with Allis pincers followed by saturated incision. The data obtained in relation to the amount of macrophage, leukocyte, fibroblast, vessel neoformation, fibrosis and collagen were submitted to parametric statistic procedures of variance analysis and "Tukey" Test and the result obtained was p < 0,05. According to the obtained results it can be concluded that low power laser therapy proved to be efficient in tendon repairing even though the animals suffered from malnutrition as well as the 1 J energy density proved to be more efficient in this case.

  7. [Injuries of the peroneal tendons : Often overlooked].

    PubMed

    Klos, K; Knobe, M; Randt, T; Simons, P; Mückley, T

    2017-12-01

    Injuries of the peroneal tendons are rare and often overlooked. Typical pathologies are tendinitis, tears and dislocation. Accompanying injuries are fractures. They are often associated with instability in the ankle and rearfoot deformities; therefore, these pathologies should be excluded or taken into consideration in the treatment. The clinical examination is crucial for the diagnosis. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations are very helpful; however, the true extent of the tendon pathology is often first seen during surgery. Bony injuries and deformities are assessed radiographically and by computed tomography (CT). Although conservative treatment is generally used at the beginning of therapy, progression is more likely to occur in the case of tears; therefore, the correct timing for an operative therapy should not be missed. Dislocations are the domain of operative therapy. Acute tendinitis, on the other hand, is usually accessible to conservative therapy if it is not the result of a gross deformity. Rehabilitation after operative treatment is demanding and prolonged especially after operative therapy of peroneal tendon tears. The results to be expected appear promising.

  8. Peroneal tendon displacement accompanying intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Rull James; Lin, Darius; Ehrlichman, Lauren K; Ellington, J Kent; Strasser, Nicholas; Kwon, John Y

    2014-02-19

    Peroneal tendon displacement (subluxation or dislocation) accompanying an intra-articular calcaneal fracture is often undetected and under-treated. The goals of this study were to determine (1) the prevalence of peroneal tendon displacement accompanying intra-articular calcaneal fractures, (2) the association of tendon displacement with fracture classifications, (3) the association of tendon displacement with heel width, and (4) the rate of missed diagnosis of the tendon displacement on radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans and the resulting treatment rate. A retrospective radiographic review of all calcaneal fractures presenting at three institutions from June 30, 2006, to June 30, 2011, was performed. CT imaging of 421 intra-articular calcaneal fractures involving the posterior facet was available for review. The prevalence of peroneal tendon displacement was noted and its associations with fracture classification and heel width were evaluated. Peroneal tendon displacement was identified in 118 (28.0%) of the 421 calcaneal fracture cases. The presence of tendon displacement was significantly associated with joint-depression fractures compared with tongue-type fractures (p < 0.001). Only twelve (10.2%) of the 118 cases of peroneal tendon displacement had been identified in the radiology reports. Although sixty-five (55.1%) of the fractures with tendon displacement had been treated with internal fixation, the tendon displacement was treated surgically in only seven (10.8%) of these cases. Analysis of CT images showed a 28% prevalence of peroneal tendon displacement accompanying intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Surgeons and radiologists are encouraged to consider this association.

  9. Reconstruction of Ligament and Tendon Defects Using Cell Technologies.

    PubMed

    Chailakhyan, R K; Shekhter, A B; Ivannikov, S V; Tel'pukhov, V I; Suslin, D S; Gerasimov, Yu V; Tonenkov, A M; Grosheva, A G; Panyushkin, P V; Moskvina, I L; Vorob'eva, N N; Bagratashvili, V N

    2017-02-01

    We studied the possibility of restoring the integrity of the Achilles tendon in rabbits using autologous multipotent stromal cells. Collagen or gelatin sponges populated with cells were placed in a resorbable Vicryl mesh tube and this tissue-engineered construct was introduced into a defect of the middle part of the Achilles tendon. In 4 months, histological analysis showed complete regeneration of the tendon with the formation of parallel collagen fibers, spindle-shaped tenocytes, and newly formed vessels.

