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Sample records for bile acid transport

  1. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  2. Bile acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-12-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na(+) taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTalpha-OSTbeta. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers.

  3. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  4. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  5. Role of the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporters in Bile Acid and Drug Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters expressed by the hepatocyte and enterocyte play critical roles in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, an effective recycling and conservation mechanism that largely restricts these potentially cytotoxic detergents to the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. In doing so, the hepatic and enterocyte transport systems ensure a continuous supply of bile acids to be used repeatedly during the digestion of multiple meals throughout the day. Absorption of bile acids from the intestinal lumen and export into the portal circulation is mediated by a series of transporters expressed on the enterocyte apical and basolateral membranes. The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter (abbreviated ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) is responsible for the initial uptake of bile acids across the enterocyte brush border membrane. The bile acids are then efficiently shuttled across the cell and exported across the basolateral membrane by the heteromeric Organic Solute Transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. This chapter briefly reviews the tissue expression, physiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and transport properties of the ASBT and OSTα-OSTα. In addition, the chapter discusses the relationship between the intestinal bile acid transporters and drug metabolism, including development of ASBT inhibitors as novel hypocholesterolemic or hepatoprotective agents, prodrug targeting of the ASBT to increase oral bioavailability, and involvement of the intestinal bile acid transporters in drug absorption and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21103970

  6. Structural Determinants for Transport Across the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Using C-24 Bile Acid Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) re-absorbs gram quantities of bile acid daily and is a potential prodrug target to increase oral drug absorption. In the absence of a high resolution hASBT crystal structure, 3D-QSAR modeling may prove beneficial in designing prodrug targets to hASBT. The objective was to derive a conformationally sampled pharmacophore 3D–QSAR (CSP-SAR) model for the uptake of bile acid conjugates by hASBT. A series of bile acid conjugates of glutamyl chenodeoxycholate were evaluated in terms of Km and normalized Vmax(normVmax) using hASBT-MDCK cells. All mono-anionic conjugates were potent substrates. Dianions, cations and zwitterions, which bound with a high affinity, were not substrates. CSP-SAR models were derived using structural and physicochemical descriptors, and evaluated via cross-validation. The best CSP-SAR model for Km included two structural and two physiochemical descriptors, where substrate hydrophobicity enhanced affinity. A best CSP-SAR model for Km/normVmax employed one structural and three physicochemical descriptors, also indicating hydrophobicity enhanced efficiency. Overall, the bile acid C-24 region accommodated a range of substituted anilines, provided a single negative charge was present near C-24. In comparing uptake findings to prior inhibition results, increased hydrophobicity enhanced activity, with dianions and zwitterions hindering activity. PMID:20939504

  7. ABC transporters, bile acids, and inflammatory stress in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renxue; Sheps, Jonathan A; Ling, Victor

    2011-04-01

    The biliary secretion of bile acids is critical for multiple liver functions including digesting fatty nutrients and driving bile flow. When this process is impaired, the accumulating bile acids cause inflammatory liver injury. Multiple ABC transporters in the liver are key players to safeguard the hepatocyte and avoid toxicity due to bile acid over-accumulation. BSEP provides for efficient secretion of bile acids across the canalicular membrane against a steep concentration gradient. MDR3/Mdr2 and ABCG5/G8 secrete phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, respectively, in coordination with BSEP-mediated bile acid secretion to mask the detergent/toxic effects of bile acids in the bile ductular space. Several lines of evidence indicate that when these critical steps are compromised, bile acid toxicity in vivo leads to inflammatory liver injury and liver cancer. In bsep-/- mice, liver cancer is rare. These mice display greatly increased expression of alternative bile acid transporters, such as Mdr1a/1b, Mrp3 and Mrp4. We believe these alternative transport systems provide an additional safeguard to avoid bile acid overload in liver. Such backup systems appear to be under-utilized in humans, as defects in BSEP and MDR3 lead to severe, often fatal childhood diseases. It is possible, therefore, that targeting ABC transporters and modulating the toxicity of the bile acid pool could be vital interventions to alleviate chronic inflammation and reduce the incidence of liver cancer in high-risk populations. The combination of an alternative ABC transporter with a novel substrate may prove an effective chemo-preventive or therapeutic strategy.

  8. Antibacterial drug treatment increases intestinal bile acid absorption via elevated levels of ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter but not organic solute transporter α protein.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drug treatment increases the bile acid pool size and hepatic bile acid concentration through the elevation of hepatic bile acid synthesis. However, the involvement of intestinal bile acid absorption in the increased bile acid pool size remains unclear. To determine whether intestinal bile acid absorption contributes to the increased bile acid pool in mice treated with antibacterial drugs, we evaluated the levels of bile acid transporter proteins and the capacity of intestinal bile acid absorption. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in ampicillin (ABPC)-treated mice, whereas organic solute transporter α (OSTα) mRNA levels, but not protein levels, significantly decreased in mice. Similar alterations in the expression levels of bile acid transporters were observed in mice treated with bacitracin/neomycin/streptomycin. The capacity for intestinal bile acid absorption was evaluated by an in situ loop method. Increased ileal absorption of taurochenodeoxycholic acid was observed in mice treated with ABPC. These results suggest that intestinal bile acid absorption is elevated in an ASBT-dependent manner in mice treated with antibacterial drugs.

  9. Using Multi-fluorinated Bile Acids and In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Measure Bile Acid Transport.

    PubMed

    Felton, Jessica; Cheng, Kunrong; Said, Anan; Shang, Aaron C; Xu, Su; Vivian, Diana; Metry, Melissa; Polli, James E; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-27

    Along with their traditional role as detergents that facilitate fat absorption, emerging literature indicates that bile acids are potent signaling molecules that affect multiple organs; they modulate gut motility and hormone production, and alter vascular tone, glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy utilization. Changes in fecal bile acids may alter the gut microbiome and promote colon pathology including cholerrheic diarrhea and colon cancer. Key regulators of fecal bile acid composition are the small intestinal Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter (ASBT) and fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19). Reduced expression and function of ASBT decreases intestinal bile acid up-take. Moreover, in vitro data suggest that some FDA-approved drugs inhibit ASBT function. Deficient FGF19 release increases hepatic bile acid synthesis and release into the intestines to levels that overwhelm ASBT. Either ASBT dysfunction or FGF19 deficiency increases fecal bile acids and may cause chronic diarrhea and promote colon neoplasia. Regrettably, tools to measure bile acid malabsorption and the actions of drugs on bile acid transport in vivo are limited. To understand the complex actions of bile acids, techniques are required that permit simultaneous monitoring of bile acids in the gut and metabolic tissues. This led us to conceive an innovative method to measure bile acid transport in live animals using a combination of proton ((1)H) and fluorine ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Novel tracers for fluorine ((19)F)-based live animal MRI were created and tested, both in vitro and in vivo. Strengths of this approach include the lack of exposure to ionizing radiation and translational potential for clinical research and practice.

  10. The ileal bile acid transporter inhibitor A4250 decreases serum bile acids by interrupting the enterohepatic circulation.

    PubMed

    Graffner, H; Gillberg, P-G; Rikner, L; Marschall, H-U

    2016-01-01

    Reabsorption of bile acids from the intestine by ileal bile acid transporter is pivotal for the enterohepatic circulation of BAs and sterol homoeostasis. To assess tolerability and study, bile acid metabolism in a phase 1 trial with the selective ileal bile acid transporter inhibitor A4250. A randomised double-blind, single-ascending dose (SAD) and multiple-ascending-dose study consisting of five cohorts comprising 40 individuals with a single administration of A4250 (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, or 10 mg) or placebo and three cohorts comprising 24 individuals with a 1-week administration of A4250 (1 or 3 mg once daily or 1.5 mg twice daily) or placebo. For the multiple-ascending-dose study, bile acids were measured by HPLC-MS in plasma and faeces, and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) were measured in plasma. No serious adverse events occurred and all participants finished the trial per protocol. At the end of the multiple-ascending-dose study, plasma total bile acids and FGF19 decreased by 47% and 76%, respectively, at 3 mg/day (P < 0.01), and by 15% and 16%, respectively, at 1.5 mg twice daily (P < 0.05). Plasma C4 and faecal bile acids increased at all dose regimens, by 555%, 664%, 292% and 338%, 421%, 420%, respectively (P < 0.01-0.05). The primary bile acids cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids constituted the majority of faecal bile acids in the A4250-treated groups. A4250 is well tolerated. By blocking ileal bile acid transporter in the terminal ileum, it highly efficiently interrupts the enterohepatic circulation of BAs, and should be of benefit to patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Clinical Trial registration EudraCT 2013-001175-21. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting β polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) α and β] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of regulatory

  12. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers, which is consistent with the trend of human NTCP mRNA expression between men and women. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid increased Bsep mRNA expression. In silico analysis indicates that female-predominant mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression may be due to GH. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  13. Molecular mechanisms of altered bile acid homeostasis in organic solute transporter-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Haywood, Jamie; Rao, Anuradha; Dawson, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) block intestinal bile acid absorption, resulting in a compensatory increase in hepatic bile acid synthesis. Inactivation of the basolateral membrane bile acid transporter (OSTα-OSTβ) also impairs intestinal bile acid absorption, but hepatic bile acid synthesis was paradoxically repressed. We hypothesized that the altered bile acid homeostasis resulted from ileal trapping of bile acids that act via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) to induce overexpression of FGF15. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether blocking FXR signaling would reverse the bile acid synthesis phenotype in Ostα null mice. The corresponding null mice were crossbred to generate OstαFxr double-null mice. All experiments compared wild-type, Ostα, Fxr and OstαFxr null littermates. Analysis of the in vivo phenotype included measurements of bile acid fecal excretion, pool size and composition. Hepatic and intestinal gene and protein expression were also examined. OstαFxr null mice exhibited increased bile acid fecal excretion and pool size, and decreased bile acid pool hydrophobicity, as compared with Ostα null mice. Inactivation of FXR reversed the increase in ileal total FGF15 expression, which was associated with a significant increase in hepatic Cyp7a1 expression. Inactivation of FXR largely unmasked the bile acid malabsorption phenotype and corrected the bile acid homeostasis defect in Ostα null mice, suggesting that inappropriate activation of the FXR-FGF15-FGFR4 pathway partially underlies this phenotype. Intestinal morphological changes and reduced apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression were maintained in Ostα(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice, indicating that FXR is not required for these adaptive responses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  15. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Frank, Matthew W; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O; Gonzalez, Frank J; Schuetz, John D

    2015-09-29

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition.

  16. Further evaluation of the interrelationship between the hepatocellular transport of bile acids and endocytosed proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, M. C.; el-Mir, M. Y.; Monte, M. J.; Perez-Barriocanal, F.; Marin, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on the relationship between the hepatocellular transport of endogenous or exogenously loaded bile acids (sodium taurocholate, TC, 0.5 mumol/min/100 g body wt) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or immunoglobulin A (IgA) (0.5 mg/100 g body wt) were carried out on anaesthetized Wistar rats. The time course of HRP excretion into bile (acceleration in the secretory peak), but not the total amount of HRP output, was affected by TC infusion. Administration of HRP was found to have no stimulatory effect on either spontaneous or TC-induced bile flow, bile acid, lecithin or cholesterol output. Spontaneous bile acid output was increased (25 and 67%, respectively) in rats that were treated for 12-h fasting or by oral administration of TC (45 mg/100 g body wt, every 12 h, for 2 days). These manoeuvres did not change the inability of HRP and IgA to increase bile acid output. Exogenous TC load had no stimulatory effect on the hepatocellular transport of endogenous bile acid pool, that was labelled by a combination of fasting and oral administration of 14C-glycocholic acid 12 h before the experiments. Therefore, exogenous bile acid load-induced stimulation of transcytosis had no effect on endogenous bile acid output. Moreover, bile secretion of both endogenous and exogenously loaded bile acids is unaffected by the administration of proteins, irrespective of whether they are endocytosed by a receptor or nonreceptor mediated process. PMID:1571280

  17. Bile acid transport in sister of P-glycoprotein (ABCB11) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ping; Wang, Renxue; Ling, Victor

    2005-09-20

    In vertebrates, bile flow is essential for movement of water and solutes across liver canalicular membranes. In recent years, the molecular motor of canalicular bile acid secretion has been identified as a member of the ATP binding cassette transporter (ABC) superfamily, known as sister of P-glycoprotein (Spgp) or bile salt export pump (Bsep, ABCB11). In humans, mutations in the BSEP gene are associated with a very low level of bile acid secretion and severe cholestasis. However, as reported previously, because the spgp(-)(/)(-) knockout mice do not express severe cholestasis and have substantial bile acid secretion, we investigated the "alternative transport system" that allows these mice to be physiologically relatively normal. We examined the expression levels of several ABC transporters in spgp(-)(/)(-) mice and found that the level of multidrug resistance Mdr1 (P-glycoprotein) was strikingly increased while those of Mdr2, Mrp2, and Mrp3 were increased to only a moderate extent. We hypothesize that an elevated level of Mdr1 in the spgp(-)(/)(-) knockout mice functions as an alternative pathway to transport bile acids and protects hepatocytes from bile acid-induced cholestasis. In support of this hypothesis, we showed that plasma membrane vesicles isolated from a drug resistant cell line expressing high levels of P-glycoprotein were capable of transporting bile acids, albeit with a 5-fold lower affinity compared to Spgp. This finding is the first direct evidence that P-glycoprotein (Mdr1) is capable of transporting bile acids.

  18. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  19. Transport of bile acids in multidrug-resistance-protein 3-overexpressing cells co-transfected with the ileal Na+-dependent bile-acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Noam; Saeki, Tohru; Bot, Ilse; Kuil, Annemieke; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Many of the transporters involved in the transport of bile acids in the enterohepatic circulation have been characterized. The basolateral bile-acid transporter of ileocytes and cholangiocytes remains an exception. It has been suggested that rat multidrug resistance protein 3 (Mrp3) fulfills this function. Here we analyse bile-salt transport by human MRP3. Membrane vesicles from insect ( Spodoptera frugiperda ) cells expressing MRP3 show time-dependent uptake of glycocholate and taurocholate. Furthermore, sulphated bile salts were high-affinity competitive inhibitors of etoposide glucuronide transport by MRP3 (IC50 approximately 10 microM). Taurochenodeoxycholate, taurocholate and glycocholate inhibited transport at higher concentrations (IC50 approximately 100, 250 and 500 microM respectively). We used mouse fibroblast-like cell lines derived from mice with disrupted Mdr1a, Mdr1b and Mrp1 genes to generate transfectants that express the murine apical Na+-dependent bile-salt transporter (Asbt) and MRP3. Uptake of glycocholate by these cells is Na+-dependent, with a K(m) and V(max) of 29+/-7 microM and 660 +/- 63 pmol/min per mg of protein respectively and is inhibited by several organic-aniontransport inhibitors. Expression of MRP3 in these cells limits the accumulation of glycocholate and increases the efflux from cells preloaded with taurocholate or glycocholate. In conclusion, we find that MRP3 transports both taurocholate and glycocholate, albeit with low affinity, in contrast with the high-affinity transport by rat Mrp3. Our results suggest that MRP3 is unlikely to be the principal basolateral bile-acid transporter of ileocytes and cholangiocytes, but that it may have a role in the removal of bile acids from the liver in cholestasis. PMID:12220224

  20. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation.

    PubMed

    Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-06-28

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation.

  1. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery. PMID:24566561

  2. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-02-25

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery.

  3. Molecular Switch Controlling the Binding of Anionic Bile Acid Conjugates to Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; Tririya, Gasirat; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) may serve as a prodrug target for oral drug absorption. Synthetic, biological, NMR and computational approaches identified the structure-activity relationships of mono- and dianionic bile acid conjugates for hASBT binding. Experimental data combined with a conformationally-sampled pharmacophore/QSAR modeling approach (CSP-SAR) predicted that dianionic substituents with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between hydroxyls on the cholane skeleton and the acid group on the conjugate's aromatic ring increased conjugate hydrophobicity and improved binding affinity. Notably, the model predicted the presence of a conformational molecular switch, where shifting the carboxylate substituent on an aromatic ring by a single position controlled binding affinity. Model validation was performed by effectively shifting the spatial location of the carboxylate by inserting a methylene adjacent to the aromatic ring, resulting in the predicted alteration in binding affinity. This work illustrates conformation as a determinant of ligand binding affinity to a biological transporter. PMID:20504026

  4. Transport of fluorescent bile acids by the isolated perfused rat liver: kinetics, sequestration, and mobilization.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, F; Schteingart, C D; Ton-Nu, H T; Cerrè, C; Steinbach, J H; Yeh, H Z; Hofmann, A F

    1998-08-01

    Hepatocyte transport of six fluorescent bile acids containing nitrobenzoxadiazolyl (NBD) or a fluorescein derivative on the side chain was compared with that of natural bile acids using the single-pass perfused rat liver. Compounds were infused at 40 nmol/g liver min for 15 minutes; hepatic uptake and biliary recovery were measured; fractional extraction, intrinsic basolateral clearance, and sequestration (nonrecovery after 45 minutes of additional perfusion) were calculated. Fluorescent bile acids were efficiently extracted during the first 3 minutes (70%-97%), but net extraction decreased with time mostly because of regurgitation into the perfusate. For cholylglycine and ursodeoxycholylglycine (UDC-glycine), extraction was 94% to 99%, and regurgitation did not occur. Intrinsic hepatic clearance of fluorescent bile acids (2-7 mL/g liver x min) was lower than that of cholylglycine (9.0 +/- 0.6; mean +/- SD) and UDC-glycine (21.4 +/- 0.4). Sequestration at 60 minutes was 8% to 26% for fluorescent bile acids with a cholyl moiety (cholylglycylaminofluorescein [CGamF], cholyllysylfluorescein [C-L-F], cholyl-[N epsilon-NBD]-lysine [C-L-NBD], and cholylaminofluorescein [CamF]), 32% for ursodeoxycholylaminofluorescein (UDCamF), and 88% for ursodeoxycholyl-(N epsilon-NBD)lysine (UDC-L-NBD). Cholylglycine and UDC-glycine had <3% retention. Biliary secretion of sequestered UDCamF, but not of UDC-L-NBD, was induced by adding dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (DBcAMP) to the perfusate, possibly by translocation to the canaliculus of pericanalicular vesicles containing fluorescent bile acids. Biliary secretion of UDC-L-NBD, but not of UDCamF, was induced by adding cholyltaurine or UDC-taurine, possibly by inhibition of binding to intracellular constituents or of transport into organelles. It is concluded that fluorescent bile acids are efficiently transported across the basolateral membrane, but in contrast to natural conjugated bile acids, are sequestered in the

  5. The solute carrier family 10 (SLC10): beyond bile acid transport

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Polli, James E.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier (SLC) family 10 (SLC10) comprises influx transporters of bile acids, steroidal hormones, various drugs, and several other substrates. Because the seminal transporters of this family, namely, sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2), were primarily bile acid transporters, the term “sodium bile salt cotransporting family” was used for the SLC10 family. However, this notion became obsolete with the finding of other SLC10 members that do not transport bile acids. For example, the sodium-dependent organic anion transporter (SOAT; SLC10A6) transports primarily sulfated steroids. Moreover, NTCP was shown to also transport steroids and xenobiotics, including HMG-CoA inhibitors (statins). The SLC10 family contains four additional members, namely, P3 (SLC10A3; SLC10A3), P4 (SLC10A4; SLC10A4), P5 (SLC10A5; SLC10A5) and SLC10A7 (SLC10A7), several of which were unknown or considered hypothetical until approximately a decade ago. While their substrate specificity remains undetermined, great progress has been made towards their characterization in recent years. SLC10A4 may participate in vesicular storage or exocytosis of neurotransmitters or mastocyte mediators, whereas SLC10A5 and SLC10A7 may be involved in solute transport and SLC10A3 may have a role as a housekeeping protein. Finally, the newly found role of bile acids in glucose and energy homeostasis, via the TGR5 receptor, sheds new light on the clinical relevance of ASBT and NTCP. The present mini-review provides a brief summary of recent progress on members of the SLC10 family. PMID:23506869

  6. Separate transport systems for biliary secretion of sulfated and unsulfated bile acids in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, F; Enserink, M; Havinga, R; van der Steen, A B; Hardonk, M J; Fevery, J; Vonk, R J

    1988-01-01

    Biliary secretion of 3 alpha-sulfated bile acids has been studied in Wistar rats with an autosomal recessive defect in the hepatic transport of bilirubin. Liver function, established by measurement of various enzymes in plasma, by enzyme histochemical methods, and by electron microscopy, appeared to be normal in these rats. Serum levels of unconjugated, monoglucuronidated, and diglucuronidated bilirubin were 0.62, 1.62, and 6.16 mumol/liter, respectively, compared with 0.17, 0.08, and 0.02 mumol/liter in control rats. Biliary bilirubin secretion was strongly reduced in the mutant animals: 0.21 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.03 nmol/min per 100 g body wt in control rats. Despite normal biliary bile acid output, bile flow was markedly impaired in the mutant animals, due to a 53% reduction of the bile acid-independent fraction of bile flow. The transport maximum for biliary secretion of dibromosulphthalein (DBSP) was also drastically reduced (-53%). Biliary secretion of intravenously administered trace amounts of the 3 alpha-sulfate esters of 14C-labeled taurocholic acid (-14%), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (-39%), taurolithocholic acid (-73%), and glycolithocholic acid (-91%) was impaired in the jaundiced rats compared with controls, in contrast to the biliary secretion of the unsulfated parent compounds. Hepatic uptake of sulfated glycolithocholic acid was not affected in the jaundiced animals. Preadministration of DBSP (15 mumol/100 g body wt) to normal Wistar rats significantly impaired the biliary secretion of sulfated glycolithocholic acid, but did not affect taurocholic acid secretion. We conclude that separate transport systems in the rat liver exist for biliary secretion of sulfated and unsulfated bile acids; the sulfates probably share secretory pathways with the organic anions bilirubin and DBSP. The described genetic defect in hepatic transport function is associated with a reduced capacity to secrete sulfated bile acids into bile; this becomes more pronounced with

  7. Bile acids: regulation of synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, John Y L

    2009-10-01

    Bile acids are physiological detergents that generate bile flow and facilitate intestinal absorption and transport of lipids, nutrients, and vitamins. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and inflammatory agents that rapidly activate nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways that regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids exerts important physiological functions not only in feedback inhibition of bile acid synthesis but also in control of whole-body lipid homeostasis. In the liver, bile acids activate a nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), that induces an atypical nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner, which subsequently inhibits nuclear receptors, liver-related homolog-1, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha and results in inhibiting transcription of the critical regulatory gene in bile acid synthesis, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). In the intestine, FXR induces an intestinal hormone, fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15; or FGF19 in human), which activates hepatic FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) signaling to inhibit bile acid synthesis. However, the mechanism by which FXR/FGF19/FGFR4 signaling inhibits CYP7A1 remains unknown. Bile acids are able to induce FGF19 in human hepatocytes, and the FGF19 autocrine pathway may exist in the human livers. Bile acids and bile acid receptors are therapeutic targets for development of drugs for treatment of cholestatic liver diseases, fatty liver diseases, diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome.

  8. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  9. New substrates of the multispecific bile acid transporter in liver cells: interference of some linear renin inhibiting peptides with transport protein(s) for bile acids.

    PubMed

    Bertrams, A A; Ziegler, K

    1991-01-23

    Interactions between some stable linear peptides with renin inhibitory activity and a multispecific transport system in the basolateral plasma membrane of liver cells was studied on cell suspensions. The peptides used in our experiments were taken up by liver cells and subsequently eliminated without any biotransformation (e.g., proteolysis). No degradation products could be detected in the extracellular medium by thin-layer chromatography. All peptides tested inhibited the uptake of physiological and of some foreign substrates of the multispecific bile acid transporter (MT). The phalloidin response of liver cells was also inhibited to a similar degree in a concentration-dependent manner. The potency of inhibition did not correlate with the lipophilic properties of the peptides. On the other hand a tight correlation could be documented between the inhibition of cholate transport and that of the phalloidin response. Transport inhibition of typical substrates of the MT by the above renin inhibitors was competitive. In contrast, the transport of a typical substrate of the bilirubin carrier (rifampicin), of amino acids (alpha-aminoisobutyric acid), long chain fatty acids (oleic acid) and cationic compounds (thiamin hydrochloride) was not inhibited by the same renin inhibitors. These results indicate that linear renin inhibiting peptides are taken up into liver cells by carrier proteins related to the MT.

  10. Design and Evaluation of a Novel Trifluorinated Imaging Agent for Assessment of Bile Acid Transport Using Fluorine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vivian, Diana; Cheng, Kunrong; Khurana, Sandeep; Xu, Su; Dawson, Paul A.; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we developed a trifluorinated bile acid, CA-lys-TFA, with the objective of noninvasively assessing bile acid transport in vivo using 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CA-lys-TFA was successfully imaged in the mouse gallbladder, but was susceptible to deconjugation in vitro by choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH), a bacterial bile acid deconjugating enzyme found in the terminal ileum and colon. The objective of the present study was to develop a novel trifluorinated bile acid resistant to deconjugation by CGH. CA-sar-TFMA was designed, synthesized, and tested for in vitro transport properties, stability, imaging properties, and its ability to differentially accumulate in the gallbladders of normal mice, compared with mice with known impaired bile acid transport (deficient in the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, ASBT). CA-sar-TFMA was a potent inhibitor and substrate of ASBT and the Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. Stability was favorable in all conditions tested, including the presence of CGH. CA-sar-TFMA was successfully imaged and accumulated at 16.1-fold higher concentrations in gallbladders from wild-type mice compared with those from Asbt-deficient mice. Our results support the potential of using MRI with CA-sar-TFMA as a noninvasive method to assess bile acid transport in vivo. PMID:25196788

  11. ATP-dependent transport of bile acid intermediates across rat liver peroxisomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Une, Mizuho; Iguchi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Tomoko; Tomita, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2003-08-01

    The bile acid intermediate 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) is converted to cholic acid exclusively in peroxisomes by the oxidative cleavage of the side chain. To investigate the mechanism by which the biosynthetic intermediates of bile acids are transported into peroxisomes, we incubated THCA or its CoA ester (THC-CoA) with isolated intact rat liver peroxisomes and analyzed their oxidation products, cholic acid and 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoic acid. The oxidation of both THCA and THC-CoA was dependent on incubation time and peroxisomal proteins, and was stimulated by ATP. THC-CoA was efficiently oxidized to cholic acid and 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoic acid as compared with THCA, suggesting that THC-CoA is the preferred substrate for transport into peroxisomes. The oxidation of THC-CoA was significantly inhibited by sodium azide, verapamile, and N-ethylmaleimide. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of ATP on the oxidation was not replaced by GTP or AMP. In addition, the ATP-dependent oxidation of THC-CoA was markedly inhibited by pretreatment of peroxisomes with proteinase K when peroxisomal matrix proteins were not degraded. These results suggest that an ATP-dependent transport system for THC-CoA exists on peroxisomal membranes.

  12. Inhibition of ileal apical but not basolateral bile acid transport reduces atherosclerosis in apoE⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Haywood, Jamie; Dawson, Paul A

    2013-08-01

    Interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids induces hepatic bile acid synthesis, increases hepatic cholesterol demand, and increases clearance of apoB-containing lipoproteins in plasma. Based on these effects, bile acid sequestrants have been used for many years to treat hypercholesterolemia and the associated atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of blocking ileal apical versus basolateral membrane bile acid transport on the development of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in mouse models. ApoE(-/-) and Ldlr(-/-) mice deficient in the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) or apoE(-/-) mice deficient in the basolateral bile acid transporter (Ostα) were fed an atherogenic diet for 16 weeks. Bile acid metabolism, cholesterol metabolism, gene expression, and development of atherosclerosis were examined. Mice deficient in Asbt exhibited the classic response to interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, including significant reductions in hepatic and plasma cholesterol levels, and reduced aortic cholesteryl ester content. Ileal Fibroblast Growth Factor-15 (FGF15) expression was significantly reduced in Asbt(-/-)apoE(-/-) mice and was inversely correlated with expression of hepatic cholesterol 7-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1). Ileal FGF15 expression was directly correlated with plasma cholesterol levels and aortic cholesterol content. In contrast, plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis development were not reduced in apoE(-/-) mice deficient in Ostα. Decreases in ileal FGF15, with subsequent increases in hepatic Cyp7a1 expression and bile acid synthesis appear to be necessary for the plasma cholesterol-lowering and atheroprotective effects associated with blocking intestinal bile acid absorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of common polymorphisms of the farnesoid X receptor and bile acid transporters on the pharmacokinetics of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao; Fok, Benny S P; Wo, Siu-Kwan; Lee, Vincent H L; Zuo, Zhong; Tomlinson, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a natural, dihydroxy bile acid, promotes gallstone dissolution and has been attributed with several other beneficial effects. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) may influence the pharmacokinetics of UDCA by modulating the expression of bile acid transporters. This exploratory study examined whether common functional polymorphisms in FXR and in bile acid transporter genes affect the pharmacokinetics of exogenous UDCA. Polymorphisms in genes for transporters involved in bile acid transport, solute carrier organic anion 1B1 (SLCO1B1) 388A>G and 521T>C, solute carrier 10A1 (SLC10A1) 800 C>T and ATP-binding cassette B11 (ABCB11) 1331T>C, and the FXR -1G>T polymorphism were genotyped in 26 male Chinese subjects who ingested single oral 500-mg doses of UDCA. Plasma concentrations of UDCA and its major conjugate metabolite glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) were determined. The mean systemic exposure of UDCA was higher in the five subjects with one copy of the FXR -1G>T variant allele than in those homozygous for the wild-type allele (n = 21) (AUC0-24 h : 38.5 ± 28.2 vs. 20.9 ± 8.0 μg h/mL, P = 0.021), but this difference appeared mainly due to one outlier with the -1GT genotype and elevated baseline and post-treatment UDCA concentrations. After excluding the outlier, body weight was the only factor associated with plasma concentrations of UDCA and there were no significant associations with the other polymorphisms examined. None of the polymorphisms affected the pharmacokinetics of GUDCA. This study showed that the common polymorphisms in bile acid transporters had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of exogenous UDCA but an effect of the FXR polymorphism cannot be excluded.

  14. Role of hepatic transporters in prevention of bile acid toxicity after partial hepatectomy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Csanaky, Iván L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Tanaka, Yuji; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    The enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids (BAs) is important in several physiological processes. Although there has been considerable research on liver regeneration after two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PHx), little is known about how the liver protects itself against BA toxicity during regeneration. In this study, various BAs in plasma and liver, the composition of micelle-forming bile constituents, as well as gene expression of the main hepatobiliary transporters were quantified in sham-operated and PHx mice 24 and 48 h after surgery. PHx did not influence the hepatic concentrations of taurine-conjugated BAs (T-BA) but increased the concentration of glycine-conjugated (G-BA) and unconjugated BAs. Total BA excretion (μg·min−1·g liver wt−1) increased 2.4-fold and was accompanied by a 55% increase in bile flow after PHx. The plasma concentrations of T-BAs (402-fold), G-BAs (17-fold), and unconjugated BAs (500-fold) increased. The mRNA and protein levels of the BA uptake transporter Ntcp were unchanged after PHx, whereas the canalicular Bsep protein increased twofold at 48 h. The basolateral efflux transporter Mrp3 was induced at the mRNA (2.6-fold) and protein (3.1-fold) levels after PHx, which may contribute to elevated plasma BA and bilirubin levels. Biliary phospholipid excretion was nearly doubled in PHx mice, most likely owing to increased mRNA expression of the phospholipid transporter, Mdr2. In conclusion, the remnant liver after PHx excretes 2.5-fold more BAs and three times more phospholipids per gram liver than the sham-operated mouse liver. Upregulation of phospholipid transport may be important in protecting the biliary tract from BA toxicity during PHx. PMID:19497955

  15. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors.

  16. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  17. Cholesterol reduces the effects of dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids on water and solute transport in the human jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Broor, S L; Slota, T; Ammon, H V

    1980-01-01

    Jejunal perfusion studies were performed in 16 healthy volunteers to test the hypothesis that intraluminal cholesterol can mitigate the fluid secretion induced by dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids. Fluid secretion in the presence of 5 mM taurodeoxycholate was somewhat reduced by 4 mM mono-olein which was used for the solubilization of cholesterol. Addition of 0.8 mM cholesterol reduced fluid secretion further (P less than 0.05). Fluid secretion induced by 4 mM oleic acid was changed to net absorption in a linear fashion with increasing cholesterol concentration in the perfusion solutions. 1 mM cholesterol reduced fluid secretion induced by 6 mM oleic acid (P less than 0.005), but had no effect on fluid secretion induced by 6 mM linolenic acid. Glucose absorption was generally affected in a similar manner as water transport. In vitro, 1 mM cholesterol reduced monomer activity of 6 mM oleic acid to 72.3 +/- 0.9% of control and that of linolenic acid to 81.1 +/- 1.7% of control. Although statistically significant (P less than 0.001), the difference in the effects of cholesterol on monomer activities of the two fatty acids was rather small and it is unlikely that changes in monomer concentration of fatty acids and bile acids account for the protective effect of cholesterol. The in vivo observations point to a new physiological role for biliary cholesterol: the modification of the response of the small intestine to the effects of dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids. PMID:7358850

  18. Structural requirements of the human sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT): Role of 3- and 7-OH moieties on binding and translocation of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    González, Pablo M.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Ward, Weslyn C.; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are the end products of cholesterol metabolism. One of the critical steps in their biosynthesis involves the isomerization of the 3β-hydroxyl (-OH) group on the cholestane ring to the common 3α-configuration on BAs. BAs are actively recaptured from the small intestine by the human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter (hASBT) with high affinity and capacity. Previous studies have suggested that no particular hydroxyl group on BAs is critical for binding or transport by hASBT, even though 3β-hydroxylated BAs were not examined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the 3α-OH group on BAs binding and translocation by hASBT. Ten 3β-hydroxylated BAs (Iso-bile acids, iBAs) were synthesized, characterized, and subjected to hASBT inhibition and uptake studies. hASBT inhibition and uptake kinetics of iBAs were compared to that of native 3α-OH BAs. Glycine conjugates of native and isomeric BAs were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations in order to identify topological descriptors related to binding and translocation by hASBT. Iso-BAs bound to hASBT with lower affinity and exhibited reduced translocation than their respective 3α-epimers. Kinetic data suggests that, in contrast to native BAs where hASBT binding is the rate-limiting step, iBAs transport was rate-limited by translocation and not binding. Remarkably, 7-dehydroxylated iBAs were not hASBT substrates, highlighting the critical role of 7-OH group on BA translocation by hASBT, especially for iBAs. Conformational analysis of gly-iBAs and native BAs identified topological features for optimal binding as: concave steroidal nucleus, 3-OH “on-” or below-steroidal plane, 7-OH below-plane, and 12-OH moiety towards-plane. Our results emphasize the relevance of the 3α-OH group on BAs for proper hASBT binding and transport and revealed the critical role of 7-OH group on BA translocation, particularly in the absence of a 3α-OH group. Results have implications for BA

  19. [Hepatocellular transport of bile acids and organic anions in infection and SIRS--evidence for different mechanisms for regulating membrane transport proteins].

    PubMed

    Bolder, U; Thasler, W E; Hofmann, A F; Jauch, K W

    1998-01-01

    The alteration of proinflammatory mediators during sepsis and SIRS results in a large variety of adaptive changes of metabolic and physiologic variables. This study investigated the alterations of hepatocellular transport in a rat sepsis model (LPS i.p.) as well as in a model inducing SIRS by sterile abscess formation (turpentine i.m.). Two bile acids (Cholyltaurine and Chemodeoxycholyltaurine) and one organic anion (Sulfolithocholyltaurine) were used as marker substrates to investigate the time course of hepatocellular transport function. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused rat livers and plasma membrane vesicles. During sepsis, both, the transport of bile acids and that of the organic anion was markedly reduced. In contrast no alteration of transport was detected during SIRS. However, biliary secretion of glutathione (+90%) and bile acid independent bile flow (%) were increased. mRNA levels of bile acid and organic anion transport proteins were reduced. The lowest values were noted 12 h after injection of LPS or turpentine. Almost unchanged kinetic parameters during SIRS pointed to a normal population of transporters with regard to quantity and substrate affinity. Therefore it seems that transcriptional regulation plays an important role for the expression of transport proteins during sepsis, whereas posttranscriptional regulation may be of importance during SIRS. The clinical phenomenon of septic cholestasis including jaundice implies endotoxemia and differenciates against SIRS.

  20. The hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Mrp2 are downregulated in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Nathan J; Estrada, Teresa E; Frisk, Harrison A; Canet, Mark J; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Dvorak, Bohuslav; Lux, Katie; Halpern, Melissa D

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency of premature infants and is characterized by an extensive hemorrhagic inflammatory necrosis of the distal ileum and proximal colon. We have previously shown that, during the development of experimental NEC, the liver plays an important role in regulating inflammation in the ileum, and accumulation of ileal bile acids (BA) along with dysregulation of ileal BA transporters contributes to ileal damage. Given these findings, we speculated that hepatic BA transporters would also be altered in experimental NEC. Using both rat and mouse models of NEC, levels of Cyp7a1, Cyp27a1, and the hepatic BA transporters Bsep, Ntcp, Oatp2, Oatp4, Mrp2, and Mrp3 were investigated. In addition, levels of hepatic BA transporters were also determined when the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-18, which are both elevated in NEC, are neutralized during disease development. Ntcp and Mrp2 were decreased in NEC, but elevated ileal BA levels were not responsible for these reductions. However, neutralization of TNF-α normalized Ntcp, whereas removal of IL-18 normalized Mrp2 levels. These data show that the hepatic transporters Ntcp and Mrp2 are downregulated, whereas Cyp27a1 is increased in rodent models of NEC. Furthermore, increased levels of TNF-α and IL-18 in experimental NEC may play a role in the regulation of Ntcp and Mrp2, respectively. These data suggest the gut-liver axis should be considered when therapeutic modalities for NEC are developed.

  1. Hepatic alterations are accompanied by changes to bile acid transporter-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinov, Damir; DeMorrow, Sharon; McMillin, Matthew; Kain, Jessica; Mukherjee, Sanjib; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Frampton, Gabriel; Bricker, Paul Clint S.; Hurst, Jacob; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    Annually, there are over 2 million incidents of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and treatment options are non-existent. While many TBI studies have focused on the brain, peripheral contributions involving the digestive and immune systems are emerging as factors involved in the various symptomology associated with TBI. We hypothesized that TBI would alter hepatic function, including bile acid system machinery in the liver and brain. The results show activation of the hepatic acute phase response by 2 hours after TBI, hepatic inflammation by 6 hours after TBI and a decrease in hepatic transcription factors, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3 at 2 and 24 hrs after TBI. Bile acid receptors and transporters were decreased as early as 2 hrs after TBI until at least 24 hrs after TBI. Quantification of bile acid transporter, ASBT-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus, revealed a significant decrease following TBI. These results are the first to show such changes following a TBI, and are compatible with previous studies of the bile acid system in stroke models. The data support the emerging idea of a systemic influence to neurological disorders and point to the need for future studies to better define specific mechanisms of action. PMID:28106051

  2. Mouse organic solute transporter alpha deficiency alters FGF15 expression and bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha; Haywood, Jamie; Kock, Nancy D; Dawson, Paul A

    2012-08-01

    Blocking intestinal bile acid (BA) absorption by inhibiting or inactivating the apical sodium-dependent BA transporter (Asbt) classically induces hepatic BA synthesis. In contrast, blocking intestinal BA absorption by inactivating the basolateral BA transporter, organic solute transporter alpha-beta (Ostα-Ostβ) is associated with an altered homeostatic response and decreased hepatic BA synthesis. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, including the role of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15). BA and cholesterol metabolism, intestinal phenotype, expression of genes important for BA metabolism, and intestinal FGF15 expression were examined in wild type, Ostα(-/-), Fxr(-/-), and Ostα(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice. Inactivation of Ostα was associated with decreases in hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) expression, BA pool size, and intestinal cholesterol absorption. Ostα(-/-) mice exhibited significant small intestinal changes, including altered ileal villus morphology, and increases in intestinal length and mass. Total ileal FGF15 expression was elevated almost 20-fold in Ostα(-/-) mice as a result of increased villus epithelial cell number and ileocyte FGF15 protein expression. Ostα(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice exhibited decreased ileal FGF15 expression, restoration of intestinal cholesterol absorption, and increases in hepatic Cyp7a1 expression, fecal BA excretion, and BA pool size. FXR deficiency did not reverse the intestinal morphological changes or compensatory decrease for ileal Asbt expression in Ostα(-/-) mice. These results indicate that signaling via FXR is required for the paradoxical repression of hepatic BA synthesis but not the complex intestinal adaptive changes in Ostα(-/-) mice. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of transport activities of 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids in bile salt export pump and multidrug resistance-associated proteins using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Murai, Tsuyoshi; Oda, Kana; Toyo, Terutake; Nittono, Hiroshi; Takei, Hajime; Muto, Akina; Kimura, Akihiko; Kurosawa, Takao

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for the measurement of transport activities in membrane vesicles obtained from Sf9 cells for 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Calibration curves for the bile acids were linear over the range of 10 to 2000 pmol/mL, and the detection limit was less than 1 pmol/mL for 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids using selected reaction monitoring analysis. The analytical method was applied to measurements of transport activities in membrane vesicles obtained from human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-, 3-, and human bile salt export pump-expressing Sf9 cells for conjugated 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids. The present study demonstrated that human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 vesicles accepted conjugated 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids along with common bile acids such as glycocholic acid and taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate.

  4. Measurement of transport activities of bile acids in human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kana; Murai, Tsuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Kurosawa, Takao

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for the measurement of transport activities in membrane vesicles obtained from human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3-expressing Sf9 cells for 1beta-hydroxy-, 6alpha-hydroxy- and unsaturated bile acids by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Calibration curves for the bile acids were linear over the range of 10 to 2000 pmol/mL, and the detection limit was less than 2 pmol/mL for all bile acids using selected reaction monitoring analysis. The method was applied to measurements of adenosine triphosphate-dependent transport activities of the membrane vesicles for the above-mentioned hydroxylated and unsaturated bile acids. The present study demonstrated that the human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 vesicles accepted 1beta-, 6alpha-hydroxylated and unsaturated bile acids along with common bile acids, such as glycocholic acid and taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate. The developed method is useful for measurements of bile acid transport activities.

  5. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  6. The Ileal Lipid Binding Protein Is Required for Efficient Absorption and Transport of Bile Acids in the Distal Portion of the Murine Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Praslickova, Dana; Torchia, Enrique C.; Sugiyama, Michael G.; Magrane, Elijah J.; Zwicker, Brittnee L.; Kolodzieyski, Lev; Agellon, Luis B.

    2012-01-01

    The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp) is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6−/− mice) and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, P<0.05) in female but not male Fabp6−/− mice. The activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (cyp7a1), the rate-controlling enzyme of the classical bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was significantly increased in female (63.5%, P<0.05) but not in male Fabp6−/− mice. The amount of [3H]taurocholic acid (TCA) excreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (P<0.025) higher for female Fabp6−/− mice whereas it was 57.3% (P<0.01) lower for male Fabp6−/− mice, compared to wild-type mice. The retained fraction of the [3H]TCA localized in the small and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02) and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01), respectively, in male Fabp6−/− mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6−/− mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03) in both sexes of Fabp6−/− mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) in mice. PMID:23251388

  7. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  8. Bile acids and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Vance L; Banan, Babak; Ajouz, Hana; Abumrad, Naji N; Flynn, Charles R

    2017-08-01

    Bariatric surgery, specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), are the most effective and durable treatments for morbid obesity and potentially a viable treatment for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The resolution rate of T2D following these procedures is between 40 and 80% and far surpasses that achieved by medical management alone. The molecular basis for this improvement is not entirely understood, but has been attributed in part to the altered enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. In this review we highlight how bile acids potentially contribute to improved lipid and glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure after these procedures. The impact of altered bile acid levels in enterohepatic circulation is also associated with changes in gut microflora, which may further contribute to some of these beneficial effects. We highlight the beneficial effects of experimental surgical procedures in rodents that alter bile secretory flow without gastric restriction or altering nutrient flow. This information suggests a role for bile acids beyond dietary fat emulsification in altering whole body glucose and lipid metabolism strongly, and also suggests emerging roles for the activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid x receptor (FXR) and G-protein coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5) in these improvements. The limitations of rodent studies and the current state of our understanding is reviewed and the potential effects of bile acids mediating the short- and long-term metabolic improvements after bariatric surgery is critically examined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Specific bile acids inhibit hepatic fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Biao; Park, Hyo Min; Kazantzis, Melissa; Lin, Min; Henkin, Amy; Ng, Stephanie; Song, Sujin; Chen, Yuli; Tran, Heather; Lai, Robin; Her, Chris; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Forman, Barry M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are known to play important roles as detergents in the absorption of hydrophobic nutrients and as signaling molecules in the regulation of metabolism. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that naturally occurring bile acids interfere with protein-mediated hepatic long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) uptake. To this end stable cell lines expressing fatty acid transporters as well as primary hepatocytes from mouse and human livers were incubated with primary and secondary bile acids to determine their effects on LCFA uptake rates. We identified ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as the two most potent inhibitors of the liver-specific fatty acid transport protein 5 (FATP5). Both UDCA and DCA were able to inhibit LCFA uptake by primary hepatocytes in a FATP5-dependent manner. Subsequently, mice were treated with these secondary bile acids in vivo to assess their ability to inhibit diet-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Administration of DCA in vivo via injection or as part of a high-fat diet significantly inhibited hepatic fatty acid uptake and reduced liver triglycerides by more than 50%. In summary, the data demonstrate a novel role for specific bile acids, and the secondary bile acid DCA in particular, in the regulation of hepatic LCFA uptake. The results illuminate a previously unappreciated means by which specific bile acids, such as UDCA and DCA, can impact hepatic triglyceride metabolism and may lead to novel approaches to combat obesity-associated fatty liver disease. PMID:22531947

  10. New insights into bile acid malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Ian; Nolan, Jonathan; Pattni, Sanjeev S; Walters, Julian R F

    2011-10-01

    Bile acid malabsorption occurs when there is impaired absorption of bile acids in the terminal ileum, so interrupting the normal enterohepatic circulation. The excess bile acids in the colon cause diarrhea, and treatment with bile acid sequestrants is beneficial. The condition can be diagnosed with difficulty by measuring fecal bile acids, or more easily by retention of selenohomocholyltaurine (SeHCAT), where this is available. Chronic diarrhea caused by primary bile acid diarrhea appears to be common, but is under-recognized where SeHCAT testing is not performed. Measuring excessive bile acid synthesis with 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one may be an alternative means of diagnosis. It appears that there is no absorption defect in primary bile acid diarrhea but, instead, an overproduction of bile acids. Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) inhibits hepatic bile acid synthesis. Defective production of FGF19 from the ileum may be the cause of primary bile acid diarrhea.

  11. Aerobic catabolism of bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, R A; Park, R J; Smith, M G

    1982-01-01

    Seventy-eight stable cultures obtained by enrichment on media containing ox bile or a single bile acid were able to utilize one or more bile acids, as well as components of ox bile, as primary carbon sources for growth. All isolates were obligate aerobes, and most (70) were typical (48) or atypical (22) Pseudomonas strains, the remainder (8) being gram-positive actinomycetes. Of six Pseudomonas isolates selected for further study, five produced predominantly acidic catabolites after growth on glycocholic acid, but the sixth, Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752, accumulated as the principal product a neutral steroid catabolite. Optimum growth of Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31752 on ox bile occurred at pH 7 to 8 and from 25 to 30 degrees C. No additional nutrients were required to sustain good growth, but growth was stimulated by the addition of ammonium sulfate and yeast extract. Good growth was obtained with a bile solids content of 40 g/liter in shaken flasks. A near-theoretical yield of neutral steroid catabolites, comprising a major (greater than 50%) and three minor products, was obtained from fermentor growth of ATCC 31752 in 6.7 g of ox bile solids per liter. The possible commercial exploitation of these findings to produce steroid drug intermediates for the pharmaceutical industry is discussed. PMID:7149711

  12. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  13. The novel putative bile acid transporter SLC10A5 is highly expressed in liver and kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Carla F.; Godoy, Jose R.; Doering, Barbara; Cavalcanti, Marcia C.O.; Bergmann, Martin; Petzinger, Ernst; Geyer, Joachim . E-mail: Joachim.M.Geyer@vetmed.uni-giessen.de

    2007-09-14

    Here we report the identification, cloning, and characterization of SLC10A5, which is a new member of Solute Carrier Family 10 (SLC10), also known as the 'sodium/bile acid cotransporter family'. Expression of SLC10A5/Slc10a5 was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and revealed its highest expression levels in liver and kidney in humans, rat and mouse. In rat liver and kidney, Slc10a5 expression was localized by in situ hybridization to hepatocytes and proximal tubules, respectively. A SLC10A5-FLAG fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 cells and showed an apparent molecular weight of 42 kDa after immunoprecipitation. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the SLC10A5-FLAG protein was detected in the oocyte's plasma membrane but showed no transport activity for taurocholate, cholate, estrone-3-sulfate, or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. As bile acid carriers are the most related carriers to SLC10A5 though, we strongly suppose that SLC10A5 is an orphan carrier with yet non-identified substrates.

  14. Functional human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) with bile acid synthesis and transport capacities: A novel in vitro cholestatic model

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xuan; Gao, Yimeng; Wu, Zhitao; Ma, Leilei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Le; Lin, Yunfei; Hui, Lijian; Pan, Guoyu

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis is a leading cause of drug withdrawal. However, the use of primary human hepatocytes (PHHs), the gold standard for predicting cholestasis in vitro, is limited by their high cost and batch-to-batch variability. Mature hepatocyte characteristics have been observed in human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) derived from human fibroblast transdifferentiation. Here, we evaluated whether hiHeps could biosynthesize and excrete bile acids (BAs) and their potential as PHH alternatives for cholestasis investigations. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blotting indicated that hiHeps highly expressed BA synthases and functional transporters. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) showed that hiHeps produced normal intercellular unconjugated BAs but fewer conjugated BAs than human hepatocytes. When incubated with representative cholestatic agents, hiHeps exhibited sensitive drug-induced bile salt export pump (BSEP) dysfunction, and their response to cholestatic agent-mediated cytotoxicity correlated well with that of PHHs (r2 = 0.8032). Deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced hepatotoxicity in hiHeps was verified by elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and γ-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT) levels. Mitochondrial damage and cell death suggested DCA-induced toxicity in hiHeps, which were attenuated by hepatoprotective drugs, as in PHHs. For the first time, hiHeps were reported to biosynthesize and excrete BAs, which could facilitate predicting cholestatic hepatotoxicity and screening potential therapeutic drugs against cholestasis. PMID:27934920

  15. Bile Acids and the Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review We examine the latest research on the emerging bile acid-gut microbiome axis and its role in health and disease. Our focus revolves around two key microbial pathways for degrading bile salts, and the impact of bile acid composition in the gut on the gut microbiome and host physiology. Recent findings Bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acids in the intestines. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. Bile acids are emerging as regulators of the gut microbiome at the highest taxomic levels. The role of bile acids as hormones and potentiators of liver cancer are also emerging. Summary The host and microbiome appear to regulate bile acid pool size. The host produces a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Members of the microbiome utilize bile acids and their conjugates resulting in agonism of FXR in intestine and liver resulting in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. Hydrophilicity of the bile acid pool is associated with disease states. Reduced bile acid levels in the gut are associated with bacterial overgrowth and inflammation. Diet, antibiotic therapy, and disease states affect the balance of the microbiome-bile acid pool. PMID:24625896

  16. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  17. Bile acids and intestinal microbiota in autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Tang, Ruqi; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2017-09-01

    Autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases, including primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), are manifested as an impairment of normal bile flow and excessive accumulation of potentially toxic bile acids. Endogenous bile acids are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of cholestasis. Consequently, chronic cholestasis affects the expression of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptors, and results in liver injury. Several lines of evidence suggest that intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the etiopathogenesis of cholestatic liver diseases by regulating metabolism and immune responses. However, progression of the disease may also affect the composition of gut microbiota, which in turn exacerbates the progression of cholestasis. In addition, the interaction between intestinal microbiota and bile acids is not unidirectional. Bile acids can shape the gut microbiota community, and in turn, intestinal microbes are able to alter bile acid pool. In general, gut microbiota actively communicates with bile acids, and together play an important role in the pathogenesis of PBC and PSC. Targeting the link between bile acids and intestinal microbiota offers exciting new perspectives for the treatment of those cholestatic liver diseases. This review highlights current understanding of the interactions between bile acids and intestinal microbiota and their roles in autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases. Further, we postulate a bile acids-intestinal microbiota-cholestasis triangle in the pathogenesis of autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases and potential therapeutic strategies by targeting this triangle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  19. CP-MLR/PLS directed QSAR study on apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter inhibition activity of benzothiepines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brij Kishore; Singh, Prithvi; Pilania, Pradeep; Sarbhai, Kirti; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S

    2011-02-01

    The apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibition activity of benzothiepine derivatives have been analyzed based on topological and molecular features. Analysis of the structural features in conjunction with the biological endpoints in Combinatorial Protocol in Multiple Linear Regression (CP-MLR) led to the identification of 21 descriptors for modeling the activity. The study clearly suggested that the role of Randic shape index (path/walk ratio 3) and topological charges of 2-, 5-, and 6-orders to optimize the ASBT inhibitory activity of titled compounds. The influence of atomic van der Waals volumes, masses, Sanderson electronegativities, and polarizabilities are indicated via different lags of Moran and Geary autocorrelations. Presence of tertiary aromatic amine functionality in molecular structure has also shown its relevance in rationalizing the biological actions of benzothiepines. The PLS analysis has confirmed the dominance of information content of CP-MLR identified descriptors for modeling the activity when compared to those of the leftover ones.

