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Sample records for biliary cancer cell

  1. IDH mutations in liver cell plasticity and biliary cancer.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supriya K; Parachoniak, Christine A; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive cancer associated with the bile ducts within the liver. These tumors are characterized by frequent gain-of-function mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes-that are also common in subsets of neural, haematopoietic and bone tumors, but rare or absent in the other types of gastrointestinal malignancy. Mutant IDH acts through a novel mechanism of oncogenesis, producing high levels of the metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with the function of α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzymes that regulate diverse cellular processes including histone demethylation and DNA modification. Recently, we used in vitro stem cell systems and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to demonstrate that mutant IDH promotes ICC formation by blocking hepatocyte differentiation and increasing pools of hepatic progenitors that are susceptible to additional oncogenic hits leading to ICC. We found that silencing of HNF4A-encoding a master transcriptional regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence-was critical to mutant IDH-mediated inhibition of liver differentiation. In line with these findings, human ICC with IDH mutations are characterized by a hepatic progenitor cell transcriptional signature suggesting that they are a distinct ICC subtype as compared to IDH wild type tumors. The role of mutant IDH in controlling hepatic differentiation state suggests the potential of newly developed inhibitors of the mutant enzyme as a form of differentiation therapy in a solid tumor.

  2. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitor on proliferation of biliary tract cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Ning; Wang, Xin; Zou, Sheng-Quan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA) on the growth of biliary tract cancer cell lines (gallbladder carcinoma cell line and cholangiocarcinoma cell line) in vivo and in vitro, and to investigate the perspective of histone deacetylase inhibitor in its clinical application. METHODS: The survival rates of gallbladder carcinoma cell line (Mz-ChA-l cell line) and cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (QBC939, KMBC and OZ cell lines) treated with various doses of TSA were detected by methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. A nude mouse model of transplanted gallbladder carcinoma (Mz-ChA-l cell line) was successfully established, and changes in the growth of transplanted tumor after treated with TSA were measured. RESULTS: TSA could inhibit the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma cell line (Mz-ChA-l cell line) and cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (QBC939, KMBC and OZ cell lines) in a dose-dependent manner. After the nude mouse model of transplanted gallbladder carcinoma (Mz-ChA-l cell line) was successfully established, the growth of cancer was inhibited in the model after treated with TSA. CONCLUSION: TSA can inhibit the growth of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18442209

  3. PIK3CA mutation detection in metastatic biliary cancer using cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shibing; Lee, Sujin; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Mao, Mao; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh

    2015-01-01

    PIK3CA mutation is considered a good candidate for targeted therapies in cancers, especially biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) from serum by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as an alternative source for PIK3CA mutation analysis. To identify matching archival tumour specimens from serum samples of advanced BTC patients, mutation detection using ddPCR with Bio-Rad's PrimePCR mutation and wild type assays were performed for PIK3CA p.E542K, p.E545K, and p.H1047R. Thirty-eight patients with metastatic BTC were enrolled. Only one (BTC 29T) sample (n = 38) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K and another (BTC 27T) for p.H1047R mutation; none was positive for PIK3CA p.E545K. Matched serum sample (BTC 29P) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K with 28 mutant copies detected, corresponding to 48 copies/ml of serum and an allelic prevalence of 0.3%. Another matched serum sample (BTC 27P) was positive for PIK3CA p.H1047R with 10 mutant copies detected, i.e. 18 copies/ml and an allelic frequency of 0.2%. High correlation was noted in the PIK3CA mutation status between tumour gDNA and serum cfDNA. Low-level PIK3CA mutations were detectable in the serum indicating the utility of cfDNA as a DNA source to detect cancer-derived mutations in metastatic biliary cancers. PMID:26498688

  4. MicroRNAs Associated with the Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in Biliary Tract Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andrej; Mayr, Christian; Bach, Doris; Illig, Romana; Plaetzer, Kristjan; Berr, Frieder; Pichler, Martin; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a palliative treatment option for unresectable hilar biliary tract cancer (BTC) showing a considerable benefit for survival and quality of life with few side effects. Currently, factors determining the cellular response of BTC cells towards PDT are unknown. Due to their multifaceted nature, microRNAs (miRs) are a promising analyte to investigate the cellular mechanisms following PDT. For two photosensitizers, Photofrin® and Foscan®, the phototoxicity was investigated in eight BTC cell lines. Each cell line (untreated) was profiled for expression of n = 754 miRs using TaqMan® Array Human MicroRNA Cards. Statistical analysis and bioinformatic tools were used to identify miRs associated with PDT efficiency and their putative targets, respectively. Twenty miRs correlated significantly with either high or low PDT efficiency. PDT was particularly effective in cells with high levels of clustered miRs 25-93*-106b and (in case of miR-106b) a phenotype characterized by high expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin and high proliferation (cyclinD1 and Ki67 expression). Insensitivity towards PDT was associated with high miR-200 family expression and (for miR-cluster 200a/b-429) expression of differentiation markers Ck19 and Ck8/18. Predicted and validated downstream targets indicate plausible involvement of miRs 20a*, 25, 93*, 130a, 141, 200a, 200c and 203 in response mechanisms to PDT, suggesting that targeting these miRs could improve susceptibility to PDT in insensitive cell lines. Taken together, the miRNome pattern may provide a novel tool for predicting the efficiency of PDT and—following appropriate functional verification—may subsequently allow for optimization of the PDT protocol. PMID:25380521

  5. Extracellular ATP induces cytoplasmic and nuclear Ca2+ transients via P2Y2 receptor in human biliary epithelial cancer cells (Mz-Cha-1).

    PubMed

    Elsing, Christoph; Georgiev, Tihomir; Hübner, Christian A; Boger, Regina; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Schlenker, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    Extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) play a role in biliary epithelial cell function. Since nucleotide receptors are potential targets for various diseases related to epithelial cell dysfunction and cancer, the purpose of this study was to investigate the expression and to functionally characterize the nucleotide receptor subtypes in biliary epithelial cancer cells (Mz-Cha-1). Extracellular ATP dose-dependently resulted in an intracellular Ca(2+) increase (mean effective concentration (EC(50)) 40 μM). Uridine triphosphate (UTP) produced a similar Ca(2+) response and cross-desensitation was observed. The rank order of tested agonists was ATP=UTP> adenosine>ADP=AMP>α,β-methylene-ATP. This confirms the functional expression of purinoceptor P2Y2 and P2Y4 in biliary epithelial cancer cell membranes. mRNAs for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y6 purinergic receptor subtypes were found, whereas western blot analysis suggested only the expression of P2Y2 receptors. Confocal imaging and nuclear staining was used to compartmentalize ATP-induced cytosolic and nuclear Ca(2+)-transients, indicating a role for secretory ATP in regulating nuclear function, by increasing nuclear Ca(2+) concentrations. These data define the expression profile of P2Y receptors on human biliary epithelial cancer cells and indicate P2Y2 receptors as being potential targets in new treatment strategies for biliary cancer.

  6. Phenylethyl isothiocyanate reverses cisplatin resistance in biliary tract cancer cells via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiwei; Zhan, Ming; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Benpeng; Yang, Kai; Yang, Jie; Yi, Jing; Huang, Qihong; Mohan, Man; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a highly malignant cancer. BTC exhibits a low response rate to cisplatin (CDDP) treatment, and therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of CDDP resistance is urgently needed. Here, we show that BTC cells develop CDDP resistance due, in part, to upregulation of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1). Phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in watercress, could enhance the efficacy of CDDP by degrading Mcl-1. PEITC-CDDP co-treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells and inhibited xenograft tumor growth without obvious toxic effects. In vitro, PEITC decreased reduced glutathione (GSH), which resulted in decreased GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and increased glutathionylation of Mcl-1, leading to rapid proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1. Furthermore, we identified Cys16 and Cys286 as Mcl-1 glutathionylation sites, and mutating them resulted in PEITC-mediated degradation resistant Mcl-1 protein. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CDDP resistance is partially associated with Mcl-1 in BTC cells and we identify a novel mechanism that PEITC can enhance CDDP-induced apoptosis via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1. Hence, our results provide support that dietary intake of watercress may help reverse CDDP resistance in BTC patients. PMID:26848531

  7. Phenylethyl isothiocyanate reverses cisplatin resistance in biliary tract cancer cells via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiwei; Zhan, Ming; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Benpeng; Yang, Kai; Yang, Jie; Yi, Jing; Huang, Qihong; Mohan, Man; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a highly malignant cancer. BTC exhibits a low response rate to cisplatin (CDDP) treatment, and therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of CDDP resistance is urgently needed. Here, we show that BTC cells develop CDDP resistance due, in part, to upregulation of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1). Phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in watercress, could enhance the efficacy of CDDP by degrading Mcl-1. PEITC-CDDP co-treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells and inhibited xenograft tumor growth without obvious toxic effects. In vitro, PEITC decreased reduced glutathione (GSH), which resulted in decreased GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and increased glutathionylation of Mcl-1, leading to rapid proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1. Furthermore, we identified Cys16 and Cys286 as Mcl-1 glutathionylation sites, and mutating them resulted in PEITC-mediated degradation resistant Mcl-1 protein. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CDDP resistance is partially associated with Mcl-1 in BTC cells and we identify a novel mechanism that PEITC can enhance CDDP-induced apoptosis via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1. Hence, our results provide support that dietary intake of watercress may help reverse CDDP resistance in BTC patients.

  8. The BMI1 inhibitor PTC-209 is a potential compound to halt cellular growth in biliary tract cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Christian; Wagner, Andrej; Loeffelberger, Magdalena; Bruckner, Daniela; Jakab, Martin; Berr, Frieder; Di Fazio, Pietro; Ocker, Matthias; Neureiter, Daniel; Pichler, Martin; Kiesslich, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    BMI1 is a core component of the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and is up-regulated in biliary tract cancer (BTC), contributing to aggressive clinical features. In this study we investigated the cytotoxic effects of PTC-209, a recently developed inhibitor of BMI1, in BTC cells. PTC-209 reduced overall viability in BTC cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion (0.04 - 20 μM). Treatment with PTC-209 led to slightly enhanced caspase activity and stop of cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PTC-209 caused cell cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint. A comprehensive investigation of expression changes of cell cycle-related genes showed that PTC-209 caused significant down-regulation of cell cycle-promoting genes as well as of genes that contribute to DNA synthesis initiation and DNA repair, respectively. This was accompanied by significantly elevated mRNA levels of cell cycle inhibitors. In addition, PTC-209 reduced sphere formation and, in a cell line-dependent manner, aldehyde dehydrogease-1 positive cells. We conclude that PTC-209 might be a promising drug for future in vitro and in vivo studies in BTC. PMID:26623561

  9. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  10. Novel bacteriochlorine for high tissue-penetration: photodynamic properties in human biliary tract cancer cells in vitro and in a mouse tumour model.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Michael; Schastak, Stanislaw I; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hermann, Ralf; Sack, Ulrich; Mössner, Joachim; Berr, Frieder

    2003-10-15

    Photodynamic therapy of bile duct cancer using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and laser light of 630 nm wavelength is confined to a tumouricidal tissue penetration of 4 mm, which might be doubled with laser light between 700 and 800 nm. Therefore, we investigated the photosensitising properties of a novel bacteriochlorine, tetrakis-pyridyl-tetrahydroporphyrin tosylat (THP) with high absorption at 763 nm. Two biliary cancer cell lines (BDC, GBC) were incubated with HPD or THP to assess cellular uptake kinetics, dark cytotoxicity, and photodynamic cytotoxicity (laser light exposure 1-20 J/cm2). Tumours grown from BDC cells in subcutaneous tissue of severe combined immunodeficient mice were treated with laser light of 30 J/cm2 after injection of THP. The concentrations that killed 50% of cells in the dark were 680 microg/ml of HPD, but > 6400 microg/ml of THP in BDC cells, and 220 microg/ml of HPD, but 6400 microg/ml of THP in GBC cells. Both cell lines exhibited uptake and retention of THP and photodynamic cytotoxicity (up to 86% cells killed). THP induced tumour-selective phototoxicity in the cholangiocarcinoma model. The novel bacteriochlorine THP exhibits photosensitiser properties in biliary tract cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and could achieve deep tumouricidal tissue penetration due to photoactivation at 763 nm.

  11. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD.

  12. Liver Fluke-Associated Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Piyachaturawat, Panida; Aumpansub, Prapimphan; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2017-08-09

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive cancer arising from epithelial cells of the bile duct. Most patients with CCA have an unresectable tumor at the time of diagnosis. In Western countries, the risk of CCA increases in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, whereas liver fluke infection appears to be the major risk factor for CCA in Asian countries. A diagnosis of liver fluke infection often relies on stool samples, including microscopic examination, polymerase chain reaction-based assays, and fluke antigen detection. Tests of serum, saliva and urine samples are also potentially diagnostic. The presence of liver fluke along with exogenous carcinogens magnifies the risk of CCA in people living in endemic areas. The "liver fluke-cholangiocarcinoma" carcinogenesis pathways consist of mechanical damage to the bile duct epithelium, immunopathologic and cellular reactions to the liver fluke's antigens and excretory/secretory products, liver fluke-induced changes in the biliary tract microbiome and the effects of repeated treatment for liver fluke. A vaccine and novel biomarkers are needed for the primary and secondary prevention of CCA in endemic areas. Importantly, climate change exerts an effect on vector-borne parasitic diseases, and awareness of liver fluke should be enhanced in potentially migrated habitat areas.

  13. Biliary Tract Cancer: Epidemiology, Radiotherapy, and Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Bridgewater, John A; Goodman, Karyn A; Kalyan, Aparna; Mulcahy, Mary F

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer, or cholangiocarcinoma, arises from the biliary epithelium of the small ducts in the periphery of the liver (intrahepatic) and the main ducts of the hilum (extrahepatic), extending into the gallbladder. The incidence and epidemiology of biliary tract cancer are fluid and complex. It is shown that intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is on the rise in the Western world, and gallbladder cancer is on the decline. Radiation therapy has emerged as an important component of adjuvant therapy for resected disease and definitive therapy for locally advanced disease. The emerging sophisticated techniques of imaging tumors and conformal dose delivery are expanding the indications for radiotherapy in the management of bile duct tumors. As we understand more about the molecular pathways driving biliary tract cancers, targeted therapies are at the forefront of new therapeutic combinations. Understanding the gene expression profile and mutational burden in biliary tract cancer allows us to better discern the pathogenesis and identify promising new developmental therapeutic targets.

  14. Advances in the Management of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ciombor, Kristen Keon; Goff, Laura Williams

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTC), though uncommon, are highly fatal malignancies, and current treatments fail to cure or control the majority of tumors. Given the complexity of the anatomy and often aggressive nature of the disease, multidisciplinary treatment, including palliation, is often required. However, systemic therapy with cytotoxics and/or targeted agents are routinely the mainstay of treatment for patients with advanced biliary tract cancers, and new targets and agents provide hope for this disease. This article focuses on recent advances in the management of biliary tract cancers, with a special focus on the molecular basis for current therapeutic investigation in this disease. PMID:23416860

  15. Biliary metal stents are superior to plastic stents for preoperative biliary decompression in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Decker, Christopher; Christein, John D; Phadnis, Milind A; Wilcox, C Mel; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2011-07-01

    It is unclear whether plastic or metal stents are more suitable for preoperative biliary decompression in pancreatic cancer. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of endoscopic reinterventions in patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing plastic or self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placements for preoperative biliary decompression. This was a retrospective study of all patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to pancreatic head cancer who underwent their index endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and all follow-up biliary stent placements at our center before undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. Plastic or SEMS were placed at ERCP for biliary decompression. The main outcome measure was to compare the rate of endoscopic reinterventions between the plastic and SEMS cohorts. 29 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy had preoperative biliary stent placement (18 plastic, 11 SEMS) at our center. Whereas none of the 11 patients who underwent SEMS placement had stent dysfunction, 7 of 18 (39%) patients with plastic stents required endoscopic reintervention before surgery (P=0.02). Reinterventions were due to cholangitis (n=1) or persistent elevation in serum bilirubin levels (n=6). Two patients with SEMS underwent EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration after ERCP, which yielded a positive diagnosis of cancer in all cases; SEMS did not impair visualization of the tumor mass at EUS. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was undertaken successfully in all 29 patients and the presence of a SEMS did not interfere with biliary anastomosis. On univariate logistic regression, only SEMS placement was associated with less need for endoscopic reintervention (P=0.02). SEMS are superior to plastic stents for preoperative biliary decompression in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Clinical implications of APEX1 and Jagged1 as chemoresistance factors in biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Beum; Cho, Won Jin; Choi, Nam Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Park, Jun Hee; Lee, Hee-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Biliary cancer is a highly malignant neoplasm with poor prognosis and most patients need to undergo palliative chemotherapy, however major clinical problem associated with the use of chemotherapy is chemoresistance. So far, we aimed at investigating clinical implications of apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1 (APEX1) and Jagged1 as chemoresistance factors in biliary tract cancer. Methods We used 5 human biliary tract cancer cell lines (SNU-245, SNU-308, SNU-478, SNU-1079, and SNU-1196), and investigated the chemosensitivity of APEX1 and Jagged1 through 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Western blot. Alternately, the 10 patients of advanced biliary cancer consist of 2 group according to the chemotherapy response examined by immunohistochemistry using APEX1 and Jagged1 antibody, and protein expression level was scored for staining intensity and percent positive cell. Results The result of MTT assay after APEX1 knockdown showed that strong coexpression of APEX1 and Jagged1 cell line (SNU-245, SNU-1079, and SNU-1196) showed a greater decrease in IC50 of chemotherapeutic agent (5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine and cisplatin). The Western blot analysis of APEX1 and Jagged1 expression in biliary cancer cell lines after APEX1 knockdown definitively demonstrated decreased Jagged1 expression. The APEX1 and Jagged1expression level of immunohistochemistry represented that chemorefractory patients had higher than chemoresponsive patients. Conclusion These results demonstrate that simultaneous high expression of APEX1 and Jagged1 is associated with chemoresistance in biliary cancer and suggest that is a potential therapeutic target for chemoresistance in advanced biliary cancer. PMID:28090501

  17. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  18. FXR agonists enhance the sensitivity of biliary tract cancer cells to cisplatin via SHP dependent inhibition of Bcl-xL expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhan, Ming; Li, Qi; Chen, Wei; Chu, Huiling; Huang, Qihong; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Man, Mohan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance is common in patients with biliary tract cancer (BTC) including gallbladder cancer (GBC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Therefore, it is necessary to identify effective chemotherapeutic agents for BTC. In the present study, we for the first time tested the effect of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists GW4064 and CDCA (chenodeoxycholic acid) in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) on increasing the chemosensitivity in BTC. Our results show that co-treatment of CDDP with FXR agonists remarkably enhance chemosensitivity of BTC cells. Mechanistically, we found that activation of FXR induced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), which in turn inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and resulted in down-regulation of Bcl-xL expression in BTC cells, leading to increased susceptibility to CDDP. Moreover, the experiments on tumor-bearing mice showed that GW4064/CDDP co-treatment inhibited the tumor growth in vivo by up-regulating SHP expression and down-regulating STAT3 phosphorylation. These results suggest CDDP in combination with FXR agonists could be a potential new therapeutic strategy for BTC. PMID:27127878

  19. Diet and biliary tract cancer risk in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shakira M; Gao, Yu-Tang; Nogueira, Leticia M; Shen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Bingsheng; Rashid, Asif; Hsing, Ann W; Koshiol, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Trends in biliary tract cancer incidence rates have increased in Shanghai, China. These trends have coincided with economic and developmental growth, as well as a shift in dietary patterns to a more Westernized diet. To examine the effect of dietary changes on incident disease, we evaluated associations between diet and biliary tract cancers amongst men and women from a population-based case-control study in Shanghai, China. Biliary tract cancer cases were recruited from 42 collaborating hospitals in urban Shanghai, and population-based controls were randomly selected from the Shanghai Household Registry. Food frequency questionnaire data were available for 225 gallbladder, 190 extrahepatic bile duct, and 68 ampulla of Vater cancer cases. A total of 39 food groups were created and examined for associations with biliary tract cancer. Interestingly, only four food groups demonstrated a suggested association with gallbladder, extrahepatic bile duct, or ampulla of Vater cancers. The allium food group, consisting of onions, garlic, and shallots showed an inverse association with gallbladder cancer (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.68-0.97). Similar trends were seen in the food group containing seaweed and kelp (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.67-0.96). In contrast, both preserved vegetables and salted meats food groups showed positive associations with gallbladder cancer (OR:1.27, 95% CI: 1.06-1.52; OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.02-1.37, respectively). Each of these four food groups showed similar trends for extrahepatic bile duct and ampulla of Vater cancers. The results of our analysis suggest intake of foods with greater anti-inflammatory properties may play a role in decreasing the risk of biliary tract cancers. Future studies should be done to better understand effects of cultural changes on diet, and to further examine the impact diet and inflammation have on biliary tract cancer incidence.

  20. Diet and biliary tract cancer risk in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shakira M.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Nogueira, Leticia M.; Shen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Bingsheng; Rashid, Asif; Hsing, Ann W.; Koshiol, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Trends in biliary tract cancer incidence rates have increased in Shanghai, China. These trends have coincided with economic and developmental growth, as well as a shift in dietary patterns to a more Westernized diet. To examine the effect of dietary changes on incident disease, we evaluated associations between diet and biliary tract cancers amongst men and women from a population-based case-control study in Shanghai, China. Biliary tract cancer cases were recruited from 42 collaborating hospitals in urban Shanghai, and population-based controls were randomly selected from the Shanghai Household Registry. Food frequency questionnaire data were available for 225 gallbladder, 190 extrahepatic bile duct, and 68 ampulla of Vater cancer cases. A total of 39 food groups were created and examined for associations with biliary tract cancer. Interestingly, only four food groups demonstrated a suggested association with gallbladder, extrahepatic bile duct, or ampulla of Vater cancers. The allium food group, consisting of onions, garlic, and shallots showed an inverse association with gallbladder cancer (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.68–0.97). Similar trends were seen in the food group containing seaweed and kelp (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.67–0.96). In contrast, both preserved vegetables and salted meats food groups showed positive associations with gallbladder cancer (OR:1.27, 95% CI: 1.06–1.52; OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.02–1.37, respectively). Each of these four food groups showed similar trends for extrahepatic bile duct and ampulla of Vater cancers. The results of our analysis suggest intake of foods with greater anti-inflammatory properties may play a role in decreasing the risk of biliary tract cancers. Future studies should be done to better understand effects of cultural changes on diet, and to further examine the impact diet and inflammation have on biliary tract cancer incidence. PMID:28288186

  1. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages.

    PubMed

    Mittal, B; Deutsch, M; Iwatsuki, S

    1985-04-01

    We analyzed the records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From our data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed.

  2. Primary cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Iwatsuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The records of 22 patients with cancers of extrahepatic biliary passages (EHBP) were analyzed to understand their natural histories and patterns of failure and to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments. None of the preoperative investigations consistently defined the entire extent of tumor. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) was the most helpful (100%) in accurately defining the site of ductal obstruction. Computed tomography was helpful in diagnosing liver metastases in 53% and primary tumor mass in 23% of patients. The most common sites of tumor failure or persistence were: liver (67%), tumor bed (56%), peritoneum (22%), porta hepatis and lymph nodes (17%). The median survival for the entire group was 6.8 months. Surgery plays an important role in managing these tumors and in defining tumor extent for subsequent adjuvant irradiation. Patients receiving radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF had a longer median survival (11 months) than patients receiving less than 70 TDF (4.4 months). All three patients, who were alive and free of disease greater than 1 year, received radiation doses greater than or equal to 70 TDF. From the data, it is difficult to comment on the effectiveness of chemotherapy. The authors have made suggestions regarding radiation volume and doses to various structures. The need for entering these patients into multi-institutional clinical trials is stressed.

  3. Serum Lipid Levels and the Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers and Biliary Stones: A Population-based Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Chen, Jinbo; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rashid, Asif; Chang, Shih-Chen; Shen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Bing-Sheng; Han, Tian-Quan; Zhang, Bai-He; Danforth, Kim N.; Althuis, Michelle D.; Hsing, Ann W.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers, encompassing the gallbladder, extrahepatic bile ducts, and ampulla of Vater, are rare, but highly fatal malignancies. Gallstones, the predominant risk factor for biliary cancers, are linked with hyperlipidemia. As part of a population-based case-control study conducted in Shanghai, China, we examined the associations of serum lipid levels with biliary stones and cancers. We included 460 biliary cancer cases (264 gallbladder, 141 extrahepatic bile duct, and 55 ampulla of Vater), 981 biliary stone cases, and 858 healthy individuals randomly selected from the population. Participants completed an in-person interview and gave overnight fasting blood samples. Participants in the highest quintile of triglycerides (≥ 160 mg/dl) had a 1.4-fold risk of biliary stones (95% CI=1.1-1.9), a 1.9-fold risk of gallbladder cancer (95% CI=1.3-2.8), and a 4.8-fold risk of bile duct cancer (95% CI=2.8-8.1), compared to the reference group (third quintile: 90-124 mg/dl). Participants in the lowest quintile of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (< 30 mg/dl) had a 4.2-fold risk of biliary stones (95% CI=3.0-6.0), an 11.6-fold risk of gallbladder cancer (95% CI=7.3-18.5), and a 16.8-fold risk of bile duct cancer (95% CI=9.1-30.9), relative to the reference group (third quintile: 40-49 mg/dl). In addition, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and apolipoprotein A (apo A) were inversely associated with biliary stones; whereas low levels as well as high levels of total cholesterol, LDL, apo A, and apolipoprotein B (apo B) were associated with excess risks of biliary tract cancers. Our findings support a role for serum lipids in gallstone development and biliary carcinogenesis. PMID:18076041

  4. Cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract: epidemiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Fraumeni, J F

    1975-11-01

    The epidemiological patterns for pancreatic and biliary cancers reveal more differences than similarities. Pancreatic carcinoma is common in western countries, although 2 Polynesian groups (New Zealand Maoris and native Hawaiians) have the highest rates internationally. In the United States the disease is rising in frequency, predominating in males and in blacks. The rates are elevated in urban areas, but geographic analysis uncovered no clustering of contiguous counties except in southern Louisiana. The origin of pancreatic cancer is obsure, but a twofold increased risk has been documented for cigarette smokers and diabetic patients. Alcohol, occupational agents, and dietary fat have been suspected, but not proven to be risk factors. Except for the rare hereditary form of pancreatitis, there are few clues to genetic predisposition. In contrast, the reported incidence of biliary tract cancer is highest in Latin American populations and American Indians. The tumor predominates in females around the world, except for Chinese and Japanese who show a male excess. In the United States the rates are higher in whites than blacks, and clusters of high-risk counties have been found in the north central region, the southwest, and Appalachia. The distribution of biliary tumors parallels that of cholesterol gallstones, the major risk factor for biliary cancer. Insights into biliary carcinogenesis depend upon clarification of lithogenic influences, such as pregnancy, obesity, and hyperlipoproteinemia, exogenous estrogens, familial tendencies, and ethnic-geographic factors that may reflect dietary habits. Noncalculous risk factors for biliary cancer include ulcerative colitis, clonorchiasis, Gardner's syndrome, and probably certain industrial exposures. Within the biliary tract, tumors of the gallbladder and bile duct show epidemiological distinctions. In contrast to gallbladder cancer, bile duct neoplasms predominate in males; they are less often associated with stones and more

  5. Therapeutic implication of HER2 in advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yongjun; Ha, Hyerim; Park, Ji Eun; Bang, Ju-Hee; Jin, Mei Hua; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Han, Sae-Won; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no validated therapeutic target for biliary tract cancer (BTC). This study aimed to investigate the pre-clinical and clinical implication of HER2 as a therapeutic target in BTC. We established two novel HER2-amplified BTC cell lines, SNU-2670 and SNU-2773, from gallbladder cancer patients. SNU-2670 and SNU-2773 cells were sensitive to trastuzumab, dacomitinib, and afatinib compared with nine HER2-negative BTC cell lines. Dacomitinib and afatinib led to G1 cell cycle arrest in SNU-2773 cells and apoptosis in SNU-2670 cells. Furthermore, dacomitinib, afatinib, and trastuzumab showed synergistic cytotoxicity when combined with some cytotoxic drugs including gemcitabine, cisplatin, paclitaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. In a SNU-2670 mouse xenograft model, trastuzumab demonstrated a good anti-tumor effect as a monotherapy and in combination with gemcitabine increasing apoptosis. In our clinical data, 13.0% of patients with advanced BTC were defined as HER2-positive. Of these, three patients completed HER2-targeted chemotherapy. Two of them demonstrated a partial response, and the other one showed stable disease for 18 weeks. In summary, these pre-clinical and clinical data suggest that HER2 could be a therapeutic target, and that a HER2-targeting strategy should be developed further in patients with HER2-positive advanced BTC. PMID:27517322

  6. Nal-IRI With 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Leucovorin or Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin in Advanced Biliary-tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Adenocarcinoma Metastatic; Biliary Tract Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Biliary Tract; Adenocarinoma Locally Advanced; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  7. Percutaneous biliary drainage using open cell stents for malignant biliary hilar obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sun Jun; Bae, Jae Ik; Han, Tae Sun; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Ji Dae; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and the effectiveness of the complex assembly of open cell nitinol stents for biliary hilar malignancy. During the 10 month period between January and October 2007, 26 consecutive patients with malignant biliary hilar obstruction underwent percutaneous insertion of open cell design nitinol stents. Four types of stent placement methods were used according to the patients' ductal anatomy of the hilum. We evaluated the technical feasibility of stent placement, complications, patient survival, and the duration of stent patency. Bilobar biliary stent placement was conducted in 26 patients with malignant biliary obstruction-T (n = 9), Y (n = 7), crisscross (n = 6) and multiple intersecting types (n = 4). Primary technical success was obtained in 24 of 26 (93%) patients. The crushing of the 1st stent during insertion of the 2nd stent occurred in two cases. Major complications occurred in 2 of 26 patients (7.7%). One case of active bleeding from hepatic segmental artery and one case of sepsis after procedure occurred. Clinical success was achieved in 21 of 24 (87.5%) patients, who were followed for a mean of 141.5 days (range 25-354 days). The mean primary stent patency period was 191.8 days and the mean patient survival period was 299 days. Applying an open cell stent in the biliary system is feasible, and can be effective, especially in multiple intersecting stent insertions in the hepatic hilum.

  8. Percutaneous Biliary Drainage Using Open Cell Stents for Malignant Biliary Hilar Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sun Jun; Han, Tae Sun; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Ji Dae; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, safety and the effectiveness of the complex assembly of open cell nitinol stents for biliary hilar malignancy. Materials and Methods During the 10 month period between January and October 2007, 26 consecutive patients with malignant biliary hilar obstruction underwent percutaneous insertion of open cell design nitinol stents. Four types of stent placement methods were used according to the patients' ductal anatomy of the hilum. We evaluated the technical feasibility of stent placement, complications, patient survival, and the duration of stent patency. Results Bilobar biliary stent placement was conducted in 26 patients with malignant biliary obstruction-T (n = 9), Y (n = 7), crisscross (n = 6) and multiple intersecting types (n = 4). Primary technical success was obtained in 24 of 26 (93%) patients. The crushing of the 1st stent during insertion of the 2nd stent occurred in two cases. Major complications occurred in 2 of 26 patients (7.7%). One case of active bleeding from hepatic segmental artery and one case of sepsis after procedure occurred. Clinical success was achieved in 21 of 24 (87.5%) patients, who were followed for a mean of 141.5 days (range 25-354 days). The mean primary stent patency period was 191.8 days and the mean patient survival period was 299 days. Conclusion Applying an open cell stent in the biliary system is feasible, and can be effective, especially in multiple intersecting stent insertions in the hepatic hilum. PMID:23118579

  9. Src as a Therapeutic Target in Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ah-Rong; Kim, Ji-Won; Park, Ji Eun; Bang, Ju-Hee; Jin, Mei Hua; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Han, Sae-Won; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-07-01

    Src, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in a number of cancer-related signaling pathways and aberrantly activated in biliary tract cancer (BTC). This study aimed to elucidate the potential role of Src as a therapeutic target in BTC. We tested bosutinib, an orally active c-Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, alone or in combination with cytotoxic agents using 9 human BTC cell lines: SNU-245, SNU-308, SNU-478, SNU-869, SNU-1079, SNU-1196, HuCCT1, TFK-1, and EGI-1. Of these, SNU-308 and SNU-478 were relatively sensitive to bosutinib. Bosutinib abrogated phosphorylation of Src and its downstream molecules, and significantly increased G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Bosutinib significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion and decreased epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers. Bosutinib combined with gemcitabine or cisplatin showed synergistic antiproliferative and antimigratory effects. In addition, this combination further inhibited phosphorylation of Src and its downstream molecules and decreased epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker expression compared with bosutinib alone. We established a SNU-478 xenograft model for in vivo experiments, because SNU-478 was more tumorigenic than SNU-308. Bosutinib combined with gemcitabine or cisplatin showed significantly more potent antitumor effects than bosutinib alone. Bosutinib combined with gemcitabine further decreased Ki-67 expression and Src phosphorylation, and further increased TUNEL expression. Our data suggest that Src might be a potential therapeutic target in BTC. Bosutinib demonstrated promising antitumor activity alone or in combination with gemcitabine or cisplatin in BTC cells, which supports further clinical development in patients with advanced BTC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1515-24. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Inhibition of histone deacetylase for the treatment of biliary tract cancer: A new effective pharmacological approach

    PubMed Central

    Bluethner, Thilo; Niederhagen, Manuel; Caca, Karel; Serr, Frederik; Witzigmann, Helmut; Moebius, Christian; Mossner, Joachim; Wiedmann, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors NVP-LAQ824 and NVP-LBH589 on biliary tract cancer. METHODS: Cell growth inhibition by NVP-LAQ824 and NVP-LBH589 was studied in vitro in 7 human biliary tract cancer cell lines by MTT assay. In addition, the anti-tumoral effect of NVP-LBH589 was studied in a chimeric mouse model. Anti-tumoral drug mechanism was assessed by immunoblotting for acH4 and p21WAF-1/CIP-1, PARP assay, cell cycle analysis, TUNEL assay, and immunhistochemistry for MIB-1. RESULTS: In vitro treatment with both compounds significantly suppressed the growth of all cancer cell lines [mean IC50 (3 d) 0.11 and 0.05 μmol/L, respectively], and was associated with hyperacetylation of nucleosomal histone H4, increased expression of p21WAF-1/CIP-1, induction of apoptosis (PARP cleavage), and cell cycle arrest at G2/M checkpoint. After 28 d, NVP-LBH589 significantly reduced tumor mass by 66% (bile duct cancer) and 87% (gallbladder cancer) in vivo in comparison to placebo, and potentiated the efficacy of gemcitabine. Further analysis of the tumor specimens revealed increased apoptosis by TUNEL assay and reduced cell proliferation (MIB-1). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that NVP-LBH589 and NVP-LAQ824 are active against human biliary tract cancer in vitro. In addition, NVP-LBH589 demonstrated significant in vivo activity and potentiated the efficacy of gemcitabine. Therefore, further clinical evaluation of this new drug for the treatment of biliary tract cancer is recommended. PMID:17729398

  11. T cell targeting and phagocytosis of apoptotic biliary epithelial cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Allina, Jorge; Hu, Bin; Sullivan, Daniel M; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Thung, Swan N; Bronk, Steven F; Huebert, Robert C; van de Water, Judy; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Gershwin, M E; Gores, Gregory J; Odin, Joseph A

    2006-12-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is characterized by loss of tolerance against ubiquitously expressed mitochondrial autoantigens followed by biliary and salivary gland epithelial cell (BEC and SGEC) destruction by autoreactive T cells. It is unclear why BECs and SGECs are targeted. Previous work demonstrated that the reduced form of the major PBC autoantigen predominated in apoptotic BECs and SGECs as opposed to an oxidized form in other apoptotic cells. This led to the hypothesis that presentation of novel self-peptides from phagocytosed apoptotic BECs might contribute to BEC targeting by autoreactive T cells. The effect of autoantigen redox status on self-peptide formation was examined along with the phagocytic ability of BECs. Oxidation of PBC autoantigens first was shown to be due to protein S-glutathionylation of lipoyllysine residues. Absence of protein S-glutathionylation generated novel self-peptides and affected T cell recognition of a lipoyllysine containing peptide. Liver biopsy staining revealed BEC phagocytosis of apoptotic BECs (3.74+/-2.90% of BEC) was present in PBC (7 of 7 cases) but not in normal livers (0 of 3). BECs have the ability to present novel mitochondrial self-peptides derived from phagocytosed apoptotic BECs. Apoptotic cell phagocytosis by non-professional phagocytes may influence the tissue specificity of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Hepatic duct stricture after radical radiation therapy for biliary cancer: recurrence or fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martenson, J.A. Jr.; Gunderson, L.L.; Buskirk, S.J.; Nagorney, D.M.; Martin, J.K.; May, G.R.; Bender, C.E.; Tremaine, W.J.

    1986-07-01

    Two patients with biliary cancer received radical radiation therapy. After treatment, both patients experienced episodes of biliary obstruction without definite evidence of progression of the tumor. These cases emphasize the importance of including radiation-induced biliary fibrosis in the differential diagnosis of hepatic duct stricture after radical radiation therapy.

  13. Cell lineage tracing reveals a biliary origin of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Rachel V; Boulter, Luke; Kendall, Timothy J; Minnis-Lyons, Sarah E; Walker, Robert; Wigmore, Stephen J; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a treatment refractory malignancy with a high mortality and an increasing incidence worldwide. Recent studies have observed that activation of Notch and AKT signalling within mature hepatocytes is able to induce the formation of tumours displaying biliary lineage markers, thereby raising the suggestion that it is hepatocytes, rather than cholangiocytes or hepatic progenitor cells that represent the cell of origin of this tumour. Here we utilise a cholangiocyte-lineage tracing system to target p53 loss to biliary epithelia and observe the appearance of labelled biliary lineage tumours in response to chronic injury. Consequent to this, up-regulation of native functional Notch signalling is observed to occur spontaneously within cholangiocytes and hepatocytes in this model as well as in human ICC. These data prove that in the context of chronic inflammation and p53 loss, frequent occurrences in human disease, biliary epithelia are a target of transformation and an origin of ICC. PMID:24310400

  14. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  15. Classification of biliary tract cancers established by the Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery: 3(rd) English edition.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masaru; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Nagino, Masato; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Kokudo, Norihiro; Sano, Keiji; Endo, Itaru; Unno, Michiaki; Chijiiwa, Kazuo; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Kinoshita, Hisafumi; Oka, Masaaki; Kubota, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Masanori; Uemoto, Shinji; Shimada, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Inui, Kazuo; Tazuma, Susumu; Furuse, Junji; Yanagisawa, Akio; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kijima, Hiroshi; Takada, Tadahiro

    2015-03-01

    The 3(rd) English edition of the Japanese classification of biliary tract cancers was released approximately 10 years after the 5(th) Japanese edition and the 2(nd) English edition. Since the first Japanese edition was published in 1981, the Japanese classification has been in extensive use, particularly among Japanese surgeons and pathologists, because the cancer status and clinical outcomes in surgically resected cases have been the main objects of interest. However, recent advances in the diagnosis, management and research of the disease prompted the revision of the classification that can be used by not only surgeons and pathologists but also by all clinicians and researchers, for the evaluation of current disease status, the determination of current appropriate treatment, and the future development of medical practice for biliary tract cancers. Furthermore, during the past 10 years, globalization has advanced rapidly, and therefore, internationalization of the classification was an important issue to revise the Japanese original staging system, which would facilitate to compare the disease information among institutions worldwide. In order to achieve these objectives, the new Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers principally adopted the 7(th) edition of staging system developed by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). However, because there are some points pending in these systems, several distinctive points were also included for the purpose of collection of information for the future optimization of the staging system. Free mobile application of the new Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers is available via http://www.jshbps.jp/en/classification/cbt15.html. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  16. Biliary system

    MedlinePlus

    The biliary system creates, moves, stores, and releases bile into the duodenum . This helps the body digest food. It also assists ... from the liver to the duodenum. The biliary system includes: The gallbladder Bile ducts and certain cells ...

  17. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-23

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20-22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs.

  18. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  19. Extra-hepatic biliary tract metastases from breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelson, G.; Chu A.M.; Doucette, J.A.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1980-04-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of 49 breast cancer patients who were seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1962 to 1978 and who developed biliary tract metastases. Although these findings were incidental at autopsy in 21 patients, clinical evidence of extra-hepatic biliary involvement developed in 28. This was documented radiographically, surgically, and/or confirmed at autopsy. Although most patients had previous or concurrent nobiliary tract metastases, in 6 patients the initial site of failure was in the extra-hepatic biliary system. Analysis of the 28 patients in the clinical group revealed that initial management with radiation therapy alone produced a response in 3 of 6 patients. However, when radiation was coupled with bypass surgery and/or adjuvant chemotherapy, a response occurred in 3 of 3; the total radiation therapy response rate was 6/9. Chemotherapy given either alone or in combination with surgery produced a response in only one of 7 patients. All 4 irradiated patients who were treated with a time-dose-fractionation (TDF) > 40 had a complete response compared to a complete response in only 2 of 8 with a TDF greater than or equal to 40. The median survival of the irradiated group was 6 months compared to 3.3 months in the treated-unirradiated patients and 0.7 months in the untreated patients. The onset of jaundice in a breast cancer patient does not necessarily indicate progressive hepatic involvement. Patients with extrahepatic metastatic obstruction are being recognized increasingly and should be treated vigorously, especially since such patients with no liver parenchymal involvement have a greater survival (median 6 months) than those with liver involvement (median 1.8 months).

  20. Targeting Angiogenesis in Biliary Tract Cancers: An Open Option

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Valeria; Brunetti, Oronzo; Lupo, Luigi; Testini, Mario; Maiorano, Eugenio; Simone, Michele; Longo, Vito; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Russo, Antonio; Ribatti, Domenico; Silvestris, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are characterized by a bad prognosis and the armamentarium of drugs for their treatment is very poor. Although the inflammatory status of biliary tract represents the first step in the cancerogenesis, the microenvironment also plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BTCs, promoting tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Several molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF), are involved in the angiogenesis process and their expression on tumor samples has been explored as prognostic marker in both cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Recent studies evaluated the genomic landscape of BTCs and evidenced that aberrations in several genes enrolled in the pro-angiogenic signaling, such as FGF receptor-2 (FGFR-2), are characteristic of BTCs. New drugs targeting the signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis have been tested in preclinical studies both in vitro and in vivo with promising results. Moreover, several clinical studies tested monoclonal antibodies against VEGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the VEGF and the MEK/ERK pathways. Herein, we evaluate both the pathogenic mechanisms of BTCs focused on angiogenesis and the preclinical and clinical data available regarding the use of new anti-angiogenic drugs in these malignancies. PMID:28212293

  1. Targeting Angiogenesis in Biliary Tract Cancers: An Open Option.

    PubMed

    Simone, Valeria; Brunetti, Oronzo; Lupo, Luigi; Testini, Mario; Maiorano, Eugenio; Simone, Michele; Longo, Vito; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Russo, Antonio; Ribatti, Domenico; Silvestris, Nicola

    2017-02-15

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are characterized by a bad prognosis and the armamentarium of drugs for their treatment is very poor. Although the inflammatory status of biliary tract represents the first step in the cancerogenesis, the microenvironment also plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BTCs, promoting tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Several molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF), are involved in the angiogenesis process and their expression on tumor samples has been explored as prognostic marker in both cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Recent studies evaluated the genomic landscape of BTCs and evidenced that aberrations in several genes enrolled in the pro-angiogenic signaling, such as FGF receptor-2 (FGFR-2), are characteristic of BTCs. New drugs targeting the signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis have been tested in preclinical studies both in vitro and in vivo with promising results. Moreover, several clinical studies tested monoclonal antibodies against VEGF and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the VEGF and the MEK/ERK pathways. Herein, we evaluate both the pathogenic mechanisms of BTCs focused on angiogenesis and the preclinical and clinical data available regarding the use of new anti-angiogenic drugs in these malignancies.

  2. Biliary metastasis in colorectal cancer confers a poor prognosis: case study of 5 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Frederick Hong-Xiang; Shi, Wang

    2017-01-01

    The biliary duct is an extremely rare site for colon cancer metastasis. It often leads to a diagnostic dilemma, since primary cholangiocarcinoma (potentially treatable with surgery) has a similar presentation. This paper highlights our experience with 5 consecutive patients who had colon malignancy with biliary metastasis, and prognosis of their disease. Five patients, with a history of primary colon cancer since 2010, were identified to have biliary metastasis. Of these, 4 (80.0%) patients were male. The median time to diagnosis of biliary metastasis from diagnosis of colon cancer was 59.2 months (0-70.1 months), and all exhibited symptoms of biliary obstruction or its associated complications. Evaluation of the tumour samples revealed all specimens to be negative for CK7 but positive for CK20, suggestive of a colorectal primary. The median survival of the 5 patients was 23.5 months (1.8-44.5 months) from the diagnosis of biliary metastasis. However, none of their death was related to the direct complication of biliary obstruction. Biliary metastasis is a rare entity for metastatic colon malignancy. Diagnosis may be difficult radiologically, and immunohistochemical staining may help in identification. The overall survival for these patients is dismal. PMID:28317047

  3. The Emerging Role of miRNAs and Their Clinical Implication in Biliary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Martins, Nina Nayara; da Silva Oliveira, Kelly Cristina; Braga Bona, Amanda; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Ishak, Geraldo; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers are aggressive malignancies that include gallbladder cancer and tumors of intra- and extrahepatic ducts and have a poor prognosis. Surgical resection remains the main curative therapy. Nevertheless, numerous patients experience recurrence even after radical surgery. This scenario drives the research to identify biliary tract cancer biomarkers despite the limited progress that has been made. Recently, a large number of studies have demonstrated that deregulated expression of microRNAs is closely associated with cancer development and progression. In this review, we highlight the role and importance of microRNAs in biliary tract cancers with an emphasis on utilizing circulating microRNAs as potential biomarkers. Additionally, we report several single-nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA genes that are associated with the susceptibility of biliary tract tumors. PMID:28115929

  4. The Emerging Role of miRNAs and Their Clinical Implication in Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Martins, Nina Nayara; da Silva Oliveira, Kelly Cristina; Braga Bona, Amanda; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Ishak, Geraldo; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers are aggressive malignancies that include gallbladder cancer and tumors of intra- and extrahepatic ducts and have a poor prognosis. Surgical resection remains the main curative therapy. Nevertheless, numerous patients experience recurrence even after radical surgery. This scenario drives the research to identify biliary tract cancer biomarkers despite the limited progress that has been made. Recently, a large number of studies have demonstrated that deregulated expression of microRNAs is closely associated with cancer development and progression. In this review, we highlight the role and importance of microRNAs in biliary tract cancers with an emphasis on utilizing circulating microRNAs as potential biomarkers. Additionally, we report several single-nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA genes that are associated with the susceptibility of biliary tract tumors.

  5. Targeted therapy in biliary tract cancer: 2009 update.

    PubMed

    Tonini, Giuseppe; Virzì, Vladimir; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Santini, Daniele

    2009-12-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) include cholangiocarcinoma (intrahepatic, perihilar and extrahepatic), carcinoma of the gall bladder and ampullary carcinoma. In patients with advanced disease the prognosis is poor. There is not a consensus regarding treatment strategy. Chemotherapy has only limited efficacy. This review summarizes the new approaches for BTC patients and the rationale for targeted therapies. The prognostic factors and the molecular features of BTC are analyzed. The clinical trials evaluating the targeted agents are accurately described, especially those assessing the role of anti-EGFR and antiangiogenic drugs. The ongoing trials are also analyzed. In fact, only the results of these trials will establish which is the most effective agent or combination for this setting.