  10. A novel biodegradable PCL film for tendon reconstruction: Achilles tendon defect model in rats.

    PubMed

    Kazimoğlu, C; Bölükbaşi, S; Kanatli, U; Senköylü, A; Altun, N S; Babaç, C; Yavuz, H; Pişkin, E

    2003-09-01

    This study aims to investigate applicability of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) biodegradable films for repair of gaps in Achilles tendons in a rat model, also comparing surgical repair versus no repair approaches. PCL was synthesized with tailor-made properties, then, PCL films were prepared by solvent casting. Seventy-five outbred Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups: (i) sham operated (skin incision only); (ii) no repair (complete division of the Achilles tendon and plantaris tendon without repair); (iii) Achilles repair (with a modified Kessler type suture); and (iv) plasty of Achilles tendon defects with the biodegradable PCL films, and (v) animals subjected to 1 cm mid-substance defect with no repair. Functional performance was determined from the measurements of hindpaw prints utilizing the Achilles functional index. The animals were killed 8 weeks after surgery and histological and biomechanical evaluations were made. All groups subjected to Achilles tendon division had a significant functional impairment that gradually improved so that by day 28 there were no functional impairments in any group whereas animals with a defect remained impaired. The magnitude of the biomechanical and morphological changes at postoperative 8 weeks were similar for no repair group (conservative), Achilles repair group and tendonplasty group (biodegradable PCL film group). The initial rate of functional recovery was significantly different for primary suture, Achilles repair group and PCL film group (p>0.01). But, at the 28th day, functional recovery was quite similar to the other groups. In summary, our results suggest that the PCL film can be an alternative biomaterial for tendon replacement.

  11. Semitendinosus Tendon Autograft for Reconstruction of Large Defects in Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat Shivajirao; Dumbre Patil, Vaishali Sampat; Basa, Vikas Rajeshwarrao; Dombale, Ajay Birappa

    2014-07-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are associated with considerable functional morbidity. When treated operatively, debridement of degenerated tendon ends may create large defects. Various procedures to reconstruct large defects have been described. We present a simple technique in which an autologous semitendinosus tendon graft is used to reconstruct defects larger than 5 cm in chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to describe our operative technique and its functional outcome. Achilles ruptures of more than 6 weeks duration were considered for the study. We treated 35 patients (20 males, 15 females) with symptomatic chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. The mean age was 47.4 years (range, 30 to 59). The smallest defect that we had reconstructed was 5 cm, and the largest was 9 cm in length. The average follow-up duration was 30.7 months (range, 20 to 42). Postoperatively, the strength of gastrocsoleus was measured by manual muscle testing (MMT) in non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing positions. All operated patients showed satisfactory functional outcome, good soft tissue healing, and no reruptures. The preoperative weight-bearing MMT of 2/5 improved to 4/5 or 5/5 postoperatively. In all patients, postoperative non-weight-bearing MMT was 5/5. All patients returned to their prerupture daily activity. We present a technique that is simple, with low morbidity. We believe it is a valuable option especially when allografts are not available. It is inexpensive as suture anchors or tenodesis screws are not used. This can be a useful option if other tendons (flexor hallucis longus, peroneus brevis, etc) are not available for transfer. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox.

    PubMed

    Thwin, San San; Fazlin, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3-14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery.

  13. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  14. Reconstruction of a ruptured patellar tendon using ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with preserved distal insertions: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute patellar tendon ruptures with poor tissue quality. Ruptures that have been neglected are difficult to repair. Several surgical techniques for the repair of the patellar tendon have been reported, however, these techniques remain difficult because of contractures, adhesions, and atrophy of the quadriceps muscle after surgery. Case presentation We report the cases of 2 Japanese patients (Case 1: a 16-year-old male and Case 2: a 43-year-old male) with patellar tendon ruptures who were treated by reconstruction using semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) tendons with preserved distal insertions. Retaining the original insertion of the STG appears to preserve its viability and provide the revascularization necessary to accelerate healing. Both tendons were placed in front of the patella, in a figure-of-eight fashion, providing stability to the patella. Conclusion Both patients recovered near normal strength and stability of the patellar tendon as well as restoration of function after the operation. PMID:24010848

  15. Variable effect of steam injection level on beef muscles: semitendinosus and biceps femoris cooked in convection-steam oven.