  20. Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues Lining the Extracellular Loop I of Sodium-coupled Bile Acid Transporter ASBT Interact with Na+ and 7α-OH Moieties on the Ligand Cholestane Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Functional contributions of residues Val-99—Ser-126 lining extracellular loop (EL) 1 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter were determined via cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol modification, and in silico interpretation. Despite membrane expression for all but three constructs (S112C, Y117C, S126C), most EL1 mutants (64%) were inactivated by cysteine mutation, suggesting a functional role during sodium/bile acid co-transport. A negative charge at conserved residues Asp-120 and Asp-122 is required for transport function, whereas neutralization of charge at Asp-124 yields a functionally active transporter. D124A exerts low affinity for common bile acids except deoxycholic acid, which uniquely lacks a 7α-hydroxyl (OH) group. Overall, we conclude that (i) Asp-122 functions as a Na+ sensor, binding one of two co-transported Na+ ions, (ii) Asp-124 interacts with 7α-OH groups of bile acids, and (iii) apolar EL1 residues map to hydrophobic ligand pharmacophore features. Based on these data, we propose a comprehensive mechanistic model involving dynamic salt bridge pairs and hydrogen bonding involving multiple residues to describe sodium-dependent bile acid transporter-mediated bile acid and cation translocation. PMID:18508772

  1. Bile

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive tract. Bile contains: Mostly cholesterol Bile acids (also called bile salts) Bilirubin (a breakdown product or red blood cells) It also contains: Water Body salts (such as potassium and sodium) Copper ...

  2. Bile Acids, Obesity, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huijuan; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are increasingly recognized as key regulators of systemic metabolism. While bile acids have long been known to play important and direct roles in nutrient absorption, bile acids also serve as signaling molecules. Bile acid interactions with the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the membrane receptor G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 (TGR5) can regulate incretin hormone and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) secretion, cholesterol metabolism, and systemic energy expenditure. Bile acid levels and distribution are altered in type 2 diabetes and increased following bariatric procedures, in parallel with reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Thus, modulation of bile acid levels and signaling, using bile acid binding resins, TGR5 agonists, and FXR agonists, may serve as a potent therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other components of the metabolic syndrome in humans. PMID:25194176

  3. The continuing importance of bile acids in liver and intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, A F

    Bile acids, the water-soluble, amphipathic end products of cholesterol metabolism, are involved in liver, biliary, and intestinal disease. Formed in the liver, bile acids are absorbed actively from the small intestine, with each molecule undergoing multiple enterohepatic circulations before being excreted. After their synthesis from cholesterol, bile acids are conjugated with glycine or taurine, a process that makes them impermeable to cell membranes and permits high concentrations to persist in bile and intestinal content. The relation between the chemical structure and the multiple physiological functions of bile acids is reviewed. Bile acids induce biliary lipid secretion and solubilize cholesterol in bile, promoting its elimination. In the small intestine, bile acids solubilize dietary lipids promoting their absorption. Bile acids are cytotoxic when present in abnormally high concentrations. This may occur intracellularly, as occurs in the hepatocyte in cholestasis, or extracellularly, as occurs in the colon in patients with bile acid malabsorption. Disturbances in bile acid metabolism can be caused by (1) defective biosynthesis from cholesterol or defective conjugation, (2) defective membrane transport in the hepatocyte or ileal enterocyte, (3) defective transport between organs or biliary diversion, and (4) increased bacterial degradation during enterohepatic cycling. Bile acid therapy involves bile acid replacement in deficiency states or bile acid displacement by ursodeoxycholic acid, a noncytotoxic bile acid. In cholestatic liver disease, administration of ursodeoxycholic acid decreases hepatocyte injury by retained bile acids, improving liver tests, and slowing disease progression. Bile acid malabsorption may lead to high concentrations of bile acids in the colon and impaired colonic mucosal function; bile acid sequestrants provide symptomatic benefit for diarrhea. A knowledge of bile acid physiology and the perturbations of bile acid metabolism in liver

  4. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  5. Rifampicin-induced injury in HepG2 cells is alleviated by TUDCA via increasing bile acid transporters expression and enhancing the Nrf2-mediated adaptive response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Lihong; Feng, Hui; Wang, Wei; Cai, Yi; Qi, Fen; Tao, Xiaofang; Liu, Jun; Shen, Yujun; Ren, Xiaofei; Chen, Xi; Xu, Jianming; Shen, Yuxian

    2017-07-06

    Bile acid transporters and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf-2)-mediated adaptive response play important roles in the development of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). However, little is known about the contribution of the adaptive response to rifampicin (RFP)-induced cell injury. In this study, we found RFP decreased the survival rate of HepG2 cells and increased the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), γ-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT), total bilirubin (TBIL), direct bilirubin (DBIL), indirect bilirubin (IBIL), total bile acid (TBA) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the cell culture supernatants in both a concentration- and a time-dependent manner. RFP increased the expression levels of bile acid transporter proteins and mRNAs, such as bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), Na(+)/taurocholate cotransporter (NTCP), organic anion transporting protein 2 (OATP2), organic solute transporter β (OSTβ) and Nrf2. Following the transient knockdown of Nrf2 and treatment with RFP, the expression levels of the BSEP, MDR1, MRP2, NTCP, OATP2 and OSTβ proteins and mRNAs were decreased to different degrees. Moreover, the cell survival was decreased, whereas the LDH level in the cell culture supernatant was increased. Overexpression of the Nrf2 gene produced the opposite effects. Treatment with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) increased the expression levels of the bile acid transporters and Nrf2, decreased the expression levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), and inhibited RFP-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, TUDCA reduced cell apoptosis, increased cell survival and decreased the levels of LDH, ALT, AST, AKP, γ-GT, TBIL, DBIL, IBIL, TBA and ATP in the cell culture

  6. Prediction of Altered Bile Acid Disposition Due to Inhibition of Multiple Transporters: An Integrated Approach Using Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes, Mechanistic Modeling, and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cen; Yang, Kyunghee; Brouwer, Kenneth R.; St. Claire, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Transporter-mediated alterations in bile acid disposition may have significant toxicological implications. Current methods to predict interactions are limited by the interplay of multiple transporters, absence of protein in the experimental system, and inaccurate estimates of inhibitor concentrations. An integrated approach was developed to predict altered bile acid disposition due to inhibition of multiple transporters using the model bile acid taurocholate (TCA). TCA pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by mechanistic modeling using sandwich-cultured human hepatocyte data with protein in the medium. Uptake, basolateral efflux, and biliary clearance estimates were 0.63, 0.034, and 0.074 mL/min/g liver, respectively. Cellular total TCA concentrations (Ct,Cells) were selected as the model output based on sensitivity analysis. Monte Carlo simulations of TCA Ct,Cells in the presence of model inhibitors (telmisartan and bosentan) were performed using inhibition constants for TCA transporters and inhibitor concentrations, including cellular total inhibitor concentrations ([I]t,cell) or unbound concentrations, and cytosolic total or unbound concentrations. For telmisartan, the model prediction was accurate with an average fold error (AFE) of 0.99–1.0 when unbound inhibitor concentration ([I]u) was used; accuracy dropped when total inhibitor concentration ([I]t) was used. For bosentan, AFE was 1.2–1.3 using either [I]u or [I]t. This difference was evaluated by sensitivity analysis of the cellular unbound fraction of inhibitor (fu,cell,inhibitor), which revealed higher sensitivity of fu,cell,inhibitor for predicting TCA Ct,Cells when inhibitors exhibited larger ([I]t,cell/IC50) values. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the applicability of a framework to predict hepatocellular bile acid concentrations due to drug-mediated inhibition of transporters using mechanistic modeling and cytosolic or cellular unbound concentrations. PMID:27233294

  7. Pregnancy and bile acid disorders.

    PubMed

    Pataia, Vanessa; Dixon, Peter H; Williamson, Catherine

    2017-07-01

    During pregnancy, extensive adaptations in maternal metabolic and immunological physiology occur. Consequently, preexisting disease may be exacerbated or attenuated, and new disease susceptibility may be unmasked. Cholestatic diseases, characterized by a supraphysiological raise in bile acid levels, require careful monitoring during pregnancy. This review describes the latest advances in the knowledge of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), the most common bile acid disorder specific to pregnancy, with a focus on the disease etiology and potential mechanisms of ICP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes, including fetal demise. The course of preexisting cholestatic conditions in pregnancy is considered, including primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cholangitis, biliary atresia, and Alagille syndrome. The currently accepted treatments for cholestasis in pregnancy and promising new therapeutics for the condition are described. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Bile Acids in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Hayley D.; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, a structurally related group of molecules derived from cholesterol, have a long history as therapeutic agents in medicine, from treatment for primarily ocular diseases in ancient Chinese medicine to modern day use as approved drugs for certain liver diseases. Despite evidence supporting a neuroprotective role in a diverse spectrum of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including several small pilot clinical trials, little is known about their molecular mechanisms or their physiological roles in the nervous system. We review the data reported for their use as treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and their underlying molecular basis. While data from cellular and animal models and clinical trials support potential efficacy to treat a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, the relevant bile acids, their origin, and the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which they confer neuroprotection are not known delaying translation to the clinical setting. PMID:27920719

  9. In vitro uptake of bile acids by choroid plexus, kidney cortex and anterior uvea. I. The iodipamide-sensitive transport systems in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Bárány, E H

    1975-02-01

    Renal cortex, anterior uvea, lateral choroid plexus and terminal ileum accumulate -14C-cholate, glycocholate, deoxycholate and chenodeoxycholate to considerable tissue/medium ratios. Iodipamide partly inhibits accumulation by kidney, uvea and plexus but not ileum. In renal cortex the sensitive part is similar to 10, 60 and 90 percent for dihydroxy acids, cholate and glycocholate respectively. Hippurate depresses uptake in kidney and uvea but hardly in plexus. Simultaneous uptake by renal cortex and uvea of -14C-cholate or glycocholate, -125I-iodipamide and -131I-o-iodohippurate was studied with unlabelled iodipamide and hippurate as inhibitors. The concentration-dependence of the inhibition required the assumption of 4 partly overlapping iodipamide-sensitive transport systems handling the 4 test substances: the hippurate (H)-system, one moderately (L(1)) and one very hippurate-resistant (L(2)) part of the liverlike L-system and a fourth system called BS, more evenly inhibitable by iodipamide and hippurate than the others. The L(2)-system carries iodipamide but very little bile acids. No iodipamide-sensitive system clearly specialized for bile acid transport was found. The systems have only moderate affinity for bile acids and probably treat them just as large organic anions. A new mathematical procedure to test the degree of complexity of composite transport systems without kinetic assumptions was used.

  10. The role of lithocholic acid in the regulation of bile acid detoxication, synthesis, and transport proteins in rat and human intestine and liver slices.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ansar A; Chow, Edwin C Y; Porte, Robert J; Pang, K Sandy; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2011-02-01

    The effects of the secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid (LCA), a VDR, FXR and PXR ligand, on the regulation of bile acid metabolism (CYP3A isozymes), synthesis (CYP7A1), and transporter proteins (MRP3, MRP2, BSEP, NTCP) as well as nuclear receptors (FXR, PXR, LXRα, HNF1α, HNF4α and SHP) were studied in rat and human precision-cut intestine and liver slices at the mRNA level. Changes due to 5 to 10 μM of LCA were compared to those of other prototype ligands for VDR, FXR, PXR and GR. LCA induced rCYP3A1 and rCYP3A9 in the rat jejunum, ileum and colon, rCYP3A2 only in the ileum, rCYP3A9 expression in the liver, and CYP3A4 in the human ileum but not in liver. LCA induced the expression of rMRP2 in the colon but not in the jejunum and ileum but did not affect rMRP3 expression along the length of the rat intestine. In human ileum slices, LCA induced hMRP3 and hMRP2 expression. In rat liver slices, LCA decreased rCYP7A1, rLXRα and rHNF4α expression, induced rSHP expression, but did not affect rBSEP or rNTCP expression; whereas in the human liver, a small but significant decrease was found for hHNF1α expression. These data suggests profound species differences in the effects of LCA on bile acid transport, synthesis and detoxification. An examination of the effects of prototype VDR, PXR, GR and FXR ligands showed that these pathways are all intact in precision cut slices and that LCA exerted VDR, PXR and FXR effects. The LCA-induced altered enzymes and transporter expressions in the intestine and liver would affect the disposition of drugs.

  11. The ABC-Type Multidrug Resistance Transporter LmrCD Is Responsible for an Extrusion-Based Mechanism of Bile Acid Resistance in Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Arsalan Haseeb; Bakkes, Patrick J.; Lubelski, Jacek; Agustiandari, Herfita; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Upon prolonged exposure to cholate and other toxic compounds, Lactococcus lactis develops a multidrug resistance phenotype that has been attributed to an elevated expression of the heterodimeric ABC-type multidrug transporter LmrCD. To investigate the molecular basis of bile acid resistance in L. lactis and to evaluate the contribution of efflux-based mechanisms in this process, the drug-sensitive L. lactis NZ9000 ΔlmrCD strain was challenged with cholate. A resistant strain was obtained that, compared to the parental strain, showed (i) significantly improved resistance toward several bile acids but not to drugs, (ii) morphological changes, and (iii) an altered susceptibility to antimicrobial peptides. Transcriptome and transport analyses suggest that the acquired resistance is unrelated to elevated transport activity but, instead, results from a multitude of stress responses, changes to the cell envelope, and metabolic changes. In contrast, wild-type cells induce the expression of lmrCD upon exposure to cholate, whereupon the cholate is actively extruded from the cells. Together, these data suggest a central role for an efflux-based mechanism in bile acid resistance and implicate LmrCD as the main system responsible in L. lactis. PMID:18790870

  12. Ileal apical Na+-dependent bile acid transporter ASBT is upregulated in rats with diabetes mellitus induced by low doses of streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Annaba, Fadi; Ma, Ke; Kumar, Pradeep; Dudeja, Amish K; Kineman, Rhonda D; Shneider, Benjamin L; Saksena, Seema; Gill, Ravinder K; Alrefai, Waddah A

    2010-10-01

    Increased intestinal bile acid absorption and expansion of the bile acid pool has been implicated in the hypercholesterolemia associated with diabetes mellitus. However, the molecular basis of the increase in bile acid absorption in diabetes mellitus is not fully understood. The ileal apical Na(+)-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) is primarily responsible for active reabsorption of the majority of bile acids. Current studies were designed to investigate the modulation of ASBT function and expression in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus in rats and to examine the effect of insulin on rat ASBT promoter by insulin. Diabetes mellitus was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of low doses of STZ (20 mg/kg body wt) on five consecutive days. Human insulin (10 U/day) was given to a group of diabetic rats for 3 days before euthanasia. RNA and protein were extracted from mucosa isolated from the small intestine and ASBT expression was assessed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Our data showed that ASBT mRNA and protein expression were significantly elevated in diabetic rats. Insulin treatment of diabetic rats reversed the increase in ASBT protein expression to control levels. Consistently, ileal Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]taurocholic uptake in isolated intestinal epithelial cells was significantly increased in diabetic rats. In vitro studies utilizing intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells demonstrated that ASBT expression and promoter activity were significantly decreased by insulin. These studies demonstrated that insulin directly influences ASBT expression and promoter activity and that ASBT function and expression are increased in rats with STZ-induced diabetes mellitus. The increase in ASBT expression may contribute to disturbances in cholesterol homeostasis associated with diabetes mellitus.

  13. Evolution of substrate specificity for the bile salt transporter ASBT (SLC10A2)[S

    PubMed Central

    Lionarons, Daniël A.; Boyer, James L.; Cai, Shi-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The apical Na+-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT/SLC10A2) is essential for maintaining the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. It is not known when Slc10a2 evolved as a bile salt transporter or how it adapted to substantial changes in bile salt structure during evolution. We characterized ASBT orthologs from two primitive vertebrates, the lamprey that utilizes early 5α-bile alcohols and the skate that utilizes structurally different 5β-bile alcohols, and compared substrate specificity with ASBT from humans who utilize modern 5β-bile acids. Everted gut sacs of skate but not the more primitive lamprey transported 3H-taurocholic acid (TCA), a modern 5β-bile acid. However, molecular cloning identified ASBT orthologs from both species. Cell-based assays using recombinant ASBT/Asbt's indicate that lamprey Asbt has high affinity for 5α-bile alcohols, low affinity for 5β-bile alcohols, and lacks affinity for TCA, whereas skate Asbt showed high affinity for 5α- and 5β-bile alcohols but low affinity for TCA. In contrast, human ASBT demonstrated high affinity for all three bile salt types. These findings suggest that ASBT evolved from the earliest vertebrates by gaining affinity for modern bile salts while retaining affinity for older bile salts. Also, our results indicate that the bile salt enterohepatic circulation is conserved throughout vertebrate evolution. PMID:22669917

  14. Na+/Taurocholate Cotransporting Polypeptide and Apical Sodium-Dependent Bile Acid Transporter Are Involved in the Disposition of Perfluoroalkyl Sulfonates in Humans and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen; Zitzow, Jeremiah D.; Ehresman, David J.; Chang, Shu-Ching; Butenhoff, John L.; Forster, Jameson; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Among the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFASs), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have half-lives of several years in humans, mainly due to slow renal clearance and potential hepatic accumulation. Both compounds undergo enterohepatic circulation. To determine whether transporters involved in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are also involved in the disposition of PFASs, uptake of perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), PFHxS, and PFOS was measured using freshly isolated human and rat hepatocytes in the absence or presence of sodium. The results demonstrated sodium-dependent uptake for all 3 PFASs. Given that the Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) and the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT) are essential for the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, transport of PFASs was investigated in stable CHO Flp-In cells for human NTCP or HEK293 cells transiently expressing rat NTCP, human ASBT, and rat ASBT. The results demonstrated that both human and rat NTCP can transport PFBS, PFHxS, and PFOS. Kinetics with human NTCP revealed Km values of 39.6, 112, and 130 µM for PFBS, PFHxS, and PFOS, respectively. For rat NTCP Km values were 76.2 and 294 µM for PFBS and PFHxS, respectively. Only PFOS was transported by human ASBT whereas rat ASBT did not transport any of the tested PFASs. Human OSTα/β was also able to transport all 3 PFASs. In conclusion, these results suggest that the long half-live and the hepatic accumulation of PFOS in humans are at least, in part, due to transport by NTCP and ASBT. PMID:26001962

  15. Regulation of the Function of the Human ABCG2 Multidrug Transporter by Cholesterol and Bile Acids: Effects of Mutations in Potential Substrate and Steroid Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Telbisz, Ágnes; Hegedüs, Csilla; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    ABCG2 (ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2) is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that actively extrudes xenobiotics and endobiotics from the cells and causes multidrug resistance in cancer. In the liver, ABCG2 is expressed in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes and excretes its substrates into the bile. ABCG2 is known to require high membrane cholesterol content for maximal activity, and by examining purified ABCG2 reconstituted in proteoliposomes we have recently shown that cholesterol is an essential activator, while bile acids significantly modify the activity of this protein. In the present work, by using isolated insect cell membrane preparations expressing human ABCG2 and its mutant variants, we have analyzed whether certain regions in this protein are involved in sterol recognition. We found that replacing ABCG2-R482 with large amino acids does not affect cholesterol dependence, but changes to small amino acids cause altered cholesterol sensitivity. When leucines in the potential steroid-binding element (SBE, aa 555–558) of ABCG2 were replaced by alanines, cholesterol dependence of ABCG2 activity was strongly reduced, although the L558A mutant variant when purified and reconstituted still required cholesterol for full activity. Regarding the effect of bile acids in isolated membranes, we found that these compounds decreased ABCG2-ATPase in the absence of drug substrates, which did not significantly affect substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. These ABCG2 mutant variants also altered bile acid sensitivity, although cholic acid and glycocholate were not transported by the protein. We suggest that the aforementioned two regions in ABCG2 are important for sterol sensing and may represent potential targets for pharmacologic modulation of ABCG2 function. PMID:24384916

  16. Sodium Taurocholate Modifies the Bile Acid-Independent Fraction of Canalicular Bile Flow in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Alfred L.; Wood, R. A. B.; Moossa, A. R.; Boyer, James L.

    1979-01-01

    Bile acid-independent secretion and the choleretic response to taurocholate were determined in rhesus monkeys fitted with indwelling silastic cannulas in the common bile ducts. Bile acids were infused intravenously in random order at 3.5, 7.0, or 10.5 μmol/min for 1.5 h each. When data were analyzed with a single regression line, bile flow increased in proportion to the level of bile acid secretion, although the y-intercepts (the conventional measurement of bile acid-independent secretion) varied widely (77.9±40.9 ml/24 h). The variation in y-intercepts was observed between animals and with repeated studies in the same animal and could not be explained by sex differences or the effects of the indwelling silastic cannulas, but seemed to be related to the order of bile acid infusion. With only two taurocholic acid infusion rates (7.0 and 3.5 μmol/min), [14C]erythritol clearance was greater per mole of secreted bile acid when the initial bile acid infusion was at the high level, but approached zero at low bile acid secretion rates, which suggests that so-called bile acid-independent canalicular flow is closely related to bile acid secretion or is small in size. The augmentation in [14C]erythritol clearance when the high infusion rate was given first was also associated with an increase in biliary clearance of [3H]inulin, which indicates that the premeability to inulin was also enhanced. Identical experiments which substituted equimolar infusions of a nonmicelle-forming bile acid (taurodehydrocholate) for taurocholate failed to demonstrate any difference in choleretic response or biliary clearance of [3H]inulin with the order of bile acid infusion. These experiments demonstrate that a micelleforming bile acid, taurocholate, can increase the permeability of the biliary system to large molecular weight solutes and simultaneously modify the y-intercept and the volume of bile secreted in response to the transported bile acid. Taurocholate may, therefore, modify its own

  17. Berberine-induced Inactivation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 Signaling Promotes Male-specific Expression of a Bile Acid Uptake Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bu, Pengli; Le, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Youcai; Cheng, Xingguo

    2017-03-17

    Sodium-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (Ntcp/NTCP) is the major uptake transporter of bile salts in mouse and human livers. In certain diseases, including endotoxemia, cholestasis, diabetes, and hepatocarcinoma, Ntcp/NTCP expression is markedly reduced, which interferes with enterohepatic circulation of bile salts, impairing the absorption of lipophilic compounds. Therefore, normal Ntcp/NTCP expression in the liver is physiologically important. Berberine is an herbal medicine used historically to improve liver function and has recently been shown to repress STAT signaling. However, berberine effects on Ntcp/NTCP expression are unknown, prompting use to investigate this possible connection. Our results showed that berberine dose-dependently increased Ntcp expression in male mouse liver and decreased taurocholic acid levels in serum but increased them in the liver. In mouse and human hepatoma cells, berberine induced Ntcp/NTCP mRNA and protein expression and increased cellular uptake of [3H] taurocholate. Mechanistically, berberine decreased nuclear protein levels of phospho-JAK2 and phospho-STAT5, thus disrupting the JAK2-STAT5 signaling. Moreover, berberine stimulated luciferase reporter expression from the mouse Ntcp promoter when one putative STAT5 response element (RE) (-1137 bp) was deleted and from the human NTCP promoter when three putative STAT5REs (-2898, -2164, and -691 bp) were deleted. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that berberine decreased binding of phospho-STAT5 protein to the-2164 and -691 bp STAT5REs in the human NTCP promoter. In summary, berberine-disrupted STAT5 signaling promoted mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression, resulting in enhanced bile acid uptake. Therefore, berberine may be a therapeutic candidate compound for maintaining bile acid homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Preference of Conjugated Bile Acids over Unconjugated Bile Acids as Substrates for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Takahiro; Sato, Toshihiro; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Goto, Junichi; Mano, Nariyasu

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids, the metabolites of cholesterol, are signaling molecules that play critical role in many physiological functions. They undergo enterohepatic circulation through various transporters expressed in intestine and liver. Human organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1 and OATP1B3 contribute to hepatic uptake of bile acids such as taurocholic acid. However, the transport properties of individual bile acids are not well understood. Therefore, we selected HEK293 cells overexpressing OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 to evaluate the transport of five major human bile acids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid) together withtheir glycine and taurine conjugates via OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. The bile acids were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The present study revealed that cholic acid, chenodeoxyxcholic acid, and deoxycholic acid were transported by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, while ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were not significantly transported by OATPs. However, all the conjugated bile acids were taken up rapidly by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. Kinetic analyses revealed the involvement of saturable OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated transport of bile acids. The apparent Km values for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 of the conjugated bile acids were similar (0.74–14.7 μM for OATP1B1 and 0.47–15.3 μM for OATP1B3). They exhibited higher affinity than cholic acid (47.1 μM for OATP1B1 and 42.2 μM for OATP1B3). Our results suggest that conjugated bile acids (glycine and taurine) are preferred to unconjugated bile acids as substrates for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. PMID:28060902

  19. Preference of Conjugated Bile Acids over Unconjugated Bile Acids as Substrates for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3.

    PubMed

    Suga, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Sato, Toshihiro; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Goto, Junichi; Mano, Nariyasu

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids, the metabolites of cholesterol, are signaling molecules that play critical role in many physiological functions. They undergo enterohepatic circulation through various transporters expressed in intestine and liver. Human organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1 and OATP1B3 contribute to hepatic uptake of bile acids such as taurocholic acid. However, the transport properties of individual bile acids are not well understood. Therefore, we selected HEK293 cells overexpressing OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 to evaluate the transport of five major human bile acids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid) together withtheir glycine and taurine conjugates via OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. The bile acids were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The present study revealed that cholic acid, chenodeoxyxcholic acid, and deoxycholic acid were transported by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, while ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were not significantly transported by OATPs. However, all the conjugated bile acids were taken up rapidly by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. Kinetic analyses revealed the involvement of saturable OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated transport of bile acids. The apparent Km values for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 of the conjugated bile acids were similar (0.74-14.7 μM for OATP1B1 and 0.47-15.3 μM for OATP1B3). They exhibited higher affinity than cholic acid (47.1 μM for OATP1B1 and 42.2 μM for OATP1B3). Our results suggest that conjugated bile acids (glycine and taurine) are preferred to unconjugated bile acids as substrates for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3.

  20. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 2 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 Printable PDF Open All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2 is a disorder characterized ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 1 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 Printable PDF Open All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 is a disorder characterized ...

  3. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  4. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Phase IIb Trial of A3309, A Bile Acid Transporter Inhibitor, for Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Chey, William D; Camilleri, Michael; Chang, Lin; Rikner, Leif; Graffner, Hans

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A3309 is a minimally absorbed ileal bile acid (BA) transporter (IBAT) inhibitor. We conducted an 8-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group, phase IIb study, which evaluated A3309 in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). METHODS: Patients with CIC (modified Rome III criteria and <3 complete (CSBM) spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs)/week during the 2-week baseline) were randomized to 5, 10, or 15 mg A3309 or placebo once daily. The primary end point was change in SBM number during week 1 compared with baseline. Other bowel and abdominal symptoms were assessed as secondary end points. Serum 7αC4 and lipids were evaluated as biomarkers of BA synthesis/loss. RESULTS: In all, 190 patients (mean 48 years, 90% female) were randomized. Mean increase (95% confidence interval) in SBM for week 1 were 1.7 (0.7–2.8) for placebo vs. 2.5 (1.5–3.5), 4.0 (2.9–5.0), and 5.4 (4.4–6.4) for 5 mg, 10 mg (P<0.002), and 15 mg (P<0.001) A3309, respectively. Increased stool frequency was maintained over 8 weeks. Time to first SBM and CSBM were significantly reduced in the 10- and 15-mg A3309 groups compared with placebo. Straining and bloating decreased with A3309 compared with placebo (P<0.05). Increased 7αC4 and reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with A3309 suggested increased BA synthesis and BA loss. The most common adverse events (AEs) were abdominal pain and diarrhea, which occurred most commonly in the 15-mg A3309 group. No drug-related serious AEs were observed. CONCLUSIONS: A3309 increased stool frequency and improved constipation-related symptoms in CIC; effects were maintained over 8 weeks of treatment. PMID:21606974

  5. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  6. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid protects bile acid homeostasis under inflammatory conditions and dampens Crohn's disease-like ileitis.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, Lien; Borsboom, Daniel; Devriese, Sarah; Van Welden, Sophie; Holvoet, Tom; Devisscher, Lindsey; Hindryckx, Pieter; De Vos, Martine; Laukens, Debby

    2017-02-06

    Bile acids regulate the expression of intestinal bile acid transporters and are natural ligands for nuclear receptors controlling inflammation. Accumulating evidence suggests that signaling through these receptors is impaired in inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated whether tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a secondary bile acid with cytoprotective properties, regulates ileal nuclear receptor and bile acid transporter expression and assessed its therapeutic potential in an experimental model of Crohn's disease (CD). Gene expression of the nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor and the bile acid transporters apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and organic solute transporter α and β was analyzed in Caco-2 cell monolayers exposed to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, in ileal tissue of TNF(ΔARE/WT) mice and in inflamed ileal biopsies from CD patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. TNF(ΔARE/WT) mice and wild-type littermates were treated with TUDCA or placebo for 11 weeks and ileal histopathology and expression of the aforementioned genes were determined. Exposing Caco-2 cell monolayers to TNFα impaired the mRNA expression of nuclear receptors and bile acid transporters, whereas co-incubation with TUDCA antagonized their downregulation. TNF(ΔARE/WT) mice displayed altered ileal bile acid homeostasis that mimicked the situation in human CD ileitis. Administration of TUDCA attenuated ileitis and alleviated the downregulation of nuclear receptors and bile acid transporters in these mice. These results show that TUDCA protects bile acid homeostasis under inflammatory conditions and suppresses CD-like ileitis. Together with previous observations showing similar efficacy in experimental colitis, we conclude that TUDCA could be a promising therapeutic agent for inflammatory bowel disease, warranting a clinical trial.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 6 February 2017; doi:10

  7. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  8. Structure and Functional Characterization of a Bile Acid 7α Dehydratase BaiE in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D.; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L.; Ridlon, Jason M.; Wells, James E.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, we report crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound (3-oxo-Δ4,6- lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)) complex. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α+β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35 and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirmed that these residues are essential for catalysis and also confirmed the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady state kinetic studies revealed that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  9. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives, due to their amphipathic characteristics. BAs are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver via transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated. The transport and synthesis of BAs are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors. In addition to their primary effect, BAs have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer, intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport. BAs are not equivalent in any of these biological activities, and structural requirements have been generally identified. In particular, some BAs may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease, although further research is necessary in this field. This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology. PMID:18837078

  10. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 is involved in bile acid homeostasis by modulating fatty acid transport protein-5 in the liver of micea

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Carlos A.; Morgan, Stuart A.; Rose, Adam J.; Herzig, Stephan; Lavery, Gareth G.; Odermatt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11β-HSD1) plays a key role in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Besides, it metabolizes some oxysterols and bile acids (BAs). The GR regulates BA homeostasis; however, the impact of impaired 11β-HSD1 activity remained unknown. We profiled plasma and liver BAs in liver-specific and global 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. 11β-HSD1-deficiency resulted in elevated circulating unconjugated BAs, an effect more pronounced in global than liver-specific knockout mice. Gene expression analyses revealed decreased expression of the BA-CoA ligase Fatp5, suggesting impaired BA amidation. Reduced organic anion-transporting polypeptide-1A1 (Oatp1a1) and enhanced organic solute-transporter-β (Ostb) mRNA expression were observed in livers from global 11β-HSD1-deficient mice. The impact of 11β-HSD1-deficiency on BA homeostasis seems to be GR-independent because intrahepatic corticosterone and GR target gene expression were not substantially decreased in livers from global knockout mice. Moreover, Fatp5 expression in livers from hepatocyte-specific GR knockout mice was unchanged. The results revealed a role for 11β-HSD1 in BA homeostasis. PMID:25061560

  11. Inhibition of Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Slc10a2 Improves Triglyceride Metabolism and Normalizes Elevated Plasma Glucose Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Snaith, Michael; Lindmark, Helena; Lundberg, Johanna; Östlund-Lindqvist, Ann-Margret; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids increases cholesterol catabolism, thereby stimulating hepatic cholesterol synthesis from acetate. We hypothesized that such treatment should lower the hepatic acetate pool which may alter triglyceride and glucose metabolism. We explored this using mice deficient of the ileal sodium-dependent BA transporter (Slc10a2) and ob/ob mice treated with a specific inhibitor of Slc10a2. Plasma TG levels were reduced in Slc10a2-deficient mice, and when challenged with a sucrose-rich diet, they displayed a reduced response in hepatic TG production as observed from the mRNA levels of several key enzymes in fatty acid synthesis. This effect was paralleled by a diminished induction of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (Srebp1c). Unexpectedly, the SR-diet induced intestinal fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 mRNA and normalized bile acid synthesis in Slc10a2−/− mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of Slc10a2 in diabetic ob/ob mice reduced serum glucose, insulin and TGs, as well as hepatic mRNA levels of Srebp1c and its target genes. These responses are contrary to those reported following treatment of mice with a bile acid binding resin. Moreover, when key metabolic signal transduction pathways in the liver were investigated, those of Mek1/2 - Erk1/2 and Akt were blunted after treatment of ob/ob mice with the Slc10a2 inhibitor. It is concluded that abrogation of Slc10a2 reduces hepatic Srebp1c activity and serum TGs, and in the diabetic ob/ob model it also reduces glucose and insulin levels. Hence, targeting of Slc10a2 may be a promising strategy to treat hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes. PMID:22662222

  12. Risk factors for development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury: inhibition of hepatic basolateral bile acid transporters multidrug resistance-associated proteins 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J; Swaan, Peter W; Stewart, Paul W; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2014-04-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potential of drugs. The inhibitory effect of 88 drugs (100 μM) on MRP3- and MRP4-mediated substrate transport was measured in membrane vesicles. Drugs selected for investigation included 50 BSEP non-inhibitors (24 non-cholestatic; 26 cholestatic) and 38 BSEP inhibitors (16 non-cholestatic; 22 cholestatic). MRP4 inhibition was associated with an increased risk of cholestatic potential among BSEP non-inhibitors. In this group, for each 1% increase in MRP4 inhibition, the odds of the drug being cholestatic increased by 3.1%. Using an inhibition cutoff of 21%, which predicted a 50% chance of cholestasis, 62% of cholestatic drugs inhibited MRP4 (P < 0.05); in contrast, only 17% of non-cholestatic drugs were MRP4 inhibitors. Among BSEP inhibitors, MRP4 inhibition did not provide additional predictive value of cholestatic potential; almost all BSEP inhibitors were also MRP4 inhibitors. Inclusion of pharmacokinetic predictor variables (e.g., maximal unbound concentration in plasma) in addition to percent MRP4 inhibition in logistic regression models did not improve cholestasis prediction. Association of cholestasis with percent MRP3 inhibition was not statistically significant, regardless of BSEP-inhibition status. Inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI.

  13. Risk Factors for Development of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Inhibition of Hepatic Basolateral Bile Acid Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C.; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J.; Swaan, Peter W.; Stewart, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potential of drugs. The inhibitory effect of 88 drugs (100 μM) on MRP3- and MRP4-mediated substrate transport was measured in membrane vesicles. Drugs selected for investigation included 50 BSEP non-inhibitors (24 non-cholestatic; 26 cholestatic) and 38 BSEP inhibitors (16 non-cholestatic; 22 cholestatic). MRP4 inhibition was associated with an increased risk of cholestatic potential among BSEP non-inhibitors. In this group, for each 1% increase in MRP4 inhibition, the odds of the drug being cholestatic increased by 3.1%. Using an inhibition cutoff of 21%, which predicted a 50% chance of cholestasis, 62% of cholestatic drugs inhibited MRP4 (P < 0.05); in contrast, only 17% of non-cholestatic drugs were MRP4 inhibitors. Among BSEP inhibitors, MRP4 inhibition did not provide additional predictive value of cholestatic potential; almost all BSEP inhibitors were also MRP4 inhibitors. Inclusion of pharmacokinetic predictor variables (e.g., maximal unbound concentration in plasma) in addition to percent MRP4 inhibition in logistic regression models did not improve cholestasis prediction. Association of cholestasis with percent MRP3 inhibition was not statistically significant, regardless of BSEP-inhibition status. Inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI. PMID:24154606

  14. Identification of the Bile Acid Transporter Slco1a6 as a Candidate Gene That Broadly Affects Gene Expression in Mouse Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianan; Keller, Mark P.; Oler, Angie T.; Rabaglia, Mary E.; Schueler, Kathryn L.; Stapleton, Donald S.; Broman, Aimee Teo; Zhao, Wen; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S.; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Broman, Karl W.; Attie, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed gene expression in six tissues in an F2 intercross between mouse strains C57BL/6J (abbreviated B6) and BTBR T+ tf/J (abbreviated BTBR) made genetically obese with the Leptinob mutation. We identified a number of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) affecting the expression of numerous genes distal to the locus, called trans-eQTL hotspots. Some of these trans-eQTL hotspots showed effects in multiple tissues, whereas some were specific to a single tissue. An unusually large number of transcripts (∼8% of genes) mapped in trans to a hotspot on chromosome 6, specifically in pancreatic islets. By considering the first two principal components of the expression of genes mapping to this region, we were able to convert the multivariate phenotype into a simple Mendelian trait. Fine mapping the locus by traditional methods reduced the QTL interval to a 298-kb region containing only three genes, including Slco1a6, one member of a large family of organic anion transporters. Direct genomic sequencing of all Slco1a6 exons identified a nonsynonymous coding SNP that converts a highly conserved proline residue at amino acid position 564 to serine. Molecular modeling suggests that Pro564 faces an aqueous pore within this 12-transmembrane domain-spanning protein. When transiently overexpressed in HEK293 cells, BTBR organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1A6-mediated cellular uptake of the bile acid taurocholic acid (TCA) was enhanced compared to B6 OATP1A6. Our results suggest that genetic variation in Slco1a6 leads to altered transport of TCA (and potentially other bile acids) by pancreatic islets, resulting in broad gene regulation. PMID:26385979

  15. Identification of the Bile Acid Transporter Slco1a6 as a Candidate Gene That Broadly Affects Gene Expression in Mouse Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianan; Keller, Mark P; Oler, Angie T; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathryn L; Stapleton, Donald S; Broman, Aimee Teo; Zhao, Wen; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Broman, Karl W; Attie, Alan D

    2015-11-01

    We surveyed gene expression in six tissues in an F2 intercross between mouse strains C57BL/6J (abbreviated B6) and BTBR T(+) tf/J (abbreviated BTBR) made genetically obese with the Leptin(ob) mutation. We identified a number of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) affecting the expression of numerous genes distal to the locus, called trans-eQTL hotspots. Some of these trans-eQTL hotspots showed effects in multiple tissues, whereas some were specific to a single tissue. An unusually large number of transcripts (∼8% of genes) mapped in trans to a hotspot on chromosome 6, specifically in pancreatic islets. By considering the first two principal components of the expression of genes mapping to this region, we were able to convert the multivariate phenotype into a simple Mendelian trait. Fine mapping the locus by traditional methods reduced the QTL interval to a 298-kb region containing only three genes, including Slco1a6, one member of a large family of organic anion transporters. Direct genomic sequencing of all Slco1a6 exons identified a nonsynonymous coding SNP that converts a highly conserved proline residue at amino acid position 564 to serine. Molecular modeling suggests that Pro564 faces an aqueous pore within this 12-transmembrane domain-spanning protein. When transiently overexpressed in HEK293 cells, BTBR organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1A6-mediated cellular uptake of the bile acid taurocholic acid (TCA) was enhanced compared to B6 OATP1A6. Our results suggest that genetic variation in Slco1a6 leads to altered transport of TCA (and potentially other bile acids) by pancreatic islets, resulting in broad gene regulation.

  16. [Analysis on replacement of traditional Chinese medicine bear bile with bile acids based on drug properties].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bin; Ren, Ying-Long; Ma, Li; Gu, Hao; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the rationality of the clinical replacement of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) bear bile with bile acid constituents, and analyze the difference between these constituents and bear bile in drug properties. Summarizing the drug properties of bear bile by reference to medical literatures for drug properties of TCM bear bile and Science of Traditional Chinese Medicine (China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2007). Analyzing and summarizing the pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents according to relevant literatures for studies on pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents in CNKI database. Predicating the drug properties of these bile acid constituents by using the drug property predication model established by the study group according the pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents in the paper, and compare the prediction results with the drug properties of bear bile. Bile acid constituents in bear bile were mostly cold in property, bitter in taste, and the combination of their drug properties could reflect the combined drug properties of bear bile. All of these bile acid constituents in bear bile could show part of effects of bear bile. Attention shall be given to regulate the medication scheme in clinical application according to actual conditions.

  17. Hepatoprotective bile acid 'ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)' Property and difference as bile acids.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kaoru; Imada, Teruaki; Tsurufuji, Makoto

    2005-10-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a bile acid, which is present in human bile at a low concentration of only 3% of total bile acids. It is a 7beta-hydroxy epimer of the primary bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). UDCA is isolated from the Chinese drug 'Yutan' a powder preparation derived from the dried bile of adult bears. For centuries, Yutan has been used in the treatment of hepatobiliary disorders. In Japan, it has also been in widespread use as a folk medicine from the mid-Edo period. In Japan, not only basic studies such as isolation, crystallization, definition of the chemical structure and establishment of the synthesis of UDCA have been conducted but clinical studies have been conducted. First reports on the effects of UDCA in patients with liver diseases came from Japan as early as 1961. In the 1970s, the first prospective study of patients with gallbladder stones treated with UDCA demonstrating gallstone dissolution was reported. In late 1980s, a number of controlled trials on the use of UDCA in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) were reported. Since then, a variety of clinical studies have shown the beneficial effect of UDCA in liver disease worldwide. To date, UDCA is utilized for the treatment of PBC for which it is the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In recent years, with the advent of molecular tools, the mechanisms of action of bile acids and UDCA have been investigated, and various bioactivities and pharmacological effects have been revealed. Based on the results of these studies, the bioactive substances in bile acids that are involved in digestive absorption may play important roles in signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of UDCA is evidently involved. We reveal the physicochemical properties of UDCA as bile acid and overview the established pharmacological effects of UDCA from its metabolism. Furthermore, we overview the current investigations into the mechanism of action of UDCA in

  18. Effect of sodium taurolithocholate on bile flow and bile acid excretion

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Norman B.; Emerman, Sidney

    1968-01-01

    Sodium taurolithocholate and sodium taurocholenate were infused intravenously into rats and hamsters. Each bile acid salt was given alone or in combination with varying amounts of a primary bile salt, either sodium taurocholate or sodium taurochenodeoxycholate. Bile flow, total bile acid salt excretion, and the excretion of sodium taurolithocholate were quantitatively determined. In addition, mannitol excretion in bile was determined at various flow rates. Sodium taurolithocholate was found to be rapidly excreted in bile in concentrations greater than its aqueous solubility. When the endogenous excretion rate of bile salt or the infusion of primary bile salt was less than the molar amount of administered sodium taurolithocholate, cholestasis always occurred. Increasing molar amounts of primary bile salt prevented cholestasis and enhanced the excretion rate of sodium taurolithocholate. Infusion of sodium taurocholenate, a nonhemolytic bile salt, caused an effect on bile flow and bile acid salt excretion qualitatively similar to sodium taurolithocholate. The induction of cholestasis can be attributed to the physical properties of these poorly water soluble bile salts. The reduction in bile flow could not be shown to be related to water reabsorption from the biliary tree since there was no increase in mannitol concentration in bile during cholestasis. Reduction in bile flow may be related to obstruction of segments of the biliary tree by precipitates of sodium taurolithocholate and possibly to a decrease in water entry into the biliary tree during infusion of this bile acid salt. PMID:5645847

  19. Deficiency of Capicua disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjeong; Park, Sungjun; Choi, Nahyun; Lee, Jieon; Yoe, Jeehyun; Kim, Soeun; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Kang, Hyojin; Fryer, John D.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Yoontae

    2015-01-01

    Capicua (CIC) has been implicated in pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and cancer in mammals; however, the in vivo physiological functions of CIC remain largely unknown. Here we show that Cic hypomorphic (Cic-L-/-) mice have impaired bile acid (BA) homeostasis associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines. We discovered that several drug metabolism and BA transporter genes were down-regulated in Cic-L-/- liver, and that BA was increased in the liver and serum whereas bile was decreased within the gallbladder of Cic-L-/- mice. We also found that levels of proinflammatory cytokine genes were up-regulated in Cic-L-/- liver. Consistent with this finding, levels of hepatic transcriptional regulators, such as hepatic nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1α), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ), forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2), and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα), were markedly decreased in Cic-L-/- mice. Moreover, induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfα) expression and decrease in the levels of FOXA2, C/EBPβ, and RXRα were found in Cic-L-/- liver before BA was accumulated, suggesting that inflammation might be the cause for the cholestasis in Cic-L-/- mice. Our findings indicate that CIC is a critical regulator of BA homeostasis, and that its dysfunction might be associated with chronic liver disease and metabolic disorders. PMID:25653040

  20. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Curt; Ellis, Ewa; Abrahamsson, Anna; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Björkhem, Ingemar; Axelson, Magnus

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William’s E medium. The medium was collected and re newed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDC A was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamethasone and thyroid hormone alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addit ion of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium. PMID:11819640

  1. Macitentan does not interfere with hepatic bile salt transport.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Alexander; Äänismaa, Päivi; de Kanter, Ruben; Delahaye, Stephane; Treher, Marianne; Hess, Patrick; Sidharta, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension with the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been associated with transient increases in liver transaminases. Mechanistically, bosentan inhibits the bile salt export pump (BSEP) leading to an intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic bile salts, which eventually results in hepatocellular damage. BSEP inhibition by bosentan is amplified by its accumulation in the liver as bosentan is a substrate of organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) transport proteins. The novel endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan shows a superior liver safety profile. Introduction of the less acidic sulfamide moiety and increased lipophilicity yield a hepatic disposition profile different from other endothelin receptor antagonists. Passive diffusion rather than OATP-mediated uptake is the driving force for macitentan uptake into the liver. Interaction with the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and BSEP transport proteins involved in hepatic bile salt homeostasis is therefore limited due to the low intrahepatic drug concentrations. Evidence for this conclusion is provided by in vitro experiments in drug transporter-expressing cell lines, acute and long-term studies in rats and dogs, absence of plasma bile salt changes in healthy human volunteers after multiple dosing, and finally the liver safety profile of macitentan in the completed phase III morbidity/mortality SERAPHIN (Study with an Endothelin Receptor Antagonist in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Clinical Outcome) trial. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Suppressed hepatic bile acid signalling despite elevated production of primary and secondary bile acids in NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Na; Baker, Susan S; Chapa-Rodriguez, Adrian; Liu, Wensheng; Nugent, Colleen A; Tsompana, Maria; Mastrandrea, Lucy; Buck, Michael J; Baker, Robert D; Genco, Robert J; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhu, Lixin

    2017-08-03

    Bile acids are regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism, and modulate inflammation in the liver and other tissues. Primary bile acids such as cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) are produced in the liver, and converted into secondary bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid by gut microbiota. Here we investigated the possible roles of bile acids in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis and the impact of the gut microbiome on bile acid signalling in NAFLD. Serum bile acid levels and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), liver gene expression profiles and gut microbiome compositions were determined in patients with NAFLD, high-fat diet-fed rats and their controls. Serum concentrations of primary and secondary bile acids were increased in patients with NAFLD. In per cent, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) antagonistic DCA was increased, while the agonistic CDCA was decreased in NAFLD. Increased mRNA expression for cytochrome P450 7A1, Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and paraoxonase 1, no change in mRNA expression for small heterodimer partner and bile salt export pump, and reduced serum FGF19 were evidence of impaired FXR and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4)-mediated signalling in NAFLD. Taurine and glycine metabolising bacteria were increased in the gut of patients with NAFLD, reflecting increased secondary bile acid production. Similar changes in liver gene expression and the gut microbiome were observed in high-fat diet-fed rats. The serum bile acid profile, the hepatic gene expression pattern and the gut microbiome composition consistently support an elevated bile acid production in NAFLD. The increased proportion of FXR antagonistic bile acid explains, at least in part, the suppression of hepatic FXR-mediated and FGFR4-mediated signalling. Our study suggests that future NAFLD intervention may target the components of FXR signalling, including the bile acid converting gut microbiome. © Article

  3. Bile Acid-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elisabeth; Pozdeev, Vitaly I; Gatidis, Sergios; Qadri, Syed M; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Lang, Florian; Lang, Karl S; Lang, Philipp A

    2016-01-01

    In nucleated cells, bile acids may activate cation channels subsequently leading to entry of Ca2+. In erythrocytes, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity triggers eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Eryptosis is triggered by bile duct ligation, an effect partially attributed to conjugated bilirubin. The present study explored, whether bile acids may stimulate eryptosis. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes have been identified utilizing annexin V binding, cell volume estimated from forward scatter, cytosolic Ca2+ activity determined using Fluo-3 fluorescence, and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface utilizing specific antibodies. The exposure of human erythrocytes to glycochenodesoxycholic (GCDC) and taurochenodesoxycholic (TCDC) acid was followed by a significant decrease of forward scatter and significant increase of Fluo-3 fluorescence, ceramide abundance as well as annexin V binding. The effect on annexin V binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Bile acids stimulate suicidal cell death, an effect paralleled by and in part due to Ca2+ entry and ceramide. The bile acid induced eryptosis may in turn lead to accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes and, thus, may contribute to anemia in cholestatic patients. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Cholesterol Feeding Prevents Hepatic Accumulation of Bile Acids in Cholic Acid-Fed Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-Null Mice: FXR-Independent Suppression of Intestinal Bile Acid Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Masaaki; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Nomoto, Masahiro; Takamatsu, Yuki; Sato, Nozomi; Hamatsu, Mayumi; Dawson, Paul A.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Cholic acid (CA) feeding of farnesoid X receptor (Fxr)-null mice results in markedly elevated hepatic bile acid levels and liver injury. In contrast, Fxr-null mice fed cholesterol plus CA (CA+Chol) do not exhibit liver injury, and hepatic bile acid levels and bile acid pool size are reduced 51 and 40%, respectively, compared with CA-treated Fxr-null mice. These decreases were not observed in wild-type mice. Despite a reduced bile acid pool size, hepatic Cyp7a1 mRNA expression was increased in Fxr-null mice fed the CA+Chol diet, and biliary bile acid output was not changed. Analysis of other potential protective mechanisms revealed significant decreases in portal blood bile acid concentrations and a reduced ileal bile acid absorption capacity, as estimated using an in situ loop method. Fecal bile acid excretion was also increased in Fxr-null mice fed the CA+Chol versus CA diet. The decreased ileal bile acid absorption correlated with decreased ileal apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT) protein expression in brush-border membranes. These results suggest a critical role for ileal bile acid absorption in regulation of hepatic bile acid levels in Fxr-null mice fed CA+Chol. Furthermore, experiments with Fxr-null mice suggest that cholesterol feeding can down-regulate ASBT expression through a pathway independent of FXR. PMID:18988759

  5. The crucial role of bile acids in the entry of porcine enteric calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2014-05-01

    Replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC) in LLC-PK cells is dependent on the presence of bile acids in the medium. However, the mechanism of bile acid-dependent PEC replication is unknown. Understanding of bile acid-mediated PEC replication may provide insight into cultivating related human noroviruses, currently uncultivable, which are the major cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans. Our results demonstrated that while uptake of PEC into the endosomes does not require bile acids, the presence of bile acids is critical for viral escape from the endosomes into cell cytoplasm to initiate viral replication. We also demonstrated that bile acid transporters including the sodium-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter are important in exerting the effects of bile acids in PEC replication in cells. In summary, our results suggest that bile acids play a critical role in virus entry for successful replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Developmental pattern of 3-oxo-Δ4 bile acids in neonatal bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, T.; Kimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Tohma, M.; Kato, H.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate whether a fetal pathway of bile acid synthesis persists in neonates and infants.
METHODS—3-oxo-Δ4 bile acids were determined qualitatively and quantitatively in the urine, meconium, and faeces of healthy neonates and infants, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.
RESULTS—The mean percentage of 3-oxo-Δ4 bile acids in total bile acids in urine at birth was significantly higher than that at 3 or 7 days, and at 1 or 3 months of age. The concentration of this component in meconium was significantly higher than that in faeces at 7 days and at 1 or 3 months of age.
CONCLUSIONS—The presence of large amounts of urinary 3-oxo-Δ4 bile acids may indicate immaturity in the activity of hepatic 3-oxo-Δ4-steroid 5β-reductase in the first week of postnatal life. Large amounts of this component in meconium may be due to the ingestion of amniotic fluid by the fetus during pregnancy.