  6. MicroRNA markers for the diagnosis of pancreatic and biliary-tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Motohiro; Sudo, Hiroko; Kawauchi, Junpei; Takizawa, Satoko; Kondou, Satoshi; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to detect pancreatic cancer or biliary-tract cancer at an early stage using current diagnostic technology. Utilizing microRNA (miRNA) markers that are stably present in peripheral blood, we aimed to identify pancreatic and biliary-tract cancers in patients. With "3D-Gene", a highly sensitive microarray, we examined comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in 571 serum samples obtained from healthy patients, patients with pancreatic, biliary-tract, or other digestive cancers, and patients with non-malignant abnormalities in the pancreas or biliary tract. The samples were randomly divided into training and test cohorts, and candidate miRNA markers were independently evaluated. We found 81 miRNAs for pancreatic cancer and 66 miRNAs for biliary-tract cancer that showed statistically different expression compared with healthy controls. Among those markers, 55 miRNAs were common in both the pancreatic and biliary-tract cancer samples. The previously reported miR-125a-3p was one of the common markers; however, it was also expressed in other types of digestive-tract cancers, suggesting that it is not specific to cancer types. In order to discriminate the pancreato-biliary cancers from all other clinical conditions including the healthy controls, non-malignant abnormalities, and other types of cancers, we developed a diagnostic index using expression profiles of the 10 most significant miRNAs. A combination of eight miRNAs (miR-6075, miR-4294, miR-6880-5p, miR-6799-5p, miR-125a-3p, miR-4530, miR-6836-3p, and miR-4476) achieved a sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and AUC of 80.3%, 97.6%, 91.6% and 0.953, respectively. In contrast, CA19-9 and CEA gave sensitivities of 65.6% and 40.0%, specificities of 92.9% and 88.6%, and accuracies of 82.1% and 71.8%, respectively, in the same test cohort. This diagnostic index identified 18/21 operable pancreatic cancers and 38/48 operable biliary-tract cancers in the entire cohort. Our results suggest that the assessment of

  7. Occurrence of pancreatic, biliary tract, and gallbladder cancers in Alaska Native people, 1973–2007

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Kelly, Janet J.; Ashokkumar, Ramkumar; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the occurrence of pancreatic, biliary tract, and gallbladder cancers within the Alaska Native (AN) population. Study design Population-based analysis utilizing a tumor registry and comparative population data. Methods Pancreaticobiliary cancers rates for AN people during 1973–2007 were determined from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) AN Tumor Registry. Cancer incidence rates were age-adjusted to the World Standard Million and compared over 2 time periods with US white and black rates. Results During 1973–2007, 213 AN people developed pancreatic cancer, 73 gallbladder cancer and 61 biliary tract cancer. Pancreatic cancer occurs at similar rates in AN men and women, but data for 1993–2007 indicate that the rates among AN men may be increasing. The incidence rate in AN women (9.5/100,000) was statistically higher than in US white women (5.8/100,000). The incidence for biliary tract cancer in AN men and gallbladder cancer in AN men and women is statistically higher than that for US whites and blacks. Conclusions Pancreaticobiliary cancers, particularly biliary tract and gallbladder cancers, in both AN men and women and pancreatic cancer in women occur at an increased rate in AN people. Risk factors relating to the elevated rate are discussed. Certain factors are potentially modifiable, such as the use of tobacco and obesity. PMID:22456038

  8. [Intraductal biliary metastases from colorectal cancer: a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Tirapu de Sagrario, M G; Baleato González, S; García Figueiras, R; Coessens, A

    2014-01-01

    Intrabiliary metastases are rare, and their imaging characteristics make them easy to confuse with primary biliary tumors, especially with cholangiocarcinoma. We present two cases of patients with histories of colorectal cancer who presented with obstructive jaundice secondary to intraductal metastases. We describe the imaging findings and emphasize the key radiologic manifestations for the differential diagnosis between intrabiliary metastases and primary biliary tumors. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of biliary cholangiocarcinoma cell apoptosis by 103Pd cholangial radioactive stent gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    He, Gui-jin; Sun, Dan-dan; Ji, Da-wei; Sui, Dong-ming; Yu, Fa-qiang; Gao, Qin-yi; Dai, Xian-wei; Gao, Hong; Jiang, Tao; Dai, Chao-liu

    2008-06-05

    In recent years, interventional tumor therapy, involving implantation of intra-cholangial metal stents through percutaneous trans-hepatic punctures, has provided a new method for treating cholangiocarcinoma. (103)Pd cholangial radioactive stents can concentrate high radioactive dosages into the malignant tumors and kill tumor cells effectively, in order to prevent re-stenosis of the lumen caused by a relapsed tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of gamma-rays released by the (103)Pd biliary duct radioactive stent in treating cholangiocarcinoma via induction of biliary cholangiocarcinoma cell apoptosis. A group of biliary duct cancer cells was collectively treated with a dose of gamma-rays. Cells were then examined by the 3-(4, 5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl terazolium-bromide (MTT) technique for determining the inhibition rate of the biliary duct cancer cells, as well as with other methods including electron microscopy, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, and flow cytometry were applied for the evaluation of their morphological and biochemical characteristics. The growth curve and the growth inhibition rate of the cells were determined, and the changes in the ultrastructure of the cholangiocarcinoma cells and the DNA electrophoresis bands were examined under a UV-lamp. The gamma-ray released by (103)Pd inhibited cholangiocarcinoma cell growth, as demonstrated when the growth rate of the cells was stunned by a gamma-ray with a dosage larger than 197.321 MBq. Typical features of cholangiocarcinoma cell apoptosis were observed in the 197.321 MBq dosage group, while cell necrosis was observed when irradiated by a dosage above 245.865 MBq. DNA agarose gel electrophoresis results were different between the 197.321 MBq irradiation dosage group, the 245.865 MBq irradiation dosage group, and the control group. (103)Pd radioactive stents which provide a radioactive dosage of 197.321 MBq are effective in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma

  10. Molecular profiling of biliary tract cancer: a target rich disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are relatively uncommon orphan tumors that have an aggressive disease course and a poor clinical outcome. Surgery is the only curative treatment, but most patients present with advanced disease and therefore have a limited survival. Gemcitabine and cisplatin based chemotherapy has been the only widely accepted standard systemic therapy regimen in these patients but these tumors can be chemoresistant, further complicating their management. In recent times, there has been considerable research in the genetics of BTC and with the advent of new, advanced technologies like next-generation sequencing (NGS) we are achieving a greater understanding of its disease biology. With the help of NGS, we have now been able to identify actionable mutations such as in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), FGFR2, BRAF and HER2/neu genes for targeted therapeutics and correlate the genetic variations with distinct clinical prognoses. This recent genetic information has the potential to make precision medicine a part of routine clinical practice for the management of BTC patients. PMID:27747093

  11. Investigation of Spatial Clustering of Biliary Tract Cancer Incidence in Osaka, Japan: Neighborhood Effect of a Printing Factory

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuri; Nakaya, Tomoki; Ioka, Akiko; Nakayama, Tomio; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Uehara, Shinichiro; Kogawa Sato, Kyoko; Endo, Ginji; Hayashi, Tomoshige

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2013, an unusually high incidence of biliary tract cancer among current or former workers of the offset color proof printing department of a printing company in Osaka, Japan, was reported. The purpose of this study was to examine whether distance from the printing factory was associated with incidence of biliary tract cancer and whether incident biliary tract cancer cases clustered around the printing factory in Osaka using population-based cancer registry data. Methods We estimated the age-standardized incidence ratio of biliary tract cancer according to distance from this printing factory. We also searched for clusters of biliary tract cancer incidence using spatial scan statistics. Results We did not observe statistically significantly high or low standardized incidence ratios for residents in each area categorized by distance from the printing factory for the entire sample or for either sex. The scan statistics did not show any statistically significant clustering of biliary tract cancer incidence anywhere in Osaka prefecture in 2004–2007. Conclusions There was no statistically significant clustering of biliary tract cancer incidence around the printing factory or in any other areas in Osaka, Japan, between 2004 and 2007. To date, even if some substances have diffused outside this source factory, they do not appear to have influenced the incidence of biliary tract cancer in neighboring residents. PMID:26902168

  12. Investigation of Spatial Clustering of Biliary Tract Cancer Incidence in Osaka, Japan: Neighborhood Effect of a Printing Factory.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuri; Nakaya, Tomoki; Ioka, Akiko; Nakayama, Tomio; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Uehara, Shinichiro; Kogawa Sato, Kyoko; Endo, Ginji; Hayashi, Tomoshige

    2016-09-05

    In 2013, an unusually high incidence of biliary tract cancer among current or former workers of the offset color proof printing department of a printing company in Osaka, Japan, was reported. The purpose of this study was to examine whether distance from the printing factory was associated with incidence of biliary tract cancer and whether incident biliary tract cancer cases clustered around the printing factory in Osaka using population-based cancer registry data. We estimated the age-standardized incidence ratio of biliary tract cancer according to distance from this printing factory. We also searched for clusters of biliary tract cancer incidence using spatial scan statistics. We did not observe statistically significantly high or low standardized incidence ratios for residents in each area categorized by distance from the printing factory for the entire sample or for either sex. The scan statistics did not show any statistically significant clustering of biliary tract cancer incidence anywhere in Osaka prefecture in 2004-2007. There was no statistically significant clustering of biliary tract cancer incidence around the printing factory or in any other areas in Osaka, Japan, between 2004 and 2007. To date, even if some substances have diffused outside this source factory, they do not appear to have influenced the incidence of biliary tract cancer in neighboring residents.

  13. B cell deficient mice are protected from biliary obstruction in the rotavirus-induced mouse model of biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Tucker, Rebecca M; Fenner, Erika K; Pelanda, Roberta; Mack, Cara L

    2013-01-01

    A leading theory regarding the pathogenesis of biliary atresia (BA) is that bile duct injury is initiated by a virus infection, followed by an autoimmune response targeting bile ducts. In experimental models of autoimmune diseases, B cells have been shown to play an important role. The aim of this study was to determine the role of B cells in the development of biliary obstruction in the Rhesus rotavirus (RRV)-induced mouse model of BA. Wild-type (WT) and B cell-deficient (Ig-α(-/-)) mice received RRV shortly after birth. Ig-α(-/-) RRV-infected mice had significantly increased disease-free survival rate compared to WT RRV-infected BA mice (76.8% vs. 17.5%). In stark contrast to the RRV-infected BA mice, the RRV-infected Ig-α(-/-) mice did not have hyperbilirubinemia or bile duct obstruction. The RRV-infected Ig-α(-/-) mice had significantly less liver inflammation and Th1 cytokine production compared to RRV-infected WT mice. In addition, Ig-α(-/-) mice had significantly increased numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs) at baseline and after RRV infection compared to WT mice. However, depletion of Tregs in Ig-α(-/-) mice did not induce biliary obstruction, indicating that the expanded Tregs in the Ig-α(-/-) mice were not the sole reason for protection from disease. Conclusion : B cell deficient Ig-α(-/-) mice are protected from biliary obstruction in the RRV-induced mouse model of BA, indicating a primary role of B cells in mediating disease pathology. The mechanism of protection may involve lack of B cell antigen presentation, which impairs T-cell activation and Th1 inflammation. Immune modulators that inhibit B cell function may be a new strategy for treatment of BA.

  14. Managing malignant biliary obstruction in pancreas cancer: Choosing the appropriate strategy

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Brian R; Parepally, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with pancreatic cancer develop malignant biliary obstruction. Treatment of obstruction is generally indicated to relieve symptoms and improve morbidity and mortality. First-line therapy consists of endoscopic biliary stent placement. Recent data comparing plastic stents to self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) has shown improved patency with SEMS. The decision of whether to treat obstruction and the means for doing so depends on the clinical scenario. For patients with resectable disease, preoperative biliary decompression is only indicated when surgery will be delayed or complications of jaundice exist. For patients with locally advanced disease, self-expanding metal stents are superior to plastic stents for long-term patency. For patients with advanced disease, the choice of metallic or plastic stent depends on life expectancy. When endoscopic stent placement fails, percutaneous or surgical treatments are appropriate. Endoscopic therapy or surgical approach can be used to treat concomitant duodenal and biliary obstruction. PMID:25071329

  15. Heterogeneity and stochastic growth regulation of biliary epithelial cells dictate dynamic epithelial tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kamimoto, Kenji; Kaneko, Kota; Kok, Cindy Yuet-Yin; Okada, Hajime; Miyajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Tohru

    2016-07-19

    Dynamic remodeling of the intrahepatic biliary epithelial tissue plays key roles in liver regeneration, yet the cellular basis for this process remains unclear. We took an unbiased approach based on in vivo clonal labeling and tracking of biliary epithelial cells in the three-dimensional landscape, in combination with mathematical simulation, to understand their mode of proliferation in a mouse liver injury model where the nascent biliary structure formed in a tissue-intrinsic manner. An apparent heterogeneity among biliary epithelial cells was observed: whereas most of the responders that entered the cell cycle upon injury exhibited a limited and tapering growth potential, a select population continued to proliferate, making a major contribution in sustaining the biliary expansion. Our study has highlighted a unique mode of epithelial tissue dynamics, which depends not on a hierarchical system driven by fixated stem cells, but rather, on a stochastically maintained progenitor population with persistent proliferative activity.

  16. Androgen-deprivation therapy and risk for biliary disease in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Philip J; Smith, Matthew R; O'Malley, A James; Keating, Nancy L

    2014-03-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) by either a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist or bilateral orchiectomy improves disease-related outcomes of men with prostate cancer but has a variety of adverse metabolic effects including obesity, increased abdominal girth, increased triglycerides, and insulin resistance. Each is a risk factor for gallstone disease. Additionally, GnRH agonist treatment was recently shown in metabolomic analyses to increase plasma levels of some bile acids. To assess the relationship between ADT and the incidence of biliary disease in men with prostate cancer. We studied 183 842 men >65 yr of age living in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results regions who were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1992 to 2007 and followed through 2009. We calculated incidence rates for biliary disease during treatment with GnRH agonists, orchiectomy, or no therapy. We used Cox proportional hazard models to assess the association of ADT with biliary disease. Among 183 842 men with locoregional prostate cancer, 48.4% received GnRH agonist treatment and 2.2% underwent bilateral orchiectomy during follow-up. GnRH agonist treatment was associated with a significantly higher incidence of biliary disease compared with no treatment (15.7 vs 13.4 cases per 1000 person-years; p<0.001). In adjusted analyses, GnRH agonist use was associated with the risk of biliary disease (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.15; p<0.001). Orchiectomy was not significantly associated with biliary disease. GnRH agonist treatment may be associated with a greater risk of incident biliary disease. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. BRCA/Fanconi anemia pathway implicates chemoresistance to gemcitabine in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Shogo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Tomokuni, Akira; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Hama, Naoki; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Koichi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    The BRCA/Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway plays a key role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. We focused on this pathway to clarify chemoresistance mechanisms in biliary tract cancer (BTC). We also investigated changes in the CD24(+)/44(+) population that may be involved in chemoresistance, as this population likely includes cancer stem cells. We used three BTC cell lines to establish gemcitabine (GEM)-resistant (GR) cells and evaluated the expression of BRCA/FA pathway components, chemoresistance, and the effect of BRCA/FA pathway inhibition on the CD24(+)/44(+) population. FANCD2 and CD24 expression were evaluated in 108 resected BTC specimens. GR cells highly expressed the BRCA/FA components. The BRCA/FA pathway was upregulated by GEM and cisplatin (CDDP) exposure. Inhibition using siRNA and RAD51 inhibitor sensitized GR cells to GEM or CDDP. The CD24(+)/44(+) population was increased in GR and parent BTC cells treated with GEM or CDDP and highly expressed BRCA/FA genes. FANCD2 was related to CD24 expression in resected BTC specimens. Inhibition of the BRCA/FA pathway under GEM reduced the CD24(+)/44(+) population in MzChA1-GR cells. Thus, high expression of the BRCA/FA pathway is one mechanism of chemoresistance against GEM and/or CDDP and is related to the CD24(+)/44(+) population in BTC.

  18. Somatostatin analogue (octreotide) inhibits bile duct epithelial cell proliferation and fibrosis after extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, T. F.; Tector, A. J.; Goerke, M. E.; Kitchen, S.; Lagunoff, D.

    1993-01-01

    Extrahepatic biliary obstruction leads to bile duct epithelial cell proliferation. Somatostatin and its analogue, octreotide, have been shown to inhibit DNA synthesis and proliferation in hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of octreotide on the biliary epithelial cell proliferative responses to biliary obstruction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent common bile duct ligation and subcutaneous injection of either saline or octreotide (6 micrograms/kg) twice daily for 7 days. Morphometric analysis of hepatocytes, bile duct epithelial cells, and periportal connective tissue was performed by computerized point counting. Hepatocyte volume was preserved with octreotide treatment, which also significantly decreased bile duct proliferation and periportal extracellular matrix deposition in response to biliary obstruction compared with saline treated, duct-ligated animals. These results indicate that octreotide prevents the morphological changes that accompany extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Images Figure 1 PMID:8256850

  19. Clinical efficacy of metallic biliary stents combined with different anti-cancer treatments in the management of bile duct cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Fei; Chen, Chen; Han, Xin-Wei; Zhen, Li; Jiao, De-Chao; Ma, Ji

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate selection of an anti-cancer treatment after biliary stenting for bile duct cancer and the effects of new anti-cancer treatments are unclear. To determine the clinical efficacy of metallic biliary stents combined with different anticancer treatments in the management of bile duct cancer. We compared 49 patients with bile duct cancer who underwent biliary stenting plus anticancer treatment with 60 patients who underwent stenting alone (controls) in our hospital, between December 1998 and December 2012. In the combined-treatment group, 23 patients underwent three-dimensional radiation therapy, 21 underwent chemotherapy, and 5 underwent both three-dimensional radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The survival rate (chi2 = 41.563, P = 0.000) and duration of stent patency (chi2 = 50.268, P = 0.000) were significantly greater in the combined-treatment group than the control group. Adverse reactions were observed .The patients in the combined-treatment group developed nausea, vomiting and leukopenia, which were cured with symptomatic treatment. No biliary stent-related complications occurred in either group. Metallic biliary stent insertion combined with different anti-cancer treatments can increase survival and stent patency rates in bile duct cancer patients. This combination treatment was safe and effective.

  20. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, whether Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in over 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease. PMID:26192438

  1. Effect of NF-κB inhibition on chemoresistance in biliary-pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uwagawa, Tadashi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Biliary cancer and pancreatic cancer are considered to be difficult diseases to cure. Although complete resection provides the only means of curing these cancers, the rate of resectability is not high. Therefore, chemotherapy is often selected in patients with advanced unresectable biliary-pancreatic cancer. Many combination chemotherapy regimens have been applied in clinical trials. However, the survival time is not satisfactory. On the other hand, most chemotherapeutic agents induce anti-apoptotic transcriptional factor nuclear factor kappa b (NF-κB) activation, and agent-induced NF-κB activation is deeply involved in the onset of chemoresistance. Recently, novel approaches to potentiating chemosensitivity in cases of biliary-pancreatic cancer using NF-κB inhibitors with cytotoxic agents have been reported, most of which comprise translational research, although some clinical trials have also been conducted. Nevertheless, to date, there is no breakthrough chemotherapy regimen for these diseases. As some reports show promising data, combination chemotherapy consisting of a NF-κB inhibitor with chemotherapeutic agents seems to improve chemosensitivity and prolong the survival time of biliary-pancreatic cancer patients.

  2. The Biliary Epithelium Gives Rise to Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affò, Silvia; Coll, Mar; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Millán, Cristina; Blaya, Delia; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Rentero, Carles; José Lozano, Juan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Solar, Myriam; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Enrich, Carlos; Ginès, Pere; Bataller, Ramon; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Severe liver diseases are characterized by expansion of liver progenitor cells (LPC), which correlates with disease severity. However, the origin and role of LPC in liver physiology and in hepatic injury remains a contentious topic. We found that ductular reaction cells in human cirrhotic livers express hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1β). However, HNF1β expression was not present in newly generated epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-positive hepatocytes. In order to investigate the role of HNF1β- expressing cells we used a tamoxifen-inducible Hnf1βCreER/R26RYfp/LacZ mouse to lineage-trace Hnf1β+ biliary duct cells and to assess their contribution to LPC expansion and hepatocyte generation. Lineage tracing demonstrated no contribution of HNF1β+ cells to hepatocytes during liver homeostasis in healthy mice or after loss of liver mass. After acute acetaminophen or carbon tetrachloride injury no contribution of HNF1β+ cells to hepatocyte was detected. We next assessed the contribution of Hnf1β+ -derived cells following two liver injury models with LPC expansion, a diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidin (DDC)-diet and a choline-deficient ethionine-supplemented (CDE)-diet. The contribution of Hnf1β+ cells to liver regeneration was dependent on the liver injury model. While no contribution was observed after DDC-diet treatment, mice fed with a CDE-diet showed a small population of hepatocytes derived from Hnf1β+ cells that were expanded to 1.86% of total hepatocytes after injury recovery. Genome-wide expression profile of Hnf1β+ -derived cells from the DDC and CDE models indicated that no contribution of LPC to hepatocytes was associated with LPC expression of genes related to telomere maintenance, inflammation, and chemokine signaling pathways. Conclusion HNF1β+ biliary duct cells are the origin of LPC. HNF1β+ cells do not contribute to hepatocyte turnover in the healthy liver, but after certain liver injury, they can differentiate to

  3. Biliary dysplasia, cell proliferation and nuclear DNA-fragmentation in primary sclerosing cholangitis with and without cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, A; Glaumann, H; Stål, P; Wang, G S; Broomé, U

    2001-01-01

    To study the extent of biliary dysplasia, and the degree of cell proliferation and apoptosis in bile duct cells (BDC) from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), with and without cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Specimens of liver tissue from 16 patients suffering from PSC and CC, and 16 patients with end-stage PSC without cancer, were investigated. Histological evaluation of presence of biliary dysplasia and bile duct proliferation was made. Immunohistochemistry, applying antibodies against Ki-67, p53 and bcl-2, was used. Nuclear DNA fragmentation was assessed by in situ DNA labelling (ApopTag). The numbers of positive cells expressed as a percentage of the total number of BDCs constituted the labelling index (LI). Bile duct dysplasia was significantly more frequent in nontumorous liver tissue from patients with PSC and CC than from patients having end-stage PSC without cancer (P < 0.05). Patients with biliary dysplasia had a higher frequency of marked bile duct proliferation (P < 0.01) than patients without dysplasia. In tumour tissue, the LI for Ki-67 positive nuclei was more than four times the LI of nuclear DNA fragmentation (P < 0.01). Ki-67, bcl-2, p53 or DNA fragmentation were not significantly different in nontumorous liver tissue from patients with and without CC. Immunohistochemical staining for p53 was positive in 75% of the tumours, whilst in nontumorous tissue no such overexpression was found. PSC patients with CC more often display biliary dysplasia than those with end-stage PSC, indicating that biliary dysplasia may be a precancerous stage in PSC. Additionally, p53 mutation seems to be a late event in tumour development, since no p53 expression was found in the premalignant areas with nontumorous BDC.

  4. A label-retaining but unipotent cell population resides in biliary compartment of mammalian liver

    PubMed Central

    Viil, Janeli; Klaas, Mariliis; Valter, Kadri; Belitškin, Denis; Ilmjärv, Sten; Jaks, Viljar

    2017-01-01

    Cells with slow proliferation kinetics that retain the nuclear label over long time periods–the label-retaining cells (LRCs)–represent multipotent stem cells in a number of adult tissues. Since the identity of liver LRCs (LLRCs) had remained elusive we utilized a genetic approach to reveal LLRCs in normal non-injured livers and characterized their regenerative properties in vivo and in culture. We found that LLRCs were located in biliary vessels and participated in the regeneration of biliary but not hepatocyte injury. In culture experiments the sorted LLRCs displayed an enhanced self-renewal capacity but a unipotent biliary differentiation potential. Transcriptome analysis revealed a unique set of tumorigenesis- and nervous system-related genes upregulated in LLRCs when compared to non-LRC cholangiocytes. We conclude that the LLRCs established during the normal morphogenesis of the liver do not represent a multipotent primitive somatic stem cell population but act as unipotent biliary progenitor cells. PMID:28084309

  5. Circulating CYFRA 21-1 is a Specific Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker in Biliary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Michael H; Sandanayake, Neomal S; Andreola, Fausto; Dhar, Dipok K; Webster, George J; Dooley, James S; Pereira, Stephen P

    2011-01-01

    Background Biliary tract cancer (BTC) has a poor prognosis, in part related to difficulties in diagnosis. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) is a constituent of the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells. CK19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1) are rarely identified in the blood of healthy individuals. We assessed the utility of CYFRA 21-1 as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of BTC. Methods Blood was prospectively collected from patients with benign biliary disease (n = 39), primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 19), PSC-related cholangiocarcinoma (n = 6) and sporadic BTC (n = 60). CYFRA 21-1 levels were measured in duplicate by ELISA. Results CYFRA 21-1 (≤1.5 ng/mL) had a sensitivity of 56% and specificity of 88%, compared with figures of 79% and 78% for CA 19-9 (≤37 U/mL). Using a higher cut-off of 3 ng/mL, CYFRA 21-1 had a sensitivity of 30% and specificity of 97%. Combination of CYFRA 21-1 (≤1.5 ng/mL) and CA 19-9 (≤37 U/mL) resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 45% and 96%. In contrast to CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 (≤3.0 ng/mL) alone was a strong predictor of prognosis (median survival 2 months vs 10 months, p = 0.001). Conclusion Elevated circulating CYFRA 21-1 is a specific, but less sensitive diagnostic marker than CA 19-9, predicts a poor outcome and may act as a surrogate marker of circulating tumor cells in BTC. Further prospective studies of its utility in assessing operability and response to chemotherapy are needed. PMID:22228935

  6. Mutant IDH inhibits HNF-4α to block hepatocyte differentiation and promote biliary cancer.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supriya K; Parachoniak, Christine A; Ghanta, Krishna S; Fitamant, Julien; Ross, Kenneth N; Najem, Mortada S; Gurumurthy, Sushma; Akbay, Esra A; Sia, Daniela; Cornella, Helena; Miltiadous, Oriana; Walesky, Chad; Deshpande, Vikram; Zhu, Andrew X; Hezel, Aram F; Yen, Katharine E; Straley, Kimberly S; Travins, Jeremy; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Gliser, Camelia; Ferrone, Cristina R; Apte, Udayan; Llovet, Josep M; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2014-09-04

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are among the most common genetic alterations in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), a deadly liver cancer. Mutant IDH proteins in IHCC and other malignancies acquire an abnormal enzymatic activity allowing them to convert α-ketoglutarate (αKG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which inhibits the activity of multiple αKG-dependent dioxygenases, and results in alterations in cell differentiation, survival, and extracellular matrix maturation. However, the molecular pathways by which IDH mutations lead to tumour formation remain unclear. Here we show that mutant IDH blocks liver progenitor cells from undergoing hepatocyte differentiation through the production of 2HG and suppression of HNF-4α, a master regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. Correspondingly, genetically engineered mouse models expressing mutant IDH in the adult liver show an aberrant response to hepatic injury, characterized by HNF-4α silencing, impaired hepatocyte differentiation, and markedly elevated levels of cell proliferation. Moreover, IDH and Kras mutations, genetic alterations that co-exist in a subset of human IHCCs, cooperate to drive the expansion of liver progenitor cells, development of premalignant biliary lesions, and progression to metastatic IHCC. These studies provide a functional link between IDH mutations, hepatic cell fate, and IHCC pathogenesis, and present a novel genetically engineered mouse model of IDH-driven malignancy.

  7. Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, Tarceva &/or Cisplatin in HCC & Biliary Tree Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-15

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Bile Duct Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  8. Primary biliary cirrhosis: an orchestrated immune response against epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, M E; Ansari, A A; Mackay, I R; Nakanuma, Y; Nishio, A; Rowley, M J; Coppel, R L

    2000-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and is characterized by chronic progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts with portal inflammation and ultimately fibrosis. The serologic hallmark of PBC is the presence of antibodies to mitochondria, especially to the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The mechanisms by which (and if) such antibodies produce liver tissue injury are unknown. However, the presence of these antibodies has allowed detailed immunological definition of the antigenic epitopes, the nature of reactive autoantibodies and the characterization of T-cell responses. Several mechanisms may now be proposed regarding the immune-mediated bile duct damage in PBC, including the possible role of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity and intracellular interaction between the IgA class of antimitochondrial antibodies and mitochondrial autoantigens. There are major questions which remain unanswered, including, of course, etiology, but also the reasons for female predominance, the absence of PBC in children, the relative ineffectiveness of immunosuppressive drugs, and the specific role of mitochondrial antigens. The data so far provide suggestive evidence that PBC is a mucosal disease; this thesis provides a basis for discussion of etiology via the enterohepatic circulation of toxins and/or infection.

  9. The association between biliary tract inflammation and risk of digestive system cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Lin, Che-Chen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Su, Wen-Pang; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lai, Hsueh-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between biliary tract inflammation (BTI) and digestive system cancers is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between BTI and the risks of digestive system cancers. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data, information on a cohort of patients diagnosed with BTI (n = 4398) between 2000 and 2009 was collected. A comparison cohort of sex-, age-, and index year-matched persons without BTI (n = 17,592) was selected from the same database. The disease was defined by the ICD-9-CM. Both cohorts were followed until the end of 2010 and incidences of digestive system cancers were calculated. The results revealed an increase in adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of biliary tract cancer (24.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.20–65.02), primary liver cancer (1.53; 95% CI: 1.07–2.18), and pancreatic cancer (3.10; 95% CI: 1.20–8.03) in patients with both gallbladder and BTI. The aHR of stomach cancer was also found to be increased (2.73; 95% CI: 1.28–5.81) in patients with gallbladder inflammation only. There were no differences in esophageal cancer (aHR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.23–2.87) and colorectal cancer (aHR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.59–1.45). The aHR for digestive system cancers increased by 3.66 times (95% CI: 2.50–5.35) and 12.20 times (95% CI: 8.66–17.17) in BTI visits frequency averaged 2 to 4 visits per year and frequency averaged ≥5 visits per year, respectively. Patients with BTI have significantly higher risk of digestive system cancers, particularly biliary tract, pancreatic, and primary liver cancers, compared with those who are without it. PMID:27495065

  10. Biliary tract obstruction secondary to cancer: management guidelines and selected literature review.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Kane, R A; Harrison, D A; McDermott, W V

    1987-06-01

    Malignant biliary tract obstruction (MBTO) due to either primary biliary tract cancer or metastasis to the porta hepatis is a common clinical problem. The most common metastatic tumors causing MBTO in order of frequency are gastric, colon, breast, and lung cancers. Radiographic diagnostic procedures should proceed in a cost-effective sequence from ultrasonography, computerized tomography (CT), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC), and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with the goal of establishing the site of the biliary tract obstruction. The identification of the site of obstruction could be established by ultrasound 70% to 80%, CT scan 80% to 90%, PTHC 100%, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) 85%. Therapeutic intervention by radiographic decompression (PTHC or endoscopic prosthesis), surgical bypass, or radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy may be selectively used based on (1) the site of obstruction; (2) the type of primary tumor; and (3) the presence of specific symptoms related to the obstruction. ("Prophylactic" biliary tract decompression to prevent ascending cholangitis is not supported by the literature in that the frequency of sepsis in the face of malignant obstruction is small (in contrast to sepsis associated with stone disease). Furthermore, PTHC with drainage as a long-term procedure is associated with a substantial frequency of sepsis and is unnecessary and possibly problematic as a preoperative procedure simply to reduce the bilirubin level. The use of radiation therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy for patients not deemed suitable for a surgical bypass because of the presence of proximal obstruction is an important alternative to PTHC.

  11. TAS-102 in Treating Advanced Biliary Tract Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-07

    Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage III Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7

  12. Early Gastric Cancer Recurrence Following Curative Resection Presenting as Biliary Tract Dilatation, Pancreatic Duct Dilatation and Intestinal Wall Thickening.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yukiko; Tanaka, Eri; Noguchi, Kensaku; Yamamoto, Shinzo; Taniguchi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Hideo; Kumasaka, Toshio; Nakata, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Early gastric cancer, especially cancer confined to the mucosa (stage T1a), is known to have a high cure rate with rare recurrence. We herein report the case of a 40-year-old female who initially presented with biliary tract dilatation, pancreatic duct dilatation and intestinal wall thickening 3 years after curative resection of pT1aN0 stage gastric cancer. The intestinal resection specimen revealed tumor cells spreading through the subserosa to the submucosa sparing mucosal membrane, which made exploratory laparotomy the only approach to confirm the diagnosis. It is always important to be aware of malignancy recurrence and clinicians should not hesitate to choose exploratory laparotomy to avoid any delay in the diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Single-agent gemcitabine in elderly patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Hitoshi; Kawana, Kenichi; Taniguchi, Reo; Jono, Fumitake; Sakai, Eiji; Ohubo, Hidenori; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Murata, Yoriko; Inamori, Masahiho; Hata, Yasuo; Nahajima, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine (GEM) on survival in elderly patients (aged > or = 70 years) with unresectable biliary tract cancer as compared with best supportive care (BSC). We conducted a retrospective study of consecutive patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer administered GEM (800-1,000 mg/m2) on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks as a first-line treatment. Eligibility included age 70 years and over, and bile duct carcinoma or gallbladder cancer. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled: 13 (46.4%) received chemotherapy with GEM and 15 (53.6%) received BSC. No cases of complete or partial response were observed. Stable and progressive disease was observed in 9 (69.2%) and 2 patients (15.4%), respectively. Disease control rate was 69.2%. The median overall survival time of patients treated with GEM and BSC was 9.1 and 2.9 months, and the 1-year survival rates were 15.4% and 6.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in three (23.1%), leukopenia in two (15.4%) and anemia in one patient (7.7%). Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities were constipation (7.7%) and fatigue (7.7%). Chemotherapy with single-agent GEM is a safe and well tolerated regimen for elderly patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer.

  14. The rise of the FGFR inhibitor in advanced biliary cancer: the next cover of time magazine?

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Sumera

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCAs) are heterogeneous tumors arising from the biliary tract with features of cholangiocyte differentiation. CCAs are aggressive tumors with limited treatment options and poor overall survival. Only a subset of CCA patients with early stage disease can avail potentially curative treatment options. For advanced biliary tract tumors, currently there are limited effective treatment modalities. Recent advances have provided greater insight into the genomic landscape of CCAs. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway is involved in key cellular processes essential to survival and differentiation. Accordingly, aberrant FGFR signaling has significant oncogenic potential. Recent discovery of FGFR2 gene fusions in CCA has heightened interest in FGFR inhibition in advanced biliary tract cancer. These findings have served as a catalyst for ongoing clinical investigation of FGFR inhibition in CCA patients with various FGFR signaling abnormalities. Herein, we review FGFR aberrations in CCA and their prognostic implications, FGFR targeting as a viable therapeutic option in advanced biliary tract malignancies, and future directions for development of combination approaches utilizing FGFR inhibition. PMID:27747092

  15. The rise of the FGFR inhibitor in advanced biliary cancer: the next cover of time magazine?

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sumera; Borad, Mitesh J

    2016-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinomas (CCAs) are heterogeneous tumors arising from the biliary tract with features of cholangiocyte differentiation. CCAs are aggressive tumors with limited treatment options and poor overall survival. Only a subset of CCA patients with early stage disease can avail potentially curative treatment options. For advanced biliary tract tumors, currently there are limited effective treatment modalities. Recent advances have provided greater insight into the genomic landscape of CCAs. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway is involved in key cellular processes essential to survival and differentiation. Accordingly, aberrant FGFR signaling has significant oncogenic potential. Recent discovery of FGFR2 gene fusions in CCA has heightened interest in FGFR inhibition in advanced biliary tract cancer. These findings have served as a catalyst for ongoing clinical investigation of FGFR inhibition in CCA patients with various FGFR signaling abnormalities. Herein, we review FGFR aberrations in CCA and their prognostic implications, FGFR targeting as a viable therapeutic option in advanced biliary tract malignancies, and future directions for development of combination approaches utilizing FGFR inhibition.

  16. Targeted medical therapy of biliary tract cancer: Recent advances and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Höpfner, Michael; Schuppan, Detlef; Scherübl, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The limited efficacy of cytotoxic therapy for advanced biliary tract and gallbladder cancers emphasizes the need for novel and more effective medical treatment options. A better understanding of the specific biological features of these neoplasms led to the development of new targeted therapies, which take the abundant expression of several growth factors and cognate tyrosine kinase receptors into account. This review will briefly summarize the status and future perspectives of antiangiogenic and growth factor receptor-based pharmacological approaches for the treatment of biliary tract and gallbladder cancers. In view of multiple novel targeted approaches, the rationale for innovative therapies, such as combinations of growth factor (receptor)-targeting agents with cytotoxic drugs or with other novel anticancer drugs will be highlighted. PMID:19084910

  17. Single-agent gemcitabine in elderly patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Hitoshi; Kawana, Kenichi; Taniguchi, Reo; Jono, Fumitake; Sakai, Eiji; Okubo, Hidenori; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Murata, Yoriko; Inamori, Masahiko; Hata, Yasuo; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effect of systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine (GEM) on survival in elderly patients (aged > or =70 years) with unresectable biliary tract cancer and compares it with best supportive care (BSC). We conducted a retrospective study of consecutive patients aged > or =70 years, with unresectable biliary tract cancer who were administered GEM (800-1000 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks as a first-line treatment. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled: 13 (46.4%) received chemotherapy with GEM and 15 (53.6%) received BSC. No cases of complete or partial response were observed. Stable disease was observed in 9 patients (69.2%) and progressive disease in 2 patients (15.4%). Disease control rate was 69.2%. The median overall survival time of patients treated with GEM and BSC was 9.1 and 2.9 months, and the 1-year survival rates were 15.4% and 6.7% respectively. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in three patients (23.1%), leukopenia in two patients (15.4%) and anemia in one patient (7.7%). Grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities were constipation (7.7%) and fatigue (7.7%). Chemotherapy with single-agent GEM is a safe and well tolerated regimen for elderly patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer.

  18. Geometric shifting of the porta hepatis during posthepatectomy radiotherapy for biliary tract cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Kim, Dae Yong . E-mail: radiopia@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sang Jae; Kim, Seong Hoon; Park, Kyung Woo; Lee, Woo Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, Joong-Won

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate geometric shifting of the porta hepatis induced by liver regeneration during radiotherapy (RT) after partial hepatectomy for biliary tract cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 2004 and August 2005, the study enrolled 10 biliary tract cancer patients who underwent hemihepatectomy or more extensive surgery and were scheduled to receive postoperative RT. All patients received 4500 cGy RT in 25 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Before RT and in the third and fifth weeks during RT, the liver volume was determined using CT, and geometric location of the porta hepatis was determined using a conventional simulator. Results: The liver volume increase during RT was 246.6 {+-} 118.2 cm{sup 3}. The overall actual shifting length of the porta hepatis was 9.8 {+-} 2.5 mm, with right and left hepatectomy causing a 10.1 {+-} 1.7 mm shift to the right or 9.2 {+-} 4.3 mm shift to the left, respectively. The actual shifting length of the porta hepatis was proportional to the increase in liver volume during RT (r 0.742, p = 0.014). Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated that the porta hepatis can be shifted by liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. We recommend an additional RT margin or adaptive RT (repeat planning at several intervals during the treatment course) to avoid exclusion of the porta hepatis from the RT target volume after partial hepatectomy for biliary tract cancer.

  19. Histological complete response in a patient with advanced biliary tract cancer treated by gemcitabine/cisplatin/S-1 combination chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Tokuhiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Yamamoto, Masashi; Hayashi, Shiro; Nakajima, Sachiko; Fukui, Koji; Dono, Keizo; Adachi, Shiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Kanai, Masashi; Inada, Masami

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with increased levels of biliary enzymes. On imaging, the patient was diagnosed with unresectable intrahepatic biliary tract cancer (BTC) with invasion of the portal vein and para-aortic lymph node metastasis (cT3N1M1, cStage IVb) and underwent endoscopic biliary drainage for the biliary stricture prior to therapy. The patient was subsequently enrolled in a phase III randomized trial (UMIN000014371/NCT02182778) and randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine/cisplatin/S-1 (GCS) combination therapy intravenously at doses of 1,000 or 25 mg/m2 on day 1 and orally twice daily at a dose of 80 mg/m2 on days 1–7 every 2 weeks. After 12 cycles of scheduled therapy without uncontrollable adverse effects, the patient achieved a good partial response with chemotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a marked reduction of the primary and metastatic lesions. In addition,18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT revealed diminishing abnormal uptake and no macroscopic evidence of factors adversely affecting tumor resectability. Therefore, the patient underwent extended right hepatic lobectomy, lymph node dissection and left hepaticojejunostomy. Finally, histological examination of the resected tissues revealed no residual cancer cells, suggesting a pathologically complete response. We herein present the case of a patient with intrahepatic BTC who achieved a pathologically complete response following combination chemotherapy with GCS. PMID:28101354

  20. Methylated Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) Gene: Evaluation of Tumor Suppressor Function and Biomarker Potential in Biliary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, John B; Li, Jia; Zou, Hongzhi; Oseini, Abdul M; Strauss, Benjamin B; Gulaid, Kadra H.; Moser, Catherine D; Aderca, Ileana; Ahlquist, David A; Roberts, Lewis R; Shire, Abdirashid M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is an uncommon and highly lethal malignancy, early detection enables the application of potentially curative therapies and improves survival. Consequently, tools to improve the early diagnosis of CC are urgently needed. During a screen for genes epigenetically suppressed by methylation in CC that might serve as methylation markers for CC, we found that the BMP3 gene is methylated in CC cell lines, but the potential diagnostic value and the function of BMP3 in CC are unknown. Methods We aimed to quantitatively assess BMP3 methylation in resected CC tumor specimens using methylation specific PCR and evaluate the tumor suppressor role of BMP3 in biliary cancer cell lines in comparison to an immortalized normal cholangiocyte cell line. Expression of BMP3 was quantified by mRNA levels before and after treatment with 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A. After transfection with a BMP3-containing plasmid, cell viability was measured using the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay and apoptosis quantified by caspase assay. Results In primary CC tumor tissue specimens significantly more methylated BMP3 copies were found when compared to matched benign bile duct epithelium from the same patient, with high specificity. BMP3 expression was absent in cell lines with BMP3 methylation; this suppression of BMP3 expression was reversed by treatment with a DNA demethylating agent and histone de-acetylase inhibitor. Transfection of a BMP3-expressing construct into a BMP3-negative biliary cancer cell line restored BMP3 mRNA expression and reduced cell proliferation and cell viability while increasing the rate of apoptosis. Conclusion These findings strongly support a tumor suppressor role for BMP3 in CC and suggest that BMP3 methylation may be a new biomarker for early detection of CCs. of the peptidome are also involved. PMID:25077038

  1. Heterogeneity and stochastic growth regulation of biliary epithelial cells dictate dynamic epithelial tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kamimoto, Kenji; Kaneko, Kota; Kok, Cindy Yuet-Yin; Okada, Hajime; Miyajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the intrahepatic biliary epithelial tissue plays key roles in liver regeneration, yet the cellular basis for this process remains unclear. We took an unbiased approach based on in vivo clonal labeling and tracking of biliary epithelial cells in the three-dimensional landscape, in combination with mathematical simulation, to understand their mode of proliferation in a mouse liver injury model where the nascent biliary structure formed in a tissue-intrinsic manner. An apparent heterogeneity among biliary epithelial cells was observed: whereas most of the responders that entered the cell cycle upon injury exhibited a limited and tapering growth potential, a select population continued to proliferate, making a major contribution in sustaining the biliary expansion. Our study has highlighted a unique mode of epithelial tissue dynamics, which depends not on a hierarchical system driven by fixated stem cells, but rather, on a stochastically maintained progenitor population with persistent proliferative activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15034.001 PMID:27431614

  2. Notch Signaling Coordinates Progenitor Cell-Mediated Biliary Regeneration Following Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Hu, Tianyuan; Zhang, Hui; Shen, Miao; Cheng, Ping; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chengfeng; Li, Jingjing; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Rong; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Junshan; Xia, Yujing; De Assuncao, Thiago M.; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Huebert, Robert C.; Bin Zhou; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional regulation contributes to the pathogenesis of both congenital and adult forms of liver disease. Although the transcription factor RBPJ is essential for liver morphogenesis and biliary development, its specific function in the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPC) has not been investigated, and little is known about its role in adult liver regeneration. HPCs are bipotent liver stem cells that can self-replicate and differentiate into hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in vitro. HPCs are thought to play an important role in liver regeneration and repair responses. While the coordinated repopulation of both hepatocyte and cholangiocyte compartment is pivotal to the structure and function of the liver after regeneration, the mechanisms coordinating biliary regeneration remain vastly understudied. Here, we utilized complex genetic manipulations to drive liver-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene in conjunction with lineage tracing techniques to delineate the precise functions of RBPJ during biliary development and HPC-associated biliary regeneration after hepatectomy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RBPJ promotes HPC differentiation toward cholangiocytes in vitro and blocks hepatocyte differentiation through mechanisms involving Hippo-Notch crosstalk. Overall, this study demonstrates that the Notch-RBPJ signaling axis critically regulates biliary regeneration by coordinating the fate decision of HPC and clarifies the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:26951801

  3. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Patient Received Combination Chemotherapy Gemcitabine, Cisplatin, and 5-FU for Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aznab, Mozaffar; Khazaei, Mansour

    2016-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been an acute, usually self-limiting disease of the skin and mucous membranes. This case report has presented an evidence of the development Stevens - Johnson syndrome associated with combination chemotherapy administration of 5FU, gemcitabin and cisplatin in a patient with biliary tract cancer. Our case was a 54-year-old woman patient, a case of biliary tract cancer who has developed more severe symptoms of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Diagnosis has confirmed by skin biopsy of an affected area .The patient has improved with supportive care, and during 25 day occurred recovery. Although Stevens-Johnson syndrome has been a rare toxicity, physicians should pay a special attention to the monitoring of biliary tract cancer patients on combination chemotherapy with 5FU, cisplatin and gemcitabin.

  4. A case-control study of gallstones: a major risk factor for biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Kato, I; Kato, K; Akai, S; Tominaga, S

    1990-01-01

    Because of the strong association between gallstones and biliary tract cancer, we conducted a case-control study of gallstones at Niigata Cancer Center Hospital. Eighty-six cases with gallstones (33 males and 53 females) and 116 hospital controls (56 males and 60 females) were surveyed by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Gallstones were categorized into cholesterol stones (25 cases) and pigment stones (30 cases) based on the appearance of the stones. In multivariate analyses based on an unconditional logistic regression model, the risk of total gallstones was positively associated with a taste for salty food (relative risk (RR) = 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-4.84), an intake of lettuce and cabbage (RR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.47-6.06) and a family history of biliary diseases (RR = 5.63, 95% CI: 1.76-17.95), and inversely associated with an intake of salted and dried fish (RR = 0.16, 95% CI: 0.04-0.64). When analyzed by type of stones, cholesterol stones were associated with a taste for oily food (RR = 3.87, 95% CI: 1.36-11.03) and pigment stones were positively associated with professional or administrative occupation (RR = 4.74, 95% CI: 1.35-16.68) and inversely associated with a taste for less greasy food (RR = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.10-0.83). Some of these results are consistent with the results of our previous study on biliary tract cancer.

  5. Worldwide Burden of and Trends in Mortality From Gallbladder and Other Biliary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Siegel, Rebecca L; Islami, Farhad; Bray, Freddie; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2017-08-18

    Gallbladder cancer has a low rate of survival, a unique geographic distribution, and is associated with lifestyle factors that have changed in recent decades. Little is known about the extent to which behavioral patterns have affected global trends in gallbladder cancer. We investigated recent mortality patterns and trends worldwide. We collected data from the World Health Organization's Cancer Mortality Database to examine sex-specific, age-standardized rates of death from gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers (excluding intrahepatic bile duct cancer; International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, code 156, or International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code C23-24). We compiled cross-sectional rates of mortality from 2009 through 2013 from 50 countries, and also trends over time from 1985 through 2014, using joinpoint regression analysis of data from 45 countries. Among women, from 2009 through 2013, there was a 26-fold variation in rates of mortality from gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; rates ranged from 0.8 deaths per 100,000 in South Africa to 21.2 deaths per 100,000 in Chile. Among men, rates varied 16-fold, from 0.6 deaths per 100,000 in the United Kingdom and Ireland to 9.9 deaths per 100,000 in Chile. Rates of mortality were higher for women than men in 22 of 48 countries for which comparison was possible. Mortality rates are decreasing in most countries, with decreases in the highest-risk populations of 2% or more annually (except Croatia). However, rates continued their long-term increase in Greece, by 1.4% annually in women and 4.7% annually in men from 1985 through 2012, and began increasing in the mid-2000s by 1.9% or more annually in women in the United Kingdom and The Netherlands and in men in Germany. In an analysis of the World Health Organization's Cancer Mortality Database, we found that rates of death from gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers are decreasing in most countries but increasing in some

  6. Development of new drug strategies in infrequent digestive tumors: esophageal, biliary tract, and anal cancers.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Jaume; Ramos, Francisco Javier; Macarulla, Teresa; Elez, Elena; Ruiz-Echarri, Manuel; Perez-Garcia, Jose; Tabernero, Josep

    2009-07-01

    In the last years, interesting advances have been reported in the treatment of infrequent digestive tumors. The increasing development of new targeted therapies in human cancer has also impacted in these rare gastrointestinal malignancies providing a wide range of possibilities in the design of future clinical trials. The inhibition of angiogenesis and the blockage of the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have provided the most interesting activity in recently reported studies for esophageal and biliary tract carcinomas. Additionally, several targeted therapies have been developed to target the main kinase proteins of the most important pathways of these malignancies. The results of the biggest phase III trial in locally advanced anal carcinoma have been recently published. Finally, the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor has also showed promising activity in anal carcinomas. Recent advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis have led to meaningful changes in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Although the major advances in targeted therapy have been introduced in the treatment of colorectal cancer, new interesting approaches have been reported in less frequent gastrointestinal tumors such as esophageal, biliary tract, and anal canal carcinoma opening a new hope in the treatment of these rare tumors in the molecular targeted therapy era.

  7. Isolation, culture and characterization of biliary epithelial cells from different anatomical levels of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary tree from a mouse.

    PubMed

    Katayanagi, K; Kono, N; Nakanuma, Y

    1998-04-01

    We developed methods to isolate biliary epithelial cells (BECs) from the gallbladder (GB), common bile duct (CBD), intrahepatic large bile duct (ILBD) and small bile duct (ISBD) of a mouse, simultaneously. ILBD and ISBD were cut from the biliary tree after collagenase perfusion of the liver. BECs from all of these biliary segments were cultured as explants on collagen gel. BECs spread from the explants and formed cellular sheets. Areas of these sheets composed entirely of BECs were cut and placed on other gels as subculture, and this continued for 10 passages. Primary and passage cultured BECs on gel were composed of a monolayer of epithelial cells. Passaged cultured BECs in gel formed a spherical cyst lined by a single epithelial layer. Ultrastructurally, microvilli were dense on the luminal surface, and junctional complex and interdigitation was identifiable on the lateral surfaces. These features were similar in both primary and passaged cultured BECs, irrespective of their anatomical origin. Major histocompatibility complex antigens and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were induced on the basolateral cell membranes of primary and passaged cultured BECs, by interferon-gamma. Although several phenotypic, structural and probable biological features of BECs inherent to each anatomical level may be lost after culture on gel, a combination of this method, several immunological modifications in experimental animals, and addition of immunologically active substances to the culture medium will make the immunopathologic analysis of biliary diseases possible.