    PubMed

    Zając, Marzena; Kącik, Sławomir; Palka, Krystyna; Widurek, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Combi ovens are used very often in restaurants to heat up food. According to the producers the equipment allows to cook meat portions which are more tender and flavoursome comparing to conventional cooking techniques. Beef steaks from muscles semitendinosus and biceps femoris were cooked in convection-steam oven at three humidity levels: 10, 60 and 100%. Chemical composition, including total and insoluble collagen content and cook losses were analysed along with the texture and colour parameters. M. biceps femoris was the hardest and the most chewy at 100% steam saturation level and hardness measured for m. semitendinosus was the lowest at 10% of vapour injection. Changing the steam conditions in the oven chamber did not affect the detectable colour differences of m. biceps femoris, but it was significant for m. semitendinosus. Applying 100% steam saturation caused higher cook losses and the increase of insoluble collagen fractions in both analysed muscles. The results are beneficial for caterers using steam-convection ovens in terms of providing evidence that the heating conditions should be applied individually depending on the muscle used. The tenderness of m. semitendinosus muscle cooked at 10% steam saturation level was comparable to the tenderness obtained for the same muscle aged for 10 days and cooked with 100% steam saturation. Steaks from m. biceps femoris muscle should be cooked with maximum 60% saturation level to obtain higher tenderness.

  16. Multilayered Electrospun Scaffolds for Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chainani, Abby; Hippensteel, Kirk J.; Kishan, Alysha; Garrigues, N. William; Ruch, David S.; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Full-thickness rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in people over the age of 65. High retear rates and poor functional outcomes are common after surgical repair, and currently available extracellular matrix scaffold patches have limited abilities to enhance new tendon formation. In this regard, tissue-engineered scaffolds may provide a means to improve repair of rotator cuff tears. Electrospinning provides a versatile method for creating nanofibrous scaffolds with controlled architectures, but several challenges remain in its application to tissue engineering, such as cell infiltration through the full thickness of the scaffold as well as control of cell growth and differentiation. Previous studies have shown that ligament-derived extracellular matrix may enhance differentiation toward a tendon or ligament phenotype by human adipose stem cells (hASCs). In this study, we investigated the use of tendon-derived extracellular matrix (TDM)-coated electrospun multilayered scaffolds compared to fibronectin (FN) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) coating for use in rotator cuff tendon tissue engineering. Multilayered poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds were prepared by sequentially collecting electrospun layers onto the surface of a grounded saline solution into a single scaffold. Scaffolds were then coated with TDM, FN, or PBS and seeded with hASCs. Scaffolds were maintained without exogenous growth factors for 28 days in culture and evaluated for protein content (by immunofluorescence and biochemical assay), markers of tendon differentiation, and tensile mechanical properties. The collagen content was greatest by day 28 in TDM-scaffolds. Gene expression of type I collagen, decorin, and tenascin C increased over time, with no effect of scaffold coating. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan and dsDNA contents increased over time in culture, but there was no effect of scaffold coating. The Young's modulus did not change over time, but yield strain

  17. The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Miao-Sui; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2011-03-01

    Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon. This study was designed to investigate the potential mechanism of BPC 157 to enhance healing of injured tendon. The outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants cultured with or without BPC 157 was examined. Results showed that BPC 157 significantly accelerated the outgrowth of tendon explants. Cell proliferation of cultured tendon fibroblasts derived from rat Achilles tendon was not directly affected by BPC 157 as evaluated by MTT assay. However, the survival of BPC 157-treated cells was significantly increased under the H(2)O(2) stress. BPC 157 markedly increased the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by transwell filter migration assay. BPC 157 also dose dependently accelerated the spreading of tendon fibroblasts on culture dishes. The F-actin formation as detected by FITC-phalloidin staining was induced in BPC 157-treated fibroblasts. The protein expression and activation of FAK and paxillin were determined by Western blot analysis, and the phosphorylation levels of both FAK and paxillin were dose dependently increased by BPC 157 while the total amounts of protein was unaltered. In conclusion, BPC 157 promotes the ex vivo outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants, cell survival under stress, and the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts, which is likely mediated by the activation of the FAK-paxillin pathway.

  18. Distinguishing between extra natural inflation and natural inflation after BICEP2

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lim, C.S.; Lin, Chia-Min, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: lim@lab.twcu.ac.jp, E-mail: lin@chuo-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we carefully calculated the tensor-to-scalar ratio, the running spectral index, and the running of running spectrum for (extra) natural inflation in order to compare with recent BICEP2 data, PLANCK satellite data and future 21 cm data. We discovered that the prediction for running spectral index and the running of running spectrum in natural inflation is different from that in the case of extra natural inflation. Near future observation for the running spectral index can only provide marginal accuracy which may not allow us distinguishing between extra natural inflation from natural inflation clearly unless the experimental accuracy canmore » be further improved.« less