 Keywords: ketonic bile acid; 3-oxo-Δ4 bile acid; 3-oxo-Δ4-steroid 5β-reductase; meconium; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry PMID:9279184

  7. Bile acids induce necrosis in pancreatic stellate cells dependent on calcium entry and sodium‐driven bile uptake

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowska, Monika A.; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.; Petersen, Ole H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Acute biliary pancreatitis is a sudden and severe condition initiated by bile reflux into the pancreas.Bile acids are known to induce Ca2+ signals and necrosis in isolated pancreatic acinar cells but the effects of bile acids on stellate cells are unexplored.Here we show that cholate and taurocholate elicit more dramatic Ca2+ signals and necrosis in stellate cells compared to the adjacent acinar cells in pancreatic lobules; whereas taurolithocholic acid 3‐sulfate primarily affects acinar cells.Ca2+ signals and necrosis are strongly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ as well as Na+; and Na+‐dependent transport plays an important role in the overall bile acid uptake in pancreatic stellate cells.Bile acid‐mediated pancreatic damage can be further escalated by bradykinin‐induced signals in stellate cells and thus killing of stellate cells by bile acids might have important implications in acute biliary pancreatitis. Abstract Acute biliary pancreatitis, caused by bile reflux into the pancreas, is a serious condition characterised by premature activation of digestive enzymes within acinar cells, followed by necrosis and inflammation. Bile acids are known to induce pathological Ca2+ signals and necrosis in acinar cells. However, bile acid‐elicited signalling events in stellate cells remain unexplored. This is the first study to demonstrate the pathophysiological effects of bile acids on stellate cells in two experimental models: ex vivo (mouse pancreatic lobules) and in vitro (human cells). Sodium cholate and taurocholate induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in stellate cells, larger than those elicited simultaneously in the neighbouring acinar cells. In contrast, taurolithocholic acid 3‐sulfate (TLC‐S), known to induce Ca2+ oscillations in acinar cells, had only minor effects on stellate cells in lobules. The dependence of the Ca2+ signals on extracellular Na+ and the presence of sodium–taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) indicate a Na

  8. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  9. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease. PMID:26431088

  10. Liver fatty-acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene ablation alters liver bile acid metabolism in male mice

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Although the physiological roles of the individual bile acid synthetic enzymes have been extensively examined, relatively little is known regarding the function of intracellular bile acid-binding proteins. Male L-FABP (liver fatty-acid-binding protein) gene-ablated mice were used to determine a role for L-FABP, the major liver bile acid-binding protein, in bile acid and biliary cholesterol metabolism. First, in control-fed mice L-FABP gene ablation alone increased the total bile acid pool size by 1.5-fold, especially in gall-bladder and liver, but without altering the proportions of bile acid, cholesterol and phospholipid. Loss of liver L-FABP was more than compensated by up-regulation of: other liver cytosolic bile acid-binding proteins [GST (glutathione S-transferase), 3α-HSD (3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase)], key hepatic bile acid synthetic enzymes [CYP7A1 (cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase) and CYP27A1 (sterol 27α-hydroxylase)], membrane bile acid translocases [canalicular BSEP (bile salt export pump), canalicular MRP2 (multidrug resistance associated protein 2), and basolateral/serosal OATP-1 (organic anion transporting polypeptide 1)], and positive alterations in nuclear receptors [more LXRα (liver X receptor α) and less SHP (short heterodimer partner)]. Secondly, L-FABP gene ablation reversed the cholesterol-responsiveness of bile acid metabolic parameters such that total bile acid pool size, especially in gall-bladder and liver, was reduced 4-fold, while the mass of biliary cholesterol increased 1.9-fold. The dramatically reduced bile acid levels in cholesterol-fed male L-FABP (−/−) mice were associated with reduced expression of: (i) liver cytosolic bile acid-binding proteins (L-FABP, GST and 3α-HSD), (ii) hepatic bile acid synthetic enzymes [CYP7A1, CYP27A1 and SCP-x (sterol carrier protein-x/3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase)] concomitant with decreased positive nuclear receptor alterations (i.e. less LXRα and more SHP), and (iii) membrane bile acid

  11. Effect of coprophagy on bile acid metabolism in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Yahiro, K; Setoguchi, T; Katsuki, T

    1979-12-01

    The effect of coprophagy on the 7 alpha-dehydroxylation of biliary bile acids was studied in the rabbit. Bile acid composition of bile and intestinal contents was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography. Biliary bile acid composition of normal rabbits (n = 5) was: deoxycholic acid, 95.3 +/- 1.0SE % and cholic acid, 2.3 +/- 1.1SE %. When coprophagy was prevented, significant alterations were observed in biliary bile acid composition, including a considerable decrease in deoxycholic acid (82.5 +/- 2.8SE %, p less than 0.01) and a marked increase in cholic acid (15.2 +/- 3.0SE %, p less than 0.002). These results indicate that coprophagy is a factor causing an increase of the 7 alpha-dehydroxylated bile acid, deoxycholic acid (and lithocholic acid when the animals were fed chenodeoxycholic acid) in rabbit bile.

  12. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-05

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter.

  13. Diglucuronide: a novel bile acid metabolite

    SciTech Connect

    Radominska-Pyrek, A.; Shattuck, K.E.; Zimniak, P.; Lester, R.; Pyrek, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    Bile acids can be glucuronidated on steroidal hydroxyl groups. Recent results from the laboratory also documented the formation of carboxyl-linked glucuronides as the major type of conjugation for short-chain bile acids. Now they report the identification of a short-chain bile acid glucuronidated on both the carboxyl and hydroxyl group. (3-/sup 3/H)Norlithocholate was administered to rats prepared with a biliary fistula and its metabolites were identified. 75% of the metabolites found in bile were glucuronides, the ratio of hydroxyl-linked to carboxyl-linked being 2:1. The assignment of a compound to one of these two classes of conjugate can be made based on their NMR spectra, which differ characteristically in the chemical shifts of several hydrogens. One metabolite, homogeneous by chromatographic and spectral criteria and accounting for 11% of the biliary radioactivity, exhibited NMR signals of both types of glucuronide in a ratio of 1:1. This, and TLC comparison with a chemically synthesized standard, allowed the assignment of the diglucuronide structure to this compound. Further confirmation was obtained from in vitro experiments. Norlithocholate glucuronide, when incubated with UDP-(/sup 14/C)-glucuronic acid and rat liver microsomes, is converted to a radioactive product, presumably the diglucuronide. Under identical conditions, lithocholate glucuronide does not give rise to a radiolabeled product.

  14. [Measurement of the transport activities of bile salt export pump using chemiluminescence detection method].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kana; Murai, Tsuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Hui, Shu-Ping; Kurosawa, Takao

    2010-05-01

    Monovalent bile acids, such as taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile acids, are excreted into bile by bile salt export pumps (BSEP, ABCB11). Human BSEP (hBSEP) is physiologically important because it was identified as the gene responsible for the genetic disease: progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC-2). The evaluation of the inhibitory effect of hBSEP transport activity provides significant information for predicting toxic potential in the early phase of drug development. The role and function of hBSEP have been investigated by the examination of the ATP-dependent transport of radioactive isotopically (RI)-labeled bile acid such as a tritium labeled taurocholic acid, in membrane vesicles obtained from hBSEP-expressing cells. The chemiluminescence detection method using 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD) had been developed for a simple analysis of bile acids in human biological fluids. This method is extremely sensitive and it may be applicable for the measurements of bile acid transport activities by hBSEP vesicles without using RI-labeled bile acid. The present paper deals with an application of the chemiluminescence detection method using 3alpha-HSD with enzyme cycling method to the measurement of ATP-dependent transport activities of taurocholic acid (T-CA) in membrane vesicles obtained from hBSEP-expressing Sf9 cells. Calibration curves for T-CA was linear over the range from 10 to 400 pmol/ml. The values of the kinetic parameters for hBSEP vesicles obtained by the chemiluminescence detection method were comparable with the values of that obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. This assay method was highly useful for the measurements of bile acid transport activities.

  15. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms.

  16. The gut microbiome, probiotics, bile acids axis, and human health.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mitchell Lawrence; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Prakash, Satya

    2014-06-01

    The human gut microbiome produces potent ligands to bile acid receptors, and probiotics could act as therapeutics of bile acid dysmetabolism. A recent study in Cell Reports demonstrates that probiotic VSL#3 affects bile acid deconjugation and excretion, as well as the gut-liver FXR-FGF15 axis.

  17. Peripheral serotonin enhances lipid metabolism by accelerating bile acid turnover.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Akasaka, Daisuke; Ogasawara, Hideki; Sato, Kan; Miyake, Masato; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yu; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Hondo, Tetsuya; Chao, Guozheng; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2010-10-01

    Serotonin is synthesized by two distinct tryptophan hydroxylases, one in the brain and one in the periphery. The latter is known to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. These two serotonin systems have apparently independent functions, although the functions of peripheral serotonin have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the physiological effect of peripheral serotonin on the concentrations of metabolites in the circulation and in the liver. After fasting, mice were ip injected with 1 mg serotonin. The plasma glucose concentration was significantly elevated between 60 and 270 min after the injection. In contrast, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were decreased. The hepatic glycogen synthesis and concentrations were significantly higher at 240 min. At the same time, the hepatic triglyceride content was significantly lower than the basal levels noted before the serotonin injection, whereas the hepatic cholesterol content was significantly higher by 60 min after the injection. Furthermore, serotonin stimulated the contraction of the gallbladder and the excretion of bile. After the serotonin injection, there was a significant induction of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression, resulting in a decrease in the concentration of bile acids in the feces. Additionally, data are presented to show that the functions of serotonin are mediated through diverse serotonin receptor subtypes. These data indicate that peripheral serotonin accelerates the metabolism of lipid by increasing the concentration of bile acids in circulation.

  18. [Correlations of bile acids in the bile of rats in conditions of alloxan induced diabetes melitus].

    PubMed

    Danchenko, N M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Tsudzevych, B O

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of bile acids in the bile of rats with alloxan diabetes was investigated using the method of thin-layer chromatography. Changes of coefficients of conjugation and hydroxylation of bile acids were calculated and analyzed in half-hour samples of bile obtained during the 3-hour experiment. It has been found that the processes of conjugation of cholic acid with glycine and taurine are inhibited in alloxan diabetes. At the same time a significant increase of free threehydroxycholic and dixydroxycholic bile acids and conjugates of the latter ones with taurine has been registered. Coefficients of hydroxylation in alloxan diabetes show the domination of "acidic" pathway in bile acid biosynthesis that is tightly connected with the activity of mitochondrial enzymes.

  19. Herbert Falk: a vital force in the renaissance of bile acid research and bile acid therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Herbert Falk died on August 8, 2008, after a long illness. It was his vision that initiated the Bile Acid Meetings and brought to market chenodeoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid for the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones as well as the successful treatment of cholestatic liver disease. The 1st Bile Acid Meeting was a small workshop held at the University Hospital of Freiburg in 1970. Great interest in the topic was evident at that small meeting and led to a larger meeting in 1972, whose scope included both the basic and clinical aspects of bile acids. These meetings have continued at biennial intervals, the 2010 meeting being the 21st. The program has always included discussions of the most fundamental aspects of bile acid biosynthesis and metabolism as well as clinical applications of bile acid therapy. The meetings featured brief presentations, ample time for discussion, and imaginative social programs. They have always been flawlessly organized. Social programs usually included a hike through the beautiful countryside of the Black Forest followed by dinner in a rustic restaurant. Herbert Falk took part in these programs, personally welcoming every participant. In the warm glow of the 'Badische' hospitality, friendships developed, and scientific collaborations were often arranged. From a scientific standpoint, there has been enormous progress in understanding the chemistry and biology of bile acids. Herbert Falk established the Windaus Prize in 1978, and the prize has been given to individuals whose contributions moved the field forward. These bile acid meetings have been marvelous, rewarding experiences. We must all be grateful to Herbert Falk's vision in establishing the Falk Foundation that has so generously sponsored these meetings. We also express our gratitude to his widow, Ursula Falk, who continues this worthy tradition.

  20. Characterization of bile acids and fatty acids from ox bile in oil paintings by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casas-Catalán, M J; Doménech-Carbó, M T; Mateo-Castro, R; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Bosch-Reig, F

    2004-02-06

    Characterization of ox bile, traditionally used in painting, is of interest in the fields of archaeometry and conservation and restoration of works of art. Bile acids, fatty acids (F), and cholesterol found in ox bile have been identified using a derivatization method that combines the formation of ethyl esters from the carboxylic groups and the trimethylsilyl ethers from hydroxyl groups. This method of analysis is consistent with these others proposed by the authors to analyze drying oils, proteins, and diterpenic resins usually used as binders and varnishes by the painters. Bile acids from binary samples such as animal glue/ox bile, casein/ox bile and Arabic gum/ox bile have been successfully analyzed using the proposed method. Finally, a method of analysis of mixtures of drying oil and ox bile has been also proposed attempting to quantitatively characterize samples in which ox bile was added to the drying oil for increasing the surfactant properties.

  1. A Single Element in the 3′ UTR of the Apical Sodium-Dependent Bile Acid Transporter Controls both Stabilization and Destabilization of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Dellys M.; Ghosh, Ayantika; Chen, Frank; Shneider, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    mRNA stability appears to play a key role in the ontogenic regulation of the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). The RNA binding proteins, Hu antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP), stabilize and destabilize ASBT mRNA, respectively. Potential HuR binding sites were assessed by sequence analysis in the context of prior in vitro functional analyses of the rat ASBT 3′UTR. Wild type and mutant binding sites were investigated by gel shift analysis using IEC-6 cell extracts. The functional consequences of binding site mutations were assessed using two different hybrid reporter constructs linking the 3′UTR element to a either a luciferase or a β-globin coding mRNA sequence. A specific metastasis associated gene 1 cis-element (MTA1) was identified in the ASBT 3′UTR that became associated with proteins in IEC-6 cell extracts and could be supershifted by HuR or TTP antibodies. Mutation of this cis-element abrogated the gel shift of IEC-6 proteins. Furthermore hybrid constructs containing a mutant MTA1 element had reduced responses to modulation of HuR or TTP. For the first time we have identified a single specific sequence element in the 3′UTR of the rat ASBT mRNA that mediates counter-regulatory changes in mRNA abundance in response to both HuR and TTP. PMID:24946903

  2. Beyond intestinal soap--bile acids in metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Bloks, Vincent W; Groen, Albert K

    2014-08-01

    Over the past decade, it has become apparent that bile acids are involved in a host of activities beyond their classic functions in bile formation and fat absorption. The identification of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as a nuclear receptor directly activated by bile acids and the discovery that bile acids are also ligands for the membrane-bound, G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (also known as TGR5) have opened new avenues of research. Both FXR and TGR5 regulate various elements of glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Consequently, a picture has emerged of bile acids acting as modulators of (postprandial) metabolism. Therefore, strategies that interfere with either bile acid metabolism or signalling cascades mediated by bile acids may represent novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Synthetic modulators of FXR have been designed and tested, primarily in animal models. Furthermore, the use of bile acid sequestrants to reduce plasma cholesterol levels has unexpected benefits. For example, treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with sequestrants causes substantial reductions in plasma levels of glucose and HbA1c. This Review aims to provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms by which bile acids modulate glucose and energy metabolism, particularly focusing on the glucose-lowering actions of bile acid sequestrants in insulin resistant states and T2DM.

  3. Mitochondrial genome depletion dysregulates bile acid- and paracetamol-induced expression of the transporters Mdr1, Mrp1 and Mrp4 in liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Perez, MJ; Gonzalez-Sanchez, E; Gonzalez-Loyola, A; Gonzalez-Buitrago, JM; Marin, JJG

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Mitochondria are involved in the toxicity of several compounds, retro-control of gene expression and apoptosis activation. The effect of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) depletion on changes in ABC transporter protein expression in response to bile acids and paracetamol was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Hepa 1-6 mouse hepatoma cells with 70% decrease in 16S/18S rRNA ratio (Rho cells) were obtained by long-term treatment with ethidium bromide. KEY RESULTS Spontaneous apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were decreased in Rho cells. Following glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) or paracetamol, Rho cells generated less ROS and were more resistant to cell death. Apoptosis induced by GCDCA and Fas was also reduced. The basal expression of Mdr1 was significantly enhanced, but this was not further stimulated by GCDCA or paracetamol, as observed in wild-type (WT) cells. Basal expression of Mrp1 and Mrp4 was similar in WT and Rho cells, whereas they were up-regulated only in WT cells after GCDCA or paracetamol, along with the transcription factors Shp and Nrf2, but not Fxr or Pxr. Increased expression of Nrf2 was accompanied by its enhanced nuclear translocation. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid failed to cause any of the effects observed for GCDCA or paracetamol. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The Nrf2-mediated pathway is partly independent of ROS production. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 is insufficient to up-regulate Mdr1, Mrp1 and Mrp4, which requires the participation of other regulatory element(s) whose activation in response to GCDCA and paracetamol is impaired in Rho cells and hence probably sensitive to ROS. PMID:21175587

  4. Obesity diabetes and the role of bile acids in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bile acids have many activities over and above their primary function in aiding absorption of fat and fat soluble vitamins. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol, and thus are involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Bile acids stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) production in the distal small bowel and colon, stimulating insulin secretion, and therefore, are involved in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Bile acids through their insulin sensitising effect play a part in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Bile acid metabolism is altered in obesity and diabetes. Both dietary restriction and weight loss due to bariatric surgery, alter the lipid carbohydrate and bile acid metabolism. Recent research suggests that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO is a central regulator of bile, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism, but conflicting studies mean that our understanding of the complexity is not yet complete. PMID:28191525

  5. Obeticholic acid, a selective farnesoid X receptor agonist, regulates bile acid homeostasis in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jackson, Jonathan P; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2017-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a master regulator of bile acid homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in bile acid synthesis and cellular membrane transport. Impairment of bile acid efflux due to cholangiopathies results in chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal elevation of intrahepatic and systemic bile acid levels. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a potent and selective FXR agonist that is 100-fold more potent than the endogenous ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The effects of OCA on genes involved in bile acid homeostasis were investigated using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. Gene expression was determined by measuring mRNA levels. OCA dose-dependently increased fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) which, in turn, suppress mRNA levels of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo synthesis of bile acids. Consistent with CYP7A1 suppression, total bile acid content was decreased by OCA (1 μmol/L) to 42.7 ± 20.5% relative to control. In addition to suppressing de novo bile acids synthesis, OCA significantly increased the mRNA levels of transporters involved in bile acid homeostasis. The bile salt excretory pump (BSEP), a canalicular efflux transporter, increased by 6.4 ± 0.8-fold, and the basolateral efflux heterodimer transporters, organic solute transporter α (OSTα ) and OSTβ increased by 6.4 ± 0.2-fold and 42.9 ± 7.9-fold, respectively. The upregulation of BSEP and OSTα and OSTβ, by OCA reduced the intracellular concentrations of d8 -TCA, a model bile acid, to 39.6 ± 8.9% relative to control. These data demonstrate that OCA does suppress bile acid synthesis and reduce hepatocellular bile acid levels, supporting the use of OCA to treat bile acid-induced toxicity observed in cholestatic diseases. © 2017 Intercept Pharmaceuticals. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and

  6. Key discoveries in bile acid chemistry and biology and their clinical applications: history of the last eight decades

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alan F.; Hagey, Lee R.

    2014-01-01

    During the last 80 years there have been extraordinary advances in our knowledge of the chemistry and biology of bile acids. We present here a brief history of the major achievements as we perceive them. Bernal, a physicist, determined the X-ray structure of cholesterol crystals, and his data together with the vast chemical studies of Wieland and Windaus enabled the correct structure of the steroid nucleus to be deduced. Today, C24 and C27 bile acids together with C27 bile alcohols constitute most of the bile acid “family”. Patterns of bile acid hydroxylation and conjugation are summarized. Bile acid measurement encompasses the techniques of GC, HPLC, and MS, as well as enzymatic, bioluminescent, and competitive binding methods. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids results from vectorial transport of bile acids by the ileal enterocyte and hepatocyte; the key transporters have been cloned. Bile acids are amphipathic, self-associate in solution, and form mixed micelles with polar lipids, phosphatidylcholine in bile, and fatty acids in intestinal content during triglyceride digestion. The rise and decline of dissolution of cholesterol gallstones by the ingestion of 3,7-dihydroxy bile acids is chronicled. Scientists from throughout the world have contributed to these achievements. PMID:24838141

  7. Transcription of the Human Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase Gene (EPHX1) Is Regulated by PARP-1 and Histone H1.2. Association with Sodium-Dependent Bile Acid Transport.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Zhu, Qin-shi; Zhong, Shuping; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a bifunctional protein that plays a central role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics as well as mediating the sodium-dependent transport of bile acids into hepatocytes. These compounds are involved in cholesterol homeostasis, lipid digestion, excretion of xenobiotics and the regulation of several nuclear receptors and signaling transduction pathways. Previous studies have demonstrated the critical role of GATA-4, a C/EBPα-NF/Y complex and an HNF-4α/CAR/RXR/PSF complex in the transcriptional regulation of the mEH gene (EPHX1). Studies also identified heterozygous mutations in human EPHX1 that resulted in a 95% decrease in mEH expression levels which was associated with a decrease in bile acid transport and severe hypercholanemia. In the present investigation we demonstrate that EPHX1 transcription is significantly inhibited by two heterozygous mutations observed in the Old Order Amish population that present numerous hypercholanemic subjects in the absence of liver damage suggesting a defect in bile acid transport into the hepatocyte. The identity of the regulatory proteins binding to these sites, established using biotinylated oligonucleotides in conjunction with mass spectrometry was shown to be poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) bound to the EPHX1 proximal promoter and a linker histone complex, H1.2/Aly, bound to a regulatory intron 1 site. These sites exhibited 71% homology and may represent potential nucleosome positioning domains. The high frequency of the H1.2 site polymorphism in the Amish population results in a potential genetic predisposition to hypercholanemia and in conjunction with our previous studies, further supports the critical role of mEH in mediating bile acid transport into hepatocytes.

  8. The ulcerogenic effect of bile and bile acid in rats during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisener, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of oxen bile and individual bile acids or their sodium salts on the gastric mucosa of rats was investigated in combination with immobilization stress. A statistically significant higher frequency of ulcers was only determined in the application of 10% oxen bile. Dosages on 10% sodium glycocholic acid demonstrated strong toxic damage with atonic dilation of the stomach and extensive mucosal bleeding.

  9. Bile Acid Signaling Is Involved in the Neurological Decline in a Murine Model of Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Ashfaq, Samir; de los Santos, Mario; Grant, Stephanie; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neurological complication of liver failure. Serum bile acids are elevated after liver damage and may disrupt the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain. Our aim was to assess the role of serum bile acids in the neurological complications after acute liver failure. C57Bl/6 or cytochrome p450 7A1 knockout (Cyp7A1−/−) mice were fed a control, cholestyramine-containing, or bile acid–containing diet before azoxymethane (AOM)-induced acute liver failure. In parallel, mice were given an intracerebroventricular infusion of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) Vivo-morpholino before AOM injection. Liver damage, neurological decline, and molecular analyses of bile acid signaling were performed. Total bile acid levels were increased in the cortex of AOM-treated mice. Reducing serum bile acids via cholestyramine feeding or using Cyp7A1−/− mice reduced bile acid levels and delayed AOM-induced neurological decline, whereas cholic acid or deoxycholic acid feeding worsened AOM-induced neurological decline. The expression of bile acid signaling machinery apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, FXR, and small heterodimer partner increased in the frontal cortex, and blocking FXR signaling delayed AOM-induced neurological decline. In conclusion, circulating bile acids may play a pathological role during hepatic encephalopathy, although precisely how they dysregulate normal brain function is unknown. Strategies to minimize serum bile acid concentrations may reduce the severity of neurological complications associated with liver failure. PMID:26683664

  10. Lithocholic Acid Feeding Induces Segmental Bile Duct Obstruction and Destructive Cholangitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Wagner, Martin; Zollner, Gernot; Krause, Robert; Zatloukal, Kurt; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We determined the mechanisms of hepatobiliary injury in the lithocholic acid (LCA)-fed mouse, an increasingly used model of cholestatic liver injury. Swiss albino mice received control diet or 1% (w/w) LCA diet (for 1, 2, and 4 days), followed by assessment of liver morphology and ultrastructure, tight junctions, markers of fibrosis and key proteins of hepatobiliary function, and bile flow and composition. As expected LCA feeding led to bile infarcts, which were followed by a destructive cholangitis with activation and proliferation of periductal myofibroblasts. At the ultrastructural level, small bile ducts were frequently obstructed by crystals. Biliary-excreted fluorescence-labeled ursodeoxycholic acid accumulated in bile infarcts, whereas most infarcts did not stain with India ink injected into the common bile duct; both findings are indicative of partial biliary obstruction. Expression of the main basolateral bile acid uptake proteins (sodium-taurocholate cotransporter and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1) was reduced, the canalicular transporters bile salt export pump and multidrug-related protein 2 were preserved, and the basolateral transporter multidrug-related protein 3 and the detoxifying enzyme sulfotransferase 2a1 were induced. Thus, we demonstrate that LCA feeding in mice leads to segmental bile duct obstruction, destructive cholangitis, periductal fibrosis, and an adaptive transporter and metabolic enzyme response. PMID:16436656

  11. Lithocholic acid feeding induces segmental bile duct obstruction and destructive cholangitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fickert, Peter; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Wagner, Martin; Zollner, Gernot; Krause, Robert; Zatloukal, Kurt; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2006-02-01

    We determined the mechanisms of hepatobiliary injury in the lithocholic acid (LCA)-fed mouse, an increasingly used model of cholestatic liver injury. Swiss albino mice received control diet or 1% (w/w) LCA diet (for 1, 2, and 4 days), followed by assessment of liver morphology and ultrastructure, tight junctions, markers of fibrosis and key proteins of hepatobiliary function, and bile flow and composition. As expected LCA feeding led to bile infarcts, which were followed by a destructive cholangitis with activation and proliferation of periductal myofibroblasts. At the ultrastructural level, small bile ducts were frequently obstructed by crystals. Biliary-excreted fluorescence-labeled ursodeoxycholic acid accumulated in bile infarcts, whereas most infarcts did not stain with India ink injected into the common bile duct; both findings are indicative of partial biliary obstruction. Expression of the main basolateral bile acid uptake proteins (sodium-taurocholate cotransporter and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1) was reduced, the canalicular transporters bile salt export pump and multidrug-related protein 2 were preserved, and the basolateral transporter multidrug-related protein 3 and the detoxifying enzyme sulfotransferase 2a1 were induced. Thus, we demonstrate that LCA feeding in mice leads to segmental bile duct obstruction, destructive cholangitis, periductal fibrosis, and an adaptive transporter and metabolic enzyme response.

  12. Organochloride pesticides modulated gut microbiota and influenced bile acid metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Shao, Wentao; Zhang, Chunlan; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Qihan; Liu, Hui; Sun, Haidong; Jiang, Zhaoyan; Gu, Aihua

    2017-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) can persistently accumulate in body and threaten human health. Bile acids and intestinal microbial metabolism have emerged as important signaling molecules in the host. However, knowledge on which intestinal microbiota and bile acids are modified by OCPs remains unclear. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p, p'-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) for 8 weeks. The relative abundance and composition of various bacterial species were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bile acid composition was analyzed by metabolomic analysis using UPLC-MS. The expression of genes involved in hepatic and enteric bile acids metabolism was measured by real-time PCR. Expression of genes in bile acids synthesis and transportation were measured in HepG2 cells incubated with p, p'-DDE and β-HCH. Our findings showed OCPs changed relative abundance and composition of intestinal microbiota, especially in enhanced Lactobacillus with bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity. OCPs affected bile acid composition, enhanced hydrophobicity, decreased expression of genes on bile acid reabsorption in the terminal ileum and compensatory increased expression of genes on synthesis of bile acids in the liver. We demonstrated that chronic exposure of OCPs could impair intestinal microbiota; as a result, hepatic and enteric bile acid profiles and metabolism were influenced. The findings in this study draw our attention to the hazards of chronic OCPs exposure in modulating bile acid metabolism that might cause metabolic disorders and their potential to cause related diseases in human. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Muricholic bile acids are potent regulators of bile acid synthesis via a positive feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Bonde, Y; Eggertsen, G; Rudling, M

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid (BA) synthesis is regulated by negative feedback end-product inhibition, initiated by farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) in liver and gut. Studies on cholic acid (CA)-free Cyp8b1(-/-) mice have concluded that CA is a potent suppressor of BA synthesis. Cyp8b1(-/-) mice have increased BA synthesis and an enlarged BA pool, a phenotype shared with bile-duct-ligated, antibiotics-administered and with germ-free mice. Studies on such mice have concluded BA synthesis is induced due to reduced hormonal signalling by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)15 from intestine to liver. A mutual finding in these models is that potent FXR-agonistic BAs are reduced. We hypothesized that the absence of the potent FXR agonist deoxycholic acid (DCA) may be important for the induction of BA synthesis in these situations. Two of these models were investigated, antibiotic treatment and Cyp8b1(-/-) mice and their combination. Secondary BA formation was inhibited by ampicillin (AMP) given to wild-type and Cyp8b1(-/-) mice. We then administered CA, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or DCA to AMP-treated Cyp8b1(-/-) mice. Our data show that the phenotype of AMP-treated wild-type mice resembles that of Cyp8b1(-/-) mice with fourfold induced Cyp7a1 expression, increased intestinal apical sodium-dependent BA transporter expression and increased hepatic BA levels. We also show that reductions in the FXR-agonistic BAs CDCA, CA, DCA or lithocholic acid cannot explain this phenotype; instead, it is likely due to increases in levels of α- and β-muricholic BAs and ursodeoxycholic acid, three FXR-antagonistic BAs. Our findings reveal a potent positive feedback mechanism for regulation of BA synthesis in mice that appears to be sufficient without endocrine effects of FGF15 on Cyp7a1. This mechanism will be fundamental in understanding BA metabolism in both mice and humans. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  14. Confocal imaging with a fluorescent bile acid analogue closely mimicking hepatic taurocholate disposition.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, Tom; Sempels, Wouter; Snoeys, Jan; Holmstock, Nico; Chatterjee, Sagnik; Stieger, Bruno; Augustijns, Patrick; Hofkens, Johan; Mizuno, Hideaki; Annaert, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to characterize the in vitro hepatic transport mechanisms in primary rat and human hepatocytes of the fluorescent bile acid derivative N-(24-[7-(4-N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole)]amino-3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-27-nor-5β-cholestan-26-oyl)-2'-aminoethanesulfonate (tauro-nor-THCA-24-DBD), previously synthesized to study the activity of the bile salt export pump (BSEP). The fluorescent bile acid derivative exhibited saturable uptake kinetics in suspended rat hepatocytes. Hepatic uptake was inhibited in the presence of substrates/inhibitors of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) family and Na(+) -taurocholate cotransporting peptide (Ntcp). Concentration-dependent uptake of the fluorescent bile acid was also saturable in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with rNtcp, hNTCP, OATP1B1, or OATP1B3. The fluorescent bile acid derivative was actively excreted in the bile canaliculi of sandwich-cultured rat and human hepatocytes (SCRH and SCHH), with a biliary excretion index (BEI) of 26% and 32%, respectively. In SCRH, cyclosporin A significantly decreased the BEI to 5%. Quantification by real-time confocal imaging further confirmed canalicular transport of the fluorescent bile acid derivative (BEI = 75%). We conclude that tauro-nor-THCA-24-DBD is a useful probe to study interference of drugs with NTCP/Ntcp- and BSEP/Bsep-mediated transport in fluorescence-based in vitro assays.

  15. Quantitative profiling of 19 bile acids in rat plasma, liver, bile and different intestinal section contents to investigate bile acid homeostasis and the application of temporal variation of endogenous bile acids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Shu, Ting; Liu, Guanlan; Mei, Huifang; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2017-09-01

    Bile acid homeostasis is maintained by liver synthesis, bile duct secretion, microbial metabolism and intestinal reabsorption into the blood. When drug insults result in liver damage, the variances of bile acids (BAs) are related to the physiological status of the liver. Here, we established a method to simultaneously quantify 19 BAs in rat plasma, liver, bile and different intestinal section contents (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon) using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to reveal the pattern of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in physiological situations. Dynamic changes in bile acid composition appeared throughout the enterohepatic circulation of the BAs; taurine- and glycine-conjugated BAs and free BAs had different dynamic homeostasis levels in the circulatory system. cholic acid (CA), beta-muricholic acid (beta-MCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), glycocholic acid (GCA) and taurocholic acid (TCA) greatly fluctuated in the bile acid pool under physiological conditions. Taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile acids constituted more than 90% in the bile and liver, whereas GCA and TCA accounted for more than half of the total bile acids and the secretion of bile mainly via conjugating with taurine. While over 80% of BAs in plasma were unconjugated bile acids, CA and HDCA were the most abundant elements. Unconjugated bile acids constituted more than 90% in the intestine, and CA, beta-MCA and HDCA were the top three bile acids in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum content, but LCA and HDCA were highest in the cecum and colon content. As the main secondary bile acid converted by microflora in the intestine, LCA was enriched in the cecum and DCA mostly in the colon. As endogenous substances, the concentrations of plasma BAs were closely related to time rhythm and diet. In conclusion, analyzing detailed BA profiles in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in a single run is possible

  16. Bile Acid diarrhea: prevalence, pathogenesis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-05-23

    Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is usually seen in patients with ileal Crohn's disease or ileal resection. However, 25% to 50% of patients with functional diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) also have evidence of BAD. It is estimated that 1% of the population may have BAD. The causes of BAD include a deficiency in fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a hormone produced in enterocytes that regulates hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. Other potential causes include genetic variations that affect the proteins involved in BA enterohepatic circulation and synthesis or in the TGR5 receptor that mediates the actions of BA in colonic secretion and motility. BAs enhance mucosal permeability, induce water and electrolyte secretion, and accelerate colonic transit partly by stimulating propulsive high-amplitude colonic contractions. There is an increased proportion of primary BAs in the stool of patients with IBS-D, and some changes in the fecal microbiome have been described. There are several methods of diagnosing BAD, such as (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test retention, serum C4, FGF-19, and fecal BA measurement; presently, therapeutic trials with BA sequestrants are most commonly used for diagnosis. Management involves the use of BA sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam. FXR agonists such as obeticholic acid constitute a promising new approach to treating BAD.

  17. Effect of acute bile acid pool depletion on total and ionized calcium concentrations in human bile.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, D; Murphy, G M; Dowling, R H

    1995-04-01

    Although calcium salts are important components of gallstones, there are few data on the total and ionized calcium content of human bile. Therefore, in 14 fasting T-tube patients studied 7-11 days after cholecystectomy, we measured bile flow, bile acid [BA], total [CaTOT] and free ionized [Ca++] calcium concentrations, in 20-30 min bile collections during acute BA pool depletion induced by 6-8 h of continuous bile drainage. During washout of the BA pool there were parallel falls in bile flow, BA output and total calcium output (correlation coefficients ranging from 0.59 to 0.99; P < 0.02-0.001). In 12 of the 14 patients, [CaTOT] also fell (from 1.84 +/- 0.29 to 1.32 +/- 0.34 mmol L-1) in parallel with [BA] (from 34.0 +/- 14.0 to 8.2 +/- 8.0 mmol L-1; r = 0.75-0.98; P < 0.005). In contrast, biliary [Ca++] remained virtually unchanged. These data suggest that the BAs are linked to the bound, rather than to the free, ionized, fraction of biliary calcium, which is consistent with in vivo calcium binding by BAs. A model is proposed in which BA-induced biliary calcium secretion results from (i) bile acid-induced water flow via solvent drag; and (ii) calcium binding in the bile canaliculus by bile acids, which induces paracellular diffusion of Ca++, thereby maintaining [Ca++] independent of [BA].

  18. A novel bile acid biosynthesis defect due to a deficiency of peroxisomal ABCD3.

    PubMed

    Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Koster, Janet; Denis, Simone; Van Roermund, Carlo W; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Moser, Ann B; Visser, Wouter F; Gulluoglu, Mine; Durmaz, Ozlem; Demirkol, Mubeccel; Waterham, Hans R; Gökcay, Gülden; Wanders, Ronald J A; Valle, David

    2015-01-15

    ABCD3 is one of three ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters present in the peroxisomal membrane catalyzing ATP-dependent transport of substrates for metabolic pathways localized in peroxisomes. So far, the precise function of ABCD3 is not known. Here, we report the identification of the first patient with a defect of ABCD3. The patient presented with hepatosplenomegaly and severe liver disease and showed a striking accumulation of peroxisomal C27-bile acid intermediates in plasma. Investigation of peroxisomal parameters in skin fibroblasts revealed a reduced number of enlarged import-competent peroxisomes. Peroxisomal beta-oxidation of C26:0 was normal, but beta-oxidation of pristanic acid was reduced. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous deletion at the DNA level of 1758bp, predicted to result in a truncated ABCD3 protein lacking the C-terminal 24 amino acids (p.Y635NfsX1). Liver disease progressed and the patient required liver transplantation at 4 years of age but expired shortly after transplantation. To corroborate our findings in the patient, we studied a previously generated Abcd3 knockout mouse model. Abcd3-/- mice accumulated the branched chain fatty acid phytanic acid after phytol loading. In addition, analysis of bile acids revealed a reduction of C24 bile acids, whereas C27-bile acid intermediates were significantly increased in liver, bile and intestine of Abcd3-/- mice. Thus, both in the patient and in Abcd3-/- mice, there was evidence of a bile acid biosynthesis defect. In conclusion, our studies show that ABCD3 is involved in transport of branched-chain fatty acids and C27 bile acids into the peroxisome and that this is a crucial step in bile acid biosynthesis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Association of canalicular membrane enzymes with bile acid micelles and lipid aggregates in human and rat bile.

    PubMed

    Accatino, L; Pizarro, M; Solís, N; Koenig, C S

    1995-01-18

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the characteristics of the polymolecular association between canalicular membrane enzymes, bile acids, cholesterol and phospholipids in bile and into the celular mechanisms whereby the enzymes are secreted into bile. With this purpose, we studied the distribution of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipids, proteins and representative canalicular membrane enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), which can be considered specific marker constituents, in bile fractions enriched in phospholipid-cholesterol lamellar structures (multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles) and bile acid-mixed micelles. These fractions were isolated by ultracentrifugation from human hepatic bile, normal rat bile and bile of rats treated with diosgenin, a steroid that induces a marked increase in biliary cholesterol secretion, and were characterized by density, lipid composition and transmission electron microscopy. These studies demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase are secreted into both human and rat bile where they are preferentially associated with bile acid-mixed micelles, suggesting a role for bile acids in both release of these enzymes and lipids from the canalicular membrane and solubilization in bile. In addition, heterogeneous association of these enzymes with nonmicellar, lamellar structures in human and rat bile is consistent with the hypothesis that processes independent of the detergent effects of bile acids might also result in the release of specific intrinsic membrane proteins into bile.

  20. Effects of bile acid administration on bile acid synthesis and its circadian rhythm in man

    SciTech Connect

    Pooler, P.A.; Duane, W.C.

    1988-09-01

    In man bile acid synthesis has a distinct circadian rhythm but the relationship of this rhythm to feedback inhibition by bile acid is unknown. We measured bile acid synthesis as release of 14CO2 from (26-14C)cholesterol every 2 hr in three normal volunteers during five separate 24-hr periods. Data were fitted by computer to a cosine curve to estimate amplitude and acrophase of the circadian rhythm. In an additional six volunteers, we measured synthesis every 2 hr from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. only. During the control period, amplitude (expressed as percentage of mean synthesis) averaged 52% and acrophase averaged 6:49 a.m. During administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 126% of baseline (p less than 0.1), amplitude averaged 43% and acrophase averaged 6:20 a.m. During administration of chenodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 43% of baseline (p less than 0.001), amplitude averaged 53% and acrophase averaged 9:04 a.m. Addition of prednisone to this regimen of chenodeoxycholic acid to eliminate release of 14CO2 from corticosteroid hormone synthesis resulted in a mean amplitude of 62% and a mean acrophase of 6:50 a.m., values very similar to those in the baseline period. Administration of prednisone alone also did not significantly alter the baseline amplitude (40%) or acrophase (6:28 a.m.). We conclude that neither chenodeoxycholic acid nor ursodeoxycholic acid significantly alters the circadian rhythm of bile acid synthesis in man.

  1. Bile acid malabsorption in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Libor

    2015-02-01

    Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a common but an underestimated and often neglected sign of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), especially those affecting the distal ileum. Clinically relevant BAM is most often present in patients with Crohn's ileitis and particularly in ileal-resected Crohn's disease patients. However, deterioration of bile acid (BA) metabolism occurs also in patients with IBD without ileal disease or in those in clinical remission, and the role of BAM in these patients is not well appreciated by clinicians. In a majority of cases, BAM in IBD is caused by impaired conjugated BA reabsorption, mediated by apical sodium/BA cotransporting polypeptide, localized at the luminal surface of the ileal enterocytes. As a consequence, numerous pathological sequelae may occur, including the malfunction of lipid digestion with clinical steatorrhea, impaired intestinal motility, and/or significant changes in the intestinal microflora environment. In this review, a detailed description of the pathophysiological mechanisms of BAM-related diarrhea is presented. Although BAM is present in a significant number of patients with Crohn's disease, its laboratory assessment is not routinely included in diagnostic workups, partially because of costs, logistical reasons, or the unavailability of the more sophisticated laboratory equipment needed. Simultaneously, novel findings related to the effects of the BA signaling pathways on immune functions (mediated through TGR5, cell membrane G protein-coupled BA receptor 1, nuclear farnesoid X receptor, nuclear pregnane X receptor, or nuclear vitamin D receptor) are discussed along with intestinal metabolism in its relationship to the pathogenesis of IBD.

  2. Effect of twice-daily oral administration of hydrocortisone on the bile acids composition of gallbladder bile in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kook, Peter H; Schellenberg, Stefan; Rentsch, Katharina M; Reusch, Claudia E; Glaus, Tony M

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effects of twice-daily oral administration of hydrocortisone on the bile acids composition of gallbladder bile in dogs. 6 placebo-treated control dogs and 6 hydrocortisone-treated dogs. Dogs received hydrocortisone (median dose, 8.5 mg/kg) or a gelatin capsule (control group) orally every 12 hours for 84 days. Gallbladder bile samples were obtained via percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis from each dog before (day 0 [baseline]), during (days 28, 56, and 84), and after (days 28p, 56p, and 84p) treatment for differentiated quantification of unconjugated bile acids and taurine-conjugated and glycine-conjugated bile acids via high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Treatment with hydrocortisone for 84 days resulted in significant and reversible increases in the concentrations of unconjugated bile acids (ie, cholic, chenodeoxycholic, and deoxycholic acids) and a significant and reversible decrease in the concentration of total taurine-conjugated bile acids, compared with baseline or control group values. Treatment with hydrocortisone had no effect on bile concentrations of glycine-conjugated bile acids. In dogs, hydrocortisone administration caused reversible shifts toward higher concentrations of the more hydrophobic unconjugated bile acids (chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid) and toward lower concentrations of the amphipathic taurine-conjugated bile acids in gallbladder bile. These data suggest that similar bile acids changes could cause major alterations in gallbladder structure or function over time in hypercortisolemic dogs.

  3. Acetic Acid Sclerotherapy for Treatment of a Bile Leak from an Isolated Bile Duct After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Gibok Eun, Choong Ki; Choi, HyunWook

    2011-02-15

    Bile leak after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not uncommon, and it mainly occurs from the cystic duct stump and can be easily treated by endoscopic techniques. However, treatment for leakage from an isolated bile duct can be troublesome. We report a successful case of acetic acid sclerotherapy for bile leak from an isolated bile duct after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  4. Bile acids: analysis in biological fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, William J.; Sjövall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The formation of bile acids/bile alcohols is of major importance for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Besides their functions in lipid absorption, bile acids/bile alcohols are regulatory molecules for a number of metabolic processes. Their effects are structure-dependent, and numerous metabolic conversions result in a complex mixture of biologically active and inactive forms. Advanced methods are required to characterize and quantify individual bile acids in these mixtures. A combination of such analyses with analyses of the proteome will be required for a better understanding of mechanisms of action and nature of endogenous ligands. Mass spectrometry is the basic detection technique for effluents from chromatographic columns. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization provides the highest sensitivity in metabolome analysis. Classical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is less sensitive but offers extensive structure-dependent fragmentation increasing the specificity in analyses of isobaric isomers of unconjugated bile acids. Depending on the nature of the bile acid/bile alcohol mixture and the range of concentration of individuals, different sample preparation sequences, from simple extractions to group separations and derivatizations, are applicable. We review the methods currently available for the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids and tissues, with emphasis on the combination of liquid and gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. PMID:20008121

  5. Substrate specificity of human ABCC4 (MRP4)-mediated cotransport of bile acids and reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Rius, Maria; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Hofmann, Alan F; Keppler, Dietrich

    2006-04-01

    The multidrug resistance protein ABCC4 (MRP4), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, mediates ATP-dependent unidirectional efflux of organic anions out of cells. Previous studies showed that human ABCC4 is localized to the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes and mediates, among other substrates, the cotransport of reduced glutathione (GSH) with bile acids. In the present study, using inside-out membrane vesicles, we demonstrated that human ABCC4 in the presence of physiological concentrations of GSH has a high affinity for the taurine and glycine conjugates of the common natural bile acids as well as the unconjugated bile acid cholate. Chenodeoxycholyltaurine and chenodeoxycholylglycine were the GSH cosubstrates with the highest affinities for ABCC4, with K(m) values of 3.6 and 5.9 microM, respectively. Ursodeoxycholyltaurine and ursodeoxycholylglycine were cotransported together with GSH by ABCC4 with K(m) values of 7.8 and 12.5 microM, respectively, but no transport of ursodeoxycholate and deoxycholate was observed. The simultaneous transport of labeled GSH and cholyltaurine or cholylglycine was demonstrated in double-labeled cotransport experiments with a bile acid-to-GSH ratio of approximately 1:22. K(m) values of the bile acids for ABCC4 were in a range similar to those reported for the canalicular bile salt export pump ABCB11. Under physiological conditions, the sinusoidal ABCC4 may compete with canalicular ABCB11 for bile acids and thereby play a key role in determining the hepatocyte concentration of bile acids. In cholestatic conditions, ABCC4 may become a key pathway for efflux of bile acids from hepatocytes into blood.

  6. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion (< 5%) of tauro-BALU-1 was detected. BALU-1 did not inhibit the biliary secretion of endogenous bile acids. When highly choleretic bile acids, - ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) - were administered, they were found less efficient than BALU-1 in preventing phalloidin-induced cholestasis. Biliary phalloidin elimination was low but it was increased by BALU-1 > TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  7. Metformin impairs systemic bile acid homeostasis through regulating SIRT1 protein levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Yang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Huabing; Kong, Xingxing; Yao, Lu; Cui, Xiaona; Zou, Yongkang; Fang, Fude; Yang, Jichun; Chang, Yongsheng

    2017-01-01

    Metformin is widely used to treat hyperglycemia. However, metformin treatment may induce intrahepatic cholestasis and liver injury in a few patients with type II diabetes through an unknown mechanism. Here we show that metformin decreases SIRT1 protein levels in primary hepatocytes and liver. Both metformin-treated wild-type C57 mice and hepatic SIRT1-mutant mice had increased hepatic and serum bile acid levels. However, metformin failed to change systemic bile acid levels in hepatic SIRT1-mutant mice. Molecular mechanism study indicates that SIRT1 directly interacts with and deacetylates Foxa2 to inhibit its transcriptional activity on expression of genes involved in bile acids synthesis and transport. Hepatic SIRT1 mutation elevates Foxa2 acetylation levels, which promotes Foxa2 binding to and activating genes involved in bile acids metabolism, impairing hepatic and systemic bile acid homeostasis. Our data clearly suggest that hepatic SIRT1 mediates metformin effects on systemic bile acid metabolism and modulation of SIRT1 activity in liver may be an attractive approach for treatment of bile acid-related diseases such as cholestasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simplified quantitative determination of total fecal bile acids.

    PubMed

    de Wael, J; Raaymakers, C E; Endeman, H J

    1977-09-01

    To determine total fecal bile acids, these are extracted with diethyl ether after boiling with a solution of potassium hydroxide in ethanediol. After evaporating the ether and dissolving the residue in methanol, the bile acids are directly determined with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Values for 9 normals are given.