  8. Endoscopic inside stent placement is suitable as a bridging treatment for preoperative biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Watanabe, Seitaro; Hosono, Kunihiro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kaneko, Takashi; Sugimori, Kazuya; Tokuhisa, Motohiko; Goto, Ayumu; Mori, Ryutaro; Taniguchi, Koichi; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Endo, Itaru; Maeda, Shin; Ichikawa, Yasushi

    2015-02-05

    Endoscopic biliary stenting (EBS) is one of the most important palliative treatments for biliary tract cancer. However, reflux cholangitis arising from bacterial adherence to the inner wall of the stent must be avoided. We evaluated the use of EBS above the sphincter of Oddi to determine whether reflux cholangitis could be prevented in preoperative cases. Fifty-seven patients with primary biliary tract cancer were retrospectively recruited for the evaluation of stent placement either above (n = 25; inside stent group) or across (n = 32; conventional stent group) the sphincter of Oddi. We compared the stent patency periods prior to the time of surgical resection. The preoperative periods were 96.3 days in the conventional stent group and 96.8 days in the inside stent group (P = 0.979). Obstructive jaundice and/or acute cholangitis occurred in 7 patients (28.0%) in the inside stent group and in 15 patients (46.9%) in the conventional stent group during the preoperative period (P = 0.150). The average patency periods of the stents were 85.2 days (range, 13-387 days) for the inside stent group and 49.1 days (range, 9-136 days) for the conventional stent group (log-rank test: P = 0.009). The mean numbers of re-interventions because of stent occlusion were 0.32 for the inside stent group and 1.03 for the conventional stent group (P = 0.026). Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography complications occurred in 2 patients in the inside stent group and 4 patients in the conventional stent group (P = 0.516). Postoperative liver abscess occurred in 1 patient in the inside stent group and 5 patients in the conventional stent group (P = 0.968). Inside stent placement was the only significant preventative factor associated with stent obstruction based on univariate (hazard ratio [HR], 0.286; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.114-0.719; P = 0.008) and multivariate (HR, 0.292; 95% CI, 0.114-0.750; P = 0.011) analyses. Temporary plastic stent placement above the sphincter of

  9. Octreotide for cancer of the liver and biliary tree.

    PubMed

    Kouroumalis, E A

    2001-01-01

    Inoperable liver tumors have an unfavorable natural course despite various therapeutic modalities. Octreotide, a somatostatin analog, has shown considerable antitumor activity on animal models of various hepatic tumors and on isolated cell culture lines. In this paper, a review of the experimental evidence is presented. Moreover clinical papers of case reports of uncontrolled studies of patients are also reviewed. The majority of clinical studies provide evidence of a clinical and biochemical response of liver endocrine tumors while regression of tumor size is a rare event. A randomized controlled trial of octreotide in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma has shown a significant survival benefit in the treated patients. Literature reports indicate a stimulatory effect of octreotide on Kupffer cells as a possible antitumor mechanism, but other antiproliferative actions of octreotide have been suggested but not proved. Finally the question of the presence and affinity of somatostatin receptors on liver tumor tissue is discussed. In conclusion, according to our experience, octreotide administration is the best available treatment for advanced inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma and future better patient selection, based on receptor subtypes, might further improve the results. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Deregulated MicroRNAs in Biliary Tract Cancer: Functional Targets and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Beyreis, Marlena; Wagner, Andrej; Pichler, Martin; Neureiter, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is still a fatal disease with very poor prognosis. The lack of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and of effective therapeutic targets is a major demanding problem in diagnosis and management of BTC. Due to the clinically silent and asymptomatic characteristics of the tumor, most patients are diagnosed at an already advanced stage allowing only for a palliative therapeutic approach. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs well known to regulate various cellular functions and pathologic events including the formation and progression of cancer. Over the last years, several studies have shed light on the role of microRNAs in BTC, making them potentially attractive therapeutic targets and candidates as biomarkers. In this review, we will focus on the role of oncogenic and tumor suppressor microRNAs and their direct targets in BTC. Furthermore, we summarize and discuss data that evaluate the diagnostic power of deregulated microRNAs as possible future biomarkers for BTC. PMID:27957497

  11. A Review of the Physiological and Immunological Functions of Biliary Epithelial Cells: Targets for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis, Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Drug-induced Ductopenias

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Te; Davis, Paul A.; Luketic, VelImir A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2004-01-01

    Our understanding of biliary epithelial cells (BEC) in physiobiology and immunology has steadily expanded. BEC transports IgA as well as IgM into bile, synthesizes and secretes various chemokines, cytokines, and expresses adhesion molecules involved in cell interaction and signal transduction. These then suggest a myriad of potential roles for BEC in defense from invading microorganisms as well as the pathogenesis of diverse immunologically driven diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), graft-versus-host disease, and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Despite the progress, there still remain many areas of BEC biology that require further investigation. Most importantly, it remains to be clarified that the extent to which the immunologic activities observed in BEC represent a BEC response to tissue injury or whether BEC themselves are the active participants in the pathogenesis of various cholestatic immunological diseases, including PBC and PSC. PMID:15559365

  12. A population based analysis of prognostic factors in advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Daniel; Lim, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding prognostic factors in advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) remains scarce. The aim of this study was to review our institutional experience with cisplatin and gemcitabine in advanced BTC as well as to evaluate potential prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Material and methods Consecutive patients with advanced BTC who initiated palliative chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine from 2009 to 2012 at the BC Cancer Agency were identified using the pharmacy database. Clinicopathologic variables and treatment outcome were retrospectively collected. Potential prognostic factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 106 patients were included in the analysis. Median OS was 8.5 months (95% CI: 6.5-10.5). On univariate analysis, poor ECOG performance status (ECOG PS) at diagnosis, primary tumor location (extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and unknown biliary cancer), and sites of advanced disease (extra-hepatic metastasis) were significantly associated with worse OS (P<0.001, 0.036 and 0.034, respectively). Age, gender, CA19-9, CEA, hemoglobin, neutrophil count, and prior stent were not significantly associated with OS. On multivariate analysis, ECOG PS 2/3 was the only predictor of poor OS (P<0.001), while primary location (P=0.089) and sites of advanced disease (P=0.079) had a non-significant trend towards prognostic significance. Conclusions In this population based analysis, a poorer performance status was significantly prognostic of worse OS. Although not significant in our analysis, primary tumor location and sites of advanced disease may also have prognostic relevance. PMID:25436121

  13. A phase I trial investigating pulsatile erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in advanced biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Goff, Laura W; Cardin, Dana B; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Du, Liping; Koyama, Tatsuki; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Salaria, Safia N; Young, Ruth T; Ciombor, Kristen K; Gilbert, Jill; Smith, Stephen James; Chan, Emily; Berlin, Jordan

    2017-02-01

    Advanced biliary tract cancers (ABTC) are among the deadliest malignancies with limited treatment options after progression on standard-of-care chemotherapy, which includes gemcitabine (GEM) and oxaliplatin (OX). The epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib has been explored in ABTC with modest efficacy. Erlotinib given continuously may antagonize the action of chemotherapy against cycling tumor cells, but pulsatile dosing of erlotinib with chemotherapy may improve efficacy. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of pulsatile erlotinib with GEMOX. This was a single-institution phase Ib study that enrolled adult patients with unresectable or metastatic biliary tract, pancreas, duodenal, or ampullary carcinomas that have not received any prior treatment for their disease. Dose escalation followed a standard 3 + 3 design, and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were any treatment-related, first course non-hematologic grade ≥ 3 toxicity, except nausea/vomiting, or grade 4 hematologic toxicity. A dose expansion cohort in ABTC was treated at the MTD. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled and 4 dose levels were explored. The MTD was erlotinib 150 mg + GEM 800 mg/m(2) + OX 85 mg/m(2). DLTs were diarrhea and anemia. Most frequent toxicities were nausea (78 %), fatigue (71 %), neuropathy (68 %), and diarrhea (61 %), predominantly grade 1-2. In the ABTC patients, the objective response and disease control rates were 29 % and 94 %, respectively, and median overall survival was 18 months. Erlotinib plus GEMOX was well tolerated. Encouraging anti-tumor activity was seen as evidenced by a high disease control rate and longer median OS than standard chemotherapy in the patients with ABTC.

  14. Biliary tract cancers: molecular profiling as a tool for treatment decisions. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Rossana, Berardi; Scartozzi, Mario; Mario, Scartozzi; Freddari, Federica; Federica, Freddari; Squadroni, Michela; Michela, Squadroni; Santinelli, Alfredo; Alfredo, Santinelli; Bearzi, Italo; Italo, Bearzi; Fabris, Guidalberto; Guidalberto, Fabris; Cascinu, Stefano; Stefano, Cascinu

    2006-08-01

    Biliary tract cancer is a quite rare disease; despite recent significant advances in imaging modalities, most of the patients have advanced disease at presentation thus making radical surgery not feasible. Many different chemotherapeutic regimens have been investigated in small uncontrolled studies, with generally disappointing results. We extensively reviewed the literature on this topic trying to give an explanation to chemoresistance in this setting of patients and considering the molecular profiling as a tool for treatment decision. This review is divided in two parts, in the first one we illustrated chemotherapy results and possible mechanisms of resistance. In the second part we analysed the new molecular targets developing an hypothesis about the future therapeutics perspectives.

  15. Efficacy of gemcitabine plus platinum agents for biliary tract cancers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yong-jun; Li, Hong-bo; Hu, Jun-bo; Zou, Sheng-quan

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a meta-analysis of the efficacy of gemcitabine+platinum agent regimens in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). PubMed and Google Scholar were searched using the following combination of search terms: gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, cholangiocarcinoma, biliary, gallbladder, bile duct. Studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis if they were randomized trials on the use of gemcitabine plus a platinum agent for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic cancer) BTC. Outcomes of interest were response rate, overall survival, and progression-free survival. Pooled odds ratios/differences in median survival and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined for each outcome. A total of 47 records were identified in the initial search. Ultimately, three open-label randomized trials (two phase 2 and one phase 3) met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Two studies compared gemcitabine plus cisplatin with gemcitabine alone, whereas the other study compared gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin with fluorouracil-folinic acid. The total number of patients in the studies ranged from 54 to 410. The overall analyses revealed that all survival outcomes assessed were significantly more favorable for patients treated with gemcitabine plus platinum agents than for patients not treated with this combination. Response rates: odds ratio=2.639, 95% CI=1.210-5.757, Z=2.439, P=0.015; pooled difference in median overall survival=3.822 months, 95% CI=1.798-5.845 months, Z=3.702, P<0.001; pooled difference in median progression-free survival=3.268 months, 95% CI=1.996-4.541 months, Z=5.035, P<0.001. Patients with advanced BTC who are treated with gemcitabine plus platinum agents may experience better survival outcomes compared with patients who are not treated with this combination of chemotherapy.

  16. The association between biliary tract inflammation and risk of digestive system cancers: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Lin, Che-Chen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Su, Wen-Pang; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lai, Hsueh-Chou

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between biliary tract inflammation (BTI) and digestive system cancers is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between BTI and the risks of digestive system cancers.Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data, information on a cohort of patients diagnosed with BTI (n = 4398) between 2000 and 2009 was collected. A comparison cohort of sex-, age-, and index year-matched persons without BTI (n = 17,592) was selected from the same database. The disease was defined by the ICD-9-CM. Both cohorts were followed until the end of 2010 and incidences of digestive system cancers were calculated.The results revealed an increase in adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of biliary tract cancer (24.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.20-65.02), primary liver cancer (1.53; 95% CI: 1.07-2.18), and pancreatic cancer (3.10; 95% CI: 1.20-8.03) in patients with both gallbladder and BTI. The aHR of stomach cancer was also found to be increased (2.73; 95% CI: 1.28-5.81) in patients with gallbladder inflammation only. There were no differences in esophageal cancer (aHR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.23-2.87) and colorectal cancer (aHR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.59-1.45). The aHR for digestive system cancers increased by 3.66 times (95% CI: 2.50-5.35) and 12.20 times (95% CI: 8.66-17.17) in BTI visits frequency averaged 2 to 4 visits per year and frequency averaged ≥5 visits per year, respectively.Patients with BTI have significantly higher risk of digestive system cancers, particularly biliary tract, pancreatic, and primary liver cancers, compared with those who are without it.

  17. Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of Biliary Tract and Gallbladder Cancer in a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Susanna C; Giovannucci, Edward L; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-10-01

    Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption raises blood glucose concentration and has been positively associated with weight gain and type 2 diabetes, all of which have been implicated in the development of biliary tract cancer (BTC). This study examined the hypothesis that sweetened beverage consumption is positively associated with risk of BTC in a prospective study. The study population comprised 70 832 Swedish adults (55.9% men, age 45-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and Cohort of Swedish Men who were free of cancer and diabetes and completed a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Incident BTC case patients were ascertained through linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to analyze the data. All statistical tests were two-sided. During a mean follow-up of 13.4 years, 127 extrahepatic BTC case patients (including 71 gallbladder cancers) and 21 intrahepatic BTC case patients were ascertained. After adjustment for other risk factors, women and men in the highest category of combined sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption had a statistically significantly increased risk of extrahepatic BTC and gallbladder cancer. The multivariable hazard ratios for two or more servings per day (200 mL/serving) of sweetened beverages compared with no consumption were 1.79 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 3.13) for extrahepatic BTC and 2.24 (95% CI = 1.02 to 4.89) for gallbladder cancer. The corresponding hazard ratio for intrahepatic BTC was 1.69 (95% CI = 0.41 to 7.03). These findings support the hypothesis that high consumption of sweetened beverages may increase the risk of BTC, particularly gallbladder cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Postnatal paucity of regulatory T cells and control of NK cell activation in experimental biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Alexander G.; Saxena, Vijay; Shivakumar, Pranavkumar; Sabla, Gregg E.; Simmons, Julia; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Although recent studies have identified important roles for T and NK cells in the pathogenesis of biliary atresia (BA), the mechanisms by which susceptibility to bile duct injury is restricted to the neonatal period are unknown. Methods We characterised hepatic regulatory T cells (Tregs) by flow cytometry in two groups of neonatal mice challenged with rhesus rotavirus (RRV) at day 7 (no ductal injury) or day 1 of life (resulting in BA), determined the functional interaction with effector cells in co-culture assays, and examined the effect of adoptive transfer of CD4+ cells on the BA phenotype. Results While day 7 RRV infection increased hepatic Tregs (Foxp3+ CD4+ CD25+) by 10-fold within 3 days, no increase in Tregs occurred at this time point following infection on day 1. In vitro, Tregs effectively suppressed NK cell activation by hepatic dendritic cells and decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNFα and IL-15, following RRV infection. In vivo, adoptive transfer of CD4+ cells prior to RRV inoculation led to increased survival, improved weight gain, decreased population of hepatic NK cells, and persistence of donor Tregs in the liver. Conclusions 1) The liver is devoid of Tregs early after perinatal RRV infection; 2) Tregs suppress DC-dependent activation of naive NK cells in vitro, and Treg-containing CD4+ cells inhibit hepatic NK cell expansion in vivo. Thus, the postnatal absence of Tregs may be a key factor that allows hepatic DCs to act unopposed in NK cell activation during the initiation of neonatal bile duct injury. PMID:20347178

  19. Natural history of metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients with good performance status (PS) who were treated with only best supportive care (BSC).

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun Ho; Song, Haa-Na; Kim, Rock Bum; Oh, Sung Yong; Lim, Ho Yeong; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Se Hoon; Kim, Moon Jin; Lee, Soon Il; Ryou, Sung Hyeok; Hwang, In Gyu; Jang, Joung-Soon; Kim, Hong Jun; Choi, Jun Young; Kang, Jung-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Although chemotherapy is widely recommended for patients with metastatic biliary tract cancer, the natural course of these patients, especially those with good performance status who are indicated for chemotherapy, is not known. We retrospectively reviewed patients with metastatic or locally advanced biliary cancer who were diagnosed at six cancer centers. Patients were eligible if they had good performance (ECOG 0-2) and no history of any treatment for cancer. The primary objective was to evaluate the survival time of patients with advanced biliary cancer with good performance who were untreated. Of the 1677 patients, 204 met the inclusion criteria. The median age and overall survival were 72.0 years and 7.1 months. Overall survival (months) by location was 4.7 for intrahepatic, 9.7 for extrahepatic, 4.4 for gallbladder and 11.2 for ampulla of vater cancer. In subgroup analysis, overall survival of locally advanced biliary cancer was 13.8 months and that of patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen/carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 10.6 months. In multivariate analysis, variables that were associated with poor prognosis were metastatic biliary cancer [hazard ratio 2.19 (P = 0.001)], high baseline carcinoembryonic antigen level (defined as >4.0 ng/ml) [hazard ratio 1.51 (P = 0.024)] and high baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level (defined as >100 U/ml) [hazard ratio 1.93 (P = 0.001)]. Advanced biliary tract cancer with good performance status showed modest survival without any treatment. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that patients with normal carbohydrate antigen 19-9 or carcinoembryonic antigen level or locally advanced status had favorable survival. Further studies comparing the outcome of chemotherapy with that of best supportive care in patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer are warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Phenotypical and functional alterations of CD8 regulatory T cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernuzzi, Francesca; Fenoglio, Daniela; Battaglia, Florinda; Fravega, Marco; Gershwin, M. Eric; Indiveri, Francesco; Ansari, Aftab A.; Podda, Mauro; Invernizzi, Pietro; Filaci, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that lead to loss of tolerance in autoimmune disease have remained both elusive and diverse, including both genetic predisposition and generic dysregulation of critical mononuclear cell subsets. In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), patients exhibit a multilineage response to the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase involving antibody as well as autoreactive CD4 and CD8 responses. Recent data from murine models of PBC have suggested that a critical mechanism of biliary destruction is mediated by liver-infiltrating CD8 cells. Further, the number of autoreactive liver-infiltrating CD4 and CD8 cells is significantly higher in liver than blood in patients with PBC. Based on this data, we have studied the frequencies and phenotypic characterization of both CD4 and CD8 regulatory T cell components in both patients with PBC and age–sex matched controls. Our data is striking and indicate that CD8 Treg populations from PBC patients, but not controls, have significant phenotypic alterations, including increased expression of CD127 and reduced CD39. Furthermore, in vitro induction of CD8 Tregs by incubation with IL10 is significantly reduced in PBC patients. Importantly, the frequencies of circulating CD4+CD25+ and CD8+ and CD28− T cell subpopulations are not significantly different between patients and controls. In conclusion, these data identify the CD8 Treg subset as a regulatory T cell subpopulation altered in patients with PBC. PMID:20638239

  1. Human biliary tree stem/progenitor cells immunomodulation: Role of hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Maraldi, Tullia; Guida, Marianna; Beretti, Francesca; Resca, Elisa; Carpino, Guido; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Gentile, Raffaele; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Murgia, Alba; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; De Pol, Anto

    2017-04-01

    Human biliary tree stem/progenitor cells (hBTSC) are multipotent epithelial stem cells with the potential for allogenic transplant in liver, biliary tree, and pancreatic diseases. Human mesenchymal stem cells, but also epithelial stem cells, are able to modulate immune responses with different types of secretion molecules. The initial aim of the present study was to develop for the first time a culture protocol in order to expand hBTSC in vitro through passages, allowing to maintain a similar stem cell and secretome profile. Furthermore, we investigated the secretome profile of the hBTSC to assess the production of molecules capable of affecting immune feedback. We found that hepatocyte growth factor produced by hBTSC exerts its cytoprotective role inducing apoptosis in human immune cells, such as lymphocytes. The present study, therefore, supports the hypothesis that hBTSC can be useful for the purpose of regenerative medicine, as they can be banked and expanded, and they can secrete immunoregulatory factors. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  2. The potential role of comprehensive genomic profiling to guide targeted therapy for patients with biliary cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwajeong; Ross, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-01

    Remarkable advancements in techniques of genomic profiling and bioinformatics have led to the accumulation of vast amounts of knowledge on the genomic profiles of biliary tract cancer (BTC). Recent largescale molecular profiling studies have not only highlighted genomic differences characterizing tumors of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts and gallbladder, but have also revealed differences in genomic profiles pertaining to associated risk factors. Novel genomic alterations such as FGFR2 fusions and IDH1/2 mutations in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and ERBB2 alterations in gallbladder cancer (GBCA) are emerging as targeted therapy options capable of advancing precision medicine for the care of these patients. Moreover, variable genomic alterations also appear to impact prognosis and overall disease outcome independent from their therapy selection value. High mutational burden and increased expression of immune checkpoint-related proteins observed in a subset of BTC also show a potential for guidance of immunotherapy. Thus, comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is rapidly achieving status as an integral component of precision medicine and is starting to become invaluable in guiding the management of patients with BTC, a rare disease with dismal outcome.

  3. S100 protein positive dendritic cells in primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic inflammatory liver diseases. Relevance to pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. J.; Sever, C.; Kakizoe, S.; Oguma, S.; Starzl, T. E.; Jaffe, R.

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine the location of dendritic cells, in chronic inflammatory liver disease was performed. S100 protein positivity and dendritic cytoplasmic morphology were used to identify dendritic cells. S100 protein positive dendritic cells (S100 + DC) were found inside the basement membrane between biliary epithelial cells of septal bile ducts of livers affected by early stage PBC, but were not present at later stages. S100 + DC also were seen in areas of piecemeal necrosis in chronic active hepatitis of various etiologies. In contrast, intra-epithelial S100 + DC were not found with any consistency in sclerosing cholangitis, secondary biliary cirrhosis, extrahepatic biliary atresia, or chronic liver allograft rejection, all of which are characterized by inflammatory bile duct damage. The possible relevance of DC in the pathogenesis of PBC is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2705505

  4. High single-session success rate of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement with modified large cell Niti-S stents for malignant hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Hirofumi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Tsujino, Takeshi; Matsubara, Saburo; Yashima, Yoko; Ito, Yukiko; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Takahara, Naminatsu; Miyabayashi, Koji; Mizuno, Suguru; Mohri, Dai; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Sasaki, Takashi; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Sasahira, Naoki; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic bilateral self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement in a stent-in-stent method for malignant hilar biliary obstruction is technically challenging. Technical difficulties in the initial placement and reinterventions for stent occlusion are disadvantages inherent to this stent-in-stent method. We previously reported the feasibility of Niti-S large cell D-type biliary stents (LCD). This multicenter prospective consecutive study evaluated the efficacy of bilateral SEMS placement using modified LCD with large and uniform cells, a slimmer delivery system and high radial force. From July 2010 to June 2011, 26 consecutive patients with unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction underwent endoscopic bilateral placement of modified LCD in a stent-in-stent method at three tertiary hospitals. Ten patients had gallbladder cancer, eight had cholangiocarcinoma, four had lymph node metastasis, two had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and two had liver metastasis. Single-session and final technical success rate was 96% and 100%, respectively. Functional success rate was 89%. Stent occlusion occurred in 11 patients (42%) because of sludge (n = 7) or tumor ingrowth (n = 4). Endoscopic bilateral reintervention was technically easy and successful: six patients had stent clearance by balloon sweeping and five had plastic stent placement. According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival and stent patency were 220 days and 157 days, respectively. Modified LCD achieved a high technical success rate both in the initial stent-in-stent placement and in bilateral reinterventions in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  5. Second-line chemotherapy in advanced biliary cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lamarca, A; Hubner, R A; David Ryder, W; Valle, J W

    2014-12-01

    The randomized NCRN phase III ABC-02 trial provided level-A evidence for first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine combination in advanced biliary cancer (ABC). This systematic literature review aims to evaluate the level of evidence for the use of second-line chemotherapy for patients with ABC in terms of overall survival (OS), response, toxicity and quality of life. Eligible studies were identified using Medline, ASCO, ESMO and the World Gastrointestinal Congress databases. Searches were last updated on 15 December 2013. Eligible studies reported survival and/or response data for patients with ABC receiving second-line systemic chemotherapy. This systematic review was registered in the PROSPERO database (No. CRD42013004205). Five hundred and fifty-eight studies were identified from the searches in Medline (n = 342), ASCO (n = 160), ESMO (n = 27) and World Gastrointestinal Congress (n = 29). Twenty-five studies were eligible: 14 phase II clinical trials, 9 retrospective analyses and 2 case reports. In total, data from 761 patients were reported with median number of patients included in each study of 22 (range 9-96). The mean OS was 7.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 6.2-8.2] [phase II: 6.6 (95% CI 5.1-8.1); retrospective analysis: 7.7 (95% CI 6.5-8.9)]. The mean progression-free survival (PFS), response rate (RR) and disease control rate were 3.2 months (95% CI 2.7-3.7), 7.7% (95% CI 4.6-10.9) and 49.5% (95% CI 41.4-57.7), respectively. The best correlations were between OS and PFS for all studies (r = 0.54; P = 0.01) and between OS and PFS (r = 0.61; P = 0.04) and OS and RR (r = 0.62; P = 0.03) for phase II studies, respectively. Biliary tract cancer is known to be a chemo-responsive disease. There is insufficient evidence (level C) to recommend a second-line chemotherapy schedule in ABC, although the available data suggest that a cohort of patients may benefit. Further prospective and randomized studies are needed to clarify the relative

  6. A Multicenter Phase II Study of Gemcitabine, Capecitabine, and Bevacizumab for Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Renuka V; Pokuri, Venkata K; Groman, Adrienne; Ma, Wen W; Malhotra, Usha; Iancu, Dan M; Grande, Catherine; Saab, Tanios B

    2016-11-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor overexpression, seen in 42% to 76% of biliary tract cancers (BTCs), correlates with poor survival. We explored the safety/efficacy and potential biomarkers for bevacizumab in combination with gemcitabine-capecitabine in advanced BTCs. Inoperable stage III/IV BTC patients in our prospective study were given 1000 mg/m of gemcitabine (on days 1, 8), 650 mg/m of capecitabine (on days 1 to 14), and 15 mg/kg of bevacizumab (on day 1) in 21-day cycles. Circulating tumor cells and quality of life were assessed at baseline and before cycle 2 and 3. In total, 50 patients with gallbladder cancer (22%), intrahepatic (58%), and extrahepatic (20%) cholangiocarcinoma, received a median of 8 treatment cycles for median treatment duration of 5.8 months. Common grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (36%), thrombocytopenia (16%), fatigue (20%), infections (14%), and hand-foot syndrome (10%). There were 12 partial response (24%), 24 stable disease (48%) with clinical benefit rate of 72%. Median progression-free survival was 8.1 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3-9.9). Median overall survival was 10.2 months (95% confidence interval, 7.5-13.7). Circulating tumor cells were identified at baseline in 21/46 patients (46%), who had lower median overall survival compared with those without (9.4 vs. 13.7 mo; P=0.29). Patients with quality of life scores greater than the group median by the end of first cycle of treatment had improved survival compared with those who did not (13.3 vs. 9.4 mo; P=0.39). Addition of bevacizumab to gemcitabine/capecitabine did not improve outcome in an unselected group of patients with advanced BTC compared with historical controls. The selective benefit of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in BTC remains to be explored.

  7. Metal or plastic stents for preoperative biliary drainage in resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tol, J A M G; van Hooft, J E; Timmer, R; Kubben, F J G M; van der Harst, E; de Hingh, I H J T; Vleggaar, F P; Molenaar, I Q; Keulemans, Y C A; Boerma, D; Bruno, M J; Schoon, E J; van der Gaag, N A; Besselink, M G H; Fockens, P; van Gulik, T M; Rauws, E A J; Busch, O R C; Gouma, D J

    2016-12-01

    In pancreatic cancer, preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) increases complications compared with surgery without PBD, demonstrated by a recent randomised controlled trial (RCT). This outcome might be related to the plastic endoprosthesis used. Metal stents may reduce the PBD-related complications risk. A prospective multicentre cohort study was performed including patients with obstructive jaundice due to pancreatic cancer, scheduled to undergo PBD before surgery. This cohort was added to the earlier RCT (ISRCTN31939699). The RCT protocol was adhered to, except PBD was performed with a fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS). This FCSEMS cohort was compared with the RCT's plastic stent cohort. PBD-related complications were the primary outcome. Three-group comparison of overall complications including early surgery patients was performed. 53 patients underwent PBD with FCSEMS compared with 102 patients treated with plastic stents. Patients' characteristics did not differ. PBD-related complication rates were 24% in the FCSEMS group vs 46% in the plastic stent group (relative risk of plastic stent use 1.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p=0.011). Stent-related complications (occlusion and exchange) were 6% vs 31%. Surgical complications did not differ, 40% vs 47%. Overall complication rates for the FCSEMS, plastic stent and early surgery groups were 51% vs 74% vs 39%. For PBD in pancreatic cancer, FCSEMS yield a better outcome compared with plastic stents. Although early surgery without PBD remains the treatment of choice, FCSEMS should be preferred over plastic stents whenever PBD is indicated. Dutch Trial Registry (NTR3142). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Plasma cells and the chronic nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Miura, Tomofumi; Nakamura, Junichiro; Yamada, Satoshi; Miura, Tsutomu; Yanagi, Masahiko; Matsuda, Yasunobu; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Emura, Iwao; Tsuneyama, Koichi; He, Xiao-Song; Gershwin, M Eric

    2012-03-01

    There has been increased interest in the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Although the vast majority of patients with this disease have anti-mitochondrial antibodies, there is no correlation of anti-mitochondrial antibody titer and/or presence with disease severity. Furthermore, in murine models of PBC, it has been suggested that depletion of B cells may exacerbate biliary pathology. To address this issue, we focused on a detailed phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cell infiltrates surrounding the intrahepatic bile ducts of patients with PBC, primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis, chronic hepatitis C, and graft-versus-host disease, including CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD38, and immunoglobulin classes, as well as double immunohistochemical staining for CD38 and IgM. Interestingly, CD20 B lymphocytes, which are a precursor of plasma cells, were found in scattered locations or occasionally forming follicle-like aggregations but were not noted at the proximal location of chronic nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis. In contrast, there was a unique and distinct coronal arrangement of CD38 cells around the intrahepatic ducts in PBC but not controls; the majority of such cells were considered plasma cells based on their expression of intracellular immunoglobulins, including IgM and IgG, but not IgA. Patients with PBC who manifest this unique coronal arrangement were those with significantly higher titers of anti-mitochondrial antibodies. These data collectively suggest a role for plasma cells in the specific destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts in PBC and confirm the increasing interest in plasma cells and autoimmunity. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. In recurrent primary biliary cirrhosis after liver transplantation, biliary epithelial cells show increased expression of mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Motoko; Hsu, Maylee; Yeh, Matthew M; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2015-10-01

    In biliary epithelial lesions in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), mitochondrial proteins associated with deregulated autophagy are abnormally expressed. We examined whether this could be used as a diagnostic marker for end-stage PBC and recurrent PBC after liver transplantation. We examined the expression of the mitochondrial protein pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 component and cytochrome c oxidase, subunit I (CCO), the autophagy-related marker microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3), and p62/sequestosome-1 and the senescence markers p16(Ink4a) and p21(WAF1/Cip1) in small bile ducts and bile ductules in explanted livers from patients with PBC (n = 20) in comparison with liver tissue from control patients (n = 21) and post-transplant samples including recurrent PBC and cellular rejection (n = 28). Intense granular expression of mitochondrial proteins was significantly more frequent in small bile ducts in explanted livers with PBC than in control livers (p < 0.05). Post-transplant samples comprised of three groups: group A (positive for mitochondrial proteins, n = 7), group B (positive for either autophagy-related or senescence markers but negative for mitochondrial proteins, n = 7), and group C (all negative, n = 14). All but one case of group A were clinically and histologically diagnosed as recurrent PBC. In contrast, all cases of group B were diagnosed as cellular rejection. This study suggests that the expression of mitochondrial proteins in small bile ducts may be a useful diagnostic marker for end-stage PBC and recurrent PBC after liver transplantation.

  10. KRAS Mutation as a Potential Prognostic Biomarker of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Masaaki; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Matsushima, Satsuki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Furuse, Junji; Watanabe, Takashi; Mori, Toshiyuki; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to identify the unique molecular characteristics of biliary tract cancer (BTC) for the development of novel molecular-targeted therapies. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed mutational analysis of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and FBXW7 and immunohistochemical analysis of EGFR and TP53 in 63 Japanese patients with BTC and retrospectively evaluated the association between the molecular characteristics and clinicopathological features of BTC. RESULTS KRAS mutations were identified in 9 (14%) of the 63 BTC patients; no mutations were detected within the analyzed regions of BRAF, PIK3CA, and FBXW7. EGFR overexpression was observed in 5 (8%) of the 63 tumors, while TP53 overexpression was observed in 48% (30/63) of the patients. Overall survival of patients with KRAS mutation was significantly shorter than that of patients with the wild-type KRAS gene (P = 0.005). By multivariate analysis incorporating molecular and clinicopathological features, KRAS mutations and lymph node metastasis were identified to be independently associated with shorter overall survival (KRAS, P = 0.004; lymph node metastasis, P = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that KRAS mutation is a poor prognosis predictive biomarker for the survival in BTC patients. PMID:28008299

  11. γδ T cells and Foxp3(+) Treg cells infiltration in children with biliary atresia and its significance.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Zhang, Xi; Tang, Shao-Tao; Yang, Li; Cao, Guo-Qing; Li, Shuai; Yang, De-Hua

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the changes in the proportion of γδ T cells and Foxp3(+) Treg cells in children with BA (biliary atresia). The distribution of γδ T cells in the liver tissues and the proportion of γδ T cells and Foxp3(+) Treg cells were observed and detected in BA Group (32 cases) and control group (CG) (12 cases) by using immunohistochemical methods and flow cytometry. The periportal bile duct of liver in BA Group was surrounded by a large number of γδ T cells and a certain degree of Foxp3(+) Treg cells infiltration. Additionally, the proportion of γδ T cells and Foxp3(+) Treg cells was significantly higher than that in CG (P<0.05). And significantly negative correlation was revealed in the proportion of γδ T cells and Foxp3(+) Treg cells (P<0.05). The increase of γδ T cells or inhibition of Foxp3(+) Treg cell proliferation in liver tissues of patients with biliary atresia exacerbated the progressive inflammatory injury of bile ducts.

  12. Diagnosis of pancreaticobiliary malignancy by detection of minichromosome maintenance protein 5 in biliary brush cytology

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Margaret G; Huggett, Matthew T; Chapman, Michael H; Johnson, Gavin J; Webster, George J; Thorburn, Douglas; Mackay, James; Pereira, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    Background: Biliary brush cytology is the standard method of evaluating biliary strictures, but is insensitive at detecting malignancy. In pancreaticobiliary cancer minichromosome maintenance replication proteins (MCM 2–7) are dysregulated in the biliary epithelium and MCM5 levels are elevated in bile samples. This study aimed to validate an immunocolorimetric ELISA assay for MCM5 as a pancreaticobiliary cancer biomarker in biliary brush samples. Methods: Biliary brush specimens were collected prospectively at ERCP from patients with a biliary stricture. Collected samples were frozen at −80 °C. The supernatant was washed and lysed cells incubated with HRP-labelled anti-MCM5 mouse monoclonal antibody. Test positivity was determined by optical density absorbance. Patients underwent biliary brush cytology or additional investigations as per clinical routine. Results: Ninety-seven patients were included in the study; 50 had malignant strictures. Median age was 65 years (range 21–94) and 51 were male. Compared with final diagnosis the MCM5 assay had a sensitivity for malignancy of 65.4% compared with 25.0% for cytology. In the 72 patients with paired MCM5 assay and biliary brush cytology, MCM5 demonstrated an improved sensitivity (55.6% vs 25.0% P=0.0002) for the detection of malignancy. Conclusions: Minichromosome maintenance replication protein5 is a more sensitive indicator of pancreaticobiliary malignancy than standard biliary brush cytology. PMID:28081547

  13. [Biliary ascariasis].

    PubMed

    Mensing, M; Cruz y Rivero, M A; Alarcon Hernandez, C; Garcia Himmelstine, L; Vogel, H

    1986-06-01

    Biliary ascariasis is a complication of intestinal ascariasis. This results in characteristic findings in the intravenous cholangiocholecystogram and in the sonogram. Characteristic signs of biliary ascariasis are, in the longitudinal section, the "strip sign", "spaghetti sign", "inner tube sign", and in transverse section "a bull's eye in the triple O". The helminth can travel from out of the biliary duct system back into the intestines, so that control examinations can even be negative.

  14. Inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers and risk of liver and biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Nöthlings, Ute; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Boffetta, Paolo; Trepo, Elisabeth; Westhpal, Sabine; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Stepien, Magdalena; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Dossus, Laure; Racine, Antoine; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Benetou, Vassiliki; Agnoli, Claudia; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Gram, Inger Torhild; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Sánchez, María-José; Gavrila, Diana; Barricarte, Aurelio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Ohlsson, Bodil; Lindkvist, Björn; Johansson, Anders; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Travis, Ruth C; Riboli, Elio; Pischon, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and associated metabolic disorders have been implicated in liver carcinogenesis; however, there are little data on the role of obesity-related biomarkers on liver cancer risk. We studied prospectively the association of inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers with risks of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic bile duct (IBD), and gallbladder and biliary tract cancers outside of the liver (GBTC) in a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Over an average of 7.7 years, 296 participants developed HCC (n = 125), GBTC (n = 137), or IBD (n = 34). Using risk-set sampling, controls were selected in a 2:1 ratio and matched for recruitment center, age, sex, fasting status, and time of blood collection. Baseline serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-peptide, total high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin, leptin, fetuin-a, and glutamatdehydrogenase (GLDH) were measured, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. After adjustment for lifestyle factors, diabetes, hepatitis infection, and adiposity measures, higher concentrations of CRP, IL-6, C-peptide, and non-HMW adiponectin were associated with higher risk of HCC (IRR per doubling of concentrations = 1.22; 95% CI = 1.02-1.46; P = 0.03; 1.90; 95% CI = 1.30-2.77; P = 0.001; 2.25; 95% CI = 1.43-3.54; P = 0.0005; and 2.09; 95% CI = 1.19-3.67; P = 0.01, respectively). CRP was associated also with risk of GBTC (IRR = 1.22; 95% CI = 1.05-1.42; P = 0.01). GLDH was associated with risks of HCC (IRR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.25-2.11; P = 0.0003) and IBD (IRR = 10.5; 95% CI = 2.20-50.90; P = 0.003). The continuous net reclassification index was 0.63 for CRP, IL-6, C-peptide, and non-HMW adiponectin and 0.46 for GLDH, indicating good predictive ability of these biomarkers. Conclusion: Elevated levels of

  15. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine with low dose cyclophosphamide in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Shirahama, Takahisa; Muroya, Daisuke; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Naito, Masayasu; Yamashita, Takuto; Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Okuda, Koji; Itoh, Kyogo; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yutani, Shigeru

    2017-02-11

    Since the prognosis of advanced biliary tract cancer (aBTC) still remains very poor, new therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapies, need to be developed. In the current study, we conducted an open-label randomized phase II study to test whether low dose cyclophosphamide (CPA) could improve antigen-specific immune responses and clinical efficacy of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) in 49 previously treated aBTC patients. Patients with aBTC refractory to at least one regimen of chemotherapies were randomly assigned to receive PPV with low dose CPA (100 mg/ day for 7 days before vaccination) (PPV/CPA, n=24) or PPV alone (n=25). A maximum of four HLA-matched peptides were selected based on the pre-existing peptide-specific IgG responses, followed by subcutaneous administration. T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides in the PPV/CPA arm tended to be greater than those in the PPV alone arm. The PPV/CPA arm showed significantly better progression-free survival (median time: 6.1 vs 2.9 months; hazard ratio (HR): 0.427; P = 0.008) and overall survival (median time: 12.1 vs 5.9 months; HR: 0.376; P = 0.004), compared to the PPV alone arm. The PPV alone arm, but not the PPV/CPA arm, showed significant increase in plasma IL-6 after vaccinations, which might be associated with inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses. These results suggested that combined treatment with low dose CPA could provide clinical benefits in aBTC patients under PPV, possibly through prevention of IL-6-mediated immune suppression. Further clinical studies would be recommended to clarify the clinical efficacy of PPV/CPA in aBTC patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Limited Role for Biliary Stent as Surrogate Fiducial Marker in Pancreatic Cancer: Stent and Intratumoral Fiducials Compared

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Lens, Eelco; Wognum, Silvia; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Because of low soft-tissue contrast of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fiducial markers are often used for radiation therapy patient setup verification. For pancreatic cancer patients, biliary stents have been suggested as surrogate fiducials. Using intratumoral fiducials as standard for tumor position, this study aims to quantify the suitability of biliary stents for measuring interfractional and respiratory-induced position variations of pancreatic tumors. Methods and Materials: Eleven pancreatic cancer patients with intratumoral fiducials and a biliary stent were included in this study. Daily CBCT scans (243 in total) were registered with a reference CT scan, based on bony anatomy, on fiducial markers, and on the biliary stent, respectively. We analyzed the differences in tumor position (ie, markers center-of-mass position) among these 3 registrations. In addition, we measured for 9 patients the magnitude of respiratory-induced motion (MM) of the markers and of the stent on 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and determined the difference between these 2 magnitudes (ΔMM). Results: The stent indicated tumor position better than bony anatomy in 67% of fractions; the absolute difference between the markers and stent registration was >5 mm in 46% of fractions and >10 mm in 20% of fractions. Large PTV margins (superior-inferior direction, >19 mm) would be needed to account for this interfractional position variability. On 4DCT, we found in superior-inferior direction a mean ΔMM of 0.5 mm (range, –2.6 to 4.2 mm). Conclusions: For respiratory-induced motion, the mean ΔMM is small, but for individual patients the absolute difference can be >4 mm. For interfractional position variations, a stent is, on average, a better surrogate fiducial than bony anatomy, but large PTV margins would still be required. Therefore, intratumoral fiducials are recommended for online setup verification for all pancreatic patients scheduled for radiation therapy, including

  17. Fn14 hepatic progenitor cells are associated with liver fibrosis in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lulu; Lv, Zhibao; Gong, Zhenhua; Sheng, Qingfeng; Gao, Zhimei; Zhang, Yuting; Yu, Shenghua; Zhou, Junmei; Xi, Zhengjun; Wang, Xueli

    2017-05-01

    The liver in biliary atresia (BA) is characterized by progressing fibrosis which is promoted by unclear reasons. We aimed to understand the factors influencing liver fibrosis. This study hypothesized that HPCs (hepatic progenitor cells) are activated and associated with liver fibrosis in biliary atresia. Liver samples from biliary atresia patients are as BA group, and the normal liver derived from hepatoblastoma infants during operation are control group. The extent of fibrosis in liver samples was blindly evaluated by two experienced pathologists depending on Ishak system. The BA liver samples were divided into mild liver fibrosis group (grade I-IV, BAa) and severe liver fibrosis group (grade V-VI, BAb) to detect Fn14 protein expression. In mRNA level, Fn14 expression was 21.23 ± 8.3 vs. 1.00 ± 0.17, p = 0.023 < 0.05 and CD133 expression was 6.02 ± 2.16 vs. 1.14 ± 0.75, p = 0.008 < 0.01 between BA group and control group. Fn14 cells co-expressed the progenitor marker CD133 in liver, and activated in BA. Fn14 andα-SMA were co-location in fibrous area in liver. Compared to the control group, Fn14, CD133, and α-SMA protein expression were 2.10 ± 0.53 vs. 0.97 ± 0.2, p = 0.001, 2.23 ± 0.57 vs. 1.00 ± 0.03, p = 0.000, 4.96 ± 2.4 vs. 1.00 ± 0.22, p = 0.001. The Fn14 protein expression was 2.60 ± 0.35 vs. 1.86 ± 0.42, p = 0.012, between BAb and BAa group. Fn14 cells, which co-express the progenitor marker CD133 in liver, are HPCs and activated in BA. Fn14 + HPCs are associated with liver fibrosis in BA.

  18. Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin for Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Oh; Oh, Do-Youn; Hsu, Chiun; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Li-Tzong; Orlando, Mauro; Kim, Jong Seok; Lim, Ho Yeong

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that combined gemcitabine-cisplatin chemotherapy extends survival in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). We conducted a systematic review in order to collate this evidence and assess whether gemcitabine-cisplatin efficacy is influenced by primary tumor site, disease stage, or geographic region, and whether associated toxicities are related to regimen. MEDLINE (1946-search date), EMBASE (1966-search date), ClinicalTrials. gov (2008-search date), and abstracts from major oncology conferences (2009- search date) were searched (5 Dec 2013) using terms for BTC, gemcitabine, and cisplatin. All study types reporting efficacy (survival, response rates) or safety (toxicities) outcomes of gemcitabine-cisplatin in BTC were eligible for inclusion; efficacy data were extracted from prospective studies only. Evidence retrieved from one meta-analysis (abstract), four randomized controlled trials, 12 nonrandomized prospective studies, and three retrospective studies supported the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine-cisplatin for BTC. Median overall survival ranged from 4.6 to 11.7 months, and response rate ranged from 17.1% to 36.6%. Toxicities were generally acceptable and manageable. Heterogeneity in study designs and data collected prevented formal meta-analysis, however exploratory assessments suggested that efficacy did not vary with primary tumor site (gallbladder vs. others), disease stage (metastatic vs. locally advanced), or geographic origin (Asia vs. other). Incidence of grade 3/4 toxicities was not related to gemcitabine dose or cisplatin frequency. Despite individual variation in study designs, the evidence presented suggests that gemcitabine-cisplatin is effective in patients from a diverse range of countries and with heterogeneous disease characteristics. No substantial differences in toxicity were observed among the different dosing schedules of gemcitabine and cisplatin.

  19. Multivariate prognostic factors analysis for second-line chemotherapy in advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, L; Cereda, S; Aprile, G; Di Girolamo, S; Santini, D; Silvestris, N; Lonardi, S; Leone, F; Milella, M; Vivaldi, C; Belli, C; Bergamo, F; Lutrino, S E; Filippi, R; Russano, M; Vaccaro, V; Brunetti, A E; Rotella, V; Falcone, A; Barbera, M A; Corbelli, J; Fasola, G; Aglietta, M; Zagonel, V; Reni, M; Vasile, E; Brandi, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of second-line chemotherapy (CT) is not established in advanced biliary tract cancer (aBTC). We investigated the outcome of aBTC patients treated with second-line CT and devised a prognostic model. Methods: Baseline clinical and laboratory data of 300 consecutive aBTC patients were collected and association with overall survival (OS) was investigated by multivariable Cox models. Results: The following parameters resulted independently associated with longer OS: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 (P<0.001; hazard ratio (HR), 0.348; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.215–0.562), CA19.9 lower than median (P=0.013; HR, 0.574; 95% CI 0.370–0.891), progression-free survival after first-line CT ⩾6 months (P=0.027; HR, 0.633; 95% CI 0.422–0.949) and previous surgery on primary tumour (P=0.027; HR, 0.609; 95% CI 0.392–0.945). We grouped the 249 patients with complete data available into three categories according to the number of fulfilled risk factors: median OS times for good-risk (zero to one factors), intermediate-risk (two factors) and poor-risk (three to four factors) groups were 13.1, 6.6 and 3.7 months, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusions: Easily available clinical and laboratory factors predict prognosis of aBTC patients undergoing second-line CT. This model allows individual patient-risk stratification and may help in treatment decision and trial design. PMID:24714745

  20. MicroRNA profiling of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell lines reveals biliary epithelial cell-specific microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Mishima, Takuya; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Arima, Yasuo; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Kanda, Tomohiro; Ishibashi, Osamu; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Tajiri, Takashi; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2009-08-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), which arises in the small bile ducts of the liver, is the second most common liver malignancy. Although modulation of microRNA (miRNA) expression has been shown to be a potent sign of malignant tumors, miRNA profiles of ICC remains unclear. We performed sequencing analysis of the small RNA libraries of 2 ICC cell lines (HuCCT1 and MEC) and one normal intrahepatic biliary epithelial cell line (HIBEpiC) to produce the miRNA profiles of ICC in vitro. Furthermore, by means of the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we validated the differential expression of miRNAs cloned exclusively or predominantly from each of the cell lines. A total of 35,759 small RNA clones were obtained from the 3 cell lines. We identified 27 miRNAs that were expressed exclusively or predominantly in each cell line. Subsequent validation with the real-time PCR confirmed that the miRNAs hsa-miR-22, -125a, -127, -199a, -199a*, -214, -376a, and -424 were expressed specifically in HIBEpiC but were downregulated in the ICC cell lines. Our study provides important information for facilitating studies of the functional role(s) of miRNAs in carcinogenesis of the hepatobiliary system. The biliary epithelial cell-specific miRNAs identified in this study may serve as potential biomarkers for ICC.

  1. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  2. Inhibition of mast cell-derived histamine secretion by cromolyn sodium treatment decreases biliary hyperplasia in cholestatic rodents.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Lindsey L; Hargrove, Laura A; Graf, Allyson B; Francis, Taylor C; Hodges, Kyle M; Nguyen, Quy P; Ueno, Yoshi; Greene, John F; Meng, Fanyin; Huynh, Victoria D; Francis, Heather L

    2014-12-01

    Cholangiopathies are characterized by dysregulation of the balance between biliary growth and loss. We have shown that histamine (HA) stimulates biliary growth via autocrine mechanisms. To evaluate the paracrine effects of mast cell (MC) stabilization on biliary proliferation, sham or BDL rats were treated by IP-implanted osmotic pumps filled with saline or cromolyn sodium (24 mg/kg BW/day (inhibits MC histamine release)) for 1 week. Serum, liver blocks and cholangiocytes were collected. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression was measured using real-time PCR in cholangiocytes. Intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) was evaluated by IHC for CK-19. MC number was determined using toluidine blue staining and correlated to IBDM. Proliferation was evaluated by PCNA expression in liver sections and purified cholangiocytes. We assessed apoptosis using real-time PCR and IHC for BAX. Expression of MC stem factor receptor, c-kit, and the proteases chymase and tryptase were measured by real-time PCR. HA levels were measured in serum by EIA. In vitro, MCs and cholangiocytes were treated with 0.1% BSA (basal) or cromolyn (25 μM) for up to 48 h prior to assessing HDC expression, HA levels and chymase and tryptase expression. Supernatants from MCs treated with or without cromolyn were added to cholangiocytes before measuring (i) proliferation by MTT assays, (ii) HDC gene expression by real-time PCR and (iii) HA release by EIA. In vivo, cromolyn treatment decreased BDL-induced: (i) IBDM, MC number, and biliary proliferation; (ii) HDC and MC marker expression; and (iii) HA levels. Cromolyn treatment increased cholangiocyte apoptosis. In vitro, cromolyn decreased HA release and chymase and tryptase expression in MCs but not in cholangiocytes. Cromolyn-treated MC supernatants decreased biliary proliferation and HA release. These studies provide evidence that MC histamine is key to biliary proliferation and may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cholangiopathies.

  3. Association between green tea/coffee consumption and biliary tract cancer: A population-based cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Makiuchi, Takeshi; Sobue, Tomotaka; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Ishihara, Junko; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Green tea and coffee consumption may decrease the risk of some types of cancers. However, their effects on biliary tract cancer (BTC) have been poorly understood. In this population-based prospective cohort study in Japan, we investigated the association of green tea (total green tea, Sencha, and Bancha/Genmaicha) and coffee consumption with the risk for BTC and its subtypes, gallbladder cancer, and extrahepatic bile duct cancer. The hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 89 555 people aged 45-74 years were enrolled between 1995 and 1999 and followed up for 1 138 623 person-years until 2010, during which 284 cases of BTC were identified. Consumption of >720 mL/day green tea was significantly associated with decreased risk compared with consumption of ≤120 mL/day (hazard ratio = 0.67 [95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.97]), and a non-significant trend of decreased risk associated with increased consumption was observed (P-trend = 0.095). In the analysis according to the location of the primary tumor, consuming >120 mL green tea tended to be associated with decreased risk of gallbladder cancer and extrahepatic bile duct cancer. When Sencha and Bancha/Genmaicha were analyzed separately, we observed a non-significant trend of decreased risk of BTC associated with Sencha but no association with Bancha/Genmaicha. For coffee, there was no clear association with biliary tract, gallbladder, or extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Our findings suggest that high green tea consumption may lower the risk of BTC, and the effect may be attributable to Sencha consumption.

