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Sample records for biliary stricture dilation

  1. Transhepatic Balloon Dilatation of Early Biliary Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Successful Initial and Mid-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Mor, Eytan; Bartal, Gabriel; Atar, Eli; Shapiro, Riki; Bar-Nathan, Nathan; Bachar, Gil N.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the initial and mid-term outcomes of transhepatic balloon dilatation for the treatment of early biliary strictures in lateral left-segment liver transplants in young children.Methods: Between April 1997 and May 2001, seven children aged 9 months to 6 years with nine benign strictures in left-segment liver grafts were treated percutaneously. Sessions of two or three dilations were performed three or four times at average intervals of 10-20 days. In each session, the biliary stenoses were gradually dilated using balloons of 3-7 mm. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 54 months (mean 27 months, median 12 months). Clinical success was defined as resolution of the stenosis, normalization of liver enzymes and lack of clinical symptoms. Results: Technical success was achieved in all nine strictures. Hemobilia occurred in one patient and was successfully treated. On follow-up, all patients had complete clinical recovery with normalization of liver function and imaging of patent bile ducts. Conclusion: Balloon dilatation is an effective and relatively safe method for the treatment of early biliary strictures in left-segment liver transplantation in young children. We recommend this approach as the initial treatment for early strictures. Metal stents or surgery should be reserved for patients with late appearance of strictures or failure of balloon dilatation.

  2. Percutaneous management of postoperative anastomotic biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A

    2008-06-01

    Postoperative anastomotic biliary strictures can occur after surgery in bile ducts belonging to transplanted or native (nontransplanted) livers. The majority of postoperative anastomotic strictures encountered by interventional radiologists are most likely in liver transplant recipients due to the large and growing liver transplant recipient population worldwide compared with patients with native livers and biliary enteric anastomoses. They occur after 2.5 to 13% of liver transplantations and they represent at least one-half of biliary strictures encountered after liver transplantation. Anastomotic biliary strictures are considered technical in nature, accentuated by fibrosis and scarring that may be secondary to, if not exacerbated by, graft ischemia. There are numerous variables in the percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation protocols applied to treat anastomotic biliary strictures. These include (1) types of balloons, (2) how long balloons are inflated, (3) how frequently patients return for additional dilation sessions, and (4) the interval(s) at which they return. No alteration in these variables has proven to improve long-term patency. In addition, new technology such as cutting balloons and stents has not been fully evaluated to determine their effect on long-term patency. The current article describes the overall theme of balloon dilation protocols for the management of anastomotic biliary strictures and discusses possible future management of such strictures.

  3. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  4. Management of Biliary Strictures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Strictures of the bile duct are a well-recognized complication of liver transplant and account for more than 50% of all biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplant and living donor liver transplant. Biliary strictures that develop after transplant are classified as anastomotic strictures or nonanastomotic strictures, depending on their location in the bile duct. The incidence, etiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the 2 types vary greatly, so their distinction is clinically important. The imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of biliary strictures is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography because of its high rate of diagnostic accuracy and limited risk of complications. Biliary strictures that develop after liver transplant may be managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), or surgical revision, including retransplant. The initial treatment of choice for these strictures is ERC with progressive balloon dilation and the placement of increasing numbers of plastic stents. PTC and surgery are generally reserved for failures of endoscopic therapy or for anatomic variants that are not suitable for ERC. In this article, we discuss the classification of biliary strictures, their diagnosis, and the therapeutic strategies that can be used to manage these common complications of liver transplant. PMID:27482175

  5. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  6. Common controversies in management of biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Parsi, Mansour A

    2017-01-01

    Biliary strictures are caused by a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant conditions, each requiring a specific treatment approach. Management of biliary strictures often involves endoscopy either for definite treatment, as a bridge to surgery or for palliative purposes. Endoscopic treatment of various types of biliary strictures is not standardized and there are multiple areas of controversy regarding the best treatment options. These controversies are mainly due to lack of well-designed comparative studies to support a specific therapy. This paper reviews three common areas of controversy in the endoscopic management of biliary strictures. The areas discussed in this editorial include the role of biliary drainage in resectable malignant strictures and whether such drainage should be performed routinely prior to surgery, the best endoscopic palliation for unresectable hilar strictures and whether unilateral or bilateral stenting should be attempted, and the optimal endoscopic management for dominant strictures in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. The goal of this editorial is twofold. The first is to review the current literature on management of the aforementioned strictures and offer recommendations based on available evidence. The second goal is to highlight the gaps in our knowledge which in turn can encourage future research on these topics. PMID:28275292

  7. Biliary strictures: endoscopic assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Paranandi, Bharat; Oppong, Kofi W

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of biliary strictures can be challenging. Endoscopy has an established role in the diagnosis and therapy of biliary strictures. However, the diagnostic yield from conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography tissue sampling is modest. Improvements in existing technologies as well as the implementation of novel technologies and techniques have the potential to improve the diagnostic performance of endoscopy and expand its therapeutic role. Recent studies have enabled greater clarity about the role of preoperative biliary drainage and the choice of stents in this setting as well as the utility of metal stents in benign and malignant disease. PMID:28261440

  8. Endoscopic palliation of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Sanjay M; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary strictures often present late after the window for curative resection has elapsed. In such patients, the goal of therapy is typically focused on palliation. While historically, palliative measures were performed surgically, the advent of endoscopic intervention offers minimally invasive options to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life, and in some cases, increase survival of these patients. Some of these therapies, such as endoscopic biliary decompression, have become mainstays of treatment for decades, whereas newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, and photodynamic therapy offer additional options for patients with incurable biliary malignancies. PMID:26989459

  9. Biliary metal stents for proximal esophageal or hypopharyngeal strictures.

    PubMed

    Bechtler, Matthias; Wagner, Florian; Fuchs, Erik-Sebastian; Jakobs, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic dilation is the standard of care for stenoses of the cervical esophagus, but refractory strictures require some form of stenting. Most endoscopists avoid the placement of metal stents near the upper esophageal sphincter as they can cause major problems like severe cervical pain and globus sensation. We report our results with the use of biliary SEMS in the upper esophagus, which have a smaller diameter than regular esophageal stents and therefore exert less expansive force. We retrospectively reviewed all patients in our center between July 2011 and June 2014 who received a biliary metal stent because of a refractory stricture in the cervical esophagus. We implanted biliary SEMS (Wallflex, Boston Scientific) with a diameter of 1 cm and length of 6-8 cm. Technical and clinical success, adverse events and duration of stenting were evaluated. Ten patients were treated with biliary SEMS in the upper esophagus. Strictures were located between 10 and 19 cm from incisor teeth. Stent placement was successful in all (10/10) patients. One stent had to be extracted because of pain and globus sensation. Apart from that stent tolerability was good. All remaining patients (9/9) reported improvement of dysphagia with a decrease in mean dysphagia score from 3.2 to 1.78. Mean duration of stenting was 68 days. Because of a high clinical success rate and good tolerability, biliary metal stents are a reasonable alternative for difficult strictures in the cervical esophagus, especially in the palliative setting.