  9. Differential diagnosis in patients with suspected bile acid synthesis defects

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Dorothea; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Rohrer, Tilman; Engelmann, Guido; Heverin, Maura; Russell, David W; Clayton, Peter T; Hoffmann, Georg F; Okun, Jürgen G

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical presentations associated with bile acid synthesis defects and to describe identification of individual disorders and diagnostic pitfalls. METHODS: Authors describe semiquantitative determination of 16 urinary bile acid metabolites by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Sample preparation was performed by solid-phase extraction. The total analysis time was 2 min per sample. Authors determined bile acid metabolites in 363 patients with suspected defects in bile acid metabolism. RESULTS: Abnormal bile acid metabolites were found in 36 patients. Two patients had bile acid synthesis defects but presented with atypical presentations. In 2 other patients who were later shown to be affected by biliary atresia and cystic fibrosis the profile of bile acid metabolites was initially suggestive of a bile acid synthesis defect. Three adult patients suffered from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. Nineteen patients had peroxisomal disorders, and 10 patients had cholestatic hepatopathy of other cause. CONCLUSION: Screening for urinary cholanoids should be done in every infant with cholestatic hepatopathy as well as in children with progressive neurological disease to provide specific therapy. PMID:22416181

  10. Novel regulator of enterohepatic bile acid signaling protects against hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2013-06-04

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease and can be treated by targeting bile acid and cholesterol metabolism. Vergnes et al. (2013) now identify Diet1 as a novel regulator of fibroblast growth factor 15/19 production and bile acid biosynthesis.

  11. BASIC--a bile acid-sensitive ion channel highly expressed in bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Wiemuth, Dominik; Sahin, Hacer; Falkenburger, Björn H; Lefèvre, Cathérine M T; Wasmuth, Hermann E; Gründer, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    Brain liver intestine Na+ channel (BLINaC) is an ion channel of the DEG/ENaC gene family of unknown function. BLINaC from rats (rBLINaC) and humans (INaC) is inactive at rest, and its mode of activation has remained unclear. Here, we show that the BLINaC protein localizes to cholangiocytes, epithelial cells that line bile ducts. Moreover, we provide evidence that rBLINaC and INaC are robustly activated by bile acids, in particular chenodeoxycholic acid and hyodeoxycholic acid (EC50=2.1±0.05 mM). Thus, BLINaC appears to be an epithelial cation channel of bile ducts sensitive to physiological concentrations of bile acids. BLINaC is related to acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and to the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and shares ligand activation with ASICs and epithelial localization with ENaC. Therefore, based on the close homology of BLINaC to ASICs and its activation by bile acids, we propose to rename BLINaC bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC).

  12. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis. Design An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6–60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and FGF-19 were quantified. Results On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR) of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6–47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7–3.3] (p = 0.01) in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19), a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower. Conclusion SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the

  13. Promotion of PDT efficacy by bile acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Michelle; Reiners, John, Jr.; Kessel, David

    2003-06-01

    We had previously described the use of relatively hydrophobic bile acids, notably UDCA (ursodeoxycholate) for the promotion of the apoptotic response to photodynamic therapy. Further study revealed that this effect occurred only when the target for photodamage was the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. The efficacy of lysosomal photodamage, leading to a cleavage of the protein Bid, was not influenced by UDCA. Moreover, the apoptotic cell death resulting from treatment of cells with the non-peptidic Bcl-2 inhibitor HA 14-1 was also promoted by UDCA. These results are consistent with the proposal that the pro-apoptotic effects of UDCA are directed against Bcl-2, promoting inactivation by HA 14-1 or photodamage.

  14. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  15. Fatty acid bile acid conjugates (FABACs)—New molecules for the prevention of cholesterol crystallisation in bile

    PubMed Central

    Gilat, T; Somjen, G; Mazur, Y; Leikin-Frenkel, A; Rosenberg, R; Halpern, Z; Konikoff, F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cholesterol gall stones are a frequent disease for which at present surgery is the usual therapy. Despite the importance of bile acids it has become evident that phospholipids are the main cholesterol solubilisers in bile. Even phospholipid components, such as fatty acids, have anticrystallising activity.
AIM—To synthesise fatty acid bile acid conjugates (FABACs) and study their effects on cholesterol crystallisation in bile in vitro and in vivo.
METHODS—FABACs were prepared by conjugation of cholic acid at position 3 with saturated fatty acids of variable chain length using an amide bond. Cholesterol crystallisation and its kinetics (crystal observation time, crystal mass) were studied in model bile, pooled enriched human bile, and fresh human bile using FABACs with saturated fatty acids of varying chain length (C-6 to C-22). Absorption of FABACs into blood and bile was tested in hamsters. Prevention of biliary cholesterol crystallisation in vivo was tested in hamsters and inbred mice.
RESULTS—FABACs strongly inhibited cholesterol crystallisation in model as well as native bile. The FABACs with longer acyl chains (C-16 to C-22) were more effective. At a concentration of 5 mM, FABACs almost completely inhibited cholesterol crystallisation in fresh human bile for 21 days. FABACs were absorbed and found in both portal and heart blood of hamsters. Levels in bile were 2-3 times higher than in blood, indicating active secretion. Appreciable levels were found in the systemic circulation 24-48 hours after a single administration. Ingested FABACs completely prevented the formation of cholesterol crystals in the gall bladders of hamsters and mice fed a lithogenic diet.
CONCLUSIONS—FABACs are potent inhibitors of cholesterol crystallisation in bile. They are absorbed and secreted into bile and prevent the earliest step of cholesterol gall stone formation in animals. These compounds may be of potential use in cholesterol gall stone disease in

  16. [Structure determination of three novel bile acids from bear bile powder].

    PubMed

    Jian, Long-Hai; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Ke; Ji, Shen

    2013-08-01

    A method of LC-QTOF/MS combining with chemical synthesis has been used to determine the structures of three novel bile acids from bear bile powder. Reference substances of tauroursodeoxycholic acid and taurochenodeoxycholic acid were oxidized by pyridinium chlorochromate. The products were analyzed by LC-QTOF/MS. Total 4 products including 3 isomers were predicted and identified according to the PCC oxidation theory and LC-QTOF/MS results. Bear bile powder samples were dissolved by methanol and analyzed by LC-QTOF/MS. Three unknown peaks were found and identified as 2-[[(3beta, 5beta)-3-hydroxy-7, 24-dioxocholan-24-yl]amino]-ethanesulfonic acid, 2-[[(5beta)-3, 7, 24-trioxocholan-24-yl]amino]-ethanesulfonic acid and 2-[[(5beta, 7beta)-7-hydroxy-3, 24-dioxocholan-24-yl]amino]-ethanesulfonic acid, separately, by matching their results with that of oxidation products above.

  17. Bile Acid-Activated Receptors, Intestinal Microbiota, and the Treatment of Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Distrutti, Eleonora

    2015-11-01

    The composition of the bile acid pool is a function of the microbial metabolism of bile acids in the intestine. Perturbations of the microbiota shape the bile acid pool and modulate the activity of bile acid-activated receptors (BARs) even beyond the gastrointestinal tract, triggering various metabolic axes and altering host metabolism. Bile acids, in turn, can also regulate the composition of the gut microbiome at the highest taxonomic levels. Primary bile acids from the host are preferential ligands for the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), while secondary bile acids from the microbiota are ligands for G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). In this review, we examine the role of bile acid signaling in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and how changes in bile acid composition affect human metabolism. Bile acids may offer novel therapeutic modalities in inflammation, obesity, and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bile Acid Determination after Standardized Glucose Load in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Jacobs, Katherine; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Lupo, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a rare liver disorder, usually manifesting in the third trimester and associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality. The hallmark laboratory abnormality in ICP is elevated fasting serum bile acids; however, there are limited data on whether a nonfasting state affects a pregnant woman's total bile acids. This study assesses fasting and nonfasting bile acid levels in 10 healthy pregnant women after a standardized glucose load to provide insight into the effects of a glucose load on bile acid profiles. Study Design Pilot prospective cohort analysis of serum bile acids in pregnant women. A total of 10 healthy pregnant women from 28 to 32 weeks' gestation were recruited for the study before undergoing a glucose tolerance test. Total serum bile acids were collected for each subject in the overnight fasting state, and 1 and 3 hours after the 100-g glucose load. Results There was a statistically significant difference between fasting versus 3-hour values. There was no statistically significant difference between fasting versus 1-hour and 1-hour versus 3-hour values. Conclusion There is a difference between fasting and nonfasting total serum bile acids after a 100-g glucose load in healthy pregnant women. PMID:26495178

  19. Effect of Glycine-Conjugated Bile Acids with and without Lecithin on Water and Glucose Absorption in Perfused Human Jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David L.; Phillips, Sidney F.; Hofmann, Alan F.

    1973-01-01

    Perfusion studies were performed in healthy volunteers to test whether the secretory effect of conjugated bile acids, previously shown for the colon, was also present in the jejunum. A perfusion system with a proximal occlusive balloon (and continuous aspiration of duodenal secretions) was used; isotonic test solutions contained glycine-conjugated bile acids with or without lecithin. Fluid movement was measured by changes in the concentration of polyethylene glycol (PEG, mol wt 4,000). Conjugated dihydroxy bile acids inhibited electrolyte and fluid absorption and, at higher concentrations, evoked secretion of an isotonic fluid. Glucose absorption continued, despite fluid secretion, but its rate decreased. The secretory effects of bile acids were abolished by the addition of lecithin to the bile acid solutions. A trihydroxy bile acid (cholylglycine) had no effect on jejunal absorption. Small amounts (6-9%) of conjugated bile acids were absorbed in the jejunum; lecithin was well absorbed (72-90%). The results indicate that dihydroxy bile acids influence salt and water transport in the human jejunum but that this effect may be abolished when a polar lipid such as lecithin is present. We speculate that this effect of bile acids may modify fluid movement in the small intestine postprandially after fat absorption has occurred. Images PMID:4700493

  20. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-01-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target. PMID:26261286

  1. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-10-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. The control of bile acid pool size: Effect of jejunal resection and phenobarbitone on bile acid metabolism in the rat 1

    PubMed Central

    Mok, H. Y. I.; Perry, P. M.; Dowling, R. Hermon

    1974-01-01

    In patients with cholesterol gallstones, there is a diminished bile acid pool and the bile becomes supersaturated with cholesterol. Medical treatment has been aimed at re-expanding the pool to improve cholesterol solubility in bile but as yet the factors controlling the size of the bile acid pool' are unknown. Therefore the role of the liver and intestine in controlling bile acid pool size in the rat was studied and the effect of experimental expansion of the pool on bile acid metabolism and bile lipid composition examined. Bile acid absorption was increased from ileum made hyperplastic by previous jejunectomy and hepatic bile acid synthesis was increased by phenobarbitone treatment. Both jejunal resection and phenobarbitone significantly increased the size of the bile acid pool from 32.2 ± SEM 0.94 μmoles/100 g body weight to 42.2 ± 1.71 and 44.4 ± 2.03 respectively. However, the effects of these experimental manipulations on bile acid secretion rate, enterohepatic cycling frequency, and synthesis rates were quite different. Jejunectomy caused a 56% increase in bile acid secretion and more rapid cycling of the bile acid pool but the enhanced absorption did not depress bile acid synthesis. In contrast, phenobarbitone markedly increased synthesis from 14.5 ± 1.42 μmoles.100 g BW−1. 24 hr−1 to 25.9 ± 3.19 but there was no significant change in bile acid secretion and the choleresis seen after phenobarbitone was mainly due to an increase in the bile acid-independent fraction of bile flow. In these experimental studies in the rat, expansion of the bile acid pool did not significantly change bile lipid composition or cholesterol solubility in bile. PMID:4834548

  3. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  4. Real Time Monitoring of Intracellular Bile Acid Dynamics Using a Genetically Encoded FRET-based Bile Acid Sensor.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiel, Sandra; Merkx, Maarten; Van de Graaf, Stan

    2016-01-04

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) has become a powerful tool for monitoring protein folding, interaction and localization in single cells. Biosensors relying on the principle of FRET have enabled real-time visualization of subcellular signaling events in live cells with high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we describe the application of a genetically encoded Bile Acid Sensor (BAS) that consists of two fluorophores fused to the farnesoid X receptor ligand binding domain (FXR-LBD), thereby forming a bile acid sensor that can be activated by a large number of bile acids species and other (synthetic) FXR ligands. This sensor can be targeted to different cellular compartments including the nucleus (NucleoBAS) and cytosol (CytoBAS) to measure bile acid concentrations locally. It allows rapid and simple quantitation of cellular bile acid influx, efflux and subcellular distribution of endogenous bile acids without the need for labeling with fluorescent tags or radionuclei. Furthermore, the BAS FRET sensors can be useful for monitoring FXR ligand binding. Finally, we show that this FRET biosensor can be combined with imaging of other spectrally distinct fluorophores. This allows for combined analysis of intracellular bile acid dynamics and i) localization and/or abundance of proteins of interest, or ii) intracellular signaling in a single cell.

  5. The human gut sterolbiome: bile acid-microbiome endocrine aspects and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S.

    2015-01-01

    The human body is now viewed as a complex ecosystem that on a cellular and gene level is mainly prokaryotic. The mammalian liver synthesizes and secretes hydrophilic primary bile acids, some of which enter the colon during the enterohepatic circulation, and are converted into numerous hydrophobic metabolites which are capable of entering the portal circulation, returned to the liver, and in humans, accumulating in the biliary pool. Bile acids are hormones that regulate their own synthesis, transport, in addition to glucose and lipid homeostasis, and energy balance. The gut microbial community through their capacity to produce bile acid metabolites distinct from the liver can be thought of as an “endocrine organ” with potential to alter host physiology, perhaps to their own favor. We propose the term “sterolbiome” to describe the genetic potential of the gut microbiome to produce endocrine molecules from endogenous and exogenous steroids in the mammalian gut. The affinity of secondary bile acid metabolites to host nuclear receptors is described, the potential of secondary bile acids to promote tumors, and the potential of bile acids to serve as therapeutic agents are discussed. PMID:26579434

  6. Nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 is a major determinant of bile acid homeostasis in the liver and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Mennone, Albert; Soroka, Carol J.; Harry, Kathy; Hagey, Lee R.; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key regulator for induction of hepatic detoxification and antioxidant mechanisms, as well as for certain hepatobiliary transporters. To examine the role of Nrf2 in bile acid homeostasis and cholestasis, we assessed the determinants of bile secretion and bile acid synthesis and transport before and after bile duct ligation (BDL) in Nrf2−/− mice. Our findings indicate reduced rates of biliary bile acid and GSH excretion, higher levels of intrahepatic bile acids, and decreased expression of regulators of bile acid synthesis, Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, in Nrf2−/− compared with wild-type control mice. The mRNA expression of the bile acid transporters bile salt export pump (Bsep) and organic solute transporter (Ostα) were increased in the face of impaired expression of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins Mrp3 and Mrp4. Deletion of Nrf2 also decreased ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) expression, leading to reduced bile acid reabsorption and increased loss of bile acid in feces. Finally, when cholestasis is induced by BDL, liver injury was not different from that in wild-type BDL mice. These Nrf2−/− mice also had increased pregnane X receptor (Pxr) and Cyp3a11 mRNA expression in association with enhanced hepatic bile acid hydroxylation. In conclusion, this study finds that Nrf2 plays a major role in the regulation of bile acid homeostasis in the liver and intestine. Deletion of Nrf2 results in a cholestatic phenotype but does not augment liver injury following BDL. PMID:22345550

  7. Bile Acids Conjugation in Human Bile Is Not Random: New Insights from 1H-NMR Spectroscopy at 800 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Cooper, Amanda; Raftery, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids constitute a group of structurally closely related molecules and represent the most abundant constituents of human bile. Investigations of bile acids have garnered increased interest owing to their recently discovered additional biological functions including their role as signaling molecules that govern glucose, fat and energy metabolism. Recent NMR methodological developments have enabled single-step analysis of several highly abundant and common glycine- and taurine- conjugated bile acids, such as glycocholic acid, glycodeoxycholic acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and taurochenodeoxycholic acid. Investigation of these conjugated bile acids in human bile employing high field (800 MHz) 1H-NMR spectroscopy reveals that the ratios between two glycine-conjugated bile acids and their taurine counterparts correlate positively (R2 = 0.83–0.97; p = 0.001 × 10−2–0.006 × 10−7) as do the ratios between a glycine-conjugated bile acid and its taurine counterpart (R2 = 0.92–0.95; p = 0.004 × 10−3–0.002 × 10−10). Using such correlations, concentration of individual bile acids in each sample could be predicted in good agreement with the experimentally determined values. These insights into the pattern of bile acid conjugation in human bile between glycine and taurine promise useful clues to the mechanism of bile acids’ biosynthesis, conjugation and enterohepatic circulation, and may improve our understanding of the role of individual conjugated bile acids in health and disease. PMID:19373503

  8. Olfactory sensitivity of Pacific Lampreys to lamprey bile acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Sorensen, Peter W.; Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata are in decline throughout much of their historical range in the Columbia River basin. In support of restoration efforts, we tested whether larval and adult lamprey bile acids serve as migratory and spawning pheromones in adult Pacific lampreys, as they do in sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus. The olfactory sensitivity of adult Pacific lampreys to lamprey bile acids was measured by electro-olfactogram recording from the time of their capture in the spring until their spawning in June of the following year. As controls, we tested L-arginine and a non-lamprey bile acid, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLS). Migrating adult Pacific lampreys were highly sensitive to petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone) and 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey sex pheromone) when first captured. This sensitivity persisted throughout their long migratory and overwinter holding period before declining to nearly unmeasurable levels by the time of spawning. The absolute magnitudes of adult Pacific lamprey responses to lamprey bile acids were smaller than those of the sea lamprey, and unlike the sea lamprey, the Pacific lamprey did not appear to detect TLS. No sexual dimorphism was noted in olfactory sensitivity. Thus, Pacific lampreys are broadly similar to sea lampreys in showing sensitivity to the major lamprey bile acids but apparently differ in having a longer period of sensitivity to those acids. The potential utility of bile acid-like pheromones in the restoration of Pacific lampreys warrants their further investigation in this species.

  9. The effect of bile, bile acids and detergents on calcium absorption in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Webling, D. D'A.; Holdsworth, E. S.

    1965-01-01

    1. Bile from rachitic or normal chicks causes an immediate increase in the intestinal absorption of soluble calcium in rachitic and vitamin D3-treated chicks as tested in vivo by intestinal-loop and oral-dosing methods. 2. This effect is apparently solely due to the taurine-conjugated bile acids present in the bile and is independent of the action of vitamin D. 3. Chick bile and bile acids can increase the solubility and the absorption of calcium presented as sparingly soluble calcium hydrogen phosphate. 4. In addition, bile is necessary to some extent at least for the intestinal absorption of vitamin D3 in the chick and this would indirectly enhance the absorption of calcium. 5. Thus bile is capable of a threefold action in the absorption of calcium in the chick. It is suggested that the direct action on sparingly soluble forms of calcium is of considerable physiological importance since most of the calcium in the normal bird's diet would be in this form. 6. Bile acids enhance the absorption of calcium in all regions of the small intestine of the chick. 7. Of a range of bile acids and detergents tested for enhancement of calcium absorption, various taurine-conjugated bile acids and sodium lauryl sulphate, an anionic detergent, are effective. A non-ionic detergent (Tween 80) and a cationic detergent (Zephiran) are without effect. 8. The ability of a substance to increase directly the intestinal absorption of soluble calcium appears to depend to some extent on an anionic detergent action, i.e. the ability to form a salt or complex soluble to some extent in both aqueous and lipid phases. 9. In chicks the immediate deposition of calcium (45Ca) in the bones closely reflects any increase in plasma calcium radioactivity regardless of the cause of the increase and regardless of the vitamin D3 status. Although sodium lauryl sulphate can increase markedly the calcium absorption from the gut and the immediate deposition in the bones it has no significant effect on rickets

  10. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  11. Are bile acid malabsorption and bile acid diarrhoea important causes of loose stool complicating cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Phillips, F; Muls, A C G; Lalji, A; Andreyev, H J N

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during and after cancer therapy can significantly affect quality of life and interfere with treatment. This study assessed whether bile acid malabsorption (BAM) or bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) are important causes of diarrhoea associated with cancer treatment. A retrospective analysis was carried out of consecutive patients assessed for BAM using ((75) Se) Selenium homocholic acid taurocholate (SeHCAT) scanning, after reporting any episodes of loose stool, attending a gastroenterology clinic in a cancer centre. Between 2009 and 2013, 506 consecutive patients (54.5% male; age range: 20-91 years), were scanned. BAM/BAD was diagnosed in 215 (42.5%). It was mild in 25.6%, moderate in 29.3% and severe in 45.1%. Pelvic chemoradiation had induced BAM in > 50% of patients. BAM was also frequent after treatment for conditions not previously associated with BAM, such as anal and colorectal cancer, and was present in > 75% of patients referred after pancreatic surgery. It was also unexpectedly frequent in patients who were treated for malignancy outside the GI tract, such as breast cancer and haematological malignancy. BAM/BAD are very common and under-appreciated causes of GI symptoms after cancer treatment. Health professionals should have a low threshold in suspecting this condition, as diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve quality of life. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Comparison study between fasting total serum bile acid and post prandial bile acid in hepatic diseases: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Boonyapisit, S; Lekhakula, S; Amornkittichareon, B; Shumnumsirivath, D

    1994-01-01

    Fasting bile acid, two-hour post prandial bile acid and other liver function tests (Bili, AST, ALT, ALB, Glob, ALP) were measured in 22 normal and 28 liver diseased patients. In normal volunteers, the mean value of fasting total serum bile acid (FTBA) and postprandial serum bile acid (PTBA) were 3.08 mumole/L (S.D. 1.65) range 0.21-6.26 mumol/L, and 8.07 mumole/L (S.D. 2.99) range 4.06-15.65 mumole/L. Comparison between FTBA, PTBA and other liver function tests in various liver diseases from this study the PTBA was not statistically significant superior to FTBA. Therefore, it is not necessary to do the PTBA at this time until more data is available.

  13. Impact of Gut Microbiota-Mediated Bile Acid Metabolism on the Solubilization Capacity of Bile Salt Micelles and Drug Solubility.

    PubMed

    Enright, Elaine F; Joyce, Susan A; Gahan, Cormac G M; Griffin, Brendan T

    2017-04-03

    In recent years, the gut microbiome has gained increasing appreciation as a determinant of the health status of the human host. Bile salts that are secreted into the intestine may be biotransformed by enzymes produced by the gut bacteria. To date, bile acid research at the host-microbe interface has primarily been directed toward effects on host metabolism. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of changes in gut microbial bile acid metabolism on the solubilization capacity of bile salt micelles and consequently intraluminal drug solubility. First, the impact of bile acid metabolism, mediated in vivo by the microbial enzymes bile salt hydrolase (BSH) and 7α-dehydroxylase, on drug solubility was assessed by comparing the solubilization capacity of (a) conjugated vs deconjugated and (b) primary vs secondary bile salts. A series of poorly water-soluble drugs (PWSDs) were selected as model solutes on the basis of an increased tendency to associate with bile micelles. Subsequently, PWSD solubility and dissolution was evaluated in conventional biorelevant simulated intestinal fluid containing host-derived bile acids, as well as in media modified to contain microbial bile acid metabolites. The findings suggest that deconjugation of the bile acid steroidal core, as dictated by BSH activity, influences micellar solubilization capacity for some PWSDs; however, these differences appear to be relatively minor. In contrast, the extent of bile acid hydroxylation, regulated by microbial 7α-dehydroxylase, was found to significantly affect the solubilization capacity of bile salt micelles for all nine drugs studied (p < 0.05). Subsequent investigations in biorelevant media containing either the trihydroxy bile salt sodium taurocholate (TCA) or the dihydroxy bile salt sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) revealed altered drug solubility and dissolution. Observed differences in biorelevant media appeared to be both drug- and amphiphile (bile salt/lecithin) concentration

  14. Bile Acids Improve the Antimicrobial Effect of Rifaximin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Darkoh, Charles; Lichtenberger, Lenard M.; Ajami, Nadim; Dial, Elizabeth J.; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common infirmities affecting international travelers, occurring in 20 to 50% of persons from industrialized countries visiting developing regions. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common causative agent and is isolated from approximately half of the cases of traveler's diarrhea. Rifaximin, a largely water-insoluble, nonabsorbable (<0.4%) antibiotic that inhibits bacterial RNA synthesis, is approved for use for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea caused by diarrheagenic E. coli. However, the drug has minimal effect on the bacterial flora or the infecting E. coli strain in the aqueous environment of the colon. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect and bioavailability of rifaximin in aqueous solution in the presence and absence of physiologic concentrations of bile acids. The methods used included growth measurement of ETEC (strain H10407), rifaximin solubility measurements, total bacterial protein determination, and assessment of the functional activity of rifaximin by monitoring inhibition of bacterial β-galactosidase expression. Solubility studies showed rifaximin to be 70- to 120-fold more soluble in bile acids (approximately 30% in 4 mM bile acids) than in aqueous solution. Addition of both purified bile acids and human bile to rifaximin at subinhibitory and inhibitory concentrations significantly improved the drug's anti-ETEC effect by 71% and 73%, respectively, after 4 h. This observation was confirmed by showing a decrease in the overall amount of total bacterial protein expressed during incubation of rifaximin plus bile acids. Rifaximin-treated samples containing bile acids inhibited the expression of ETEC β-galactosidase at a higher magnitude than samples that did not contain bile acids. The study provides data showing that bile acids solubilize rifaximin on a dose-response basis, increasing the drug's bioavailability and antimicrobial effect. These observations suggest

  15. A novel class of apical sodium--dependent bile salt transporter inhibitors: 1-(2,4-bifluorophenyl)-7-dialkylamino-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Pang, Guoxun; Ren, Jinfeng; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Juxian

    2017-03-01

    The apical sodium--dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) is the main transporter to promote re-absorption of bile acids from the intestinal tract into the enterohepatic circulation. Inhibition of ASBT could increase the excretion of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. Therefore, ASBT is an attractive target for developing new cholesterol-lowering drugs. In this report, a series of 1-(2,4-bifluorophenyl)-7-dialkylamino-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxamides were designed as inhibitors of ASBT. Most of them demonstrated potency against ASBT transport of bile acids. In particular, compound 4a1 was found to have the best activity, resulting in 80.1% inhibition of ASBT at 10 μmol/L.

  16. Metabolic effects of bile acids in the gut in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Boesjes, Marije; Brufau, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, it became clear that bile acids, in addition to their role in intestinal absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins, are major regulators of metabolism. They activate signal transduction pathways through binding to the specific bile acid receptors TGR5 and FXR. Indirectly, bile acids influence metabolism via modification of the gut microbiota ecosystem. The relation between bile acid metabolism and gut microbiota composition is very complex whereas gut microbiota modulates bile acid structure, creating a complex bile acid pool consisting of a mixture of differentially structured species, bile acids alter gut microbiota by disturbing bacterial membrane integrity. In addition, to the effects on glucose and energy homeostasis, recent literature ascribed a role for bile acid signaling in control of inflammation and regulation of the nervous system. In this review, we discuss a selection of recent published studies describing the effects of intestinal bile acid signaling on health and disease.

  17. Identification of bile acid-CoA: amino acid N-acyltransferase in rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Kwakye, J B; Johnson, M R; Barnes, S; Grizzle, W E; Diasio, R B

    1991-01-01

    A novel location of the bile-acid-conjugating enzyme bile acid-CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAT) has been discovered in the cytosolic fraction of rat kidney. Both taurine and glycine were utilized as substrates. Formation of bile acid N-acyl amidates was verified by h.p.l.c. by comparison with authentic standards and by specific hydrolysis using cholylglycine hydrolase. Immunoblot analysis using a human liver anti-BAT polyclonal antibody indicated that rat kidney BAT has the same molecular mass as rat liver BAT. These findings suggest that the kidney has a role in bile acid metabolism and physiology. Images Fig. 6. PMID:1764044

  18. Metabolism of Cholesterol and Bile Acids by the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host's enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered. PMID:25437605

  19. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  20. Metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Philippe

    2013-12-30

    The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host's enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered.

  1. Bile acids. 38. Conversion of 5 -cholestane-3 ,7 -diol to allo bile acids by the rat.

    PubMed

    Noll, B W; Doisy, E A; Elliott, W H

    1973-07-01

    5alpha-[4-(14)C, 3alpha-(3)H]Cholestane-3beta,7alpha-diol was prepared from individual samples of 5alpha-[3alpha-(3)H]cholestane-3beta,7alpha-diol and 5alpha-[4-(14)C]cholestane-3beta,7alpha-diol, each derived from 3beta-acetoxycholest-5-en-7-one. Bile was collected for 11 days from adult male rats, with cannulated bile ducts, that had received intraperitoneally 0.90-0.92 mg of the doubly labeled diol. Bile from the first 10 hr, containing 63% of the administered (14)C and 6% of the (3)H, was hydrolyzed, and the bile acids were separated by acetic acid partition chromatography. Allochenodeoxycholic and allocholic acids contained at least 20.6% and 48.6%, respectively, of the (14)C retained in the biliary acids. Small amounts of (14)C (2.5% and 1.9%, respectively) were present in the 3beta isomers of these acids, but the tritium content totaled more than half of that found in the bile acid fraction. No evidence was obtained for presence of the extensive quantities of the allomuricholates.

  2. Physiological control of cholecystokinin release and pancreatic enzyme secretion by intraduodenal bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Koop, I; Schindler, M; Bosshammer, A; Scheibner, J; Stange, E; Koop, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The physiological relevance of duodenal bile acids in the control of cholecystokinin release and pancreatic enzyme secretion is still unknown. AIMS: To provide a near physiological situation by perfusing a bile acid mixture mimicking the individual endogenous bile acid composition of the person under investigation. For maximal reduction of endogenous bile output the CCK-A receptor antagonist loxiglumide was infused intravenously. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seven healthy volunteers were studied on four different days by a duodenal marker perfusion technique. The individual bile acid composition in duodenal juice and test meal stimulated bile acid output was assessed on day 1. Bile acids were perfused at an amount of 30 or 100% as determined on day 1 in combination with the test meal in the presence or absence of loxiglumide. Pancreatic enzymes, bilirubin, and bile acid output were determined in duodenal juice. Plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) and plasma pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were measured radioimmunologically. RESULTS: Bile acid perfusion did not significantly alter stimulated pancreatic enzyme, bilirubin or bile acid output or plasma CCK. Loxiglumide did not alter basal CCK release but increased test meal stimulated CCK output fourfold (p < 0.05). The addition of bile acids to the test meal at a dose resembling 30% of bile acid output as determined on day 1 prevented this increase. Plasma PP concentration remained unchanged by bile acids and were mostly undetectable during loxiglumide infusion. CONCLUSIONS: The CCK producing cell is under constant suppression by intraduodenal bile acids which cannot be further enhanced by a physiological bile acid mixture. However, removal of duodenal bile acids by inhibition of gall bladder contraction unmasks this suppression leading to a dramatic increase in plasma CCK levels. As little as one third of postprandially released bile acids completely reverse this effect. Bile acids are the most important luminal regulator

  3. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  4. Bile acid malabsorption in chronic diarrhea: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Barkun, Alan N; Love, Jonathan; Gould, Michael; Pluta, Henryk; Steinhart, Hillary

    2013-11-01

    Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a common but frequently under-recognized cause of chronic diarrhea, with an estimated prevalence of 4% to 5%. The published literature for the period 1965 to 2012 was examined for articles regarding the pathophysiology and treatment of BAM to provide an overview of the management of BAM in gastroenterology practice. BAM is classified as type 1 (secondary to ileal dysfunction), type 2 (idiopathic) or type 3 (secondary to gastrointestinal disorders not associated with ileal dysfunction). The estimated prevalence of BAM is >90% in patients with resected Crohn disease (CD) and 11% to 52% of unresected CD patients (type 1); 33% in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (type 2); and is a frequent finding postcholecystectomy or postvagotomy (type 3). Investigations include BAM fecal bile acid assay, 23-seleno-25-homo-tauro-cholic acid (SeHCAT) testing and high-performance liquid chromatography of serum 7-α-OH-4-cholesten-3-one (C4), to determine the level of bile acid synthesis. A less time-consuming and expensive alternative in practice is an empirical trial of the bile acid sequestering agent cholestyramine. An estimated 70% to 96% of chronic diarrhea patients with BAM respond to short-course cholestyramine. Adverse effects include constipation, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, bloating and abdominal pain. Other bile acid sequestering agents, such as colestipol and colesevelam, are currently being investigated for the treatment of BAM-associated diarrhea. BAM is a common cause of chronic diarrhea presenting in gastroenterology practice. In accordance with current guidelines, an empirical trial of a bile acid sequestering agent is warranted as part of the clinical workup to rule out BAM.

  5. Bile acid malabsorption in chronic diarrhea: Pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barkun, Alan; Love, Jonathan; Gould, Michael; Pluta, Henryk; Steinhart, A Hillary

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a common but frequently under-recognized cause of chronic diarrhea, with an estimated prevalence of 4% to 5%. METHODS: The published literature for the period 1965 to 2012 was examined for articles regarding the pathophysiology and treatment of BAM to provide an overview of the management of BAM in gastroenterology practice. RESULTS: BAM is classified as type 1 (secondary to ileal dysfunction), type 2 (idiopathic) or type 3 (secondary to gastrointestinal disorders not associated with ileal dysfunction). The estimated prevalence of BAM is >90% in patients with resected Crohn disease (CD) and 11% to 52% of unresected CD patients (type 1); 33% in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (type 2); and is a frequent finding postcholecystectomy or postvagotomy (type 3). Investigations include BAM fecal bile acid assay, 23-seleno-25-homo-tauro-cholic acid (SeHCAT) testing and high-performance liquid chromatography of serum 7-α-OH-4-cholesten-3-one (C4), to determine the level of bile acid synthesis. A less time-consuming and expensive alternative in practice is an empirical trial of the bile acid sequestering agent cholestyramine. An estimated 70% to 96% of chronic diarrhea patients with BAM respond to short-course cholestyramine. Adverse effects include constipation, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, bloating and abdominal pain. Other bile acid sequestering agents, such as colestipol and colesevelam, are currently being investigated for the treatment of BAM-associated diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS: BAM is a common cause of chronic diarrhea presenting in gastroenterology practice. In accordance with current guidelines, an empirical trial of a bile acid sequestering agent is warranted as part of the clinical workup to rule out BAM. PMID:24199211

  6. Urinary metabolomics in Fxr-null mice reveals activated adaptive metabolic pathways upon bile acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joo-Youn; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Kang, Dong Wook; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Luecke, Hans; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates genes involved in synthesis, metabolism, and transport of bile acids and thus plays a major role in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. In this study, metabolomic responses were investigated in urine of wild-type and Fxr-null mice fed cholic acid, an FXR ligand, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Multivariate data analysis between wild-type and Fxr-null mice on a cholic acid diet revealed that the most increased ions were metabolites of p-cresol (4-methylphenol), corticosterone, and cholic acid in Fxr-null mice. The structural identities of the above metabolites were confirmed by chemical synthesis and by comparing retention time (RT) and/or tandem mass fragmentation patterns of the urinary metabolites with the authentic standards. Tauro-3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrol (3alpha,6,7alpha,12alpha-tetrahydroxy-5beta-cholestan-26-oyltaurine), one of the most increased metabolites in Fxr-null mice on a CA diet, is a marker for efficient hydroxylation of toxic bile acids possibly through induction of Cyp3a11. A cholestatic model induced by lithocholic acid revealed that enhanced expression of Cyp3a11 is the major defense mechanism to detoxify cholestatic bile acids in Fxr-null mice. These results will be useful for identification of biomarkers for cholestasis and for determination of adaptive molecular mechanisms in cholestasis.

  7. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition-induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic acid in the Ursidae: biliary bile acids of bears, pandas, and related carnivores.

    PubMed

    Hagey, L R; Crombie, D L; Espinosa, E; Carey, M C; Igimi, H; Hofmann, A F

    1993-11-01

    The biliary bile acid composition of gallbladder bile obtained from six species of bears (Ursidae), the Giant panda, the Red panda, and 11 related carnivores were determined by reversed phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bile acids were conjugated solely with taurine (in N-acyl linkage) in all species. Ursodeoxycholic acid (3 alpha, 7 beta-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid) was present in all Ursidae, averaging 1-39% of biliary bile acids depending on the species; it was not detected or present as a trace constituent (< 0.5%) in all other species, including the Giant panda. Ursodeoxycholic acid was present in 73 of 75 American Black bears, and its proportion averaged 34% (range 0-62%). Ursodeoxycholic acid averaged 17% of biliary bile acids in the Polar bear (n = 4) and 18% in the Brown bear (n = 6). Lower proportions (1-8%) were present in the Sun bear (n = 2), Ceylon Sloth bear (n = 1), and the Spectacled bear (n = 1). Bile of all species contained taurine-conjugated chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid. In some related carnivores, deoxycholic acid, the 7-dehydroxylation product of cholic acid, was also present. To determine whether the 7 beta hydroxy group of ursodeoxycholic acid was formed by hepatic or bacterial enzymes, bile acids were determined in hepatic bile obtained from bears with chronic biliary fistulae. Fistula bile samples contained ursodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and a trace amount of cholic acid, all as taurine conjugates, indicating that ursodeoxycholic acid is a primary bile acid formed in the liver in Ursidae.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Mouse ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) plays a critical role in bile acid reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kihwa; Schmahl, Jennifer; Lee, Jong-Min; Garcia, Karen; Patil, Ketan; Chen, Amelia; Keene, Michelle; Murphy, Andrew; Sleeman, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a unique peptide gut hormone that requires post-translational modification to stimulate both feeding and growth hormone release. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) was identified as a specific acyl-transferase for ghrelin, and recent genetic deletion studies of the Goat gene (Goat(-/-)) uncovered the role of ghrelin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. To further understand the physiological functions of the GOAT/ghrelin system, we have conducted a metabolomic and microarray profile of Goat-null mice, as well as determined Goat expression in different tissues using the lacZ reporter gene. Serum metabolite profile analysis revealed that Goat(-/-) mice exhibited increased secondary bile acids >2.5-fold. This was attributed to increased mRNA and protein expression of the ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ISBT) in the intestinal and biliary tract. Increased expression of additional solute carrier proteins, including Slc5a12 (>10-fold) were also detected in the small intestine and bile duct. Goat staining was consistently observed in the pituitary glands, stomach, and intestines, and to a lesser extent in the gallbladder and pancreatic duct. This is the first report that the GOAT/ghrelin system regulates bile acid metabolism, and these findings suggest a novel function of GOAT in the regulation of intestinal bile acid reabsorption..

  10. Fecal bile acids of black-footed ferrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Louise; Johnson, M.K.; Clark, T.W.; Schroder, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    Fecal bile acid characteristics have been used to identify scats to species of origin. Fecal bile acids in scats from 20 known black-footed ferrets ( Mustela nigripes ), 7 other known small carnivores, and 72 of unknown origin were analyzed to determine if this procedure could be used as a tool to verify ferret presence in an area. Seventeen ferret scats were suitable for analysis and had a mean fecal bile acid index of 156 ± 9. This was significantly different from mean indices for the other carnivores; however, substantial overlap among confidence intervals occurred for badgers, kit foxes, and especially long-tailed weasels. We conclude this method is not useful for making positive identifications if individual ferret scats and suggest that we may be able to definitively identify individual scats with reasonable confidence by using gas-liquid chromatography.

  11. Gelation of self-assembed bile acid-PEG conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandman, Satu; Le Devedec, Frantz; Zhu, X. X.

    2012-02-01

    The aggregation of macromolecules and low-molar-mass compounds into elongated self-assemblies such as wormlike micelles, fibers, or tubules increases the viscosity of the solutions and often leads to gelation due to network formation, even in organic solvents. Such one-dimensional nanostructures are promising candidates for drug delivery vehicles, packing materials for separation, templates for metal nanowires, biocides, and photo- or biocatalysis. An interesting group of compounds capable of this type of self-organization are bile acids, which are endogeneous steroids known to form gels at high concentrations and appropriate pH conditions. Grafting poly(ethylene oxide) on bile acids via anionic polymerization brings along thermoresponsiveness represented by lower critical solution temperature (LCST), while self-assembling occurs below another threshold temperature leading to a gelation at high concentrations, as shown by rheological experiments. The latter transition is assigned to the nanotube formation of pegylated bile acids, visualized by electron microscopy.

  12. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases.

  13. Toxic bile acids in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: influence of gastric acidity

    PubMed Central

    Nehra, D; Howell, P; Williams, C; Pye, J; Beynon, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Bile acid toxicity has been shown in the gastric, colonic, and hepatic tissues; the effect on oesophageal mucosa is less well known. 
AIMS—To determine the spectrum of bile acids refluxing in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and its relation to oesophageal pH using a new technique of combined oesophageal aspiration and pH monitoring. 
METHODS—Ten asymptomatic subjects and 30 patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (minimal mucosal injury, erosive oesophagitis (grade 2 or 3 Savary-Miller), Barrett's oesophagus/stricture; n=10 in each group) underwent 15 hour continuous oesophageal aspiration with simultaneous pH monitoring. Bile acid assay of the oesophageal samples was performed using modified high performance liquid chromatography. 
RESULTS—The peak bile acid concentration and DeMeester acid scores were significantly higher in the patients with oesophagitis (median bile acid concentration 124 µmol/l; acid score 20.2) and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture (181 µmol/l; 43.3) than patients with minimal injury (14 µmol/l; 12.5) or controls (0 µmol/l; 11.1). The predominant bile acids detected were cholic, taurocholic, and glycocholic acids but there was a significantly greater proportion of secondary bile acids, deoxycholic and taurodeoxycholic acids, in patients with erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture. Although bile acid reflux episodes occurred at variable pH, a temporal relation existed between reflux of taurine conjugates and oesophageal acid exposure (r=0.58, p=0.009). 
CONCLUSION—Toxic secondary bile acid fractions have been detected in patients with extensive mucosal damage. Mixed reflux is more harmful than acid reflux alone with possible toxic synergism existing between the taurine conjugates and acid. 

 Keywords: bile acids; reflux oesophagitis; Barrett's oesophagus PMID:10205192

  14. Thermodynamic and solution state NMR characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids to STARD5.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Cabana, Jérôme; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2013-11-01

    STARD5 is a member of the STARD4 sub-family of START domain containing proteins specialized in the non-vesicular transport of lipids and sterols. We recently reported that STARD5 binds primary bile acids. Herein, we report on the biophysical and structural characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids by STARD5 at physiological concentrations. We found that the absence of the 7α-OH group and its epimerization increase the affinity of secondary bile acids for STARD5. According to NMR titration and molecular modeling, the affinity depends mainly on the number and positions of the steroid ring hydroxyl groups and to a lesser extent on the presence or type of bile acid side-chain conjugation. Primary and secondary bile acids have different binding modes and display different positioning within the STARD5 binding pocket. The relative STARD5 affinity for the different bile acids studied is: DCA>LCA>CDCA>GDCA>TDCA>CA>UDCA. TCA and GCA do not bind significantly to STARD5. The impact of the ligand chemical structure on the thermodynamics of binding is discussed. The discovery of these new ligands suggests that STARD5 is involved in the cellular response elicited by bile acids and offers many entry points to decipher its physiological role.

  15. Hydrophobicity and retention coefficient of selected bile Acid oxo derivatives.

    PubMed

    Poša, Mihalj; Pilipović, Mladena Ana Lalić; Popović, Jovan

    2010-12-01

    Retention coefficients (k) of cholic acid and its keto derivatives are determined by means of Reversed Phase High Pressure Liquid Chromatography at different temperatures (303K, 309K, and 313K). At each studied temperature, retention factor decreases if the hydroxyl group in the cholic acid molecule replaces oxo group. In addition, the change of retention coefficient in a function of temperature (Δk/ΔT) is dominant for the cholic acid while by increasing the number of oxo groups it decreases. Introduction of an oxo group in a bile acid molecule leads to the lower hydrophobicity of the β side of the steroid nucleus. Because of that, less interaction happens between β side of the steroid nucleus and stationary phase. For dehydrocholic acid (three- oxo derivative), the value for Δk/ΔT shows an exception of this explanation. This suggests that in this molecule the planar polarity is disturbed. Partition coefficient K of nitrazepam (probe molecule) in micelles of bile acid salts at the examined temperatures shows a high linear correlation with retention factors of the selected bile acids. This indicates the importance of hydrophobic interactions in mixed micelles between the examined drug and bile acid salts. Haemolytic potential (erythrocyte haemolysis, log (Lys50)) represents measure of membranotoxicity of bile acids. In addition, it is shown that haemolytic potential correlates highly with the retention coefficient. All experiments that we conducted to obtain the values of K and log (Lys50) as well as their correlations with k, contribute to significance of retention coefficient as a measure of hydrophobicity in biopharmaceutical experiments.

  16. Histone H3K4 trimethylation by MLL3 as part of ASCOM complex is critical for NR activation of bile acid transporter genes and is downregulated in cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Surapureddi, S.; Balasubramaniyan, N.; Ahn, Jaeyong; Goldstein, J. A.; Suchy, Frederick J.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid x receptor (FXR) is a critical regulator of multiple genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. The coactivators attracted to promoters of FXR target genes and epigenetic modifications that occur after ligand binding to FXR have not been completely defined, and it is unknown whether these processes are disrupted during cholestasis. Using a microarray, we identified decreased expression of mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3), a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) lysine methyl transferase at 1 and 3 days of post-common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP) analysis revealed that H3K4me3 of transporter promoters by MLL3 as part of activating signal cointegrator-2 -containing complex (ASCOM) is essential for activation of bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (MRP2), and sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) genes by FXR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 6 (NCOA6) or MLL3/MLL4 mRNAs by small interfering RNA treatment led to a decrease in BSEP and NTCP mRNA levels in hepatoma cells. Human BSEP promoter transactivation by FXR/RXR was enhanced in a dose-dependent fashion by NCOA6 cDNA coexpression and decreased by AdsiNCOA6 infection in HepG2 cells. GST-pull down assays showed that domain 3 and 5 of NCOA6 (LXXLL motifs) interacted with FXR and that the interaction with domain 5 was enhanced by chenodeoxycholic acid. In vivo ChIP assays in HepG2 cells revealed ligand-dependent recruitment of ASCOM complex to FXR element in BSEP and GR element in NTCP promoters, respectively. ChIP analysis demonstrated significantly diminished recruitment of ASCOM complex components and H3K4me3 to Bsep and Mrp2 promoter FXR elements in mouse livers after CBDL. Taken together, these data show that the “H3K4me3” epigenetic mark is essential to activation of BSEP, NTCP, and MRP2 genes by nuclear receptors and is downregulated in cholestasis

  17. A prospective study of faecal bile acids and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haines, A; Hill, M J; Thompson, M H; Owen, R W; Williams, R E; Meade, T W; Wilkes, H; Griffin, M

    2000-10-01

    A prospective study of 7079 people aged 45-74 recruited through general practices in South Wales, Herefordshire and Edinburgh, Scotland was undertaken to test the hypothesis that faecal bile acids are implicated in the causation of large bowel cancer. The population was recruited between 1974 and 1980 and the response rate for stool collection was 67%. Bile acid analyses were performed on those cases that presented by 1990. It was decided in advance to examine the hypothesis separately for left- and right-sided bowel cancer because of known epidemiological differences between the two sites and to exclude the cases presenting within 2 years of the stool sample from the analyses because the cancer could have been present at recruitment and might have possibly affected faecal bile acid concentrations. Each case (n = 51 left-sided and 8 right-sided) was matched with three controls by age (within 5 years), sex, place of residence and time of providing the stool sample (within 3 months). Statistical analyses using conditional logistic regression showed no significant differences between the left-sided cases and controls for any of the concentrations of individual bile acids, total bile acid concentrations, faecal neutral steroids, percentage bacterial conversion and the ratio of lithocholic acid to deoxycholic acid concentrations. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.021) association of the presence of chenodeoxycholic acid (5/8 samples) in the right-sided cases compared with the controls (3/23), odds ratio 6.26 (95% confidence interval 1.19, 32.84). A high proportion of primary bile acids has also been found in other studies of patients with a genetic predisposition to proximal bowel cancer, however this pattern may also occur in low risk groups, such as Indian vegetarians, suggesting that they may predispose to right-sided bowel cancer only in the presence of other, as yet unknown factors. If bile acids are involved in the causation of large bowel cancer, they

  18. Bile acids and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Molecular insights and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P.; Karpen, Saul J.; Dawson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a burgeoning health problem worldwide and an important risk factor for both hepatic and cardiometabolic mortality. The rapidly increasing prevalence of this disease and of its aggressive form nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) will require novel therapeutic approaches to prevent disease progression to advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis and cancer. In recent years, bile acids have emerged as relevant signaling molecules that act at both hepatic and extrahepatic tissues to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolic pathways as well as energy homeostasis. Activation or modulation of bile acid receptors, such as the farnesoid X receptor and TGR5, and transporters, such as the ileal apical sodium‐dependent bile acid transporter, appear to affect both insulin sensitivity and NAFLD/NASH pathogenesis at multiple levels, and these approaches hold promise as novel therapies. In the present review, we summarize current available data on the relationships of bile acids to NAFLD and the potential for therapeutically targeting bile‐acid‐related pathways to address this growing world‐wide disease. (Hepatology 2017;65:350‐362) PMID:27358174

  19. Bile acid dysregulation, gut dysbiosis, and gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuei, Jessica; Chau, Thinh; Mills, David; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Because of increasingly widespread sedentary lifestyles and diets high in fat and sugar, the global diabetes and obesity epidemic continues to grow unabated. A substantial body of evidence has been accumulated which associates diabetes and obesity to dramatically higher risk of cancer development, particularly in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, diabetic and obese individuals have been shown to suffer from dysregulation of bile acid (BA) homeostasis and dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome. Abnormally elevated levels of cytotoxic secondary BAs and a pro-inflammatory shift in gut microbial profile have individually been linked to numerous enterohepatic diseases including cancer. However, recent findings have implicated a detrimental interplay between BA dysregulation and intestinal dysbiosis that promotes carcinogenesis along the gut–liver axis. This review seeks to examine the currently investigated interactions between the regulation of BA metabolism and activity of the intestinal microbiota and how these interactions can drive cancer formation in the context of diabesity. The precarcinogenic effects of BA dysregulation and gut dysbiosis including excessive inflammation, heightened oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation are discussed. Furthermore, by focusing on the mediatory roles of BA nuclear receptor farnesoid x receptor, ileal transporter apical sodium dependent BA transporter, and G-coupled protein receptor TGR5, this review attempts to connect BA dysregulation, gut dysbiosis, and enterohepatic carcinogenesis at a mechanistic level. A better understanding of the intricate interplay between BA homeostasis and gut microbiome can yield novel avenues to combat the impending rise in diabesity-related cancers. PMID:24951470

  20. Bile acid dysregulation, gut dysbiosis, and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuei, Jessica; Chau, Thinh; Mills, David; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2014-11-01

    Because of increasingly widespread sedentary lifestyles and diets high in fat and sugar, the global diabetes and obesity epidemic continues to grow unabated. A substantial body of evidence has been accumulated which associates diabetes and obesity to dramatically higher risk of cancer development, particularly in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, diabetic and obese individuals have been shown to suffer from dysregulation of bile acid (BA) homeostasis and dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome. Abnormally elevated levels of cytotoxic secondary BAs and a pro-inflammatory shift in gut microbial profile have individually been linked to numerous enterohepatic diseases including cancer. However, recent findings have implicated a detrimental interplay between BA dysregulation and intestinal dysbiosis that promotes carcinogenesis along the gut-liver axis. This review seeks to examine the currently investigated interactions between the regulation of BA metabolism and activity of the intestinal microbiota and how these interactions can drive cancer formation in the context of diabesity. The precarcinogenic effects of BA dysregulation and gut dysbiosis including excessive inflammation, heightened oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation are discussed. Furthermore, by focusing on the mediatory roles of BA nuclear receptor farnesoid x receptor, ileal transporter apical sodium dependent BA transporter, and G-coupled protein receptor TGR5, this review attempts to connect BA dysregulation, gut dysbiosis, and enterohepatic carcinogenesis at a mechanistic level. A better understanding of the intricate interplay between BA homeostasis and gut microbiome can yield novel avenues to combat the impending rise in diabesity-related cancers.

  1. Transport systems in cholangiocytes: their role in bile formation and cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, M.