  4. Cell adhesion molecules P-cadherin and CD24 are markers for carcinoma and dysplasia in the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Riener, Marc-Oliver; Vogetseder, Alexander; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kristiansen, Glen; Jochum, Wolfram

    2010-11-01

    P-cadherin (CDH3) and CD24 are cell adhesion molecules that control morphogenic processes, cell motility, and invasive growth of tumor cells. The aim of our study was to investigate P-cadherin and CD24 expression in carcinomas and dysplastic lesions of the biliary tract and to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of these cell adhesion molecules. Using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, we analyzed P-cadherin, CD24, and p53 expression in 117 carcinomas of the biliary tract (19 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 59 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 39 gallbladder carcinomas) and correlated our findings with clinicopathologic parameters. We found P-cadherin positivity in 37% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 73% of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 64% of gallbladder carcinomas, respectively. CD24 reactivity was observed in 21% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 58% of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 42% of gallbladder carcinomas. Nuclear p53 expression was found in 37% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 46% of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 45% of gallbladder carcinomas. We also studied P-cadherin, CD24, and p53 expression in normal (n = 30), inflamed (n = 22), and dysplastic (n = 21) biliary epithelium of extrahepatic bile ducts. Dysplastic biliary epithelium was positive for P-cadherin in 91%, for CD24 in 71%, and for p53 in 24% of lesions, respectively. In contrast, normal and inflamed epithelia were negative for all 3 proteins. We conclude that P-cadherin and CD24 are expressed in carcinomas of the biliary tract with high frequency and at an early stage of carcinogenesis. Therefore, they may be useful markers for early detection and as targets for therapy of cholangiocarcinoma.

  5. [Long-Term Multidisciplinary Therapy for Multiple Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer with Biliary Drainage for Occlusive Jaundice--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Shu; Mikami, Koji; Murata, Kohei; Nushijima, Yoichirou; Okada, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Tetsu; Fukuchi, Nariaki; Ebisui, Chikara; Yokouchi, Hideoki; Kinuta, Masakatsu

    2015-11-01

    Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old man who was diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer with synchronous multiple liver metastases following resection of a primary lesion. Subsequent mFOLFOX+BV therapy elicited a marked response in the liver metastases, which led to the patient undergoing hepatic (S7) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), hepatic resection (lateral segmentectomy and partial [S5] resection), and cholecystectomy. Six months later, transluminal RFA was repeated because liver (S7) metastasis recurred, and 8 courses of XELOX plus BV therapy were administered. As obstructive jaundice due to recurrence of the liver metastases developed after a 6 months hiatus in chemotherapy, we endoscopically inserted a biliary stent. Despite reducing IRIS plus BV therapy, obstructive jaundice developed again, and 3 intrahepatic biliary stents were inserted with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. To date, the patient has been alive for 4 years since the initial resection of the primary lesion after undergoing consecutive systemic chemotherapy with different regimens. Some studies have shown that in cases of obstructive jaundice caused by advanced gastrointestinal cancer, longer survival could be expected by reducing the severity of jaundice, suggesting that resuming chemotherapy as well as improving the severity of jaundice could contribute to better outcomes. The patient in the present case was successfully treated twice with biliary drainage for occlusive jaundice and chemotherapy, suggesting that a combination of multidisciplinary therapy and adequate local therapy such as biliary drainage could be important for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer.

  6. Optimal dose of gemcitabine for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancer in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Ebata, Tomoki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Maeda, Osamu; Mitsuma, Ayako; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Nagino, Masato; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear consensus does not exist about whether the initial dose of gemcitabine, an essential anticancer antimetabolite, should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction. Adult patients with biliary tract or pancreatic cancer were divided into three groups according to whether they had mild, moderate, or severe liver dysfunction, evaluated on the basis of serum bilirubin and liver transaminase levels at baseline. As anticancer treatment, gemcitabine at a dose of 800 or 1000 mg/m(2) was given as an i.v. infusion once weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. The patients were prospectively evaluated for adverse events during the first cycle, and the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its inactive metabolite, difluorodeoxyuridine, were studied to determine the optimal initial dose of gemcitabine as monotherapy according to the severity of liver dysfunction. A total of 15 patients were studied. Liver dysfunction was mild in one patient, moderate in six, and severe in eight. All 15 patients had been undergoing biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice when they received gemcitabine. Grade 3 cholangitis developed in one patient with moderate liver dysfunction who received gemcitabine at the dose level of 1000 mg/m(2). No other patients had severe treatment-related adverse events resulting in the omission or discontinuation of gemcitabine treatment. The plasma concentrations of gemcitabine and difluorodeoxyuridine were similar among the groups. An initial dose reduction of gemcitabine as monotherapy for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancers is not necessary for patients with hyperbilirubinemia, provided that obstructive jaundice is well managed. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005363.)

  7. Chemical coding and chemosensory properties of cholinergic brush cells in the mouse gastrointestinal and biliary tract

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Burkhard; Jurastow, Innokentij; Bader, Sandra; Ringer, Cornelia; von Engelhardt, Jakob; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Diener, Martin; Kummer, Wolfgang; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Weihe, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    The mouse gastro-intestinal and biliary tract mucosal epithelia harbor choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive brush cells with taste cell-like traits. With the aid of two transgenic mouse lines that express green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the ChAT promoter (EGFPChAT) and by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that EGFPChAT cells were clustered in the epithelium lining the gastric groove. EGFPChAT cells were numerous in the gall bladder and bile duct, and found scattered as solitary cells along the small and large intestine. While all EGFPChAT cells were also ChAT-positive, expression of the high-affinity choline transporter (ChT1) was never detected. Except for the proximal colon, EGFPChAT cells also lacked detectable expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). EGFPChAT cells were found to be separate from enteroendocrine cells, however they were all immunoreactive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18), transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), and for cyclooxygenases 1 (COX1) and 2 (COX2). The ex vivo stimulation of colonic EGFPChAT cells with the bitter substance denatonium resulted in a strong increase in intracellular calcium, while in other epithelial cells such an increase was significantly weaker and also timely delayed. Subsequent stimulation with cycloheximide was ineffective in both cell populations. Given their chemical coding and chemosensory properties, EGFPChAT brush cells thus may have integrative functions and participate in induction of protective reflexes and inflammatory events by utilizing ACh and prostaglandins for paracrine signaling. PMID:25852573

  8. Circulating follicular helper T cells presented distinctively different responses toward bacterial antigens in primary biliary cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Tong, Da-Nian; Guan, Jiao; Li, Mei-Fang; Feng, Qi-Ming; Zhou, Min-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Yun

    2017-10-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease with unknown causes. The initiation of PBC is associated with bacterial infections and abnormal immune correlates, such as the presence of self-reactive anti-mitochondrial antibodies and shifted balance of T cell subsets. In particular, the CD4(+)CXCR5(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cells are highly activated in PBC patients and are significantly associated with PBC severity, but the underlying reasons are unknown. In this study, we found that the circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells were enriched with the interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting Th1-subtype and the interleukin (IL)-17-secreting Th17-subtype, but not the IL-4-secreting Th2 subtype. We further demonstrated that a host of microbial motifs, including Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C), LPS, imiquimod, and CpG, could significantly stimulate IFN-γ, IL-17, and/or IL-21 from circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells in PBC patients, especially in the presence of monocytes and B cells. Whole bacterial cells of Escherichia coli, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, and Mycobacterium gordonae, could also potently stimulate IFN-γ, IL-17, and/or IL-21 production from circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells. But interestingly, while the whole cell could potently stimulate circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells from both healthy controls and PBC patients, the cell protein lysate could only potently stimulate circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells from PBC patients, but not those from healthy controls, suggesting that circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells in PBC patients had distinctive antigen-specificity from those in healthy individuals. Together, these data demonstrated that bacterial antigen stimulation is a potential source of aberrant Tfh cell activation in PBC patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... make the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  10. Dysregulation of peritoneal cavity B1a cells and murine primary biliary cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-Qing; Yang, Wei; Yao, Yuan; Ma, Hong-Di; Wang, Yin-Hu; Li, Liang; Wu, Qingfa; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease with progressive cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Similar to human patients with PBC, p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice spontaneously develop severe autoimmune cholangitis. Although there has been considerable work on immune regulation and autoimmunity, there is a relative paucity of work directed at the functional implications of the key peritoneal cavity (PC) B cell subset, coined B1a cells in PBC. We used flow cytometry and high-resolution microarrays to study the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of B cells, particularly B1a cells, in the PC of p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice compared to controls. Importantly, B1a cell proliferation was markedly lower as the expression of Ki67 decreased. Meanwhile, the apoptosis level was much higher. These lead to a reduction of B1a cells in the PC of p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice compared to controls. In contrast, there was a dramatic increase of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells accompanied by elevated production of IFN-γ. In addition, we found a negative correlation between the frequency of B1a cells and the presence of autoreactive CD8+ T cells in both liver and PC of p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice. From a functional perspective, B cells from p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice downregulated IL-10 production and CTLA-4 expression, leading to loss of B cell regulatory function. We suggest that the dysfunction of B1a cells in the PC in this murine model of autoimmune cholangitis results in defective regulatory function. This highlights a new potential therapeutic target in PBC. PMID:27105495

  11. Penetration and co-localization in MDCK cell mitochondria of IgA derived from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, A C; Shultz, D B; Luton, F; Mostov, K E; Richly, E; Leung, P S; Benson, G D; Ansari, A A; Coppel, R L; Gershwin, M E; Van de Water, J

    1998-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease of unknown etiology characterized by high-titer anti-mitochondrial antibodies. The major autoantigen has been identified as the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2). The fact that PDC-E2 is present in all nucleated cells, but autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells, prompted us to investigate the possibility that mucosally-derived IgA may be pathogenic for biliary epithelial cells. Serum IgA was purified from six patients with PBC and its localization and ability to penetrate cells was studied using Madine-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells transfected with the human IgA receptor (MDCK-pIgR). The potential of IgA to be transported through the cells was studied by a combination of immunohistochemistry and dual color fluorescent microscopy. Interestingly, IgA from all PBC patients co-localized with PDC-E2 (the major autoantigen of PBC) inside the cells; this was demonstrated by dual staining with anti-human IgA and a mouse monoclonal antibody directed to PDC-E2. In contrast, no co-localization was observed for IgA controls. Furthermore, dual staining of liver sections from PBC patients demonstrated co-localization of IgA and PDC-E2, both cytoplasmically and at the apical surface. We postulate that there may be a direct effect of these autoantibodies on the mitochondrial function of biliary epithelial cells. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. B cell depletion in treating primary biliary cirrhosis: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Xuan

    2012-08-14

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a progressive autoimmune liver disease of unknown etiology that affects almost exclusively women. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is currently the only approved drug by Food and Drug Administration for patients with PBC. Although the precise pathogenesis of PBC remains unclear, it has been postulated that many cell populations, including B cells, are involved in the ongoing inflammatory process, which implicates, not surprisingly, a potential therapeutic target of depleting B cell to treat this disorder. Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been approved for the treatment of lymphoma and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Whether it is effective in the treatment of PBC has not been evaluated. Recently, Tsuda et al([1]) demonstrated that B cell depletion with rituximab significantly reduced the number of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA)-producing B cells, AMA titers, the plasma levels of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM and IgG) as well as serum alkaline phosphatase, and it was well tolerated by all the treated patients with no serious adverse events. This observation provides a novel treatment option for the patients with PBC who have incomplete response to UDCA.

  13. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  14. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Variants in hormone-related genes and the risk of biliary tract cancers and stones: a population-based study in China

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Sakoda, Lori C.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rashid, Asif; Chen, Jinbo; Chen, Bingshu E.; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Shen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Bing-Sheng; Han, Tian-Quan; Zhang, Bai-He; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen; Hsing, Ann W.

    2009-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers, encompassing gallbladder, extrahepatic bile duct and ampulla of Vater cancers, are uncommon but often fatal malignancies. Hormone-related factors, including parity, oral contraceptive use, obesity, and gallstones, have been implicated in the etiology of these cancers. To further clarify the role of hormones in biliary tract cancers and biliary stones, we genotyped 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nine genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis, metabolism and transport in a population-based case-control study in Shanghai, China. This study included subjects who completed an interview and provided blood, which totaled 411 biliary tract cancer and 893 biliary stone patients and 786 healthy Shanghai residents. The CYP1A1 IVS1 + 606 (rs2606345) T allele was associated with gallbladder [odds ratio (OR) = 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3–3.0] and bile duct cancers (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–3.1), whereas the CYP1A1 Ex7 + 131 (rs1048943) G allele was associated with ampulla of Vater cancer (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.5–5.4). After taking into account multiple comparisons for SNPs within each gene, CYP1A1 was significantly associated with gallbladder (P = 0.004) and ampulla of Vater cancers (P = 0.01), but borderline with bile duct cancer (P = 0.06). The effect of CYP1A1 IVS1 + 606 on gallbladder cancer was more pronounced among non-obese (body mass index < 23) (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.8–6.1; P interaction = 0.001). Among women taking oral contraceptives, the effect of SHBG Ex8 + 6 (rs6259) on gallbladder cancer (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 2.2–20.5; P interaction = 0.001) and stones (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1–4.9; P-interaction = 0.05) was statistically significant. Our findings suggest that common variants in hormone-related genes contribute to the risk of biliary tract cancers and stones, possibly by modulating hormone metabolism. PMID:19168589

  16. Biliary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 356. Suchy FJ. Anatomy, histology, embryology, developmental anomalies, and pediatric disorders of the biliary ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  17. Anti-CD16 autoantibodies and delayed phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Allina, Jorge; Stanca, Carmen M; Garber, John; Hu, Bin; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Bach, Nancy; Odin, Joseph A

    2008-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is characterized by chronic hepatic inflammation and immune mediated apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells. Delayed macrophage phagocytosis of opsonized apoptotic cells, noted in other autoimmune diseases, may promote inflammation. Recent studies suggest serum anti-CD16 autoantibodies contribute to impaired macrophage phagocytosis by blocking complement receptor 3 (CR3) signaling via CD16. Therefore, serum anti-CD16 levels and the ability of monocyte derived macrophages from individuals with PBC to phagocytosis apoptotic cells were compared to controls. The mean level of anti-CD16 IgM autoantibodies (0.86+/-0.62 v. 0.35+/-0.22, respectively, p=0.031) was increased in PBC compared to control sera, and mean PBC phagocytosis of opsonized apoptotic cells was significantly decreased compared to controls (23.9+/-12.2% v. 43.9+/-14.4%, respectively, p=0.020). However, PBC phagocytosis of opsonized apoptotic cells was not significantly affected by the presence or absence of autologous serum (20.8+/-13.5% v. 23.9+/-12.2%, respectively, p=0.560). PBC phagocytosis of opsonized apoptotic cells inversely correlated with CD16 (and CR3) expression levels on Day 5 after culture in the presence or absence of autologous serum (r=-0.546, p=0.033 and r=-0.519, p=0.042, respectively). Phagocytosis of non-opsonized apoptotic cells did not correlate with CD16 or CR3 expression (p>0.050). In conclusion, PBC macrophage phagocytosis of opsonized apoptotic cells is impaired, irrespective of serum factors and may increase hepatic inflammation.

  18. Prox1 ablation in hepatic progenitors causes defective hepatocyte specification and increases biliary cell commitment

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Asha; Ye, Jianming; Yu, Nanjia; Guez, Fanny; Bedford, David C.; Neale, Geoffrey A.; Cordi, Sabine; Brindle, Paul K.; Lemaigre, Frederic P.; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The liver has multiple functions that preserve homeostasis. Liver diseases are debilitating, costly and often result in death. Elucidating the developmental mechanisms that establish the liver’s architecture or generate the cellular diversity of this organ should help advance the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hepatic diseases. We previously reported that migration of early hepatic precursors away from the gut epithelium requires the activity of the homeobox gene Prox1. Here, we show that Prox1 is a novel regulator of cell differentiation and morphogenesis during hepatogenesis. Prox1 ablation in bipotent hepatoblasts dramatically reduced the expression of multiple hepatocyte genes and led to very defective hepatocyte morphogenesis. As a result, abnormal epithelial structures expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers or resembling ectopic bile ducts developed in the Prox1-deficient liver parenchyma. By contrast, excessive commitment of hepatoblasts into cholangiocytes, premature intrahepatic bile duct morphogenesis, and biliary hyperplasia occurred in periportal areas of Prox1-deficient livers. Together, these abnormalities indicate that Prox1 activity is necessary to correctly allocate cell fates in liver precursors. These results increase our understanding of differentiation anomalies in pathological conditions and will contribute to improving stem cell protocols in which differentiation is directed towards hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. PMID:24449835

  19. Allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in patients with UDCA-resistant primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Han, Qin; Chen, Hua; Wang, Ke; Shan, Guang-liang; Kong, Fang; Yang, Yun-jiao; Li, Yong-zhe; Zhang, Xuan; Dong, Fen; Wang, Qian; Xu, Dong; Hu, Zhao-jun; Wang, Shi-hua; Keating, Armand; Bi, Ya-lan; Zhang, Feng-chun; Zhao, Robert Chun-hua

    2014-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cell transplantation (BM-MSCT) for patients with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)-resistant primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Ten patients were enrolled in this trial of BM-MSCT. All patients were permitted to concurrently continue their previous UDCA treatment. The efficacy of BM-MSCT in UDCA-resistant PBC was assessed at various time points throughout the 12-month follow up. No transplantation-related side effects were observed. The life quality of the patients was improved after BM-MSCT as demonstrated by responses to the PBC-40 questionnaire. Serum levels of ALT, AST, γ-GT, and IgM significantly decreased from baseline after BM-MSCT. In addition, the percentage of CD8+ T cells was reduced, while that of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells was increased in peripheral lymphocytic subsets. Serum levels of IL-10 were also elevated. Notably, the optimal therapeutic outcome was acquired in 3 to 6 months and could be maintained for 12 months after BM-MSCT. In conclusion, allogeneic BM-MSCT in UDCA-resistant PBC is safe and appears to be effective.

  20. Phase II study of gemcitabine, oxaliplatin in combination with panitumumab in KRAS wild-type unresectable or metastatic biliary tract and gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hezel, A F; Noel, M S; Allen, J N; Abrams, T A; Yurgelun, M; Faris, J E; Goyal, L; Clark, J W; Blaszkowsky, L S; Murphy, J E; Zheng, H; Khorana, A A; Connolly, G C; Hyrien, O; Baran, A; Herr, M; Ng, K; Sheehan, S; Harris, D J; Regan, E; Borger, D R; Iafrate, A J; Fuchs, C; Ryan, D P; Zhu, A X

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current data suggest that platinum-based combination therapy is the standard first-line treatment for biliary tract cancer. EGFR inhibition has proven beneficial across a number of gastrointestinal malignancies; and has shown specific advantages among KRAS wild-type genetic subtypes of colon cancer. We report the combination of panitumumab with gemcitabine (GEM) and oxaliplatin (OX) as first-line therapy for KRAS wild-type biliary tract cancer. Methods: Patients with histologically confirmed, previously untreated, unresectable or metastatic KRAS wild-type biliary tract or gallbladder adenocarcinoma with ECOG performance status 0–2 were treated with panitumumab 6 mg kg−1, GEM 1000 mg m−2 (10 mg m−2 min−1) and OX 85 mg m−2 on days 1 and 15 of each 28-day cycle. The primary objective was to determine the objective response rate by RECIST criteria v.1.1. Secondary objectives were to evaluate toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival. Results: Thirty-one patients received at least one cycle of treatment across three institutions, 28 had measurable disease. Response rate was 45% and disease control rate was 90%. Median PFS was 10.6 months (95% CI 5–24 months) and median overall survival 20.3 months (95% CI 9–25 months). The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were anaemia 26%, leukopenia 23%, fatigue 23%, neuropathy 16% and rash 10%. Conclusions: The combination of gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and panitumumab in KRAS wild type metastatic biliary tract cancer showed encouraging efficacy, additional efforts of genetic stratification and targeted therapy is warranted in biliary tract cancer. PMID:24960403

  1. Biliary tree stem cells, precursors to pancreatic committed progenitors: evidence for possible life-long pancreatic organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Carpino, Guido; Cui, Cai-Bin; Dominguez-Bendala, Juan; Wauthier, Eliane; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Pileggi, Antonello; Gerber, David; Furth, Mark E; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Inverardi, Luca; Reid, Lola M

    2013-09-01

    Peribiliary glands (PBGs) in bile duct walls, and pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) associated with pancreatic ducts, in humans of all ages, contain a continuous, ramifying network of cells in overlapping maturational lineages. We show that proximal (PBGs)-to-distal (PDGs) maturational lineages start near the duodenum with cells expressing markers of pluripotency (NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2), proliferation (Ki67), self-replication (SALL4), and early hepato-pancreatic commitment (SOX9, SOX17, PDX1, and LGR5), transitioning to PDG cells with no expression of pluripotency or self-replication markers, maintenance of pancreatic genes (PDX1), and expression of markers of pancreatic endocrine maturation (NGN3, MUC6, and insulin). Radial-axis lineages start in PBGs near the ducts' fibromuscular layers with stem cells and end at the ducts' lumens with cells devoid of stem cell traits and positive for pancreatic endocrine genes. Biliary tree-derived cells behaved as stem cells in culture under expansion conditions, culture plastic and serum-free Kubota's Medium, proliferating for months as undifferentiated cells, whereas pancreas-derived cells underwent only approximately 8-10 divisions, then partially differentiated towards an islet fate. Biliary tree-derived cells proved precursors of pancreas' committed progenitors. Both could be driven by three-dimensional conditions, islet-derived matrix components and a serum-free, hormonally defined medium for an islet fate (HDM-P), to form spheroids with ultrastructural, electrophysiological and functional characteristics of neoislets, including glucose regulatability. Implantation of these neoislets into epididymal fat pads of immunocompromised mice, chemically rendered diabetic, resulted in secretion of human C-peptide, regulatable by glucose, and able to alleviate hyperglycemia in hosts. The biliary tree-derived stem cells and their connections to pancreatic committed progenitors constitute a biological framework for life-long pancreatic

  2. Percutaneous transhepatic portal vein stenting for malignant portal vein stenosis secondary to recurrent perihilar biliary cancer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takashi; Ebata, Tomoki; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Sugawara, Gen; Mori, Yoshine; Suzuki, Kojiro; Nagino, Masato

    2015-10-01

    Transhepatic portal vein (PV) stenting has been shown to be one of the most important treatments for patients with PV stenosis caused by hepatopancreatobiliary malignancy. Ten consecutive patients with PV stenosis caused by the recurrence of a perihilar biliary malignancy underwent transhepatic PV stenting. A self-expandable metallic stent was deployed at the stenosis site. The patients were retrospectively analyzed with regard to the procedure, complications, and survival after the stent placement. The median interval between the primary resection and the PV stenting was 22 months. The initial hepatic resection was a left trisectionectomy with caudate lobectomy in seven patients, a left hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy in one patient, a right anterior sectionectomy with caudate lobectomy following a left hepatectomy in one patient and a partial liver resection in one patient. The angle of the PV around the stenosis was greater in the patients with PV stenosis located in the right posterior PV. Eight patients with successful PV stent placement were able to receive anticancer treatment, with a median survival of 14 months. The remaining two patients without successful PV stent placement survived less than 6 months. Portal vein stenting might offer relief from the symptoms associated with PV hypertension and the opportunity for sustainable anticancer therapy in patients with recurrent perihilar biliary malignancy. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  3. Serum cell death biomarkers for prediction of liver fibrosis and poor prognosis in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Tomohiro; Umemura, Takeji; Fujimori, Naoyuki; Shibata, Soichiro; Ichikawa, Yuki; Kimura, Takefumi; Joshita, Satoru; Komatsu, Michiharu; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Tanaka, Eiji; Ota, Masao

    2015-01-01

    The development of simple, noninvasive markers of liver fibrosis is urgently needed for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). This study examined the ability of several serum biomarkers of cell death to estimate fibrosis and prognosis in PBC. A cohort of 130 patients with biopsy-proven PBC and 90 healthy subjects were enrolled. We assessed the utility of the M30 ELISA, which detects caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) fragments and is representative of apoptotic cell death, as well as the M65 and newly developed M65 Epideath (M65ED) ELISAs, which detect total CK-18 as indicators of overall cell death, in predicting clinically relevant fibrosis stage. All 3 cell death biomarkers were significantly higher in patients with PBC than in healthy controls and were significantly correlated with fibrosis stage. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the M65 and M65ED assays for differentiation among significant fibrosis, severe fibrosis, and cirrhosis were 0.66 and 0.76, 0.66 and 0.73, and 0.74 and 0.82, respectively. In multivariate analysis, high M65ED (hazard ratio 6.13; 95% confidence interval 1.18-31.69; P = 0.031) and severe fibrosis (hazard ratio 7.45; 95% confidence interval 1.82-30.51; P = 0.005) were independently associated with liver-related death, transplantation, or decompensation. High serum M65ED was also significantly associated with poor outcome in PBC (log-rank test; P = 0.001). Noninvasive cell death biomarkers appear to be clinically useful in predicting fibrosis in PBC. Moreover, the M65ED assay may represent a new surrogate marker of adverse disease outcome.

  4. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP) expression on T cells and on a natural-killer-cell sub-population.

    PubMed

    Moller, M J; Kammerer, R; Grunert, F; von Kleist, S

    1996-03-15

    Human T and natural-killer (NK) cells, that are thought to be the major cytotoxic effector-cell populations in the defence against neoplastic cells, were isolated from blood and decidua in order to analyze their expression of carcinoembronic-antigen-(CEA)-family-member proteins. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP,CD66a) was the only member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family detected. While freshly isolated T-cells expressed low amounts of BGP, freshly isolated NK cells were negative. After in vitro stimulation for 3 days, T cells up-regulated their BGP expression and a sub-group of NK cells (CD16- CD56+), known to predominate in decidua revealed de novo expression of BGP. In contrast, stimulated CD16+ CD56+ NK cells, which occur exclusively in the blood, remained negative. The expression of BGP could be shown on the protein level by using a panel of 12 well-defined MAbs and on the transcription level in rt-PCR and subsequent oligonucleotide hybridization. Interestingly, rIL-2-stimulated T cells expressed 3-fold higher levels of BGP compared with those seen after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). PHA, on the other hand, induced a higher expression of HLA-DR, an activation marker of T cells. The differential regulation implies a distinct function of BGP and HLA-DR.

  5. Ongoing activation of autoantigen-specific B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Weici; Leung, Patrick S C; Bowlus, Christopher L; Dhaliwal, Sandeep; Coppel, Ross L; Ansari, Aftab A; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Wang, Jinjun; Kenny, Thomas P; He, Xiao-Song; Mackay, Ian R; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-11-01

    The serologic hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the antimitochondrial response to the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), has unique features, including continuous high titers of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG reactivity throughout all stages of disease, capable not only of target enzyme inhibition, but also crossreactive with chemical xenobiotics that share molecular homology with the inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2; such chemicals have been proposed as potential etiological agents. We used flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) to examine B-cell subsets in 59 subjects, including 28 with PBC, 13 with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), and 18 healthy controls. Strikingly, in PBC, although there were no significant differences in B-cell phenotype subpopulations, 10% of the total IgG and IgA plasmablast population and 23% of the IgM plasmablast population were uniquely reactive with PDC-E2, detected in the CXCR7+ CCR10low plasmablast population. In contrast, plasmablast reactivity to a control antigen, tetanus toxoid, was minimal and similar in all groups. Additionally, we isolated plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies and compared reactivity with plasma-derived antibodies and noted a distinct noncirculating tissue source of xenobiotic crossreacting antibodies. The high levels of autoantigen specific peripheral plasmablasts indicate recent activation of naive or memory B cells and a continuous and robust activation. The presence of CXCR7+ CCR10low PDC-E2-specific ASCs suggests a mechanistic basis for the migration of circulating antigen specific plasmablasts to the mucosal epithelial ligands CXCL12 and CCL28. Our findings suggest a sustained rigorous B-cell response in PBC, likely activated and perpetuated by cognate autoantigen. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Cediranib Maleate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-10

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  7. Endoscopic biliary drainage for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer with obstructive jaundice who are to undergo gemcitabine chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Osamu; Fujita, Naotaka; Kobayashi, Go; Noda, Yutaka; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess optimum endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) in cases with unresectable pancreatic cancer in the era of gemcitabine (GEM). METHODS: Thirty patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, who presented with jaundice and underwent chemotherapy using GEM after EBD were included in this study (GEM group). Fifteen cases with the same clinical manifestation and stage of pancreatic cancer treated with EBD alone were also included as controls. A covered metallic stent (CMS) or a plastic stent (PS) was used for EBD. The mean survival time (MST) in each group, risk factors of survival time, type of stent used and associated survival time, occlusion rate of stent, patency period of stent, and risk factors of stent occlusion were evaluated. RESULTS: MST in the GEM group was longer than that in the control (9.9 mo vs 6.2 mo). In the GEM group, the survival time was not different between those who underwent metallic stenting and those who underwent plastic stenting. Stent occlusion occurred in 60% of the PS group and 7% of the CMS group. The median stent patency in the PS-GEM group and the CMS-GEM group was 5 mo and 7.5 mo, respectively. Use of a PS was the only risk factor of stent occlusion. CONCLUSION: A CMS is recommended in cases presenting with jaundice due to unresectable pancreatic cancer, since the use of a CMS makes it possible to continue chemotherapy using GEM without repetition of stent replacement. PMID:17143944

  8. A randomised phase II study of OSI-7904L versus 5-fluorouracil (FU)/leucovorin (LV) as first-line treatment in patients with advanced biliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ciuleanu, T; Diculescu, M; Hoepffner, N M; Trojan, J; Sailer, V; Zalupski, M; Herrmann, T; Roth, A; Chick, J; Brock, K; Albert, D; Philip, P A

    2007-08-01

    The prognosis of advanced biliary tract carcinoma is poor with chemotherapy limited to a palliative role. This randomised study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a new liposomal thymidylate synthase inhibitor (TSI), OSI-7904L, in parallel with a modified de Gramont regimen of 5-FU/LV in patients with advanced biliary cancer. Patients with previously untreated advanced or metastatic carcinoma of the biliary tract were randomised to receive either OSI-7904L 12 mg/m2 intravenously every 21 days or a modified de Gramont schedule of 5-FU/LV (intravenous l-LV 200 mg/m2, bolus 5-FU 400 mg/m2 and a 46-h infusion of 5-FU 2,400 mg/m2) every 14 days. Twenty-two patients were randomised, 11 to each group. No patients responded in the OSI-7904L arm, while one patient achieved a partial response in the 5-FU/LV arm. The rates of disease stabilisation were 4/11 (OSI-7904L) and 10/11 (5-FU/LV). Both treatment arms were generally well tolerated. These results show that the activity of OSI-7904L is below a level of clinical relevance in advanced biliary tract cancer, providing only a small degree of disease stabilisation. A simplified de Gramont schedule appears to have marginally more activity. Both treatments were well tolerated.

  9. Prospective Study of Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and Carbohydrate Intake in Relation to Risk of Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Susanna C; Giovannucci, Edward L; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    Diets that induce a high glycemic response might increase the risk of biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the hypothesis that diets with high glycemic load (GL) and high glycemic index (GI), which are measures of the glycemic effect of foods, are associated with an increased incidence of BTC. We used data from a population-based prospective study of 76,014 Swedish adults (age 45-83 years; 57% men) who were free of cancer and had completed a food-frequency questionnaire in the autumn of 1997. Incident cancer cases were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Cancer Registry. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a mean follow-up of 13.3 years (1,010,777 person-years), we identified 140 extrahepatic BTC cases (including 77 gallbladder cancers) and 23 intrahepatic BTC cases. A high dietary GL was associated with an increased risk of BTC. The multivariable relative risks for the highest versus lowest quartile of dietary GL were 1.63 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-2.63) for extrahepatic BTC, 2.14 (95% CI, 1.06-4.33) for gallbladder cancer, and 3.46 (95% CI, 1.22-9.84) for intrahepatic BTC. Dietary GI was statistically significantly positively associated with risk of extrahepatic BTC and gallbladder cancer. We observed no statistically significant association between carbohydrate intake and BTC risk, although all associations were positive. Although these data do not prove a causal relationship, they are consistent with the hypothesis that high-GL and high-GI diets are associated with an increased risk of BTC.

  10. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans.

    PubMed

    Fedirko, V; Lukanova, A; Bamia, C; Trichopolou, A; Trepo, E; Nöthlings, U; Schlesinger, S; Aleksandrova, K; Boffetta, P; Tjønneland, A; Johnsen, N F; Overvad, K; Fagherazzi, G; Racine, A; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Grote, V; Kaaks, R; Boeing, H; Naska, A; Adarakis, G; Valanou, E; Palli, D; Sieri, S; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Panico, S; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Siersema, P D; Peeters, P H; Weiderpass, E; Skeie, G; Engeset, D; Quirós, J R; Zamora-Ros, R; Sánchez, M J; Amiano, P; Huerta, J M; Barricarte, A; Johansen, D; Lindkvist, B; Sund, M; Werner, M; Crowe, F; Khaw, K T; Ferrari, P; Romieu, I; Chuang, S C; Riboli, E; Jenab, M

    2013-02-01

    The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; N = 191), intrahepatic bile duct (IBD; N = 66), and biliary tract (N = 236) cancer risk was investigated in 477 206 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Dietary intake was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from proportional hazard models. HBV/HCV status was measured in a nested case-control subset. Higher dietary GI, GL, or increased intake of total carbohydrate was not associated with liver or biliary tract cancer risk. For HCC, divergent risk estimates were observed for total sugar = 1.43 (1.17-1.74) per 50 g/day, total starch = 0.70 (0.55-0.90) per 50 g/day, and total dietary fiber = 0.70 (0.52-0.93) per 10 g/day. The findings for dietary fiber were confirmed among HBV/HCV-free participants [0.48 (0.23-1.01)]. Similar associations were observed for IBD [dietary fiber = 0.59 (0.37-0.99) per 10 g/day], but not biliary tract cancer. Findings suggest that higher consumption of dietary fiber and lower consumption of total sugars are associated with lower HCC risk. In addition, high dietary fiber intake could be associated with lower IBD cancer risk.

  11. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, V.; Lukanova, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopolou, A.; Trepo, E.; Nöthlings, U.; Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boffetta, P.; Tjønneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Naska, A.; Adarakis, G.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, P. D.; Peeters, P. H.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Quirós, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sánchez, M. J.; Amiano, P.; Huerta, J. M.; Barricarte, A.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Werner, M.; Crowe, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Chuang, S. C.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. Patients and methods The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; N = 191), intrahepatic bile duct (IBD; N = 66), and biliary tract (N = 236) cancer risk was investigated in 477 206 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Dietary intake was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from proportional hazard models. HBV/HCV status was measured in a nested case–control subset. Results Higher dietary GI, GL, or increased intake of total carbohydrate was not associated with liver or biliary tract cancer risk. For HCC, divergent risk estimates were observed for total sugar = 1.43 (1.17–1.74) per 50 g/day, total starch = 0.70 (0.55–0.90) per 50 g/day, and total dietary fiber = 0.70 (0.52–0.93) per 10 g/day. The findings for dietary fiber were confirmed among HBV/HCV-free participants [0.48 (0.23–1.01)]. Similar associations were observed for IBD [dietary fiber = 0.59 (0.37–0.99) per 10 g/day], but not biliary tract cancer. Conclusions Findings suggest that higher consumption of dietary fiber and lower consumption of total sugars are associated with lower HCC risk. In addition, high dietary fiber intake could be associated with lower IBD cancer risk. PMID:23123507

  12. Role of AE2 for pHi regulation in biliary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Axel R.; Lopez, María; Ardura-Fabregat, Alberto; Medina, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    The Cl−/HCO−3anion exchanger 2 (AE2) is known to be involved in intracellular pH (pHi) regulation and transepithelial acid-base transport. Early studies showed that AE2 gene expression is reduced in liver biopsies and blood mononuclear cells from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a disease characterized by chronic non-suppurative cholangitis associated with antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and other autoimmune phenomena. Microfluorimetric analysis of the Cl−/HCO−3 anion exchange (AE) in isolated cholangiocytes showed that the cAMP-stimulated AE activity is diminished in PBC compared to both healthy and diseased controls. More recently, it was found that miR-506 is upregulated in cholangiocytes of PBC patients and that AE2 may be a target of miR-506. Additional evidence for a pathogenic role of AE2 dysregulation in PBC was obtained with Ae2−/−a,b mice, which develop biochemical, histological, and immunologic alterations that resemble PBC (including development of serum AMA). Analysis of HCO−3 transport systems and pHi regulation in cholangiocytes from normal and Ae2−/−a,b mice confirmed that AE2 is the transporter responsible for the Cl−/HCO−3exchange in these cells. On the other hand, both Ae2+/+a,b and Ae2−/−a,b mouse cholangiocytes exhibited a Cl−-independent bicarbonate transport system, essentially a Na+-bicarbonate cotransport (NBC) system, which could contribute to pHi regulation in the absence of AE2. PMID:24478713

  13. Rhesus rotavirus VP4 sequence-specific activation of mononuclear cells is associated with cholangiopathy in murine biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Walther, Ashley; Mohanty, Sujit K; Donnelly, Bryan; Coots, Abigail; Lages, Celine S; Lobeck, Inna; Dupree, Phylicia; Meller, Jaroslaw; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Tiao, Greg

    2015-09-15

    Biliary atresia (BA), a neonatal obstructive cholangiopathy, remains the most common indication for pediatric liver transplantation in the United States. In the murine model of BA, Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) VP4 surface protein determines biliary duct tropism. In this study, we investigated how VP4 governs induction of murine BA. Newborn mice were injected with 16 strains of rotavirus and observed for clinical symptoms of BA and mortality. Cholangiograms were performed to confirm bile duct obstruction. Livers and bile ducts were harvested 7 days postinfection for virus titers and histology. Flow cytometry assessed mononuclear cell activation in harvested cell populations from the liver. Cytotoxic NK cell activity was determined by the ability of NK cells to kill noninfected cholangiocytes. Of the 16 strains investigated, the 6 with the highest homology to the RRV VP4 (>87%) were capable of infecting bile ducts in vivo. Although the strain Ro1845 replicated to a titer similar to RRV in vivo, it caused no symptoms or mortality. A Ro1845 reassortant containing the RRV VP4 induced all BA symptoms, with a mortality rate of 89%. Flow cytometry revealed that NK cell activation was significantly increased in the disease-inducing strains and these NK cells demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of cytotoxicity against noninfected cholangiocytes. Rotavirus strains with >87% homology to RRV's VP4 were capable of infecting murine bile ducts in vivo. Development of murine BA was mediated by RRV VP4-specific activation of mononuclear cells, independent of viral titers.

  14. Biliary cystadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bartolome, Miguel A Hernandez; Ruiz, Sagrario Fuerte; Romero, Israel Manzanedo; Lojo, Beatriz Ramos; Prieto, Ignacio Rodriguez; Alvira, Luis Gimenez; Carreño, Rosario Granados; Esteban, Manuel Limones

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of cystadenoma is rare, even more so when located in the extrahepatic bile duct. Unspecific clinical signs may lead this pathology to be misdiagnosed. The need for pathological anatomy in order to distinguish cystadenomas from simple biliary cysts is crucial. The most usual treatment nowadays is resection of the bile duct, together with cholecystectomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction. PMID:19630118

  15. Biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chardot, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease characterised by a biliary obstruction of unknown origin that presents in the neonatal period. It is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in this age group. BA occurs in approximately 1/18,000 live births in Western Europe. In the world, the reported incidence varies from 5/100,000 to 32/100,000 live births, and is highest in Asia and the Pacific region. Females are affected slightly more often than males. The common histopathological picture is one of inflammatory damage to the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts with sclerosis and narrowing or even obliteration of the biliary tree. Untreated, this condition leads to cirrhosis and death within the first years of life. BA is not known to be a hereditary condition. No primary medical treatment is relevant for the management of BA. Once BA suspected, surgical intervention (Kasai portoenterostomy) should be performed as soon as possible as operations performed early in life is more likely to be successful. Liver transplantation may be needed later if the Kasai operation fails to restore the biliary flow or if cirrhotic complications occur. At present, approximately 90% of BA patients survive and the majority have normal quality of life. PMID:16872500

  16. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  17. Prevalence of gastric parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liaskos, Christos; Norman, Gary L; Moulas, Anargyros; Garagounis, Athanasios; Goulis, Ioannis; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Dalekos, George N

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of antibodies against gastric parietal cells (GPA), intrinsic factor antibodies (IFA) and the presence of pernicious anemia in a large cohort of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients as similar data is missing. 157 PBC patients and 357 controls (73 with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), 35 primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), 45 HBV, 37 HCV, 36 alcoholic liver disease (ALD), 35 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and 96 healthy) were investigated for IgG-isotype-specific GPA and IFA by ELISAs and vitamin-B(12) levels by a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The detection of IgG-GPA was significantly higher in PBC (31.8%) compared to AIH (10.9%; p=0.001), PSC (0%; p=0.000), HCV (13.5%; p=0.01), HBV (13.3%; p=0.006), ALD (8.3%; p=0.004), NAFLD (11.4%; p=0.003) and healthy (10.4%; p=0.001). IgG-IFA were detected in 12% of GPA-positive PBC patients and in none of the other liver diseases or in healthy (p=0.001). This reactivity was significantly associated with lower vitamin-B(12) levels compared to those with an IFA-negative test (p=0.025). A significant proportion of PBC patients had IgG-GPA and IFA compared to controls. IgG-IFA were detected only in GPA-positive PBC patients and associated with lower vitamin-B(12) levels compared to those with an IFA-negative test. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Randomized phase II study of gemcitabine plus S-1 combination therapy vs. S-1 in advanced biliary tract cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG0805).

    PubMed

    Takashima, Atsuo; Morizane, Chigusa; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Okusaka, Takuji; Furuse, Junji

    2010-12-01

    A randomized Phase II selection design trial comparing gemcitabine plus S-1 combination therapy with S-1 monotherapy for chemo-naïve unresectable or recurrent biliary tract cancer patients was started in Japan. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the two regimens and to determine which is more promising as a test arm regimen to be compared with the current standard regimen, gemcitabine plus cisplatin, in a subsequent Phase III trial. Patients with unresectable or recurrent biliary tract cancer are randomized to either gemcitabine plus S-1 combination therapy arm or S-1 monotherapy arm. A total of 100 patients will be accrued for this study from 18 institutions over 1 year. The primary endpoint is the proportion of 1-year overall survival, and the secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, response rate and adverse events.

  19. Safety and effectiveness of gemcitabine in 260 patients with biliary tract cancer in a Japanese clinical practice based on post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Sumiko; Nishiuma, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Noriko; Taketsuna, Masanori; Taniai, Hisashi

    2012-11-01

    Gemcitabine was approved for the treatment of biliary tract cancer in 2006 in Japan. While biliary tract cancer is usually associated with patients 70 years of age or older and/or those who tend to have underlying liver dysfunction, data on this population were limited in the Japanese Phase II study of gemcitabine. Thus, further evaluation of safety and effectiveness in this population was planned. This special post-marketing surveillance was conducted as an observational study on the use of gemcitabine in a clinical practice setting. Gemcitabine-naïve patients with biliary tract cancer were enrolled from 2006 to 2008 and observed over 12 months; one or more doses of gemcitabine were administered during the period. Data such as patient background, treatment details, adverse events occurring during the observational period, laboratory values of liver enzyme and survival status were collected 3 and 12 months after the start of therapy. Of the 285 patients registered for the study, 260 were included in the analysis. The mean age was 66.9 years. There were 120 patients (46.2%) classified as elderly (70 years or older). Haematotoxicities were the most common adverse drug reactions. In the elderly and the non-elderly, adverse drug reactions (serious) occurred in 48.3% (20.8%) and 50.7% (12.9%), respectively. The overall estimated 1-year survival rate was 52.5% (95% confidence interval, 45.9-58.7%). In line with previous clinical and post-marketing studies conducted in Japan, the results of this study suggest that gemcitabine could be used safely and effectively for biliary tract cancer patients including the elderly.

  20. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Abdominal obesity, weight gain during adulthood and risk of liver and biliary tract cancer in a European cohort.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Sabrina; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Pischon, Tobias; Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Trepo, Elisabeth; Boffetta, Paolo; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van den Berg, Saskia; Peeters, Petra H M; Braaten, Tonje; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Travier, Noémie; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Lindkvist, Björn; Regner, Sara; Werner, Mårten; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Travis, Ruth C; Norat, Teresa; Wark, Petra A; Riboli, Elio; Nöthlings, Ute

    2013-02-01

    General obesity has been positively associated with risk of liver and probably with biliary tract cancer, but little is known about abdominal obesity or weight gain during adulthood. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to investigate associations between weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), weight change during adulthood and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic (IBDC) and extrahepatic bile duct system cancer [EBDSC including gallbladder cancer (GBC)] among 359,525 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Hepatitis B and C virus status was measured in a nested case-control subset. During a mean follow-up of 8.6 years, 177 cases of HCC, 58 cases of IBDC and 210 cases of EBDSC, including 76 cases of GBC, occurred. All anthropometric measures were positively associated with risk of HCC and GBC. WHtR showed the strongest association with HCC [relative risk (RR) comparing extreme tertiles 3.51, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.09-5.87; p(trend) < 0.0001] and with GBC (RR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.12-2.16 for an increment of one unit in WHtR). Weight gain during adulthood was also positively associated with HCC when comparing extreme tertiles (RR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.49-4.13; <0.001). No statistically significant association was observed between obesity and risk of IBDC and EBDSC. Our results provide evidence of an association between obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, and risk of HCC and GBC. Our findings support public health recommendations to reduce the prevalence of obesity and weight gain in adulthood for HCC and GBC prevention in Western populations. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers and Liver Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Godos, Justyna; Micek, Agnieszka; Marranzano, Marina; Salomone, Federico; Rio, Daniele Del; Ray, Sumantra

    2017-08-28

    A meta-analysis was conducted to summarize the evidence from prospective cohort and case-control studies regarding the association between coffee intake and biliary tract cancer (BTC) and liver cancer risk. Eligible studies were identified by searches of PubMed and EMBASE databases from the earliest available online indexing year to March 2017. The dose-response relationship was assessed by a restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. A stratified and subgroup analysis by smoking status and hepatitis was performed to identify potential confounding factors. We identified five studies on BTC risk and 13 on liver cancer risk eligible for meta-analysis. A linear dose-response meta-analysis did not show a significant association between coffee consumption and BTC risk. However, there was evidence of inverse correlation between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk. The association was consistent throughout the various potential confounding factors explored including smoking status, hepatitis, etc. Increasing coffee consumption by one cup per day was associated with a 15% reduction in liver cancer risk (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.82 to 0.88). The findings suggest that increased coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of liver cancer, but not BTC.

  3. MK2206 in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Biliary Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Stage IV Distal Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  4. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  5. Late Development of Bile Duct Cancer in Patients Who Had Biliary-Enteric Drainage for Benign Disease: A Follow-Up Study of More Than 1,000 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tocchi, Adriano; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Liotta, Gianluca; Lepre, Luca; Cassini, Diletta; Miccini, Michelangelo

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between biliary-enteric surgical drainage and the late development of cholangiocarcinoma of the biliary tract. Summary Background Data In patients with biliary-enteric drainage, reflux of intestinal contents into the bile duct may occur and cause cholangitis, which is regarded as the most serious complication of these procedures. Lithiasis of the biliary tract and a previous biliary-enteric anastomosis have both been suggested to favor the late onset of cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 1,003) undergoing three different procedures of biliary-enteric anastomosis (transduodenal sphincteroplasty, choledochoduodenostomy, and hepaticojejunostomy) between 1967 and 1997 were included in this study. The postoperative clinical course and long-term outcome were evaluated by a retrospective review of the hospital records and follow-up. Mean follow-up was 129.6 months. Results Fifty-five (5.5%) cases of primary bile duct cancer were found among the 1,003 patients at intervals of 132 to 218 months from biliary-enteric anastomosis. The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in the three groups was 5.8% in transduodenal sphincteroplasty patients, 7.6% in choledochoduodenostomy patients, and 1.9% in hepaticojejunostomy patients. The incidence of malignancy related to the different underlying diagnosis was 5.9%, 7.2%, and 1.9% in patients with choledocholithiasis, sphincter of Oddi stenosis, and postoperative benign stricture, respectively. Although only one patient who developed cholangiocarcinoma had previous concurrent lithiasis of the biliary tract, 40 patients had experienced mostly severe, recurrent cholangitis. No case of malignancy occurred in patients scored as having no cholangitis in the early and long-term postoperative outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses have shown the presence of cholangitis as the only factor affecting the incidence of cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions Chronic inflammatory changes consequent

  6. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  7. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for preoperative biliary decompression in patients with resectable and borderline-resectable pancreatic cancer: outcomes in 241 patients.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ali A; Mehendiratta, Vaibhav; Loren, David; Kowalski, Thomas; Fang, John; Hilden, Kristen; Adler, Douglas G

    2013-06-01

    Obstructive jaundice caused by distal biliary obstruction can present in up to 70 % of patients with localized cancer of the head of the pancreas. The aim of this study was to report our experience in using self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for preoperative biliary decompression in patients with resectable and borderline resectable carcinoma of the pancreatic head. We performed a retrospective study evaluating patients from two tertiary referral centers. Two-hundred and forty-one patients with resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma underwent ERCP with metal biliary stent placement between September 2006 and August 2011. We assessed the effectiveness of SEMS to adequately decompress the biliary tree, procedural success, patient survival, stent patency, and stent-related complications. Two-hundred and forty-one patients were evaluated [123 male, mean age (± SD) 67.4 ± 9.8 years; resectable 174, borderline resectable 67]. Patients with borderline-resectable cancer underwent neoadjuvant therapy and restaging before possible curative surgery. Successful placement of a metal biliary stent was achieved in all patients and improved jaundice. Patients were followed for mean duration of 6.3 months. The overall survival was 49 % at 27 months. Fourteen (5.8 %) patients experienced stent occlusion; the mean time to stent occlusion was 6.6 (range 1-20) months. Immediate complications included: post-ERCP pancreatitis (n = 14), stent migration (n = 3), and duodenal perforation (n = 3). Long-term complications included stent migration (n = 9) and hepatic abscess (n = 1). A total of 144/174 patients deemed to have resectable cancer at time of diagnosis underwent curative surgery. Due to disease progression or the discovery of metastasis after neoadjuvant therapy, only 22/67 patients with borderline-resectable cancer underwent curative surgery. SEMS should be considered for patients with obstructive jaundice and resectable or borderline resectable pancreatic

  8. Review article: surgical, neo-adjuvant and adjuvant management strategies in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, J R A; Olde Damink, S W M; Imber, C; Bridgewater, J; Pereira, S P; Malagó, M

    2011-11-01

    The majority of patients with cholangiocarcinoma present with advanced, irresectable tumours associated with poor prognosis. The incidence and mortality rates associated with cholangiocarcinoma continue to rise, mandating the development of novel strategies for early detection, improved resection and treatment of residual lesions. To review the current evidence base for surgical, adjuvant and neo-adjuvant techniques in the management of cholangiocarcinoma. A search strategy incorporating PubMed/Medline search engines and utilising the key words biliary tract carcinoma; cholangiocarcinoma; management; surgery; chemotherapy; radiotherapy; photodynamic therapy; and radiofrequency ablation, in various combinations, was employed. Data on neo-adjuvant and adjuvant techniques remain limited, and much of the literature concerns palliation of inoperable disease. The only opportunity for long-term survival remains surgical resection with negative pathological margins or liver transplantation, both of which remain possible in only a minority of selected patients. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant techniques currently provide only limited success in improving survival. The development of novel strategies and treatment techniques is crucial. However, the shortage of randomised controlled trials is compounded by the low feasibility of conducting adequately powered trials in liver surgery, due to the large sample sizes that are required. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Limited T-cell receptor diversity in liver-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Diu, A; Moebius, U; Ferradini, L; Genevée, C; Roman-Roman, S; Claudon, M; Delorme, D; Meuer, S; Hercend, T; Praz, F

    1993-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is associated with the presence of high-titer anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies as well as T-cell infiltration of the liver, suggesting the involvement of autoimmune mechanisms. We have studied here the sequences of T-cell receptor alpha and beta chains expressed by T-cell clones derived from liver-infiltrating lymphocytes of two patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Among the eight clones studied from the first patient, four expressed the same member of the V beta 6 subfamily, associated with either V alpha 4 (three clones) or V alpha 21 (one clone) gene segment. Two other clones expressed an identical V beta 12 transcript, and two in-frame alpha chain transcripts, involving V alpha 2 and V alpha 7 gene segments. From the second patient, eight out of the nine clones were found to rearrange V beta 17-J beta 2.1 and V alpha 3 gene segments. The remaining clone expressed distinct T-cell receptor chains, involving V beta 9 and V alpha 11 gene segments. As deduced from the analysis of their junctional regions, the eight T-cell clones expressing V beta 17/V alpha 3 gene segments derived from only three different T cells. Furthermore, conserved amino acid motifs were found to be encoded in both the alpha and the beta-chain junctional regions. Together, these data show a local amplification of unique T lymphocytes in both patients. The use of identical V beta J beta and V alpha gene segments with similar junctional sequences by three different cells, evidenced in one of the two cases, strengthens the view that liver-infiltrating T lymphocytes are selected locally by autoantigens in PBC.