  10. Current diagnosis and treatment of benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Inseok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remain a significant biliary complication and play an important role in graft and patient survival. Benign biliary strictures after transplantation are classified into anastomotic or non-anastomotic strictures. These two types differ in presentation, outcome, and response to therapy. The leading causes of biliary strictures include impaired blood supply, technical errors during surgery, and biliary anomalies. Because patients usually have non-specific symptoms, a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Magnetic resonance cholangiography has gained widespread acceptance as a reliable noninvasive tool for detecting biliary complications. Endoscopy has played an increasingly prominent role in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary strictures after LDLT. Endoscopic management in LDLT recipients may be more challenging than in deceased donor liver transplantation patients because of the complex nature of the duct-to-duct reconstruction. Repeated aggressive endoscopic treatment with dilation and the placement of multiple plastic stents is considered the first-line treatment for biliary strictures. Percutaneous and surgical treatments are now reserved for patients for whom endoscopic management fails and for those with multiple, inaccessible intrahepatic strictures or Roux-en-Y anastomoses. Recent advances in enteroscopy enable treatment, even in these latter cases. Direct cholangioscopy, another advanced form of endoscopy, allows direct visualization of the inner wall of the biliary tree and is expected to facilitate stenting or stone extraction. Rendezvous techniques can be a good option when the endoscopic approach to the biliary stricture is unfeasible. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. PMID:26819525

  11. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  12. Efficacy of multiple biliary stenting for refractory benign biliary strictures due to chronic calcifying pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, Hiroshi; Mikata, Rintaro; Ishihara, Takeshi; Sakai, Yuji; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Yasui, Shin; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate endoscopic therapy efficacy for refractory benign biliary strictures (BBS) with multiple biliary stenting and clarify predictors. METHODS Ten consecutive patients with stones in the pancreatic head and BBS due to chronic pancreatitis who underwent endoscopic therapy were evaluated. Endoscopic insertion of a single stent failed in all patients. We used plastic stents (7F, 8.5F, and 10F) and increased stents at intervals of 2 or 3 mo. Stents were removed approximately 1 year after initial stenting. BBS and common bile duct (CBD) diameter were evaluated using cholangiography. Patients were followed for ≥ 6 mo after therapy, interviewed for cholestasis symptoms, and underwent liver function testing every visit. Patients with complete and incomplete stricture dilations were compared. RESULTS Endoscopic therapy was completed in 8 (80%) patients, whereas 2 (20%) patients could not continue therapy because of severe acute cholangitis and abdominal abscess, respectively. The mean number of stents was 4.1 ± 1.2. In two (20%) patients, BBS did not improve; thus, a biliary stent was inserted. BBS improved in six (60%) patients. CBD diameter improved more significantly in the complete group than in the incomplete group (6.1 ± 1.8 mm vs 13.7 ± 2.2 mm, respectively, P = 0.010). Stricture length was significantly associated with complete stricture dilation (complete group; 20.5 ± 3.0 mm, incomplete group; 29.0 ± 5.1 mm, P = 0.011). Acute cholangitis did not recur during the mean follow-up period of 20.6 ± 7.3 mo. CONCLUSION Sequential endoscopic insertion of multiple stents is effective for refractory BBS caused by chronic calcifying pancreatitis. BBS length calculation can improve patient selection procedure for therapy. PMID:28101303

  13. Eosinophilic Cholangitis—A Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Biliary Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios Panagiotis; Vezakis, Antonios I.; Kontis, Elissaios A.; Pantiora, Eirini V.; Stefanidis, Gerasimos G.; Politi, Aikaterini N.; Koutoulidis, Vasilios K.; Mela, Maria K.; Polydorou, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When confronting a biliary stricture, both benign and malignant etiologies must be carefully considered as a variety of benign biliary strictures can masquerade as hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Therefore, patients could undergo a major surgery despite the possibility of a benign biliary disease. Approximately 15% to 24% of patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected biliary malignancy will have benign pathology. Eosinophilic cholangitis (EC) is a rare benign disorder of the biliary tract, which can cause obstructive jaundice and can pose a difficult diagnostic task. We present a rare case of a young woman who was referred to our hospital with obstructive painless jaundice due to a biliary stricture at the confluence of the hepatic bile ducts, with a provisional diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Though, during her work up she was found to have EC, an extremely rare benign cause of biliary stricture, which is characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltration of the biliary tree causing stricturing, fibrosis, and obstruction and which is reversible with short-term high-dose steroids. Despite its rarity, EC should be taken into consideration when imaging modalities demonstrate a biliary stricture, especially if preoperative diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made, in the setting of peripheral eosinophilia and the absence of cardinal symptoms of malignancy. PMID:26735539

  14. The role of interventional radiology in the treatment of biliary strictures after paediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fonio, Paolo; Calandri, Marco; Faletti, Riccardo; Righi, Dorico; Cerrina, Alessia; Brunati, Andrea; Salizzoni, Mauro; Gandini, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous treatment of biliary strictures after paediatric liver transplantation. In the period between October 1999 and October 2010, a total of 92 transplants in 86 children were performed at our Liver Transplant Centre. Eighteen patients had anastomotic biliary strictures (in four cases associated with intrahepatic bile duct stenosis). Percutaneous treatment (transhepatic biliary drainage and conventional/cutting balloon dilatation) was proposed as a first approach in 13/18 patients. Strict radiation protection precautions were taken in accordance with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. Mean follow-up time was 2,364 days. Surgical correction was required in 3/13 patients; in 8/13 cases, there was complete disappearance of clinical symptoms without bile duct dilatation; in one case, an asymptomatic persistent bile duct dilatation was detected while in the other case, the liver is currently in cirrhotic degeneration (69 % clinical success including the asymptomatic patient with biliary dilatation). Two of the five patients who were initially treated with surgery required percutaneous revision (clinical success of 100 %). There were two cases of long-term restenosis and two cases of transient haemobilia. Percutaneous procedures are safe and effective therapeutic options for the treatment of biliary strictures after paediatric liver transplantation.

  15. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  16. Side-by-side placement of bilateral endoscopic metal stents for the treatment of postoperative biliary stricture.