    1997-01-01

    Formation of bile requires the coordinated function of two epithelial cell types: hepatocytes, that are responsible for secretion of the major osmolytes and biliary constituents and cholangiocytes that regulate the fluidity and alkalinity of bile through secretion of osmolytes such as Cl- and HCO3- Studies in isolated cholangiocyte preparations have elucidated the basic transport mechanisms involved in constitutive and stimulated secretory activities in the biliary epithelium. Basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger and Na+:HCO3- symporter mediate HCO3- uptake, while an apical cAMP-activated Cl-/HCO3- exchanger secretes bicarbonate into the lumen. Cholangiocytes also possess a cAMP-stimulated Cl- conductance (CFTR) and a Ca-activated Cl- channel, both likely located at the apical membrane. Cholangiocyte secretory functions are regulated by a complex network of hormones mainly acting via the cAMP system. In addition, recent data indicate that part of the regulation of ductular secretion may take place at the apical membrane of the cholangiocyte through factors present into the bile, such as ATP, bile acids and glutathione. Primary damage to the biliary epithelium is the cause of several chronic cholestatic disorders (cholangiopathies). From a pathophysiological point of view, common to all cholangiopathies is the coexistance of cholangiocyte death and proliferation and various degrees of portal inflammation and fibrosis. Cholestasis dominates the clinical picture and, pathophysiologically, may initiate or worsen the process. Alterations in biliary electrolyte transport could contribute to the pathogenesis of cholestasis in primary bile duct diseases. Cystic Fibrosis-related liver disease represents an example of biliary cirrhosis secondary to a derangement of cholangiocyte ion transport. Most primary cholangiopaties recognize an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Cytokines, chemokines, and proinflammatory mediators released in the portal spaces or produced by the cholangiocyte

  2. Non chromatographic colorimetric assay for total taurine-conjugated bile acids: application of measurements of glycine: taurine ratio in bile.

    PubMed

    Christie, W H; Macdonald, I A; Williams, C N

    1975-03-01

    A direct colorimetric assay for total conjugated taurine from bile-rich duodenal aspirates is described. The method is based on complete acetylation of the free hydroxyl groups by acetic anhydride at 100 degrees C. of both the tri- and di-hydroxy bile acids in Folch extracted bile samples. Taurine-conjugated bile acids are measured by ion pair formation with Azure A and subsequent extraction of the complex into the organic phase of a biphasic system. Absorption at 645 nm. of this complex directly quantifies total taurine-conjugated bile acid. Total bile acids are then estimated by the 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay. The difference between the concentration of the total conjugated bile acid and of the total conjugated taurine determines the concentration of glycine conjugates and the glycine:taurine ratio. Potentially interfering materials such as sulphalipids, certain phospholipids, and unconjugated bile acids are removed by Folch extraction. The 3-hydroxysteroid sulfates (cholesteryl sulfate, lithocholate sulfate, and glycocholate sulfate) are not measurable by heating in acetic anhydride and do not interfere. Taurolithocholate-3-sulfate, under identical conditions, gives a measurable but very low color yield and in normal physiologic concentrations would contribute negligible color. As previously reported, this assay under prescribed conditions is selective for long-chain amphipathic sulfates or sulfonates with no measurable color yield with glycine conjugates, unconjugated bile acids, free fatty acids, or lecithin. Values for glycine:taurine ratios by the above-described method in both normal bile extracts and extracts from patients with either elevated or depressed ratios relate closely to those determined by thin-layer chromatography.

  3. Hydroxylation, conjugation and sulfation of bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Meijer, P.

    1988-08-15

    Hydroxylation of lithocholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic and cholic acids was studied in monolayers of rat hepatocytes cultured for 76 h. The majority of added lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids was metabolized to beta-muricholic acid (56-76%). A small part of these bile acids (9%), however, and a considerable amount of deoxycholic and cholic acids (21%) were converted into metabolites more polar than cholic acid in the first culture period. Formation of these compounds decreased during the last day of culture. Bile acids synthesized after addition of (4-/sup 14/C)-cholesterol were almost entirely (97%) sulfated and/or conjugated, predominantly with taurine (54-66%), during culture. Sulfated bile acids were mainly composed of free bile acids. The ability of hepatocytes to sulfurylate bile acids declined with culture age. Thus, rat hepatocytes in primary monolayer culture are capable to sulfurylate bile acids and to hydroxylate trihydroxylated bile acids, suggesting formation of polyhydroxylated metabolites.

  4. Strong activation of bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) by ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Wiemuth, Dominik; Sahin, Hacer; Lefèvre, Cathérine M T; Wasmuth, Hermann E; Gründer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC gene family of unknown function. Rat BASIC (rBASIC) is inactive at rest. We have recently shown that cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the bile ducts, are the main site of BASIC expression in the liver and identified bile acids, in particular hyo- and chenodeoxycholic acid, as agonists of rBASIC. Moreover, it seems that extracellular divalent cations stabilize the resting state of rBASIC, because removal of extracellular divalent cations opens the channel. In this addendum, we demonstrate that removal of extracellular divalent cations potentiates the activation of rBASIC by bile acids, suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Furthermore, we show that rBASIC is strongly activated by the anticholestatic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), suggesting that BASIC might mediate part of the therapeutic effects of UDCA.

  5. Bile acids, farnesoid X receptor, atherosclerosis and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Folkert; Stroeve, Johanna H M; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2007-06-01

    Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules synthesized from cholesterol exclusively in the liver that are essential for effective absorption of dietary fat. In addition to this 'classical role', bile acids act as signalling molecules that control their own metabolism by activating the nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor. Recent work demonstrates that farnesoid X receptor exerts metabolic control beyond bile acid homeostasis, notably effects on HDL, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Farnesoid X receptor influences insulin sensitivity of tissues that are not part of the enterohepatic circulation, for example, adipose tissue. Certain metabolic effects in the liver appear to be mediated via farnesoid X receptor-stimulated release of an intestinal growth factor. In addition, novel signalling pathways independent of farnesoid X receptor have been identified that may contribute to bile acid-mediated metabolic regulation. Farnesoid X receptor represents a potentially attractive target for treatment of various aspects of the metabolic syndrome and for prevention of atherosclerosis. Yet, in view of its pleiotropic effects and apparent species-specificity, it is evident that successful interference of the farnesoid X receptor signalling system will require the development of gene-specific and/or organ-specific farnesoid X receptor modulators and extensive testing in human models of disease.

  6. Regulation of bile acid synthesis in rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kubaska, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hepatocyte monolayer cultures (PHC) were prepared and incubated in serum free media. Cells from a cholestyramine fed rat converted exogenous (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-bile acids at a 3-fold greater rate than rats fed a normal diet. PHC synthesize bile acids (BA) at a rate of approximately 0.06 ..mu..g/mg protein/h. The major bile acid composition, as determined by GLC, was ..beta..-muricholic acid (BMC) and cholic acid (CA) in a 3:1 ratio, respectively. PHC rapidly converted free BA and BA intermediates into taurine conjugated trihydroxy-BA up to 87h after plating. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A-reductase activity assayed in microsomes prepared from PHC, decreased during the initial 48h, then remained constant. Cholesterol 7..cap alpha..-hydroxylase activity decreased during the initial 48h, then increased during the next 48h. This occurred while whole cells produced BA at a linear rate. The effect of individual BA on bile acid synthesis (BAS) was also studied. Relative rates of BAS were measured as the conversion of (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-BA. BA combinations were tested in order to simulate the composition of the enterohepatic circulation. The addition of TCA (525 ..mu..M) plus TCDCA (80..mu..M), in concentrations which greatly exceed the concentration of BA (60..mu..M) in rate portal blood, failed to inhibit BAS. BA plus phospholipid and/or cholesterol also did not inhibit BAS. Surprisingly, crude rat bile with a final concentration comparable to those in the synthetic mix inhibited (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol conversion into (/sup 14/C)-BA.

  7. Comparison of endogenous and radiolabeled bile acid excretion in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, L.R.; Bilhartz, L.E.; Santa Ana, C.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Fecal recovery of radioactivity after ingestion of a bolus of radiolabeled bile acid is abnormally high in most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. To evaluate the significance of this malabsorption, concurrent fecal excretion of both exogenous radiolabeled bile acid and endogenous (unlabeled) bile acid were measured in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. Subjects received a 2.5-microCi oral dose of taurocholic acid labeled with 14C in the 24th position of the steroid moiety. Endogenous bile acid excretion was measured by a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay on a concurrent 72-h stool collection. Both radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion were abnormally high in most patients with chronic diarrhea compared with normal subjects, even when equivoluminous diarrhea was induced in normal subjects by ingestion of osmotically active solutions. The correlation between radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion was good. However, neither radiolabeled nor endogenous bile acid excretion was as abnormal as is typically seen in patients with ileal resection, and none of these diarrhea patients responded to treatment with cholestyramine with stool weights less than 200 g. These results suggest (a) that this radiolabeled bile acid excretion test accurately reflects excess endogenous bile acid excretion; (b) that excess endogenous bile acid excretion is not caused by diarrhea per se; (c) that spontaneously occurring idiopathic chronic diarrhea is often associated with increased endogenous bile acid excretion; and (d) that bile acid malabsorption is not likely to be the primary cause of diarrhea in most of these patients.

  8. Hypercholesterolemia and changes in lipid and bile acid metabolism in male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sandra K; Lear, Steven R; Deane, Sean; Dubrac, Sandrine; Huling, Sandra L; Nguyen, Lien; Bollineni, Jaya S; Shefer, Sarah; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Cohen, David E; Shneider, Benjamin; Sehayek, Ephraim; Ananthanarayanan, Meena; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Suchy, Fredrick J; Batta, Ashok K; Salen, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, has been implicated in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. The gene, CYP7A1, encoding a protein with this activity, is expressed normally only in hepatocytes and is highly regulated. Our cyp7A1 gene knockout mouse colony, as young adults on a chow diet, is hypercholesterolemic. These mice were characterized extensively to understand how cyp7A1 affects lipid and bile acid homeostasis in different tissue compartments and whether gender plays a modifying role. Both male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice had decreased hepatic LDL receptors, unchanged hepatic cholesterol synthesis, increased intestinal cholesterol synthesis and bile acid transporters, and decreased fecal bile acids but increased fecal sterols. In females, cyp7A1 deficiency also caused changes in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, decreased hepatic canalicular bile acid transporter, Bsep, and gallbladder bile composition altered to a lithogenic profile. Taken together, the data suggest that cyp7A1 deficiency results in a proatherogenic phenotype in both genders and leads to a prolithogenic phenotype in females.

  9. Molecular determinants in the transport of a bile acid-derived diagnostic agent in tumoral and nontumoral cell lines of human liver.

    PubMed

    Libra, Antonin; Fernetti, Cristina; Lorusso, Vito; Visigalli, Massimo; Anelli, Pier Lucio; Staud, Frantisek; Tiribelli, Claudio; Pascolo, Lorella

    2006-11-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of liver diseases. As gadocoletic acid trisodium salt (B22956/1), a new contrast agent showing high biliary excretion, may be potentially advantageous in hepatobiliary imaging, the aim of the study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of hepatic transport of the B22956 ion in a cellular model of hepatic tumor. B22956 ion uptake was measured in tumoral (HepG2) and nontumoral (Chang liver) hepatic cell lines. Absolute quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses, using cloned PCR products as standards, were performed on total RNA of both cell lines and normal liver to evaluate the transcription of 12 transport genes: SLCO1A2, SLCO2B1, SLCO1B1, SLCO3A1, SLCO4A1, SLCO1B3, SLC22A7, SLC22A8, SLC22A1, SLC10A1, SLC15A1, and SLC15A2. B22956 transport was more efficient in Chang liver than in HepG2 cells and was inhibited by cholecystokinin-8, a specific substrate of OATP1B3. Real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed different transcription profiles in the tumoral and nontumoral cell lines. Compared with normal liver, the expression of SLCO1B1, SLCO3A1, and SLCO1B3 was greatly repressed in HepG2 cells, whereas SLCO2B1, SLC22A7, and SLC22A8 expression was either maintained or increased. On the contrary, in Chang liver cells, SLC22A7 and SLC22A8 genes were undetectable, whereas the expression of SLCO3A1, SLCO4A1, and SLCO1B3 was similar to normal liver. Transport studies and gene expression analyses indicated that B22956 ion is a good substrate to the liver-specific OATP1B3, reported to be poorly expressed or absent in human liver tumors. Therefore, B22956 may be helpful in detecting hepatic neoplastic lesions by CE-MRI.

  10. The protective effect of hydrophilic bile acids on bile acid hepatotoxicity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kitani, K

    1995-09-01

    Taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC) (or taurocholate, TC) excessively i.v. infused in rats causes an acute cholestasis accompanied by an excessive excretion of various proteins (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH, albumin, etc.) into the bile. This cholestasis was initially found to be effectively prevented by a simultaneous infusion of tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC). Later this property was found to be shared by glycoursodeoxycholate (GUDC) and tauro (and glyco) alpha and beta-muricholate (MC) all known to be relatively hydrophilic. The extent of the preventative effect appears to be comparable for taurine and glycine conjugates of all three bile salts (UDC, alpha-MC and beta-MC). An albumin leakage into the bile enhanced by TCDC infusion appears to be mainly from albumin in the serum, since i.v. injected 125I-human serum albumin excretion into the bile paralled the rat albumin excretion. Despite very drastic biochemical abnormalities induced by TCDC infusion, morphological correlates in the liver are scarce both from light and electron microscopic examinations, the only correlate with biochemical parameters being a sporadic necrosis of hepatocytes, especially in the periportal areas. Although there is not sufficient morphological evidence, it appears that TCDC infusion causes a direct communication between serum and bile leading to a rapid leakage of large molecules such as albumin and even gamma-globulin. Conjugates of hydrophilic bile salts such as UDC, alpha-MC and beta-MC efficiently prevent such bile abnormalities but their hydrophilicity is not the sole determinant of this property since a more hydrophilic bile salt such as taurodehydrocholate does not possess this property. The underlying mechanism(s) for this protective property remains uncertain.

  11. Valproic acid-associated vanishing bile duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Selim; Durmaz, Ozlem; Celtik, Coskun; Aydogan, Aysen; Güllüoglu, Mine; Sökücü, Semra

    2010-07-01

    Hepatotoxicity as a result of valproic acid therapy is well documented. Elevation in aminotransferase activities is rarely associated with symptoms. It sometimes manifests as acute liver failure. Here, we report a 8-year-old girl who was referred for unresolving jaundice and itching for 3 months. Past history revealed afebrile convulsion 5 months previously and beginning of valproic acid treatment. Valproic acid was discontinued after the development of jaundice. Physical examination revealed ichterus, xanthomas on extensor surfaces of extremities, and hepatomegaly without any sign of chronic liver disease. Total and direct bilirubin levels were 20.2 and 12.9 mg/dL, respectively. Enzyme activities indicating cholestasis were increased together with blood cholesterol. Tests for infectious and autoimmune, metabolic, and genetic disorders were not informative. Liver biopsy revealed portal inflammation, severe bile duct loss, and cholestasis. The patient was considered to have valproic acid-associated vanishing bile duct syndrome, which has not been reported previously.

  12. A novel primary bile acid in the Shoebill stork and herons and its phylogenetic significance.

    PubMed

    Hagey, L R; Schteingart, C D; Ton-Nu, H-T; Hofmann, A F

    2002-05-01

    The Shoebill stork, an enigma phylogenetically, was found to contain as its dominant biliary bile acid 16alpha-hydroxychenodeoxycholic acid, a heretofore undescribed bile acid. The bile acid occurred as its taurine N-acyl amidate; structure was established by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). A search for this novel bile acid in other Ciconiiformes showed that it constituted >92% of biliary bile acids in five of nine herons in the Ardidae, but was absent in all other families (Ciconiidae, Threskiornithidae, Scopidae, Phoenicopteridae). The presence of this biochemical trait in the Shoebill stork and certain herons suggests that these birds are closely related.

  13. Impact of Dry Solids and Bile Acid Concentrations on Bile Acid Binding Capacity of Extruded Oat Cereals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extruded breakfast cereals (EBC), processed from two oat lines, N979-5-2-4 (N979) and ‘Jim’, with beta-glucan concentrations of 8.7 and 4.9%, respectively, were used to determine the impact of dry solids (DS) and bile acid (BA) concentrations on in vitro BA binding efficiency. A full fractional fact...

  14. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  15. Elevated bile acids in newborns with Biliary Atresia (BA).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kejun; Lin, Na; Xiao, Yongtao; Wang, Yang; Wen, Jie; Zou, Gang-Ming; Gu, Xuefan; Cai, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Biliary Atresia (BA), a result from inflammatory destruction of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts, is a severe hepatobiliary disorder unique to infancy. Early diagnosis and Kasai operation greatly improve the outcome of BA patients, which encourages the development of early screening methods. Using HPLC coupled tandem mass spectrometry, we detected primary bile acids content in dried blood spots obtained from 8 BA infants, 17 neonatal jaundice and 292 comparison infants at 3-4 days of life. Taurocholate (TC) was significantly elevated in biliary atresia infants (0.98 ± 0.62 µmol/L) compared to neonatal jaundice (0.47 ± 0.30 µmol/L) and comparison infants (0.43 ± 0.40 µmol/L), with p=0.0231 and p=0.0016 respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for TC to discriminate BA and comparison infants was 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.72-0.92). A cutoff of 0.63 µmol/L produced a sensitivity of 79.1% and specificity of 62.5%. The concentrations of total bile acids were also raised significantly in BA compared to comparison infants (6.62 ± 3.89 µmol/L vs 3.81 ± 3.06 µmol/L, p=0.0162), with the area under ROC curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval: 0.61-0.89). No significant difference was found between the bile acids of neonatal jaundice and that of comparison infants. The early increase of bile acids indicates the presentation of BA in the immediate newborn period and the possibility of TC as newborn screening marker.

  16. Increased cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase expression and size of the bile acid pool in the lactating rat

    PubMed Central

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Cohen, David E.; Vore, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Maximal bile acid secretory rates and expression of bile acid transporters in liver and ileum are increased in lactation, possibly to facilitate increased enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We determined changes in the size and composition of the bile acid pool and key enzymes of the bile acid synthetic pathway [cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), sterol 27-hydroxylase (Cyp27a1), and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (Cyp8b1)] in lactating rats relative to female virgin controls. The bile acid pool increased 1.9 to 2.5-fold [postpartum (PP) days 10, 14, and 19–23], compared with controls. A 1.5-fold increase in cholic acids and a 14 to 20% decrease in muricholic acids in lactation significantly increased the hydrophobicity index. In contrast, the hepatic concentration of bile acids and small heterodimer partner mRNA were unchanged in lactation. A 2.8-fold increase in Cyp7a1 mRNA expression at 16 h (10 h of light) demonstrated a shift in the diurnal rhythm at day 10 PP; Cyp7a1 protein expression and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity were significantly increased at this time and remained elevated at day 14 PP but decreased to control levels by day 21 PP. There was an overall decrease in Cyp27a1 mRNA expression and a 20% decrease in Cyp27a1 protein expression, but there was no change in Cyp8b1 mRNA or protein expression at day 10 PP. The increase in Cyp7a1 expression PP provides a mechanism for the increase in the bile acid pool. PMID:18292185

  17. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α regulation of bile acid and drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John YL

    2013-01-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a liver-enriched nuclear receptor that plays a critical role in early morphogenesis, fetal liver development, liver differentiation and metabolism. Human HNF4α gene mutations cause maturity on-set diabetes of the young type 1, an autosomal dominant non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. HNF4α is an orphan nuclear receptor because of which the endogenous ligand has not been firmly identified. The trans-activating activity of HNF4α is enhanced by interacting with co-activators and inhibited by corepressors. Recent studies have revealed that HNF4α plays a central role in regulation of bile acid metabolism in the liver. Bile acids are required for biliary excretion of cholesterol and metabolites, and intestinal absorption of fat, nutrients, drug and xenobiotics for transport and distribution to liver and other tissues. Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors to control lipids and drug metabolism in the liver and intestine. Therefore, HNF4α plays a central role in coordinated regulation of bile acid and xenobiotics metabolism. Drugs that specifically activate HNF4α could be developed for treating metabolic diseases such as diabetes, dyslipidemia and cholestasis, as well as drug metabolism and detoxification. PMID:19239393

  18. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  19. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

  20. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  1. Bile Acid Pool Dynamics in Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis with Partial External Bile Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Jericho, Hilary Smith; Kaurs, Elizabeth; Boverhof, Renze; Knisely, Alex; Shneider, Benjamin L; Verkade, Henkjan J; Whitington, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Partial external bile diversion (PEBD) is an established therapy for low-GGT Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis (PFIC). This study sought to determine if the dynamics of the cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) pools in low-GGT-PFIC subjects with successful PEBD were equivalent to those achieved with successful liver transplantation (LTX). Methods The kinetics of CA and CDCA metabolism were measured by stable isotope dilution in plasma samples in 5 PEBD subjects all with intact canalicular BSEP expression and compared to low-GGT-PFIC subjects with successful LTX. Stomal loss of bile acids was measured in PEBD subjects. Results The fractional turnover rate for CA in the PEBD group ranged from 0.5 to 4.2 d−1 (LTX group, range 0.2 – 0.9 d−1, p = 0.076) and for CDCA from 0.7 to 4.5 d−1 (LTX group 0.3 – 0.4 d−1, p = 0.009). The CA and CDCA pool sizes were equivalent between groups; however pool composition in PEBD was somewhat more hydrophilic. The CA/CDCA ratio in PEBD ranged from 0.9 to 19.5, whereas in LTX it ranged from 0.5 to 2.6. Synthesis rates computed from isotope dilution correlated well with timed output for both CA: r2 = 0.760, p = 0.024 and CDCA: r2 = 0.690, p = 0.021. Conclusions PEBD results in bile acid fractional turnover rates greater than LTX, pool sizes equivalent to LTX and pool composition that is at least as hydrophilic as produced by LTX. PMID:25383786

  2. Profile of serum bile acids in non-cholestatic volunteers: gender-related differences in response to fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, J.; Caron, P.; Straka, R. J.; Barbier, O.

    2016-01-01

    Fenofibrate belongs to hypolipidemic fibrates that act as activators of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, a regulator of bile acid synthesis, metabolism and transport. The present study aimed at evaluating the effects of fenofibrate on the circulating bile acid profile in humans. Hundred healthy men and women completed a 3-week intervention with fenofibrate, and 17 bile acid species were measured in serum samples drawn before and after fenofibrate treatment. Fenofibrate caused significant reductions in levels of chenodeoxycholic (−26.4%), ursodeoxycholic (−30.5%), lithocholic (−18.4%), deoxycholic (−22.3%) and hyodeoxycholic (−19.2%) acids. A gender-related difference was observed in the response of various bile acids and the total bile acid concentration was significantly reduced only in men (−18.6%), while remaining almost unchanged in women (+0.36%). This difference detected suggests that fenofibrate should be more efficient at reducing bile acid toxicity in men than in women in cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:21716269

  3. In Vitro Bile Acid Binding Capacities of Red Leaf Lettuce and Cruciferous Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Yang, Isabelle F; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2017-09-13

    In the present study, we tested the bile acid binding capacity of red leaf lettuce, red cabbage, red kale, green kale, and Brussels sprouts through in vitro digestion process by simulating mouth, gastric, and intestinal digestion using six bile acids at physiological pH. Green and red kale exhibited significantly higher (86.5 ± 2.9 and 89.7 ± 0.9%, respectively) bile acid binding capacity compared to the other samples. Further, three different compositions of bile acids were tested to understand the effect on different health conditions. To predict the optimal dose for bile acid binding, we established a logistic relationship between kale dose and bile acid binding capacity. The results indicated that kale showed significantly higher bile acid binding capacity (82.5 ± 2.9% equivalent to 72.06 mg) at 1.5 g sample and remained constant up to 2.5 g. In addition, minimally processed (microwaved 3 min or steamed 8 min) green kale showed significantly enhanced bile acid binding capacity (91.1 ± 0.3 and 90.2 ± 0.7%, respectively) compared to lyophilized kale (85.5 ± 0.24%). Among the six bile acids tested, kale preferentially bound hydrophobic bile acids chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid. Therefore, regular consumption of kale, especially minimally processed kale, can help excrete more bile acids and, thus, may lower the risk of hypercholesterolemia.

  4. Bile acids stimulate chloride secretion through CFTR and calcium-activated Cl- channels in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Siobhán M; Mroz, Magdalena S; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J; Harvey, Brian J

    2014-09-01

    Bile acids resulting from the aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate are often present in the lower airways of people with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory distress diseases. Surprisingly, there is little or no information on the modulation of airway epithelial ion transport by bile acids. The secretory effect of a variety of conjugated and unconjugated secondary bile acids was investigated in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells grown under an air-liquid interface and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic transepithelial ion transport was measured as short-circuit current (Isc). The taurine-conjugated secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), was found to be the most potent modulator of basal ion transport. Acute treatment (5 min) of Calu-3 cells with TDCA (25 μM) on the basolateral side caused a stimulation of Isc, and removal of extracellular Cl(-) abolished this response. TDCA produced an increase in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-dependent current that was abolished by pretreatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172. TDCA treatment also increased Cl(-) secretion through calcium-activated chloride (CaCC) channels and increased the Na(+)/K(+) pump current. Acute treatment with TDCA resulted in a rapid cellular influx of Ca(2+) and increased cAMP levels in Calu-3 cells. Bile acid receptor-selective activation with INT-777 revealed TGR5 localized at the basolateral membrane as the receptor involved in TDCA-induced Cl(-) secretion. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that low concentrations of bile acids can modulate Cl(-) secretion in airway epithelial cells, and this effect is dependent on both the duration and sidedness of exposure to the bile acid.

  5. A comparative study of the sulfation of bile acids and a bile alcohol by the Zebra danio (Danio rerio) and human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs)

    PubMed Central

    Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Injeti, Elisha; Liu, Ming-Yih; Williams, Frederick E.; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2012-01-01

    The current study was designed to examine the sulfation of bile acids and bile alcohols by the Zebra danio (Danio rerio) SULTs in comparison with human SULTs. A systematic analysis using the fifteen Zebra danio SULTs revealed that SULT3 ST2 and SULT3 ST3 were the major bile acid/alcohol-sulfating SULTs. Among the eleven human SULTs, only SULT2A1 was found to be capable of sulfating bile acids and bile alcohols. To further investigate the sulfation of bile acids and bile alcohols by the two Zebra danio SULT3 STs and the human SULT2A1, pH-dependence and kinetics of the sulfation of bile acids/alcohols were analyzed. pH-dependence experiments showed that the mechanisms underlying substrate recognition for the sulfation of lithocholic acid (a bile acid) and 5α-petromyzonol (a bile alcohol) differed between the human SULT2A1 and the Zebra danio SULT3 ST2 and ST3. Kinetic analysis indicated that both the two Zebra danio SULT3 STs preferred petromyzonol as substrate compared to bile acids. In contrast, the human SULT2A1 was more catalytically efficient toward lithocholic acid than petromyzonol. Collectively, the results imply that the Zebra danio and human SULTs have evolved to serve for the sulfation of, respectively, bile alcohols and bile acids, matching the cholanoid profile in these two vertebrate species. PMID:21839837

  6. A comparative study of the sulfation of bile acids and a bile alcohol by the Zebra danio (Danio rerio) and human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs).

    PubMed

    Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Krasowski, Matthew D; Injeti, Elisha; Liu, Ming-Yih; Williams, Frederick E; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2011-11-01

    The current study was designed to examine the sulfation of bile acids and bile alcohols by the Zebra danio (Danio rerio) SULTs in comparison with human SULTs. A systematic analysis using the fifteen Zebra danio SULTs revealed that SULT3 ST2 and SULT3 ST3 were the major bile acid/alcohol-sulfating SULTs. Among the eleven human SULTs, only SULT2A1 was found to be capable of sulfating bile acids and bile alcohols. To further investigate the sulfation of bile acids and bile alcohols by the two Zebra danio SULT3 STs and the human SULT2A1, pH-dependence and kinetics of the sulfation of bile acids/alcohols were analyzed. pH-dependence experiments showed that the mechanisms underlying substrate recognition for the sulfation of lithocholic acid (a bile acid) and 5α-petromyzonol (a bile alcohol) differed between the human SULT2A1 and the Zebra danio SULT3 ST2 and ST3. Kinetic analysis indicated that both the two Zebra danio SULT3 STs preferred petromyzonol as substrate compared to bile acids. In contrast, the human SULT2A1 was more catalytically efficient toward lithocholic acid than petromyzonol. Collectively, the results imply that the Zebra danio and human SULTs have evolved to serve for the sulfation of, respectively, bile alcohols and bile acids, matching the cholanoid profile in these two vertebrate species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lithocholic acid decreases expression of bile salt export pump through farnesoid X receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinghua; Lo, Jane-L; Huang, Li; Zhao, Annie; Metzger, Edward; Adams, Alan; Meinke, Peter T; Wright, Samuel D; Cui, Jisong

    2002-08-30

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP) is a major bile acid transporter in the liver. Mutations in BSEP result in progressive intrahepatic cholestasis, a severe liver disease that impairs bile flow and causes irreversible liver damage. BSEP is a target for inhibition and down-regulation by drugs and abnormal bile salt metabolites, and such inhibition and down-regulation may result in bile acid retention and intrahepatic cholestasis. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the regulation of BSEP expression by FXR ligands in primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. We demonstrate that BSEP expression is dramatically regulated by ligands of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Both the endogenous FXR agonist chenodeoxycholate (CDCA) and synthetic FXR ligand GW4064 effectively increased BSEP mRNA in both cell types. This up-regulation was readily detectable at as early as 3 h, and the ligand potency for BSEP regulation correlates with the intrinsic activity on FXR. These results suggest BSEP as a direct target of FXR and support the recent report that the BSEP promoter is transactivated by FXR. In contrast to CDCA and GW4064, lithocholate (LCA), a hydrophobic bile acid and a potent inducer of cholestasis, strongly decreased BSEP expression. Previous studies did not identify LCA as an FXR antagonist ligand in cells, but we show here that LCA is an FXR antagonist with partial agonist activity in cells. In an in vitro co-activator association assay, LCA decreased CDCA- and GW4064-induced FXR activation with an IC(50) of 1 microm. In HepG2 cells, LCA also effectively antagonized GW4064-enhanced FXR transactivation. These data suggest that the toxic and cholestatic effect of LCA in animals may result from its down-regulation of BSEP through FXR. Taken together, these observations indicate that FXR plays an important role in BSEP gene expression and that FXR ligands may be potential therapeutic drugs for intrahepatic cholestasis.

  8. Description and simulation of a physiological pharmacokinetic model for the metabolism and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in man. Cholic acid in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, A F; Molino, G; Milanese, M; Belforte, G

    1983-01-01

    A multicompartmental pharmacokinetic model based on physiological principles, experimental data, and the standard mathematical principles of compartmental analysis has been constructed that fully describes the metabolism and enterohepatic cycling in man of cholic acid, a major bile acid. The model features compartments and linear transfer coefficients. The compartments are aggregated into nine spaces based on physiological considerations (liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, jejunum, ileum, colon, portal blood sinusoidal blood, and general circulation). The transfer coefficients are also categorized according to function: flow, i.e., emptying of gallbladder or intestinal spaces, and circulation of the blood; biotransformation, i.e., conjugation, deconjugation, or dehydroxylation; and transport, i.e., active or passive transport. The model is made time dependent by introducing meals, which trigger discrete increases in gallbladder emptying and intestinal flow. Each space contains three compartments. For cholic acid, these are unconjugated cholic acid, cholylglycine, and cholyltaurine. The model was then used with all existing experimental data to simulate cholic acid metabolism in healthy man over a 24-h period. Satisfactory agreement was obtained between simulated and experimental results for serum bile acid levels, hepatic bile acid secretion, and bile acid secretion into the intestine. The model was also used to classify 16 clinical instances in which the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids is altered by drugs or disease. The model can be extended to describe completely the metabolism and enterohepatic circulation of any bile acids in man in health and digestive disease. The model should also be broadly applicable to the description of the pharmacokinetics of all other drugs whose metabolism is similar to that of bile acids, i.e., drugs for which there are tissue and bacterial biotransformations, enterohepatic cycling, and appreciable first-pass clearance. Images

  9. Human liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase gammagamma isozyme: the sole cytosolic 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of iso bile acids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, H U; Oppermann, U C; Svensson, S; Nordling, E; Persson, B; Höög, J O; Jörnvall, H

    2000-04-01

    3beta-Hydroxy (iso) bile acids are formed during enterohepatic circulation from 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids and constitute normal compounds in plasma but are virtually absent in bile. Isoursodeoxycholic acid (isoUDCA) is a major metabolite of UDCA. In a recent study it was found that after administration of isoUDCA, UDCA became the major acid in bile. Thus, epimerization of the 3beta-hydroxy to a 3alpha-hydroxy group, catalyzed by 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) and 3-oxo-reductases must occur. The present study aims to characterize the human liver bile acid 3beta-HSD. Human liver cytosol and recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) betabeta and gammagamma isozymes were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. Activity staining with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) or oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) as cofactors and various iso bile acids as substrates was used to screen for 3beta-HSD activity. Reaction products were identified and quantified by gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Computer-assisted substrate docking of isoUDCA to the active site of a 3-dimensional model of human class I gammagamma ADH was performed. ADH gammagamma isozyme was identified as the iso bile acid 3beta-HSD present in human liver cytosol, with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Values for k(cat)/K(m) were in the rank order isodeoxycholic acid (isoDCA), isochenodeoxycholic acid (isoCDCA), isoUDCA, and isolithocholic acid (isoLCA) (0.10, 0.09, 0.08, and 0. 05 min(-1) x micromol/L(-1), respectively). IsoUDCA fits as substrate to the 3-dimensional model of the active-site of ADH gammagamma. ADH gammagamma isozyme was defined as the only bile acid 3beta-HSD in human liver cytosol. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are candidates for the binding and transport of 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids. We assume that ADH gammagamma isozyme is involved in cytosolic bile acid binding and transport processes as well.

  10. Towards the elucidation of molecular determinants of cooperativity in the liver bile acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ferranti, Pasquale; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Bile acid binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Liver BABPs act in parallel with ileal transporters to ensure vectorial transport of bile salts in hepatocytes and enterocytes, respectively. We describe the investigation of ligand binding to liver BABP, an essential step in the understanding of intracellular bile salt transport. Binding site occupancies were monitored in NMR titration experiments using (15)N-labelled ligand, while the relative populations of differently bound BABP forms were assessed by mass spectrometry. This site-specific information allowed the determination of intrinsic thermodynamic parameters and the identification of an extremely high cooperativity between two binding sites. Protein-observed NMR experiments revealed a global structural rearrangement which suggests an allosteric mechanism at the basis of the observed cooperativity. The view of a molecular tool capable of buffering against significant concentrations of free bile salts in a large range of solution conditions emerges from the observed pH-dependence of binding. We set to determine the molecular determinants of cooperativity by analysing the binding properties of a protein containing a mutated internal histidine. Both mass spectrometry and NMR experiments are consistent with an overall decreased binding affinity of the mutant, while the measured diffusion coefficients of ligand species reveal that the affinity loss concerns essentially one of the two binding sites. We therefore identified a mutation able to disrupt energetic communication functional to efficient binding and conclude that the buried histidine establishes contacts that stabilize the ternary complex. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Synthesis and antifungal activity of bile acid-derived oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Svetaz, Laura; Butassi, Estefanía; Zacchino, Susana A; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2016-04-01

    Peracetylated bile acids (1a-g) were used as starting materials for the preparation of fourteen new derivatives bearing an oxazole moiety in their side chain (6a-g, 8a-g). The key step for the synthetic path was a Dakin-West reaction followed by a Robinson-Gabriel cyclodehydration. A simpler model oxazole (12) was also synthesized. The antifungal activity of the new compounds (6a-g) as well as their starting bile acids (1a-g) was tested against Candida albicans. Compounds 6e and 6g showed the highest percentages of inhibition (63.84% and 61.40% at 250 μg/mL respectively). Deacetylation of compounds 6a-g, led to compounds 8a-g which showed lower activities than the acetylated derivatives.

  12. In vitro inhibition of OATP-mediated uptake of phalloidin using bile acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Vicens, Marta; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Hepatocyte uptake of phalloidin is carried out mainly by OATP1B1. We have used this compound as a prototypic substrate and assayed the ability to inhibit OATP-mediated phalloidin transport of four bile acid derivatives (BALU-1, BALU-2, BALU-3 and BALU-4) that showed positive results in preliminary screening. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes for heterologous expression of transporters, BALUs were found to inhibit taurocholic acid (TCA) transport by OATP1B1 (but not OATP1B3) as well as by rat Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4 and Oatp1b2. The study of their ability to inhibit sodium-dependent bile acid transporters revealed that the four BALUs induced an inhibition of rat Asbt-mediated TCA transport, which was similar to TCA-induced self-inhibition. Regarding human NTCP and rat Ntcp, BALU-1 differs from the other three BALUS in its lack of effect on TCA transport by these proteins. Using HPLC-MS/MS and CHO cells stably expressing OATP1B1 the ability of BALU-1 to inhibit the uptake of phalloidin itself by this transporter was confirmed. Kinetic analysis using X. laevis oocytes revealed that BALU-1-induced inhibition of OATP1B1 was mainly due to a competitive mechanism (Ki = 8 {mu}M). In conclusion, BALU-1 may be useful as a pharmacological tool to inhibit the uptake of compounds mainly taken up by OATP1B1 presumably without impairing bile acid uptake by the major carrier accounting for this process, i.e., NTCP.

  13. Differences in phosphatidylcholine and bile acids in bile from Egyptian and UK patients with and without cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hashim Abdalla, Mohamed S; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Sharif, Amar W; Williams, Horace R T; Crossey, Mary M E; Badra, Gamal A; Thillainayagam, Andrew V; Bansi, Devinder S; Thomas, Howard C; Waked, Imam A; Khan, Shahid A

    2011-06-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a fatal malignancy, the incidence of which is increasing worldwide, with substantial regional variation. Current diagnostic techniques to distinguish benign from malignant biliary disease are unsatisfactory. Metabolic profiling of bile may help to differentiate benign from malignant disease. No previous studies have compared the metabolic profiles of bile from two geographically and racially distinct groups of CC patients. This study aimed to compare metabolic profiles of bile, using in vitro proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, from CC patients from Egypt and the UK, and from patients with CC and patients with non-malignant biliary disease. A total of 29 bile samples, collected at cholangiography, were analysed using an 11.7-T system. Samples were from eight CC patients in either Egypt (n = 4) or the UK (n = 4) and 21 patients with benign biliary disease (choledocholithiasis [n = 8], sphincter of Oddi dysfunction [n = 8], primary sclerosing cholangitis [n = 5]). Bile phosphatidylcholine (PtC) was significantly reduced in CC patients. Egyptian CC patients had significantly lower biliary PtC levels compared with UK patients. Taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile acids (H-26 and H-25 protons, respectively) were significantly elevated in bile from patients with CC compared with bile from patients with benign diseases (P = 0.013 and P < 0.01, respectively). Biliary PtC levels potentially differentiate CC from benign biliary disease. Reduced biliary PtC in Egyptian compared with UK patients may reflect underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  14. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with (/sup 14/C)taurocholate

    SciTech Connect

    Jazrawi, R.P.; Ferraris, R.; Bridges, C.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-07-01

    The apparent fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75-SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ((14C)CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75-SeHCAT than for (14C)CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75-SeHCAT than for (14C)CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function.

  15. Analysis of ileal sodium/bile acid cotransporter and related nuclear receptor genes in a family with multiple cases of idiopathic bile acid malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Montagnani, Marco; Abrahamsson, Anna; Gälman, Cecilia; Eggertsen, Gösta; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Ravaioli, Elisa; Einarsson, Curt; Dawson, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of most cases of idiopathic bile acid malabsorption (IBAM) is unknown. In this study, a Swedish family with bile acid malabsorption in three consecutive generations was screened for mutations in the ileal apical sodium-bile acid cotransporter gene (ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) and in the genes for several of the nuclear receptors known to be important for ASBT expression: the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The patients presented with a clinical history of idiopathic chronic watery diarrhea, which was responsive to cholestyramine treatment and consistent with IBAM. Bile acid absorption was determined using 75Se-homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT); bile acid synthesis was estimated by measuring the plasma levels of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4). The ASBT, FXR, and PPARα genes in the affected and unaffected family members were analyzed using single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing HPLC, and direct sequencing. No ASBT mutations were identified and the ASBT gene did not segregate with the bile acid malabsorption phenotype. Similarly, no mutations or polymorphisms were identified in the FXR or PPARα genes associated with the bile acid malabsorption phenotype. These studies indicate that the intestinal bile acid malabsorption in these patients cannot be attributed to defects in ASBT. In the absence of apparent ileal disease, alternative explanations such as accelerated transit through the small intestine may be responsible for the IBAM. PMID:17171805

  16. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  17. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in rat bile using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-orbitrap mass spectrometry: Alteration of the bile acid composition with aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gakyung; Lee, Hyunbeom; Hong, Jongki; Lee, Soo Hyun; Jung, Byung Hwa

    2016-09-15

    Bile acids (BAs) play important roles in physiological functions, including the homeostasis of cholesterol and lipids and as ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). With the increasing importance of BAs, analytical methods for their quantification and screening have been developed. However, due to the diverse range and variety of BAs with different activation potency, a simple, effective, and sensitive method is required to screen BAs for accurate quantification and identification. This paper presents an application of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS) for profiling BAs in bile. Using this method, along with the accurate quantification of 19 targeted BAs, 22 unknown BAs were detected and characterized by their fragmentation patterns. The method is beneficial for screening most of the BAs (quantitatively and qualitatively) in rat bile with simple preparation in a single run. The sample dilution ranges of each BA were optimized depending on the concentration of BAs in the bile to obtain good peak separation and accurate data. The method validation was performed successfully using charcoal-treated bile and the intra and inter-day coefficients of variation were less than 20% for all BAs while the recovery were above 88.5% except for the lithocholic acid. The method was applied to profile the age-dependent changes in the contents of rat BAs. Through statistical analysis, we found that as the rats aged, unconjugated BAs and glycine-conjugated BAs decreased or were unaffected, while taurine-conjugated BAs were increased in general. Among the unknown BAs, 5 of the taurine-conjugated BAs increased, while a glycine-conjugated BA decreased, in agreement with the trends of the targeted BAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values <50 μM), but only about 20% of the non-sDILI drugs showed this strength of inhibition in primary human hepatocytes and these drugs are associated only with cholestatic and mixed hepatocellular cholestatic (mixed) injuries. The sDILI drugs, which did not show substantial inhibition of bile salt transport activity, are likely to be associated with immune-mediated liver injury. Twenty-four drugs were also tested in monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune

  19. Fasting levels of monoketonic bile acids in human peripheral and portal circulation.

    PubMed

    Björkhem, I; Angelin, B; Einarsson, K; Ewerth, S

    1982-09-01

    It has been suggested that large amounts of ketonic bile acids may be present in portal venous blood. We have therefore determined the approximate concentration of 3-oxo-, 7-oxo-, and 12-oxo-bile acids (monoketonic bile acids) in human peripheral and portal circulation. These compounds were converted into the corresponding 3alpha-, 7alpha-, and 12alpha-hydroxy bile acids by treatment with sodium borodeuteride, thus increasing the molecular weight of each bile acid formed by one mass unit. The ratio between deuterated and nondeuterated bile acid was determined by combined gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with use of selected ion monitoring. From the ratio obtained and from the concentration of unlabeled bile acid, determined by isotope dilution-mass spectrometry, the approximate concentration of the different ketonic bile acids could be calculated. This method underestimates 3-oxygenated bile acids by 4-8%, 7-oxygenated bile acids by 2-3%, and 12-oxygenated bile acids by about 25%. The approximate concentration of monoketonic 3,7-oxygenated bile acids was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.02 and 0.37 +/- 0.25 micro mol/l in the peripheral venous serum and the portal venous serum, respectively. The approximate concentration of monoketonic 3,12-oxygenated bile acids was found to be 0.07 +/- 0.02 and 0.32 +/- 0.12 micro mol/l in the peripheral venous serum and the portal venous serum, respectively. The approximate concentration of monoketonic 3,7,12-oxygenated bile acids was found to be 0.03 +/- 0.01 and 0.14 +/- 0.05 micro mol/l in the peripheral venous serum and in the portal venous serum, respectively. The total concentration of the ketonic bile acids constituted only 9 +/- 1% and 8 +/- 3% of the nonoxidized bile acids in the peripheral venous serum and in the portal venous serum, respectively. Thus it seems less likely that the portal inflow of ketonic bile acids is of significant physiological importance under normal conditions.-Björkhem, I., B. Angelin, K

  20. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  1. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-07

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis.

  2. A biosynthetic pathway for a prominent class of microbiota-derived bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A. Sloan; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The gut bile acid pool is millimolar in concentration, varies widely in composition among individuals, and is linked to metabolic disease and cancer. Although these molecules derive almost exclusively from the microbiota, remarkably little is known about which bacterial species and genes are responsible for their biosynthesis. Here, we report a biosynthetic pathway for the second most abundant class in the gut, iso (3β-hydroxy) bile acids, whose levels exceed 300 µM in some humans and are absent in others. We show, for the first time, that iso bile acids are produced by Ruminococcus gnavus, a far more abundant commensal than previously known producers; and that the iso bile acid pathway detoxifies deoxycholic acid, favoring the growth of the keystone genus Bacteroides. By revealing the biosynthetic genes for an abundant class of bile acids, our work sets the stage for predicting and rationally altering the composition of the bile acid pool. PMID:26192599

  3. A biosynthetic pathway for a prominent class of microbiota-derived bile acids.

    PubMed

    Devlin, A Sloan; Fischbach, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    The gut bile acid pool is millimolar in concentration, varies widely in composition among individuals and is linked to metabolic disease and cancer. Although these molecules are derived almost exclusively from the microbiota, remarkably little is known about which bacterial species and genes are responsible for their biosynthesis. Here we report a biosynthetic pathway for the second most abundant class in the gut, 3β-hydroxy(iso)-bile acids, whose levels exceed 300 μM in some humans and are absent in others. We show, for the first time, that iso-bile acids are produced by Ruminococcus gnavus, a far more abundant commensal than previously known producers, and that the iso-bile acid pathway detoxifies deoxycholic acid and thus favors the growth of the keystone genus Bacteroides. By revealing the biosynthetic genes for an abundant class of bile acids, our work sets the stage for predicting and rationally altering the composition of the bile acid pool.

  4. Oligomeric bile acid-mediated oral delivery of low molecular weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Park, Jooho; Alam, Farzana; Chung, Seung Woo; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-02-10

    Intestinal transporters are limited to the transport of small molecular substrates. Here, we describe the development of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT)-targeted high-affinity oligomeric bile acid substrates that mediate the transmembrane transport of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Several oligomers of deoxycholic acid (oligoDOCA) were synthesized to investigate the substrate specificity of ASBT. To see the binding of oligoDOCA on the substrate-binding pocket of ASBT, molecular docking was used and the dissociation rate constants (KD) were measured using surface plasmon resonance. The KD for tetrameric DOCA (tetraDOCA) was 50-fold lower than that for monomeric DOCA, because tetraDOCA interacted with several hydrophobic grooves in the substrate-binding pocket of ASBT. The synthesized oligoDOCA compounds were subsequently chemically conjugated to macromolecular LMWH. In vitro, tetraDOCA-conjugated LMWH (LHe-tetraD) had highest selectivity for ASBT during its transport. Orally administered LHe-tetraD showed remarkable systemic anticoagulation activity and high oral bioavailability of 33.5±3.2% and 19.9±2.5% in rats and monkeys, respectively. Notably, LHe-tetraD successfully prevented thrombosis in a rat model of deep vein thrombosis. These results represent a major advancement in ASBT-mediated LMWH delivery and may facilitate administration of many important therapeutic macromolecules through a non-invasive oral route.

  5. Longitudinal profiles of 15 serum bile acids in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tribe, Rachel M; Dann, Anthony T; Kenyon, Anna P; Seed, Paul; Shennan, Andrew H; Mallet, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Increased maternal serum bile acids are implicated in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Individual bile acid profiles and their relationship with disease progression, however, remain unknown. The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the temporal changes in bile acids in normal pregnancy and in pregnancies complicated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and pruritus gravidarum. A validated method for the evaluation of 15 bile acids (conjugated and unconjugated) in a single serum sample was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) with an electrospray interface. Bile acid concentrations were assessed in samples (16 weeks of gestation to 4 weeks postpartum) from women with, or who later developed, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (n=63) and were compared with those from normal pregnant women (n=26) and from women with pruritus gravidarum (n=43). Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy was associated with a predominant increase in cholic acid conjugated with taurine and glycine, from 24 weeks of pregnancy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment (> or =21 days, n=15) significantly reduced serum taurocholic and taurodeoxycholic acid concentrations (P<0.01). Bile acid profiles were similar in normal pregnancy and pregnancy associated with pruritus gravidarum. The bile acid profiles and effects of treatment by UDCA implicate a role for taurine-conjugated bile acids in the syndrome of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. [corrected] With regard to individual bile acid profiles, pruritus gravidarum is a disorder quite distinct from intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

  6. Identification of cytosolic and microsomal bile acid-binding proteins in rat ileal enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; Kramer, W.; Wilson, F.A. )

    1990-09-05

    Studies were performed to determine the subcellular fractions and proteins involved in the intracellular transport of bile acids in rat ileal cells. The photolabile derivative 7,7-azo-taurocholate inhibited the Na(+)-dependent uptake of taurocholate into rat ileal enterocytes reversibly in the dark and irreversibly following photolysis. When photolabeled cells were submitted to subcellular fractionation, greatest radioactivity was found in the soluble protein (SP) fraction with decreasing radioactivity in the brush-border-(BBM), basolateral-(BLM), mitochondria-(MT), microsome-(MC), and Golgi-(GO) enriched fractions. Following trichloroacetic acid precipitation, delipidation, and correction for loss of marker enzyme activity, protein bound radioactivity was in SP greater than BBM greater than MC greater than BLM greater than GO greater than MT. When photolabeled cells were first fractionated and then submitted to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a 99-kDa polypeptide was associated with BBM, 54- and 59-kDa polypeptides with BLM, 14-, 35-, 43-, 59-, and 68-kDa polypeptides with SP and a 20-kDa polypeptide with MC fractions. Immunoprecipitation with known antisera identified the 68-kDa polypeptide as albumin and the 43-kDa polypeptide as actin. No precipitation on the 14-kDa polypeptide was noted with anti-hepatic and anti-intestinal fatty acid-binding proteins. No precipitation of the 35-kDa polypeptide occurred with antibody to the hepatic cytosolic bile acid-binding protein. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized 20-kDa microsomal, and 14- and 35-kDa cytosolic bile acid-binding polypeptides which may be involved in the transcellular movement of bile acids.

  7. Bile Acid Responses in Methane and Non-Methane Producers to Standard Breakfast Meals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acids and their conjugates are important regulators of glucose homeostasis. Previous research has revealed the ratio of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid to affect insulin resistance in humans. Bile acid de-conjugation and intestinal metabolism depend on gut microbes which may be affected by hos...