  19. Surgical management of haemangiopericytoma involving the biceps femoris muscle in four dogs.

    PubMed

    Connery, N A; Bellenger, C R

    2002-11-01

    Four dogs with haemangiopericytoma of the subcutaneous tissue overlying and infiltrating the biceps femoris muscle were successfully managed using complete resection of the involved muscle with 2 to 3 cm skin margins. Postoperatively, no local recurrence was noted in any of the dogs in a follow-up period of four to 33 months (mean 22 months). Wound dehiscence, attributed to increased tension and inadequate exercise restriction, occurred in two of the four cases. Closure of the large cutaneous deficit in the craniolateral thigh and stifle was achieved by rotation of a flank-fold skin flap in one case. Strict exercise restriction and the use of a Robert Jones dressing may prevent muscle suture disruption. These measures should enable primary wound healing in the region to progress without complication.

  20. Did BICEP2 see vector modes? First B-mode constraints on cosmic defects.

    PubMed

    Moss, Adam; Pogosian, Levon

    2014-05-02

    Scaling networks of cosmic defects, such as strings and textures, actively generate scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations throughout the history of the Universe. In particular, vector modes sourced by defects are an efficient source of the cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization. We use the recently released BICEP2 and POLARBEAR B-mode polarization spectra to constrain properties of a wide range of different types of cosmic strings networks. We find that in order for strings to provide a satisfactory fit on their own, the effective interstring distance needs to be extremely large--spectra that fit the data best are more representative of global strings and textures. When a local string contribution is considered together with the inflationary B-mode spectrum, the fit is improved. We discuss implications of these results for theories that predict cosmic defects.

  1. Gene Expression Profiling of the Intact Dermal Sheath Cup of Human Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Shiro; Ishimatsu-Tsuji, Yumiko; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuzo; Soma, Tsutomu; Ideta, Ritsuro; Mukai, Hideki; Kishimoto, Jiro

    2018-04-24

    Cells that constitute the dermal papillae of hair follicles might be derived from the dermal sheath, the peribulbar component of which is the dermal sheath cup. The dermal sheath cup is thought to include the progenitor cells of the dermal papillae and possesses hair inductive potential; however, it has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the gene expression profile of the intact dermal sheath cup, and identified dermal sheath cup signature genes, including extracellular matrix components and BMP-binding molecules, as well as TGF-b1 as an upstream regulator. Among these, GREM2, a member of the BMP antagonists, was found by in situ hybridization to be highly specific to the dermal sheath cup, implying that GREM2 is a key molecule contributing to maintenance of the properties of the dermal sheath cup.

  2. Effect of acute high-intensity resistance exercise on optic nerve sheath diameter and ophthalmic artery blood flow pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, W K; Hughes, W E; Heffernan, K S

    2015-12-01

    Exertional hypertension associated with acute high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) increases both intravascular and intracranial pressure (ICP), maintaining cerebrovascular transmural pressure. Carotid intravascular pressure pulsatility remains elevated after RE. Whether ICP also remains elevated after acute RE in an attempt to maintain the vessel wall transmural pressure is unknown. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), a valid proxy of ICP, was measured in 20 participants (6 female; 24 ± 4 yr, 24.2 ± 3.9 kg m(-)(2)) at rest (baseline), following a time-control condition, and following RE (5 sets, 5 repetition maximum bench press, 5 sets 10 repetition maximum biceps curls) using ultrasound. Additionally, intracranial hemodynamic pulsatility index (PI) was assessed in the ophthalmic artery (OA) by using Doppler. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was obtained from synthesized aortic pressure waveforms obtained via a brachial oscillometric cuff and carotid pulse pressure was measured by using applanation tonometry. Aortic PWV (5.2 ± 0.5-6.0 ± 0.7 m s(-1), P < 0.05) and carotid pulse pressure (45 ± 17-59 ± 19 mm Hg, P < 0.05) were significantly elevated post RE compared with baseline. There were no significant changes in ONSD (5.09 ± 0.7-5.09 ± 0.7 mm, P > 0.05) or OA flow PI (1.35 ± 0.2-1.38 ± 0.3, P > 0.05) following acute RE. In conclusion, during recovery from acute high-intensity RE, there are increases in aortic stiffness and extracranial pressure pulsatility in the absence of changes in ICP and flow pulsatility. These findings may have implications for alterations in cerebral transmural pressure and cerebral aneurysmal wall stress following RE.