  10. Sequential computerized hepatobiliary imaging during percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Falchero, F.; Valentini, M.; Ciambellotti, E.; Becchi, G.

    1985-04-01

    Sequential computerized hepatobiliary imaging was performed in 11 jaundiced patients before, during, and after biliary decompression. The rates of plasma clearances and radionuclide accumulation in liver cells and biliary tree were calculated, in addition to the uptake and retention index.

  11. Relevance of MicroRNA200 Family and MicroRNA205 for Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and Clinical Outcome in Biliary Tract Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Urbas, Romana; Mayr, Christian; Klieser, Eckhard; Fuereder, Julia; Bach, Doris; Stättner, Stefan; Primavesi, Florian; Jaeger, Tarkan; Stanzer, Stefanie; Ress, Anna Lena; Löffelberger, Magdalena; Wagner, Andrej; Berr, Frieder; Ritter, Markus; Pichler, Martin; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Extensive stromal interaction is one reason for the dismal outcome of biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis and is partly regulated by microRNAs (miRs). This study explores the expression of anti-EMT miR200 family (miR141, −200a/b/c, −429) and miR205 as well as the EMT-related proteins E-cadherin and vimentin in a panel of BTC cell lines and clinical specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry, respectively. MicroRNA expression was correlated to (i) the expression patterns of E-cadherin and vimentin; (ii) clinicopathological characteristics; and (iii) survival data. MicroRNA-200 family and miR205 were expressed in all BTC cells and clinical specimens. E-cadherin and vimentin showed a mutually exclusive expression pattern in both, in vitro and in vivo. Expression of miR200 family members positively correlated with E-cadherin and negatively with vimentin expression in BTC cells and specimens. High expression of miR200 family members (but not miR205) and E-cadherin was associated with longer survival, while low miR200 family and high vimentin expression was a predictor of unfavorable survival. Overall, the current study demonstrates the relevance of the miR200 family in EMT of BTC tumors and suggests these miRs as predictors for positive outcome. PMID:27941621

  12. Prospective evaluation of the clinical implications of the tumor metabolism and chemotherapy-related changes in advanced biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jaemin; Kwon, Hyun Woo; Park, Seongyeol; Oh, Do-Youn; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-03-02

    Purpose: Tumor metabolism measured by (18)F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has a diagnostic and prognostic role in several cancers. The clinical implication of tumor metabolism in biliary tract cancer (BTC) has not been studied well. Therefore, we evaluated the prognostic value of tumor metabolism and chemotherapy-related changes in advanced BTC patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled advanced BTC patients before the initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Using (18)F-FDG PET, we assessed the baseline maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and monitored the changes of SUVmax during chemotherapy. We analyzed the associations between SUVmax, and clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 75 patients were enrolled. All patients received gemcitabine/cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy. Primary tumor site, histologic differentiation, molecular characteristics, laboratory findings, and disease extent were associated with the metabolic characteristics. The high metabolism group showed worse survival outcome [Hazard ratio (HR)=4.09, P = 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR=2.61, P = 0.019 for overall survival (OS)] than the low metabolism group. The lesser reduction of SUVmax was also associated with worse outcome (HR=3.35, P = 0.002 for PFS; HR=1.96, P = 0.082 for OS). Considering both baseline tumor metabolism and its chemotherapy-related changes, patients with a low metabolism and a more reduction in metabolism obtained the best OS (20.7 months versus 6.2 months, P = 0.013). Conclusion: Tumor metabolic activity and the chemotherapy-related changes in the metabolism are associated with prognosis in advanced BTC patients.

  13. Comparison of the Efficacy between Gemcitabine-Cisplatin and Capecitabine-Cisplatin Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Hong, Tae Ho; Lee, In Seok; You, Young Kyoung; Lee, Myung Ah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Gemcitabine-cisplatin combination chemotherapy has been regarded as standard regimen for advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC), based on the ABC-02 trial. To date, however, no studies have compared the efficacies of gemcitabine-platinum and fluoropyrimidine- platinum combination chemotherapy, even though fluoropyrimidine has been widely used as a backbone agent for gastrointestinal cancer. This study compared the efficacy and toxicities of gemcitabine-cisplatin (GP) and capecitabine-cisplatin (XP) combination chemotherapy for treatment of advanced BTC. Materials and Methods We examined 49 patients treated with GP and 44 patients treated with XP from October 2009 to July 2012. All patients had unresectable BTC. The GP regimen comprised gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2, intravenously [IV], days 1 and 8) and cisplatin (75 mg/m2, IV, day 1). The XP regimen comprised capecitabine (1,250 mg/m2 twice a day, peroral, days 1-14) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2, IV, day 1, every three weeks). We analyzed the response rate (RR), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results The RRs were 27.3% and 6.1% in the XP and GP arms, respectively. XP resulted in longer TTP (5.2 months vs. 3.6 months, p=0.016), but OS was not statistically different (10.7 months vs. 8.6 months, p=0.365). Both regimens resulted in grade 3-4 hematologic toxicities, but febrile neutropenia was not noted. Grade 3-4 asthenia, stomatitis, and hand-foot syndrome occurred more frequently in the XP arm. Conclusion XP resulted in a superior TTP and RR compared to GP for treatment of advanced BTC, with comparable toxicity. Conduct of prospective large, randomized trials to evaluate the possibility of XP as another standard therapy is warranted. PMID:25648099

  14. Comparison of the Efficacy between Gemcitabine-Cisplatin and Capecitabine-Cisplatin Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Hong, Tae Ho; Lee, In Seok; You, Young Kyoung; Lee, Myung Ah

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine-cisplatin combination chemotherapy has been regarded as standard regimen for advanced or metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC), based on the ABC-02 trial. To date, however, no studies have compared the efficacies of gemcitabine-platinum and fluoropyrimidine- platinum combination chemotherapy, even though fluoropyrimidine has been widely used as a backbone agent for gastrointestinal cancer. This study compared the efficacy and toxicities of gemcitabine-cisplatin (GP) and capecitabine-cisplatin (XP) combination chemotherapy for treatment of advanced BTC. We examined 49 patients treated with GP and 44 patients treated with XP from October 2009 to July 2012. All patients had unresectable BTC. The GP regimen comprised gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2), intravenously [IV], days 1 and 8) and cisplatin (75 mg/m(2), IV, day 1). The XP regimen comprised capecitabine (1,250 mg/m(2) twice a day, peroral, days 1-14) and cisplatin (60 mg/m(2), IV, day 1, every three weeks). We analyzed the response rate (RR), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. The RRs were 27.3% and 6.1% in the XP and GP arms, respectively. XP resulted in longer TTP (5.2 months vs. 3.6 months, p=0.016), but OS was not statistically different (10.7 months vs. 8.6 months, p=0.365). Both regimens resulted in grade 3-4 hematologic toxicities, but febrile neutropenia was not noted. Grade 3-4 asthenia, stomatitis, and hand-foot syndrome occurred more frequently in the XP arm. XP resulted in a superior TTP and RR compared to GP for treatment of advanced BTC, with comparable toxicity. Conduct of prospective large, randomized trials to evaluate the possibility of XP as another standard therapy is warranted.

  15. Interleukin-6 Promotes the Migration and Cellular Senescence and Inhibits Apoptosis of Human Intrahepatic Biliary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Dong, Juan; Bu, Xiu-Qin; Huang, Yong; Yang, Jing-Yu; Dong, Xuan; Liu, Jie

    2017-08-31

    Biliary epithelial cells (BEC) are closely related to some immune regulatory bile duct diseases. However, the complexity and polymorphism of the morphology and function of bile duct cells have hindered further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate how interleukin-6 (IL-6) affects the migration, cellular senescence and apoptosis of human intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HIBECs). The HIBECs were stimulated by different concentrations of IL-6 (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 ng/ml, respectively). Transwell assay was performed in order to measure the migration abilities, positive β-Galactosidase staining for the cellular senescence of HIBECs, MTT assay for changes of proliferation after IL-6 treatment and flow cytometry for cell cycle and apoptosis. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blotting were conducted in order to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in HIBECs. In comparison to the 0 ng/ml group, in the 5, 10, 15 and 20 ng/ml groups, a significant increase in the number of migratory HIBECs, proliferation, along with mRNA and protein expressions of EMT markers was observed. While the mRNA and protein expressions of epithelial markers, the number of β-Galactosidase positive staining cells, as well as apoptosis rate of HIBECs dramatic decreased. Further, the aforementioned changes were significantly more evident in the 15 and 20 ng/ml groups in comparison to the 5 and 10 ng/ml groups. IL-6 may stimulate EMT, enhance the migration and proliferation, and inhibit apoptosis of HIBECs, thus delaying cellular senescence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Afatinib Dimaleate and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-04

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  17. A systematic review of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of pre-cancerous skin conditions, Barrett's oesophagus and cancers of the biliary tract, brain, head and neck, lung, oesophagus and skin.

    PubMed

    Fayter, D; Corbett, M; Heirs, M; Fox, D; Eastwood, A

    2010-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is the use of a light-sensitive drug, in combination with light of a visible wavelength, to destroy target cells. PDT is used either as a primary treatment or as an adjunctive treatment. It is fairly well accepted in clinical practice for some types of skin cancer but has yet to be fully explored as a treatment for other forms of cancer. To systematically review the clinical effectiveness and safety of PDT in the treatment of Barrett's oesophagus, pre-cancerous skin conditions and the following cancers: biliary tract, brain, head and neck, lung, oesophageal and skin. The search strategy included searching electronic databases (between August and October 2008), followed by update searches in May 2009, along with relevant bibliographies, existing reviews, conference abstracts and contact with experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in skin conditions and Barrett's oesophagus, non-randomised trials for all other sites. People with Barrett's oesophagus, pre-cancerous skin conditions or primary cancer in the following sites: biliary tract, brain, head and neck, lung, oesophageal and skin. Any type of PDT for either curative or palliative treatment. Any comparator including differing applications of PDT treatments (relevant comparators varied according to the condition). The outcomes measured were mortality, morbidity, quality of life, adverse events and resource use. A standardised data extraction form was used. The quality of RCTs and non-randomised controlled studies was assessed using standard checklists. Data extracted from the studies were tabulated and discussed in a narrative synthesis, and the influence of study quality on results was discussed. Meta-analysis was used to estimate a summary measure of effect on relevant outcomes, with assessment of both clinical and statistical heterogeneity. Two reviewers independently screened all titles and abstracts, and data extracted and quality assessed the trials, with

  18. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  19. Comparative proteomics reveals novel components at the plasma membrane of differentiated HepaRG cells and different distribution in hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells.

    PubMed

    Petrareanu, Catalina; Macovei, Alina; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L; Darie, Costel C; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells.

  20. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Novel Components at the Plasma Membrane of Differentiated HepaRG Cells and Different Distribution in Hepatocyte- and Biliary-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Alisa G.; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L.; Darie, Costel C.; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells. PMID:23977166

  1. Biliary tree stem/progenitor cells in glands of extrahepatic and intraheptic bile ducts: an anatomical in situ study yielding evidence of maturational lineages.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Guido; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Onori, Paolo; Franchitto, Antonio; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Rossi, Massimo; Wang, Yunfang; Semeraro, Rossella; Anceschi, Maurizio; Brunelli, Roberto; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2012-02-01

    Stem/progenitors have been identified intrahepatically in the canals of Hering and extrahepatically in glands of the biliary tree. Glands of the biliary tree (peribiliary glands) are tubulo-alveolar glands with mucinous and serous acini, located deep within intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. We have shown that biliary tree stem/progenitors (BTSCs) are multipotent, giving rise in vitro and in vivo to hepatocytes, cholangiocytes or pancreatic islets. Cells with the phenotype of BTSCs are located at the bottom of the peribiliary glands near the fibromuscular layer. They are phenotypically heterogeneous, expressing transcription factors as well as surface and cytoplasmic markers for stem/progenitors of liver (e.g. SOX9/17), pancreas (e.g. PDX1) and endoderm (e.g. SOX17, EpCAM, NCAM, CXCR4, Lgr5, OCT4) but not for mature markers (e.g. albumin, secretin receptor or insulin). Subpopulations co-expressing liver and pancreatic markers (e.g. PDX1(+)/SOX17(+)) are EpCAM(+/-), and are assumed to be the most primitive of the BTSC subpopulations. Their descendants undergo a maturational lineage process from the interior to the surface of ducts and vary in the mature cells generated: pancreatic cells in hepatopancreatic ducts, liver cells in large intrahepatic bile ducts, and bile duct cells along most of the biliary tree. We hypothesize that there is ongoing organogenesis throughout life, with BTSCs giving rise to hepatic stem cells in the canals of Hering and to committed progenitors within the pancreas. The BTSCs are likely to be central to normal tissue turnover and injury repair and to be key elements in the pathophysiology of liver, pancreas and biliary tree diseases, including oncogenesis.

  2. Evidence for the targeting by 2-oxo-dehydrogenase enzymes in the T cell response of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, J; Ansari, A A; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Roche, T; Bonkovsky, H; Kaplan, M; Gershwin, M E

    1991-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease that includes the presence of lymphoid infiltrates in portal tracts, high titer autoantibodies against pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2 (PDH-E2) and branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase-E2 (BCKD-E2), and biliary tract destruction. The mechanism by which the autoimmune response is induced, the specificity of damage to the biliary epithelium, and the role of T cells in PBC are still unknown. To address these issues, we have taken advantage of a mouse mAb, coined C355.1, and studied its reactivity against a panel of liver tissue from normal subjects as well as a panel of liver specimens from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and chronic active hepatitis (CAH). C355.1, much like human autoantibodies to PDH-E2, reacts exclusively by immunoblotting with PDH-E2, binds to the inner lipoyl domain of the protein, and inhibits PDH-E2 activity in vitro. In addition, we have also attempted to develop cloned T cell lines that react with PDH-E2 and/or BCKD-E2 using liver biopsies from patients with PBC, compared with CAH. Although monoclonal C355.1 produced typical mitochondrial fluorescence on sections of normal liver, pancreas, lung, heart, thyroid, and kidney, it produced a distinct and intense reactivity when used to stain the bile ducts of patients with PBC. Nine of 13 PBC liver biopsies studied herein contained bile ducts on light microscopy, all of which reacted intensely at a 1:100 culture supernatant dilution of monoclonal C355.1. In contrast, although bile ducts of liver specimens from normals, CAH, and progressive sclerosing cholangitis also reacted with C355.1, such reactivity was exclusively mitochondrial and readily detectable only at a dilution of 1:2. More importantly, we generated CD4+, CD8-, alpha beta TCR+ cloned T cell lines from patients with PBC, but not from CAH, that produced IL-2 specifically in response to PDH-E2 or BCKD-E2.

  3. Dendritic Cells Regulate Treg-Th17 Axis in Obstructive Phase of Bile Duct Injury in Murine Biliary Atresia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Li, Kang; Yang, Li; Tang, Shao-Tao; Wang, Xin-Xing; Cao, Guo-Qing; Li, Shuai; Lei, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Several cell types are considered to be effector cells in bile duct injury in rhesus rotavirus (RRV)-induced experimental biliary atresia (BA). Here, we identified an increased T helper 17 (Th17) cell population in a BA mode. By depleting the Th17 cells, the BA symptoms (onset of jaundice, acholic stools and retarded growth) were attenuated and the survival rate was improved. Furthermore, we found that in mice with BA, the percentage of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells decreased along with the increased percentage of Th17 cells. However, the absolute numbers of Treg and Th17 cells were both increased in liver of RRV-injected mice compared to saline-injected mice. The proportion of Th17 cells at 7 days post-infection was decreased if Treg cells isolated from normal adult mice, but not Treg cells from the livers of mice with BA, were intraperitoneally transferred on day 5 of life. In vitro experiments also showed that Treg cells from mice with BA had a diminished suppressive effect on Th17 cell generation. To determine the mechanisms, we investigated the production of cytokines in the liver. The level of IL-6, which has been shown to be abundantly secreted by activated dendritic cells (DCs), was remarkably elevated. Importantly, in a Treg/Th17 cell suppression assay, IL-6 was demonstrated to paralyze the Treg cells' suppressive effect on Th17 cells and eventually the unrestrained increase of Th17 cells contributed to bile duct injury. In conclusion, the DC-regulated Treg-Th17 axis, probably in conjunction with other effector T cells, aggravates progressive inflammatory injury at the time of ductal obstruction.

  4. Comparison of the influence of plastic and fully covered metal biliary stents on the accuracy of EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ali A; Fein, Michael; Kowalski, Thomas E; Loren, David E; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A

    2012-09-01

    Prior studies have reported that the presence of prior biliary stent may interfere with EUS visualization of pancreatic tumors. We aimed to compare the influence of the biliary plastic and fully covered self-expanding metal stents (CSEMS) on the accuracy of EUS-FNA cytology in patients with solid pancreatic masses. We conducted a retrospective study evaluating 677 patients with solid pancreatic head/uncinate lesions and a previous biliary stent in whom EUS-FNA was performed. The patients were stratified into two groups: (1) those with a plastic stents and (2) those with CSEMS. Performance characteristics of EUS-FNA including the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were compared between the two groups. The frequency of obtaining an adequate cytology by EUS-FNA was similar in both the CSEMS group and the plastic stent group (97 vs. 97.1 % respectively; p = 1.0). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EUS-FNA was not significantly different between patients with CSEMS and plastic stents (96.8, 100, 100 % and 97.3, 98, 99.8 %, respectively). The negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was lower in the CSEMS group compared to the plastic stent group (66.6 vs. 78.1 % respectively; p = 0.42). There was one false-positive cytology in the plastic stent group compared to none in the CSEMS group. In a retrospective cohort trial, EUS-FNA was found to be highly accurate and safe in diagnosing patients with suspected pancreatic cancer, even in the presence of a plastic or metallic biliary stent. The presence of a stent did not contribute to a higher false-positive cytology rate.

  5. Dendritic Cells Regulate Treg-Th17 Axis in Obstructive Phase of Bile Duct Injury in Murine Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shao-tao; Wang, Xin-xing; Cao, Guo-qing; Li, Shuai; Lei, Hai-yan; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Several cell types are considered to be effector cells in bile duct injury in rhesus rotavirus (RRV)-induced experimental biliary atresia (BA). Here, we identified an increased T helper 17 (Th17) cell population in a BA mode. By depleting the Th17 cells, the BA symptoms (onset of jaundice, acholic stools and retarded growth) were attenuated and the survival rate was improved. Furthermore, we found that in mice with BA, the percentage of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells decreased along with the increased percentage of Th17 cells. However, the absolute numbers of Treg and Th17 cells were both increased in liver of RRV-injected mice compared to saline-injected mice. The proportion of Th17 cells at 7 days post-infection was decreased if Treg cells isolated from normal adult mice, but not Treg cells from the livers of mice with BA, were intraperitoneally transferred on day 5 of life. In vitro experiments also showed that Treg cells from mice with BA had a diminished suppressive effect on Th17 cell generation. To determine the mechanisms, we investigated the production of cytokines in the liver. The level of IL-6, which has been shown to be abundantly secreted by activated dendritic cells (DCs), was remarkably elevated. Importantly, in a Treg/Th17 cell suppression assay, IL-6 was demonstrated to paralyze the Treg cells’ suppressive effect on Th17 cells and eventually the unrestrained increase of Th17 cells contributed to bile duct injury. In conclusion, the DC-regulated Treg-Th17 axis, probably in conjunction with other effector T cells, aggravates progressive inflammatory injury at the time of ductal obstruction. PMID:26325187

  6. Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Mikelle D.; Murray, Karen F.

    2011-01-01

    Extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), an inflammatory sclerosing cholangiopathy, is the leading indication for liver transplantation in children. The cause is still unknown, although possible infectious, genetic, and immunologic etiologies have received much recent focus. These theories are often dependent on each other for secondary or coexisting mechanisms. Concern for EHBA is raised by a cholestatic infant, but the differential diagnosis is large and the path to diagnosis remains varied. Current treatment is surgical with an overall survival rate of approximately 90%. The goals of this article are to review the important clinical aspects of EHBA and to highlight some of the more recent scientific and clinical developments contributing to our understanding of this condition. PMID:18496390

  7. Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas as a Cause of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jeet; Nehme, Fredy; Salyers, William

    2016-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas (SCCP) is a rare neoplasm, given a lack of naturally occurring squamous cells within the pancreas, accounting for only 0.2% of all pancreatic cancers. The etiology is unknown. Symptomatology is non-specific and similar to other pancreatic neoplasms. No non-invasive testing can adequately rule in SCCP, and workup should proceed similarly to any pancreatic mass. Tissue sampling is required for diagnosis and guidance of further management, most commonly by endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspirate. SCCP is more aggressive than adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with a median survival of three and ten months for those treated with palliative and surgical intent, respectively. The optimal treatment regimen remains unknown, though the uses of radiation therapy, platinum-based regimens, gemcitabine, and 5-FU have all been reported with favorable results. We present a case of primary SCCP in an 81-year-old female who presented with jaundice. PMID:27909644

  8. Phase 2 study of combination SPI-1620 with docetaxel as second-line advanced biliary tract cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Richard; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Amin, Manik; Rocha-Lima, Caio Max S; Gandhi, Jitendra; Harris, William P; Song, Tao; Portnoy, David

    2017-07-11

    This multicentre, open-label study evaluated the efficacy and safety of SPI-1620, an analogue of endothelin-1, administered in combination with docetaxel as second-line treatment for patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (ABTC). Eligible patients received continuous cycles of combination therapy with SPI-1620 (11 μg m(-2)) and docetaxel (75 mg m(-2)) intravenously every 3 weeks until disease progression (PD) or intolerable toxicity. Tumour response was evaluated using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging every 2 cycles (6 weeks). The primary efficacy end point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included overall response rate (ORR), duration of response, and overall survival (OS) that were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the 30 enrolled patients, 25 patients had qualifying events (PD or death), 1 patient was nonevaluable, and 4 patients were censored at the time of their last tumour assessment. Our primary end point of PFS ⩾5 months was not reached. Median PFS was 2.6 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-2.8), ranging from 0.7 to 8.4 months. The ORR was 10.3% (95% CI: 0.02-0.27). Eleven additional patients achieved stable disease. The OS was 4.87 months. The most common grade 3-4 toxicities were febrile neutropenia and neutropenia. The addition of docetaxel to SPI-1620 in second-line ABTC did not meet the pre-specified primary end point of PFS ⩾5 months in unselected patient population.

  9. The correlation between LDH serum levels and clinical outcome in advanced biliary tract cancer patients treated with first line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Del Prete, Michela; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Santini, Daniele; Silvestris, Nicola; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Valgiusti, Martina; Brunetti, Oronzo; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Lai, Eleonora; Dessì, Alessandra; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2016-04-11

    LDH may represent an indirect marker of neo-angiogenesis and worse prognosis in many tumour types. We assessed the correlation between LDH and clinical outcome for biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients treated with first-line chemotherapy. Overall, 114 advanced BTC patients treated with first-line gemcitabine and cisplatin were included. Patients were divided into two groups (low vs. high LDH), according to pre-treatment LDH values. Patients were also classified according to pre- and post-treatment variation in LDH serum levels (increased vs. decreased). Median progression free survival (PFS) was 5.0 and 2.6 months respectively in patients with low and high pre-treatment LDH levels (p = 0.0042, HR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.37-0.87). Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 and 5.6 months (low vs. high LDH) (p = 0.324, HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.54-1.24). DCR was 71% vs. 43% (low vs. high LDH) (p = 0.002). In 38 patients with decreased LDH values after treatment, PFS and OS were respectively 6.2 and 12.1 months, whereas in 76 patients with post-treatment increased LDH levels, PFS and OS were respectively 3.0 and 5.1 months (PFS: p = 0.0009; HR = 0.49; 95% IC: 0.33-0.74; OS: p < 0.0001; HR = 0.42; 95% IC: 0.27-0.63). Our data seem to suggest that LDH serum level may predict clinical outcome in BTC patients receiving first-line chemotherapy.

  10. The Effects of Endothelial Cells-Preserving Technique on Microsurgical Vascular Reconstruction in Biliary Tract Malignancy: Report of Twenty Cases

    PubMed Central

    Miyagi, Shigehito; Nakanishi, Wataru; Kawagishi, Naoki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Unno, Michiaki; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    We describe our experience of resectional surgery with microsurgical reconstruction of the hepatic arteries in 20 cases with biliary tract malignancy. Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is a lethal complication; therefore, it is important to perform microsurgical reconstruction safely. Recently, we adopted the back wall support suture technique with double needle sutures that does not require the damaged short arteries to be turned over. In this technique, each stitch is placed from the inner side to the outer side to keep endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to develop safety methods. From 2003 to 2012, 20 patients with biliary tract malignancy with possible involvement of the hepatic arteries underwent resectional surgery with microvascular reconstruction (cholangiocarcinoma: n = 15; others: n = 5). For this cohort study, patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 5) included patients who underwent the conventional ‘twist technique’ and group II (n = 15) included patients who underwent the microsurgical back wall support suture technique with double needle sutures and received gabexate mesilate, a strong serine protease inhibitor (40 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. We investigated HAT using Doppler ultrasonography for 10 days. No postoperative mortality was observed. The incidence of HAT was only one case in group I, and there was no significant difference between the two groups. However, the value of the pulsatile index and acceleration time were significantly improved in group II. In conclusion, the back wall support suture technique with gabexate mesilate administration during microvascular reconstruction was found to be safe. It is important to keep endothelial cells healthy for microvascular reconstruction. PMID:24574945

  11. The effects of endothelial cells-preserving technique on microsurgical vascular reconstruction in biliary tract malignancy: report of twenty cases.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Shigehito; Nakanishi, Wataru; Kawagishi, Naoki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Unno, Michiaki; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    We describe our experience of resectional surgery with microsurgical reconstruction of the hepatic arteries in 20 cases with biliary tract malignancy. Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is a lethal complication; therefore, it is important to perform microsurgical reconstruction safely. Recently, we adopted the back wall support suture technique with double needle sutures that does not require the damaged short arteries to be turned over. In this technique, each stitch is placed from the inner side to the outer side to keep endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to develop safety methods. From 2003 to 2012, 20 patients with biliary tract malignancy with possible involvement of the hepatic arteries underwent resectional surgery with microvascular reconstruction (cholangiocarcinoma: n = 15; others: n = 5). For this cohort study, patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 5) included patients who underwent the conventional 'twist technique' and group II (n = 15) included patients who underwent the microsurgical back wall support suture technique with double needle sutures and received gabexate mesilate, a strong serine protease inhibitor (40 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. We investigated HAT using Doppler ultrasonography for 10 days. No postoperative mortality was observed. The incidence of HAT was only one case in group I, and there was no significant difference between the two groups. However, the value of the pulsatile index and acceleration time were significantly improved in group II. In conclusion, the back wall support suture technique with gabexate mesilate administration during microvascular reconstruction was found to be safe. It is important to keep endothelial cells healthy for microvascular reconstruction.

  12. Protective response of the Ah receptor to ANIT-induced biliary epithelial cell toxicity in see-through medaka.

    PubMed

    Volz, David C; Kullman, Seth W; Howarth, Deanna L; Hardman, Ron C; Hinton, David E

    2008-04-01

    The adaptive role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah receptor or AHR) in protecting against disease-related conditions remains unclear in nonmammalian models, particularly teleosts. Therefore, this study focused on the potential role of AHR in response to biliary epithelial cell toxicity and hepatobiliary alteration in medaka. See-through medaka (STII strain) were exposed for 96 h using the biliary toxicant alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) as a reagent, and fish were evaluated daily using histological and ultrastructural analysis, and by imaging directly through the body wall of living fish. Brightfield and transmission electron microscopy showed that a single ANIT dose (40 mg/kg) specifically induced swelling and apoptosis of bile preductular epithelial cells (BPDECs) as early as 6 h after initial exposure. Following ANIT-induced BPDEC toxicity, in vivo imaging of STII medaka showed significant gallbladder discoloration from 48-72 h. Collectively, these pathologic data suggested that ANIT exposure resulted in acute hepatobiliary changes, lasting < 96 h following initial exposure. We then tested the potential role of AHR in response to ANIT-induced hepatobiliary alteration. Overall, we demonstrated that (1) transient AHR activation and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) induction in livers occurred during ANIT-induced hepatobiliary impairment, (2) pretreatment with an AHR agonist partially protected against acute hepatobiliary alteration, and (3) using a luciferase-based reporter assay, the bile pigment bilirubin weakly activated mouse AHR and binding to medaka-specific CYP1A promoter, resulting in AHR element-driven transcription. Given that bile acids and pigments are present in mammalian and fish liver, these studies collectively suggest that bile-induced AHR activation may be conserved between teleosts and rodents.

  13. Revision concepts and distinctive points of the new Japanese classification for biliary tract cancers in comparison with the 7(th) edition of the Union for International Cancer Control and the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Nagino, Masato; Takada, Tadahiro; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    The 3(rd) English edition of the Japanese classification of the biliary tract cancers (JC) is now available in this journal. The primary aim of this revision is to provide all clinicians and researchers with a common language of cancer staging at an international level. On the other hand, there are several important issues that should be solved for the optimization of the staging system. Revision concepts and major revision points of the 3(rd) English edition of the JC were reviewed. Furthermore, comparing with the 7(th) edition of staging system developed by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), distinctive points in the JC was discussed. In this edition of the JC, the same stage groupings as those in the UICC/AJCC staging system were basically adopted. T, N, and M categories were also identical in principle with those in the UICC/AJCC staging system, although slight modifications were proposed as the "Japanese rules". As distinctive points, perihilar cholangiocarcinomas and ampullary region carcinomas were clearly defined. Intraepithelial tumor was discriminated from invasive carcinoma at ductal resection margins. Classifications of site-specific surgical margin status remained in this edition. Histological classification was based on that in the former editions of the JC, but adopted some parts of the World Health Organization classification. The JC now share its staging system of the biliary tact carcinomas with the UICC/AJCC staging system. Future validation of the "Japanese rules" could provide important evidence to make globally standardized staging system. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  14. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but without substantial clinical success. In this review, the authors discuss the history of plastic biliary stent development and the current use of plastic stents for malignant biliary diseases.

  15. Prognostic significance of thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase expression in biliary tract cancer patients receiving adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    KIM, KWAN WOO; KWON, HYUK-CHAN; KIM, SUNG-HYUN; OH, SUNG YONG; LEE, SUEE; LEE, JI HYUN; ROH, MYUNG HWAN; KIM, MIN CHAN; KIM, KI HAN; KIM, YOUNG HOON; ROH, YOUNG HOON; JEONG, JIN SOOK; KIM, HYO-JIN

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a relatively uncommon type of cancer, accounting for ∼4% of the malignant neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) predict clinical outcome in BTC patients treated with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. TS and TP expression were found to be significantly correlated with cancer location (P=0.044 and 0.031, respectively). The multivariate analysis revealed that age [hazard ratio (HR)=2.157, P=0.008], stage (HR=2.234, P<0.001), resection margin status (HR=2.748, P=0.004) and TP expression (HR=2.014, P=0.039) were independently associated with overall survival (OS). PMID:24649282

  16. Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease & NASH Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis) Hepatitis ...

  17. Enhanced innate immune responsiveness and intolerance to intestinal endotoxins in human biliary epithelial cells contributes to chronic cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Tobias; Beutler, Claudia; Picó, Almudena Hurtado; Shibolet, Oren; Pratt, Daniel S; Pascher, Andreas; Neuhaus, Peter; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Berg, Thomas; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2011-11-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) orchestrate the innate immune defence in human biliary epithelial cells (BECs). Tight control of PRR signalling provides tolerance to physiological amounts of intestinal endotoxins in human bile to avoid constant innate immune activation in BECs. We wanted to determine whether inappropriate innate immune responses to intestinal endotoxins contribute to the development and perpetuation of chronic biliary inflammation. We examined PRR-mediated innate immune responses and protective endotoxin tolerance in primary BECs isolated from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), alcoholic liver disease and patients without chronic liver disease. Expression studies comprised northern blots, RT-PCR, Western blots and immunocytochemistry. Functional studies comprised immuno-precipitation Western blots, FACS for endotoxin uptake, and NF-κB activation assays and ELISA for secreted IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Primary BECs from explanted PSC livers showed reversibly increased TLR and NOD protein expression and activation of the MyD88/IRAK signalling complex. Consecutively, PSC BECs exhibited inappropriate innate immune responses to endotoxins and did not develop immune tolerance after repeated endotoxin exposures. This endotoxin hyper-responsiveness was probably because of the stimulatory effect of abundantly expressed IFN-γ and TNF-α in PSC livers, which stimulated TLR4-mediated endotoxin signalling in BECs, leading to increased TLR4-mediated endotoxin incorporation and impaired inactivation of the TLR4 signalling cascade. As TNF-α inhibition partly restored protective innate immune tolerance, endogenous TNF-α secretion probably contributed to inappropriate endotoxin responses in BECs. Inappropriate innate immune responses to intestinal endotoxins and subsequent endotoxin intolerance because of enhanced PRR signalling in BECs probably contribute to chronic cholangitis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure ... is required to watch for new sites of basal cell cancer.

  19. Impact of Intraluminal Brachytherapy on Survival Outcome for Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer: A Propensity-Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Oikawa, Hirobumi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kanesaka, Naoto; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Kosugi, Takashi; Hatano, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masao; Ito, Yoshinori; Takayama, Makoto; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Imai, Michiko; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether adding intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) to definitive radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable biliary tract cancer has a positive impact on survival outcome. Methods and Materials: The original cohort comprised 209 patients, including 153 who underwent external beam RT (EBRT) alone and 56 who received both ILBT and EBRT. By matching propensity scores, 56 pairs (112 patients) consisting of 1 patient with and 1 patient without ILBT were selected. They were well balanced in terms of sex, age, performance status, clinical stage, jaundice, and addition of chemotherapy. The impact of ILBT on overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC) was investigated. Results: The 2-year OS rates were 31% for the ILBT+ group and 40% for theILBT– group (P=.862). The 2-year DSS rates were 42% for the ILBT+ group and 41% for the ILBT– group (P=.288). The 2-year LC rates were 65% for the ILBT+ group and 35% for the ILBT– group (P=.094). Three of the 4 sensitivity analyses showed a significantly better LC for the ILBT+ group (P=.010, .025, .049), and another showed a marginally better LC (P=.068), and none of the sensitivity analyses showed any statistically significant differences in OS or DSS. Conclusions: In the treatment for unresectable biliary tract cancer, the addition of ILBT to RT has no impact on OS or DSS but is associated with better LC. Therefore, the role of ILBT should be addressed by other measures than survival benefit, for example, by less toxicity, prolonged biliary tract patency decreasing the need for further palliative interventions, or patient quality of life.

  20. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000282.htm Primary biliary cirrhosis To use the sharing features on this page, ... and leads to scarring of the liver called cirrhosis. This is called biliary cirrhosis. Causes The cause ...

  1. Phenotyping and auto-antibody production by liver-infiltrating B cells in primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian K; Guevel, Bardia T; Reynolds, Gary M; Gupta Udatha, D B R K; Henriksen, Eva Kristine Klemsdal; Stamataki, Zania; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Liaskou, Evaggelia

    2017-02-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are immune-mediated biliary diseases that demonstrate prominent and restricted genetic association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. In PBC, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are specific and used as diagnostic biomarkers. PSC-relevant auto-antibodies remain controversial despite a distinct HLA association that mirrors archetypical auto-antigen driven disorders. Herein, we compared antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) in PSC and PBC liver explants to determine if liver-infiltrating ASCs represent an opportune and novel source of disease-relevant auto-antibodies. Using enzymatic digestion and mechanical disruption, liver mononuclear cells (LIMCs) were isolated from fresh PSC and PBC explants and plasmablast (CD19+CD27+CD38(hi)CD138-) and plasma cell (CD19+CD27+CD38(hi)CD138+) ASCs were enumerated by flow cytometry. We observed 45-fold fewer plasma cells in PSC explants (n = 9) compared to PBC samples (n = 5, p < 0.01) and 10-fold fewer IgA-, IgG- and IgM-positive ASCs (p < 0.05). Liver-infiltrating ASCs from PSC and PBC explants were functional and produced similar concentrations of IgA, IgG and IgM following 2 weeks of culture. Antibody production by PBC ASCs (n = 3) was disease-specific as AMA to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit (PDC-E2) was detected by immunostaining, immunoblotting and ELISA. Antibody profiling of PSC supernatants (n = 9) using full-length recombinant human protein arrays (Cambridge Protein Arrays) revealed reactivities to nucleolar protein 3 (5/9) and hematopoietic cell-specific Lyn substrate 1 (3/9). Array analysis of PBC supernatants (n = 3) detected reactivities to PDC-E2 and hexokinase 1 (3/3). In conclusion, we detected unique frequencies of liver-infiltrating ASCs in PSC and PBC and in so doing, highlight a feasible approach for understanding disease-relevant antibodies in PSC.

  2. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  3. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  4. Financial Impact of Postoperative Complication Following Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gani, Faiz; Hundt, John; Makary, Martin A; Haider, Adil H; Zogg, Cheryl K; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-04-01

    Despite increasing efforts for cost containment, little is known regarding the financial implications of postoperative complication under current volume-driven payment paradigms. This study sought the test the associations between hospital finances and postoperative complications among hepato-pancreatico-bilary cancer patients. Patients undergoing surgery for the management of a hepatobiliary or pancreatic cancer between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013 were identified using institutional claims and cost-accounting data. Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to calculate risk-adjusted fixed and variable costs, payments, and net margins. A total of 1483 met inclusion criteria. Fixed ($9290 [interquartile range (IQR) $7129-$11,598] vs. $14,784 [IQR $10,523-$22,799], p < 0.001) and variable costs ($12,342 [IQR $9886-$14,762] vs. $19,330 [IQR $13,967-$29,435], p < 0.001) were higher among patients who developed a postoperative complication following a hepatectomy. A higher contribution margin ($12,421 [IQR $8440-$16,445] vs. $20,016 [IQR $14,212-$39,179], p < 0.001), as well as a twofold higher net profit was noted among patients who developed postoperative complication ($2788 [IQR $660-$5815] vs. $5515 [IQR $1068-$10,315], p < 0.001). Total hospital costs ($26,840 [IQR $21,318-$35,358] vs. $46,628 [IQR $31,974-$69,326], p < 0.001) as well as payments ($32,761 [IQR $26,394-$41,883] vs. $53,612 [IQR $38,548-$78,116], p < 0.001) were more than 1.5 times higher among patients who developed a postoperative complication following pancreatic resection. Contribution margins ($18,356 [IQR $14,024-$24,390] vs. $29,153 [IQR $20,256-$41,785], p < 0.001), as well as net profits ($5907 [IQR $2179-$9412] vs. $8114 [IQR $2518-$14,249], p < 0.001) were higher among patients who developed postoperative complication following pancreatic surgery. A positive association was observed between net profits and postoperative complications. Future policies

  5. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  6. Real-time PCR-based analysis of the human bile microRNAome identifies miR-9 as a potential diagnostic biomarker for biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Kengo; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Ishibashi, Osamu; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Arima, Yasuo; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomohiro; Akagi, Ichiro; Tajiri, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Uchida, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is often difficult to diagnose definitively, even through histological examination. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a variety of physiological processes. In recent years, it has been suggested that profiles for circulating miRNAs, as well as those for tissue miRNAs, have the potential to be used as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer. The aim of this study was to confirm the existence of miRNAs in human bile and to assess their potential as clinical biomarkers for BTC. We sampled bile from patients who underwent biliary drainage for biliary diseases such as BTC and choledocholithiasis. PCR-based miRNA detection and miRNA cloning were performed to identify bile miRNAs. Using high-throughput real-time PCR-based miRNA microarrays, the expression profiles of 667 miRNAs were compared in patients with malignant disease (n = 9) and age-matched patients with the benign disease choledocholithiasis (n = 9). We subsequently characterized bile miRNAs in terms of stability and localization. Through cloning and using PCR methods, we confirmed that miRNAs exist in bile. Differential analysis of bile miRNAs demonstrated that 10 of the 667 miRNAs were significantly more highly expressed in the malignant group than in the benign group at P<0.0005. Setting the specificity threshold to 100% showed that some miRNAs (miR-9, miR-302c*, miR-199a-3p and miR-222*) had a sensitivity level of 88.9%, and receiver-operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that miR-9 and miR-145* could be useful diagnostic markers for BTC. Moreover, we verified the long-term stability of miRNAs in bile, a characteristic that makes them suitable for diagnostic use in clinical settings. We also confirmed that bile miRNAs are localized to the malignant/benign biliary epithelia. These findings suggest that bile miRNAs could be informative biomarkers for hepatobiliary disease and that some miRNAs, particularly miR-9, may be helpful in the diagnosis and clinical management of BTC.

  7. Real-Time PCR-Based Analysis of the Human Bile MicroRNAome Identifies miR-9 as a Potential Diagnostic Biomarker for Biliary Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shigehara, Kengo; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Ishibashi, Osamu; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Arima, Yasuo; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomohiro; Akagi, Ichiro; Tajiri, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Uchida, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is often difficult to diagnose definitively, even through histological examination. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a variety of physiological processes. In recent years, it has been suggested that profiles for circulating miRNAs, as well as those for tissue miRNAs, have the potential to be used as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer. The aim of this study was to confirm the existence of miRNAs in human bile and to assess their potential as clinical biomarkers for BTC. We sampled bile from patients who underwent biliary drainage for biliary diseases such as BTC and choledocholithiasis. PCR-based miRNA detection and miRNA cloning were performed to identify bile miRNAs. Using high-throughput real-time PCR-based miRNA microarrays, the expression profiles of 667 miRNAs were compared in patients with malignant disease (n = 9) and age-matched patients with the benign disease choledocholithiasis (n = 9). We subsequently characterized bile miRNAs in terms of stability and localization. Through cloning and using PCR methods, we confirmed that miRNAs exist in bile. Differential analysis of bile miRNAs demonstrated that 10 of the 667 miRNAs were significantly more highly expressed in the malignant group than in the benign group at P<0.0005. Setting the specificity threshold to 100% showed that some miRNAs (miR-9, miR-302c*, miR-199a-3p and miR-222*) had a sensitivity level of 88.9%, and receiver-operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that miR-9 and miR-145* could be useful diagnostic markers for BTC. Moreover, we verified the long-term stability of miRNAs in bile, a characteristic that makes them suitable for diagnostic use in clinical settings. We also confirmed that bile miRNAs are localized to the malignant/benign biliary epithelia. These findings suggest that bile miRNAs could be informative biomarkers for hepatobiliary disease and that some miRNAs, particularly miR-9, may be helpful in the diagnosis and clinical management of BTC. PMID

  8. Ductular network formation by rat biliary epithelial cells in the dynamical culture with collagen gel and dimethylsulfoxide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Sudo, Ryo; Fukasawa, Kazutomo; Ikeda, Mariko; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2008-08-01

    Formation of bile ducts in culture is important for reconstructing hepatic organoids with bile drainage systems. However, morphogenic factors of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) have been poorly understood because of the lack of experimental models. Here, we demonstrated that rat BECs formed bile ductular networks in dynamic culture, when culture conditions were sequentially controlled. BEC morphogenesis was achieved through two-dimensional culture on collagen gel, collagen gel sandwich configuration, and 1% dimethylsulfoxide stimulation. In this culture system, BECs developed into large bile duct structures (LBDs) that formed interconnected networks of continuous lumens. LBD luminal surfaces possessed well developed microvilli, consisted of 7 to 10 BECs, and their inner diameters measured 20 to 50 microm. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the cells in LBDs expressed apical and basal domain markers of BECs. Immunofluorescent staining identified apical domain markers such as Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) anion exchanger 2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator on the luminal surface of LBDs, responding to secretin stimulation as well as laminin protein surrounding LBDs. Furthermore, the cells in LBDs transported metabolized fluorescein from the basal side to the luminal space, further demonstrating that the reconstructed LBDs were functionally and morphologically similar to the bile ducts in vivo. The culture model described here will be useful in reconstructing hepatic tissues as well as in understanding the mechanism of bile duct development and its disruption in disease.

  9. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  10. Clinical Study on Using (125)I Seeds Articles Combined with Biliary Stent Implantation in the Treatment of Malignant Obstructive Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Zheng, Yan-Bo; Song, Xue-Peng; Sun, Bo-Lin; Jiang, Wen-Jin; Wang, Li-Gang

    2017-08-01

    Aim: To study the feasibility and curative effect of(125)I seeds articles combined with biliary stent implantation in the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients with malignant obstructive jaundice were included. Twenty-four were treated by biliary stent implantation combined with intraluminal brachytherapy by (125)I seeds articles as the experimental group, while the remaining 26 were treated by biliary stent implantation only as the control group. The goal of this study was to evaluate total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and tumor markers (cancer antigen (CA)-199, CA-242 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)), as well as biliary stent patency status and survival time before and after surgery. Results: Jaundice improved greatly in both groups. The decreases of CA-199 and CA-242 had statistical significance (p=0.003 and p=0.004) in the experimental group. The ratio of biliary stent patency was 83.3% (20/24) in the experimental group and 57.7% (15/26) in the control group (p=0.048). The biliary stent patency time in the experimental group was 1~15.5 (mean=9.84) months. The biliary stent patency time in the control group was 0.8~9 (mean=5.57) months, which was statistically significant (p=0.018). The median survival time was 10.2 months in the experimental group, while 5.4 months in control group (p<0.05). Conclusion:(125)I seeds articles combined with biliary stent implantation significantly prolongs biliary stent patency time and survival time for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice possibly by inhibiting the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and the growth of tumor. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Immunolocalization of putative human liver progenitor cells in livers from patients with end-stage primary biliary cirrhosis and sclerosing cholangitis using the monoclonal antibody OV-6.

    PubMed

    Crosby, H A; Hubscher, S; Fabris, L; Joplin, R; Sell, S; Kelly, D; Strain, A J

    1998-03-01

    The term oval cell describes small cells with oval nuclei that arise in the periphery of the portal tracts in rat models of hepatocarcinogenesis and injury and can differentiate into either hepatocytes or bile duct cells, ie, are bipotential. The presence of such cells in human liver is controversial. Here, immunolocalization of OV-6 and two biliary markers, cytokeratin 19 (CK-19) and human epithelial antigen 125 (HEA-125) is compared in normal adult human livers and in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) liver sections. CK-19 and HEA-125 stained bile ducts and ductules in normal liver as well as proliferating ductular structures in diseased livers. OV-6 did not label ducts or ductules in normal liver, but in PBC and PSC stained numerous proliferating ductular and periductular cells and lobular hepatocytes. In PBC, discrete OV-6-positive cells with a mature biliary-cell-like morphology were seen integrated into some intact bile ducts as well as occasional small immature oval-like cells. In addition, in PSC, hepatocytes in regenerating lobules were also strongly stained with OV-6, and on close inspection, in both PBC and PSC, oval cells and small hepatocytes at the margins of the lobules were strongly labeled. In contrast to the rat liver, OV-6 and CK-19 staining did not always co-localize. It is proposed that the small OV-6-positive oval cells are analogous to those seen in rat models and may represent human liver progenitor cells that may differentiate into OV-6-positive ductal cells or lobular hepatocytes.

  12. Squamous cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... relatively slow-growing. It is more likely than basal cell cancer to spread (metastasize) to other locations, including internal organs. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor along ...