  8. Microbiota transplantation restores normal fecal bile acid composition in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Weingarden, Alexa R; Chen, Chi; Bobr, Aleh; Yao, Dan; Lu, Yuwei; Nelson, Valerie M; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander

    2014-02-15

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a highly effective therapy for refractory, recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which develops following antibiotic treatments. Intestinal microbiota play a critical role in the metabolism of bile acids in the colon, which in turn have major effects on the lifecycle of C. difficile bacteria. We hypothesized that fecal bile acid composition is altered in patients with recurrent CDI and that FMT results in its normalization. General metabolomics and targeted bile acid analyses were performed on fecal extracts from patients with recurrent CDI treated with FMT and their donors. In addition, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to determine the bacterial composition of pre- and post-FMT fecal samples. Taxonomic bacterial composition of fecal samples from FMT recipients showed rapid change and became similar to the donor after the procedure. Pre-FMT fecal samples contained high concentrations of primary bile acids and bile salts, while secondary bile acids were nearly undetectable. In contrast, post-FMT fecal samples contained mostly secondary bile acids, as did non-CDI donor samples. Therefore, our analysis showed that FMT resulted in normalization of fecal bacterial community structure and metabolic composition. Importantly, metabolism of bile salts and primary bile acids to secondary bile acids is disrupted in patients with recurrent CDI, and FMT corrects this abnormality. Since individual bile salts and bile acids have pro-germinant and inhibitory activities, the changes suggest that correction of bile acid metabolism is likely a major mechanism by which FMT results in a cure and prevents recurrence of CDI.

  9. Beneficial role of dietary folic acid on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in ethanol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Villa, Maria Jesus; Ojeda, Maria Luisa; Rubio, Jose Maria; Murillo, Maria Luisa; Sánchez, Olimpia Carreras

    2009-07-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is altered by chronic ethanol consumption. In previous articles, we demonstrated the anti-oxidant capacity of folic acid, which may be useful in the prevention of damage provoked by ethanol. We want to determine the effects of ethanol on cholesterol and bile metabolism and whether a folic acid-supplemented diet could change alterations provoked by a chronic ethanol intake in rats. We used four experimental groups: (1) control, (2) alcohol, (3) alcohol supplemented with folic acid, and (4) control supplemented with folic acid. In all the experimental groups, we measured hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and cholesterol and bile acids in serum, liver, bile, and feces. We have found that the alcohol-fed groups showed high hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity, total hepatic and serum cholesterol concentration, bile cholesterol secretion concentration, and cholesterol enterohepatic circulation. Total serum and hepatic cholesterol levels decreased when alcohol-fed rats were supplemented with folic acid. The hepatic bile acid concentration increased in both chronic ethanol groups. Folic acid supplementation significantly increased bile cholesterol secretion, the bile acids in bile, and fecal bile acid excretion in ethanol-exposed rats. The independent bile acid fraction showed no significant differences between both ethanol groups with respect to Na+, K+, and Cl- concentrations. Folic acid increases bile flow, bile acid synthesis from cholesterol, and bile acid excretion via feces, thus provoking a decrease in serum and hepatic cholesterol. However none of these actions were observed in supplemented control rats. This, therefore, could be yet another beneficial effect of folic acid on alcoholic patients.

  10. Lake char (Salvelinus namaycush) olfactory neurons are highly sensitive and specific to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunbo; Hara, Toshiaki J

    2009-02-01

    Bile acids have been implicated as chemical signals in spawning behaviour of lake char (Salvelinus namaycush). In this study, we investigated olfactory responses of lake char to bile acids by using the electro-olfactogram recording. Lake char detected 9 out of 38 bile acids tested at thresholds 0.02-0.5 nM. The most stimulatory included chenodeoxycholic acid, cholic acid, taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and taurolithocholic acid 3alpha-sulphate. Structure-activity analysis indicated that substituents in the side chain or hydroxyl sulphation were determinant elements for the recognition of individual bile acid receptors, while the position and orientation of hydroxyls or the type of amidation were important for effective stimulation. Three distinct types of concentration-response relationships were found, representing free, taurine- or glycine-amidated, and 3alpha-sulphated bile acids. Cross-adaptation and binary mixture experiments revealed the presence of multiple olfactory receptors for bile acids. Lake char were also capable of detecting petromyzonol sulphate at 1 nM, possibly via its own receptors. Our study further showed that the olfactory responses to bile acids were independent of those of known odorants including amino acids, prostaglandins and gonadal steroids. We conclude that lake char possess multiple olfactory receptors capable of discriminating bile acids produced and released by conspecifics.

  11. Effects of artificial depletion of the bile acid pool in man.

    PubMed Central

    Jazrawi, R P; Bridges, C; Joseph, A E; Northfield, T C

    1986-01-01

    In order to elucidate the relationship between bile acid pool size and cholesterol saturation index of fasting state gall bladder bile, we artificially depleted the bile acid pool in 12 healthy volunteers. Bile acid pool size decreased from 7.6 +/- 0.9 to 5.8 +/- 0.7 mmol (mean +/- SEM, p less than 0.01), and saturation index of fasting state gall bladder bile increased from 0.93 +/- 0.07 to 1.18 +/- 0.07 (p less than 0.001). There was no alteration in saturation index of basal or stimulated hepatic bile. There was no change in gall bladder storage of basal hepatic bile, nor in the proportion of the bile acid pool stored in the gall bladder. The bile acid mass in the gall bladder fell from 4.9 +/- 0.5 to 3.4 +/- 0.4 mmol (p less than 0.05) and phospholipid mass from 1.6 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol (p less than 0.05), but there was no change in cholesterol mass. The gall bladder volume fell from 30 +/- 4 to 18 +/- 2 ml (p less than 0.01). These results suggest that artificial depletion of the bile acid pool increased saturation index of fasting state gall bladder bile without altering saturation index of basal or stimulated hepatic bile; it probably increased the ratio of basal: stimulated hepatic bile within the gall bladder by decreasing gall bladder storage of stimulated hepatic bile. PMID:3732888

  12. Synthesis of bile acid monosulphates by the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, J A; Gollan, J L; Billing, B H

    1976-01-01

    Perfusion of an isolated rat kidney with labelled bile acids, in a protein-free medium, resulted in the urinary excretion of the labelled bile acid, 3% being converted into polar metabolities in 1h. These metabolities were neither glycine nor taurine conjugates, nor bile acid glucuronides, and on solovolysis yielded the free bile acid. On t.l.c. the metabolite of [24-14C]lithocholic acid had the mobility of lithocholate 3-sulphate. The principal metabolite of [24-14C]chenodeoxycholic acid had the mobility of chenodeoxycholate 7-sulphate; trace amounts appeared as chenodeoxycholate 3-sulphate. [35S]sulphate was incorporated in chenodeoxycholic acid by the kidney, resulting in a similar pattern of sulphation. No disulphate salt of chenodeoxycholic acid was detected. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that renal synthesis may account for some of the bile acid sulphates present in urine in the cholestatic syndrome in man. PMID:942413

  13. Bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder abusing an anabolic androgenic steroid.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Castano, Ekaterina; Moeckel, Gilbert; Perazella, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Bile acid nephropathy, also known as cholemic nephrosis or nephropathy, is an entity that can be seen in patients with severe cholestatic liver disease. It typically is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) with various forms of hepatic disease. Most often, patients with severe obstructive jaundice develop this lesion, which is thought to occur due to direct bile acid injury to tubular cells, as well as obstructing bile acid casts. Patients with end-stage liver disease also can develop AKI, in which case a more heterogeneous lesion occurs that includes hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular injury/necrosis. In this circumstance, acute tubular injury develops from a combination of hemodynamic changes with some contribution from direct bile acid-related tubular toxicity and obstructive bile casts. We present a case of AKI due to bile acid nephropathy in a bodybuilder who developed severe cholestatic liver disease in the setting of anabolic androgenic steroid use.

  14. Cross-talk between bile acids and gastrointestinal tract for progression and development of cancer and its therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Somanath; Kumar, Sandeep; Bajaj, Avinash

    2015-07-01

    Increasing incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer are linked to changes in lifestyle with excess of red meat/fat consumption, and elevated secretion of bile acids. Bile acids are strong signaling molecules that control various physiological processes. Failure in bile acid regulation has detrimental effects, often linked with development and promotion of cancer of digestive tract including esophagus, stomach, liver, and intestine. Excessive concentration of bile acids especially lipophillic secondary bile acids are cytotoxic causing apoptosis and reactive oxygen species-mediated damage to the cells. Resistance to this apoptosis and accumulation of mutations leads to progression of cancer. Cytotoxicity of bile acids is contingent on their chemical structure. In this review, we discuss the chemistry of bile acids, bile acid mediated cellular signaling processes, their role in GI cancer progression, and therapeutic potential of synthetic bile acid derivatives for cancer therapy.

  15. RNA-binding protein ZFP36L1 maintains posttranscriptional regulation of bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tarling, Elizabeth J; Clifford, Bethan L; Cheng, Joan; Morand, Pauline; Cheng, Angela; Lester, Ellen; Sallam, Tamer; Turner, Martin; de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q

    2017-10-02

    Bile acids function not only as detergents that facilitate lipid absorption but also as signaling molecules that activate the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR). FXR agonists are currently being evaluated as therapeutic agents for a number of hepatic diseases due to their lipid-lowering and antiinflammatory properties. FXR is also essential for maintaining bile acid homeostasis and prevents the accumulation of bile acids. Elevated bile acids activate FXR, which in turn switches off bile acid synthesis by reducing the mRNA levels of bile acid synthesis genes, including cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1). Here, we show that FXR activation triggers a rapid posttranscriptional mechanism to degrade Cyp7a1 mRNA. We identified the RNA-binding protein Zfp36l1 as an FXR target gene and determined that gain and loss of function of ZFP36L1 reciprocally regulate Cyp7a1 mRNA and bile acid levels in vivo. Moreover, we found that mice lacking hepatic ZFP36L1 were protected from diet-induced obesity and steatosis. The reduced adiposity and antisteatotic effects observed in ZFP36L1-deficient mice were accompanied by impaired lipid absorption that was consistent with altered bile acid metabolism. Thus, the ZFP36L1-dependent regulation of bile acid metabolism is an important metabolic contributor to obesity and hepatosteatosis.

  16. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure–activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists. PMID:24900622

  17. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5.

    PubMed

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gioiello, Antimo; Thomas, Charles; Pols, Thijs W H; Nuti, Roberto; Ferrari, Cristina; Giacchè, Nicola; De Franco, Francesca; Pruzanski, Mark; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2013-12-12

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure-activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists.

  18. Ginseng alleviates cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity via reversing disordered homeostasis of glutathione and bile acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, He; Long, Min-Hui; Wu, Jie; Wang, Meng-Meng; Li, Xiu-Yang; Shen, Hong; Xu, Jin-Di; Zhou, Li; Fang, Zhi-Jun; Luo, Yi; Li, Song-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP), a chemotherapeutic agent, is restricted due to its side effects, especially hepatotoxicity. Ginseng has often been clinically used with CP in China, but whether and how ginseng reduces the hepatotoxicity is unknown. In this study, the hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms under the combined usage were investigated. It was found that ginseng could ameliorate CP-induced elevations of ALP, ALT, ALS, MDA and hepatic deterioration, enhance antioxidant enzymes’ activities and GSH’s level. Metabolomics study revealed that 33 endogenous metabolites were changed by CP, 19 of which were reversed when ginseng was co-administrated via two main pathways, i.e., GSH metabolism and primary bile acids synthesis. Furthermore, ginseng could induce expression of GCLC, GCLM, GS and GST, which associate with the disposition of GSH, and expression of FXR, CYP7A1, NTCP and MRP 3, which play important roles in the synthesis and transport of bile acids. In addition, NRF 2, one of regulatory elements on the expression of GCLC, GCLM, GS, GST, NTCP and MRP3, was up-regulated when ginseng was co-administrated. In conclusion, ginseng could alleviate CP-induced hepatotoxicity via modulating the disordered homeostasis of GSH and bile acid, which might be mediated by inducing the expression of NRF 2 in liver. PMID:26625948

  19. Liquid crystal based biosensors for bile acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Tanner, Colleen; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-03-01

    The concentration level of bile acids is a useful indicator for early diagnosis of liver diseases. The prevalent measurement method in detecting bile acids is the chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, which is precise yet expensive. Here we present a biosensor platform based on liquid crystal (LC) films for the detection of cholic acid (CA). This platform has the advantage of low cost, label-free, solution phase detection and simple analysis. In this platform, LC film of 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was hosted by a copper grid supported with a polyimide-coated glass substrate. By immersing into sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, the LC film was coated with SDS which induced a homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. Addition of CA introduced competitive adsorption between CA and SDS at the interface, triggering a transition from homeotropic to homogeneous anchoring. The detection limit can be tuned by changing the pH value of the solution from 12uM to 170uM.

  20. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment. PMID:27570415

  1. Biochemical and physiological evidence that bile acids produced and released by lake char (Salvelinus namaycush) function as chemical signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Brown, S B; Hara, T J

    2001-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that faeces of juvenile lake char (Salvelinus namaycush) may contain chemical cues that mediate behaviour of conspecifics. However, our knowledge of bile acids naturally produced and released by fish is limited. Using HPLC, we fractionated bile acids produced and released by lake char and examined their stimulatory effectiveness using electro-olfactogram recordings. Taurocholic acid, taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurooxocholanic acid, taurooxodeoxycholic acid 3alpha-sulphate, trace amounts of taurolithocholic acid and an unidentified sulphated bile steroid were found in bile and faeces. Bile acids were either taurine amidated or sulphated, or both. Lake char released an average of 4 nmol min(-1) bile acids per kilogram of body weight into their tank water. Urinary bile acids accounted for only a small portion of total bile acids released into water. Water and faeces contained higher proportion of taurochenodeoxycholic acid and sulphated bile acids (relative to taurocholic acid) than bile. The electro-olfactogram recordings demonstrated that bile acids released by lake char were detectable by their olfactory system at nanomolar concentrations, which is well below the levels of bile acids released into water. The exquisite olfactory sensitivity of lake char to water-borne bile acids released by their conspecifics is consistent with a role for these compounds as important chemical signals.

  2. Characterization of AQPs in Mouse, Rat, and Human Colon and Their Selective Regulation by Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Yde, Jonathan; Keely, Stephen; Wu, Qi; Borg, Johan F.; Lajczak, Natalia; O’Dwyer, Aoife; Dalsgaard, Peter; Fenton, Robert A.; Moeller, Hanne B.

    2016-01-01

    In normal individuals, the epithelium of the colon absorbs 1.5–2 l of water a day to generate dehydrated feces. However, in the condition of bile acid malabsorption (BAM), an excess of bile acids in the colon results in diarrhea. Several studies have attempted to address the mechanisms contributing to BAM induced by various bile acids. However, none have addressed a potential dysregulation of aquaporin (AQP) water channels, which are responsible for the majority of transcellular water transport in epithelial cells, as a contributing factor to the onset of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of BAM. In this study, we aimed to systematically analyze the expression of AQPs in colonic epithelia from rat, mouse, and human and determine whether their expression is altered in a rat model of BAM. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics, RT-PCR, and western blotting identified various AQPs in isolated colonic epithelial cells from rats (AQP1, 3, 4, 7, 8) and mice (AQP1, 4, 8). Several AQPs were also detected in human colon (AQP1, 3, 4, 7–9). Immunohistochemistry localized AQP1 to the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells in the bottom of the crypts, whereas AQP3 (rat, human) and AQP4 (mice, human) were localized predominantly in the basolateral plasma membrane. AQP8 was localized intracellularly and at the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells. Rats fed sodium cholate for 72 h had significantly increased fecal water content, suggesting development of BAM-associated diarrhea. Colonic epithelial cells isolated from this model had significantly altered levels of AQP3, 7, and 8, suggesting that these AQPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of bile acid-induced diarrhea. PMID:27777930

  3. The Metabolism of Cholestanol, Cholesterol, and Bile Acids in Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Salen, Gerald; Grundy, Scott M.

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism of cholesterol and its 5-dihydro derivative, cholestanol, was investigated by means of sterol balance and isotope kinetic techniques in 3 subjects with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) and 11 other individuals. All subjects were hospitalized on a metabolic ward and were fed diets practically free of cholesterol and cholestanol. After the intravenous administration of [1,2-3H]cholestanol, the radioactive sterol was transported and esterified in plasma lipoproteins in an identical manner to cholesterol. In these short-term experiments, the specific activity-time curves of plasma cholestanol conformed to two-pool models in both the CTX and control groups. However, cholestanol plasma concentrations, total body miscible pools, and daily synthesis rates were two to five times greater in the CTX than control individuals. The short-term specific activity decay curves of plasma [4-14C]cholesterol also conformed to two-pool models in both groups. However, in the CTX subjects the decay was more rapid, and daily cholesterol synthesis was nearly double that of the control subjects. Plasma concentrations and the sizes of the rapidly turning over pool of exchangeable cholesterol were apparently small in the CTX subjects, and these measurements did not correlate with the large cholesterol deposits found in tendon and tuberous xanthomas. Despite active cholesterol synthesis, bile acid formation was subnormal in the CTX subjects. However, bile acid sequestration was accompanied by a rise in plasma cholestanol levels and greatly augmented fecal cholestanol outputs. In contrast, the administration of clofibrate lowered plasma cholesterol levels 50% and presumably reduced synthesis in the CTX subjects. Plasma cholesterol concentrations and fecal steroid excretion did not change significantly during this therapy. These findings indicate that the excessive tissue deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol that characterize CTX were associated with hyperactive neutral

  4. Hepatic bile acid metabolism in the neonatal hamster: expansion of the bile acid pool parallels increased Cyp7a1 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Burke, Katie T; Horn, Paul S; Tso, Patrick; Heubi, James E; Woollett, Laura A

    2009-07-01

    Intraluminal concentrations of bile acids are low in newborn infants and increase rapidly after birth, at least partly owing to increased bile acid synthesis rates. The expansion of the bile acid pool is critical since bile acids are required to stimulate bile flow and absorb lipids, a major component of newborn diets. The purpose of the present studies was to determine the mechanism responsible for the increase in bile acid synthesis rates and the subsequent enlargement of bile acid pool sizes (BAPS) during the neonatal period, and how changes in circulating hormone levels might affect BAPS. In the hamster, pool size was low just after birth and increased modestly until 10.5 days postpartum (dpp). BAPS increased more significantly ( approximately 3-fold) between 10.5 and 15.5 dpp. An increase in mRNA and protein levels of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting step in classical bile acid synthesis, immediately preceded an increase in BAPS. In contrast, levels of oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7b1), a key enzyme in bile acid synthesis by the alternative pathway, were relatively elevated by 1.5 dpp. farnesyl X receptor (FXR) and short heterodimeric partner (SHP) mRNA levels remained relatively constant at a time when Cyp7a1 levels increased. Finally, although simultaneous increases in circulating cortisol and Cyp7a1 levels occurred, precocious expression of Cyp7a1 could not be induced in neonatal hamsters with dexamethasone. Thus the significant increase in Cyp7a1 levels in neonatal hamsters is due to mechanisms independent of the FXR and SHP pathway and cortisol.

  5. Prognostic roles of tetrahydroxy bile acids in infantile intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chee-Seng; Kimura, Akihiko; Wu, Jia-Feng; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Hsu, Hong-Yuan; Chang, Mei-Hwei; Nittono, Hiroshi; Chen, Huey-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Tetrahydroxy bile acids (THBAs) are hydrophilic and are present at minimal or undetectable levels in healthy human adults, but are present at high levels in bile salt export pump (abcb11)-knockout mice. The roles of THBAs in human cholestatic diseases are unclear. We aimed to investigate the presence of THBAs in patients with infantile intrahepatic cholestasis and its correlation with outcome. Urinary bile acids (BAs) were analyzed by GC-MS. Data were compared between good (n = 21) (disease-free before 1 year old) and poor prognosis groups (n = 19). Good prognosis patients had a higher urinary THBA proportion than poor prognosis patients [25.89% (3.45-76.73%) vs. 1.93% (0.05-48.90%)]. A urinary THBA proportion >7.23% predicted good prognosis with high sensitivity (95.24%), specificity (84.21%), and area under the curve (0.91) (P < 0.0001). A THBA proportion 7.23% was an independent factor for decreased transplant-free survival (hazard ratio = 7.16, confidence interval: 1.24-41.31, P = 0.028). Patients with a confirmed ABCB11 or tight junction protein 2 gene mutation (n = 7) had a minimally detectable THBA proportion (0.23-2.99% of total BAs). Three patients with an ATP8B1 mutation had an elevated THBA proportion (7.51-37.26%). In conclusion, in addition to disease entity as a major determinant of outcome, a high THBA level was associated with good outcome in the infantile intrahepatic cholestasis patients.

  6. Intracellular cholesterol transport proteins enhance hydrolysis of HDL-CEs and facilitate elimination of cholesterol into bile

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Bie, Jinghua; Ghosh, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    While HDL-associated unesterified or free cholesterol (FC) is thought to be rapidly secreted into the bile, the fate of HDL-associated cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) that represent >80% of HDL-cholesterol, is only beginning to be understood. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that intracellular cholesterol transport proteins [sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) and fatty acid binding protein-1 (FABP1)] not only facilitate CE hydrolase-mediated hydrolysis of HDL-CEs, but also enhance elimination of cholesterol into bile. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of FABP1 or SCP2 in primary hepatocytes significantly increased hydrolysis of HDL-[3H]CE, reduced resecretion of HDL-CE-derived FC as nascent HDL, and increased its secretion as bile acids. Consistently, the flux of [3H]cholesterol from HDL-[3H]CE to biliary bile acids was increased by overexpression of SCP2 or FABP1 in vivo and reduced in SCP2−/− mice. Increased flux of HDL-[3H]CE to biliary FC was noted with FABP1 overexpression and in SCP2−/− mice that have increased FABP1 expression. Lack of a significant decrease in the flux of HDL-[3H]CE to biliary FC or bile acids in FABP1−/− mice indicates the likely compensation of its function by an as yet unidentified mechanism. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that FABP1 and SCP2 facilitate the preferential movement of HDL-CEs to bile for final elimination. PMID:27381048

  7. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  8. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis, and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut.

    PubMed

    Ridlon, Jason M; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid, and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic, and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome, and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal, and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa, and increasing production of deoxycholic acid. Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis, and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide

  9. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Steroidomics: Are Bioactive Bile Acids Present in Brain?*

    PubMed Central

    Ogundare, Michael; Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Lockhart, Andrew; Hall, Leslie J.; Arenas, Ernest; Sjövall, Jan; Brenton, A. Gareth; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we have profiled the free sterol content of cerebrospinal fluid by a combination of charge tagging and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Surprisingly, the most abundant cholesterol metabolites were found to be C27 and C24 intermediates of the bile acid biosynthetic pathways with structures corresponding to 7α-hydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-en-26-oic acid (7.170 ± 2.826 ng/ml, mean ± S.D., six subjects), 3β-hydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (0.416 ± 0.193 ng/ml), 7α,x-dihydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-en-26-oic acid (1.330 ± 0.543 ng/ml), and 7α-hydroxy-3-oxochol-4-en-24-oic acid (0.172 ± 0.085 ng/ml), and the C26 sterol 7α-hydroxy-26-norcholest-4-ene-3,x-dione (0.204 ± 0.083 ng/ml), where x is an oxygen atom either on the CD rings or more likely on the C-17 side chain. The ability of intermediates of the bile acid biosynthetic pathways to activate the liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptor was also evaluated. The acidic cholesterol metabolites 3β-hydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid and 3β,7α-dihydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid were found to activate LXR in a luciferase assay, but the major metabolite identified in this study, i.e. 7α-hydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-en-26-oic acid, was not an LXR ligand. 7α-Hydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-en-26-oic acid is formed from 3β,7α-dihydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid in a reaction catalyzed by 3β-hydroxy-Δ5-C27-steroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B7), which may thus represent a deactivation pathway of LXR ligands in brain. Significantly, LXR activation has been found to reduce the symptoms of Alzheimer disease (Fan, J., Donkin, J., and Wellington C. (2009) Biofactors 35, 239–248); thus, cholesterol metabolites may play an important role in the etiology of Alzheimer disease. PMID:19996111

  11. Bile acid sequestrants in type 2 diabetes: potential effects on GLP1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Sonne, David P; Hansen, Morten; Knop, Filip K

    2014-08-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been used for decades for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia. Sequestering of bile acids in the intestinal lumen interrupts enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids, which initiate feedback mechanisms on the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids in the liver, thereby lowering cholesterol concentrations in the circulation. In the early 1990s, it was observed that bile acid sequestrants improved glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Subsequently, several studies confirmed the finding and recently - despite elusive mechanisms of action - bile acid sequestrants have been approved in the USA for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Nowadays, bile acids are no longer labelled as simple detergents necessary for lipid digestion and absorption, but are increasingly recognised as metabolic regulators. They are potent hormones, work as signalling molecules on nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptors and trigger a myriad of signalling pathways in many target organs. The most described and well-known receptors activated by bile acids are the farnesoid X receptor (nuclear receptor) and the G protein-coupled cell membrane receptor TGR5. Besides controlling bile acid metabolism, these receptors are implicated in lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Interestingly, activation of TGR5 on enteroendocrine L cells has been suggested to affect secretion of incretin hormones, particularly glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1 (GCG)). This review discusses the role of bile acid sequestrants in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the possible mechanism of action and the role of bile acid-induced secretion of GLP1 via activation of TGR5.

  12. Use of D(acid)-, D(bile)-, z(acid)-, and z(bile)-values in evaluating Bifidobacteria with regard to stomach pH and bile salt sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Shigwedha, Nditange; Mwandemele, Osmund D

    2010-01-01

    The survival of bifidobacteria in simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was studied based on the D- and z-value concept. Some Bifidobacterium spp. are probiotics that improve microbial balance in the human GI tract. Because they are sensitive to low pH and bile salt concentrations, their viability in the GI tract is limited. The D- and z-value approach was therefore adopted as a result of observing constant log-cell reduction (90%) when Bifidobacterium spp. were exposed to these 2 different stressing factors. Survivals of one strain each or 4 species of Bifidobacterium was studied at pH between 3.0 and 4.5 and in ox-bile between 0.15% and 0.60% for times up to 41 h. From the D(acid)- and D(bile)-values, the order of resistance to acid and bile was B. bifidum > B. infantis > B. longum > B. adolescentis. While the former 3 strains retained high cell viability at pH 3.5 (>5.5 log CFU/mL after 5 h) and at elevated bile salt concentration of 0.6% (>4.5 log CFU/mL after 3 h), B. adolescentis was less resistant (<3.4 log CFU/mL). The z(acid)- and z(bile)-values calculated from the D(acid)- and D(bile)-values ranged from 1.11 to 1.55 pH units and 0.40% to 0.49%, respectively. The results suggest that the D(acid)-, D(bile)-, z(acid)-, and z(bile)-value approach could be more appropriate than the screening and selection method in evaluating survival of probiotic bacteria, and in measuring their tolerance or resistance to gastric acidity and the associated bile salt concentration in the small intestine. The evaluation of the tolerance of bifidobacteria to bile salts and low pH has been made possible by use of D- and z-value concept. The calculated z(acid)- and z(bile)-values were all fairly similar for the strains used and suggest the effect of increasing the bile salt concentration or decreasing the pH on the D(acid)- and D(bile)-values. This approach would be useful for predicting the suitability of bifidobacteria and other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as

  13. Potent stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 19 expression in the human ileum by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Justine H; Nolan, Jonathan D; Kennie, Sarah L; Johnston, Ian M; Dew, Tracy; Dixon, Peter H; Williamson, Catherine; Walters, Julian R F

    2013-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is proposed to be a negative feedback regulator of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. We aimed to clarify the distribution of FGF19 expression in human intestine and to investigate induction in a novel explant system. Ileal and colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at endoscopy and analyzed for FGF19 transcript expression. Primary explants were incubated with physiological concentrations of various BA for up to 6 h, and expression of FGF19 and other genes was determined. FGF19 transcripts were detected in ileum but were unquantifiable in colon. No loss of FGF19 mRNA occurred as a consequence of the explant system. Ileal FGF19 transcript expression was induced 350-fold by 50 μM chenodeoxycholate (CDCA, n = 24, P < 0.0001) and 161-fold by 50 μM glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA, n = 12, P = 0.0005). The responses of other genes to CDCA or GCDCA (50 μM) were smaller: median increases of ileal bile acid binding protein, organic solute transporter-α and -β, and short heterodimer partner were 2.4- to 4.0-fold; apical membrane sodium bile acid transporter and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) showed little change. The EC50 for FGF19 transcript induction by CDCA was 20 μM. FGF19 protein concentrations were significantly higher in the culture fluid from BA-stimulated explants. FGF19 induction with cholate was 81% of that found with CDCA, but deoxycholate (40%) and lithocholate (4%) were significantly less potent. The synthetic FXR agonist obeticholic acid was much more potent than CDCA with a 70-fold FGF19 stimulation at 1 μM. We concluded that FGF19 expression in human ileum is very highly responsive to BA. Changes in FGF19 induction are a potential mechanism involved in disorders of BA homeostasis.

  14. Potent stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 19 expression in the human ileum by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Justine H.; Nolan, Jonathan D.; Kennie, Sarah L.; Johnston, Ian M.; Dew, Tracy; Dixon, Peter H.; Williamson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is proposed to be a negative feedback regulator of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. We aimed to clarify the distribution of FGF19 expression in human intestine and to investigate induction in a novel explant system. Ileal and colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at endoscopy and analyzed for FGF19 transcript expression. Primary explants were incubated with physiological concentrations of various BA for up to 6 h, and expression of FGF19 and other genes was determined. FGF19 transcripts were detected in ileum but were unquantifiable in colon. No loss of FGF19 mRNA occurred as a consequence of the explant system. Ileal FGF19 transcript expression was induced 350-fold by 50 μM chenodeoxycholate (CDCA, n = 24, P < 0.0001) and 161-fold by 50 μM glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA, n = 12, P = 0.0005). The responses of other genes to CDCA or GCDCA (50 μM) were smaller: median increases of ileal bile acid binding protein, organic solute transporter-α and -β, and short heterodimer partner were 2.4- to 4.0-fold; apical membrane sodium bile acid transporter and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) showed little change. The EC50 for FGF19 transcript induction by CDCA was 20 μM. FGF19 protein concentrations were significantly higher in the culture fluid from BA-stimulated explants. FGF19 induction with cholate was 81% of that found with CDCA, but deoxycholate (40%) and lithocholate (4%) were significantly less potent. The synthetic FXR agonist obeticholic acid was much more potent than CDCA with a 70-fold FGF19 stimulation at 1 μM. We concluded that FGF19 expression in human ileum is very highly responsive to BA. Changes in FGF19 induction are a potential mechanism involved in disorders of BA homeostasis. PMID:23518683

  15. Intestinal bile acid sensing is linked to key endocrine and metabolic signalng pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acids have historically been considered to mainly function in cholesterol homeostasis and facilitate fat digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent discoveries show that bile acids also function as signaling molecules that exert diverse endocrine and metabolic actions by activating G prote...

  16. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  17. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  18. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Dinser, Jordan A.; Cansler, Hillary L.; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D.; Browder, Natasha S.; Riddington, Ian M.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  19. Binding of cholesterol and bile acid to hemicelluloses from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guohua; Yu, Wenjian

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using hemicellulose from rice bran to scavenge cholesterol and bile acid in vitro study. This paper demonstrates that rice bran hemicellulose A (RBHA), rice bran hemicellulose B (RBHB) and rice bran hemicellulose C (RBHC) have the potential for binding cholesterol and bile acid. The quantity of cholesterol and bile acid bound varies from one rice bran fibre to another. As it can be inferred from the results of the study, RBHB was characterized by the highest capacity for cholesterol binding, followed by RBHC and RBHA. Binding of cholesterol and bile acid to rice bran insoluble dietary fibre (RBDF) and cellulose from rice bran was found to be poor. Lignin from rice bran was the least active fraction for binding cholesterol and bile acid. This confirms that the RBHB preparation from defatted rice bran has great potential in food applications, especially in the development of functional foods.

  20. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  1. Solution structure of the supramolecular adduct between a liver cytosolic bile acid binding protein and a bile acid-based gadolinium(III)-chelate, a potential hepatospecific magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, Simona; Zanzoni, Serena; Ragona, Laura; Gianolio, Eliana; Aime, Silvio; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette

    2008-11-13

    Bile acid-conjugated gadolinium chelates were shown to display promising features for the development of hepatospecific constrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study of the pharmacokinetics of these compounds should address their possible interaction with the bile acid protein transporters. We have previously shown that a 5beta-cholanoic acid-based contrast agent is efficiently internalized in hepatocytes and is able to bind to a liver bile acid binding protein (BABP) in vitro. Here we report the solution structure of the adduct between a BABP and a gadolinium chelate/bile acid conjugate. The identification of unambiguous intermolecular distance restraints was possible through 3D edited/filtered NOESY-HSQC experiments, together with distance information derived from paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. These intermolecular contacts were used for the structure determination of the complex, using the data-driven docking software HADDOCK. The obtained results represent the starting point for the design of new and more efficient MRI contrast agents.

  2. Use of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids to Treat Inspissated Bile Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jun, Woo Young; Cho, Min Jeng; Han, Hye Seung; Bae, Sun Hwan

    2016-12-01

    Inspissated bile syndrome (IBS) is a rare condition in which thick intraluminal bile, including bile plugs, sludge, or stones, blocks the extrahepatic bile ducts in an infant. A 5-week-old female infant was admitted for evaluation of jaundice and acholic stool. Diagnostic tests, including ultrasound sonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and a hepatobiliary scan, were not conclusive. Although the diagnosis was unclear, the clinical and laboratory findings improved gradually on administration of urodeoxycholic acid and lipid emulsion containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for 3 weeks. However, a liver biopsy was suggestive of biliary atresia. This finding forced us to perform intraoperative cholangiography, which revealed a patent common bile duct with impacted thick bile. We performed normal saline irrigation and the symptom was improved, the final diagnosis was IBS. Thus, we herein report that IBS can be treated with omega-3 PUFAs as an alternative to surgical intervention.

  3. Use of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids to Treat Inspissated Bile Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Woo Young; Cho, Min Jeng; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Inspissated bile syndrome (IBS) is a rare condition in which thick intraluminal bile, including bile plugs, sludge, or stones, blocks the extrahepatic bile ducts in an infant. A 5-week-old female infant was admitted for evaluation of jaundice and acholic stool. Diagnostic tests, including ultrasound sonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and a hepatobiliary scan, were not conclusive. Although the diagnosis was unclear, the clinical and laboratory findings improved gradually on administration of urodeoxycholic acid and lipid emulsion containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for 3 weeks. However, a liver biopsy was suggestive of biliary atresia. This finding forced us to perform intraoperative cholangiography, which revealed a patent common bile duct with impacted thick bile. We performed normal saline irrigation and the symptom was improved, the final diagnosis was IBS. Thus, we herein report that IBS can be treated with omega-3 PUFAs as an alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:28090475

  4. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages.

  5. Bile acid composition of gallbladder contents in dogs with gallbladder mucocele and biliary sludge.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Toshiaki; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine bile acid composition of gallbladder contents in dogs with gallbladder mucocele and biliary sludge. ANIMALS 18 dogs with gallbladder mucocele (GBM group), 8 dogs with immobile biliary sludge (i-BS group), 17 dogs with mobile biliary sludge (m-BS group), and 14 healthy dogs (control group). PROCEDURES Samples of gallbladder contents were obtained by use of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis or during cholecystectomy or necropsy. Concentrations of 15 bile acids were determined by use of highperformance liquid chromatography, and a bile acid compositional ratio was calculated for each group. RESULTS Concentrations of most bile acids in the GBM group were significantly lower than those in the control and m-BS groups. Compositional ratio of taurodeoxycholic acid, which is 1 of 3 major bile acids in dogs, was significantly lower in the GBM and i-BS groups, compared with ratios for the control and m-BS groups. The compositional ratio of taurocholic acid was significantly higher and that of taurochenodeoxycholic acid significantly lower in the i-BS group than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, concentrations and fractions of bile acids in gallbladder contents were significantly different in dogs with gallbladder mucocele or immobile biliary sludge, compared with results for healthy control dogs. Studies are needed to determine whether changes in bile acid composition are primary or secondary events of gallbladder abnormalities.

  6. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  7. Simple steatosis sensitizes cholestatic rats to liver injury and dysregulates bile salt synthesis and transport

    PubMed Central

    Lionarons, Daniël A.; Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F.; Alles, Lindy K.; van der Mark, Vincent A.; Kloek, Jaap J.; de Waart, Dirk R.; Marsman, Hendrik A.; Rusch, Henny; Verheij, Joanne; Beuers, Ulrich; Paulusma, Coen C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder. It is uncertain if simple steatosis, the initial and prevailing form of NAFLD, sensitizes the liver to cholestasis. Here, we compared the effects of obstructive cholestasis in rats with a normal liver versus rats with simple steatosis induced by a methionine/choline-deficient diet. We found that plasma liver enzymes were higher and hepatic neutrophil influx, inflammation, and fibrosis were more pronounced in animals with combined steatosis and cholestasis compared to cholestasis alone. Circulating bile salt levels were markedly increased and hepatic bile salt composition shifted from hydrophilic tauro-β-muricholate to hydrophobic taurocholate. This shift was cytotoxic for HepG2 hepatoma cells. Gene expression analysis revealed induction of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile salt synthesis, cytochrome P450 7a1 (CYP7A1), and modulation of the hepatic bile salt transport system. In conclusion, simple steatosis sensitizes the liver to cholestatic injury, inflammation, and fibrosis in part due to a cytotoxic shift in bile salt composition. Plasma bile salt levels were elevated, linked to dysregulation of bile salt synthesis and enhanced trafficking of bile salts from the liver to the systemic circulation. PMID:27535001

  8. Intestinal sucrase inhibitors and bile acid absorption in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.; Harnett, K.M.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were carried out to determine if bile acid absorption is perturbed by the intestinal sucrase inhibitors, Acarbose and BAY m 1099 (1,5-dideoxy-1.5((2-hydroxy-ethyl) imino-)-D-glucitol). The intestinal absorption of taurocholic acid (TA) in male Wistar rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital (50mg/ig, i.p.), was assessed from its excretion rate in bile. In acute studies, 15 cm of distal ileum was perfused in vivo for 70 min with /sup 14/C-TA (0.1 mM, 5 ..mu.. Ci/mmol) in 0.154 M NaCl, 0.01 M phosphate (pH 6.8) and in some studies 20 mM sucrose. From 70-140 min the perfusate was unchanged or contained Acarbose (150, 1500 ..mu..g/ml) or BAY m 1099 (10, 25 ..mu..g/ ml). Neither drug without sucrose altered TA biliary excretion. With sucrose, BAY m 1099 (10 and 25 ..mu.. g/ml) reduced TA excretion by 11 and 22%; no greater effect occurred with 60..mu..g/ml. In subchronic studies rats were fed Acarbose (40 mg/100 g diet) or BAY m 1099 (10, 20, 40 mg/100 g diet) in AIN-76A (50% cornstarch, 15% sucrose) and after 8 wk /sup 14/C-TA (10 mg/kg, 0.08 ..mu..Ci/mg, 3 mg/ml 0.9% NaCl) was injected into the proximal small intestine. Neither drug affected the biliary excretion of TA, measured every 20 min for 4-5 hr. These studies indicate that neither acute nor subchronic regimes of Acarbose or BAY m 1099 affect the intestinal absorption of TA. A possible effect in the presence of sucrose is being explored.

  9. Microbial Biotransformations of Bile Acids as Detected by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry123

    PubMed Central

    Hagey, Lee R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Many current experiments investigating the effects of diet, dietary supplements, and pre- and probiotics on the intestinal environments do not take into consideration the potential for using bile salts as markers of environmental change. Intestinal bacteria in vertebrates can metabolize bile acids into a number of different structures, with deamidation, hydroxyl group oxidation, and hydroxyl group elimination. Fecal bile acids are readily available to sample and contain a considerable structural complexity that directly relates to intestinal morphology, bile acid residence time in the intestine, and the species of microbial forms in the intestinal tract. Here we offer a classification scheme that can serve as an initial guide to interpret the different bile acid patterns expressed in vertebrate feces. PMID:23319120

  10. Determination of bile acids by hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ghaffarzadegan, T; Nyman, M; Jönsson, J Å; Sandahl, M

    2014-01-01

    A method based on hollow-fibre liquid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography was developed for determination of specific bile acids in caecal materials of rats. Nine unconjugated bile acids, including the primary bile acids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and α-muricholic acid) and the secondary bile acids (lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, hyodeoxycholic acid, β-muricholic acid and ω-muricholic acid) were quantified. Extraction conditions were evaluated, including: sample pH, type of organic solvent and amount of caecal material to be extracted. To compensate for sample matrix effects during extraction the method of standard addition was applied. The satisfactory linearity (r(2)>0.9840), high recovery (84.2-108.7%) and good intra-assay (6.3-10.6%) and inter-assay (6.9-11.1%) precision illustrated the good performance of the present method. The method is rapid, simple and capable of detecting and determining bile acids with limit of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.002 to 0.067μg/mL and limits of quantification (LOQ) varied from 0.006 to 0.224μg/mL. The results indicated that the concentration of some secondary bile acids, which usually are associated with health problems, were lower in rats fed with fermentable dietary fibre compared with a fibre free control diet, while the concentration of primary bile acids, usually connected with positive health effects, were higher in rats fed with diets containing dietary fibre. Of the dietary fibres, guar gum and to some extent the mixture of pectin+guar gum had the most positive effects. Thus, it was concluded that the composition of bile acids can be affected by the type of diet.

  11. Bile Acids Act as Soluble Host Restriction Factors Limiting Cytomegalovirus Replication in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Anna-Kathrin; Trilling, Mirko; Rattay, Stephanie; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Haselow, Katrin; Stindt, Jan; Zimmermann, Albert; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The liver constitutes a prime site of cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication and latency. Hepatocytes produce, secrete, and recycle a chemically diverse set of bile acids, with the result that interactions between bile acids and cytomegalovirus inevitably occur. Here we determined the impact of naturally occurring bile acids on mouse CMV (MCMV) replication. In primary mouse hepatocytes, physiological concentrations of taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDC), glycochenodeoxycholic acid, and to a lesser extent taurocholic acid significantly reduced MCMV-induced gene expression and diminished the generation of virus progeny, while several other bile acids did not exert antiviral effects. The anticytomegalovirus activity required active import of bile acids via the sodium-taurocholate-cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) and was consistently observed in hepatocytes but not in fibroblasts. Under conditions in which alpha interferon (IFN-α) lacks antiviral activity, physiological TCDC concentrations were similarly effective as IFN-γ. A detailed investigation of distinct steps of the viral life cycle revealed that TCDC deregulates viral transcription and diminishes global translation in infected cells. IMPORTANCE Cytomegaloviruses are members of the Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Primary infection leads to latency, from which cytomegaloviruses can reactivate under immunocompromised conditions and cause severe disease manifestations, including hepatitis. The present study describes an unanticipated antiviral activity of conjugated bile acids on MCMV replication in hepatocytes. Bile acids negatively influence viral transcription and exhibit a global effect on translation. Our data identify bile acids as site-specific soluble host restriction factors against MCMV, which may allow rational design of anticytomegalovirus drugs using bile acids as lead compounds. PMID:27170759

  12. Profiling of urinary bile acids in piglets by a combination of enzymatic deconjugation and targeted LC-MRM-MS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acids (BAs) have an important role in the control of fat, glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Synthesis of bile acids is the major pathway for the metabolism of cholesterol and for the excretion of excess cholesterol in mammals. Bile acid intermediates and/or their metabolites are excreted in...

  13. Conjugated bile acid replacement therapy reduces urinary oxalate excretion in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Michael; Guirl, Michael J; Santa Ana, Carol A; Porter, Jack L; Neimark, Sidney; Hofmann, Alan F; Fordtran, John S

    2003-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) have steatorrhea, in part because of bile acid malabsorption that causes decreased bile acid secretion into the duodenum and consequent fat maldigestion. In SBS patients with colon in continuity, luminal calcium forms calcium fatty acid soaps rather than precipitating as insoluble calcium oxalate. Soluble oxalate is hyperabsorbed by the colon leading to hyperoxaluria and an increased risk for renal calcium oxalate stones and deposits. The authors hypothesized that oral ingestion of conjugated bile acids would increase fat absorption and thereby decrease calcium fatty acid soap formation and oxalate hyperabsorption. The effect of conjugated bile acid replacement therapy (9 g/d) on fecal fat excretion and urine oxalate excretion was measured in an appropriate patient, utilizing the metabolic balance technique. The effects of chronic bile acid replacement therapy on oxalate excretion and nutritional status also were measured in a 3-month outpatient study. Natural conjugated bile acid replacement therapy reduced fecal fat excretion from 119 to 79 g/d (Delta40 g/d), and urinary oxalate excretion from 87 to 64 mg/d (966 to 710 micromol/d; Delta23 mg/d). Cholylsarcosine, a synthetic conjugated bile acid, had similar but less powerful effects. During a 3-month outpatient trial of natural conjugated bile acids (9 g/d), urine oxalate decreased to normal levels (27 mg/d) in association with weight gain, decreased hunger, and decreased hyperphagia. Conjugated bile acid replacement therapy reduced fecal fat excretion, reduced urinary oxalate excretion, and improved nutritional status in a patient with SBS with colon in continuity, hyperoxaluria, and oxalate nephrolithiasis. Copyright 2003 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  14. Short-term circadian disruption impairs bile acid and lipid homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are physiological detergents that also activate nuclear receptors to regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting enzyme that converts cholesterol to bile acids, is transcriptionally regulated by bile acids and circadian rhythms. Fasting, nutrients and the circadian clock critically control hepatic bile acid and lipid homeostasis, while circadian misalignment is associated with metabolic syndrome in humans. To delineate these interactions, we employed a sleep disruption model to induce circadian disruption and examined hepatic metabolism with respect to bile acids, lipids and clock gene expression. B6xC57 mice were maintained on chow or Western diet and were sleep disrupted for 6 hr/day for 5 days. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hr intervals over 24 hr. Hepatic metabolic genes were examined, and bile acid pool and lipid profiles were measured over 24 hr. Sleep disruption significantly suppressed circadian expression of core clock genes, genes involved in lipid metabolism, and key regulators of Cyp7a1 as well as Cyp7a1 expression itself. Sleep disruption abolished the peak in serum cholesterol and increased liver and serum free fatty acids. Bile acid pool size was increased while liver bile acids were decreased. ChIP assay revealed HNF4α and Dbp occupancies were suppressed at the Cyp7a1 promoter in sleep-disrupted mice. When coupled with Western diet, sleep disruption abolished liver clock rhythms and elevated free fatty acids. This study suggests that even short-term circadian disruption dramatically alters hepatic clock gene expression, bile acid metabolism and lipid homeostasis to contribute to dyslipidemia.

  15. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B; Renaud, Helen J; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin+imipenem and cephalothin+neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin+imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin+neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism.

  16. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin+imipenem and cephalothin+neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vacomycin+imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin+neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. PMID:24657338

  17. Endogenous Bile Acid Disposition in Rat and Human Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St. Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2013-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR® technology, BAs were measured in cells+bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells+bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.85 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 55.6 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.210 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. PMID:22342602

  18. G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor plays a key role in bile acid metabolism and fasting-induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Boehme, Shannon; Li, Feng; Chiang, John Y L

    2017-03-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that play a critical role in regulation of hepatic metabolic homeostasis by activating nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr) and membrane G-protein-coupled receptor (Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5; Tgr5). The role of FXR in regulation of bile acid synthesis and hepatic metabolism has been studied extensively. However, the role of TGR5 in hepatic metabolism has not been explored. The liver plays a central role in lipid metabolism, and impaired response to fasting and feeding contributes to steatosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver and obesity. We have performed a detailed analysis of gallbladder bile acid and lipid metabolism in Tgr5(-/-) mice in both free-fed and fasted conditions. Lipid profiles of serum, liver and adipose tissues, bile acid composition, energy metabolism, and messenger RNA and protein expression of the genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed. Results showed that deficiency of the Tgr5 gene in mice alleviated fasting-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Expression of liver oxysterol 7α-hydroxylase in the alternative bile acid synthesis pathway was reduced. Analysis of gallbladder bile acid composition showed marked increase of taurocholic acid and decrease of tauro-α and β-muricholic acid in Tgr5(-/-) mice. Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation rate and decreased hepatic fatty acid uptake. Interestingly, fasting induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 in liver was attenuated. In addition, fasted Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased activation of hepatic growth hormone-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (GH-Stat5) signaling compared to wild-type mice.

  19. In vitro binding capacity of bile acids by defatted corn protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Kongo-Dia-Moukala, Jauricque Ursulla; Zhang, Hui; Irakoze, Pierre Claver

    2011-02-08

    Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) stronger bile acid binding capacity than all others hydrolysates tested and all crystalline bile acids tested were highly bound by cholestyramine, a positive control well known as a cholesterol-reducing agent. The bile acid binding capacity of Flavourzyme hydrolysate was almost preserved after gastrointestinal proteases digestion. The molecular weight of Flavourzyme hydrolysate was determined and most of the peptides were found between 500-180 Da. The results showed that Flavourzyme hydrolysate may be used as a potential cholesterol-reducing agent.

  20. In Vitro Binding Capacity of Bile Acids by Defatted Corn Protein Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Kongo-Dia-Moukala, Jauricque Ursulla; Zhang, Hui; Irakoze, Pierre Claver

    2011-01-01

    Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) stronger bile acid binding capacity than all others hydrolysates tested and all crystalline bile acids tested were highly bound by cholestyramine, a positive control well known as a cholesterol-reducing agent. The bile acid binding capacity of Flavourzyme hydrolysate was almost preserved after gastrointestinal proteases digestion. The molecular weight of Flavourzyme hydrolysate was determined and most of the peptides were found between 500–180 Da. The results showed that Flavourzyme hydrolysate may be used as a potential cholesterol-reducing agent. PMID:21541043

  1. Fish protein decreases serum cholesterol in rats by inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Arai, Hirofumi; Kanda, Seiji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2011-05-01

    Fish protein has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol content by inhibiting absorption of cholesterol and bile acid in laboratory animals, though the mechanism underlying this effect is not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption following fish protein intake. Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 dietary groups of 7 rats each, 1 group receiving a diet consisting of 20% casein and the other receiving a diet consisting of 10% casein and 10% fish protein. Both experimental diets also contained 0.5% cholesterol and 0.1% sodium cholate. After the rats had been on their respective diets for 4 wk, their serum and liver cholesterol contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion contents were measured. Fish protein consumption decreased serum and liver cholesterol content and increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion and simultaneously increased fecal nitrogen excretion. In addition, fish protein hydrolyzate prepared by in vitro digestion had lower micellar solubility of cholesterol and higher binding capacity for bile acids compared with casein hydrolyzate. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effect of fish protein is mediated by increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion, which is due to the digestion products of fish protein having reduced micellar solubility of cholesterol and increased bile acid binding capacity.

  2. Adsorption of bile acid by chitosan salts prepared with cinnamic acid and analogue compounds.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshifumi; Nagaki, Kumiko; Kofuji, Kyouko; Sanae, Fujiko; Kontani, Hitoshi; Kawashima, Susumu

    2006-01-01

    A chitosan (CS) powder treated with cinnamic acid and an analogue compound (CN) was prepared as CS-CN. Using it, bile acid adsorption by CS-CN and the release of CN were investigated in vitro. When CS-CN was soaked in a taurocholate solution, it released CN and simultaneously adsorbed the bile acid. For CS-CN prepared with cinnamic acid, the amount of CN released was 0.286 +/- 0.001 mmol/g CS-CN; the amount of taurocholate adsorbed was 0.284 +/- 0.003 mmol/g CS-CN. These two functions were recognized on alginate or pectin gel beads containing CS-CN. The amount of released CN was altered extensively by the species of CN used for gel-bead preparation. Results suggest that CS-CN is a candidate for complementary medicine to prevent lifestyle-related diseases.