  3. Self-Calibration of BICEP1 Three-Year Data and Constraints on Astrophysical Polarization Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. P.; Miller, N. J.; Shimon, M.; Barkats, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Keating, B. G.; Kovac, J. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeters aspire to measure the faint B-mode signature predicted to arise from inflationary gravitational waves. They also have the potential to constrain cosmic birefringence, rotation of the polarization of the CMB arising from parity-violating physics, which would produce nonzero expectation values for the CMB's temperature to B-mode correlation (TB) and E-mode to B-mode correlation (EB) spectra. However, instrumental systematic effects can also cause these TB and EB correlations to be nonzero. In particular, an overall miscalibration of the polarization orientation of the detectors produces TB and EB spectra which are degenerate with isotropic cosmological birefringence, while also introducing a small but predictable bias on the BB spectrum. We find that BICEP1 three-year spectra, which use our standard calibration of detector polarization angles from a dielectric sheet, are consistent with a polarization rotation of alpha = -2.77deg +/- 0.86deg (statistical) +/- 1.3deg (systematic). We have revised the estimate of systematic error on the polarization rotation angle from the two-year analysis by comparing multiple calibration methods. We also account for the (negligible) impact of measured beam systematic effects. We investigate the polarization rotation for the BICEP1 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands separately to investigate theoretical models that produce frequency-dependent cosmic birefringence. We find no evidence in the data supporting either of these models or Faraday rotation of the CMB polarization by the Milky Way galaxy's magnetic field. If we assume that there is no cosmic birefringence, we can use the TB and EB spectra to calibrate detector polarization orientations, thus reducing bias of the cosmological B-mode spectrum from leaked E-modes due to possible polarization orientation miscalibration. After applying this "self-calibration" process, we find that the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio decreases

  4. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  5. Time-Dependent Alterations of MMPs, TIMPs and Tendon Structure in Human Achilles Tendons after Acute Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Minkwitz, Susann; Schmock, Aysha; Kurtoglu, Alper; Tsitsilonis, Serafeim; Manegold, Sebastian; Klatte-Schulz, Franka

    2017-01-01

    A balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) is required to maintain tendon homeostasis. Variation in this balance over time might impact on the success of tendon healing. This study aimed to analyze structural changes and the expression profile of MMPs and TIMPs in human Achilles tendons at different time-points after rupture. Biopsies from 37 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were taken at surgery and grouped according to time after rupture: early (2–4 days), middle (5–6 days), and late (≥7 days), and intact Achilles tendons served as control. The histological score increased from the early to the late time-point after rupture, indicating the progression towards a more degenerative status. In comparison to intact tendons, qRT-PCR analysis revealed a significantly increased expression of MMP-1, -2, -13, TIMP-1, COL1A1, and COL3A1 in ruptured tendons, whereas TIMP-3 decreased. Comparing the changes over time post rupture, the expression of MMP-9, -13, and COL1A1 significantly increased, whereas MMP-3 and -10 expression decreased. TIMP expression was not significantly altered over time. MMP staining by immunohistochemistry was positive in the ruptured tendons exemplarily analyzed from early and late time-points. The study demonstrates a pivotal contribution of all investigated MMPs and TIMP-1, but a minor role of TIMP-2, -3, and -4, in the early human tendon healing process. PMID:29053586

  6. Co-electrospinning fabrication and photocatalytic performance of TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} core/sheath nanofibers with tunable sheath thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Houbao, E-mail: caohoubao66@163.com; Du, Pingfan; Song, Lixin

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The core–sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers were fabricated by co-electrospinning technique. • The catalytic property of nanofibers with different sheath thickness was studied. • The potential methods of improving catalytic efficiency are suggested. - Abstract: In this paper, core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers with tunable sheath thickness were directly fabricated via a facile co-electrospinning technique with subsequent calcination at 500 °C. The morphologies and structures of core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers were characterized by TGA, FESEM, TEM, FTIR, XPS and BET. It was found that the 1D core/sheath nanofibers are made up of anatase–rutile TiO{submore » 2} core and amorphous SiO{sub 2} sheath. The influences of SiO{sub 2} sheath and its thickness on the photoreactivity were evaluated by observing photo-degradation of methylene blue aqueous solution under the irradiation of UV light. Compared with pure TiO{sub 2} nanofibers, the core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers performed a better catalytic performance. That was attributed to not only efficient separation of hole–electron pairs resulting from the formation of heterojunction but also larger surface area and surface silanol group which will be useful to provide higher capacity for oxygen adsorption to generate more hydroxyl radicals. And the optimized core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers with a sheath thickness of 37 nm exhibited the best photocatalytic performance.« less