    PubMed

    Kaino, Seiji; Sen-Yo, Manabu; Shinoda, Shuhei; Kawano, Michitaka; Harima, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeyuki; Sakaida, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Postoperative biliary strictures are usually complications of cholecystectomy. Endoscopic plastic stent prosthesis is generally undertaken for treating benign biliary strictures. Recently, fully covered metal stents have been shown to be effective for treating benign distal biliary strictures. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with liver injury in which imaging studies showed a common hepatic duct stricture. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography also confirmed the presence of a common hepatic duct stricture. Temporally fully covered metal stents with dilated diameters of 6 mm were placed in a side-by-side fashion in the left and right hepatic ducts, respectively. We removed the stents 2 months after their placement. Subsequent cholangiography revealed an improvement in the biliary strictures. Although we were apprehensive about the fully covered metal stents obstructing the biliary side branches, we noted that careful placement of the bilateral metal stents did not cause any complications. Side-by-side deployment of bilateral endoscopic fully covered metal stents can be one of the safe and effective therapies for postoperative biliary stricture.

  17. Diagnostic criteria for congenital biliary dilatation 2015.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshinori; Ando, Hisami; Kamisawa, Terumi; Itoi, Takao; Urushihara, Naoto; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Hideki; Morotomi, Yoshiki

    2016-06-01

    The Diagnostic Criteria for Pancreaticobiliary Maljunction 2013 were published by the Japanese Study Group on Pancreaticobiliary Maljunction (JSGPM) in 2014. The committee of JSGPM for diagnostic criteria for pancreaticobiliary maljunction has established the standard diameter of the bile duct, and a definition of dilatation of the bile duct was proposed in 2014. The committee of JSGPM prepared the diagnostic criteria for congenital biliary dilatation in 2014, and a final revised version was approved in 2015. Congenital biliary dilatation is defined as a congenital malformation involving both local dilatation of the extrahepatic bile duct, including the common bile duct, and pancreaticobiliary maljunction. However, cases associated with intrahepatic bile duct dilatation can also be included. Various kinds of pathological conditions can occur on hepatobiliary systems and pancreas by bile duct dilatation and pancreaticobiliary maljunction. For a diagnosis of congenital biliary dilatation, both abnormal dilatation of the bile duct and pancreaticobiliary maljunction must be evident by either imaging test or anatomical examination. Acquired or secondary dilatation of the bile duct by obstruction due to biliary stones or malignancy should be strictly excluded. Diagnostic criteria for congenital biliary dilatation 2015 were established from Japan representing a world first. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  18. Use of articulated catheters in the treatment of biliary strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D.; Soulen, Michael C.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin

    1997-05-15

    We have used a single articulated catheter to obviate the need for multiple catheters in patients with complex biliary strictures or strictures associated with small or immature tracts. Two- and three-arm articulated drains (8-14 Fr) made from segments of biliary catheters were placed in 16 patients. Nine were placed transhepatically, 6 transperitoneally through existing T-tube tracts, and 1 through a cystic duct fistula. Six malignant and 10 benign strictures were stented with various catheter configurations through a single tract. Fifteen patients had two catheter components with one articulation and 1 patient had three catheter components with two articulations. The average duration of catheter drainage was 7.0 {+-} 4.2 months. Routine catheter exchanges were performed; two spontaneous occlusions occurred. In patients where internal stenting may be difficult or undesirable, articulated catheters allow satisfactory external and internal drainage of complex benign and malignant strictures through a single tract, avoiding the need for multiple transhepatic catheters.

  19. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of benign biliary strictures: What’s new?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rosa; Loureiro, Rui; Nunes, Nuno; Santos, António Alberto; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Duarte, Maria Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. The most common strictures amenable to endoscopic treatment are post-cholecystectomy, post-liver transplantation, related to primary sclerosing cholangitis and to chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures is widely used as first line therapy, since it is effective, safe, noninvasive and repeatable. Endoscopic techniques currently used are dilation, multiple plastic stents insertion and fully covered self-expandable metal stents. The main indication for dilation alone is primary sclerosing cholangitis related strictures. In the vast majority of the remaining cases, temporary placement of multiple plastic stents with/without dilation is considered the treatment of choice. Although this approach is effective, it requires multiple endoscopic sessions due to the short duration of stent patency. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents appear as a good alternative to plastic stents, since they have an increased radial diameter, longer stent patency, easier insertion technique and similar efficacy. Recent advances in endoscopic technique and various devices have allowed successful treatment in most cases. The development of novel endoscopic techniques and devices is still ongoing. PMID:26962404

  20. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  1. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    GIMÉNEZ, Mariano E.; PALERMO, Mariano; HOUGHTON, Eduardo; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo; FINGER, Caetano; VERDE, Juan M.; CÚNEO, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. Aim: To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. Methods: In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. Results: In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusion: The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:27438039

  2. Percutaneous transhepatic treatment using retrievable covered stents in patients with benign biliary strictures: mid-term outcomes in 68 patients.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Dong Il; Ko, Gi-Young; Ko, Heung Kyu; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2013-11-01

    Percutaneous balloon dilation of benign biliary stricture has been the most widely used alternative to endoscopic treatment; however, the rate of recurrence has varied from 15 to 44 %. Recently, several investigators have reported that percutaneous transhepatic placement of retrievable covered stents is feasible for the treatment of benign biliary strictures. However, these studies had only a small number of patients and had short follow-up periods. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mid-term outcomes of a retrievable covered stent for treatment of benign biliary strictures. We retrospectively assessed 68 patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic placement and removal of a retrievable covered stent between March 2007 and November 2012, for treatment of benign biliary strictures. Forty-two patients had not previously undergone interventional treatment, whereas 26 had recurrent or refractory strictures despite previous percutaneous procedures. Placement of the retrievable covered stents was technically successful in all patients. Stent migration occurred in 11 (16.2 %) patients. The mean indwelling period of drainage catheter and stent were 5.8 months (range, 3-22.5 months) and 3 months (range, 2-6.5 months), respectively. Clinical success was achieved in 59 (86.8 %) patients. During the mean follow-up of 36 months (range, 8.5-65 months), 12 (20 %) of 60 patients had recurrence of clinically significant strictures. The primary patency rates at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 91, 89, 76, 68, and 68 %, respectively. Mid-term outcomes suggested that percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures using a retrievable covered stent was a clinically effective method.

  3. Treatment of colonic anastomotic strictures with 'through the scope' balloon dilators.

    PubMed Central

    Dinneen, M D; Motson, R W

    1991-01-01

    Stricture occurs in 1.2-4.2% of colonic anastomoses. Symptomatic strictures have previously been treated by resection and re-anastomosis and more recently by radiographically guided dilatation by a modified Seldinger technique. This paper describes the endoscopic balloon dilatation of five symptomatic cases and three asymptomatic cases. Eight patients underwent balloon dilatation of colonic anastomotic strictures. Four patients had no symptoms post dilatation and the strictures remained patient on follow-up endoscopy. All the remaining patients required re-dilatation at approximately 2 months. One of these patients underwent dilatation but remained symptomatic, the dilatation was repeated and a colonic perforation occurred at this time. Of the other three, two continue to be followed up, and are well and one patient died of disseminated malignancy. Balloon dilatation with 'through the scope' dilators is a simpler technique than radiologically guided dilatation. These early results suggest that endoscopic dilatation may avoid further surgery in some patients with anastomotic stricture. PMID:2041001

  4. Isolated proximal esophageal injury from blunt trauma: endoscopic stricture dilatation.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Benoit C; Ott, David J

    2003-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma can cause isolated esophageal injuries that may be difficult to recognize. A high index of suspicion is necessary for optimal identification and management of this condition. We report a case of blunt esophageal trauma resulting from a motor vehicle accident that was initially unrecognized until the patient developed a tight stricture of the cervical esophagus. This was successfully dilated endoscopically. Aerodigestive trauma resulting from neck injuries is reviewed with emphasis on the pathophysiology of esophageal trauma.