  13. Activation or suppression of the immune response mediators in biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Min; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jinghan; Yang, Xijing; Zhou, Fuping; Li, Linfang; Yuan, Zhengang; Jin, Huajun; Qian, Qijun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Infiltration of immune cells and immune microenvironment determine the proliferative activity of the tumor and metastasis. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of activation or suppression of the immune response mediators on the prognosis of biliary tract cancer (BTC). Methods: We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase and The Cochrane Library for relevant literatures until June 2016. The quality of studies was assessed by QUADAS-2 and NOS tools. Forest and funnel plots and all statistical analyses were generated by using Review Manager 5.3. The bias of included studies was estimated by Egger's test using Meta R package. Results: A total of 2339 patients from 12 studies were finally enrolled in this meta-analysis. Patients with high expression of immune active factors, intraepithelial tumor-infiltrating CD4+ , CD8+, and Foxp3+ T lymphocytes, MHC I, NKG2D, showed a better overall survival (OS) than those with low expression (HR=0.52, 95% CI=0.41-0.67, P<0.00001). On the contrary, the high expression of immune suppressive factors (CD66b+ neutrophils, Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, Intratumoral IL-17+ cells and PD-1+/CD8+ TILs) was significantly associated with poor OS (HR=1.79, 95% CI=1.44-2.22, P<0.00001). A further analysis of therapies targeting tumor microenvironment modulation showed that the median progression free survival (PFS) for BTC patients who received adjuvant immunotherapy was longer than those who received surgery or chemotherapy alone, and the estimated pooled mean difference demonstrated a highly significant improvement (MD =2.33; 95% CI: 0.63-4.02, P=0.007). The total effect of PFS and OS was statistically longer in experimental group, compared to patients in control groups, respectively (PFS: RR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.08-1.46, P=0.004; OS: RR=1.16; 95% CI: 1.07-1.27, P=0.0006). In subgroup meta-analysis of studies on 6-, 12- and 18-month PFS and OS, it showed that adjuvant immunotherapy could improve the 6-month PFS (RR=1.23; 95

  14. Activation or suppression of the immune response mediators in biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Min; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jinghan; Yang, Xijing; Zhou, Fuping; Li, Linfang; Yuan, Zhengang; Jin, Huajun; Qian, Qijun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Infiltration of immune cells and immune microenvironment determine the proliferative activity of the tumor and metastasis. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of activation or suppression of the immune response mediators on the prognosis of biliary tract cancer (BTC). Methods: We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase and The Cochrane Library for relevant literatures until June 2016. The quality of studies was assessed by QUADAS-2 and NOS tools. Forest and funnel plots and all statistical analyses were generated by using Review Manager 5.3. The bias of included studies was estimated by Egger's test using Meta R package. Results: A total of 2339 patients from 12 studies were finally enrolled in this meta-analysis. Patients with high expression of immune active factors, intraepithelial tumor-infiltrating CD4+ , CD8+, and Foxp3+ T lymphocytes, MHC I, NKG2D, showed a better overall survival (OS) than those with low expression (HR=0.52, 95% CI=0.41-0.67, P<0.00001). On the contrary, the high expression of immune suppressive factors (CD66b+ neutrophils, Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, Intratumoral IL-17+ cells and PD-1+/CD8+ TILs) was significantly associated with poor OS (HR=1.79, 95% CI=1.44-2.22, P<0.00001). A further analysis of therapies targeting tumor microenvironment modulation showed that the median progression free survival (PFS) for BTC patients who received adjuvant immunotherapy was longer than those who received surgery or chemotherapy alone, and the estimated pooled mean difference demonstrated a highly significant improvement (MD =2.33; 95% CI: 0.63-4.02, P=0.007). The total effect of PFS and OS was statistically longer in experimental group, compared to patients in control groups, respectively (PFS: RR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.08-1.46, P=0.004; OS: RR=1.16; 95% CI: 1.07-1.27, P=0.0006). In subgroup meta-analysis of studies on 6-, 12- and 18-month PFS and OS, it showed that adjuvant immunotherapy could improve the 6-month PFS (RR=1.23; 95

  15. The Distribution and the Fibrotic Role of Elevated Inflammatory Th17 Cells in Patients With Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, TianYan; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, LiNa; Yang, YunJiao; Zhang, HaoZe; Zhang, FengChun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T helper (Th) 17 cells were reported to have the property of proinflammation and profibrosis. We first investigate the levels of Th17 cells in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients, and then explore their distribution and fibrotic role in the disease. We compared the circulating Th17 and hepatic interleukin (IL)-17-positive cells between patients and healthy controls (HCs) at different disease stages by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The levels of chemokine (c-c motif) ligand (CCL) 20 were then measured. For exploration of the reason why Th17 cells increased, CD4+CD161+ populations were sorted and cultured with IL-23 and IL-1β to analyze their proliferation and IL-17 secretions. The serum IL-23 and IL-1β were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proliferation and expressions of α-smooth muscle actin and IL-8 of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were identified after stimulated by different concentrations of IL-17. Circulating and hepatic Th17 cells were elevated in PBC patients compared with HCs. Early PBC patients presented with more Th17 cells in periphery blood and less in the liver than advanced PBC patients. Accordingly, the levels of both serum and hepatic CCL20 for Th17 cells were higher, especially in those with advanced disease. The progenitor of Th17, CD4+CD161+ cell was increased in PBC. Moreover, the percentage of Th17 cells was positively related with CD4+CD161+ cell. After stimulation with IL-23 and IL-1β which were improved in PBC patients, CD4+CD161+ cells from PBC patients expressed more IL-17, although their proliferation were not different between 2 groups. IL-17 can promote the proliferation of HSCs at a dose-dependent method, and also increase the IL-8 expression in a dose/time-dependent way. Anti-IL-17 can neutralize the above reactions. CD4+CD161+ cells are a source of increased Th17 in PBC patients. With disease progression, Th17 population decreased in the circulation, accompanied by greater

  16. The Distribution and the Fibrotic Role of Elevated Inflammatory Th17 Cells in Patients With Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, TianYan; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, LiNa; Yang, YunJiao; Zhang, HaoZe; Zhang, FengChun

    2015-11-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells were reported to have the property of proinflammation and profibrosis. We first investigate the levels of Th17 cells in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients, and then explore their distribution and fibrotic role in the disease.We compared the circulating Th17 and hepatic interleukin (IL)-17-positive cells between patients and healthy controls (HCs) at different disease stages by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The levels of chemokine (c-c motif) ligand (CCL) 20 were then measured. For exploration of the reason why Th17 cells increased, CD4CD161 populations were sorted and cultured with IL-23 and IL-1β to analyze their proliferation and IL-17 secretions. The serum IL-23 and IL-1β were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proliferation and expressions of α-smooth muscle actin and IL-8 of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were identified after stimulated by different concentrations of IL-17.Circulating and hepatic Th17 cells were elevated in PBC patients compared with HCs. Early PBC patients presented with more Th17 cells in periphery blood and less in the liver than advanced PBC patients. Accordingly, the levels of both serum and hepatic CCL20 for Th17 cells were higher, especially in those with advanced disease. The progenitor of Th17, CD4CD161 cell was increased in PBC. Moreover, the percentage of Th17 cells was positively related with CD4CD161 cell. After stimulation with IL-23 and IL-1β which were improved in PBC patients, CD4CD161 cells from PBC patients expressed more IL-17, although their proliferation were not different between 2 groups. IL-17 can promote the proliferation of HSCs at a dose-dependent method, and also increase the IL-8 expression in a dose/time-dependent way. Anti-IL-17 can neutralize the above reactions.CD4CD161 cells are a source of increased Th17 in PBC patients. With disease progression, Th17 population decreased in the circulation, accompanied by greater accumulation in the

  17. Biliary atresia in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Youson, J H

    1993-01-01

    in hepatocytes. Regression of the bile ducts and ductules is accompanied by a periductular fibrosis that seems to be a product of activity by lipocytes (Ito cells). The regurgitation of bile products into the interstitial tissue of the liver during early biliary atresia may be the stimulus for both inflammatory (granulomatous) and autoimmune responses. There are no bile ducts in adults lampreys, yet they seem to show no immediate consequences of the absence of an exocrine mechanism for the elimination of bile products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  18. An integrated approach for comparative proteomic analysis of human bile reveals overexpressed cancer-associated proteins in malignant biliary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Natalija; Visentin, Rémy; Delhaye, Myriam; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Farina, Annarita

    2014-05-01

    Proteomics is a key tool in the identification of new bile biomarkers for differentiating malignant and nonmalignant biliary stenoses. Unfortunately, the complexity of bile and the presence of molecules interfering with protein analysis represent an obstacle for quantitative proteomic studies in bile samples. The simultaneous need to introduce purification steps and minimize the use of pre-fractionation methods inevitably leads to protein loss and limited quantifications. This dramatically reduces the chance of identifying new potential biomarkers. In the present study, we included differential centrifugation as a preliminary step in a quantitative proteomic workflow involving iTRAQ labeling, peptide fractionation by OFFGEL electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS, to compare protein expression in bile samples collected from patients with malignant or nonmalignant biliary stenoses. A total of 1267 proteins were identified, including a set of 322 newly described bile proteins, mainly belonging to high-density cellular fractions. The subsequent comparative analysis led to a 5-fold increase in the number of quantified proteins over previously published studies and highlighted 104 proteins overexpressed in malignant samples. Finally, immunoblot verifications performed on a cohort of 8 malignant (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, n=4; cholangiocarcinoma, n=4) and 5 nonmalignant samples (chronic pancreatitis, n=3; biliary stones, n=2) confirmed the results of proteomic analysis for three proteins: olfactomedin-4, syntenin-2 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  19. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  20. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrastructural Characteristics of Rat Hepatic Oval Cells and Their Intercellular Contacts in the Model of Biliary Fibrosis: New Insights into Experimental Liver Fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lotowska, Joanna Maria; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek; Daniluk, Urszula; Sobaniec, Piotr; Sendrowski, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Reszec, Joanna; Debek, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been emphasized that hepatic progenitor/oval cells (HPCs) are significantly involved in liver fibrogenesis. We evaluated the multipotential population of HPCs by transmission electron microscope (TEM), including relations with adherent hepatic nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) in rats with biliary fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). The study used 6-week-old Wistar Crl: WI(Han) rats after BDL for 1, 6, and 8 weeks. Current ultrastructural analysis showed considerable proliferation of HPCs in experimental intensive biliary fibrosis. HPCs formed proliferating bile ductules and were scattered in periportal connective tissue. We distinguished 4 main types of HPCs: 0, I, II (bile duct-like cells; most common), and III (hepatocyte-like cells). We observed, very seldom presented in literature, cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially commonly found transitional hepatic stellate cells (T-HSCs) and Kupffer cells/macrophages. We showed the phenomenon of penetration of the basement membrane of proliferating bile ductules by cytoplasmic processes sent by T-HSCs and the formation of direct cell-cell contact with ductular epithelial cells related to HPCs. HPC proliferation induced by BDL evidently promotes portal fibrogenesis. Better understanding of the complex cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially T-HSCs, may help develop antifibrotic therapies in the future.

  2. Ultrastructural Characteristics of Rat Hepatic Oval Cells and Their Intercellular Contacts in the Model of Biliary Fibrosis: New Insights into Experimental Liver Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek; Daniluk, Urszula; Sobaniec, Piotr; Sendrowski, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Debek, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Recently, it has been emphasized that hepatic progenitor/oval cells (HPCs) are significantly involved in liver fibrogenesis. We evaluated the multipotential population of HPCs by transmission electron microscope (TEM), including relations with adherent hepatic nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) in rats with biliary fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Methods The study used 6-week-old Wistar Crl: WI(Han) rats after BDL for 1, 6, and 8 weeks. Results Current ultrastructural analysis showed considerable proliferation of HPCs in experimental intensive biliary fibrosis. HPCs formed proliferating bile ductules and were scattered in periportal connective tissue. We distinguished 4 main types of HPCs: 0, I, II (bile duct-like cells; most common), and III (hepatocyte-like cells). We observed, very seldom presented in literature, cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially commonly found transitional hepatic stellate cells (T-HSCs) and Kupffer cells/macrophages. We showed the phenomenon of penetration of the basement membrane of proliferating bile ductules by cytoplasmic processes sent by T-HSCs and the formation of direct cell-cell contact with ductular epithelial cells related to HPCs. Conclusions HPC proliferation induced by BDL evidently promotes portal fibrogenesis. Better understanding of the complex cellular interactions between HPCs and adjacent NPCs, especially T-HSCs, may help develop antifibrotic therapies in the future. PMID:28769978

  3. Cisplatin and gemcitabine in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (ABC) and persistent jaundice despite optimal stenting: Effective intervention in patients with luminal disease.

    PubMed

    Lamarca, Angela; Benafif, Sarah; Ross, Paul; Bridgewater, John; Valle, Juan W

    2015-09-01

    The advanced biliary tract cancer (ABC)-02 study established cisplatin and gemcitabine (CisGem) as a reference 1(st)-line regimen for patients with advanced/metastatic biliary tract cancer; patients with bilirubin ⩾ 1.5 × upper limit of normal (ULN) were excluded and there are few extant data for systemic treatment in the context of elevated bilirubin. Patients with ABC, receiving CisGem with a baseline bilirubin of ⩾ 1.5 × ULN were eligible for this retrospective analysis; response, toxicity and survival data were collected. Thirty-three patients of 545 screened; median age 59 years, range 23-79; 58% male, 58% with metastases (79% in the liver) of performance status (PS) 0 (33%), 1 (64%) or 2 (3%) were eligible. The median baseline bilirubin was 55 μmol/L (range 32-286); due to biliary tract obstruction (BTO, 76%) or liver metastases (LM, 24%). Toxicity was comparable to the ABC-02 study; bilirubin normalised in 64% during chemotherapy/follow-up. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-9.0) and median overall survival (OS) 9.5 months (95% CI: 5.7-12.8). Patients with BTO had a longer PFS and OS than those with LM (7.0 versus 2.6 months; p = 0.1633 and 9.8 versus 4.4 months, hazard ratio (HR) 0.74; p = 0.465, respectively); not statistically significant (due to small sample size). Normalisation of bilirubin and completion of eight CisGem cycles were associated with longer OS (11.4 versus 2.9 months, HR 0.49; p = 0.08 and 15.2 versus 5.4 months, HR 0.12 p < 0.001, respectively). No difference in OS was shown between the bilirubin percentiles (for either PFS or OS). For PS 0-1 patients with ABC and high bilirubin due to luminal disease despite optimal stenting CisGem can be used safely with results similar to those in patients with normal bilirubin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Biliary atresia in children].

    PubMed

    Famulski, W; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Sulkowski, S; Ostapiuk, H; Kemona, A

    1989-05-01

    Congenital biliary tract atresia was found in 0.58% of children dying in the first year of life. Most frequently atresia included the extrahepatic bile ducts, among them the common bile duct. Five cases (35.7%) had atresia associated with other developmental anomalies, which may suggest a genetic determination of the atresia. The most frequent cause of death of the newborns and infants with congenital biliary tract atresia was bronchopneumonia with associated biliary cirrhosis of the liver.

  5. Cancer Stem Cells, Cancer Cell Plasticity and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25025713

  6. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  7. Safety and Immune Response to a Multi-component Immune Based Therapy (MKC1106-PP) for Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-02

    Ovarian; Melanoma; Renal; Prostate; Colorectal; Endometrial Carcinoma; Cervical Carcinoma; Testicular Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Mesothelioma; Breast Carcinoma; Esophageal Carcinoma; Gastric Cancer; Pancreatic Carcinoma; Neuroendocrine Cancer; Liver Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Biliary Tract Cancer; Anal Carcinoma; Bone Sarcomas; Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Carcinoma of Unknown Origin, Primary

  8. Technical tips and troubleshooting of endoscopic biliary drainage for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-04-01

    Unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction (MHBO) occurs in various diseases, such as cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, and lymph node metastasis of the hilum of the liver. The majority of patients with advanced MHBO are not candidates for surgical resection because of the tumor location in the hepatic hilum and adjacent areas, advanced tumor stage, or comorbidities. Therefore, these patients often have a poor prognosis in terms of survival and quality of life. Most of these patients will require non-surgical, palliative biliary drainage. To date, various biliary drainage techniques for unresectable MHBO (UMHBO) have been reported. Of these techniques, endoscopic biliary drainage is currently considered to be the most safe and minimally invasive procedure. However, endoscopic biliary drainage for UMHBO is still not standardized regarding the optimal stent, drainage area, stenting method, and reintervention technique. Recently, towards standardization of this technique for UMHBO, clinical research and trials including randomized controlled trials have been performed. In this article, we reviewed the most important issues regarding endoscopic biliary drainage for UMHBO, focusing on prospective studies. We also described in detail the techniques and future perspectives of endoscopic biliary drainage in patients with UMHBO.

  9. Primary biliary cirrhosis and the molecular cell biology of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Worman, H J

    1994-11-01

    I hope I have demonstrated how basic research on the molecular cell biology of the nuclear envelope has provided information about the autoimmune disease PBC. I have given several examples of how highly specific immunologic reagents, obtained from patients with this disease, have been of value in experiments on the basic cell biology of the nuclear envelope. Continued work should provide further clues on how autoimmunity underlies the pathophysiology of PBC and should also provide additional reagents to study the processes of nuclear protein targeting and cell division.

  10. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  11. Membrane in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galeotti, T.; Cittadini, A.; Neri, G.; Scarpa, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on membranes in cancer cells. Topics covered include Oncogenies, hormones, and free-radical processes in malignant transformation in vitro and Superoxide onion may trigger DNA strand breaks in human granulorytes by acting as a membrane target.

  12. Self-expandable metal stents in malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Jaganmohan, Sathya; Lee, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction can be due to direct tumor infiltration, extrinsic compression, adjacent inflammation, desmoplastic reaction from tumors or, more commonly, a combination of the above factors. Pancreatic cancer is the most common cause of malignant biliary obstruction, and jaundice occurs in 70-90% of the patients during the course of the disease. Compared with the uncovered metal stents, covered metal stents have longer patency and a lower rate of tumor ingrowth, but have a higher rate of stent migration. To combat the occlusion and provide an antitumor effect, drug-eluting stents were developed. A duodenal stricture complicates biliary stent placement in 10-20% of patients with distal biliary obstruction due to pancreatic cancer. When both strictures are considered, a biliary stent can be placed either preceding or following duodenal stent placement. Complications of self-expandable metal stents include stent occlusion, stent migration, cholecystitis and pancreatitis.

  13. Management of iatrogenic porto-biliary fistula following biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Chaitowitz, I M; Heng, R; Bell, K W

    2007-12-01

    We describe a case of cystic pancreatic disease causing biliary obstruction requiring percutaneous biliary stenting. The patient subsequently re-presented with severe melaena shown to be due to a rare complication of biliary stenting with development of a porto-biliary fistula from stent erosion, successfully managed with a 'stent-within-stent'.

  14. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-28

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract.

  15. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  16. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  17. Small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura Qm; Downey, Robert J; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W; Merritt, Robert E; Moran, Cesar A; Niell, Harvey B; O'Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M; Williams, Charles C; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted.

  18. Adult Human Biliary Tree Stem Cells Differentiate to β-Pancreatic Islet Cells by Treatment with a Recombinant Human Pdx1 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scafetta, Gaia; Renzi, Anastasia; De Canio, Michele; Sicilia, Francesca; Nevi, Lorenzo; Casa, Domenico; Panetta, Rocco; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Reid, Lola M.; Federici, Giorgio; Gaudio, Eugenio; Maroder, Marella; Alvaro, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Generation of β-pancreatic cells represents a major goal in research. The aim of this study was to explore a protein-based strategy to induce differentiation of human biliary tree stem cells (hBTSCs) towards β-pancreatic cells. A plasmid containing the sequence of the human pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) has been expressed in E. coli. Epithelial-Cell-Adhesion-Molecule positive hBTSCs or mature human hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, were grown in medium to which Pdx1 peptide was added. Differentiation toward pancreatic islet cells were evaluated by the expression of the β-cell transcription factors, Pdx1 and musculoapo-neurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A, and of the pancreatic hormones, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, investigated by real time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, light microscopy and immunofluorescence. C-peptide secretion in response to high glucose was also measured. Results indicated how purified Pdx1 protein corresponding to the primary structure of the human Pdx1 by mass spectroscopy was efficiently produced in bacteria, and transduced into hBTSCs. Pdx1 exposure triggered the expression of both intermediate and mature stage β-cell differentiation markers only in hBTSCs but not in HepG2 cell line. Furthermore, hBTSCs exposed to Pdx1 showed up-regulation of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin genes and formation of 3-dimensional islet-like structures intensely positive for insulin and glucagon. Finally, Pdx1-induced islet-like structures exhibited glucose-regulated C-peptide secretion. In conclusion, the human Pdx1 is highly effective in triggering hBTSC differentiation toward functional β-pancreatic cells. PMID:26252949

  19. Heterogeneity of autoreactive T cell clones specific for the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The extraordinary specificity of bile duct destruction in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and the presence of T cell infiltrates in the portal tracts have suggested that biliary epithelial cells are the targets of an autoimmune response. The immunodominant antimitochondrial response in patients with PBC is directed against the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC-E2). Hitherto, there have only been limited reports on the characterization and V beta usage of PDC-E2-specific cloned T cell lines. In this study, we examined peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for their reactivity to the entire PDC complex as well as to the E1- and E2-specific components. We also examined the phenotype, lymphokine profile, and V beta usage of PDC-specific T cell clones isolated from cellular infiltrates from the livers of PBC patients. We report that PBMC from 16/19 patients with PBC, but not 12 control patients, respond to the PDC-E2 subunit. Interestingly, this response was directed to the inner and/or the outer lipoyl domains, despite the serologic observation that the autoantibody response is directed predominantly to the inner lipoyl domain. Additionally, lymphokine analysis of interleukin (IL) 2/IL-4/interferon gamma production from individual liver-derived autoantigen-specific T cell clones suggests that both T helper cell Th1- and Th2-like clones are present in the liver. Moreover, there was considerable heterogeneity in the T cell receptor for antigen (TCR) V beta usage of these antigen- specific autoreactive T cell clones. This is in contrast to murine studies in which animals are induced to develop autoimmunity by specific immunization and have an extremely limited T cell V beta repertoire. Thus, our data suggest that in human organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as PBC, the TCR V beta repertoire is heterogenous. PMID:7836925

  20. Reprogramming of retinoblastoma cancer cells into cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengming; Hirashima, Kanji; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2017-01-22

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in pediatric patients. It develops rapidly in the retina and can be fatal if not treated promptly. It has been proposed that a small population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), initiate tumorigenesis from immature tissue stem cells or progenitor cells. Reprogramming technology, which can convert mature cells into pluripotent stem cells (iPS), provides the possibility of transducing malignant cancer cells back to CSCs, a type of early stage of cancer. We herein took advantage of reprogramming technology to induce CSCs from retinoblastoma cancer cells. In the present study, the 4 Yamanaka transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-myc, were transduced into retinoblastoma cells (Rbc51). iPS-like colonies were observed 15 days after transduction and showed significantly enhanced CSC properties. The gene and protein expression levels of pluripotent stem cell markers (Tra-1-60, Oct4, Nanog) and cancer stem cell markers (CD133, CD44) were up-regulated in transduced Rbc51 cells compared to control cells. Moreover, iPS-like CSCs could be sorted using the Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) method. A sphere formation assay demonstrated spheroid formation in transduced Rbc51 cells cultured in serum free media, and these spheroids could be differentiated into Pax6-, Nestin-positive neural progenitors and rhodopsin- and recoverin-positive mature retinal cells. The cell viability after 5-Fu exposure was higher in transduced Rbc51 cells. In conclusion, CSCs were generated from retinoblastoma cancer cells using reprogramming technology. Our novel method can generate CSCs, the study of which can lead to better understanding of cancer-specific initiation, cancer epigenetics, and the overlapping mechanisms of cancer development and pluripotent stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width to Platelet Ratio is Related to Histologic Severity of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Hongqin; Wang, Xiaomei; Wu, Ruihong; Gao, Xiuzhu; Jin, Qinglong; Niu, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to investigate whether red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and RDW to platelet ratio (RPR) were related to the histologic severity of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Seventy-three treatment-naïve PBC patients who had undergone a liver biopsy between January 2010 and January 2015 were enrolled in our study. The patients’ histological stages were based on the classifications of Ludwig and Scheuer. The patients were divided into early stage (Stage I) and advanced stage (Stage II, III, and IV) hepatic fibrosis according to their histological stage. All common patient demographics, clinical characteristics, hematological parameters, liver biochemistry, and antimitochondrial M2 antibody levels (AMA-M2) were retrospectively analyzed, and RDW, RPR, aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and fibrosis index based on the 4 factors (FIB-4) were calculated. A total of 28 (38.4%) patients had early stage PBC, whereas 45 (62.6%) were classified as advanced stage. Regarding age, no significant differences between the early and advanced stages were observed. Patients with advanced stage PBC had significantly higher RDW (13.6 vs 14.4; P = 0.019), conjugated bilirubin (10.1 vs 23.4; P = 0.029), and significantly lower cholinesterase (7901.1 vs 6060.8; P = 0.001) and platelets (212.6 vs 167.0; P = 0.006). However, no significant differences (P > 0.05) in other routine parameters previously evaluated in PBC, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and mean platelet volume, were found between the groups. The sensitivity and specificity of RDW were 33.3% and 92.9%, respectively, and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was 0.66. However, the sensitivity and specificity of RPR were 46.7% and 96.4%, respectively, and the corresponding AUROC was 0.74 (P < 0.001). Hence, compared with preexisting indicators, RPR showed a higher AUROC than APRI (0.648; P = 0.035) and FIB-4 (0.682; P

  2. Stochastic elimination of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Michor, Franziska; Nowak, Martin A; Frank, Steven A; Iwasa, Yoh

    2003-01-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms consist of stem cells and differentiated cells. Stem cells divide to produce new stem cells or differentiated cells. Differentiated cells divide to produce new differentiated cells. We show that such a tissue design can reduce the rate of fixation of mutations that increase the net proliferation rate of cells. It has, however, no consequence for the rate of fixation of neutral mutations. We calculate the optimum relative abundance of stem cells that minimizes the rate of generating cancer cells. There is a critical fraction of stem cell divisions that is required for a stochastic elimination ('wash out') of cancer cells. PMID:14561289

  3. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  4. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  5. Cytomegalovirus-specific T-cell reactivity in biliary atresia at the time of diagnosis is associated with deficits in regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Brindley, Stephen M; Lanham, Allison M; Karrer, Frederick M; Tucker, Rebecca M; Fontenot, Andrew P; Mack, Cara L

    2012-04-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, inflammatory cholangiopathy that culminates in fibrosis of extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. A leading theory on the pathogenesis of BA is that the bile duct damage is initiated by a virus infection, followed by a bile duct-targeted autoimmune response. One mechanism of autoimmunity entails a diminished number or function of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The aim of this study was to identify potential virus-specific liver T cells from infants with BA at the time of diagnosis, implicating the virus involved in early bile duct damage. A subaim was to determine if the presence of virus infection was associated with quantitative changes in Tregs. Liver T cells from BA and control patients were cultured with antigen-presenting cells in the presence of a variety of viral or control proteins. 56% of BA patients had significant increases in interferon-gamma-producing liver T cells in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), compared with minimal BA responses to other viruses or the control group CMV response. In addition, a positive correlation between BA plasma CMV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and liver T-cell CMV reactivity was identified. Investigation of peripheral blood Tregs revealed significant deficits in Treg frequencies in BA compared with controls, with marked deficits in those BA patients who were positive for CMV. Liver T-cell responses to CMV were identified in the majority of BA patients at diagnosis, suggesting perinatal CMV infection as a plausible initiator of bile duct damage. Deficiency of Tregs in BA implies decreased inhibition of inflammation and autoreactivity, potentially allowing for exaggerated bile duct injury. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Increased incidence but improved median overall survival for biliary tract cancers diagnosed in Ontario from 1994 through 2012: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Jennifer A; Zhang-Salomons, Jina; Nanji, Sulaiman; Booth, Christopher M

    2016-08-15

    To the authors' knowledge, the incidence of biliary tract cancer (BTC) in Canada is unknown. In the current study, the authors sought to describe the epidemiology of BTC using a large population-based cancer database from Ontario, Canada. The current study was a population-based cohort study using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC), and gallbladder cancer (GBC) diagnosed between 1994 and 2012 were included. Age-standardized incidence and mortality rates were compared using incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Overall survival from the time of diagnosis was calculated for 3 eras: 1994 through 1999, 2000 through 2005, and 2006 through 2012. The number of patients receiving chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery was determined using linked clinical data. A total of 9039 cases (1569 IHCC cases, 4337 EHCC cases, and 3133 GBC cases) were identified. The rate of BTC increased by 1.6% per year (IRR, 1.016; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.008-1.024 [P<.001]). The incidence increased by 7.0% per year among cases of IHCC (IRR, 1.070; 95% CI, 1.058-1.081 [P<.001]) and 1.8% per year in cases of EHCC (IRR, 1.018; 95% CI, 1.009-1.027 [P<.001]), whereas the incidence of GBC remained unchanged (IRR, 0.991; 95% CI, 0.982-1.001 [P = .086]). The median survival for the cohort was 8.3 months, with improvement noted over the study period (6.1 months for 1994-1999 vs 8.5 months for 2000-2005 vs 10.3 months for 2006-2012 [P<.001]). The median survival was the longest for EHCC (11.3 months), followed by GBC (6.4 months) and IHCC (6.2 months). The percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy increased over the study (P<.001), whereas the percentage of patients receiving surgery decreased (P<.001). An increased incidence of BTC during 1994 through 2012 was observed. Explanations for the observed temporal improvement in median survival require further exploration. Cancer 2016

  7. Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Seth, Abhishek; Palmer, Thomas R; Campbell, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice from metastatic lung cancer is extremely rare. Most reported cases have had small cell cancer of lung or adenocarcinoma of lung as primary malignancy metastasizing to the biliary system. We report the case of a patient presenting with symptoms of obstructive jaundice found to have metastatic involvement of hepatobiliary system from squamous cell cancer (SCC) of lung. ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) with biliary stenting is the procedure of choice in such patients. Our case is made unique by the fact that technical difficulties made it difficult for the anesthesiologists to intubate the patient for an ERCP. As a result percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram (PTC) with internal-external biliary drainage was performed.

  8. Gallbladder and Biliary Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... switch to the Professional version Home Digestive Disorders Biology of the Digestive System Gallbladder and Biliary Tract ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of the Digestive System Overview of the Digestive ...

  9. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  10. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  11. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options.

  12. Characterization of acute biliary hyperplasia in Fisher 344 Rats administered the Indole-3-Carbinol Analog, NSC-743380

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, Sandy R.; Covey, Joseph; Morris, Joel; Fang, Bingliang; Horn, Thomas L.; Elsass, Karen E.; Hamre, John R.; McCormick, David L.; Davis, Myrtle A.

    2014-12-15

    NSC-743380 (1-[(3-chlorophenyl)-methyl]-1H-indole-3-carbinol) is in early stages of development as an anticancer agent. Two metabolites reflect sequential conversion of the carbinol functionality to a carboxaldehyde and the major metabolite, 1-[(3-chlorophenyl)-methyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid. In an exploratory toxicity study in rats, NSC-743380 induced elevations in liver-associated serum enzymes and biliary hyperplasia. Biliary hyperplasia was observed 2 days after dosing orally for 2 consecutive days at 100 mg/kg/day. Notably, hepatotoxicity and biliary hyperplasia were observed after oral administration of the parent compound, but not when major metabolites were administered. The toxicities of a structurally similar but pharmacologically inactive molecule and a structurally diverse molecule with a similar efficacy profile in killing cancer cells in vitro were compared to NSC-743380 to explore scaffold versus target-mediated toxicity. Following two oral doses of 100 mg/kg/day given once daily on two consecutive days, the structurally unrelated active compound produced hepatic toxicity similar to NSC-743380. The structurally similar inactive compound did not, but, lower exposures were achieved. The weight of evidence implies that the hepatotoxicity associated with NSC-743380 is related to the anticancer activity of the parent molecule. Furthermore, because biliary hyperplasia represents an unmanageable and non-monitorable adverse effect in clinical settings, this model may provide an opportunity for investigators to use a short-duration study design to explore biomarkers of biliary hyperplasia. - Highlights: • NSC-743380 induced biliary hyperplasia in rats. • Toxicity of NSC-743380 appears to be related to its anticancer activity. • The model provides an opportunity to explore biomarkers of biliary hyperplasia.

  13. [Changes in peripheral blood 25 - hydroxyvitamin D3, Th17 cells, and CD4(+) regulatory T cells and their clinical significance in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Y M; Wu, X R; Wang, Q; Yu, M F; Lu, T; Zhao, M Y

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the changes in peripheral blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D3[25-(OH)D3], CD4(+)regulatory T (Treg) cells, and Th17 cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and their mechanism of action in PBC. Methods: A total of 22 patients with PBC were enrolled and the male/female ratio was 1:21, with a mean age of 61±12 years. There were 7 healthy volunteers matched for age in the normal control group. Electrochemiluminescence immunoassay was used to measure the peripheral blood 25-(OH)D3level in the PBC group and normal control group, and flow cytometry was used to analyze the changes in Th17 cells and CD4(+)Treg cells. The t-test, rank sum test, Pearson correlation analysis, or Spearman's rank correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis according to the type of the data. Results: The PBC group had a significantly lower serum 25-(OH)D3level than the normal control group (9.49±3.65 vs 27.35±2.35 ng/ml,P< 0.01). Compared with the normal control group, the PBC group had a significantly higher percentage of Th17 cells (2.05%±1.17% vs 0.99%±0.12%,P< 0.01) and a significantly lower percentage of CD4(+)Treg cells (2.54%±1.14% vs 3.78%±0.51%,P< 0.05); there was a significant difference in Th17/Treg ratio between the PBC group and the normal control group (1.00±0.63 vs 0.26±0.02,P< 0.01). In the PBC group, peripheral blood 25-(OH)D3 was not correlated with Th17 cells or Th17/Treg ratio (r= -0.062 and -0.328,P> 0.05), while it was positively correlated with the percentage of CD4(+)Treg cells (r= 0.468,P< 0.05). Conclusion: Patients with PBC have significant reductions in peripheral blood 25-(OH)D3and percentage of CD4(+)Treg cells, a significant increase in the percentage of Th17 cells, and immune unbalance of Th17 cells and CD4(+)Treg cells. 25-(OH)D3can upregulate the percentage of CD4(+)Treg cells and thus affect the development and progression of PBC, and exogenous vitamin D may improve immune function in PBC patients.

  14. Comparison of diets of urban American Indian and non-Hispanic whites: populations with a disparity for biliary tract cancer rates.

    PubMed

    Glew, Robert H; Wold, Rosemary S; VanderJagt, Dorothy J

    2012-01-01

    The incidnece of biliary tract cancer (BTC) is many-fold higher for American Indians (AI) relative to non-Hispanic whites (NHW). Neither gallstones nor genetics can account for this difference. There is speculation that certain fatty acids in bile may play a role in preventing BTC. Since diet may influence composition of bile, we compared the dietary intakes of urban AI and NHW adult women in New Mexico. Design, a cross- sectional study of the diets of lactating AI and NHW women was conducted. Setting, the University of New Mexico Hospital. Participants, healthy lactating women 18 to 39 years of age were recruited. Main outcome measures, a three-day diet record for each participant was analyzed. The AI women consumed less calcium (p = 0.04) and significantly less short and intermediate chain-length fatty acids (C4-C12), but nearly twice as much proinflammatory arachidonic acid as the NHWs (p < 0.01). The intake of dairy products by AI women was less than NHW women (p = 0.01) while the intake of processed meat products was higher (p < 0.01). Dietary factors may account for the difference in the risk of BTC between AI and NHW women.

  15. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  16. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-12-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  17. Imaging of malignancies of the biliary tract- an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies of the biliary tract include cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancers and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Biliary tract adenocarcinomas are the second most common primary hepatobiliary cancer. Due to their slow growing nature, non-specific and late symptomatology, these malignancies are often diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis. Apart from incidental discovery of gall bladder carcinoma upon cholecystectomy, early stage biliary tract cancers are now detected with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Accurate characterization and staging of these indolent cancers will determine outcome as majority of the patients’ are inoperable at the time of presentation. Ultrasound is useful for initial evaluation of the biliary tract and gallbladder masses and in determining the next suitable modality for further evaluation. Multimodality imaging plays an integral role in the management of the biliary tract malignancies. The imaging techniques most useful are MRI with MRCP, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review we will discuss epidemiology and the role of imaging in detection, characterization and management of the biliary tract malignancies under the three broad categories of cholangiocarcinomas (intra- and extrahepatic), gallbladder cancers and ampullary carcinomas. PMID:25608662

  18. Hepatic nodular lymphoid lesion with increased IgG4-positive plasma cells associated with primary biliary cirrhosis: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Jessica; Carbonell, Nicolas; Scatton, Olivier; Marzac, Christophe; Ganne-Carrie, Nathalie; Wendum, Dominique

    2015-11-01

    The nodular lymphoid lesion of the liver known as reactive lymphoid hyperplasia or pseudolymphoma is rare and its pathogenesis is unknown. We report two cases of nodular lymphoid lesions of the liver with numerous IgG4-positive plasma cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Histologically, in both cases, the lesion showed a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with lymphoid follicles and granulomas. Fibrous tissue was scarce and without a storiform pattern. Obliterative phlebitis was not identified. The IgG4+ plasma cell counts were 82 and 76 per high power field, with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 75 and 64 %, respectively, which qualifies the lesions according to the diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease as « probable histological feature of IgG4-related disease ». There were no rearrangements of immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes and plasma cells had a polytypic pattern of kappa and lambda light-chain expression. The non-tumor liver showed primary biliary cirrhosis with destructive cholangitis without IgG4 plasma cells. In both cases, IgG4-related disease was not found in other organs neither at the time of diagnosis nor 3 years later. Serum IgG4 levels normalized after local ablation of the lesions. It seems unlikely that these lesions are a manifestation of IgG4-related disease. However, because the pathogenesis of both nodular lymphoid lesions and IgG4-related disease remains unclear, further studies are needed to elucidate a potential link between nodular lymphoid lesions of the liver and an increased number of IgG4 plasma cells. More definite conclusions will be possible when the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease has been clarified.

  19. [RACAND syndrome associated with primary biliary cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Abouzahir, A; Badaoui, M; Amezyane, T; Fatihi, J; Chahdi, H; Albouzidi, A; Mahassin, F; Ghafir, D; Ohayon, V

    2010-07-01

    The acronym RACAND means the association of Raynaud's phenomenon, anticentromere antibodies and digital necrosis without digital sclerosis. It is a rare syndrome recently individualised. The association with primary biliary cirrhosis has never been previously reported, and leads to discuss its nosology. A 57-year-old woman with a history of Raynaud's phenomenon, presented with recurrent episodes of fingers and toes necrosis. Clinical examination did not evidence digital sclerosis. Anticentromere antibody titer was high. There was no oesophageal or lung involvement. A liver biopsy performed because of moderate increase in liver enzymes showed histological lesions of primary biliary cirrhosis. Treatment with iloprost, platelet aggregation inhibitors and anticalcic drugs could not avoid amputation of several toes. It is possible that anticentromere antibodies are directly toxic to vascular endothelial cells and result in a diffuse or localized vasculopathy. The association with primary biliary cirrhosis is in favour of autoimmune condition of both vascular and ductular endothelial cells.

  20. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  3. Gemcitabine sensitivity factors, hENT1 and RRM1 as potential prognostic biomarker for advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ting; Pan, Hong; Han, Rubing; Huang, Dingzhi; Li, Hongli; Zhou, Likun; Wang, Xia; Bai, Ming; Li, Xiang; Liu, Rui; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Ba, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Biliary tract caner (BTC) is one of rare malignant disease with poor prognosis. Gemcitabine has been widely used as chemotherapeutic agent for advanced BTC treatment. Several molecules involved in gemcitabine metabolism, including human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1) and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1), have been investigated as predictive biomarkers of chemotherapy efficacy. The aim of present study is to determine whether hENT1 and RRM1 could be used as the biomarkers to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy and predict survival in patients with advanced BTC. Methods: The analysis was performed on samples from 44 patients with unresectable or recurrent BTC who were treated with gemcitabine as first-line therapy. We determined levels of hENT1 and RRM1 with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Also, its prognostic and predictive role on tumor response and several clinical factors for survival were evaluated with Kaplan-Meier or Cox analysis. Results: The patients who were clinical benefit (partial response [PR] or stable disease [SD]) had high level of hENT1 (P = 0.046) and low level of RRM1 (P = 0.033). Moreover, hENT1 expression was a significant factor for progression free survival (PFS) (P = 0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.048) in Cox univariate analysis. Also, hENT1 was an independent prognostic factor of OS based on Cox multivariate analysis (P = 0.005). Conclusions: The expression of hENT1 and RRM1 was associated with gemcitabine efficacy. hENT1 was one of reliable predictive marker of survival in patients with advanced BTC patients. PMID:25664003

  4. The relationship between the new taxonomy of Streptococcus bovis and its clonality to colon cancer, endocarditis, and biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Lazarovitch, T; Shango, M; Levine, M; Brusovansky, R; Akins, R; Hayakawa, K; Lephart, P R; Sobel, J D; Kaye, K S; Marchaim, D

    2013-04-01

    The nomenclature of Streptococcus bovis has changed. The study aims were to examine and compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes of infections based on the new taxonomy and the genetic relatedness of strains. Bacteremic cases from 2004 to 2010 at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center were reviewed. VITEK 2 later confirmed with polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used for subspecies identification. VITEK 2 later confirmed with Etests was used for minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing. Repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) was used to determine the genetic relatedness of strains. Twenty-four bacteremia cases were included. The median age of patients was 81 years (range 1 day to 91 years), two were neonates, three were pregnant, and 18 were elderly (≥ 65 years of age). The Charlson's combined conditional age-related score was 8.2 ± 2.9, and 11 (58 %) patients were immunosuppressed. There were 13 patients who had S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus, six had S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, four had S. infantarius subsp. coli, and one had S. infantarius subsp. infantarius. Ten of 19 non-pregnant adult patients had colon adenoma or carcinoma, three had acute biliary disease, and five had endocarditis. Two patients died in the hospital. rep-PCR revealed polyclonality. There were no significant associations between subspecies or genotypes and the various clinical characteristics or outcomes. S. bovis bacteremia is a serious disease that affects elderly immunosuppressed individuals. Infection is strongly associated with colon pathology and endocarditis, regardless of the new taxonomy or clone complex. The identification of S. bovis is of paramount importance, and microbiology laboratories should differentiate its processing from that of other S. viridans.

  5. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Secretin Stimulates Biliary Cell Proliferation by Regulating Expression of MicroRNA 125b and MicroRNA let7a in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Shannon; Meng, Fanyin; Han, Yuyan; Onori, Paolo; Chow, Billy K; Francis, Heather; Venter, Julie; McDaniel, Kelly; Marzioni, Marco; Invernizzi, Pietro; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Lai, Jia-ming; Huang, Li; Standeford, Holly; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Franchitto, Antonio; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Proliferating cholangiocytes secrete and respond to neuroendocrine hormones including secretin. We investigated whether secretin secreted by S cells and cholangiocytes stimulates biliary proliferation in mice. Methods Cholestasis was induced in secretin knockout (Sct−/−) and wild-type (control) mice by bile-duct ligation (BDL). At days 3 and 7 after BDL, control and Sct−/− mice received tail-vein injections of morpholinos against microRNA 125b or let7a. One week later, liver tissues and cholangiocytes were collected; immunohistochemical, immnoblot, luciferase reporter and real-time PCR assays were performed. Intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) and proliferation were measured. Secretin secretion was measured in conditioned media from cholangiocytes and S cells, and in serum and bile. Results Secretin secretion was increased in supernatants from cholangiocytes and S cells and in serum and bile following BDL in control mice. BDL Sct−/− mice had lower IBDM, reduced proliferation, and reduced production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and nerve growth factor (NGF) compared with BDL control. BDL and control mice given morpholinos against microRNA 125b or let7a had increased IBDM. Livers of mice given morpholinos against microRNA 125b had increased expression of VEGFA while those treated with morpholinos against microRNA let7a had increased expression of NGF. Secretin regulated VEGF and NGF expression that negatively correlated with microRNA 125b and let7a levels in liver tissue. Conclusions Following liver injury, secretin produced by cholangiocytes and S cells reduces microRNA 125b and let7a levels, resulting in upregulation of VEGF and NGF. Modulation of cholangiocyte expression of secretin could be a therapeutic approach for biliary diseases. PMID:24583060

  7. Obstructive Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas Taylor

    1982-01-01

    The techniques that have come into general use for diagnosing problems of obstructive jaundice, particularly in the past ten years, have been ultrasonography, computerized tomography, radionuclide imaging, transhepatic percutaneous cholangiography using a long thin needle, transhepatic percutaneous drainage for obstructive jaundice due to malignancy, endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the papilla (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy and choledochoscopy. It is helpful to review obstructive jaundice due to gallstones from a clinical point of view and the use of the directable stone basket for the retrieval of retained stones, choledochoscopy for the same purpose using the rigid versus flexible choledochoscopes and dissolution of stones using various fluids through a T tube. The use of dilation of the sphincter for the treatment of stenosis or stricture of the bile duct is now frowned on; rather, treatment choices are between the use of sphincteroplasty versus choledochoduodenostomy and choledochojejunostomy. Any patient with obstructive jaundice or anyone undergoing manipulation of the bile ducts should have prophylactic antibiotic therapy. The current literature regarding treatment of cancer of the bile ducts is principally devoted to the new ideas relative to treatment of tumors of the upper third, especially the bifurcation tumors that are now being resected rather than bypassed. Tumors of the distal bile duct are still being resected by focal operations. Finally, it is now felt that early operation for congenital biliary atresia and choledochal cysts gives the best prognosis, with preoperative diagnosis now possible with the use of ultrasonography and ERCP. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:7051569

  8. Isolation of Hepatic Progenitor Cells From Human Liver With Cirrhosis Secondary to Biliary Atresia Using EpCAM or Thy-1 Markers

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Taisuke; Enosawa, Shin; Kasahara, Mureo; Fukuda, Akinari; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Tokiwa, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic progenitor cells can be isolated from cirrhotic liver using epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or Thy-1 markers. Liver tissue with cirrhosis secondary to biliary atresia (BA) was collagenase digested, and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) were cultivated for 24 h. Noncirrhotic NPCs derived from patients with carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiencies were used as controls. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the percentages of EpCAM- and Thy-1-positive cells were significantly higher in NPC populations derived from BA liver than in those derived from control liver. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that EpCAM-positive sorted cells expressed EpCAM, Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19, whereas Thy-1-positive sorted cells expressed Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19. These findings indicate that EpCAM- or Thy-1-positive hepatic progenitor cells can be more efficiently isolated from BA liver than from control liver and suggest that the properties of EpCAM-positive cells are somewhat different from those of Thy-1-positive cells. PMID:28058189

  9. Isolation of Hepatic Progenitor Cells From Human Liver With Cirrhosis Secondary to Biliary Atresia Using EpCAM or Thy-1 Markers.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Taisuke; Enosawa, Shin; Kasahara, Mureo; Fukuda, Akinari; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Tokiwa, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic progenitor cells can be isolated from cirrhotic liver using epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or Thy-1 markers. Liver tissue with cirrhosis secondary to biliary atresia (BA) was collagenase digested, and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) were cultivated for 24 h. Noncirrhotic NPCs derived from patients with carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiencies were used as controls. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the percentages of EpCAM- and Thy-1-positive cells were significantly higher in NPC populations derived from BA liver than in those derived from control liver. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that EpCAM-positive sorted cells expressed EpCAM, Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19, whereas Thy-1-positive sorted cells expressed Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19. These findings indicate that EpCAM- or Thy-1-positive hepatic progenitor cells can be more efficiently isolated from BA liver than from control liver and suggest that the properties of EpCAM-positive cells are somewhat different from those of Thy-1-positive cells.

  10. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  12. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  13. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  14. The genetic differences between gallbladder and bile duct cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Saito, Soichiro; Ghosh, Mila; Morita, Keiko; Hirano, Takashi; Miwa, Masanao; Todoroki, Takeshi

    2006-11-01

    Biliary tract cancers carry dismal prognoses. It is commonly understood that chromosomal aberrations in cancer cells have prognostic and therapeutic implications. However, in biliary tract cancers the genetic changes have not yet been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to clarify the presence of mutations in specific chromosomal regions that are likely to harbor previously unknown genes with a significant role in the genesis of biliary tract cancer. The recently developed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) can facilitate detail analysis with high resolution and sensitivity. We applied this to 12 cancer cell lines of the gallbladder (GBC) and the bile duct (BDC) using a genome-wide scanning array. Cell line DNA was labeled with green colored Cy5 and reference DNA derived from normal human leucocytes was labeled with red colored Cy3. GBC, as well as BDC cell lines, have shown DNA copy number abnormalities (gain or loss). In each of the seven GBC cell lines, the DNA copy number was gained on 6p21.32 and was lost on 3p22.3, 3p14.2, 3p14.3, 4q13.1, 22q11.21, 22q11.23, respectively. In five BDC cell lines, there were DNA copy number gains on 7p21.1, 7p21.2, 17q23.2, 20q13.2 and losses were on 1p36.21, 4q25, 6q16.1, 18q21.31, 18q21.33, respectively. The largest region of gain was observed on 13q14.3-q21.32 ( approximately 11 Mb) and of loss on 18q12.2-q21.1 ( approximately 15 Mb), respectively. Both GBC and BDC cell lines have DNA copy number abnormalities of gains and/or losses on every chromosome. We were able to determine the genetic differences between gallbladder and bile duct cancer cell lines. BAC array CGH has a powerful potential application in the screening for DNA copy number abnormalities in cancer cell lines and tumors.

  15. Choledocholithiasis in anomalous biliary system.

    PubMed

    Leung, L C; Wong, C Y; Wong, C M; Cheung, K K

    1996-06-01

    Although congenital biliary abnormalities are common, preduodenal portal vein is very rare, not to mention preduodenal common bile duct (CBD) which has not been described before in the literature. A case with both anomalies complicated by biliary tract stones is reported. A brief review of embryonic development is also presented to explain the unusual biliary anatomy of this patient.