  3. Binding of bile acids by pastry products containing bioactive substances during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta; Szwengiel, Artur; Smoczyńska, Paulina; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Komolka, Patrycja

    2015-03-01

    The modern day consumer tends to choose products with health enhancing properties, enriched in bioactive substances. One such bioactive food component is dietary fibre, which shows a number of physiological properties including the binding of bile acids. Dietary fibre should be contained in everyday, easily accessible food products. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine sorption capacities of primary bile acid (cholic acid - CA) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic - DCA and lithocholic acids - LCA) by muffins (BM) and cookies (BC) with bioactive substances and control muffins (CM) and cookies (CC) in two sections of the in vitro gastrointestinal tract. Variations in gut flora were also analysed in the process of in vitro digestion of pastry products in a bioreactor. Enzymes: pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts: cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were added to the culture. Faecal bacteria, isolated from human large intestine, were added in the section of large intestine. The influence of dietary fibre content in cookies and concentration of bile acids in two stages of digestion were analysed. Generally, pastry goods with bioactive substances were characterized by a higher content of total fibre compared with the control samples. These products also differ in the profile of dietary fibre fractions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the bile acid profile after two stages of digestion depends on the quality and quantity of fibre. The bile acid profile after digestion of BM and BC forms one cluster, and with the CM and CC forms a separate cluster. High concentration of H (hemicellulose) is positively correlated with LCA (low binding effect) and negatively correlated with CA and DCA contents. The relative content of bile acids in the second stage of digestion was in some cases above the content in the control sample, particularly LCA. This means that the bacteria introduced in the 2nd stage of digestion synthesize the LCA.

  4. TGR5-mediated bile acid sensing controls glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Charles; Gioiello, Antimo; Noriega, Lilia; Strehle, Axelle; Oury, Julien; Rizzo, Giovanni; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Mataki, Chikage; Pruzanski, Mark; Pellicciari, Roberto; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Summary TGR5 is a G-protein coupled receptor expressed in brown adipose tissue and muscle where its activation by bile acids triggers an increase in energy expenditure and attenuates diet-induced obesity. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic gain- and loss-of function studies in vivo, we show here that TGR5 signaling induces intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, leading to improved liver and pancreatic function and enhanced glucose tolerance in obese mice. In addition, we show that the induction of GLP-1 release in enteroendocrine cells by 6α-ethyl-23(S)-methyl-cholic acid (EMCA, INT-777), a specific TGR5 agonist, is linked to an increase of the intracellular ATP/ADP ratio and a subsequent rise in intracellular calcium mobilization. Altogether, these data show that the TGR5 signaling pathway is critical in regulating intestinal GLP-1 secretion in vivo and suggest that pharmacological targeting of TGR5 may constitute a promising incretin-based strategy for the treatment of diabesity and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:19723493

  5. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-01-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. PMID:23948738

  6. Metabolomic Profiling of Bile Acids in Clinical and Experimental Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaobei; Elliott, Christopher T.; McGuinness, Bernadette; Passmore, Peter; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hölscher, Christian; McClean, Paula L.; Graham, Stewart F.; Green, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    Certain endogenous bile acids have been proposed as potential therapies for ameliorating Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but their role, if any, in the pathophysiology of this disease is not currently known. Given recent evidence of bile acids having protective and anti-inflammatory effects on the brain, it is important to establish how AD affects levels of endogenous bile acids. Using LC-MS/MS, this study profiled 22 bile acids in brain extracts and blood plasma from AD patients (n = 10) and age-matched control subjects (n = 10). In addition, we also profiled brain/plasma samples from APP/PS1 and WT mice (aged 6 and 12 months). In human plasma, we detected significantly lower cholic acid (CA, p = 0.03) in AD patients than age-matched control subjects. In APP/PS1 mouse plasma we detected higher CA (p = 0.05, 6 months) and lower hyodeoxycholic acid (p = 0.04, 12 months) than WT. In human brain with AD pathology (Braak stages V-VI) taurocholic acid (TCA) were significantly lower (p = 0.01) than age-matched control subjects. In APP/PS1 mice we detected higher brain lithocholic acid (p = 0.05) and lower tauromuricholic acid (TMCA; p = 0.05, 6 months). TMCA was also decreased (p = 0.002) in 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice along with 5 other acids: CA (p = 0.02), β-muricholic acid (p = 0.02), Ω-muricholic acid (p = 0.05), TCA (p = 0.04), and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (p = 0.02). The levels of bile acids are clearly disturbed during the development of AD pathology and, since some bile acids are being proposed as potential AD therapeutics, we demonstrate a method that can be used to support work to advance bile acid therapeutics. PMID:28629125

  7. Agonist of farnesoid X receptor protects against bile acid induced damage and oxidative stress in mouse placenta--a study on maternal cholestasis model.

    PubMed

    Wu, W B; Xu, Y Y; Cheng, W W; Wang, Y X; Liu, Y; Huang, D; Zhang, H J

    2015-05-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-specific disorder, which is characterized by raised serum bile acid level and potential adverse fetal outcome. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), also known as a bile acid receptor, was found to be expressed in placenta with low level. Whether activation of FXR by specific agonists could regulate the pathogenesis of ICP is still unclear. A model of maternal cholestasis was induced by administration of 17α-ethynylestradiol (E2) in pregnant mice for 6 days. We explored the regulatory effect of WAY-362450 (W450), a highly selective and potent FXR agonist on placenta. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of E2 increased bile acid levels in mouse serum, liver and amniotic fluid. Bile acid levels were significantly decreased after W450 treatment. W450 protected against the impairment of placentas induced by E2, including severe intracellular edema and apoptosis of trophoblasts. Moreover, W450 significantly induced the expressions of FXR target bile acid transport gene ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B (MDR/TAP), member 11 (Abcb11;Bsep) in placenta. W450 could also attenuate placental oxidative stress and increase the expressions of antioxidant enzymes Prdx1 and Prdx3. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that FXR agonist W450 modulated bile acid balance and protected against placental oxidative stress. Thus, our results support that potent FXR agonists might represent promising drugs for the treatment of ICP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and inborn errors of bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Irena; Socha, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC), types 1, 2 and 3, are due to defects in genes involved in bile secretion (FIC1, BSEP, MDR3). PFIC and inborn errors of bile acid synthesis (IEBAS) often present in infancy with cholestasis. The distinctive feature of PFIC 1 and 2 and IEBAS is a normal level of GGT, while IEBAS are suspected in patients with low plasma bile acids concentration. Molecular testing, urinary bile acid analysis (IEBAS), liver biopsy and immuno-staining are used for the diagnosis. Some patients with PFIC can be successfully treated with ursodeoxycholic acid or partial external biliary diversion. IEBAS is treated with cholic acid. Liver transplantation is required for cirrhosis with liver failure. Hepatocarcinoma has been reported in PFIC2.

  9. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. PMID:16473946

  10. The influence of bile acids on the oral bioavailability of vitamin K encapsulated in polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    van Hasselt, P M; Janssens, G E P J; Slot, T K; van der Ham, M; Minderhoud, T C; Talelli, M; Akkermans, L M; Rijcken, C J F; van Nostrum, C F

    2009-01-19

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of polymeric micelles to enable gastrointestinal absorption of the extremely hydrophobic compound vitamin K, by comparison of its absorption in bile duct ligated and sham operated rats. Hereto, vitamin K was encapsulated in micelles composed of mPEG(5000)-b-p(HPMAm-lac(2)), a thermosensitive block copolymer. Vitamin K plasma levels rose significantly upon gastric administration of 1 mg vitamin K encapsulated in polymeric micelles in sham operated rats, but not after bile duct ligation (AUC 4543 and 1.64 ng/mL/h respectively, p<0.01). Duodenal administration of polymeric micelles together with bile acids in bile duct ligated rats fully restored absorption. Dynamic light scattering time series showed a significant and dose dependent rise in micellar size in the presence of bile acids in vitro, indicating the gradual formation of mixed micelles during the first 3 h of incubation. The highest bile acid amounts (11 mM deoxycholic acid and 41 mM taurocholic acid) eventually caused aggregation of the loaded micelles after the formation of mixed micelles. These data suggest that the gastrointestinal absorption of encapsulated vitamin K from polymeric micelles is mediated by free bile and that uptake of intact micelles through pinocytosis is insignificant.

  11. The reversed feto-maternal bile acid gradient in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is corrected by ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Geenes, Victoria; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Benthin, Lisbet; Lawrance, Dominic; Chambers, Jenny; Gurung, Vinita; Thornton, Jim; Chappell, Lucy; Khan, Erum; Dixon, Peter; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Williamson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-specific liver disorder associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes. It is characterised by raised maternal serum bile acids, which are believed to cause the adverse outcomes. ICP is commonly treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). This study aimed to determine the fetal and maternal bile acid profiles in normal and ICP pregnancies, and to examine the effect of UDCA treatment. Matched maternal and umbilical cord serum samples were collected from untreated ICP (n = 18), UDCA-treated ICP (n = 46) and uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 15) cases at the time of delivery. Nineteen individual bile acids were measured using HPLC-MS/MS. Maternal and fetal serum bile acids are significantly raised in ICP compared with normal pregnancy (p = <0.0001 and <0.05, respectively), predominantly due to increased levels of conjugated cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid. There are no differences between the umbilical cord artery and cord vein levels of the major bile acid species. The feto-maternal gradient of bile acids is reversed in ICP. Treatment with UDCA significantly reduces serum bile acids in the maternal compartment (p = <0.0001), thereby reducing the feto-maternal transplacental gradient. UDCA-treatment does not cause a clinically important increase in lithocholic acid (LCA) concentrations. ICP is associated with significant quantitative and qualitative changes in the maternal and fetal bile acid pools. Treatment with UDCA reduces the level of bile acids in both compartments and reverses the qualitative changes. We have not found evidence to support the suggestion that UDCA treatment increases fetal LCA concentrations to deleterious levels.

  12. The Reversed Feto-Maternal Bile Acid Gradient in Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy Is Corrected by Ursodeoxycholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Geenes, Victoria; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Benthin, Lisbet; Lawrance, Dominic; Chambers, Jenny; Gurung, Vinita; Thornton, Jim; Chappell, Lucy; Khan, Erum; Dixon, Peter; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Williamson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-specific liver disorder associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes. It is characterised by raised maternal serum bile acids, which are believed to cause the adverse outcomes. ICP is commonly treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). This study aimed to determine the fetal and maternal bile acid profiles in normal and ICP pregnancies, and to examine the effect of UDCA treatment. Matched maternal and umbilical cord serum samples were collected from untreated ICP (n = 18), UDCA-treated ICP (n = 46) and uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 15) cases at the time of delivery. Nineteen individual bile acids were measured using HPLC-MS/MS. Maternal and fetal serum bile acids are significantly raised in ICP compared with normal pregnancy (p = <0.0001 and <0.05, respectively), predominantly due to increased levels of conjugated cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid. There are no differences between the umbilical cord artery and cord vein levels of the major bile acid species. The feto-maternal gradient of bile acids is reversed in ICP. Treatment with UDCA significantly reduces serum bile acids in the maternal compartment (p = <0.0001), thereby reducing the feto-maternal transplacental gradient. UDCA-treatment does not cause a clinically important increase in lithocholic acid (LCA) concentrations. ICP is associated with significant quantitative and qualitative changes in the maternal and fetal bile acid pools. Treatment with UDCA reduces the level of bile acids in both compartments and reverses the qualitative changes. We have not found evidence to support the suggestion that UDCA treatment increases fetal LCA concentrations to deleterious levels. PMID:24421907

  13. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  14. Taurine ameliorates cholesterol metabolism by stimulating bile acid production in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru; Fujita, Michiko; Nakamura, Masakazu; Sakono, Masanobu; Nishizono, Shoko; Sato, Masao; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Mori, Mari; Fukuda, Nobuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary taurine on cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol-fed rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two dietary groups (n = 6 in each group): a high-cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholesterol and 0.15% sodium cholate, and a high-cholesterol diet with 5% (w/w) taurine. The experimental diets were given for 2 weeks. Taurine supplementation reduced the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels by 37% and 32%, respectively. Faecal excretion of bile acids was significantly increased in taurine-treated rats, compared with untreated rats. Biliary bile acid concentrations were also increased by taurine. Taurine supplementation increased taurine-conjugated bile acids by 61% and decreased glycine-conjugated bile acids by 53%, resulting in a significant decrease in the glycine/taurine (G/T) ratio. Among the taurine-conjugated bile acids, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid were significantly increased. In the liver, taurine supplementation increased the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, by three- and two-fold, respectively. Taurine also decreased the enzymatic activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). These observations suggest that taurine supplementation increases the synthesis and excretion of taurine-conjugated bile acids and stimulates the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid by elevating the expression and activity of CYP7A1. This may reduce cholesterol esterification and lipoprotein assembly for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, leading to reductions in the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Bile acid-induced elevated oxidative stress in the absence of farnesoid X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Masahiro; Miyata, Masaaki; Yin, Shanai; Kurata, Yasushi; Shimada, Miki; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Gonzalez, Frank J; Suzuki, Kokichi; Shibasaki, Shigeki; Kurosawa, Tohru; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The major function of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is to maintain bile acid and lipid homeostasis. Fxr-null mice, in which the levels of hepatic bile acid and lipid have been elevated, develop spontaneous liver tumors. We evaluated differences in hepatic bile acid and triglyceride concentrations, and in generation of oxidative stress between wild-type mice and Fxr-null mice. The hepatic levels of 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and hydroperoxides, oxidative stress-related genes, and nuclear factor (erythroid-2 like) factor 2 (Nrf2) protein in Fxr-null mice were significantly higher than those in wild-type mice. An increase in the hepatic bile acid concentration in Fxr-null mice fed a cholic acid (CA) diet resulted in an increase in the hepatic levels of hydroperoxides, TBARS and 8OHdG, whereas a decrease in the hepatic concentration in mice fed a diet containing ME3738 (22β-methoxyolean-12-ene-3β, 24(4β)-diol) resulted in a decrease in these oxidative stress marker levels. A good correlation was observed between the hepatic bile acid concentrations and the hepatic oxidative stress marker levels, although there was no significant correlation between the hepatic triglyceride concentrations and oxidative stress. The results show that oxidative stress is spontaneously enhanced in Fxr-null mice, which may be attributable to a continuously high level of hepatic bile acids. PMID:19182371

  16. Effects of dose, flow rate, and bile acid on diclofenac disposition in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Misato; Kawase, Atsushi; Matsushima, Yuka; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    An in situ perfused rat liver system is useful for studying the hepatic disposition of drugs and their metabolites. However, the effects of the perfusion conditions on drug disposition are unclear. We examined the effects of conditions such as flow rate (13 or 26 mL/min) and bile acid on disposition of diclofenac (DF) as a model drug and DF metabolites [diclofenac-1-O-acyl glucuronide (DF-Glu) or 4'-hydroxydiclofenac (DF-4'OH)] in the absence of albumin. DF, DF-Glu, and DF-4'OH concentrations in the perfusate and cumulative amounts of DF-Glu excreted in bile were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography methods. DF in the perfusate was rapidly eliminated as the perfusate flow rate increased. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0-60) for DF-Glu and DF-4'OH in a perfusate containing bile acid was lower at a flow rate of 26 and 13 mL/min, respectively. The bile flow rate at 26 mL/min with 24 μM of bile acid in the perfusate was significantly higher (ca. 3.5 times) compared with that at 13 mL/min without bile acid. Cumulative biliary DF-Glu excretion was also dramatically affected by the flow rate and addition of bile acid. This study indicated that the flow rate and bile acid in the perfused rat liver were key factors for bile flow rate and DF, DF-Glu, and DF-4'OH disposition in the absence of albumin.

  17. Removal of bile acids by two different extracorporeal liver support systems in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Krisper, Peter; Beuers, Ulrich; Haditsch, Bernd; Schneditz, Daniel; Jung, Aleksandra; Putz-Bankuti, Csilla; Holzer, Herwig; Trauner, Michael; Stauber, Rudolf E

    2007-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is accompanied by marked intrahepatic cholestasis leading to accumulation of cytotoxic bile acids. Extracorporeal liver support systems efficiently remove bile acids, but their effect on bile acid composition in ACLF is unknown. The aim of the present study was to compare elimination of individual plasma bile acids by albumin dialysis (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System, MARS) and fractionated plasma separation (Prometheus). Eight consecutive patients with ACLF underwent alternating 6-hour sessions with MARS or Prometheus in a randomized, cross-over design. Serum samples were obtained before, during, and after each treatment, and individual bile acids including cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) were measured by gas chromatography. MARS and Prometheus removed total bile acids to a similar extent (reduction ratio, 45% and 46%, respectively). Both devices cleared cholic acid more efficiently than did CDCA. The molar fraction of CDCA (fCDCA) was elevated at baseline and correlated with the degree of liver dysfunction. Prometheus but not MARS treatments further increased fCDCA. Although both devices eliminate total bile acids to a similar extent, clearance of individual bile acids is different, leading to a slight change of the bile acid profile toward hydrophobic bile acids during Prometheus treatments.

  18. Bile acids promote diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocellular carcinoma via increased inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Beggs, Kevin; Borude, Prachi; Edwards, Genea; Bhushan, Bharat; Walesky, Chad; Roy, Nairita; Manley, Michael W; Gunewardena, Sumedha; O'Neil, Maura; Li, Hua; Apte, Udayan

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common hepatic malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer related deaths. Previous studies have implicated bile acids in pathogenesis of HCC, but the mechanisms are not known. We investigated the mechanisms of HCC tumor promotion by bile acids the diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-initiation-cholic acid (CA)-induced tumor promotion protocol in mice. The data show that 0.2% CA treatment resulted in threefold increase in number and size of DEN-induced liver tumors. All tumors observed in DEN-treated mice were well-differentiated HCCs. The HCCs observed in DEN-treated CA-fed mice exhibited extensive CD3-, CD20-, and CD45-positive inflammatory cell aggregates. Microarray-based global gene expression studies combined with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed significant activation of NF-κB and Nanog in the DEN-treated 0.2% CA-fed livers. Further studies showed significantly higher TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA, a marked increase in total and phosphorylated-p65 and phosphorylated IκBα (degradation form) in livers of DEN-treated 0.2% CA-fed mice. Treatment of primary mouse hepatocytes with various bile acids showed significant induction of stemness genes including Nanog, KLF4, Sox2, and Oct4. Quantification of total and 20 specific bile acids in liver, and serum revealed a tumor-associated bile acid signature. Finally, quantification of total serum bile acids in normal, cirrhotic, and HCC human samples revealed increased bile acids in serum of cirrhotic and HCC patients. Taken together, these data indicate that bile acids are mechanistically involved pathogenesis of HCC and may promote HCC formation via activation of inflammatory signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Steam Cooking Significantly Improves In Vitro Bile Acid Binding of Collard Greens, Kale, Mustard Greens, Broccoli, Green Bell Pepper and Cabbage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acid binding capacity has been related to the cholesterol-lowering potential of foods and food fractions. Lowering recirculating bile acids results in utilization of cholesterol to synthesize bile acid and reduced fat absorption. Secondary bile acids have been associated with increasing the r...

  20. Bile acid receptors as targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Gross, Barbara; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis. When dyslipidemia coincides with other metabolic disorders such as obesity, hypertension, and glucose intolerance, defined as the metabolic syndrome (MS), individuals present an elevated risk to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) as well as CVD. Because the MS epidemic represents a growing public health problem worldwide, the development of therapies remains a major challenge. Alterations of bile acid pool regulation in T2D have revealed a link between bile acid and metabolic homeostasis. The bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5 both regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, rendering them potential pharmacological targets for MS therapy. This review discusses the mechanisms of metabolic regulation by FXR and TGR5 and the utility relevance of natural and synthetic modulators of FXR and TGR5 activity, including bile acid sequestrants, in the treatment of the MS. PMID:22550135

  1. Bile acid diarrhoea and FGF19: new views on diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Walters, Julian R F

    2014-07-01

    Chronic diarrhoea induced by bile acids is common and the underlying mechanisms are linked to homeostatic regulation of hepatic bile acid synthesis by fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19). Increasing evidence, including that from several large case series using SeHCAT (selenium homocholic acid taurine) tests for diagnosis, indicates that bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) accounts for a sizeable proportion of patients who would otherwise be diagnosed with IBS. Studies of other approaches for diagnosis of BAD have shown increased bile acid synthesis, increased faecal levels of primary bile acids, dysbiosis and different urinary volatile organic compounds when compared with healthy controls or with other diseases. The role of the ileal hormone FGF19 in BAD has been strengthened: a prospective clinical study has confirmed low FGF19 levels in BAD, and so a test to measure these levels could be developed for diagnosis. In animal models, FGF19 depletion by antibodies produces severe diarrhoea. Bile acids affect colonic function through farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5 receptors. As well as these effects in the colon, FXR-dependent stimulation of ileal FGF19 production could be a logical mechanism to provide therapeutic benefit in BAD. Further studies of FGF19 in humans hold promise in providing novel treatments for this cause of chronic diarrhoea.

  2. Intestine-specific Deletion of Sirt1 in Mice Impairs DCoH2–HNF1α–FXR Signaling and Alters Systemic Bile Acid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kazgan, Nevzat; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R.; Purushotham, Aparna; Lu, Jing; Rao, Anuradha; Lee, Sangkyu; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Lickteig, Andrew; Csanaky, Ivan; Zhao, Yingming; Dawson, Paul A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the most conserved mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, is an important metabolic sensor in many tissues. However, little is known about its role in the small intestine, which absorbs and senses nutrients. We investigated the functions of intestinal Sirt1 in systemic bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in mice. Methods Sirt1 was specifically deleted from intestines of mice using the Flox-villin-Cre system (Sirt1 iKO mice). Intestinal and heptic tissues were collected, and bile acid absorption was analyzed using the everted gut sac experiment. Systemic bile acid metabolism was studied in Sirt1 iKO and Flox control mice placed on standard diets, diets containing 0.5% cholic acid or 1.25% cholesterol, or lithogenic diets. Results Sirt1 iKO mice had reduced intestinal Fxr signaling via Hnf1a compared with controls, which reduced expression of the bile acid transporter genes Asbt and Mcf2l (encodes Ost) and absorption of ileal bile acids. Sirt1 regulated Hnf1α–Fxr signaling partially through Dcoh2, which increases dimerization of Hnf1α. Sirt1 was found to deacetylate DCoH2, promoting its interaction with Hnf1α and inducing DNA binding by Hnf1α. Intestine-specific deletion of Sirt1 increased hepatic bile acid biosynthesis, reduced hepatic accumulation of bile acids, and protected animals from liver damage from high-bile acid diets. Conclusions Intestinal Sirt1, a key nutrient sensor, is required for ileal bile acid absorption and systemic bile acid homeostasis in mice. We delineated the mechanism of metabolic regulation of Hnf1α–Fxr signaling. Reagents designed to inhibit intestinal SIRT1 might be developed to treat bile acid-related diseases such as cholestasis. PMID:24389307

  3. Decreased bile-acid synthesis in livers of hepatocyte-conditional NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-null mice results in increased bile acids in serum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) is essential for the function of microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), including those P450s involved in bile acid (BA) synthesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (H-Cpr-null) have been engineered to understand the in vivo function of hepatic P450s in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. However, the impact of hepatic Cpr on BA homeostasis is not clear. The present study revealed that H-Cpr-null mice had a 60% decrease in total BA concentration in liver, whereas the total BA concentration in serum was almost doubled. The decreased level of cholic acid (CA) in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice is likely due to diminished enzyme activity of Cyp8b1 that is essential for CA biosynthesis. Feedback mechanisms responsible for the reduced liver BA concentrations and/or increased serum BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice included the following: 1) enhanced alternative BA synthesis pathway, as evidenced by the fact that classic BA synthesis is diminished but chenodeoxycholic acid still increases in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice; 2) inhibition of farnesoid X receptor activation, which increased the mRNA of Cyp7a1 and 8b1; 3) induction of intestinal BA transporters to facilitate BA absorption from the intestine to the circulation; 4) induction of hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters to increase BA efflux from the liver to blood; and 5) increased generation of secondary BAs. In summary, the present study reveals an important contribution of the alternative BA synthesis pathway and BA transporters in regulating BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice.

  4. Decreased Bile-Acid Synthesis in Livers of Hepatocyte-Conditional NADPH–Cytochrome P450 Reductase–Null Mice Results in Increased Bile Acids in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Zhang, Youcai

    2014-01-01

    NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) is essential for the function of microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), including those P450s involved in bile acid (BA) synthesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase (H-Cpr-null) have been engineered to understand the in vivo function of hepatic P450s in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. However, the impact of hepatic Cpr on BA homeostasis is not clear. The present study revealed that H-Cpr-null mice had a 60% decrease in total BA concentration in liver, whereas the total BA concentration in serum was almost doubled. The decreased level of cholic acid (CA) in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice is likely due to diminished enzyme activity of Cyp8b1 that is essential for CA biosynthesis. Feedback mechanisms responsible for the reduced liver BA concentrations and/or increased serum BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice included the following: 1) enhanced alternative BA synthesis pathway, as evidenced by the fact that classic BA synthesis is diminished but chenodeoxycholic acid still increases in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice; 2) inhibition of farnesoid X receptor activation, which increased the mRNA of Cyp7a1 and 8b1; 3) induction of intestinal BA transporters to facilitate BA absorption from the intestine to the circulation; 4) induction of hepatic multidrug resistance–associated protein transporters to increase BA efflux from the liver to blood; and 5) increased generation of secondary BAs. In summary, the present study reveals an important contribution of the alternative BA synthesis pathway and BA transporters in regulating BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice. PMID:25034404

  5. Impact of oral vancomycin on gut microbiota, bile acid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vrieze, Anne; Out, Carolien; Fuentes, Susana; Jonker, Lisanne; Reuling, Isaie; Kootte, Ruud S; van Nood, Els; Holleman, Frits; Knaapen, Max; Romijn, Johannes A; Soeters, Maarten R; Blaak, Ellen E; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Reijnders, Dorien; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Serlie, Mireille J; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jenst J; van der Ley, Claude; Kema, Ido P; Zoetendal, Erwin G; de Vos, Willem M; Hoekstra, Joost B L; Stroes, Erik S; Groen, Albert K; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2014-04-01

    Obesity has been associated with changes in the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota. Modulation of the microbiota by antibiotics also alters bile acid and glucose metabolism in mice. Hence, we hypothesized that short term administration of oral antibiotics in humans would affect fecal microbiota composition and subsequently bile acid and glucose metabolism. In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, 20 male obese subjects with metabolic syndrome were randomized to 7 days of amoxicillin 500 mg t.i.d. or 7 days of vancomycin 500 mg t.i.d. At baseline and after 1 week of therapy, fecal microbiota composition (Human Intestinal Tract Chip phylogenetic microarray), fecal and plasma bile acid concentrations as well as insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using [6,6-(2)H2]-glucose tracer) were measured. Vancomycin reduced fecal microbial diversity with a decrease of gram-positive bacteria (mainly Firmicutes) and a compensatory increase in gram-negative bacteria (mainly Proteobacteria). Concomitantly, vancomycin decreased fecal secondary bile acids with a simultaneous postprandial increase in primary bile acids in plasma (p<0.05). Moreover, changes in fecal bile acid concentrations were predominantly associated with altered Firmicutes. Finally, administration of vancomycin decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity (p<0.05). Amoxicillin did not affect any of these parameters. Oral administration of vancomycin significantly impacts host physiology by decreasing intestinal microbiota diversity, bile acid dehydroxylation and peripheral insulin sensitivity in subjects with metabolic syndrome. These data show that intestinal microbiota, particularly of the Firmicutes phylum contributes to bile acid and glucose metabolism in humans. This trial is registered at the Dutch Trial Register (NTR2566). Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental study on the effect of bile, and bile and hydrochloric acid mixture on the esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Manea, Georgeta Simona; Lupuşoru, Cătălina; Căruntu, Irina Draga

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of duodena gastro esophageal reflux (DGER) implies both clinical and experimental studies. Within the context of the literature, our study aimed to produce esophageal lesions by the development of an experimental model reproducing the characteristics of DGER and to analyze their microscopic pattern. The material consisted in three groups of white Wistar rats. Group I (control group) included physiologic saline gavaged rats. Group II received by the esophageal probe bovine bile pH 7, and group III 0.5% bovine bile at pH 4, to which we added hydrochloric acid 0.1 N. The rats were sacrificed in the 21st day of the experiment. The esophagus was sectioned obliquely and longitudinally, maintaining the lumen and marking the upper and lower extremities. The esophageal fragments were routinely processed for light microscopy pathology exam, in HE staining. The pathologic aspects suggested that the effect of bile and bile and hydrochloric acid mixture on the esophageal epithelium interferes with the normal keratinization process, with consequent onset of hyperkeratinization. Moreover, epithelial atrophy was present in the group II on restricted areas and in the group III on extended territories. The alterations in the keratinization process suggest the possibility of initiation in time of carcinogenic mechanism. The atrophic transformations plead for an evolution towards erosion and ulceration. The study takes into consideration the differences between human and experimental animal esophageal epithelium. Thus, there emerge new perspectives to extrapolate the experimental results into the human biologic context, the morphologic pattern proving the irritant effect of DGER in vivo.

  7. Rapid analysis of bile acids in different biological matrices using LC-ESI-MS/MS for the investigation of bile acid transformation by mammalian gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Katrin; Just, Sarah; Gau, Laura; Mueller, Henrike; Gérard, Philippe; Lepage, Patricia; Clavel, Thomas; Rohn, Sascha

    2017-02-01

    Bile acids are important signaling molecules that regulate cholesterol, glucose, and energy homoeostasis and have thus been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders. Their bioavailability is strongly modulated by the gut microbiota, which contributes to generation of complex individual-specific bile acid profiles. Hence, it is important to have accurate methods at hand for precise measurement of these important metabolites. Here, a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous identification and quantitation of primary and secondary bile acids as well as their taurine and glycine conjugates was developed and validated. Applicability of the method was demonstrated for mammalian tissues, biofluids, and cell culture media. The analytical approach mainly consists of a simple and rapid liquid-liquid extraction procedure in presence of deuterium-labeled internal standards. Baseline separation of all isobaric bile acid species was achieved and a linear correlation over a broad concentration range was observed. The method showed acceptable accuracy and precision on intra-day (1.42-11.07 %) and inter-day (2.11-12.71 %) analyses and achieved good recovery rates for representative analytes (83.7-107.1 %). As a proof of concept, the analytical method was applied to mouse tissues and biofluids, but especially to samples from in vitro fermentations with gut bacteria of the family Coriobacteriaceae. The developed method revealed that the species Eggerthella lenta and Collinsella aerofaciens possess bile salt hydrolase activity, and for the first time that the species Enterorhabdus mucosicola is able to deconjugate and dehydrogenate primary bile acids in vitro.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids: A good and a bad bile acid for intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Valeria; Rivoira, María; Marchionatti, Ana; Pérez, Adriana; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and to find out whether the inhibition of this process caused by NaDOC could be prevented by UDCA. Chicks were employed and divided into four groups: (a) controls, (b) treated with 10mM NaDOC, (c) treated with 60 μg UDCA/100g of b.w., and (d) treated with 10mM NaDOC and 60 μg UDCA/100g of b.w. UDCA enhanced intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, which was time and dose-dependent. UDCA avoided the inhibition of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by NaDOC. Both bile acids altered protein and gene expression of molecules involved in the transcellular pathway of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, but in the opposite way. UDCA aborted the oxidative stress produced by NaDOC in the intestine. UDCA and UDCA plus NaDOC increased vitamin D receptor protein expression. In conclusion, UDCA is a beneficial bile acid for intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Contrarily, NaDOC inhibits the intestinal cation absorption through triggering oxidative stress. The use of UDCA in patients with cholestasis would be benefited because of the protective effect on the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, avoiding the inhibition caused by hydrophobic bile acids and neutralizing the oxidative stress.

  9. Sweroside ameliorates α-naphthylisothiocyanate-induced cholestatic liver injury in mice by regulating bile acids and suppressing pro-inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiao-ling; Yang, Fan; Gong, Jun-ting; Tang, Xiao-wen; Wang, Guang-yun; Wang, Zheng-tao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Sweroside is an iridoid glycoside with diverse biological activities. In the present study we investigated the effects of sweroside on α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestatic liver injury in mice. Methods: Mice received sweroside (120 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or a positive control INT-747 (12 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 5 d, and ANIT (75 mg/kg, ig) was administered on d 3. The mice were euthanized on d 5, and serum biochemical markers, hepatic bile acids and histological changes were analyzed. Hepatic expression of genes related to pro-inflammatory mediators and bile acid metabolism was also assessed. Primary mouse hepatocytes were exposed to a reconstituted mixture of hepatic bile acids, which were markedly elevated in the ANIT-treated mice, and the cell viability and expression of genes related to pro-inflammatory mediators were examined. Results: Administration of sweroside or INT-747 effectively ameliorated ANIT-induced cholestatic liver injury in mice, as evidenced by significantly reduced serum biochemical markers and attenuated pathological changes in liver tissues. Furthermore, administration of sweroside or INT-747 significantly decreased ANIT-induced elevation of individual hepatic bile acids, such as β-MCA, CA, and TCA, which were related to its effects on the expression of genes responsible for bile acid synthesis and transport as well as pro-inflammatory responses. Treatment of mouse hepatocytes with the reconstituted bile acid mixture induced significant pro-inflammatory responses without affecting the cell viability. Conclusion: Sweroside attenuates ANIT-induced cholestatic liver injury in mice by restoring bile acid synthesis and transport to their normal levels, as well as suppressing pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:27498779

  10. Diagnostic Methods for Bile Acid Malabsorption in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Altered bile acid (BA) concentrations in the colon may cause diarrhea or constipation. BA malabsorption (BAM) accounts for >25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea and chronic diarrhea in Western countries. As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are desired in clinical practice to help direct the most effective treatment course for the chronic bowel dysfunction. This review appraises the methodology, advantages and disadvantages of 4 tools that directly measure BAM: 14C-glycocholate breath and stool test, 75Selenium HomotauroCholic Acid Test (SeHCAT), 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. 14C-glycocholate is a laborious test no longer widely utilized. 75SeHCAT is validated, but not available in the United States. Serum C4 is a simple, accurate method that is applicable to a majority of patients, but requires further clinical validation. Fecal measurements to quantify total and individual fecal BAs are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the U.S., and a therapeutic trial with a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data suggest there is an advantage to studying fecal excretion of the individual BAs and their role in BAM; this may constitute a significant advantage of the fecal BA method over the other tests. Fecal BA test could become a routine addition to fecal fat measurement in patients with unexplained diarrhea. In summary, availability determines the choice of test among C4, SeHCAT and fecal BA; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients. PMID:23644387

  11. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  12. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is activated by alterations of its membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Kusch, Jana; Lucas, Susana Dias; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Channels of this family are characterized by a common structure, their physiological functions and modes of activation, however, are diverse. Rat BASIC is expressed in brain, liver and intestinal tract and activated by bile acids. The physiological function of BASIC and its mechanism of bile acid activation remain a puzzle. Here we addressed the question whether amphiphilic bile acids activate BASIC by directly binding to the channel or indirectly by altering the properties of the surrounding membrane. We show that membrane-active substances other than bile acids also affect the activity of BASIC and that activation by bile acids and other membrane-active substances is non-additive, suggesting that BASIC is sensitive for changes in its membrane environment. Furthermore based on results from chimeras between BASIC and ASIC1a, we show that the extracellular and the transmembrane domains are important for membrane sensitivity.

  13. The Bile Acid-Sensitive Ion Channel (BASIC) Is Activated by Alterations of Its Membrane Environment

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Axel; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Kusch, Jana; Dias Lucas, Susana; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Channels of this family are characterized by a common structure, their physiological functions and modes of activation, however, are diverse. Rat BASIC is expressed in brain, liver and intestinal tract and activated by bile acids. The physiological function of BASIC and its mechanism of bile acid activation remain a puzzle. Here we addressed the question whether amphiphilic bile acids activate BASIC by directly binding to the channel or indirectly by altering the properties of the surrounding membrane. We show that membrane-active substances other than bile acids also affect the activity of BASIC and that activation by bile acids and other membrane-active substances is non-additive, suggesting that BASIC is sensitive for changes in its membrane environment. Furthermore based on results from chimeras between BASIC and ASIC1a, we show that the extracellular and the transmembrane domains are important for membrane sensitivity. PMID:25360526

  14. Primary bile acids as potential biomarkers for the clinical grading of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Deng, Wenping; Wang, Junwei; Shao, Yong; Ou, Minglin; Ding, Min

    2013-07-01

    To identify possible biomarkers for the clinical grading of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) through serum bile acid (SBA) profiling in women with ICP. Serum samples were collected in the last trimester of pregnancy from 33 women with severe ICP, 28 women with mild ICP, and 35 women with a normal pregnancy. The SBA levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Patients with severe ICP had significantly higher serum levels of taurochenodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, glycocholic acid (GCA), taurocholic acid (TCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid than women with mild ICP or a normal pregnancy. Primary bile acid species, in particular TCA and GCA, were the main bile acids detected and their levels were significantly higher in the severe ICP group than in the other 2 groups. There is an obvious difference in the SBA profiles of women with severe ICP and those with mild ICP, indicating that primary bile acids may be useful biomarkers for the clinical grading of ICP. Implementation of primary bile acid testing in clinical practice may help clinicians to determine the appropriate management strategy for patients with ICP. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synergistic effect of hydrochloric acid and bile acids on the pars esophageal mucosa of the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Lang, J; Blikslager, A; Regina, D; Eisemann, J; Argenzio, R

    1998-09-01

    To determine effects of finely ground diet and food deprivation on pH and bile acid concentration in the proximal portion of the porcine stomach and effects of bile acids and pH on the pars esophageal mucosa in vitro. Sixteen 15- to 30-kg pigs. Gastric content samples obtained from pigs fed a finely ground pelleted or coarsely ground meal diet were assayed for gastric pH and bile acids. Stratified squamous epithelium was studied in an Ussing chamber, and histologically. Electrical conductance and transmucosal mannitol fluxes (as indices of tissue permeability) were determined at pH 4.0, 2.0, and 1.5 and in response to treatment with 0, 1, 2, or 3 mM taurodeoxycholate or glycocholate. Pigs fed the finely ground feed had significantly (P = 0.01) lower proximal stomach pH than did pigs fed the coarse meal. Proximal stomach bile acids concentration was significantly (P = 0.04) higher in pigs fed the finely ground diet. The H+ and bile acids concentration increased with time after feeding. In vitro exposure of the stratified mucosa to high H+ (pH < 4.0) and bile salt concentration (> or = 1.0 mM) resulted in significant (P < 0.05) dose-dependent increase in tissue conductance and mannitol fluxes, whereas low pH or bile acids alone had little effect. High H+ and bile acids concentration in the stomach of pigs fed finely ground diets or subjected to feed deprivation may contribute to ulceration of the pars esophageal tissue. Bile acids act synergistically and in dose-dependent manner, with low pH causing damage to the stratified squamous epithelium in vitro.

  16. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  17. Probiotics--interactions with bile acids and impact on cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Nebojša; Stankov, Karmen; Mikov, Momir

    2012-12-01

    The use of probiotics, alone or in interaction with bile acids, is a modern strategy in the prevention and treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Numerous mechanisms for hypocholesterolemic effect of probiotics have been hypothesized, based mostly on in vitro evidence. Interaction with bile acids through reaction of deconjugation catalyzed by bile salt hydrolase enzymes (BSH) is considered as the main mechanism of cholesterol-lowering effects of probiotic bacteria, but it has been reported that microbial BSH activity could be potentially detrimental to the human host. There are several approaches for prevention of possible side effects associated with BSH activity, which at the same time increase the viability of probiotics in the intestines and also in food matrices. The aim of our study was to summarize present knowledge of probiotics-bile acids interactions, with special reference to cholesterol-lowering mechanisms of probiotics, and to report novel biotechnological approaches for increasing the pharmacological benefits of probiotics.

  18. Association between circulating vitamin D metabolites and fecal bile acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Elizabeth T.; Haussler, Mark R.; Alberts, David S.; Kohler, Lindsay N.; Lance, Peter; Martínez, María Elena; Roe, Denise J.; Jurutka, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    While hydrophobic bile acids have been demonstrated to exhibit cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in the colorectum, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been investigated as a potential chemopreventive agent. Vitamin D has been shown to play a role in both bile acid metabolism and in the development of colorectal neoplasia. Employing a cross-sectional design, we sought to determine whether baseline circulating concentrations of the vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were associated with baseline fecal bile acid concentrations in a trial of UDCA for the prevention of colorectal adenoma recurrence. We also prospectively evaluated whether vitamin D metabolite concentrations modified the effect of UDCA on adenoma recurrence. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, and calcium intake, adequate concentrations of 25(OH)D (> 30 ng/ml) were statistically significantly associated with reduced odds for high levels of total (OR=0.61; 95% CI=0.38-0.97), and primary (OR=0.61; 95% CI=0.38-0.96) bile acids, as well as individually with chenodeoxycholic acid (OR=0.39; 95% CI=0.24-0.63) and cholic acid (OR=0.56; 95% CI=0.36-0.90). No significant associations were observed for 1,25(OH)2D and high vs. low fecal bile acid concentrations. In addition, neither 25(OH)D nor 1,25(OH)2D modified the effect of UDCA on colorectal adenoma recurrence. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate an inverse relationship between circulating levels of 25(OH)D and primary fecal bile acid concentrations. These results support prior data demonstrating that vitamin D plays a key role in bile acid metabolism, and suggest a potential mechanism of action for 25(OH)D in colorectal cancer prevention. PMID:27138789

  19. Metabolism of the bile acid analogues 7 beta-methyl-cholic acid and 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, S.; Mosbach, E.H.; Cohen, B.I.; McSherry, C.K.

    1987-04-01

    The metabolism of two new bile acid analogues, 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate, was compared with that of cholate in the hamster. After intraduodenal administration of /sup 14/C-labeled compounds into bile fistula hamsters, radioactivity was exclusively recovered in bile; the more hydrophobic bile acid was absorbed more rapidly. Hepatic extraction of intravenously infused compounds was efficient and administered analogues became major biliary bile acids. Amidation of cholate was essentially complete, whereas 39% of 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 65% of 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate were secreted in unconjugated form. After intragastric administration of the compounds, radioactivity was quantitatively recovered in feces. Cholate was 7-dehydroxylated to deoxycholate, whereas 31% of 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 78% of 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate were recovered unchanged. Fifty percent of 7 beta-methyl-cholate and 15% of 7 alpha-methyl-ursocholate were transformed into ketonic derivatives, without loss of the 7-hydroxyl group. It is concluded that the introduction of the 7-methyl group did not interfere with intestinal absorption, hepatic extraction, and biliary secretion but did affect enzymatic amidation and bacterial 7-dehydroxylation of the analogues.

  20. Structural Conservation of Ligand Binding Reveals a Bile Acid-like Signaling Pathway in Nematodes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Motola, Daniel L.; Gelmedin, Verena; Hawdon, John; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid-like molecules named dafachronic acids (DAs) control the dauer formation program in Caenorhabditis elegans through the nuclear receptor DAF-12. This mechanism is conserved in parasitic nematodes to regulate their dauer-like infective larval stage, and as such, the DAF-12 ligand binding domain has been identified as an important therapeutic target in human parasitic hookworm species that infect more than 600 million people worldwide. Here, we report two x-ray crystal structures of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum DAF-12 ligand binding domain in complex with DA and cholestenoic acid (a bile acid-like metabolite), respectively. Structure analysis and functional studies reveal key residues responsible for species-specific ligand responses of DAF-12. Furthermore, DA binds to DAF-12 mechanistically and is structurally similar to bile acids binding to the mammalian bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor. Activation of DAF-12 by cholestenoic acid and the cholestenoic acid complex structure suggest that bile acid-like signaling pathways have been conserved in nematodes and mammals. Together, these results reveal the molecular mechanism for the interplay between parasite and host, provide a structural framework for DAF-12 as a promising target in treating nematode parasitism, and provide insight into the evolution of gut parasite hormone-signaling pathways. PMID:22170062

  1. 3{alpha}-6{alpha}-Dihydroxy-7{alpha}-fluoro-5{beta}-cholanoate (UPF-680), physicochemical and physiological properties of a new fluorinated bile acid that prevents 17{alpha}-ethynyl-estradiol-induced cholestasis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clerici, Carlo . E-mail: clerici@unipg.it; Castellani, Danilo; Asciutti, Stefania; Pellicciari, Roberto; Setchell, Kenneth D.R. |; O'Connell, Nancy C. |; Sadeghpour, Bahman; Camaioni, Emidio; Fiorucci, Stefano; Renga, Barbara; Nardi, Elisabetta; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Clementi, Mattia; Giuliano, Vittorio; Baldoni, Monia; Orlandi, Stefano; Mazzocchi, Alessandro; Morelli, Antonio; Morelli, Olivia

    2006-07-15

    3{alpha}-6{alpha}-Dihydroxy-7{alpha}-fluoro-5{beta}-cholanoate (UPF-680), the 7{alpha}-fluorine analog of hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), was synthesized to improve bioavailability and stability of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Acute rat biliary fistula and chronic cholestasis induced by 17{alpha}-ethynyl-estradiol (17EE) models were used to study and compare the effects of UPF-680 (dose range 0.6-6.0 {mu}mol/kg min) with UDCA on bile flow, biliary bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3} {sup -}), lipid output, biliary bile acid composition, hepatic enzymes and organic anion pumps. In acute infusion, UPF-680 increased bile flow in a dose-related manner, by up to 40.9%. Biliary HCO{sub 3} {sup -} output was similarly increased. Changes were observed in phospholipid secretion only at the highest doses. Treatment with UDCA and UPF-680 reversed chronic cholestasis induced by 17EE; in this model, UDCA had no effect on bile flow in contrast to UPF-680, which significantly increased bile flow. With acute administration of UPF-680, the biliary bile acid pool became enriched with unconjugated and conjugated UPF-680 (71.7%) at the expense of endogenous cholic acid and muricholic isomers. With chronic administration of UPF-680 or UDCA, the main biliary bile acids were tauro conjugates, but modification of biliary bile acid pool was greater with UPF-680. UPF-680 increased the mRNA for cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1) and cytochrome P450 8B (CYP8B). Both UDCA and UPF-680 increased the mRNA for Na{sup +} taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NCTP). In conclusion, UPF-680 prevented 17EE-induced cholestasis and enriched the biliary bile acid pool with less detergent and cytotoxic bile acids. This novel fluorinated bile acid may have potential in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease.

  2. Pravastatin modulates liver bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis in rats with chronic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Kolouchova, Gabriela; Brcakova, Eva; Hirsova, Petra; Sispera, Ludek; Tomsik, Pavel; Cermanova, Jolana; Hyspler, Radek; Slanarova, Martina; Fuksa, Leos; Lotkova, Halka; Micuda, Stanislav

    2011-10-01

    The administration of pravastatin to patients with cholestatic liver disease has suggested the potential of the drug with regard to reducing raised plasma cholesterol and bile acid levels. Information about the mechanisms associated with this effect is lacking. Thus, the aim of the present study is to evaluate pravastatin effects on the liver bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis in healthy and cholestatic rats. Control sham-operated and reversibly bile duct-obstructed (BDO) rats were treated with pravastatin (1 or 5 mg/kg) or the vehicle alone for 7 days after surgery. Lower doses of pravastatin reduced bile acid plasma concentrations in cholestatic animals. The effect was associated with reduced liver mRNA expression of Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Mrp2, Ugt1a1 and the increased expression of Bsep. In addition, BDO-induced increase in the liver content of cholesterol was normalized by pravastatin. The change was accompanied by the reduced liver expression of Hmg-CoA reductase, LDL receptor, and Acat2, and induced the expression of Abca1 and Mdr2. These changes corresponded with the upregulation of nuclear receptors LXRα and PPARα, and the downregulation of FXR, CAR, SREBP-2 and HNF1α. High doses of pravastatin lacked any positive effects on bile acids and cholesterol homeostasis, and blocked bile formation through the reduction of the biliary excretion of bile acids. Pravastatin rendered a positive reduction in BDO-induced increases in plasma bile acid concentrations and cholesterol liver content, mainly through the transcriptionally-mediated downregulation of genes involved in the synthesis of these compounds in the liver. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Gender, but not CYP7A1 or SLCO1B1 polymorphism, affects the fasting plasma concentrations of bile acids in human beings.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoqiang; Backman, Janne T; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Niemi, Mikko

    2012-03-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid production in human beings, and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) may influence bile acid hepatic uptake and cholesterol and bile acid synthesis rate. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of gender and CYP7A1 and SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on the fasting plasma concentrations of bile acids, bile acid synthesis marker and total cholesterol in a Finnish population. Fasting plasma concentrations of 16 endogenous bile acids, their synthesis marker (7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one) and total cholesterol were measured in 243 samples from 143 healthy volunteers. The volunteers were genotyped for 6 haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CYP7A1 and two functionally relevant SNPs in SLCO1B1. The mean plasma concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid and glycoursodeoxycholic acid were 61-111% higher in men than in women (P ≤ 0.001). Accordingly, the mean concentration of total bile acids was 51% higher in men than in women (P = 0.001). The CYP7A1 rs8192879 and rs1023652 SNPs were associated with deoxycholic acid and hyodeoxycholic acid concentrations, respectively, but the associations were not significant after correction for multiple testing. None of the six CYP7A1 SNPs was associated with the plasma concentrations of cholesterol or 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one. SLCO1B1 genotype was associated with total plasma cholesterol concentration only, but the association was not significant after correction for multiple testing. In general, the gender contributes substantially more to variation in fasting plasma bile acid concentrations than CYP7A1 or SLCO1B1 polymorphism do. Common genetic variability in CYP7A1 is unlikely to play a significant role in cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis under normal physiological conditions. © 2011 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2011

  4. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARγ expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi-Ru; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Ni; Qiao, Zhe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0 - 6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARγ protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique. RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P < 0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P < 0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P < 0.05) and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary, deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (> 20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P < 0.05). There was no expression of PPARγ in normal human esophageal epithelial cells. CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway. PMID:16688842

  5. Tandem mass spectrometric determination of atypical 3β-hydroxy-Δ5-bile acids in patients with 3β-hydroxy-Δ5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase deficiency: application to diagnosis and monitoring of bile acid therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wujuan; Jha, Pinky; Wolfe, Brian; Gioiello, Antimo; Pellicciari, Roberto; Wang, Jianshe; Heubi, James; Setchell, Kenneth D R

    2015-07-01

    3β-Hydroxy-Δ(5)-C27-steroid oxidoreductase (HSD3B7) deficiency, a progressive cholestatic liver disease, is the most common genetic defect in bile acid synthesis. Early diagnosis is important because patients respond to oral primary bile acid therapy, which targets the negative feedback regulation for bile acid synthesis to reduce the production of hepatotoxic 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids. These atypical bile acids are highly labile and difficult to accurately measure, yet a method for accurate determination of 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acid sulfates is critical for dose titration and monitoring response to therapy. We describe a electrospray ionization LC-MS/MS method for the direct measurement of atypical 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acid sulfates in urine from patients with HSD3B7 deficiency that overcomes the deficiencies of previously used GC-MS methods. Separation of sulfated 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acids was achieved by reversed-phase HPLC in a 12-min analytical run. The mean (SE) urinary concentration of the total 3β-sulfated-Δ(5)-cholenoic acids in patients with HSD3B7 deficiency was 4650 (1711) μmol/L, approximately 1000-fold higher than in noncholestatic and cholestatic patients with intact primary bile acid synthesis. GC-MS was not reliable for measuring 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acid sulfates; however, direct analysis of urine by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry yielded meaningful semiquantitative assessment of urinary excretion. The tandem mass spectrometry method described here for the measurement of 3β-hydroxy-Δ(5)-bile acid sulfates in urine can be applied to the diagnosis and accurate monitoring of responses to primary bile acid therapy in HSD3B7 patients. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  6. Histopathologic changes in the middle ear mucosa after exposure to pepsin and unconjugated bile acid.