  5. Intermittent self-dilatation for urethral stricture disease in males.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew J; Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Harding, Chris K; Dorkin, Trevor J

    2014-12-19

    Intermittent urethral self-dilatation is sometimes recommended to reduce the risk of recurrent urethral stricture. There is no consensus as to whether it is a clinically effective or cost-effective intervention in the management of this disease. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of intermittent self-dilatation after urethral stricture surgery in males compared to no intervention. We also compared different programmes of, and devices for, intermittent self-dilatation. . We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 7 May 2014), CENTRAL (2014, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1 January 1946 to Week 3 April 2014), PREMEDLINE (covering 29 April 2014), EMBASE (1 January 1947 to Week 17 2014), CINAHL (31 December 1981 to 30 April 2014) OpenGrey (searched 6 May 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (6 May 2014), WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (6 May 2014), Current Controlled Trials (6 May 2014) and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials where one arm was a programme of intermittent self-dilatation for urethral stricture were identified. Studies were excluded if they were not randomised or quasi-randomised trials, or if they pertained to clean intermittent self-catheterisation for bladder emptying. Two authors screened the records for relevance and methodological quality. Data extraction was performed according to predetermined criteria using data extraction forms. Analyses were carried out in Cochrane Review Manager (RevMan 5). The primary outcomes were patient-reported symptoms and health-related quality of life, and risk of recurrence; secondary outcomes were adverse events, acceptability of the intervention to patients and cost-effectiveness. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Eleven trials were selected for inclusion in the review, including a total of 776

  6. Hepatic duct stricture after radical radiation therapy for biliary cancer: recurrence or fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martenson, J.A. Jr.; Gunderson, L.L.; Buskirk, S.J.; Nagorney, D.M.; Martin, J.K.; May, G.R.; Bender, C.E.; Tremaine, W.J.

    1986-07-01

    Two patients with biliary cancer received radical radiation therapy. After treatment, both patients experienced episodes of biliary obstruction without definite evidence of progression of the tumor. These cases emphasize the importance of including radiation-induced biliary fibrosis in the differential diagnosis of hepatic duct stricture after radical radiation therapy.

  7. Improved classification of indeterminate biliary strictures by probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy using the Paris Criteria following biliary stenting.

    PubMed

    Taunk, Pushpak; Singh, Satish; Lichtenstein, David; Joshi, Virendra; Gold, Jason; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-10-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) using the Miami Criteria has improved classification of indeterminate biliary strictures. However, previous biliary stenting may result in their misclassification as malignant strictures. Inflammatory criteria were added to form the Paris Classification to prevent this misclassification and reduce false positives. The aim of this study was to assess if the Paris Classification was more accurate than the Miami Classification in classifying indeterminate biliary strictures after biliary stenting. This was a retrospective observational study involving 21 patients with indeterminate biliary strictures from whom 27 pCLE video sequences were obtained (20 benign and seven malignant). Patients with and without prior biliary stenting underwent pCLE. Two investigators classified the strictures as malignant or benign using the Miami and Paris Classifications. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity (Se), and specificity (Sp) of endoscopic retrograde-guided pCLE were compared with final histopathology. In those without biliary stenting, the Miami Criteria resulted in Se 88%, Sp 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 64%, negative predictive value (NPV) 92%, and accuracy 79%, while the Paris Classification resulted in Se 63%, Sp 88%, PPV 71%, NPV 82%, and accuracy 79%. In those with prior biliary stenting, the Miami Criteria resulted in Se 88%, Sp 36%, PPV 23%, NPV 93%, and accuracy 45%, while the Paris Classification resulted in Se 63%, Sp 73%, PPV 31%, NPV 91%, and accuracy 71%. The kappa statistic was 0.56. The Paris Classification improved specificity and accuracy of biliary stricture classification in those who had been previously stented and decreased the rate of misclassification of benign strictures as malignant. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Treatment of Ureterointestinal Anastomotic Strictures by Diathermal or Cryoplastic Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Orsi, Franco; Penco, Silvia Matei, Victor; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Cobelli, Ottavio De

    2007-09-15

    Background. Ureterointestinal anastomotic strictures (UAS) complicate 10-15% of surgeries for urinary diversion and are the main cause of deterioration in renal function. Treatments are surgical revision, management with autostatic stent, balloon dilatation, endoscopic incision, and percutaneous transrenal diathermy (Acucise). A new option is cryoplastic dilatation (Polar-Cath). Purpose. To assess the feasibility, complications, and preliminary results of UAS treatment using the Acucise and Polar-Cath systems. Methods. Nineteen UAS, diagnosed by ultrasonography or computed tomography and sequential renal scintigraphy, occurred in 15 cancer patients after radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Fifteen were managed with balloon diathermy and 4 by balloon cryoplasty in a three-stage procedure-percutaneous nephrostomy, diathermal or cryoplastic dilatation, and transnephrostomic control with nephrostomy removal-each separated by 15 days. All patients gave written informed consent. Results. Dilatations were successful in all cases. The procedure is simple and rapid (about 45 min) under fluoroscopic control and sedation. Procedural complications occurred in 1 (5%) patient with UAS after Wallace II uretero-ileocutaneostomy: a common iliac artery lesion was induced by diathermal dilatation, evident subsequently, and required surgical repair. Patency with balloon diathermy was good, with two restenoses developing over 12 months (range 1-22) of follow-up. With balloon cryoplastic dilatation, one restenosis developed in the short term; follow-up is too brief to assess the long-term efficacy. Conclusion. Our short-term results with diathermal and cryoplastic dilatation to resolve UAS are good. If supported by longer follow-up, the techniques may be considered as first-choice approaches to UAS. Surgery should be reserved for cases in which this minimally invasive technique fails.

  9. Novel endoscopic approaches in the diagnosis and management of biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Margaret G.; Marlow, Neale J.