  16. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  17. Cancer stem cells in surgery

    PubMed Central

    D’ANDREA, V.; GUARINO, S.; DI MATTEO, F.M.; SACCÀ, M. MAUGERI; DE MARIA, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) hypothesis is based on three fundamental ideas: 1) the similarities in the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal of normal stem cells and cancer cells; 2) the possibility that tumour cells might arise from normal stem cells; 3) the notion that tumours might contain ‘cancer stem cells’ - rare cells with indefinite proliferative potential that drive the formation and growth of tumours. The roles for cancer stem cells have been demonstrated for some cancers, such as cancers of the hematopoietic system, breast, brain, prostate, pancreas and liver. The attractive idea about cancer stem cell hypothesis is that it could partially explain the concept of minimal residual disease. After surgical macroscopically zero residual (R0) resections, even the persistence of one single cell nestling in one of the so called “CSCs niches” could give rise to distant relapse. Furthermore the metastatic cells can remain in a “dormant status” and give rise to disease after long period of apparent disease free. These cells in many cases have acquired resistance traits to chemo and radiotherapy making adjuvant treatment vain. Clarifying the role of the cancer stem cells and their implications in the oncogenesis will play an important role in the management of cancer patient by identifying new prospective for drugs and specific markers to prevent and monitoring relapse and metastasis. The identification of the niche where the CSCs reside in a dormant status might represent a valid instrument to follow-up patients also after having obtained a R0 surgical resection. What we believe is that if new diagnostic instruments were developed specifically to identify the localization and status of activity of the CSCs during tumor dormancy, this would lead to impressive improvement in the early detection and management of relapse and metastasis. PMID:25644725

  18. Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products promote the secretion of TNF-alpha in the mouse intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells via Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chao; Wang, Yan-Hong; Yu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Dan; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Li, Bo; Zhang, Bo; Tang, Ren-Xian; Zheng, Kui-Yang

    2015-10-24

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), as one of the most important pathogen pattern recognitions (PPRs) plays a central role in elicitation of innate immunity and mediation of adaptive responses against foreign antigens. However, little is known of the roles of TLR4 in the immune responses of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) induced by Clonorchis sinensis, a parasite of significance in human health. In the present study, the primary mouse intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (MIBECs) were pre-treated with TLR4 inhibitor peptide or control peptide and then stimulated by excretory/secretory products (ESP) of C. sinensis, respectively. The expressions of TLR4 and relative cytokines were determined using western blot and a bead-based analytic detection system, respectively. The results showed that ESP of C. sinensis significantly increased the expression of TLR4 which promoted the expression of MyD88 and NF-κB in BECs; the levels of TNF-α but not IL-6 from MIBECs stimulated by ESP alone were also considerably increased, compared with the group of the medium stimulated. However, the concentration of TNF-α was significantly decreased when MIBECs were pre-treated with TLR4 inhibitor. In addition, ESP could depress the level of IL-6 in MIBECs which was elevated by LPS. Our data for the first time demonstrate that ESP of C. sinensis can potently induce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines via TLR4 in MIBECs, which suggests that TLR4 plays an important role in host defenses against C. sinensis and the pathogenesis of clonorchiasis.

  19. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  20. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis.

  1. NK Cells and Cancer Immunoediting.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells (ILC) known for their ability to recognize and rapidly eliminate infected or transformed cells. Consequently, NK cells are fundamental for host protection against virus infections and malignancies. Even though the critical role of NK cells in cancer immunosurveillance was suspected years ago, the underlying mechanisms took time to be unraveled. Today, it is clear that anti-tumor functions of NK cells are tightly regulated and expand far beyond the simple killing of malignant cells. In spite of tremendous steps made in understanding the NK cell biology, further work is warranted to fully exploit the anticancer potential of these cells. Indeed, tumor-mediated immune suppression hampers NK cell activity, thus complicating their stimulation for therapeutic purposes. Herein, we review the current knowledge of NK cell functions in anti-tumor immunity . We discuss NK cell activity in the cancer immunoediting process with particular emphasis on the elimination and escape phases.

  2. Increased numbers of circulating ICOS⁺ follicular helper T and CD38⁺ plasma cells in patients with newly diagnosed primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Sun, Xiguang; Qiu, Jinpeng; Cai, Yanjun; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Pingwei; Jiang, Yanfang

    2015-02-01

    Aberrant activation of follicular helper T (TFH) and B cells is associated with the development of autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the potential role of these cells in the development of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). This study aimed at characterizing the numbers of different subsets of circulating Tfh and B cells as well as evaluating their potential association with the levels of immunoglobulins and autoantibodies in newly diagnosed PBC patients. The numbers of circulating CD27(+), CD38(+), CD86(+) and CD95(+) B cells as well as inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS)(+) and programmed death-1 (PD-1)(+), IL-21(+) TFH cells were examined in 58 patients with newly diagnosed PBC and 30 matched healthy controls (HCs). The numbers of circulating CD38(+)CD19(+), CD86(+)CD19(+), and CD95(+)CD19(+) B cells; CD3(+)CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) Tfh cells; and the levels of serum IL-21 in the PBC patients were significantly greater, but the numbers of CD27(+)CD19(+) B cells were significantly less than those in the HCs (p < 0.05). The numbers of CD3(+)CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) Tfh cells were positively correlated with the numbers of CD38(+)CD19(+) and CD86(+)CD38(+)CD19(+) B cells and the levels of serum anti-mitochondrial antibodies against M2 antigen (AMA-M2), AMA and immunolgubin M (IgM) in the PBC patients. The levels of serum IL-21 were positively correlated with the levels of serum AMA-M2, AMA, IgG and IgM, but negatively with the numbers of CD27(+)CD19(+) B cells in the PBC patients. Increased numbers of circulating ICOS(+) and IL-21(+) Tfh and CD38(+) plasma cells may be exhibited by patients with recent diagnoses of PBC.

  3. High frequency of autoantibodies in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis that bind biliary epithelial cells and induce expression of CD44 and production of interleukin 6

    PubMed Central

    Xu, B; Broome, U; Ericzon, B-G; Sumitran-Holgersson, S

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Sera of patients with autoimmune liver diseases were investigated for the presence of autoantibodies binding to human biliary epithelial cells (BECs). Furthermore, their functional capacity was investigated by testing their capacity to fix complement as well as induce expression of various adhesion molecules and production of cytokines. Methods: Sera from patients with various stages of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; n=30), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC; n=29), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n=25), and normal controls (n=12) were investigated for the presence of antibodies that reacted with unstimulated and cytokine stimulated BECs isolated from a normal healthy liver. To demonstrate organ specificity, lung epithelial cells (LECs) were used as control cells. Antibodies were tested for their functional capacity. Results: Compared with controls (8%), significantly higher numbers of PSC patients (63%, p=0.001), but not PBC (37%, NS) or AIH (16%, NS) patients, had anti-BEC antibodies. In 90% of PSC patients, the autoantibodies reacted only with cytokine stimulated target cells. Lower numbers of PSC (6%), PBC (10%), and AIH (0%) patients had LEC antibodies. Other significant findings were that anti-BEC antibodies were found in (i) PSC patients with either the HLA-DRB1*0301 or DR2 allele compared with those without (p=0.007); and (ii) in PBC patients with end stage disease compared with those without (p=0.018). Furthermore, anti-BEC antibodies from PSC and PBC but not AIH patients induced BECs to produce high levels of the cytokine interleukin 6. IgM and IgG fractions isolated from PSC but not PBC and AIH sera induced significantly increased expression of the cell adhesion molecule CD44. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis of BEC membranes demonstrated a specific band of 40 kDa with PSC sera and 45, 42, 30, and 33 kDa bands with PBC sera, which were absent in control groups. Conclusion: Thus for the first time we

  4. Early Molecular Stratification of High-risk Primary Biliary Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Claire; Green, Kile; Jopson, Laura; Millar, Ben; Innes, Barbara; Pagan, Sarah; Tiniakos, Dina; Dyson, Jessica; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Bigley, Venetia; Jones, David E; Brain, John; Walker, Lucy J

    2016-12-01

    High-risk primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), defined by inadequate response at one year to Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is associated with disease progression and liver transplantation. Stratifying high-risk patients early would facilitate improved approaches to care. Using long-term follow-up data to define risk at presentation, 6 high-risk PBC patients and 8 low-risk patients were identified from biopsy, transplant and biochemical archival records. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) liver biopsies taken at presentation were graded (Scheuer and Nakanuma scoring) and gene expression analysed using the NanoString® nCounter PanCancer Immunity 770-gene panel. Principle component analysis (PCA) demonstrated discrete gene expression clustering between controls and high- and low-risk PBC. High-risk PBC was characterised by up-regulation of genes linked to T-cell activation and apoptosis, INF-γ signalling and leukocyte migration and down-regulation of those linked to the complement pathway. CDKN1a, up-regulated in high-risk PBC, correlated with significantly increased expression of its gene product, the senescence marker p21(WAF1/Cip), by biliary epithelial cells. Our findings suggest high- and low-risk PBC are biologically different from disease outset and senescence an early feature in high-risk disease. Identification of a high-risk 'signal' early from standard FFPE tissue sections has clear clinical utility allowing for patient stratification and second-line therapeutic intervention.

  5. Modulation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Counteracts Apoptotic Cell Death and Fibrosis in a Mouse Model for Secondary Biliary Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Paridaens, Annelies; Raevens, Sarah; Devisscher, Lindsey; Bogaerts, Eliene; Verhelst, Xavier; Hoorens, Anne; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; van Grunsven, Leo A; Geerts, Anja; Colle, Isabelle

    2017-01-20

    The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cholestatic liver disease and fibrosis is not fully unraveled. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and counteract apoptosis in different pathologies. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of TUDCA in experimental secondary biliary liver fibrosis in mice, induced by common bile duct ligation. The kinetics of the hepatic UPR and apoptosis during the development of biliary fibrosis was studied by measuring markers at six different timepoints post-surgery by qPCR and Western blot. Next, we investigated the therapeutic potential of TUDCA, 10 mg/kg/day in drinking water, on liver damage (AST/ALT levels) and fibrosis (Sirius red-staining), in both a preventive and therapeutic setting. Common bile duct ligation resulted in the increased protein expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) at all timepoints, along with upregulation of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 and 12, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRsf1a) and Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) expression. Treatment with TUDCA led to a significant reduction of liver fibrosis, accompanied by a slight reduction of liver damage, decreased hepatic protein expression of CHOP and reduced gene and protein expression of pro-apoptotic markers. These data indicate that TUDCA exerts a beneficial effect on liver fibrosis in a model of cholestatic liver disease, and suggest that this effect might, at least in part, be attributed to decreased hepatic UPR signaling and apoptotic cell death.

  6. Modulation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Counteracts Apoptotic Cell Death and Fibrosis in a Mouse Model for Secondary Biliary Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Paridaens, Annelies; Raevens, Sarah; Devisscher, Lindsey; Bogaerts, Eliene; Verhelst, Xavier; Hoorens, Anne; van Vlierberghe, Hans; Van Grunsven, Leo A.; Geerts, Anja; Colle, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cholestatic liver disease and fibrosis is not fully unraveled. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and counteract apoptosis in different pathologies. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of TUDCA in experimental secondary biliary liver fibrosis in mice, induced by common bile duct ligation. The kinetics of the hepatic UPR and apoptosis during the development of biliary fibrosis was studied by measuring markers at six different timepoints post-surgery by qPCR and Western blot. Next, we investigated the therapeutic potential of TUDCA, 10 mg/kg/day in drinking water, on liver damage (AST/ALT levels) and fibrosis (Sirius red-staining), in both a preventive and therapeutic setting. Common bile duct ligation resulted in the increased protein expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) at all timepoints, along with upregulation of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 and 12, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRsf1a) and Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) expression. Treatment with TUDCA led to a significant reduction of liver fibrosis, accompanied by a slight reduction of liver damage, decreased hepatic protein expression of CHOP and reduced gene and protein expression of pro-apoptotic markers. These data indicate that TUDCA exerts a beneficial effect on liver fibrosis in a model of cholestatic liver disease, and suggest that this effect might, at least in part, be attributed to decreased hepatic UPR signaling and apoptotic cell death. PMID:28117681

  7. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and personality change. An increased risk of other disease. In addition to bile duct and liver damage, people with primary biliary cirrhosis are likely to have other metabolic or immune system disorders, including thyroid problems, limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome) and rheumatoid arthritis. ...

  8. Biliary obstruction - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100199.htm Biliary obstruction - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  9. [Cell cycle regulation in cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Shoichiro

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the properties of self-renewal and multipotency, cancer stem cells share the characteristics of their distinct cell cycle status with somatic stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained in a quiescent state with this characteristic conferring resistance to anticancer therapies that target dividing cells. Elucidation of the mechanisms of CSC quiescence might therefore be expected to provide further insight into CSC behaviors and lead to the elimination of cancer. This review summarizes several key regulators of the cell cycle in CSCs as well as attempts to define future challenges in this field, especially from the point of view of the application of our current understandings to the clinical medicine.

  10. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  11. Involvement of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Abcc2) in molecular weight-dependent biliary excretion of beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yukio; Takahara, Seiko; Kato, Sayaka; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Sai, Yoshimichi; Tamai, Ikumi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Tsuji, Akira

    2008-06-01

    In the present study, we attempted to identify the membrane permeation process(es) primarily involved in the molecular-weight-dependent biliary excretion of beta-lactam antibiotics. A search of the literature indicated that the molecular weight threshold operates mainly in the transport process across bile canalicular membranes. We confirmed that biliary clearance of the model biliary-excretion-type cephalosporin cefoperazone was reduced to 10% of the control in Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats, which are genetically deficient in multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 2, indicating that Mrp2 plays a major role as an efflux transporter on the canalicular membranes. ATP-dependent uptake of several cephalosporins including cefoperazone, cefbuperazone, cefpiramide, and ceftriaxone, all of which are mainly excreted into bile, was confirmed in membrane vesicles from Sf9 cells transfected with rat Mrp2. Both the inhibitory potency of the cephalosporins for Mrp2-mediated transport and the uptake of cephalosporins by Mrp2-expressing vesicles were molecular weight-dependent, suggesting that Mrp2 is one of the major transporters involved in molecular weight-dependent biliary excretion. An uptake study in membrane vesicles of Sf9 cells transfected with breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) revealed that Bcrp accepts cefoperazone, cefbuperazone, cefpiramide, cefotetan, ceftriaxone, cefotiam, cefamandole, and cefazolin as substrates, and Bcrp-mediated transport was also molecular weight-dependent, suggesting that Bcrp also contributes to molecular weight-dependent biliary excretion of beta-lactam antibiotics in rats.

  12. Cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Hannah K; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Heymann, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and in some cases metastasis. Recent published work demonstrates evidence of cancer stem cell phenotypes in osteosarcoma with links to drug resistance and tumorigenesis. In this review we will discuss the commonly used isolation techniques for cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma as well as the identified biochemical and molecular markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Percutaneous Palliation of Pancreatic Head Cancer: Randomized Comparison of ePTFE/FEP-Covered Versus Uncovered Nitinol Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Mouzas, Ioannis; Bezzi, Mario; Kouroumalis, Elias; Pasariello, Roberto; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated-ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered stents with that of uncovered nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer. Eighty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study. Bare nitinol stents were used in half of the patients, and ePTFE/FEP-covered stents were used in the remaining patients. Patency, survival, complications, and mean cost were calculated in both groups. Mean patency was 166.0 {+-} 13.11 days for the bare-stent group and 234.0 {+-} 20.87 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.007). Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 77.5, 69.8, and 69.8% for the bare-stent group and 97.5, 92.2, and 87.6% for the covered-stent group, respectively. Mean secondary patency was 123.7 {+-} 22.5 days for the bare-stent group and 130.3 {+-} 21.4 days for the covered-stent group. Tumour ingrowth occurred exclusively in the bare-stent group in 27.5% of cases (p = 0.002). Median survival was 203.2 {+-} 11.8 days for the bare-stent group and 247.0 {+-} 20 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.06). Complications and mean cost were similar in both groups. Regarding primary patency and ingrowth rate, ePTFE/FEP-covered stents have shown to be significantly superior to bare nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer and pose comparable cost and complications. Use of a covered stent does not significantly influence overall survival rate; nevertheless, the covered endoprosthesis seems to offer result in fewer reinterventions and better quality of patient life.

  14. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  15. Salivary Gland Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests the existence of a tumorigenic population of cancer cells that demonstrate stem cell-like properties such as self-renewal and multipotency. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC), are able to both initiate and maintain tumor formation and progression. Studies have shown that CSC are resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments preventing complete eradication of the tumor cell population. Following treatment, CSC are able to re-initiate tumor growth leading to patient relapse. Salivary gland cancers are relatively rare but constitute a highly significant public health issue due to the lack of effective treatments. In particular, patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma, the two most common salivary malignancies, have low long-term survival rates due to the lack of response to current therapies. Considering the role of CSC in resistance to therapy in other tumor types, it is possible that this unique sub-population of cells is involved in resistance of salivary gland tumors to treatment. Characterization of CSC can lead to better understanding of the pathobiology of salivary gland malignancies as well as to the development of more effective therapies. Here, we make a brief overview of the state-of-the-science in salivary gland cancer, and discuss possible implications of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to the treatment of salivary gland malignancies. PMID:23810400

  16. Future developments in biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  17. Anti-Cancer Phytometabolites Targeting Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Heron F V; Goettert, Márcia I; Justo, Giselle Z; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a plentiful source of bioactive molecules with much structural diversity. In cancer treatment, molecules obtained from plants represent an attractive alternative to other treatments because several plant-derived compounds have exhibited lower toxicity and higher selectivity against cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the possible application of bioactive molecules obtained from plants against more primitive cell populations in cancers, cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are present in several kinds of tumors and are responsible for recurrences and metastases. Common anti-cancer drugs exhibit lower effectiveness against cancer stem cells because of their biological features. However, recently discovered natural phytometabolites exert cytotoxic effects on this rare population of cells in cancers. Therefore, this review presents the latest research on promising compounds from plants that can act as antitumor drugs and that mainly affect stem cell populations in cancers.

  18. Systemic therapy in younger and elderly patients with advanced biliary cancer: sub-analysis of ABC-02 and twelve other prospective trials.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Mairéad Geraldine; Bridgewater, John; Lopes, Andre; Wasan, Harpreet; Malka, David; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Okusaka, Takuji; Knox, Jennifer J; Wagner, Dorothea; Cunningham, David; Shannon, Jenny; Goldstein, David; Moehler, Markus; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Valle, Juan W

    2017-04-12

    Outcomes in younger (<40 years) and elderly (≥70 years) patients with advanced biliary cancer (ABC) receiving palliative chemotherapy are unclear. This study assessed outcomes in those receiving monotherapy or combination therapy in thirteen prospective systemic-therapy trials. Multivariable analysis explored the impact of therapy on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in two separate age cohort groups: <70 years and ≥70 years, and <40 years and ≥40 years. Overall, 1163 patients were recruited (Jan 1997-Dec 2013). Median age of entire cohort: 63 years (range 23-85); 36 (3%) were <40, 260 (22%); ≥70. Combination therapy was platinum-based in nine studies. Among patients <40 and ≥70 years, 23 (64%) and 182 (70%) received combination therapy, respectively. Median follow-up was 42 months (95%-CI 37-51). Median PFS for patients <40 and ≥40 years was 3.5 and 5.9 months (P = 0.12), and OS was 10.8 and 9.7 months, respectively (P = 0.55). Median PFS for those <70 and ≥70 years was 6.0 and 5.0 months (P = 0.53), and OS was 10.2 and 8.8 months, respectively (P = 0.08). For the entire cohort, PFS and OS were significantly better in those receiving combination therapy: Hazard Ratio [HR]-0.66, 95%-CI 0.58-0.76, P < 0.0001 and HR-0.72, 95%-CI 0.63-0.82, P < 0.0001, respectively; and in patients ≥70 years: HR-0.54 (95%-CI 0.38-0.77, P = 0.001) and HR-0.60 (95%-CI 0.43-0.85, P = 0.004), respectively. There was no evidence of interaction between age and treatment for PFS (P = 0.58, P = 0.66) or OS (P = 0.18, P = 0.75). In ABC, younger patients are rare, and survival in elderly patients in receipt of systemic therapy for advanced disease, whether monotherapy or combination therapy, is similar to that of non-elderly patients, therefore age alone should not influence decisions regarding treatment.

  19. Percutaneous Endoscopic Retrieval and Replacement of a Knitted (Ultraflex) Biliary Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masami; Tanigawa, Noboru; Okuda, Yoshikazu; Mishima, Kazuya; Ohmura, Naoto; Kobayashi, Midori

    1997-09-15

    A knitted (Ultraflex) biliary stent became obstructed after 5 months causing recurrent jaundice in a 92-year-old man with pancreatic cancer. The obstructed stent was successfully removed percutaneously by retrieval forceps under guidance by an 8.4 Fr fiberoptic biliary endoscope. A new stent was placed. No complications were encountered.

  20. External biliary fistula.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K

    2001-01-01

    A biliary fistula is almost invariably related to gallstone disease and commonly follows a hurried cholecystectomy by an inexperienced surgeon. This catastrophy which is largely preventable, often necessitates repeated surgical intervention and accrues an estimated 5-year mortality rate approaching 30%. Published series only show a slight increase in the incidence (one per 150-200) after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The injury results from imprecise dissection and inadequate demonstration of the anatomical structures. The diagnosis is usually obvious and persistent tachycardia and hypotension inspite of an adequate intravenous infusion and a normal central venous pressure is another well known indicator of subhepatic collection of bile, which indicates an urgent ultrasonographic scanning of the upper abodmen. ERCP is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool when the continuity of the extra-hepatic biliary system has not been disrupted. An endobiliary stent can be placed across the defect in the same sitting, to tide over the immediate crisis and perhaps treat the patient on a permanent basis. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a non-invasive technique of outlining both the intra and extrahepatic biliary tree, which can provide a better road map of the fistula than an ERCP. The management has to be tailored to the patient's condition and the expertise available. A bilio-enteric anastomosis, performed 4 to 6 months after the initial surgery on a dilated common hepatic duct is more likely to succeed than an operation on a septic, hypoproteinemic patient with sodden, friable, non-dilated bile ducts. On the other hand, waiting for the ducts to dilate in a patient with a complete transection of the bile ducts with complete biliary diversion only leads to depletion of the bile acid pool, severe electrolyte derangement and nutritional failure, leading on to sepsis and death.

  1. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  2. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Sylvie; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression.

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  4. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  5. Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    1 Endocrine-Related Cancer Commentary Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis Jiyoung Park 1 and Philipp E. Scherer...REPORT DATE JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leptin And Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells To...interest. Recently several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin , an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage in the Management of Postsurgical Biliary Leaks in Patients with Nondilated Intrahepatic Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, Guido Severini, Aldo; Civelli, Enrico; Milella, Marco; Pulvirenti, Andrea; Salvetti, Monica; Romito, Raffaele; Suman, Laura; Chiaraviglio, Francesca; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks in patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts, its efficacy in restoring the integrity of bile ducts, and technical procedures to reduce morbidity. Methods. Seventeen patients out of 936 undergoing PTBD over a 20-year period had a noncholestatic liver and were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery for cancer and suffered a postsurgical biliary leak of 345 ml/day on average; 71% were in poor condition and required permanent nutritional support. An endoscopic approach failed or was excluded due to inaccessibility of the bile ducts. Results. Established biliary leaks and site of origin were diagnosed an average of 21 days (range 1-90 days) after surgery. In all cases percutaneous access to the biliary tree was achieved. An external (preleakage) drain was applied in 7 cases, 9 patients had an external-internal fistula bridging catheter, and 1 patient had a percutaneous hepatogastrostomy. Fistulas healed in an average of 31 days (range 3-118 days ) in 15 of 17 patients (88%) following PTBD. No major complications occurred after drainage. Post-PTBD cholangitis was observed in 6 of 17 patients (35%) and was related to biliary sludge formation occurring mostly when drainage lasted >30 days and was of the external-internal type. Median patient survival was 17.7 months and in all cases the repaired biliary leaks remained healed. Conclusions. PTBD is a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks. It is therefore a reliable alternative to surgical repair, which entails longer hospitalization and higher costs.

  7. Apotopes and innate immune system: novel players in the primary biliary cirrhosis scenario.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    Our understanding of primary biliary cirrhosis has been rapidly growing over the past decade and the disease is now regarded as a model for other female-predominant, organ-specific autoimmune conditions. Primary biliary cirrhosis ensues from a multi-lineage loss of tolerance to the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. One of the major unanswered questions in the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis is the specificity of small intrahepatic bile ducts attack while PDC-E2 is present in mitochondria of all nucleated cells. Recent findings suggest that the uniqueness of the primary target tissue, biliary epithelium, may be of considerable importance for understanding primary biliary cirrhosis and that the biliary epithelial cell is more than an innocent victim. Rather, it attracts an immune attack by virtue of the unique apoptotic mechanisms and by the way it handles PDC-E2. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that apoptotic bodies of biliary epithelial cell are able to activate the innate immune system in the presence of anti-mitochondrial antibodies. This review article is intended to provide a critical overview of the role of apoptosis in biliary epithelial cells, the activation of the innate immune system, and its biological and clinical significance in primary biliary cirrhosis.

  8. Alternative fuels for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Melissa M; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metabolism is significantly altered to support the various metabolic needs of tumor cells. The most prominent change is the increased tumor glycolysis that leads to increased glucose uptake and utilization. However, it has become obvious that many non-glucose nutrients, such as amino acids, lactate, acetate, and macromolecules, can serve as alternative fuels for cancer cells. This knowledge reveals an unexpected flexibility and evolutionarily conserved model in which cancer cells uptake nutrients from their external environment to fulfill their necessary energetic needs. Tumor cells may have evolved the ability to utilize different carbon sources because of the limited supply of nutrients in their microenvironment, which can be driven by oncogenic mutations or tumor microenvironmental stresses. In certain cases, these factors permanently alter the tumor cells' metabolism, causing certain nutrients to become indispensable and thus creating opportunities for therapeutic intervention to eradicate tumors by their metabolic vulnerabilities.

  9. How Can We Treat Cancer Disease Not Cancer Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu-Won; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Woo-Young; Seo, Ji Hae; Lee, Ho-Young

    2017-01-01

    Since molecular biology studies began, researches in biological science have centered on proteins and genes at molecular level of a single cell. Cancer research has also focused on various functions of proteins and genes that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Accordingly, most contemporary anticancer drugs have been developed to target abnormal characteristics of cancer cells. Despite the great advances in the development of anticancer drugs, vast majority of patients with advanced cancer have shown grim prognosis and high rate of relapse. To resolve this problem, we must reevaluate our focuses in current cancer research. Cancer should be considered as a systemic disease because cancer cells undergo a complex interaction with various surrounding cells in cancer tissue and spread to whole body through metastasis under the control of the systemic modulation. Human body relies on the cooperative interaction between various tissues and organs, and each organ performs its specialized function through tissue-specific cell networks. Therefore, investigation of the tumor-specific cell networks can provide novel strategy to overcome the limitation of current cancer research. This review presents the limitations of the current cancer research, emphasizing the necessity of studying tissue-specific cell network which could be a new perspective on treating cancer disease, not cancer cells. PMID:28052653

  10. Direct cholangiography and biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Burcharth, F; Kruse, A

    1996-01-01

    Direct cholangiography by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography has greatly improved diagnostic work-up of patients with known or suspected biliary obstruction. These diagnostic procedures were introduced in Denmark in the early 1970s, and technical refinements and clinical research of the methods were initiated. The Danish contribution led to definition of indications for direct cholangiography and general acceptance of the methods in daily clinical practice; nationally as well as internationally. The transhepatic cholangiography with selective catheterization of the biliary ducts permitted external drainage of obstructed ducts. The disadvantages of this technique inspired the innovation of internal biliary drainage and the invention of the biliary endoprosthesis. The endoscopic approach to the biliary tract and the technical improvements of accessory instruments led to the early introduction of therapeutic procedures, i.e. papillotomy, stone removal, biliary drainage and treatment of strictures and post-traumatic lesions. Experimental and clinical research with endoprostheses improved their function and prevented dislodgment. Clinical research documented that biliary drainage by endoprosthesis is a valuable alternative to surgical bypass in patients with inoperable biliary obstructions. Endoscopic therapeutic procedures for common bile duct stones have almost replaced conventional surgical treatment. Endoluminal imaging techniques are under evaluation and may contribute to future improvements.

  11. Cell-Cell Adhesion and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Staging of breast cancer. In: K.I. Bland and E.M. Copeland (eds.), The breast: Comprehensive management of benign and malignant diseases , pp. 313-330... desmosomes . The physical strength of adhesion between two cells is likely to be dependent upon a number of factors, including the number of adhesion

  12. Functional discrepancy between two liver lobes after hemilobe biliary drainage in patients with jaundice and bile duct cancer: an appraisal using (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Hata, Yasuhiro; Murata, Yoriko; Kozuki, Akihito; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Uka, Kiminori

    2014-11-01

    To determine the functional discrepancy between the two liver lobes using technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ( GSA diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging following preoperative biliary drainage and portal vein embolization ( PVE portal vein embolization ) in patients with jaundice who have bile duct cancer ( BDC bile duct cancer ). This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, with waiver of informed consent. Preoperative (99m)Tc- GSA diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin SPECT/CT fusion images from 32 patients with extrahepatic BDC bile duct cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into four groups according to the extent of biliary drainage and presence of a preoperative right PVE portal vein embolization : right lobe drainage group (right drainage), bilateral lobe drainage group (bilateral drainage), left lobe drainage group (left drainage), and left lobe drainage with right PVE portal vein embolization group (left drainage with right PVE portal vein embolization ). Percentage volume and percentage function were measured in each lobe using fusion imaging. The ratio between percentage function and percentage volume (the function-to-volume ratio) was calculated for each lobe, and the results were compared among the four groups. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. The median values for the function-to-volume ratio in the right drainage, bilateral drainage, left drainage, and left drainage with right PVE portal vein embolization group were 1.12, 1.05, 1.02, and 0.81 in the right lobe; and 0.51, 0.88, 0.96, and 1.17 in the left lobe. Significant differences in the function-to-volume ratio were observed among the four groups (right drainage vs bilateral

  13. Imaging of autoimmune biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Melinda J; Kim, So Yeon; Jhaveri, Kartik S; Behr, Spencer C; Seo, Nieun; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune biliary diseases are poorly understood but important to recognize. Initially, autoimmune biliary diseases are asymptomatic but may lead to progressive cholestasis with associated ductopenia, portal hypertension, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. The three main forms of autoimmune biliary disease are primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and IgG4-associated cholangitis. Although some overlap may occur between the three main autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts, each disease typically affects a distinct demographic group and requires a disease-specific diagnostic workup. For all the autoimmune biliary diseases, imaging provides a means to monitor disease progression, assess for complications, and screen for the development of hepatobiliary malignancies that are known to affect patients with these diseases. Imaging is also useful to suggest or corroborate the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis and IgG4-associated cholangitis. We review the current literature and emphasize radiological findings and considerations for these autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts.

  14. On the stem cell origin of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-06-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer-field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change-the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth.

  15. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  16. [Cancer initiating cell theory: popularity and controversies].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Huang, Qiang; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing

    2006-06-01

    The cancer stem cell model proposes that most tumors are derived from a single cell that is transformed into a cancer-initiating cell (cancer stem cell). Cancer stem cells have the capacity to proliferate, differentiate, and form tumors in vivo. However, the origin of cancer stem cells remains controversial. Normal stem cells are regarded as an ideal candidate for the origin of cancer stem cells when take similar characters and signaling pathways between them into consideration. In addition,cell fusion is an important physiologic process during development and tissue repair,and is closely related to several fundamental features of tumors,and thus could be involved in the development of cancer stem cells.

  17. Alternative Fuels for Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Melissa; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metabolism is significantly altered to support the various metabolic needs of tumor cells. The most prominent change is the increased tumor glycolysis that leads to increased glucose uptake and utilization. However, it has become obvious that many non-glucose nutrients, such as amino acids, lactate, acetate and macromolecules, can serve as alternative fuels for cancer cells. This knowledge reveals an unexpected flexibility and evolutionarily-conserved model in which cancer cells uptake nutrients from their external environment to fulfill their necessary energetic needs. It is possible that tumor cells have evolved the ability to utilize different carbon sources due to the limited supply of nutrient that can be driven by oncogenic mutations and tumor microenvironmental stresses. In certain cases, these factors permanently alter the tumor cells’ metabolism, causing certain nutrients to become indispensable and thus creating opportunities for therapeutic intervention to eradicate tumors by their metabolic vulnerabilities. PMID:25815843

  18. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  19. Advanced biliary tract cancer: clinical outcomes with ABC-02 regimen and analysis of prognostic factors in a tertiary care center in the United States.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Sendilnathan, Arun; Siddiqi, Nabeela Iffat; Gulati, Shuchi; Ghose, Abhimanyu; Xie, Changchun; Olowokure, Olugbenga Olanrele

    2016-12-01

    Gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is currently the standard regimen for advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC) based on the outcomes in ABC-02 trial. Multiple factors can affect outcomes in these patients. This retrospective review evaluates the University of Cincinnati experience with GC in advanced intrahepatic (IHC)/extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHC) and gall bladder carcinoma (GBC). In this study approved by University of Cincinnati IRB, retrospective analysis of advanced BTC patients seen between 01/2008 and 01/2015 was done. Kaplan Meyer method was used to calculate progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Cox model was used to test the association between baseline variables and OS/PFS, adjusting for gender and age at diagnosis. Patients were identified using ICD code for BT tumors, 26 patients met inclusion criteria: histologically proven advanced BTC that received GC as their initial chemotherapy. GC was given as per ABC-02 protocol with appropriate modifications until disease progression or unacceptable toxicities. Median age at diagnosis was 62 years (range, 31-81 years). Eighteen (69%) were IHC, 5 EHC, 3 GBC, 61% male, 73% whites. Performance status (PS): 0-1: 69%, PS 2: 31%. Baseline CA19-9 data was available for 21 patients, (range 1 to 69,543), and abnormal CA19-9 was seen in 14 patients (54%). PFS was 4.5 months (95% CI: 3.1-8.9 months) and OS was 10.5 months (95% CI: 7.9-18.8 months). OS at 6 and 12 months was 69% (18/26) and 42% (11/26). Thirty-eight percent (10/26) received 2nd line chemotherapy, of these 9/10 received 5FU based chemotherapy. Eleven percent (3/26) received 3rd line chemotherapy. Increase in baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin was associated with increased risk of death while increase in baseline CEA and ALP was associated with increased risk of progression (P valve <0.05). In the group of patients who had all three major risk factors

  20. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  1. On the Stem Cell Origin of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer—field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change—the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth. PMID:20431026

  2. Decreased Expression of Bmi1 Is Closely Associated with Cellular Senescence in Small Bile Ducts in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Motoko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Sato, Yasunori; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2006-01-01

    Cellular senescence of biliary epithelial cells with p16INK4a and p21WAF1/Cip expression in damaged small bile ducts may be critical for progressive bile duct loss in primary biliary cirrhosis. We investigated the involvement of bmi1, a polycomb group gene repressing p16INK4a expression, in the pathogenesis of biliary cellular senescence. Bmi1 expression was examined immunohistochemically in livers taken from the patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 18) and other diseased (n = 19) and normal livers (n = 16). We examined the effect of oxidative stress and a short interference RNA (siRNA) targeting bmi1 on cellular senescence in cultured mouse biliary epithelial cells. Bmi1 was widely expressed in the nuclei of biliary epithelial cells in the control livers. In contrast, bmi1 expression was significantly decreased in damaged small bile ducts in 43% of livers with primary biliary cirrhosis of stage 1/2, coordinating with the increased p16INK4a expression. In cultured biliary epithelial cells, oxidative stress by H2O2 treatment significantly decreased bmi1 expression, followed by increased P16INK4a expression. A knockdown of bmi1 induced increased p16INK4a expression, decreased cell proliferation, and increased cellular senescence. In conclusion, the decreased bmi1 expression caused by oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of cellular senescence of biliary epithelial cells in primary biliary cirrhosis. PMID:16936260

  3. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  4. Triple Staining Including FOXA2 Identifies Stem Cell Lineages Undergoing Hepatic and Biliary Differentiation in Cirrhotic Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Rogler, Charles E; Bebawee, Remon; Matarlo, Joe; Locker, Joseph; Pattamanuch, Nicole; Gupta, Sanjeev; Rogler, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations have reported many markers associated with human liver stem/progenitor cells, "oval cells," and identified "niches" in diseased livers where stem cells occur. However, there has remained a need to identify entire lineages of stem cells as they differentiate into bile ducts or hepatocytes. We have used combined immunohistochemical staining for a marker of hepatic commitment and specification (FOXA2 [Forkhead box A2]), hepatocyte maturation (Albumin and HepPar1), and features of bile ducts (CK19 [cytokeratin 19]) to identify lineages of stem cells differentiating toward the hepatocytic or bile ductular compartments of end-stage cirrhotic human liver. We identified large clusters of disorganized, FOXA2 expressing, oval cells in localized liver regions surrounded by fibrotic matrix, designated as "micro-niches." Specific FOXA2-positive cells within the micro-niches organize into primitive duct structures that support both hepatocytic and bile ductular differentiation enabling identification of entire lineages of cells forming the two types of structures. We also detected expression of hsa-miR-122 in primitive ductular reactions expected for hepatocytic differentiation and hsa-miR-23b cluster expression that drives liver cell fate decisions in cells undergoing lineage commitment. Our data establish the foundation for a mechanistic hypothesis on how stem cell lineages progress in specialized micro-niches in cirrhotic end-stage liver disease.

  5. Role of cholangiocytes in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Maroni, Luca; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco; Marzioni, Marco

    2014-08-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune liver disease characterized by selective destruction of intrahepatic cholangiocytes. Mechanisms underlying the development and progression of the disease are still controversial and largely undefined. Evidence suggests that PBC results from an articulated immunologic response against an immunodominant mitochondrial autoantigen, the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2); characteristics of the disease are also the presence of disease-specific antimitochondrial autoantibodies (AMAs) and autoreactive CD4 and CD8 T cells. Recent evidence suggests that cholangiocytes show specific immunobiological features that are responsible for the selective targeting of those cells by the immune system. The immune reaction in PBC selectively targets small sized, intrahepatic bile ducts; although a specific reason for that has not been defined yet, it has been established that the biliary epithelium displays a unique heterogeneity, for which the physiological and pathophysiological features of small and large cholangiocytes significantly differ. In this review article, the authors provide a critical overview of the current evidence on the role of cholangiocytes in the immune-mediated destruction of the biliary tree that characterizes PBC.

  6. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  7. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kasper S

    2015-12-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child's native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States.

  8. Anatomy and embryology of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Kara M; Bloomston, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Working knowledge of extrahepatic biliary anatomy is of paramount importance to the general surgeon. The embryologic development of the extrahepatic biliary tract is discussed in this article as is the highly variable anatomy of the biliary tract and its associated vasculature. The salient conditions related to the embryology and anatomy of the extrahepatic biliary tract, including biliary atresia, choledochal cysts, gallbladder agenesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and ducts of Luschka, are addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of acute biliary hyperplasia in Fisher 344 rats administered the indole-3-carbinol analog, NSC-743380.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Sandy R; Covey, Joseph; Morris, Joel; Fang, Bingliang; Horn, Thomas L; Elsass, Karen E; Hamre, John R; McCormick, David L; Davis, Myrtle A

    2014-12-15

    NSC-743380 (1-[(3-chlorophenyl)-methyl]-1H-indole-3-carbinol) is in early stages of development as an anticancer agent. Two metabolites reflect sequential conversion of the carbinol functionality to a carboxaldehyde and the major metabolite, 1-[(3-chlorophenyl)-methyl]-1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid. In an exploratory toxicity study in rats, NSC-743380 induced elevations in liver-associated serum enzymes and biliary hyperplasia. Biliary hyperplasia was observed 2 days after dosing orally for 2 consecutive days at 100mg/kg/day. Notably, hepatotoxicity and biliary hyperplasia were observed after oral administration of the parent compound, but not when major metabolites were administered. The toxicities of a structurally similar but pharmacologically inactive molecule and a structurally diverse molecule with a similar efficacy profile in killing cancer cells in vitro were compared to NSC-743380 to explore scaffold versus target-mediated toxicity. Following two oral doses of 100mg/kg/day given once daily on two consecutive days, the structurally unrelated active compound produced hepatic toxicity similar to NSC-743380. The structurally similar inactive compound did not, but, lower exposures were achieved. The weight of evidence implies that the hepatotoxicity associated with NSC-743380 is related to the anticancer activity of the parent molecule. Furthermore, because biliary hyperplasia represents an unmanageable and non-monitorable adverse effect in clinical settings, this model may provide an opportunity for investigators to use a short-duration study design to explore biomarkers of biliary hyperplasia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  11. Ceruletide analgesia in biliary colic.

    PubMed

    Pardo, A; Celotti, F; De Paolis, C

    1984-10-01

    Ceruletide is a decapeptide isolated from the skin of an Australian frog. Its chemical and biologic relationship to cholecystokinin and its potent relaxant effect on the sphincter of Oddi makes it useful in biliary colic. In this double-blind placebo-controlled experiment, 60 subjects with moderate to severe pain caused by biliary colic were injected with ceruletide, 1 ng/kg iv or with an equal volume of saline solution. Pain in the right hypochondrium, referred pain, and Murphy's sign were scored before and after treatment. Data indicate that ceruletide is effective in biliary colic.

  12. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  13. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... ducts ( cholangiocarcinoma ) Cysts in the liver Liver cancer Pancreatic cancer Swelling and scarring of the bile ducts ( primary ... More Bile Cholangiocarcinoma Cyst Duodenum Hepatic Malignancy MRI Pancreatic cancer Ultrasound X-ray Review Date 2/11/2015 ...

  14. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0644 TITLE: Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chun-Ju...Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0644 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a cell population with acquired perpetuating self-renewal properties

  15. Hallmarks of cancer: of all cancer cells, all the time?

    PubMed

    Floor, Sébastien L; Dumont, Jacques E; Maenhaut, Carine; Raspe, Eric

    2012-09-01

    In two landmark articles, Hanahan and Weinberg synthesized into one conceptual framework 'the hallmarks of cancer', a massive amount of information describing the characteristics of a cancer cell. Although this is neither the intention nor the belief of the authors, hallmarks are often interpreted as applying to a canonic cancer cell, or equally to all cells within a cancer. In this article, we clarify the separate concepts of causes, oncogenic events, signal transduction programs, and hallmarks to show that there is no unimodal relation between these concepts but a complex network of interrelations that vary in different cells, between cells, and at different times in any given cell. We consider cancer as an evolving, dynamic, and heterogeneous system, explaining, at least in part, the difficulty of treating cancer and supporting the use of simultaneous, multitarget therapies.

  16. Reprogramming cancer cells: overview & current progress.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kian Lam; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with genetic and epigenetic origins, and the possible effects of reprogramming cancer cells using the defined sets of transcription factors remain largely uninvestigated. In the handful of publications available so far, findings have shown that reprogramming cancer cells changed the characteristics of the cells to differ from the parental cancer cells. These findings indicated the possibility of utilizing reprogramming technology to create a disease model in the laboratory to be used in studying the molecular pathogenesis or for drug screening of a particular cancer model. Despite numerous methods employed in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from cancer cells only a few studies have successfully reprogrammed malignant human cells. In this review we will provide an overview on i) methods to reprogram cancer cells, ii) characterization of the reprogrammed cancer cells, and iii) the differential effects of reprogramming on malignancy, epigenetics and response of the cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Continued technical progress in cancer cell reprogramming technology will be instrumental for more refined in vitro disease models and ultimately for the development of directed and personalized therapy for cancer patients in the future.

  17. A POX on Renal Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Proline oxidase, or POX, is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing the amino acid proline. POX contributes to the regulation of cell death that occurs when cellular systems malfunction, a process called apoptosis. Previous studies have determined that levels of POX are reduced in several types of human cancer. Likewise, many cancer cells become resistant to apoptosis, suggesting a link between POX and cancer cell survival.

  18. Malignant biliary obstruction: the current role of interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Krokidis, Μiltiadis; Negru, Dragos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic head cancer are still linked with extremely high 5-year mortality in the western world. The management of such patients is complex and typically requires a multidisciplinary approach in a tertiary care center. Interventional radiology offers minimally invasive, image-guided treatment for a variety of diseases and conditions. Regarding patients with malignant biliary obstruction, IR options are considered for more than two decades as a valid management tool for both operable and non-operable cases. The options include placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drains, preoperative embolization of the portal vein and deployment of covered and uncovered biliary stents. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence in this continuously evolving field. PMID:26752947

  19. Cancer stem cells: a potential target for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Fang, Xiaoguang; Luo, Qi; Ouyang, Gaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Current evidence indicates that a subpopulation of cancer cells, named cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells, are responsible for the initiation, growth, metastasis, therapy resistance and recurrence of cancers. CSCs share core regulatory pathways with normal stem cells; however, CSCs rely on distinct reprogrammed pathways to maintain stemness and to contribute to the progression of cancers. The specific targeting of CSCs, together with conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy, may achieve stable remission or cure cancer. Therefore, the identification of CSCs and a better understanding of the complex characteristics of CSCs will provide invaluable diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic targets for clinical application. In this review, we will introduce the dysregulated properties of CSCs in cancers and discuss the possible challenges in targeting CSCs for cancer treatment.

  20. Primary Biliary Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma (MANEC): A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Wiley, Elizabeth Louise

    2016-10-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs) are composite neoplasms with areas of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma intermingled with neuroendocrine carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumor, each composing at least 30% of the neoplasm. MANECs are very infrequent overall, and they are more commonly diagnosed in the appendix, colon, and stomach. Biliary MANECs are particularly rare, and their histogenesis is debated because neuroendocrine cells are seldom identified in the normal biliary tract. They can show one of the 3 different architectural patterns described in Lewin's original classification: collision tumors, combined lesions, or amphicrine neoplasms. The neuroendocrine component is usually of a high grade, with small or large cell cytomorphology, whereas the adenocarcinoma component is either an intestinal or biliary type. Clinical presentation is characterized by locally advanced disease at the time of initial diagnosis. Recent studies suggest that treatment should be guided by the most aggressive histologic component.

  1. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  2. Schwannoma of the biliary tract resembling cholangiocarcinoma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Sanz, I; Muñoz de Nova, JL; Valdés de Anca, A; Martín Pérez, ME

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumours derived from Schwann cells and are extremely rare in the biliary tract. We present the case of a 62-year-old patient with a common bile duct schwannoma that resembled a cholangiocarcinoma. We also review all 17 previously published cases of schwannoma of the biliary tract and discuss the challenges of preoperative diagnosis. PMID:27269434

  3. Biliary hypoplasia in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K; Ahmed, S F; Murday, V; McGrogan, P

    2006-05-01

    Neonatal hepatitis and biliary hypoplasia are not recognised features of Williams syndrome. A case of Williams syndrome, presenting with neonatal conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia leading to an initial misdiagnosis is reported.

  4. Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Following treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, responsive ovarian cancer cells undergo apoptotic cell death . Several groups have shown that the...apoptotic protease, caspase 2 (C2), is an essential activator of cell death in ovarian cancer cells treated with cisplatin and we have found, by knock

  5. Biliary stents in the millennium.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Indu; Kahaleh, Michel

    2011-11-01

    Biliary stents have now been in use for over two decades. Although a plethora of literature has been published on them, this review article is unique in its attempt to summarize important landmark trials and their implications on the management of various pancreatico-biliary disorders. This article will cover the various types of stents currently being used, established and upcoming indications, techniques of placement, and complications associated with stent use.

  6. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  7. Suppression of Ov-grn-1 encoding granulin of Opisthorchis viverrini inhibits proliferation of biliary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Smout, Michael J; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach

    2015-01-01

    Multistep processes likely underlie cholangiocarcinogenesis induced by chronic infection with the fish-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. One process appears to be cellular proliferation of the host bile duct epithelia driven by excretory-secretory (ES) products of this pathogen. Specifically, the secreted growth factor Ov-GRN-1, a liver fluke granulin, is a prominent component of ES and a known driver of hyper-proliferation of cultured human and mouse cells in vitro. We show potent hyper-proliferation of human cholangiocytes induced by low nanomolar levels of recombinant Ov-GRN-1 and similar growth produced by low microgram concentrations of ES products and soluble lysates of the adult worm. To further explore the influence of Ov-GRN-1 on the flukes and the host cells, expression of Ov-grn-1 was repressed using RNA interference. Expression of Ov-grn-1 was suppressed by 95% by day 3 and by ~100% by day 7. Co-culture of Ov-grn-1 suppressed flukes with human cholangiocyte (H-69) or human cholangiocarcinoma (KKU-M214) cell lines retarded cell hyper-proliferation by 25% and 92%, respectively. Intriguingly, flukes in which expression of Ov-grn-1 was repressed were less viable in culture, suggesting that Ov-GRN-1 is an essential growth factor for survival of the adult stage of O. viverrini, at least in vitro. To summarize, specific knock down of Ov-grn-1 reduced in vitro survival and capacity of ES products to drive host cell proliferation. These findings may help to contribute to a deeper understanding of liver fluke induced cholangiocarcinogenesis.

  8. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  9. Biliary epithelial expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in primary biliary cirrhosis: an immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Kono, N; Hoso, M; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported recently that there is a unique distribution of the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2) on biliary epithelial cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) but not primary sclerosing cholangitis. This distribution has been demonstrated using a mouse monoclonal antibody, coined C355.1. The epitope recognized by C355.1 is near the lipoic acid binding site of PDC-E2. C355.1 inhibits PDC-E2 activity in vitro and, unlike a panel of other monoclonal antibodies against different regions of PDC-E2, appears to bind not only to mitochondria but also to a unique antigen expressed predominantly on the luminal side of biliary epithelial cells in PBC. We have extended these observations by studying the subcellular reactivity of C355.1 using postembedding immunoelectron microscopy on the intrahepatic small bile ducts of PBC livers, extrahepatic biliary obstruction (EBO) livers, and normal livers. We report that the reactivity of C355.1 can be classified into two categories. The first category is characterized by small foci of reaction products that were randomly dispersed in cytoplasm, particularly in supranuclear areas; the ultrastructural characterization of these foci was impossible to define but was similar in PBC and EBO. However, of particular interest was the second category of reactivity, which was characterized by deposition of reaction products around the biliary lumen, including microvilli and adjacent subluminal ectoplasm and secretory substances in the biliary lumen. This staining pattern was frequent in PBC livers, only occasionally evident in EBO livers, and not found in normal livers. These data further define and highlight the unique subcellular distribution of PDC-E2 around the biliary lumen in PBC livers and suggest that this abnormality is related to the pathogenesis of bile duct lesions.