  7. Matrix metabolism rate differs in functionally distinct tendons.

    PubMed

    Birch, Helen L; Worboys, Sarah; Eissa, Sabry; Jackson, Brendan; Strassburg, Sandra; Clegg, Peter D

    2008-04-01

    Tendon matrix integrity is vital to ensure adequate mechanical properties for efficient function. Although historically tendon was considered to be relatively inert, recent studies have shown that tendon matrix turnover is active. During normal physiological activities some tendons are subjected to stress and strains much closer to their failure properties than others. Tendons with low safety margins are those which function as energy stores such as the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) and human Achilles tendon (AT). We postulate therefore that energy storing tendons suffer a higher degree of micro-damage and thus have a higher rate of matrix turnover than positional tendons. The hypothesis was tested using tissue from the equine SDFT and common digital extensor tendon (CDET). Matrix turnover was assessed indirectly by a combination of measurements for matrix age, markers of degradation, potential for degradation and protein expression. Results show that despite higher cellularity, the SDFT has lower relative levels of mRNA for collagen types I and III. Non-collagenous proteins, although expressed at different levels per cell, do not appear to differ between tendon types. Relative levels of mRNA for MMP1, MMP13 and both pro-MMP3 and MMP13 protein activity were significantly higher in the CDET. Correspondingly levels of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were higher in the CDET and tissue fluorescence lower suggesting more rapid turnover of the collagenous component. Reduced or inhibited collagen turnover in the SDFT may account for the high level of degeneration and subsequent injury compared to the CDET.

  8. Flexor Tendon Repair With Looped Suture: 1 Versus 2 Knots.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; Skjong, Christian; Katarincic, Julia A; Got, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    To assess the strength of flexor tendon repair with looped suture. We hypothesized that, after passing the intact looped suture in the desired repair configuration, splitting the loop and tying 2 independent knots would increase the strength of flexor tendon repair. Thirty-two flexor tendons were harvested and were sharply transected in zone II. The tendons were repaired with a 4-strand core suture repair using 3-0 looped nonabsorbable nylon suture. The harvested tendons were randomly assigned and repaired with either a 1- or a 2-knot construct. The repaired flexor tendons were fixed in a servohydraulic material testing system and were loaded to failure either with uniaxial tension or cyclically. The average force at failure was 43 N for the 1-knot repair and 28 N for the 2-knot repair. The mode of failure of 15 of the flexor tendon repairs that were cyclically loaded to failure was suture pull-out. The average number of cycles and force in cyclic testing that caused failure of flexor tendon repairs was 134 cycles and 31 N for tendons repaired with looped 3-0 suture tied with 1 knot and 94 cycles and 33 N for tendons repaired with looped 3-0 suture tied with 2 knots. Our hypothesis was disproved by the results of this study. This study suggests that, when using looped suture, tying 2 independent knots instead of tying a single knot does not increase the strength of the flexor tendon repair. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of a postpartum rectus sheath haematoma.

    PubMed

    Elmoghrabi, Adel; Mohamed, Mohamed; McCann, Michael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2016-03-09

    A 35-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute severe abdominal pain at 4 days postpartum. CT of the abdomen revealed a type II rectus sheath haematoma for which she was initially treated conservatively and discharged. A few hours later, she returned to the ED with a picture suggestive of peritonitis. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed and revealed haemoperitoneum and a ruptured area on the posterior rectus sheath. Approximately 2 L of blood was aspirated. Haemostatic control was achieved and closed suction drains secured in position. The patient was discharged in stable condition on postadmission day 6. She continued to follow-up on an outpatient basis and was doing well 3 months postoperatively. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of a postpartum rectus sheath haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Elmoghrabi, Adel; McCann, Michael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute severe abdominal pain at 4 days postpartum. CT of the abdomen revealed a type II rectus sheath haematoma for which she was initially treated conservatively and discharged. A few hours later, she returned to the ED with a picture suggestive of peritonitis. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed and revealed haemoperitoneum and a ruptured area on the posterior rectus sheath. Approximately 2 L of blood was aspirated. Haemostatic control was achieved and closed suction drains secured in position. The patient was discharged in stable condition on postadmission day 6. She continued to follow-up on an outpatient basis and was doing well 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26961567