    2013-01-01

    Indeterminate bilary strictures present the clinician with a wide differential diagnosis. Histological confirmation is usually required for treatment, but tissue acquisition remains challenging. Novel developments in endoscopic technology, such as single operator cholangioscopy and confocal endomicroscopy, have led to improvements in diagnostic accuracy in recent years. In patients with non-resectable malignant biliary obstruction, effective biliary decompression improves symptoms and enables patients to undergo palliative therapies. Improvements in endoscopic techniques, biliary stents and the development of local ablative techniques have led to further improvements in stent patency and survival in these patients. In this article, we review emerging diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for the endoscopic management of indeterminate biliary strictures. PMID:24049642

  10. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  11. Endoscopic bilateral deployment of multiple metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Harada, Ryo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-05-01

    Jaundice and cholangitis are associated with morbidity and mortality for patients with malignant hilar biliary strictures. Endoscopic biliary drainage is considered a useful procedure for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar biliary strictures. However, even today, the devices and methods to effectively achieve the drainage of these strictures are under debate. Endoscopic bilateral deployment of multiple metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary strictures is a feasible and useful procedure, providing long-term patency and the preservation of functional liver volume. We report the cases of two patients who underwent endoscopic bilateral deployment of multiple metallic stents using the partial stent-in-stent method. Both of the patients had malignant hilar biliary stricture due to biliary tract cancer. The cancers were unresectable and the patients decided to receive chemotherapy. Before the chemotherapy, bilateral deployment of metallic stents was carried out and each patient has been receiving chemotherapy without occlusion of the metallic stents for several months. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  12. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Treatment of Biliary Strictures Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Righi, Dorico; Cesarani, Federico; Muraro, Emanuele; Gazzera, Carlo; Salizzoni, Mauro; Gandini, Giovanni

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of biliary strictures complicating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: Between October 1990 and May 2000, 619 patients underwent 678 liver transplants. Seventy of the 619 (11%) patients were found to be affected by biliary strictures by July 2000. Bilioplasty was performed in 51 of these 70 (73%) patients. A cohort of 33 of 51 (65%) patients were clinically followed for more than 12 months after the last percutaneous treatment and included in the survey results. Results: After one to three treatments 24 of 33 (73%)patients were stricture-free on ultrasound and MR cholangiography follow-up. A delayed stricture recurrence required a fourth percutaneous bilioplasty in two of 33 (6%) patients. A surgical bilioenteric anastomosis was performed in six of 33 (18%) patients.Retransplantation was performed due to ischemic damage in one of 33(3%) patients. Conclusion: Interventional radiology is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of most biliary strictures complicating OLT. It has a high success rate and should be considered before surgical interventions. Elective surgery may be necessary in a few failed cases or those with more severe and extensive biliary strictures.

  13. Benign Post-Radiation Rectal Stricture Treated with Endoscopic Balloon Dilation and Intralesional Triamcinolone Injection

    PubMed Central

    Karanikas, Michael; Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Zezos, Petros; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Efremidou, Eleni; Liratzopoulos, Nikolaos; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Kouklakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Post-radiation stricture is a rare complication after pelvis irradiation, but must be in the mind of the clinician evaluating a lower gastrointestinal obstruction. Endoscopy has gained an important role in chronic radiation proctitis with several therapeutic options for management of intestinal strictures. The treatment of rectal strictures has been limited to surgery with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a less invasive therapeutic approach for benign rectal strictures, endoscopic balloon dilation with or without intralesional steroid injection, has become a common treatment modality. We present a case of benign post-radiation rectal stricture treated successfully with balloon dilation and adjuvant intralesional triamcinolone injection. A 70-year-old woman presented to the emergency room complaining for 2 weeks of diarrhea and meteorism, 11 years after radiation of the pelvis due to adenocarcinoma of the uterus. Colonoscopy revealed a stricture at the rectum and multiple endoscopic biopsies were obtained from the stricture. The stricture was treated with endoscopic balloon dilation and intralesional triamcinolone injection. The procedure appears to have a high success rate and a very low complication rate. Histologic examination of the biopsies revealed non-specific inflammatory changes of the rectal mucosa and no specific changes of the mucosa due to radiation. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. The patient is stricture-free 12 months post-treatment. PMID:23271987

  14. Biliary strictures and hepatic artery flow abnormalities in split liver transplants.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Edward V; Stormon, Michael O; Shun, Albert; Verran, Deborah; Jermyn, Vicki; Wong, Christopher; Lord, David

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of HA flow abnormalities in the development of biliary strictures following split liver transplants. Data was obtained from a prospective data base of all patients undergoing split liver transplants from 2000-2008 with a follow up time of at least six months. Forty-six transplants were performed in 44 patients. Fourteen of 46 developed strictures of whom four were intrahepatic and 10 anastomotic. Nine of 14 with strictures had either hepatic artery thromobosis (HAT, four) or abnormalities of HA flow identified by routine Doppler ultrasound (5) compared with two of 32 without strictures (p < 0.02, (one temporary loss of flow and one HA aneurysm). There were no differences between the stricture and non stricture group with regard to age or weight at transplant, donor age, cold and warm ischemia times or intraoperative portal vein flow though there was a significant decrease in intraoperative HA flow in the stricture group. In conclusion, both HAT and hepatic artery flow abnormalities are associated with biliary strictures in the majority of split liver transplants. However, unrecognised abnormalities in HA flow and or other factors are likely to contribute.

  15. The Accordion Sign in the Transplant Ureter: Ramifications During Balloon Dilation of Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegshauser, J. Scott Naidu, Sailen G.; Chang, Yu-Hui H.; Huettl, Eric A.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to demonstrate the accordion sign within the transplant ureter and evaluate its ramifications during balloon dilation of strictures.MethodsA retrospective electronic chart and imaging review included demographic characteristics, procedure reports, and complications of 28 renal transplant patients having ureteral strictures treated with percutaneous balloon dilation reported in our transplant nephrology database during an 8-year period. The accordion sign was deemed present or absent on the basis of an imaging review and was defined as present when a tortuous ureter became kinked and irregular when foreshortened after placement of a wire or a catheter. Procedure-related urine leaks were categorized as occurring at the stricture if within 2 cm; otherwise, they were considered away from the stricture.ResultsThe accordion sign was associated with a significantly greater occurrence of leaks away from the stricture (P = 0.001) but not at the stricture (P = 0.34).ConclusionsThe accordion sign is an important consideration when performing balloon dilation procedures on transplant ureteral strictures, given the increased risk of leak away from the stricture. Its presence should prompt additional care during wire and catheter manipulations.