    PubMed

    Develoglu, Omer Necati; Yalcin, Enis; Bulut, Erdoğan; Celebi, Saban; Sahan, Elife; Ustundag, Nil; Dervisoglu, Sergulen; Kulekci, Mehmet; Kucur, Mine

    2014-11-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that pepsin and bile acid cause damage to the ear, nose, and throat structures as a result of extraesophageal reflux. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the damaging effect of bile acids and pepsin on the middle ear mucosa. Twenty-nine healthy rats were included in this study. The animals were divided into 5 groups. A single daily dose of 40 μmol/L chenodeoxycholic acid, 40 μg/mL pepsin, and saline were injected separately into the right middle ear of the rats. On day 30, all rats were decapitated, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the middle ear both from the control and experimental rats were prepared. A semiquantitative analysis was performed. Inflammatory response was seen in all middle ear mucosa of rats except control group 1. The degree of inflammatory response was higher in the bile acid group when compared with the other groups. Epithelial metaplastic changes with varying number of goblet cells were observed in both the bile acid- and pepsin-injected groups. These metaplastic changes were also higher in the bile acid-induced group than in the pepsin-injected group. This is the first study on the middle ear mucosal damage of both pepsin and bile acid. Our results demonstrate that bile acids were associated with more extensive mucosal injury at pH 7 in comparison to pepsin in a rat animal model. Inflammatory response and metaplastic changes may play an important role in the etiology of middle ear pathologies.

  7. Dietary fatty acids regulate cholesterol induction of liver CYP7alpha1 expression and bile acid production.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hou, Meng Jun; Ma, Jing; Tang, Zhi Hong; Zhu, Hui Lian; Ling, Wen Hua

    2005-05-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of dietary fats containing predominantly PUFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA), or saturated FA (SFA) on lipid profile and liver cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7alpha1) mRNA expression and bile acid production in C57BL/6J mice. The animals (n = 75) were randomly divided into five groups and fed a basic chow diet (AIN-93G) (BC diet), a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol (Chol diet), a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol and 14 g/100 g of safflower oil (Chol + PUFA diet), a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol and olive oil (Chol + MUFA diet), or a chow diet with 1 g/100 g of cholesterol and myristic acid (Chol + SFA diet) for 6 wk. The results showed that the Chol + SFA diet decreased CYP7alpha1 gene expression and bile acid pool size, resulting in increased blood and liver cholesterol levels. Addition of PUFA and MUFA to a 1% cholesterol diet increased the bile acid pool production or bile acid excretion and simultaneously decreased liver cholesterol accumulation despite decreased CYP7alpha1 mRNA expression. The results indicate that the decreased bile acid pool size induced by the SFA diet is related to inhibition of the liver CYP7alpha1 gene expression, but an increased bile acid pool size and improved cholesterol homeostasis are disassociated from the liver CYP7alpha1 gene expression.

  8. Serum Bile Acids in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot: A Marker for Liver and Heart?

    PubMed

    Grangl, Gernot; Zöhrer, Evelyn; Köstenberger, Martin; Jud, Alexandra; Fauler, Günter; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Marterer, Robert; Gamillscheg, Andreas; Jahnel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot may develop chronic right ventricular dysfunction and hepatic congestion over time. We hypothesized that bile acid metabolism is altered in repaired tetralogy of Fallot patients and therefore sought to correlate right ventricular indices with serum bile acid levels. Indexed right ventricular end diastolic volume, as assessed by cardiac magnetic-resonance imaging, was classified as <100ml/m2 (Group 1, n = 5), 100-150ml/m2 (Group 2, n = 18), and >150ml/m2 (Group 3, n = 6) in 29 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Pulmonary regurgitation fraction and right ventricular ejection fraction were calculated. The serum bile acid profile, including 15 species, in these patients was determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Serum bile acid levels increased from Group 1 to Group 3 (2.5 ± 0.7; 4.1 ± 2.5; 6.0 ± 2.8 μmol/l, respectively) with significantly increased bile acid values in Group 3 compared to Group 1 (p≤0.05). In Group 3, but not in Group 1 and 2, a significant increase in glycine-conjugated bile acids was observed. Pulmonary regurgitation fraction increased (12 ± 1; 28 ± 16; 43 ± 3%, Groups 1-3, respectively) and right ventricular ejection fraction decreased (48.4 ± 6.4; 48.5 ± 6.5; 42.1 ± 5.3%, Groups 1-3, respectively) with rising indexed right ventricular end diastolic volume. These preliminary results suggest that serum bile acid levels are positively correlated with indexed right ventricular end-diastolic volume in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot; however, this needs to be confirmed in a larger patient cohort.

  9. Loss of Nuclear Receptor SHP Impairs but Does Not Eliminate Negative Feedback Regulation of Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Saeki, Shigeru; Schneider, Manfred; Schaefer, Karen; Berdy, Sara; Redder, Thadd; Shan, Bei; Russell, David W.; Schwarz, Margrit

    2014-01-01

    Summary The in vivo role of the nuclear receptor SHP in feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis was examined. Loss of SHP in mice caused abnormal accumulation and increased synthesis of bile acids due to derepression of rate-limiting CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 hydroxylase enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Dietary bile acids induced liver damage and restored feedback regulation. A synthetic agonist of the nuclear receptor FXR was not hepatotoxic and had no regulatory effects. Reduction of the bile acid pool with cholestyramine enhanced CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. We conclude that input from three negative regulatory pathways controls bile acid synthesis. One is mediated by SHP, and two are SHP independent and invoked by liver damage and changes in bile acid pool size. PMID:12062084

  10. Bile acid signaling in lipid metabolism: metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of lipid and bile acid markers linked to anti-obesity and anti-diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yunpeng; Jiang, Changtao; Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Li, Tiangang; Ferrell, Jessica M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis is the major pathway for catabolism of cholesterol. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and plays an important role in regulating lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing CYP7A1 (CYP7A1-tg mice) were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, fatty liver, and diabetes. However the mechanism of resistance to HFD-induced obesity of CYP7A1-tg mice has not been determined. In this study, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles of CYP7A1-tg mice were analyzed to explore the metabolic alterations in CYP7A1-tg mice that govern the protection against obesity and insulin resistance by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analyses. Lipidomics analysis identified seven lipid markers including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were significantly decreased in serum of HFD-fed CYP7A1-tg mice. Metabolomics analysis identified 13 metabolites in bile acid synthesis including taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and tauro-β-muricholic acid (T-β-MCA) that differed between CYP7A1-tg and wild-type mice. Notably, T-β-MCA, an antagonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was significantly increased in intestine of CYP7A1-tg mice. This study suggests that reducing 12α-hydroxylated bile acids and increasing intestinal T-β-MCA may reduce high fat diet-induced increase of phospholipids, sphingomyelins and ceramides, and ameliorate diabetes and obesity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  11. Bile acid signaling in lipid metabolism: Metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of lipid and bile acid markers linked to anti-obesity and anti-diabetes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yunpeng; Jiang, Changtao; Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Tiangang; Ferrell, Jessica M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Chiang, John Y.L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis is the major pathway for catabolism of cholesterol. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and plays an important role in regulating lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing CYP7A1 (CYP7A1-tg mice) were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, fatty liver, and diabetes. However the mechanism of resistance to HFD-induced obesity of CYP7A1-tg mice has not been determined. In this study, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles of CYP7A1-tg mice were analyzed to explore the metabolic alterations in CYP7A1-tg mice that govern the protection against obesity and insulin resistance by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analyses. Lipidomics analysis identified seven lipid markers including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were significantly decreased in serum of HFD-fed CYP7A1-tg mice. Metabolomics analysis identified 13 metabolites in bile acid synthesis including taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and tauro-β-muricholic acid (T-β-MCA) that differed between CYP7A1-tg and wild-type mice. Notably, T-β-MCA, an antagonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was significantly increased in intestine of CYP7A1-tg mice. This study suggests that reducing 12α-hydroxylated bile acids and increasing intestinal T-β-MCA may reduce high fat diet-induced increase of phospholipids, sphingomyelins and ceramides, and ameliorate diabetes and obesity. PMID:24796972

  12. Biliary lipid, bile acid composition, and dietary correlations in Micmac Indian women. A population study.

    PubMed

    Williams, C N; Johnston, J L; McCarthy, S; Field, C A

    1981-01-01

    The precursor state for cholesterol gallstone formation is cholesterol-saturated bile. We studied a high-risk group for cholesterol gallstones to determine whether dietary variables affect bile cholesterol. Bile samples were analyzed from 46 Micmac Indian women without gallstones and 13 with gallstones for molar percentage cholesterol (MPC) and bile acid composition. The data were analyzed by multiple regression analysis with MPC as the dependent variable and the dietary variables, obtained from four consecutive-day food records, and biliary bile acid composition as the independent variables. In the 46 women without gallstones, obesity, calorie range/calorie intake, and iron and calcium intake were, in their order of importance, significant factors. In normal weight subjects (ponderal index > 12.5) relative obesity was still a significant correlate. Obesity and iron intake were positive correlates while calorie range/calorie intake and calcium intake varied inversely. When the effect of obesity was controlled, these factors were still significant in this group, as they were in the gallstone group. In addition, the duration of overnight fast obtained by history, together with the proportions of deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in bile were correlates of the biliary molar percentage cholesterol.

  13. Haemolytic activity of formyl- and acetyl-derivatives of bile acids and their gramine salts.

    PubMed

    Kozanecka-Okupnik, Weronika; Jasiewicz, Beata; Pospieszny, Tomasz; Matuszak, Monika; Mrówczyńska, Lucyna

    2017-10-01

    Bile acids (lithocholic: LCA, deoxycholic: DCA and cholic: CA) and their formyl- and acetyl-derivatives can be used as starting material in chemical synthesis of compounds with different biological activity strongly depended on their chemical structures. Our previous studies showed that biological activity of bile acids salts with gramine toward human erythrocytes was significantly different from the activity of bile acids alone. Moreover, gramine effectively modified the membrane perturbing activity of other steroids. As a continuation of our work, the haemolytic activity of formyl- and acetyl-substituet bile acids as well as their gramine salts was studied in vitro. The structures of new compounds were confirmed by spectral (NMR, FT-IR) analysis, mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) as well as PM5 semiempirical methods. The results shown that the haemolytic activity of formyl- and acetyl-LCA and DCA was significantly higher in comparison with their native forms at the whole concentration range. At high concentration, formyl derivative of CA was as effective as LCA and DCA derivatives whereas at lower concentration its haemolytic activity was at the level of original acid. The acetyl-CA was not active as membrane perturbing agents. Furthermore, gramine significantly decreased the membrane-perturbing activity of hydrophobic bile acids derivatives. The results obtained with the cellular system are in line with physicochemical calculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lipid and protein oxidation in hepatic homogenates and cell membranes exposed to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Martínez-Ballarín, Enrique; Miana-Mena, Javier; Berzosa, Cesar; Piedrafita, Eduardo; Cebrián, Igor; Reiter, Russel J; García, Joaquín J

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis occurs in a variety of hepatic diseases and causes damage due to accumulation of bile acids in the liver. The aim was to investigate the effect of several bile acids, i.e. chenodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, lithocholic and taurolithocholic (TLC), in inducing oxidative damage. Hepatic tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated with or without 1 mM of each bile acid, with or without 0.1 mM FeCl(3) and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid for the purpose of generating free radicals. Several bile acids increased lipid and protein oxidation, with TLC being the most pro-oxidative (657% and 175% in homogenates and 350% and 311% in membranes, respectively). TLC also enhanced iron-induced oxidative stress to lipids (21% in homogenates and 29% in membranes) and to proteins (74% in membranes). This enhancement was dose- and time-dependent and was reduced by melatonin. These results suggest that bile acids differentially mediate hepatic oxidative stress and may be involved in the physiopathology of cholestasis.

  15. Intestinal adaptation after ileal interposition surgery increases bile acid recycling and protects against obesity-related comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rohit; Kirby, Michelle; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Jha, Pinky; Klustaitis, Kori; Woollett, Laura A; Pfluger, Paul T; Balistreri, William F; Tso, Patrick; Jandacek, Ronald J; Woods, Stephen C; Heubi, James E; Tschoep, Matthias H; D'Alessio, David A; Shroyer, Noah F; Seeley, Randy J

    2010-09-01

    Surgical interposition of distal ileum into the proximal jejunum is a bariatric procedure that improves the metabolic syndrome. Changes in intestinal and hepatic physiology after ileal interposition (transposition) surgery (IIS) are not well understood. Our aim was to elucidate the adaptation of the interposed ileum, which we hypothesized, would lead to early bile acid reabsorption in the interposed ileum, thus short circuiting enterohepatic bile acid recycling to more proximal bowel segments. Rats with diet-induced obesity were randomized to IIS, with 10 cm of ileum repositioned distal to the duodenum, or sham surgery. A subgroup of sham rats was pair-fed to IIS rats. Physiological parameters were measured until 6 wk postsurgery. IIS rats ate less and lost more weight for the first 2 wk postsurgery. At study completion, body weights were not different, but IIS rats had reversed components of the metabolic syndrome. The interposed ileal segment adapted to a more jejunum-like villi length, mucosal surface area, and GATA4/ILBP mRNA. The interposed segment retained capacity for bile acid reabsorption and anorectic hormone secretion with the presence of ASBT and glucagon-like-peptide-1-positive cells in the villi. IIS rats had reduced primary bile acid levels in the proximal intestinal tract and higher primary bile acid levels in the serum, suggesting an early and efficient reabsorption of primary bile acids. IIS rats also had increased taurine and glycine-conjugated serum bile acids and reduced fecal bile acid loss. There was decreased hepatic Cyp27A1 mRNA with no changes in hepatic FXR, SHP, or NTCP expression. IIS protects against the metabolic syndrome through short-circuiting enterohepatic bile acid recycling. There is early reabsorption of primary bile acids despite selective "jejunization" of the interposed ileal segment. Changes in serum bile acids or bile acid enterohepatic recycling may mediate the metabolic benefits seen after bariatric surgery.

  16. Intestinal adaptation after ileal interposition surgery increases bile acid recycling and protects against obesity-related comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Michelle; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Jha, Pinky; Klustaitis, Kori; Woollett, Laura A.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Balistreri, William F.; Tso, Patrick; Jandacek, Ronald J.; Woods, Stephen C.; Heubi, James E.; Tschoep, Matthias H.; D'Alessio, David A.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical interposition of distal ileum into the proximal jejunum is a bariatric procedure that improves the metabolic syndrome. Changes in intestinal and hepatic physiology after ileal interposition (transposition) surgery (IIS) are not well understood. Our aim was to elucidate the adaptation of the interposed ileum, which we hypothesized, would lead to early bile acid reabsorption in the interposed ileum, thus short circuiting enterohepatic bile acid recycling to more proximal bowel segments. Rats with diet-induced obesity were randomized to IIS, with 10 cm of ileum repositioned distal to the duodenum, or sham surgery. A subgroup of sham rats was pair-fed to IIS rats. Physiological parameters were measured until 6 wk postsurgery. IIS rats ate less and lost more weight for the first 2 wk postsurgery. At study completion, body weights were not different, but IIS rats had reversed components of the metabolic syndrome. The interposed ileal segment adapted to a more jejunum-like villi length, mucosal surface area, and GATA4/ILBP mRNA. The interposed segment retained capacity for bile acid reabsorption and anorectic hormone secretion with the presence of ASBT and glucagon-like-peptide-1-positive cells in the villi. IIS rats had reduced primary bile acid levels in the proximal intestinal tract and higher primary bile acid levels in the serum, suggesting an early and efficient reabsorption of primary bile acids. IIS rats also had increased taurine and glycine-conjugated serum bile acids and reduced fecal bile acid loss. There was decreased hepatic Cyp27A1 mRNA with no changes in hepatic FXR, SHP, or NTCP expression. IIS protects against the metabolic syndrome through short-circuiting enterohepatic bile acid recycling. There is early reabsorption of primary bile acids despite selective “jejunization” of the interposed ileal segment. Changes in serum bile acids or bile acid enterohepatic recycling may mediate the metabolic benefits seen after bariatric surgery. PMID

  17. Fluorescence properties of Schiff base - N,N‧-bis(salicylidene) - 1,2-Phenylenediamine in presence of bile acid host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nayan; Paul, Pradip C.; Singh, T. Sanjoy

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence properties of Schiff base - N,N‧-bis(salicylidene) - 1,2-phenylenediamine (LH2) is used to study the micelles formed by aggregation of different important bile acids like cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and glycocholic acid by steady state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence band intensity was found out to increase with concomitant red shift with gradual addition of different bile acids. Binding constant of the probe with different bile acids as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of bile acids in the medium. The increase in fluorescence quantum yields, fluorescence decay times and substantial decrease in nonradiative decay rate constants in bile acids micellar environment points to the restricted motion of the fluorophore inside the micellar subdomains.

  18. A Surgical Model in Male Obese Rats Uncovers Protective Effects of Bile Acids Post-Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Setchell, Kenneth DR; Kirby, Michelle; Myronovych, Andriy; Ryan, Karen K.; Ibrahim, Samar H.; Berger, Jose; Smith, Kathi; Toure, Mouhamadoul; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery elevates serum bile acids. Conjugated bile acid administration, such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), improves insulin sensitivity, whereas short-circuiting bile acid circulation through ileal interposition surgery in rats raises TUDCA levels. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery outcomes could be recapitulated by short circuiting the normal enterohepatic bile circulation. We established a model wherein male obese rats underwent either bile diversion (BD) or Sham (SH) surgery. The BD group had a catheter inserted into the common bile duct and its distal end anchored into the middistal jejunum for 4–5 weeks. Glucose tolerance, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response, hepatic steatosis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were measured. Rats post-BD lost significantly more weight than the SH rats. BD rats gained less fat mass after surgery. BD rats had improved glucose tolerance, increased higher postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 response and serum bile acids but less liver steatosis. Serum bile acid levels including TUDCA concentrations were higher in BD compared to SH pair-fed rats. Fecal bile acid levels were not different. Liver ER stress (C/EBP homologous protein mRNA and pJNK protein) was decreased in BD rats. Bile acid gavage (TUDCA/ursodeoxycholic acid [UDCA]) in diet-induced obese rats, elevated serum TUDCA and concomitantly reduced hepatic steatosis and ER stress (C/EBP homologous protein mRNA). These data demonstrate the ability of alterations in bile acids to recapitulate important metabolic improvements seen after bariatric surgery. Further, our work establishes a model for focused study of bile acids in the context of bariatric surgery that may lead to the identification of therapeutics for metabolic disease. PMID:23592746

  19. Bile acid inhibition of taurocholate uptake by rat hepatocytes: role of OH groups

    SciTech Connect

    Bellentani, S.; Hardison, W.G.M.; Marchegiano, P.; Zanasi, G.; Manenti, F.

    1987-03-01

    To define further the structural specificity of the taurocholate uptake site, the authors studied the ability of a variety of taurine-conjugated bile acids with differing hydroxyl substituents on the sterol moiety to inhibit (/sup 14/C) taurocholate uptake. Rat hepatocytes isolated by collagenase perfusion were incubated in a tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane-phosphate buffer containing (/sup 14/C)taurocholate in the presence or absence of inhibitor bile acid. Stronger inhibitors were studied at a fixed concentration of 5 ..mu..M, weaker ones at 25 ..mu..M. Initial uptake velocity was measured. Uptake velocity could then be related to taurocholate concentration and a V/sub max/ and K/sub m/ could be determined by applying a nonlinear least squares fit to the data obtained with or without inhibitor. The kinetic parameters allowed the determination of the type of inhibition and of inhibition constants (K/sub i/) of the various test bile acids. The data indicate that bile acids containing a 6- or 7-OH group exhibit competitive inhibition, whereas bile acids with no 6- or 7-OH group exhibit noncompetitive inhibition. Of the compounds exhibiting competitive inhibition, K/sub i/ varied with the number of hydroxyl groups on the sterol moiety. They conclude that the presence of absence of a 6- or 7-OH group dictates the mechanism of inhibition; the number of hydroxyl substituents determines the potency of competitive inhibition.

  20. Serum bile acids and their conjugates in breast-fed infants with prolonged jaundice.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Y; Yamada, M; Nakagawa, M; Konno, T; Tada, K

    1985-05-01

    Serum bile acids and their conjugates were analysed in 20 breast-fed infants with prolonged jaundice. The mean total bile acid levels in serum were increased in the breast-fed infants with jaundice, as compared with those in either breast- or bottle-fed infants without jaundice. However, there were no significant differences between the groups. All the breast-fed infants examined, regardless of association with jaundice, had a bile acid pattern dominated by taurine conjugates (the ratio of glycine- to taurine-conjugated bile acid, G/T ratio, less than 1.00). In contrast, the bottle-fed infants without jaundice had a pattern dominated by glycine conjugates (G/T ratio, more than 1.00). Among the breast-fed infants with jaundice, the mean G/T ratio in those who had serum bilirubin levels over 10 mg/100 ml was significantly lower than that in those who had serum bilirubin levels of less than 10 mg/100 ml. The altered bile acid metabolism might be associated with the pathology of breast milk jaundice.

  1. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aldhahrani, Adil; Verdon, Bernard; Pearson, Jeffery

    2017-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury. PMID:28344983

  2. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L.; Zhang, Youcai

    2015-01-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein–coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non–12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid–binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non–12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1. PMID:26199423

  3. Steroid binding to Autotaxin links bile salts and lysophosphatidic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Keune, Willem-Jan; Hausmann, Jens; Bolier, Ruth; Tolenaars, Dagmar; Kremer, Andreas; Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Joosten, Robbie P; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Moolenaar, Wouter H; Oude Elferink, Ronald P; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2016-04-14

    Autotaxin (ATX) generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX-LPA signalling is involved in multiple biological and pathophysiological processes, including vasculogenesis, fibrosis, cholestatic pruritus and tumour progression. ATX has a tripartite active site, combining a hydrophilic groove, a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and a tunnel of unclear function. We present crystal structures of rat ATX bound to 7α-hydroxycholesterol and the bile salt tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA), showing how the tunnel selectively binds steroids. A structure of ATX simultaneously harbouring TUDCA in the tunnel and LPA in the pocket, together with kinetic analysis, reveals that bile salts act as partial non-competitive inhibitors of ATX, thereby attenuating LPA receptor activation. This unexpected interplay between ATX-LPA signalling and select steroids, notably natural bile salts, provides a molecular basis for the emerging association of ATX with disorders associated with increased circulating levels of bile salts. Furthermore, our findings suggest potential clinical implications in the use of steroid drugs.

  4. Atorvastatin alters the expression of genes related to bile acid metabolism and circadian clock in livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Kai; Li, Huan; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Li, Ying-Ying; Fu, Zidong Donna; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Atorvastatin is a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor used for hyperlipidemia. Atorvastatin is generally safe but may induce cholestasis. The present study aimed to examine the effects of atorvastatin on hepatic gene expression related to bile acid metabolism and homeostasis, as well as the expression of circadian clock genes in livers of mice. Adult male mice were given atorvastatin (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, po) daily for 30 days, and blood biochemistry, histopathology, and gene expression were examined. Repeated administration of atorvastatin did not affect animal body weight gain or liver weights. Serum enzyme activities were in the normal range. Histologically, the high dose of atorvastatin produced scattered swollen hepatocytes, foci of feathery-like degeneration, together with increased expression of Egr-1 and metallothionein-1. Atorvastatin increased the expression of Cyp7a1 in the liver, along with FXR and SHP. In contract, atorvastatin decreased the expression of bile acid transporters Ntcp, Bsep, Ostα, and Ostβ. The most dramatic change was the 30-fold induction of Cyp7a1. Because Cyp7a1 is a circadian clock-controlled gene, we further examined the effect of atorvastatin on clock gene expression. Atorvastatin increased the expression of clock core master genes Bmal1 and Npas2, decreased the expression of clock feedback genes Per2, Per3, and the clock targeted genes Dbp and Tef, whereas it had no effect on Cry1 and Nr1d1 expression. Repeated administration of atorvastatin affects bile acid metabolism and markedly increases the expression of the bile acid synthesis rate-limiting enzyme gene Cyp7a1, together with alterations in the expression of circadian clock genes.

  5. Direct measurement of first-pass ileal clearance of a bile acid in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Galatola, G.; Jazrawi, R.P.; Bridges, C.; Joseph, A.E.; Northfield, T.C. )

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method of directly measuring ileal bile acid absorption efficiency during a single enterohepatic cycle (first-pass ileal clearance). This has become feasible for the first time because of the availability of the synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid 75Selena-homocholic acid-taurine (75SeHCAT). Together with the corresponding natural bile acid cholic acid-taurine (labeled with 14C), SeHCAT was infused distal to an occluding balloon situated beyond the ampulla of Vater in six healthy subjects. Completion of a single enterohepatic cycle was assessed by obtaining a plateau for 75SeHCAT activity proximal to the occluding balloon, which prevented further cycles. Unabsorbed 75SeHCAT was collected after total gut washout, which was administered distal to the occluding balloon. 75SeHCAT activity in the rectal effluent measured by gamma counter was compared with that of absorbed 75SeHCAT level measured by gamma camera and was used to calculate first-pass ileal clearance. This was very efficient (mean value, 96%) and showed very little variation in the six subjects studied (range, 95%-97%). A parallel time-activity course in hepatic bile for 14C and 75Se during a single enterohepatic cycle, together with a ratio of unity for 14C/75Se in samples obtained at different time intervals, suggests that 75SeHCAT is handled by the ileum like the natural bile acid cholic acid-taurine. Extrapolation of 75SeHCAT first-pass ileal clearance to that of the natural bile acid therefore seems justifiable. In a subsidiary experiment, ileal absorption efficiency per day for 75SeHCAT was also measured by scanning the gallbladder area on 5 successive days after the measurement of first-pass ileal clearance. In contrast with absorption efficiency per cycle, absorption efficiency per day varied widely (49%-86%).

  6. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid, a bile acid, is neuroprotective in a transgenic animal model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Keene, C. Dirk; Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Eich, Tacjana; Chhabra, Manik S.; Steer, Clifford J.; Low, Walter C.

    2002-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an untreatable neurological disorder caused by selective and progressive degeneration of the caudate nucleus and putamen of the basal ganglia. Although the etiology of HD pathology is not fully understood, the observed loss of neuronal cells is thought to occur primarily through apoptosis. Furthermore, there is evidence in HD that cell death is mediated through mitochondrial pathways, and mitochondrial deficits are commonly associated with HD. We have previously reported that treatment with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, prevented neuropathology and associated behavioral deficits in the 3-nitropropionic acid rat model of HD. We therefore examined whether TUDCA would also be neuroprotective in a genetic mouse model of HD. Our results showed that systemically administered TUDCA led to a significant reduction in striatal neuropathology of the R6/2 transgenic HD mouse. Specifically, R6/2 mice began receiving TUDCA at 6 weeks of age and exhibited reduced striatal atrophy, decreased striatal apoptosis, as well as fewer and smaller size ubiquitinated neuronal intranuclear huntingtin inclusions. Moreover, locomotor and sensorimotor deficits were significantly improved in the TUDCA-treated mice. In conclusion, TUDCA is a nontoxic, endogenously produced hydrophilic bile acid that is neuroprotective in a transgenic mouse model of HD and, therefore, may provide a novel and effective treatment in patients with HD. PMID:12149470

  7. Relationships between fatty acid composition and bile tolerance in lactobacillus isolates from plants and from non-plant materials.

    PubMed

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Suzuki, Shigenori; Yakabe, Takafumi; Suzuki, Chise

    2012-12-01

    Twenty plant-derived and 18 non-plant-derived strains of Lactobacillus casei were compared for their growth in tryptone - yeast extract - glucose broth containing 0.3% bile by measuring absorbance at a wavelength of 620 nm after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C. Bile tolerance - a fundamental probiotic property - was calculated by dividing the experimental data by control values (growth without bile). We found that bile tolerance was strain specific but that the average bile tolerance of the plant-derived strains was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of the non-plant-derived strains tested. All tested strains could not deconjugate sodium taurocholate, indicating that the difference in bile tolerance was not due to the ability to deconjugate bile. The fatty acid compositions of the test strains with and without exposure to 0.3% bile were investigated, and a statistical correlation analysis between these compositions and their bile tolerance was conducted. The fatty acids correlated with bile tolerance differed between plant and non-plant lactobacilli. This is the first report to show that the origin (i.e., growth environment) of lactobacilli affects their fatty acid composition, which in turn, appears to be related to their bile tolerance.

  8. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  9. Bile acid increases expression of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase, in gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hye Jin; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Hyeong Hoe; Park, Hee Ju; Cheong, Jae Hun

    2014-01-07

    To investigate the effect of bile acid on the expression of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which is a major enzyme involved in histamine production, and gene expression of gastric transcription factors upon cooperative activation. HDC expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and promoter assay in human gastric precancerous tissues, normal stomach tissue, and gastric cancer cell lines. The relationship between gastric precancerous state and HDC expression induced by bile acid was determined. The association between the expression of HDC and various specific transcription factors in gastric cells was also evaluated. MKN45 and AGS human gastric carcinoma cell lines were transfected with farnesoid X receptor (FXR), small heterodimer partner (SHP), and caudal-type homeodomain transcription factor (CDX)1 expression plasmids. The effects of various transcription factors on HDC expression were monitored by luciferase-reporter promoter assay. Histamine production and secretion in the stomach play critical roles in gastric acid secretion and in the pathogenesis of gastric diseases. Here, we show that bile acid increased the expression of HDC, which is a rate-limiting enzyme of the histamine production pathway. FXR was found to be a primary regulatory transcription factor for bile acid-induced HDC expression. In addition, the transcription factors CDX1 and SHP synergistically enhanced bile acid-induced elevation of HDC gene expression. We confirmed similar expression patterns for HDC, CDX1, and SHP in patient tissues. HDC production in the stomach is associated with bile acid exposure and its related transcriptional regulation network of FXR, SHP, and CDX1.

  10. Bile Acids in Polycystic Liver Diseases: Triggers of Disease Progression and Potential Solution for Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perugorria, Maria J; Labiano, Ibone; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Marzioni, Marco; Marin, Jose J G; Bujanda, Luis; Banales, Jesús M

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) are a group of genetic hereditary cholangiopathies characterized by the development and progressive growth of cysts in the liver, which are the main cause of morbidity. Current therapies are based on surgical procedures and pharmacological strategies, which show short-term and modest beneficial effects. Therefore, the determination of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis appears to be crucial in order to find new potential targets for pharmacological therapy. Ductal plate malformation during embryogenesis and abnormal cystic cholangiocyte growth and secretion are some of the key mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PLDs. However, the discovery of the presence of bile acids in the fluid collected from human cysts and the intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic bile acids in an animal model of PLD (i.e. polycystic kidney (PCK) rat) suggest a potential role of impaired bile acid homeostasis in the pathogenesis of these diseases. On the other hand, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has emerged as a new potential therapeutic tool for PLDs by promoting the inhibition of cystic cholangiocyte growth in both PCK rats and highly symptomatic patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD: most common type of PLD), and improving symptoms. Chronic treatment with UDCA normalizes the decreased intracellular calcium levels in ADPKD human cholangiocytes in vitro, which results in the reduction of their baseline-stimulated proliferation. Moreover, UDCA decreases the liver concentration of cytotoxic bile acids in PCK rats and the bile acid-dependent enhanced proliferation of cystic cholangiocytes. Here, the role of bile acids in the pathogenesis of PLDs and the potential therapeutic value of UDCA for the treatment of these diseases are reviewed and future lines of investigation in this field are proposed.

  11. Prevalence of, and predictors of, bile acid malabsorption in outpatients with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gracie, D J; Kane, J S; Mumtaz, S; Scarsbrook, A F; Chowdhury, F U; Ford, A C

    2012-11-01

    Many physicians do not consider the diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhea, or do not have access to testing. We examined yield of 23-seleno-25-homo-tauro-cholic acid (SeHCAT) scanning in chronic diarrhea patients, and attempted to identify predictors of a positive test. Consecutive patients with chronic diarrhea undergoing SeHCAT scan over a 7-year period were identified retrospectively. Bile acid malabsorption was defined as present at a retention of <15%. Medical records were reviewed to obtain information regarding proposed risk factors. Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded, and patients were classified as having diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) if they reported abdominal pain or discomfort. Independent risk factors were assessed using multivariate logistic regression, and odds ratios (ORs) with 99% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Of 373 patients, 190 (50.9%) had bile acid malabsorption. Previous cholecystectomy (OR 2.51; 99% CI 1.10-5.77), terminal ileal resection or right hemicolectomy for Crohn's disease (OR 12.4; 99% CI 2.42-63.8), and terminal ileal resection or right hemicolectomy for other reasons (OR 7.94; 99% CI 1.02-61.6) were associated with its presence. Seventy-seven patients had IBS-D, and 21 (27.3%) tested positive. There were 168 patients with no risk factors for a positive SeHCAT scan, other than chronic diarrhea, and 63 (37.5%) had bile acid malabsorption. Bile acid malabsorption was present in 50% of patients undergoing SeHCAT scanning. Almost 40% of those without risk factors had evidence of bile acid malabsorption, and in those meeting criteria for IBS-D prevalence was almost 30%. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Thermosensitivity of bile acid-based oligo(ethylene glycol) stars in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Strandman, Satu; Le Dévédec, Frantz; Zhu, X X

    2011-08-03

    Amphiphilic star-shaped oligo(ethylene glycol)s with a hydrophobic bile acid core and varying number of hydrophilic arms have been made. Their thermal behavior in aqueous solutions depends on the number rather than the length of the arms. The two-armed lithocholate derivative showed the strongest tendency for association and exhibited the lowest cloud point (79 °C) of the oligomers made, as well as another phase separation at a lower temperature (31 °C). The "double thermosensitivity" arising both from the salt-dependent LCST of the oligo(ethylene glycol) segments and the temperature-responsive self-assembly of amphiphilic bile acid derivative provides an interesting path in the design of bile acid-based smart materials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bile acid profiles over 5 years after gastric bypass and duodenal switch: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Risstad, Hilde; Kristinsson, Jon A; Fagerland, Morten W; le Roux, Carel W; Birkeland, Kåre I; Gulseth, Hanne L; Thorsby, Per M; Vincent, Royce P; Engström, My; Olbers, Torsten; Mala, Tom

    2017-05-25

    Bile acids have been proposed as key mediators of the metabolic effects after bariatric surgery. Currently no reports on bile acid profiles after duodenal switch exist, and long-term data after gastric bypass are lacking. To investigate bile acid profiles up to 5 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch and to explore the relationship among bile acids and weight loss, lipid profile, and glucose metabolism. Two Scandinavian University Hospitals. We present data from a randomized clinical trial of 60 patients with body mass index 50-60 kg/m(2) operated with gastric bypass or duodenal switch. Repeated measurements of total and individual bile acids from fasting serum during 5 years after surgery were performed. Mean concentrations of total bile acids increased from 2.3 µmol/L (95% confidence interval [CI], -.1 to 4.7) at baseline to 5.9 µmol/L (3.5-8.3) 5 years after gastric bypass and from 1.0 µmol/L (95% CI, -1.4 to 3.5) to 9.5 µmol/L (95% CI, 7.1-11.9) after duodenal switch; mean between-group difference was -4.8 µmol/L (95% CI, -9.3 to -.3), P = .036. Mean concentrations of primary bile acids increased more after duodenal switch, whereas secondary bile acids increased proportionally across the groups. Higher levels of total bile acids at 5 years were associated with lower body mass index, greater weight loss, and lower total cholesterol. Total bile acid concentrations increased substantially over 5 years after both gastric bypass and duodenal switch, with greater increases in total and primary bile acids after duodenal switch. (Surg Obes Relat Dis 2017;0:000-000.) © 2017 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1 mediates alcohol-induced regulation of bile acid enzyme genes expression via CREBH.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Li, Tiangang; Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Jung Ran; Kwon, Joseph; Jeong, Won-Il; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Park, Tae-Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Chiang, John Y L; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids concentration in liver is tightly regulated to prevent cell damage. Previous studies have demonstrated that deregulation of bile acid homeostasis can lead to cholestatic liver disease. Recently, we have shown that ER-bound transcription factor Crebh is a downstream effector of hepatic Cb1r signaling pathway. In this study, we have investigated the effect of alcohol exposure on hepatic bile acid homeostasis and elucidated the mediatory roles of Cb1r and Crebh in this process. We found that alcohol exposure or Cb1r-agonist 2-AG treatment increases hepatic bile acid synthesis and serum ALT, AST levels in vivo alongwith significant increase in Crebh gene expression and activation. Alcohol exposure activated Cb1r, Crebh, and perturbed bile acid homeostasis. Overexpression of Crebh increased the expression of key bile acid synthesis enzyme genes via direct binding of Crebh to their promoters, whereas Cb1r knockout and Crebh-knockdown mice were protected against alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis. Interestingly, insulin treatment protected against Cb1r-mediated Crebh-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Furthermore, Crebh expression and activation was found to be markedly increased in insulin resistance conditions and Crebh knockdown in diabetic mice model (db/db) significantly reversed alcohol-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Overall, our study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of hepatic bile acid metabolism by alcohol via Cb1r-mediated activation of Crebh, and suggests that targeting Crebh can be of therapeutic potential in ameliorating alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis.

  15. Formation of C21 bile acids from plant sterols in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Boberg, K.M.; Lund, E.; Olund, J.; Bjoerkhem, I. )

    1990-05-15

    Formation of bile acids from sitosterol in bile-fistulated female Wistar rats was studied with use of 4-14C-labeled sitosterol and sitosterol labeled with 3H in specific positions. The major part (about 75%) of the 14C radioactivity recovered as bile acids in bile after intravenous administration of (4-14C)sitosterol was found to be considerably more polar than cholic acid, and only trace amounts of radioactivity had chromatographic properties similar to those of cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid. It was shown that polar metabolites were formed by intermediate oxidation of the 3 beta-hydroxyl group (loss of 3H from 3 alpha-3H-labeled sitosterol) and that the most polar fraction did not contain a hydroxyl group at C7 (retention of 3H in 7 alpha,7 beta-3H2-labeled sitosterol). Furthermore, the polar metabolites had lost at least the terminal 6 or 7 carbon atoms of the side chain (loss of 3H from 22,23-3H2- and 24,28-3H2-labeled sitosterol). Experiments with 3H-labeled 7 alpha-hydroxysitosterol and 4-14C-labeled 26-hydroxysitosterol showed that none of these compounds was an efficient precursor to the polar metabolites. By analysis of purified most polar products of (4-14C) sitosterol by radio-gas chromatography and the same products of 7 alpha,7 beta-(2H2)sitosterol by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, two major metabolites could be identified as C21 bile acids. One metabolite had three hydroxyl groups (3 alpha, 15, and unknown), and one had two hydroxyl groups (3 alpha, 15) and one keto group. Considerably less C21 bile acids were formed from (4-14C)sitosterol in male than in female Wistar rats. The C21 bile acids formed in male rats did not contain a 15-hydroxyl group. Conversion of a (4-14C)sitosterol into C21 bile acids did also occur in adrenalectomized and ovariectomized rats, indicating that endocrine tissues are not involved.

  16. [Preparation and antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone-bile acids salts].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Pi, Hui-Fang; Chen, Chang; Wu, Ji-Zhou

    2007-03-01

    To search for potential drugs with potent antitussive, expectorant, antiasthmatic activities and low toxicity, a series of verticinone-bile acids salts were prepared based on the clearly elucidated antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone in bulbs of Fritillaria and different bile acids in Snake Bile. The antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of these verticinone-bile acid salts were then screened with different animal models. Ver-CA (verticinone-cholic acid salt) and Ver-CDCA (verticinone-chenodeoxycholic acid salt) showed much more potent activities than other compounds. The bioactivities of Ver-CA and Ver-CDCA are worthy to be intensively studied, and it is also deserved to pay much attention to their much more potent antitussive effects than codeine phosphate. In order to elucidate whether they have synergistic effect and attenuated toxicity, their activities will be continuously compared with single verticinone, cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid at the same doses on different animal models. The application of "combination principles" in traditional Chinese medicinal formulations may be a novel way in triditional Chinese medicine research and discovery.

  17. Pepsin and bile acids in saliva in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux - a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sereg-Bahar, M; Jerin, A; Jansa, R; Stabuc, B; Hocevar-Boltezar, I

    2015-06-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and biliary duodenogastric reflux can cause damage to the laryngeal mucosa and voice disorders. The aim of this study was to find out whether levels of pepsin and bile acids in the saliva can serve as diagnostic markers of LPR. A prospective comparative study. Twenty-eight patients with LPR proven via high-resolution manometry and combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and 24-h pH monitoring and 48 healthy controls without symptoms of LPR were included in the study. In the patients with LPR symptoms, oesophagogastroscopy with oesophageal biopsy was performed. The levels of total pepsin, active pepsin, bile acids and the pH of the saliva were determined in all participants and compared between the groups. Reflux symptom index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS) were also obtained and compared. The groups differed significantly in RSI (P = 0.00), RFS (P = 0.00), the levels of bile acids (P = 0.005) and total pepsin in saliva (P = 0.023). The levels of total pepsin and bile acids were about three times higher in the patients with LPR than in the healthy controls. There was a significant correlation between the RSI and RFS score and the level of total pepsin and bile acids in the saliva. Histopathological examination of the oesophageal biopsy taken 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter confirmed reflux in almost 93% of patients with symptoms. The study results show that the levels of total pepsin and bile acids in saliva are significantly higher in patients with LPR than in the controls, thus suggesting this as a useful tool in the diagnosis of LPR and particularly biliary LPR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  19. Streptococcal serum opacity factor promotes cholesterol ester metabolism and bile acid secretion in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rodriguez, Perla J; Fields, David W; Raya, Joe L; Lagor, William R; Rosales, Corina; Courtney, Harry S; Gotto, Antonio M; Pownall, Henry J

    2016-03-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations negatively correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. HDL is thought to have several atheroprotective functions, which are likely distinct from the epidemiological inverse relationship between HDL-C levels and risk. Specifically, strategies that reduce HDL-C while promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may have therapeutic value. The major product of the serum opacity factor (SOF) reaction versus HDL is a cholesteryl ester (CE)-rich microemulsion (CERM), which contains apo E and the CE of ~400,000 HDL particles. Huh7 hepatocytes take up CE faster when delivered as CERM than as HDL, in part via the LDL-receptor (LDLR). Here we compared the final RCT step, hepatic uptake and subsequent intracellular processing to cholesterol and bile salts for radiolabeled HDL-, CERM- and LDL-CE by Huh7 cells and in vivo in C57BL/6J mice. In Huh7 cells, uptake from LDL was greater than from CERM (2-4X) and HDL (5-10X). Halftimes for [(14)C]CE hydrolysis were 3.0±0.2, 4.4±0.6 and 5.4±0.7h respectively for HDL, CERM and LDL-CE. The fraction of sterols secreted as bile acids was ~50% by 8h for all three particles. HDL, CERM and LDL-CE metabolism in mice showed efficient plasma clearance of CERM-CE, liver uptake and metabolism, and secretion as bile acids into the gall bladder. This work supports the therapeutic potential of the SOF reaction, which diverts HDL-CE to the LDLR, thereby increasing hepatic CE uptake, and sterol disposal as bile acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  1. Bile components and amino acids affect survival of the newly excysted juvenile Clonorchis sinensis in maintaining media.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunyu; Kim, Tae Im; Yoo, Won Gi; Cho, Pyo Yun; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2008-10-01

    Clonorchis sinensis thrives on bile juice. The effects of bile and bile acids on newly excysted juvenile C. sinensis (CsNEJ) were studied in terms of survival. Survival of CsNEJs maintained in 1x Locke's solution, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, NCTC 109, Eagle's, RPMI 1640, and 0.1% glucose was high, but dropped rapidly in 2x Locke's, 0.85% NaCl, and phosphate-buffered saline. Most amino acids in the media favored CsNEJ survival; however, aspartic and glutamic acids and adenine reduced survival. Survival was also significantly lower in media containing more than 0.1% bile. CsNEJs preconditioned in low bile media survived longer in higher bile media. All bile acids and conjugated bile salts were found to favor CsNEJ survival, except for lithocholic acid (LCA) which was toxic. NCTC 109 medium was found to be optimal for the in vitro maintenance of CsNEJs and 1x Locke's solution to be suitable for analyzing the biological effects of bioactive compounds and molecules. Based on these results, we propose that bile acids enhance activity of CsNEJs, but LCA deteriorate CsNEJs.

  2. Unconjugated Bile Acids Influence Expression of Circadian Genes: A Potential Mechanism for Microbe-Host Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; MacSharry, John; Casey, Patrick G.; Shanahan, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions to circadian rhythm in mice and humans have been associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The gut microbiota is known to be essential for the maintenance of circadian rhythm in the host suggesting a role for microbe-host interactions in the regulation of the peripheral circadian clock. Previous work suggested a role for gut bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in the regulation of host circadian gene expression. Here we demonstrate that unconjugated bile acids, known to be generated through the BSH activity of the gut microbiota, are potentially chronobiological regulators of host circadian gene expression. We utilised a synchronised Caco-2 epithelial colorectal cell model and demonstrated that unconjugated bile acids, but not the equivalent tauro-conjugated bile salts, enhance the expression levels of genes involved in circadian rhythm. In addition oral administration of mice with unconjugated bile acids significantly altered expression levels of circadian clock genes in the ileum and colon as well as the liver with significant changes to expression of hepatic regulators of circadian rhythm (including Dbp) and associated genes (Per2, Per3 and Cry2). The data demonstrate a potential mechanism for microbe-host crosstalk that significantly impacts upon host circadian gene expression. PMID:27907092

  3. Unconjugated Bile Acids Influence Expression of Circadian Genes: A Potential Mechanism for Microbe-Host Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; MacSharry, John; Casey, Patrick G; Shanahan, Fergus; Joyce, Susan A; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions to circadian rhythm in mice and humans have been associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The gut microbiota is known to be essential for the maintenance of circadian rhythm in the host suggesting a role for microbe-host interactions in the regulation of the peripheral circadian clock. Previous work suggested a role for gut bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in the regulation of host circadian gene expression. Here we demonstrate that unconjugated bile acids, known to be generated through the BSH activity of the gut microbiota, are potentially chronobiological regulators of host circadian gene expression. We utilised a synchronised Caco-2 epithelial colorectal cell model and demonstrated that unconjugated bile acids, but not the equivalent tauro-conjugated bile salts, enhance the expression levels of genes involved in circadian rhythm. In addition oral administration of mice with unconjugated bile acids significantly altered expression levels of circadian clock genes in the ileum and colon as well as the liver with significant changes to expression of hepatic regulators of circadian rhythm (including Dbp) and associated genes (Per2, Per3 and Cry2). The data demonstrate a potential mechanism for microbe-host crosstalk that significantly impacts upon host circadian gene expression.

  4. Bile Acids and Bicarbonate Inversely Regulate Intracellular Cyclic di-GMP in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Koestler, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in aquatic reservoirs and causes the diarrheal disease cholera upon entry into a human host. V. cholerae employs the second messenger molecule 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) to transition between these two distinct lifestyles. c-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. Bacteria typically encode many different DGCs and PDEs within their genomes. Presumably, each enzyme senses and responds to cognate environmental cues by alteration of enzymatic activity. c-di-GMP represses the expression of virulence factors in V. cholerae, and it is predicted that the intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is low during infection. Contrary to this model, we found that bile acids, a prevalent constituent of the human proximal small intestine, increase intracellular c-di-GMP in V. cholerae. We identified four c-di-GMP turnover enzymes that contribute to increased intracellular c-di-GMP in the presence of bile acids, and deletion of these enzymes eliminates the bile induction of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation. Furthermore, this bile-mediated increase in c-di-GMP is quenched by bicarbonate, the intestinal pH buffer secreted by intestinal epithelial cells. Our results lead us to propose that V. cholerae senses distinct microenvironments within the small intestine using bile and bicarbonate as chemical cues and responds by modulating the intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP. PMID:24799624

  5. Bile Acid secreted by male sea lamprey that acts as a sex pheromone.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiming; Scott, Alexander P; Siefkes, Michael J; Yan, Honggao; Liu, Qin; Yun, Sang-Seon; Gage, Douglas A

    2002-04-05

    We show that reproductively mature male sea lampreys release a bile acid that acts as a potent sex pheromone, inducing preference and searching behavior in ovulated female lampreys. The secreted bile acid 7alpha,12alpha,24-trihydroxy-5alpha-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate was released in much higher amounts relative to known vertebrate steroid pheromones and may be secreted through the gills. Hence, the male of this fish species signals both its reproductive status and location to females by secreting a pheromone that can act over long distances.

  6. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a “dose–response” model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR “dose-dependently” increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ω-muricholic acid (ωMCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum. - Highlights: • Dose response effects of short-term CR on BA homeostasis in male mice. • CR increased the BA pool size and many individual BAs. • CR altered BA composition (increased proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs). • Increased mRNAs of BA enzymes in liver (Cyp7a1 and BAL) and ileal BA binding protein.

  7. Synthesis and in Vitro Evaluation of Bile Acid Prodrugs of Floxuridine to Target the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Vivian, Diana; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Floxuridine is often used to treat metastatic liver disease and is given as an infusion directly into the hepatic artery to increase the amount of intact drug that reaches the liver. The objective of this work was to design and synthesize prodrugs of floxuridine through conjugation to chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to target the liver via the bile acid liver uptake transporter Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP, SLC10A1). Two isomeric prodrugs of floxuridine were synthesized: floxuridine 3′ glutamic acid-CDCA and floxuridine 5′-glutamic acid-CDCA. Both were potent inhibitors and substrates of NTCP. Floxuridine 3′ glutamic acid-CDCA showed Ki = 6.86 ± 1.37 μM, Km = 10.7 ± 2.1 μM, and passive permeability = 0.663 (± 0.121) x 10−7 cm/s while floxuridine 5′-glutamic acid-CDCA showed Ki = 0.397 ± 0.038 μM, Km = 40.4 ± 15.2 μM, and passive permeability = 1.72 (± 0.18) x 10−7 cm/s. Floxuridine itself had a higher passively permeability of 7.54 (± 0.45) x 10−7 cm/s in the same cell line, indicating that both prodrugs have the potential for lower non-specific effects than the drug alone. Prodrugs were stable in rat plasma (t = 3h), but quickly released in rat liver s9 fraction, suggesting future in vivo evaluation. PMID:25219859

  8. Alterations in bile acid synthesis in carriers of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α mutations.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, E; Nilsson, R; Groop, L; Pramfalk, C

    2013-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) cause maturity onset diabetes of the young 3 (MODY3), an autosomal dominant form of diabetes. Deficiency of HNF1α in mice results in diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and increased bile acid (BA) and cholesterol synthesis. Little is known about alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with MODY3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with MODY3 have altered cholesterol and BA synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption. A secondary aim was to investigate the effects of HNF1α mutations on the transcriptional regulation of BA metabolism. Plasma biomarkers of BA and cholesterol synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption were measured in patients with MODY3 (n = 19) and in matched healthy control subjects (n = 15). Cotransfection experiments were performed with several promoters involved in BA metabolism along with expression vectors carrying the mutations found in these patients. Plasma analysis showed higher levels of BA synthesis in patients with MODY3. No differences were observed in cholesterol synthesis or intestinal cholesterol absorption. Cotransfection experiments showed that one of the mutations (P379A) increased the induction of the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase promoter compared with HNF1α, without further differences in other studied promoters. By contrast, the other four mutations (L107I, T260M, P291fsinsC and R131Q) reduced the induction of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) promoter, which was followed by reduced repression of the small heterodimer partner promoter. In addition, these mutations also reduced the induction of the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter promoter. BA synthesis is increased in patients with MODY3 compared with control subjects. Mutations in HNF1α affect promoters involved in BA metabolism. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  9. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  10. The role of CYP3A4 in the biotransformation of bile acids and therapeutic implication for cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kong-Nan; Chen, Chen

    2014-01-01

    CYP3A4 is a major cytochrome P450. It catalyses a broad range of substrates includi