  10. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials. PMID:28149278

  11. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  12. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  13. T-cell immunometabolism against cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Yan, Wei

    2016-11-28

    T cells play critical roles in host defenses against cancer. External signals prompt activation of naïve T cells, triggering modulation of their immune functions. Emerging evidence reveals that distinct metabolic changes impact the immune functions of naïve and effector T cells, including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Since T cells appear to be key players in tumor progression, it is important to elucidate whether and how T-cell metabolic reprogramming might alter their impact on cancer progression. Here we briefly review the available knowledge regarding T cells in relation to cancer, focusing on the metabolic reprogramming of T cells and how this influences tumor progression. Emerging insights in this field are improving our understanding of the functional role of T-cell metabolic reprogramming in cancer. Further research could provide a critical foundation for new treatments targeting cancer metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lack of association between risk of biliary tract cancer and circulating IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factor) -I, IGF-II or IGFBP-3 (IGF-binding Protein-3): A nested case-control study in a large scale cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, Kiyoko; Kikuchi, Shogo; Lin, Yingsong; Ishibashi, Teruo; Obata, Yuki; Kurosawa, Michiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    Biliary tract cancer, encompassing gallbladder and bile duct cancers, has a poor prognosis, but little is known of the etiology. A nested case-control study was here conducted to evaluate the association between serum levels of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 and death from biliary tract cancer. In a large scale cohort study, 35 gallbladder and 42 bile duct cancers were observed during the follow-up. For each subject in the case group, 1-3 control subjects (228 in total) were selected randomly, matched for sex, age (as near as possible) and residential area. The subjects were divided into tertiles by circulating levels of IGF-I, IGF-II or IGFBP-3. Using conditional logistic regression, risks among the tertiles were compared adjusted for defecation, smoking and drinking habits. No remarkable differences in risks of gallbladder or bile duct cancer were observed among tertiles of IGF-I or IGF-II, and no remarkable trend was observed. Circulating IGFBP-3 showed an inverse U-shape association with gallbladder cancer and a U-shaped one with bile duct cancer. Associations between IGF-I or IGF-II and gallbladder or bile duct cancer thus were lacking or very weak. The observed U- and inverse U-shaped association of IGFBP-3 with the cancers is not suggestive of any meaningful relationships.

  15. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  16. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Programmed cell death , or apoptosis, is a genetically regulated process through which a cell is active in bringing about its own death for the sake...delays and inhibits the cell death response, so that the breast cancer cell lines are much less susceptible to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis than...lymphoid cell lines, an observation that parallels the differential susceptibility of breast cancer and lymphomas to chemotherapy-induced cell death in

  17. Leptin and cancer: from cancer stem cells to metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Scherer, Philipp E

    2011-08-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity is a risk factor of cancer incidence and mortality. Hence, the identification of the mechanistic links between obesity and cancer progression is emerging as a topic of widespread interest. Recently, several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin, an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Zheng et al. study the role of leptin on tumor growth in a xenograft model of MMTV-Wnt1-derived cancer cells. They study growth of these cancer cells in the context of obese animals, such as ob/ob mice (lacking leptin) and db/db mice (lacking functional leptin receptors (LEPR)) and find that leptin triggers LEPR-positive cancer stem cell differentiation, thereby promoting tumor cell survival. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential for leptin and leptin signaling in the context of mammary tumor growth.

  18. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design. PMID:28191547

  19. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

  20. Distribution of the interstitial Cajal-like cells in the gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary duct of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Mei, Feng; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Hong-Jun; Han, Juan; Jiang, Zhong-Yong; Zhou, De-shan

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLC) may be involved in the spontaneous rhythmic electrical activities of the extrahepatic bile duct system. The present study investigated the distribution and characteristics of ICLC, which are immunopositive for CD117/ Kit receptor tyrosine kinase, using immunohistochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody raised against CD117/Kit on whole-mount preparations. The Kit-positive ICLC were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy or fluorescence microscopy. ICLC, immunoreactive for Kit, were pleiomorphic and/or spindle-shaped cells with a few bipolar processes and distributed in the smooth muscle layers of the gallbladder and bile duct system. They were scattered in the hepatic duct, cystic duct and gallbladder as well as in the upper part of the common bile duct. The ICLC gradually increased in number and formed a completed cellular network in the lower part of the common bile duct and ampulla. The numbers of ICLC in the ampulla were similar to that of the duodenum and significantly much greater in number than in the gallbladder and bile ducts. The density of the ICLC in the common bile duct was significantly higher than that of other bile ducts. Our results suggested that the ICLC might contribute to the regulation of the spontaneous rhythmic contraction and development of motility disorders of the bile duct system.

  1. An S100P-positive biliary epithelial field is a preinvasive intraepithelial neoplasm in nodular-sclerosing cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Sato, Yasunori; Uesaka, Katsuhiko

    2017-02-01

    Nodular-sclerosing cholangiocarcinoma (NS-CCA) is a common CCA of the intrahepatic large, perihilar, and distal bile ducts. Intraepithelial biliary neoplasms, such as the mucosal extension of carcinoma and preinvasive neoplastic lesions (ie, biliary intraepithelial neoplasia) reportedly occur in the bile ducts around CCA. In the present study, we collectively refer to these intraepithelial lesions as "intraepithelial neoplasms of the bile duct (IENBs)". We examined the IENBs in 57 surgically resected cases of NS-CCA. S100P immunostaining was used to help detect IENBs. The IENBs formed field(s) of continuous neoplastic biliary epithelial cells and showed a flat, micropapillary, or papillotubular configuration. IENBs could be classified into 3 categories based on their atypia: group A (neoplastic but not enough for malignancy), B (neoplastic and sufficiently well differentiated for high-grade dysplasia), and C (overtly malignant and variably differentiated). IENB was found in 31 of 57 cases, with group C the most common (26 cases) followed by group B (22 cases) and group A (16 cases). The expression of cancer-related molecules and MIB-1 index of groups A and B differed from those of invasive CCA, whereas these features of group C were relatively similar to those of invasive CCA. In conclusion, IENB was not infrequently found in NS-CCA and could be classified into 3 grades. Preinvasive lesions (biliary intraepithelial neoplasias) are likely to be found in groups A and B, whereas cancerization would be included in group C. The classification of IENB may be useful for future studies of the preinvasive intraepithelial neoplastic lesions of NS-CCAs.

  2. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  3. Novel Biliary Reconstruction Techniques During Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Ian C.; Romano, John; Bohorquez, Humberto; Bugeaud, Emily; Bruce, David S.; Cohen, Ari J.; Seal, John; Reichman, Trevor W.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Biliary complications remain a significant problem following liver transplantation. Several surgical options can be used to deal with a significant size mismatch between the donor and recipient bile ducts during the biliary anastomosis. We compared biliary transposition to recipient biliary ductoplasty in cadaveric liver transplant. Methods: A total of 33 reconstructions were performed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2013. In the biliary transposition group (n=23), 5 reconstructions were performed using an internal stent (5 or 8 French pediatric feeding tube), and 18 were performed without. Of the 10 biliary ductoplasties, 2 were performed with a stent. All patients were managed with standard immunosuppression and ursodiol. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years. Results: No patients in the biliary transposition group required reoperation; 1 patient had an internal stent removed for recurrent unexplained leukocytosis, and 2 patients required endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and stent placement for evidence of stricture. Three anastomotic leaks occurred in the biliary ductoplasty group, and 2 patients in the biliary ductoplasty group required reoperation for biliary complications. Conclusion: Our results indicate that biliary reconstruction can be performed with either biliary transposition or biliary ductoplasty. These techniques are particularly useful when a significant mismatch in diameter exists between the donor and recipient bile ducts. PMID:28331447

  4. Modeling pathogenesis of primary liver cancer in lineage-specific mouse cell types.

    PubMed

    Holczbauer, Agnes; Factor, Valentina M; Andersen, Jesper B; Marquardt, Jens U; Kleiner, David E; Raggi, Chiara; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Seo, Daekwan; Akita, Hirofumi; Durkin, Marian E; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2013-07-01

    Human primary liver cancer is classified into biologically distinct subgroups based on cellular origin. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently described. We investigated the ability of distinct lineages of hepatic cells to become liver CSCs and the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of primary liver cancer. We transduced mouse primary hepatic progenitor cells, lineage-committed hepatoblasts, and differentiated adult hepatocytes with transgenes encoding oncogenic H-Ras and SV40LT. The CSC properties of transduced cells and their ability to form tumors were tested by standard in vitro and in vivo assays and transcriptome profiling. Irrespective of origin, all transduced cells acquired markers of CSC/progenitor cells, side populations, and self-renewal capacity in vitro. They also formed a broad spectrum of liver tumors, ranging from cholangiocarcinoma to hepatocellular carcinoma, which resembled human liver tumors, based on genomic and histologic analyses. The tumor cells coexpressed hepatocyte (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α), progenitor/biliary (keratin 19, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, A6), and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers and showed dysregulation of genes that control the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Gene expression analyses could distinguish tumors of different cellular origin, indicating the contribution of lineage stage-dependent genetic changes to malignant transformation. Activation of c-Myc and its target genes was required to reprogram adult hepatocytes into CSCs and for tumors to develop. Stable knockdown of c-Myc in transformed adult hepatocytes reduced their CSC properties in vitro and suppressed growth of tumors in immunodeficient mice. Any cell type in the mouse hepatic lineage can undergo oncogenic reprogramming into a CSC by activating different cell type-specific pathways. Identification of common and cell of origin-specific phenotypic and genetic changes could provide new therapeutic targets for liver cancer. Copyright

  5. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  6. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  7. Retroperitoneal perforation of the duodenum from biliary stent erosion.

    PubMed

    Miller, George; Yim, Duke; Macari, Michael; Harris, Marsha; Shamamian, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopically placed biliary stents have supplanted surgical decompression as the preferred treatment option for patients with obstructive jaundice from advanced pancreatic cancer. An unusual complication of indewelling biliary stents is duodenal perforation into the retroperitoneum. We describe the case of a patient with end-stage pancreatic cancer who presented with an acute abdomen from erosion of a previously placed bile duct stent through the wall of the second portion of the duodenum. Although our patient presented with advanced symptoms, clinical presentations can vary from mild abdominal discomfort and general malaise to overt septic shock. Definitive diagnosis is best made with computed tomography (CT) imaging, which can detect traces of retroperitoneal air and fluid. Treatment options vary from nonoperative management with antibiotics, bowel rest, and parenteral alimentation in the most stable patients to definitive surgery with complete diversion of gastric contents and biliary flow from the affected area in patients with clinical symptoms or radiologic evidence suggesting extensive contamination. Complications of management can include duodenal fistulization, residual retroperitoneal or intrabdominal abscess, and ongoing sepsis. This report highlights the salient issues in the presentation, diagnosis, and modern management of patients with this rare complication of indwelling biliary stents.

  8. Endoscopic management of combined malignant biliary and gastric outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yousuke; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Itoi, Takao; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Patients with periampullary cancer or gastric cancer often develop malignant biliary obstruction (MBO) and gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), and combined MBO and GOO is not rare in these patients. Combined MBO and GOO is classified by its location and sequence, and treatment strategy can be affected by this classification. Historically, palliative surgery, hepaticojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy were carried out, but the current standard treatment is combined transpapillary stent and duodenal stent placement. Although a high technical success rate is reported, the procedure can be technically difficult and duodenobiliary reflux with subsequent cholangitis is common after double stenting. Recent development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures enables the management of MBO as well as GOO under EUS guidance. EUS-guided biliary drainage is now increasingly reported as an alternative to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and GOO is one of the major reasons for failed ERCP. In addition to EUS-guided biliary drainage, the feasibility of EUS-guided double-balloon-occluded gastrojejunostomy bypass for MBO was recently reported, and EUS-guided double stenting can potentially become the treatment of choice in the future. However, as each procedure has its advantages and disadvantages, treatment strategy should be selected based on the type of obstruction and the prognosis and performance status of the patient.

  9. Trametinib or Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Biliary or Gallbladder Cancer or That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-11

    Adult Cholangiocarcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage III Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Distal Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  10. Regulation of Cell Migration in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c . THIS PAGE U UU 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Table...D, Kurisu S, Takenawa T. Regulation of cancer cell motility through actin reorganization. Cancer Science 96, 379-386 (2005). 2. Reddig PJ, Juliano ...RL. Clinging to life: cell to matrix adhesion and cell survival. Cancer Metastasis Rev 24, 425-39 (2005). 3. Dougherty GW, Jose C , Gimona M, Cutler

  11. Deregulation of Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations disrupt the regulatory circuits that govern cell function, enabling tumor cells to undergo de-regulated mitogenesis, to resist to proapoptotic insults, and to invade through tissue boundaries. Cancer cell biology has played a crucial role in elucidating the signaling mechanisms by which oncogenic mutations sustain these malignant behaviors and thereby in identifying rational targets for cancer drugs. The efficacy of such targeted therapies illustrate the power of a reductionist approach to the study of cancer. PMID:24561200

  12. Cancer stem cells: the development of new cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Scatena, Roberto; Bottoni, Patrizia; Pontoglio, Alessandro; Giardina, Bruno

    2011-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells with indefinite proliferative potential that drive the growth of tumors. CSCs seem to provide a suitable explanation for several intriguing aspects of cancer pathophysiology. An explosion of therapeutic options for cancer treatment that selectively target CSCs has been recorded in the recent years. These include the targeting of cell-surface proteins, various activated signalling pathways, different molecules of the stem cell niche and various drug resistance mechanisms. Importantly, approaching cancer research by investigating the pathogenesis of these intriguing cancer cells is increasing the knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease, emphasizing certain molecular mechanisms that have been partially neglected. The characterization of the molecular phenotype of these cancer stem-like cells, associated with an accurate definition of their typical derangement in cell differentiation, can represent a fundamental advance in terms of diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Preliminary results seem to be promising but further studies are required to define the therapeutic index of this new anticancer treatment. Moreover, understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of CSCs can expand the therapeutic applications of normal adult stem cells by reducing the risk of uncontrolled tumorigenic stem cell differentiation.

  13. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Douglas L.; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the etiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month’s duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  14. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may not be effective against the cancer stem cells that are responsible for recurrence. In recent years great progress has been made in identifying markers of both normal and malignant colon stem cells. Proteins proposed as colon cancer stem cell markers include CD133, CD44, CD166, ALDH1A1, Lgr5, and several others. In this review we consider the evidence for these proteins as colon cancer stem cell markers and as prognostic indicators of colon cancer survival. Additionally, we discuss potential functions of these proteins and the implications this may have for development of therapies that target colon cancer stem cells. PMID:21196254

  15. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  16. Linking human beta retrovirus infection with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mason, A L; Zhang, G

    2010-01-01

    Several environmental agents have been linked with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) that include bacteria, xenobiotics and viruses. A human beta retrovirus (HBRV) related to mouse mammary tumor virus has been cloned and characterized from patients with PBC. This agent can be detected in the majority of patients' perihepatic lymph nodes by immunochemistry and RT-PCR. The HBRV has recently been isolated in culture and integration sites have been identified in the genome of patients to provide convincing evidence of beta retrovirus infection in patients. Three lines of evidence support a role for the virus in PBC. First, the beta retrovirus is linked with aberrant expression of mitochondrial protein(s) on the biliary epithelium cell (BEC) surface, a disease specific phenotype. Second, the related agent, mouse mammary tumor virus has been linked with autoimmune biliary disease in the NOD.c3c4 mouse model for PBC. In this mouse model, the virus is localized to diseased biliary epithelium that also display aberrant expression of the mitochondrial autoantigens. In translational studies, both patients with PBC and NOD.c3c4 mice demonstrate significant improvement in biliary disease with combination antiviral therapy. An overview of the biological relevance of the beta retrovirus infection in PBC will be discussed in this review. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  18. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  19. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    PubMed Central

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  20. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0115 TITLE: Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kyuson Yun...SUBTITLE Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM...hypothesis, we proposed to transform neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vivo by expressing an activated form of Notch1 (N1ICD

  1. Breach of tolerance: primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the breach of tolerance that leads to active disease involves a disruption in several layers of control, including central tolerance, peripheral anergy, a "liver tolerance effect," and the action of T regulatory cells and their related cytokines. Each of these control mechanisms plays a role in preventing an immune response against self, but all of them act in concert to generate effective protection against autoimmunity without compromising the ability of the host immune system to mount an effective response to pathogens. At the same time, genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, including infection agents and xenobiotics, play important roles in breach of tolerance in the development of PBC.

  2. Epithelial–Mesenchymal Interactions in Biliary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In most cholangiopathies, liver diseases of different etiologies in which the biliary epithelium is the primary target in the pathogenic sequence, the central mechanism involves inflammation. Inflammation, characterized by pleomorphic peribiliary infiltrate containing fibroblasts, macrophages, lymphocytes, as well as endothelial cells and pericytes, is associated to the emergence of “reactive cholangiocytes.” These biliary cells do not possess bile secretory functions, are in contiguity with terminal cholangioles, and are of a less-differentiated phenotype. They have acquired several mesenchymal properties, including motility and ability to secrete a vast number of proinflammatory chemo/cytokines and growth factors along with de novo expression of a rich receptor machinery. These functional properties enable reactive cholangiocytes to establish intimate contacts and to mutually exchange a variety of paracrine signals with the different mesenchymal cell types populating the portal infiltrate. The extensive crosstalk between the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments is the driver of liver repair mechanisms in cholangiopathies, ultimately evolving toward portal fibrosis. Herein, the authors first review the properties of the different cell types involved in their interaction, and then analyze the underlying molecular mechanisms as they relate to liver repair in cholangiopathies. PMID:21344348

  3. Cancer stem cells niche: a target for novel cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shan-Yong; Hao, Yi-Bin; Nan, Ke-Jun; Fan, Tian-Li

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, cancer has been a frequent disease, and the first or second most common cause of death worldwide. Despite a better understanding of the biology of cancer cells, the therapy of most cancers has not significantly changed for the past four decades. It is because conventional chemotherapies and/or radiation therapies are usually designed to eradicate highly proliferative cells. Mounting evidence has implicated that cancer is a disease of stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are often relatively quiescent, and therefore may not be affected by therapies targeting rapidly dividing cells. Like normal stem cells (NSC) residing in a "stem cell niche" that maintains them in a stem-like state, CSC also require a special microenvironment to control their self-renewal and undifferentiated state. The "CSC niche" is likely to be the most crucial target in the treatment of cancer. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge regarding CSC and their niche microenvironments. Understanding of CSC's origin, molecular profile, and interaction with their microenvironments, this could be a paradigm shift in the treatment of cancer, away from targeting the blast cells and towards the targeting of the CSC, thus improving therapeutic outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Colon cancer: cancer stem cells markers, drug resistance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, Zuzana; Gabrisova, Veronika; Kucerova, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    Malignant tumours consist of heterogeneous populations of tumour cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a population of cells within a tumour with highly tumorigenic and chemoresistant properties. These cells may be identified by the expression of CSC markers. There are several key stem cells markers specified for colon cancer: CD133, CD44, ALDH1, ALCAM. These days, a major obstacle to effective cancer management is development of a multidrug resistance (MDR). The principal mechanism responsible for development of MDR phenotype is the over-expression of ABC transporters. Tumours and relapsing tumours after therapy are drived by subpopulations of tumour cells with aggressive phenotype resistant to chemotherapeutics. These cells are called CSC or tumour-initiating cells (TIC). Here we outline recent information about MDR of colon cancer and CSC markers. We have focused on novel therapeutic strategies which have been developed to prevent or overcome MDR. One such strategy is a combination of chemotherapy and modulators of MDR pumps or chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF. Colon cancer is characterized by the presence of colon CSC expressing specific stem cell markers. The divergent presence of these markers can help to adjust personalized therapy. The review provides a detailed overview of resistance of colon cancer cells and discusses how the presence of CSC markers can influence therapy and prognosis of patients.

  5. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  6. Evaluation of biliary disease by scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, M.D.; Hagihara, P.F.; Kim, E.E.; Coupal, J.; Griffen, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    The value of biliary scintigraphy was studied in 180 patients with suspected biliary tract disease. Most of the patients were investigated additionally by conventional techniques such as cholecystography, cholangiography and ultrasonography. It is concluded that biliary scintigraphy is a simple and safe technique for visualization of the biliary tract. It is particularly useful in the evaluation of acute cholecystitis, in patients with iodine sensitivity obstructive from nonobstructive jaundice.

  7. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  8. Copper Cu 64 Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibody M5A PET in Diagnosing Patients With CEA Positive Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Breast Cancer; Colon Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Liver and Intrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Rectal Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  10. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

  11. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  12. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy.

  13. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  14. Multidetector CT of emergent biliary pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel B; Oto, Aytekin; Thomas, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Various biliary pathologic conditions can lead to acute abdominal pain. Specific diagnosis is not always possible clinically because many biliary diseases have overlapping signs and symptoms. Imaging can help narrow the differential diagnosis and lead to a specific diagnosis. Although ultrasonography (US) is the most useful imaging modality for initial evaluation of the biliary system, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is helpful when US findings are equivocal or when biliary disease is suspected. Diagnostic accuracy can be increased by optimizing the CT protocol and using multiplanar reformations to localize biliary obstruction. CT can be used to diagnose and stage acute cholecystitis, including complications such as emphysematous, gangrenous, and hemorrhagic cholecystitis; gallbladder perforation; gallstone pancreatitis; gallstone ileus; and Mirizzi syndrome. CT also can be used to evaluate acute biliary diseases such as biliary stone disease, benign and malignant biliary obstruction, acute cholangitis, pyogenic hepatic abscess, hemobilia, and biliary necrosis and iatrogenic complications such as biliary leaks and malfunctioning biliary drains and stents. Treatment includes radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical intervention. Familiarity with CT imaging appearances of emergent biliary pathologic conditions is important for prompt diagnosis and appropriate clinical referral and treatment.

  15. Future Prospects in Breast Cancer Research – Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Henk R.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël; van den Berg, Albert; Vermes, István

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths among women. Although significant advances in the prevention, diagnosis and management are made, still every year half a million women die of breast cancer. Personalised treatment has the potential to increase treatment efficacy, and hence decrease mortality rates. Moreover, understanding cancer biology and translating this knowledge to the clinic, will improve the breast cancer therapy regime tremendously. Recently, it has been proposed that cancer stem cells (CSC) play an important role in tumour biology. CSC have the ability for self-renewal and are pivotal in setting the heterogeneous character of a tumour. Additionally, CSC possess several characteristics that make them resistant and more aggressive to the conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. Nowadays, breast cancer therapy is focused on killing the differentiated tumour cells, leaving the CSC unharmed, potentially causing recurrence of the disease and metastasis. Specific targeting of the CSC will improve the disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. In this article, two methods are described, aiming at specifically attacking the differentiated tumour cells (‘Apoptosis chip’) and the cancer stem cell. For this, microfluidics is used. PMID:27683420

  16. Cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Justin D.; Mack, Stephen C.; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Valentim, Claudia L.L.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues with defined cellular hierarchies in development and homeostasis give rise to tumors with cellular hierarchies, suggesting that tumors recapitulate specific tissues and mimic their origins. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor and contains self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor initiation and therapeutic resistance. As normal stem and progenitor cells participate in tissue development and repair, these developmental programs re-emerge in CSCs to support the development and progressive growth of tumors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern CSCs has informed the development of novel targeted therapeutics for GBM and other brain cancers. CSCs are not self-autonomous units; rather, they function within an ecological system, both actively remodeling the microenvironment and receiving critical maintenance cues from their niches. To fulfill the future goal of developing novel therapies to collapse CSC dynamics, drawing parallels to other normal and pathological states that are highly interactive with their microenvironments and that use developmental signaling pathways will be beneficial. PMID:26109046

  17. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Metallic stents in malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. Retrospective analysis of our results with metallic stent placement for malignant biliary strictures. We sought to determine parameters that influence stent patency. Methods. A total of 95 Wallstents were implanted in 65 patients (38 men, 27 women; mean age, 65.1 years) with malignant biliary obstruction. Serum bilirubin levels were assessed in 48 patients; the mean value prior to intervention was 15.0 mg/dl. Results. In 12 patients (21%) complications occurred as a result of percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Stent implantation was complicated in 13 patients, but was possible in all patients. A significant decrease in bilirubin level was seen in 83.3% of patients following stent implantation. Approximately 30% of patients developed recurrent jaundice after a mean 97.1 days. In 9 patients (15%) the recurrent jaundice was caused by stent occlusion due to tumor growth. The mean follow-up was 141.8 days, the mean survival 118.7 days. Patients with cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas had the best results. Worse results were seen in patients with pancreatic tumors and with lymph node metastases of colon and gastric cancers. Conclusions. The main predictive factors for occlusion rate and survival are the type of primary tumor, tumor stage, the decrease in bilirubin level, and the general condition of the patient.

  19. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  20. Reprogramming bladder cancer cells for studying cancer initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Iskender, Banu; Izgi, Kenan; Canatan, Halit

    2016-10-01

    The induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology is the forced expression of specific transcription factors in somatic cells resulting in transformation into self-renewing, pluripotent cells which possess the ability to differentiate into any type of cells in the human body. While malignant cells could also be reprogrammed into iPSC-like cells with lower efficiency due to the genetic and epigenetic barriers in cancer cells, only a limited number of cancer cell types could be successfully reprogrammed until today. In the present study, we aimed at reprogramming two bladder cancer cell lines HTB-9 and T24 using a non-integrating Sendai virus (SeV) system. We have generated six sub-clones using distinct combinations of four factors-OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC-in two bladder cancer cell lines. Only a single sub-clone, T24 transduced with 4Fs, gave rise to iPSC-like cells. Bladder cancer cell-derived T24 4F cells represent unique features of pluripotent cells such as epithelial-like morphology, colony-forming ability, expression of pluripotency-associated markers and bearing the ability to differentiate in vitro. This is the first study focusing on the reprogramming susceptibility of two different bladder cancer cell lines to nuclear reprogramming. Further molecular characterisation of T24 4F cells could provide a better insight for biomarker research in bladder carcinogenesis and could offer a valuable tool for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in bladder carcinoma.

  1. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  2. Molecular mimicry in primary biliary cirrhosis. Evidence for biliary epithelial expression of a molecule cross-reactive with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Water, J; Turchany, J; Leung, P S; Lake, J; Munoz, S; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Ansari, A; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1993-01-01

    Sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) react with enzymes of the 2-oxo dehydrogenase pathways, particularly PDC-E2. These enzymes are present in all nucleated cells, yet autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells. Using a panel of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies and a human combinatorial antibody specific for PDC-E2, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy sections of liver from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatocarcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies gave typical mitochondrial immunofluorescence on biliary epithelium and on hepatocytes from patients with either PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, or hepatocarcinoma. However, one of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies (C355.1) and the human combinatorial antibody reacted with great intensity and specificity with the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells from patients with PBC. Simultaneous examination of these sections with an antiisotype reagent for human IgA revealed high IgA staining in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in patients with PBC. IgG and IgA antibodies to PDC-E2 were detected in the bile of patients with PBC but not normal controls. We believe that this data may be interpreted as indicating that a molecule cross-reactive with PDC-E2 is expressed at high levels in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in PBC. Images PMID:8514873

  3. Molecular mimicry in primary biliary cirrhosis. Evidence for biliary epithelial expression of a molecule cross-reactive with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, J; Turchany, J; Leung, P S; Lake, J; Munoz, S; Surh, C D; Coppel, R; Ansari, A; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1993-06-01

    Sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) react with enzymes of the 2-oxo dehydrogenase pathways, particularly PDC-E2. These enzymes are present in all nucleated cells, yet autoimmune damage is confined to biliary epithelial cells. Using a panel of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies and a human combinatorial antibody specific for PDC-E2, we examined by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy sections of liver from patients with PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, and hepatocarcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies gave typical mitochondrial immunofluorescence on biliary epithelium and on hepatocytes from patients with either PBC, progressive sclerosing cholangitis, or hepatocarcinoma. However, one of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies (C355.1) and the human combinatorial antibody reacted with great intensity and specificity with the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells from patients with PBC. Simultaneous examination of these sections with an antiisotype reagent for human IgA revealed high IgA staining in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in patients with PBC. IgG and IgA antibodies to PDC-E2 were detected in the bile of patients with PBC but not normal controls. We believe that this data may be interpreted as indicating that a molecule cross-reactive with PDC-E2 is expressed at high levels in the luminal region of biliary epithelial cells in PBC.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Fatima; Omenetti, Alessia; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2011-01-01

    Because cell turnover occurs in all adult organs, stem/progenitor cells within the stem-cell niche of each tissue must be appropriately mobilized and differentiated to maintain normal organ structure and function. Tissue injury increases the demands on this process, and thus may unmask defective regulation of pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh), that modulate progenitor cell fate. Hh pathway dysregulation has been demonstrated in many types of cancer, including pancreatic and liver cancers, in which defective Hh signaling has been linked to outgrowth of Hh-responsive cancer stem-initiating cells and stromal elements. Hence, the Hh pathway might be a therapeutic target in such tumors. PMID:21188169

  5. Cells of Origin of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system , largely due to the fact that most EOCs are diagnosed only after the cancer has metastasized into the...Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system , largely due to the fact that most EOCs are diagnosed only...ovarian cancer by defined multiple genetic changes in a mouse model system . Cancer Cell 1, 53-62. Quartuccio, S.M., Lantvit, D.D., Bosland, M.C., and

  6. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways are inherent signaling pathways in normal embryogenesis, development, and hemostasis. However, dysfunctions of these pathways are evident in multiple tumor types and malignancies. Specifically, aberrant activation of these pathways is implicated in modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of cancer cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation into heterogeneous tumor cells. The CSCs are accountable for tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. In this review, we focus on roles of Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways in CSCs' stemness and functions and summarize therapeutic studies targeting these pathways to eliminate CSCs and improve overall cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:28356914

  7. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  8. Cancer stem cell metabolism: a potential target for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Deshpande, Kedar; Arfuso, Frank; Newsholme, Philip; Dharmarajan, Arun

    2016-11-08

    Cancer Stem cells (CSCs) are a unipotent cell population present within the tumour cell mass. CSCs are known to be highly chemo-resistant, and in recent years, they have gained intense interest as key tumour initiating cells that may also play an integral role in tumour recurrence following chemotherapy. Cancer cells have the ability to alter their metabolism in order to fulfil bio-energetic and biosynthetic requirements. They are largely dependent on aerobic glycolysis for their energy production and also are associated with increased fatty acid synthesis and increased rates of glutamine utilisation. Emerging evidence has shown that therapeutic resistance to cancer treatment may arise due to dysregulation in glucose metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, and glutaminolysis. To propagate their lethal effects and maintain survival, tumour cells alter their metabolic requirements to ensure optimal nutrient use for their survival, evasion from host immune attack, and proliferation. It is now evident that cancer cells metabolise glutamine to grow rapidly because it provides the metabolic stimulus for required energy and precursors for synthesis of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. It can also regulate the activities of some of the signalling pathways that control the proliferation of cancer cells.This review describes the key metabolic pathways required by CSCs to maintain a survival advantage and highlights how a combined approach of targeting cellular metabolism in conjunction with the use of chemotherapeutic drugs may provide a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic resistance and therefore aid in cancer therapy.

  9. Epigenetic Targeting of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer (OC). As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cell (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC towards a differentiated phenotype, by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH+ OC cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH+ cells, including their tumor initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced re-expression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by re-programming residual cancer stem-like cells. Further, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  10. Soluble programmed death-ligand 1 (sPDL1) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) predicts survival in advanced biliary tract cancer patients treated with palliative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hyerim; Nam, Ah-Rong; Bang, Ju-Hee; Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Han, Sae-Won; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Oh, Do-Youn

    2016-11-22

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in tumor tissue is under investigation as a candidate biomarker in immuno-oncology dug development. The soluble form of PD-L1 (sPDL1) is suggested to have immunosuppressive activity. In this study, we measured the serum level of sPDL1 and evaluated its prognostic implication in biliary tract cancer (BTC). Blood was collected from 158 advanced BTC patients (68 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 56 gallbladder cancer, 22 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 12 ampulla of vater cancer) before initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Serum sPDL1 was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical data included neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and systemic immune-inflammation index (SII, neutrophil × platelet/lymphocyte). The patients were assigned to two cohorts (training and validation cohort) using a simple random sampling method to validate the cut-off value of each marker. Validation was performed using a twofold cross-validation method. Overall survival (OS) of all patients was 9.07 months (95% CI: 8.20-11.33). Median sPDL1 was 1.20 ng/mL (range 0.03-7.28, mean 1.50, SD 1.22). Median NLR, PLR and SII were 2.60, 142.85 and 584.93, respectively. Patients with high sPDL1 (≥0.94 ng/mL) showed worse OS than patients with low sPDL1 (7.93 vs. 14.10 months, HR 1.891 (1.35-2.65), p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, high sPDL1 and NLR were independent poor prognostic factors. In conclusion, serum sPDL1 can be measured and has significant role on the prognosis of advanced BTC patients treated with palliative chemotherapy.

  11. Soluble programmed death-ligand 1 (sPDL1) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) predicts survival in advanced biliary tract cancer patients treated with palliative chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hyerim; Nam, Ah-Rong; Bang, Ju-Hee; Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Han, Sae-Won; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Oh, Do-Youn

    2016-01-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in tumor tissue is under investigation as a candidate biomarker in immuno-oncology dug development. The soluble form of PD-L1 (sPDL1) is suggested to have immunosuppressive activity. In this study, we measured the serum level of sPDL1 and evaluated its prognostic implication in biliary tract cancer (BTC). Blood was collected from 158 advanced BTC patients (68 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 56 gallbladder cancer, 22 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 12 ampulla of vater cancer) before initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Serum sPDL1 was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical data included neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and systemic immune-inflammation index (SII, neutrophil × platelet/lymphocyte). The patients were assigned to two cohorts (training and validation cohort) using a simple random sampling method to validate the cut-off value of each marker. Validation was performed using a twofold cross-validation method. Overall survival (OS) of all patients was 9.07 months (95% CI: 8.20-11.33). Median sPDL1 was 1.20 ng/mL (range 0.03-7.28, mean 1.50, SD 1.22). Median NLR, PLR and SII were 2.60, 142.85 and 584.93, respectively. Patients with high sPDL1 (≥0.94 ng/mL) showed worse OS than patients with low sPDL1 (7.93 vs. 14.10 months, HR 1.891 (1.35-2.65), p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, high sPDL1 and NLR were independent poor prognostic factors. In conclusion, serum sPDL1 can be measured and has significant role on the prognosis of advanced BTC patients treated with palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27780932

  12. Phosphatidylserine: A cancer cell targeting biomarker.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhupender; Kanwar, Shamsher S

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. Many prominent cancer-associated molecules have been identified over the recent years which include EGFR, CD44, TGFbRII, HER2, miR-497, NMP22, BTA, Fibrin/FDP etc. These biomarkers are often used for screening, detection, diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and monitoring of cancer development. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an essential component in all human cells which is present on the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. The oxidative stress causes exposure of PS on the surface of the vascular endothelium in the cancer cells (lung, breast, pancreatic, bladder, skin, brain metastasis, rectal adenocarcinoma etc.) but not on the normal cells. The external PS is regulated by calcium-dependent flippase activity. Cancer cell lines with high surface PS have low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium content. Human Annexin-V, PS targeting antibodies (PGN635 and bavituximab and mch1N11), lysosomal protein, phospholipid Saposin C dioleoylphosphatidylserine (SapC-DOPS), peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1, PS-binding 14-mer peptide (PSBP-6) and hexapeptide (E3) have been reported to target PS present on cancer cell surface. High expression of CD47 inhibits tumor cell phagocytosis by macrophages. The PS cancer biomarker has also been used to target the drugs to cancer cells specifically without affecting other healthy cells. Currently, the fusion protein (FP) consisting of L-methionase linked to human Annexin-V has been reported to target the cancer cells. The FP catalyzes the conversion of non-toxic prodrug selenomethionine into toxic methyl selenol which thus also prevents the methionine (essential amino acid) supplementation to the cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Endoscopic management of postoperative biliary fistulas].

    PubMed

    Farca, A; Moreno, M; Mundo, F; Rodríguez, G

    1991-01-01

    Biliary fistulas have been managed by surgical correction with no good results. From 1986 to 1990, endoscopic therapy was attempted in 24 patients with postoperative persistent biliary-cutaneous fistulas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated residual biliary stones in 19 patients (79%). The mean fistula drainage was 540 ml/day, and in 75% the site of the fistula was near the cistic duct stump. Sphincterotomy with or without biliary stent placement resulted in rapid resolution of the fistula in 23 patients (95.8%). In those patients treated with biliary stents the fistula healed spectacularly in 24-72 hrs.

  14. A cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for imaging Cu2 + in living cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Dong, Baoli; Kong, Xiuqi; Song, Xuezhen; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Weiying

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring copper level in cancer cells is important for the further understanding of its roles in the cell proliferation, and also could afford novel copper-based strategy for the cancer therapy. Herein, we have developed a novel cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for the detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. The probe employed biotin as the cancer cell-specific group. Before the treatment of Cu2 +, the probe showed nearly no fluorescence. However, the probe can display strong fluorescence at 581 nm in response to Cu2 +. The probe exhibited excellent sensitivity and high selectivity for Cu2 + over the other relative species. Under the guidance of biotin group, could be successfully used for detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. We expect that this design strategy could be further applied for detection of the other important biomolecules in living cancer cells.

  15. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  16. Autophagy and cell death to target cancer cells: exploiting synthetic lethality as cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Reyjal, Julie; Cormier, Kevin; Turcotte, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Since 1940 chemotherapy has been one of the major therapies used to kill cancer cells. However, conventional standard cytotoxic agents have a low therapeutic index and often show toxicity in healthy cells. Over the past decade, progress in molecular biology and genomics has identified signaling pathways and mutations driving different types of cancer. Genetic and epigenetic alterations that characterize tumor cells have been used in the development of targeted therapy, a very active area of cancer research. Moreover, identification of synthetic lethal interactions between two altered genes in cancer cells shows much promise to target specifically tumor cells. For a long time, apoptosis was considered the principal mechanism by which cells die from chemotherapeutic agents. Autophagy, necroptosis (a programmed cell death mechanism of necrosis), and lysosomal-mediated cell death significantly improve our understanding of how malignancy can be targeted by anticancer treatments. Autophagy is a highly regulated process by which misfolded proteins and organelles reach lysosomes for their degradation. Alterations in this cellular process have been observed in several pathological conditions, including cancer. The role of autophagy in cancer raised a paradox wherein it can act as a tumor suppressor at early stage of tumor development but can also be used by cancer cells as cytoprotection to promote survival in established tumors. It is interesting that autophagy can be targeted by anticancer agents to provoke cancer cell death. This review focuses on the role of autophagy in cancer cells and its potential to therapeutically kill cancer cells.

  17. Response of Breast Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem Cells to Metformin and Hyperthermia Alone or Combined

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemi; Park, Heon Joo; Park, Chang-Shin; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Williams, Brent; Lee, Chung K.; Song, Chang W.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5–10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44high/CD24low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44high/CD24high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs) of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia. PMID:24505341

  18. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyemi; Park, Heon Joo; Park, Chang-Shin; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Williams, Brent; Lee, Chung K; Song, Chang W

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high)/CD24(low) cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high)/CD24(high) cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs) of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  19. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Promote Proliferation of Endometrial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Kavita S.; Tham, Seng Tian; Mohamed, Zahurin; Woo, Yin Ling; Mat Adenan, Noor Azmi; Chung, Ivy

    2013-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic malignancy worldwide; yet the tumor microenvironment, especially the fibroblast cells surrounding the cancer cells, is poorly understood. We established four primary cultures of fibroblasts from human endometrial cancer tissues (cancer-associated fibroblasts, CAFs) using antibody-conjugated magnetic bead isolation. These relatively homogenous fibroblast cultures expressed fibroblast markers (CD90, vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin) and hormonal (estrogen and progesterone) receptors. Conditioned media collected from CAFs induced a dose-dependent proliferation of both primary cultures and cell lines of endometrial cancer in vitro (175%) when compared to non-treated cells, in contrast to those from normal endometrial fibroblast cell line (51%) (P<0.0001). These effects were not observed in fibroblast culture derived from benign endometrial hyperplasia tissues, indicating the specificity of CAFs in affecting endometrial cancer cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism underlying the differential fibroblast effects, we compared the activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathways in endometrial cancer cells following treatment with normal fibroblasts- and CAFs-conditioned media. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of both phosphorylated forms of Akt and Erk were significantly down-regulated in normal fibroblasts-treated cells, but were up-regulated/maintained in CAFs-treated cells. Treatment with specific inhibitors LY294002 and U0126 reversed the CAFs-mediated cell proliferation (P<0.0001), suggesting for a role of these pathways in modulating endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Rapamycin, which targets a downstream molecule in PI3K pathway (mTOR), also suppressed CAFs-induced cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Cytokine profiling analysis revealed that CAFs secrete higher levels of macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, RANTES and vascular

  20. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  1. Are All Highly Malignant Cancer Cells Identical?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    F/G /5 N 1111 2Z111117 1 125iiI 1 1. 1111_L6. -11 O=M 1 MrCROCOP RErSOLUTICN TEST CHART N, APoP SN A’ ,- ARE ALL HIGHLY MALIGNANT CANCER CELLS...Greenstein and others, we raised the question, " Is it possible that cancer cells when they reach their ultimate state of autonomy and malignancy become... cancer cells: A. T241 (DMBA induced sarcoma); B. Kreb’s ( carcinoma of the inguinal region); C. Meth. A (fibrosarcoma); D. P4132 (reticulum cell

  2. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  3. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells In Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    breast cancer (TNBC) and drug resistance. We hypothesize that obesity effects on TNBC occur via leptin -signaling stimulation of breast cancer stem...human TNBC cell lines treated with leptin , and novel leptin receptor inhibitor bound to nanoparticles (IONPs-LPrA) alone, and combined with cisplatin...a chemotherapeutic) and Sunitinib (an inhibitor of VEGFR-2 kinase). Our data show that leptin increased cell proliferation and expression of BCSC

  4. Wnt and the cancer niche: paracrine interactions with gastrointestinal cancer cells undergoing asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E; Jaiswal, Kshama R; Garfield, Susan H; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy.

  5. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  6. [Biliary atresia and polysplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Yosra; Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayet; Belghith, Mohsen; Lassad, Sahnoun; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare malformation characterized by the association of multiple rates and other congenital anomalies dominated by cardiac, vascular, intestinal and bile malformations. We report the observation of a patient operated in the neonatal period (3 days) for an upper intestinal obstruction with situs inversus. Surgical exploration noted the presence of multiple rates, a preduodenal vein, a biliary atresia and a duodenal atresia. The surgical procedures performed were a latero-lateral duodeno-duodenostomy and hepatoportoenterostomy of KASAI with simple immediate and delayed outcomes. The follow up was of 23 years. We recall the epidemiological characteristics of this malformative association and we discuss the role played by the prognosis of polysplenia syndrome in the evolution of biliary atresia. The diagnosis and treatment of biliary atresia are always urgent to increase the chances of success of the Kasai, and the chances of prolonged survival with native liver. However, almost all long-term survivors (even anicteric) have biliary cirrhosis, which requires lifelong follow up.

  7. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    PubMed

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  8. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  9. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  11. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  12. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shijie; Li, Chunbao; Cheng, Ninghui; Cui, Xiaojiang; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs). We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment. PMID:26273424

  13. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  14. Power surge: supporting cells "fuel" cancer cell mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-01-04

    An emerging paradigm in tumor metabolism is that catabolism in host cells "fuels" the anabolic growth of cancer cells via energy transfer. A study in Nature Medicine (Nieman et al., 2011) supports this; they show that triglyceride catabolism in adipocytes drives ovarian cancer metastasis by providing fatty acids as mitochondrial fuels.

  15. Targeting cancer stem cells: a new therapy to cure cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yapeng; Fu, Liwu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been defined as cells within tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. They have been identified in blood, breast, brain, colon, melanoma, pancreatic, prostate, ovarian, lung cancers and so on. It is often considered to be associated with chemo-resistance and radio-resistance that lead to the failure of traditional therapies. Most therapies are directed at the fast growing tumor mass but not the slow dividing cancer stem cells. Eradicating cancer stem cells, the root of cancer origin and recurrence, has been thought as a promising approach to improve cancer survival or even to cure cancer patients. Understanding the characteristics of cancer stem cells will help to develop novel therapies to eliminate the initiating cancer stem cell, and the relevant patents on the cancer stem cell and cancer therapy by cancer stem cells will be discussed.

  16. Recombinant immunotoxins in targeted cancer cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Y

    2001-01-01

    Targeted cancer therapy in general and immunotherapy in particular combines rational drug design with the progress in understanding cancer biology. This approach takes advantage of our recent knowledge of the mechanisms by which normal cells are transformed into cancer cells, thus using the special properties of cancer cells to device novel therapeutic strategies. Recombinant immunotoxins are excellent examples of such processes, combining the knowledge of antigen expression by cancer cells with the enormous developments in recombinant DNA technology and antibody engineering. Recombinant immunotoxins are composed of a very potent protein toxin fused to a targeting moiety such as a recombinant antibody fragment or growth factor. These molecules bind to surface antigens specific for cancer cells and kill the target cells by catalytic inhibition of protein synthesis. Recombinant immunotoxins are developed for solid tumors and hematological malignancies and have been characterized intensively for their biological activity in vitro on cultured tumor cell lines as well as in vivo in animal models of human tumor xenografts. The excellent in vitro and in vivo activities of recombinant immunotoxins have lead to their preclinical development and to the initiation of clinical trail protocols. Recent trail results have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with malignant diseases that are refractory to traditional modalities of cancer treatment: surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. The results demonstrate that such strategies can be developed into a separate modality of cancer treatment with the basic rationale of specifically targeting cancer cells on the basis of their unique surface markers. Efforts are now being made to improve the current molecules and to develop new agents with better clinical efficacy. This can be achieved by development of novel targeting moieties with improved specificity that will reduce toxicity to normal tissues. In this review

  17. Cell Polarity As A Regulator of Cancer Cell Behavior Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Senthil K; Xue, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is an evolutionarily conserved process that facilitates asymmetric distribution of organelles and proteins, is an evolutionarily conserved property that is modified dynamically during physiological processes such as cell division, migration, and morphogenesis. The plasticity with which cells change their behavior and phenotype in response to cell intrinsic and extrinsic cues is an essential feature of normal physiology. In disease states such as cancer, cells lose their ability to behave normally in response to physiological cues. A molecular understanding of mechanisms that alter the behavior of cancer cells is limited. Cell polarity proteins are an recognized class of molecules that can receive and interpret both intrinsic and extrinsic signals to modulate cell behavior. In this review, we discuss how cell polarity proteins regulate a diverse array of biological processes and how they can contribute to alterations in the behavior of cancer cells. PMID:22881459

  18. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  20. Homing of cancer cells to the bone.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anjali; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Pienta, Kenneth J; Taichman, Russell S

    2011-12-01

    A variety of tumor cells preferentially home to the bone. The homing of cancer cells to the bone represents a multi-step process that involves malignant progression of the tumor, invasion of the tumor through the extracellular matrix and the blood vessels and settling of the tumor cells in the bone. Gaining a greater understanding as to the mechanisms used by cancer cells in these processes will facilitate the design of drugs which could specifically target the homing process. In this review we will discuss the properties of tumor cells and the bone microenvironment which promote homing of a cancer cell to the bone. We will highlight the different steps and the molecular pathways involved when a cancer cell metastasize to the bone. Since bone is the major home for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we will also highlight the similarities between the homing of cancer and HSC to the bone. Finally we will conclude with therapeutic and early detection strategies which can prevent homing of a cancer cell to the bone.

  1. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-06-14

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome.

  2. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  3. Endoscopic bilateral deployment of multiple metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Harada, Ryo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-05-01

    Jaundice and cholangitis are associated with morbidity and mortality for patients with malignant hilar biliary strictures. Endoscopic biliary drainage is considered a useful procedure for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar biliary strictures. However, even today, the devices and methods to effectively achieve the drainage of these strictures are under debate. Endoscopic bilateral deployment of multiple metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary strictures is a feasible and useful procedure, providing long-term patency and the preservation of functional liver volume. We report the cases of two patients who underwent endoscopic bilateral deployment of multiple metallic stents using the partial stent-in-stent method. Both of the patients had malignant hilar biliary stricture due to biliary tract cancer. The cancers were unresectable and the patients decided to receive chemotherapy. Before the chemotherapy, bilateral deployment of metallic stents was carried out and each patient has been receiving chemotherapy without occlusion of the metallic stents for several months. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  4. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  5. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Campisi, Judith

    2016-07-12

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  6. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  7. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Allegra, Eugenia; Trapasso, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also called “cells that start the tumor,” represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal), giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division). A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on the presence of specific surface markers for selective cytotoxic agent vehicles. Finally, some research groups are trying to induce these cells to

  8. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  9. Arf proteins in cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Casalou, Cristina; Faustino, Alexandra; Barral, Duarte C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of small GTP-binding (G) proteins regulate several aspects of membrane trafficking, such as vesicle budding, tethering and cytoskeleton organization. Arf family members, including Arf-like (Arl) proteins have been implicated in several essential cellular functions, like cell spreading and migration. These functions are used by cancer cells to disseminate and invade the tissues surrounding the primary tumor, leading to the formation of metastases. Indeed, Arf and Arl proteins, as well as their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) have been found to be abnormally expressed in different cancer cell types and human cancers. Here, we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of Arf family proteins and their GEFs and GAPs in cancer progression, focusing on 3 different mechanisms: cell-cell adhesion, integrin internalization and recycling, and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:27589148

  10. External biliary fistula in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilbo, N; Mirabella, S; Strignano, P; Ricchiuti, A; Lupo, F; Giono, I; Sanna, C; Fop, F; Salizzoni, M

    2009-05-01

    During orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), various situations may occur in which biliary reconstruction is neither technically feasible nor recommended. One bridge to a delayed anastomosis can be an external biliary fistula (EBF). This procedure allows the surgeon to execute hemostatic maneuvers, such as abdominal packing; therefore, biliary reconstruction can be subsequently performed in a bloodless operative field without edematous tissues. EBF can be made by placing in the donor biliary tract a cannula that is fixed to the bile duct using 2-0 silk ties and secured outside the abdominal wall. The biliary anastomosis will be performed within 2 days after the OLT. The aim of this study was to examine the safety of EBF in terms of the incidence of biliary complications compared with a direct anastomosis. Among 1,634 adult OLTs performed in 17 years in our center, 1,322 were carried out with termino-terminal hepaticocholedochostomy (HC-TT); two with side-to-side hepaticocholedochostomy; 208 with hepaticojejunostomy (HJ); 31 with EBF and delayed HC-TT, and 71 with EBF and delayed HJ. Biliary complication rates in the EBF group were 24.5%, including 23.9% in the delayed HJ and 25.8% in the delayed HC-TT. Biliary complication incidence among all OLTs was 24.6% (P = NS). No complications related to the procedure were observed. Therefore, EBF is a safe technique without a higher biliary complication rate. It may be useful when a direct biliary anastomosis is dangerous.

  11. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    2015-10-01

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  12. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of