  16. Balloon Dilatation of Salivary Duct Strictures: Report on 36 Treated Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Nicholas A.; Brown, Jackie E.; Escudier, Michael P.; Wilson, Ron F.; McGurk, Mark

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the technique for balloon dilatation of salivary duct strictures and evaluates the clinical and radiographic findings in a consecutive series of 36 affected glands. Methods: Thirty-four patients (36 glands) had balloon dilatation of their salivary duct strictures performed under fluoroscopic control. They were evaluated immediately afterwards and at review by sialography. Results: In 36 cases attempted, 33 (92%) strictures were dilated. The immediate post-treatment sialogram was available in 28 cases, of which 23 (82%) demonstrated complete and four (14%) partial elimination of stricture. In one case the appearance was unchanged(4%). Review data (mean 6.8 months) were available on 25 glands: 12 were asymptomatic (48%), 12 (48%) had reduced symptoms and one (4%)failed to improve. Sialographic data were available on 21 glands: in 10(48%) the duct remained patent, in one (5%) the stricture was partially eliminated, in seven (33%) the strictures had returned and in the remaining three (14%) cases there was complete obstruction. Conclusions: Balloon dilatation is an effective treatment of salivary duct stenosis. In half the cases the stricture recurred but symptomatic improvement was achieved and maintained in the majority of cases.

  17. Meta-Analysis of the Long Term Success Rate of Different Interventions in Benign Biliary Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Huszár, Orsolya; Kokas, Bálint; Mátrai, Péter; Hegyi, Péter; Pétervári, Erika; Vincze, Áron; Pár, Gabriella; Sarlós, Patrícia; Bajor, Judit; Czimmer, József; Mosztbacher, Dóra; Márta, Katalin; Zsiborás, Csaba; Varjú, Péter; Szücs, Ákos

    2017-01-01

    Background Benign biliary stricture is a rare condition and the majority of the cases are caused by operative trauma or chronic inflammation based on various etiology. Although the initial results of endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical treatment are impressive, no comparison about long term stricture resolution is available. Aims The goal of this study was to compare the long term disease free survival in benign biliary strictures with various etiology after surgery, percutaneous transhepatic—and endoscopic treatment. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched by computer and manually for published studies. The investigators selected the publications according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, processed the data and assessed the quality of the selected studies. Meta-analysis of data of 24 publications was performed to compare long term disease free survival of different treatment groups. Results Compared the subgroups surgery resulted in the highest long term stricture resolution rate, followed by the percutaneous transhepatic treatment, the multiple plastic stent insertion and covered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS), however the difference was not significant. All compared methods are significantly superior to the single plastic stent placement. Long term stricture resolution rate irrespectively of any therapy is still not more than 84%. Conclusions In summary, the use of single plastic stent is not recommended. Further randomized studies and innovative technical development are required for improving the treatment of benign biliary strictures. PMID:28076371

  18. Trans-Balloon Visualisation During Dilatation (TBVD) of Oesophageal Strictures: a Novel Innovation.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Haseeb A; Azeem, Beenish; Bughio, Mumtaz; Bass, Gary A; Elfadul, Amr; Salih, Monim; Fahmy, Waleed; Walsh, Thomas N

    2016-04-01

    Hydrostatic balloon dilatation of upper gastrointestinal strictures is associated with a risk of perforation that varies with the underlying pathology and with the technique employed. We present a technique of trans-balloon visualisation of the stricture during dilatation (TBVD) that allows direct 'real-time' observation of the effect of dilatation on the stricture, facilitating early recognition of mucosal abruption, thereby reducing the perforation rate. We retrospectively analysed 100 consecutive patients, undergoing balloon dilatation of oesophageal strictures between 1st of January 2011 and 1st of July 2014. One hundred patients underwent 186 dilatations, with 34 having multiple procedures (mean 1.86). All had oesophageal strictures (mean diameter 8.49 mm, range 5-11 mm) and most underwent dilatation up to a maximum of 17 mm (mean 14.7 mm). Fifty-six percent were male and the average age was 62.5 years (17-89 years). Only one patient (0.5% of all procedures) had a full-thickness perforation requiring intervention while just one further patient had a deep mucosal tear that did not require intervention. TBVD is a safe technique with a short learning curve and is one of the important factors that allow potentially difficult dilatations to be performed safely with an exceptionally low rate of adverse events of less than 1%.

  19. Benign biliary strictures refractory to standard bilioplasty treated using polydoxanone biodegradable biliary stents: retrospective multicentric data analysis on 107 patients.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giovanni; Michelozzi, Caterina; Melchiorre, Fabio; Poretti, Dario; Pedicini, Vittorio; Salvetti, Monica; Criado, Eva; Falcò Fages, Joan; De Gregorio, Miguel Ángel; Laborda, Alicia; Sonfienza, Luca Maria; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Panek, Jiri; Andrasina, Tomas; Gimenez, Mariano

    2016-11-01

    To assess mid-term outcome of biodegradable biliary stents (BBSs) to treat benign biliary strictures refractory to standard bilioplasty. Institutional review board approval was obtained and patient consent was waived. 107 patients (61 males, 46 females, mean age 59 ± 16 years), were treated. Technical success and complications were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (55 males, 42 females, aged 57 ± 17 years) were considered for follow-up analysis (mean follow-up 23 ± 12 months). Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U tests were used and a Kaplan-Meier curve was calculated. The procedure was always feasible. In 2/107 cases (2 %), stent migration occurred (technical success 98 %). 4/107 patients (4 %) experienced mild haemobilia. No major complications occurred. In 19/97 patients (18 %), stricture recurrence occurred. In this group, higher rate of subsequent cholangitis (84.2 % vs. 12.8 %, p = 0.001) and biliary stones (26.3 % vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.003) was noted. Estimated mean time to stricture recurrence was 38 months (95 % C.I 34-42 months). Estimated stricture recurrence rate at 1, 2, and 3 years was respectively 7.2 %, 26.4 %, and 29.4 %. Percutaneous placement of a BBS is a feasible and safe strategy to treat benign biliary strictures refractory to standard bilioplasty, with promising results in the mid-term period. • Percutaneous placement of a BBS is 100 % feasible. • The procedure appears free from major complications, with few minor complications. • BBSs offer promising results in the mid-term period. • With a BBS, external catheter/drainage can be removed early. • BBSs represent a new option in treating benign biliary stenosis.

  20. Tubercular versus Crohn’s ileal strictures: role of endoscopic balloon dilatation without fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Singh Rana, Surinder; Kumar Bhasin, Deepak; Rao, Chalapathi; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Background Benign ileal strictures can cause considerable morbidity and they have been conventionally treated with surgery. The aim of this study was to report our experience of endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) in patients with terminal ileal strictures because of Crohn’s disease and tuberculosis. Methods Over the last 8 years, 9 patients (6 males; mean age 39.7±13.2 years) with benign terminal ileal strictures were treated by EBD using a colonoscope and through-the-scope controlled radial expansion balloon dilators. Results The etiology of benign ileal stricture was Crohn’s disease in 5 and tuberculosis in 4 patients. All the patients with Crohn’s disease had no or partial response to 4 weeks of steroid therapy and there were no mucosal ulcerations on ileoscopy. Three patients with ileal strictures due to tuberculosis underwent dilatation after completion of the antitubercular therapy (ATT) while one patient required dilatation 3 months after starting ATT. All patients had single ileal stricture with length of stricture ranging from 0.6-1.8 cm. EBD was successful in all 9 patients with a median number of dilating sessions required of 2 (range: 1-5 sessions). Patients with Crohn’s disease required more endoscopic sessions as compared to patients with tuberculosis but this difference was not statistically significant (mean number of session being 3.0±1.58 vs. 1.75±0.5 sessions respectively; P=0.1). One patient with ileal tuberculosis had enterolith proximal to the stricture that could be removed with dormia. There were no complications of the endoscopic procedure. Conclusions EBD is an effective, safe, and minimally invasive treatment modality for benign ileal strictures. PMID:24714760

  1. Liver transplant-related anastomotic biliary strictures: a novel, rapid, safe, radiation-sparing, and cost-effective management approach.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Monique T; Huang, Robert J; Thosani, Nirav C; Choudhary, Abhishek; Girotra, Mohit; Banerjee, Subhas

    2017-07-27

    Biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are typically managed by sequential ERCP procedures, with incremental dilation of the stricture and stent exchange (IDSE) and placement of new stents. This approach resolves >80% of strictures after 12 months but requires costly, lengthy ERCPs with significant patient radiation exposure. Increasing awareness of the harmful effects of radiation, escalating healthcare costs, and decreasing reimbursement for procedures mandate maximal efficiency in performing ERCP. We compared the traditional IDSE protocol with a sequential stent addition (SSA) protocol, in which additional stents are placed across the stricture during sequential ERCPs, without stent removal/exchange or stricture dilation. Patients undergoing ERCP for OLT-related anastomotic strictures from 2010 to 2016 were identified from a prospectively maintained endoscopy database. Procedure duration, fluoroscopy time, stricture resolution rates, adverse events, materials fees, and facility fees were analyzed for IDSE and SSA procedures. Seventy-seven patients underwent 277 IDSE and 132 SSA procedures. Mean fluoroscopy time was 64.5% shorter (P < .0001) and mean procedure duration 41.5% lower (P < .0001) with SSA compared with IDSE. SSA procedures required fewer accessory devices, resulting in significantly lower material (63.8%, P < .0001) and facility costs (42.8%, P < .0001) compared with IDSE. Stricture resolution was >95%, and low adverse event rates did not significantly differ. SSA results in shorter, cost-effective procedures requiring fewer accessory devices and exposing patients to less radiation. Stricture resolution rates are equivalent to IDSE, and adverse events do not differ significantly, even in this immunocompromised population. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for benign bronchial stricture occurring after radiotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Heung Kyu; Song, Ho-Young

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with benign bronchial stricture occurring after radiotherapy (RT). From March 2002 to January 2013, ten patients with benign bronchial stricture occurring after RT underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation as their initial treatment. Technical success, primary and secondary clinical success, improvement in respiratory status, and complications were evaluated. The symptomatic improvement period was calculated. A total of 15 balloon dilation sessions were performed in ten patients, with a range of 1-4 sessions per patient (mean 1.5 sessions). Technical success was achieved in 100 %. Six of the ten patients exhibited no symptom recurrence and required no further treatment until the end of follow-up (range 4-105 months). Four patients (40 %) experienced recurrent symptom, and two of four patients underwent repeat balloon dilations. The remaining two patients underwent cutting balloon dilation and temporary stent placement, respectively, and they exhibited symptom improvement after adjuvant treatment until the end of our study. Finally, primary clinical success was achieved in six of ten patients (60 %) and secondary clinical success was achieved in eight of ten patients (80 %). The mean symptom improvement period was 61.9 ± 16 months (95 % confidence interval 30.6-93.3). Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation seems to be safe and clinically effective for the treatment of RT-induced benign bronchial stricture. Temporary stent placement or cutting balloon dilation could be considered in patients with benign bronchial strictures resistant to fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation.

  3. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures using covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS).

    PubMed

    Irani, Shayan; Baron, Todd H; Akbar, Ali; Lin, Otto S; Gluck, Michael; Gan, Ian; Ross, Andrew S; Petersen, Bret T; Topazian, Mark; Kozarek, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Traditional endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures (BBS) consists of placement of one or more plastic stents. Emerging data support the use of covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS). We sought to assess outcome of endoscopic temporary placement of CSEMS in patients with BBS. This was a retrospective study of CSEMS placement for BBS between May 2005 and July 2012 from two tertiary care centers. A total of 145 patients (81 males, median age 59 years) with BBS were identified; 73 of which were classified as extrinsic and were caused by chronic pancreatitis, and 70 were intrinsic. Main outcome measures were resolution of stricture and adverse events (AEs) due to self-expandable metal stents (SEMS)-related therapy. Fully covered and partially covered 8-10 mm diameter SEMS were placed and subsequently removed in 121/125 (97 %) attempts in BBS (failure to remove four partially covered stents). Stricture resolution occurred in 83/125 (66 %) patients after a median stent duration of 26 weeks (median follow-up 90 weeks). Resolution of extrinsic strictures was significantly lower compared to intrinsic strictures (31/65, 48 % vs. 52/60, 87 %, p = 0.004) despite longer median stent duration (30 vs. 20 weeks). Thirty-seven AEs occurred in 25 patients (17 %), with 12 developing multiple AEs including cholangitis (n = 17), pancreatitis (n = 5), proximal stent migration (n = 3), cholecystitis (n = 2), pain requiring SEMS removal and/or hospitalization (n = 3), inability to remove (n = 4), and new stricture formation (n = 3). Benign biliary strictures can be effectively treated with CSEMS. Successful resolution of biliary strictures due to extrinsic disease is seen significantly less often than those due to intrinsic disease. Removal is successful in all patients with fully covered SEMS.

  4. Recurrence rate of anastomotic biliary strictures in patients who have had previous successful endoscopic therapy for anastomotic narrowing after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alazmi, W M; Fogel, E L; Watkins, J L; McHenry, L; Tector, J A; Fridell, J; Mosler, P; Sherman, S; Lehman, G A

    2006-06-01

    The development of anastomotic strictures is one of the most common complications of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with choledochocholedochostomy anastomosis. Endoscopic therapy with balloon dilation and/or stent placement is an effective therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the recurrence rate of anastomotic strictures and the features that predict recurrence after previously successful endoscopic therapy. We searched the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) database for all patients who had had an OLT who were undergoing ERCP. The study cohort consisted of post-OLT patients who had a recurrence of anastomotic stricture after initial resolution following a course of endoscopic therapy. A total of 916 OLT operations were performed during the study period from June 1994 to November 2004. Out of this group, 143 patients (15.6 %) were diagnosed with anastomotic stricture and underwent a total of 423 ERCPs for endoscopic treatment. Twelve patients who are still undergoing endoscopic therapy were excluded from the analysis. The technical success rate was 96.6 %, and the endoscopic therapy was successful in 82 % of patients; 18 % had a recurrence of cholestasis and ERCP revealed a recurrence of the anastomotic stricture that required intervention. The mean time of follow-up after stent removal was 28 months (range 1 - 114 months). The study did not reveal any clinical or endoscopic parameters that could predict recurrence, though the presence of a biliary leak at initial ERCP and a longer time to initial presentation were factors that showed a trend toward an increased likelihood of recurrence. Biliary strictures remain a common complication after OLT, and in nearly one in five patients these strictures recur after initially successful endoscopic therapy. There were no clinical or endoscopic parameters identified in this study that predicted recurrence. Further study is needed to determine what type of endoscopic therapy would minimize

  5. Balloon dilatation in esophageal strictures in epidermolysis bullosa and the role of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gollu, Gulnur; Ergun, Ergun; Ates, Ufuk; Can, Ozlem S; Dindar, Huseyin

    2017-02-01

    Esophageal involvement, which causes stricture, is a complication in epidermolysis bullosa. This causes dysphagia and malnutrition and leads to deterioration of skin lesions in these patients. The charts of 11 patients with epidermolysis bullosa and esophageal stricture who were included into dilatation program between 2003 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven of the patients were female and four were male. The median age was 14 (2-32) years. The mean body weight of patients was 27.8 (9-51) kg. The location and number of strictured parts of the esophagus were previously evaluated with upper gastrointestinal contrast study and after that flexible endoscopy was used for dilatation. Eight patients had middle esophageal, three patients had proximal esophageal and one of them had both proximal and middle esophageal strictures. The strictures were dilated 56 times in total (mean 5 times). One patient underwent gastrostomy and was medically followed-up after a perforation occurrence during the dilatation procedure. In a 32-year-old female patient, colon interposition was performed after four dilatations since optimal nutritional and developmental status could not be achieved. The dilatation program of nine patients is still in progress. Seven of them can easily swallow solid food but two of them have some difficulties in swallowing between dilatations. One patient rejected the program and quitted, while one patient refused colon interposition and died because of complications related to amyloidosis during the dilatation program. After resolution of the swallowing problem, skin lesions were observed to heal quickly. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare cause of dysphagia. Esophageal balloon dilatation with flexible endoscopy is a safe and efficient method in patients with this condition. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. Management of liver transplantation biliary stricture: Results from a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Fernanda Prata; Kahaleh, Michel; Ferrari, Angelo P

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review results of endoscopic treatment for anastomotic biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) during an 8-year period. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographys (ERCPs) performed between May 2006 and June 2014 in deceased OLT recipients with anastomotic stricture at a tertiary care hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups, according to the type of stent used (multiple plastic or covered self-expandable metal stents), which was chose on a case-by-case basis and their characteristics. The primary outcome was anastomotic stricture resolution rate determined if there was no more than a minimum waist at cholangiography and a 10 mm balloon could easily pass through the anastomosis with no need for further intervention after final stent removal. Secondary outcomes were technical success rate, number or ERCPs required per patient, number of stents placed, stent indwelling, stricture recurrence rate and therapy for recurrent anastomotic biliary stricture (AS). Stricture recurrence was defined as clinical laboratorial and/or imaging evidence of obstruction at the anastomosis level, after it was considered completely treated, requiring subsequent interventional procedure. RESULTS: A total of 195 post-OLT patients were assessed for eligibility. One hundred and sixty-four (164) patients were diagnosed with anastomotic biliary stricture. ERCP was successfully performed in 157/164 (95.7%) patients with AS, that were treated with either multiple plastic (n = 109) or metallic billiary stents (n = 48). Mean treatment duration, number of procedures and stents required were lower in the metal stent group. Acute pancreatitis was the most common procedure related complication, occurring in 17.1% in the covered self-expandable metal stents (cSEMS) and 4.1% in the multiple plastic stent (MPS) group. Migration was the most frequent stent related complication, observed in 4.3% and 5.5% (cSEMS and MPS

  7. Can esophageal dilation be avoided in the treatment of severe esophageal stricture caused by eosinophilic esophagitis?

    PubMed

    Silva, D; Santos, F; Piedade, S; Morais-Almeida, M

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory immune-mediated disease with predominant eosinophilic inflammation characterized by the presence of esophageal dysfunction symptoms. Treatment delay can be associated with disease complications, like esophageal strictures, that can justify the use of invasive procedures which are not deprived of side effects. We present a case report of a 14 year old child with severe esophageal stricture secondary to EoE, that was treated with topical and systemic corticosteroid before any invasive procedure was considered. After 26 weeks of medical treatment, significant improvement of esophageal dysfunction occurred with histological remission and stricture resolution. In patients with severe esophageal strictures secondary to EoE, the need for esophageal dilation procedures should be considered only after anti-inflammatory treatment.

  8. Long-term results of endoscopic balloon dilatation of lower gastrointestinal tract strictures in Crohn's disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Stienecker, Klaus; Gleichmann, Daniel; Neumayer, Ulrike; Glaser, H Joachim; Tonus, Carolin

    2009-06-07

    To examine the long-term results of endoscopic treatment in a prospective study conducted over a period of 10 years, 1997 to January 2007. A total of 25 patients (20 female and five male: aged 18-75 years), with at least one symptom of stricture not passable with the standard colonoscope and with a confirmed scarred Crohn's stricture of the lower gastrointestinal tract, were included in the study. The main symptom was abdominal pain. The endoscopic balloon dilatation was performed with an 18 mm balloon under endoscopic and radiological control. Eleven strictures were located in the colon, 13 at the anastomosis after ileocecal resection, three at the Bauhin valve and four in the ileum. Four patients had two strictures and one patient had three strictures. Of the 31 strictures, in 30 was balloon dilatation successful in a single endoscopic session, so that eventually the strictures could be passed easily with the standard colonoscope. In one patient with a long stricture of the ileum involving the Bauhin valve and an additional stricture of the ileum which were 15 cm apart, sufficient dilatation was not possible. This patient therefore required surgery. Improvement of abdominal symptoms was achieved in all cases which had technically successful balloon dilatation, although in one case perforation occurred after dilatation of a recurrent stricture. Available follow-up was in the range of 54-118 mo (mean of 81 mo). The relapse rate over this period was 46%, but 64% of relapsing strictures could be successfully dilated again. Only in four patients was surgery required during this follow-up period. We conclude from these initial results that endoscopic balloon dilatation, especially for short strictures in Crohn's disease, can be performed with reliable success. Perforation is a rare complication. It is our opinion that in the long-term, the relapse rate is probably higher than after surgery, but usually a second endoscopic treatment can be performed successfully

  9. [Dilatation of anastomotic stricture by Nd:YAG laser beam under endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Lu, Z C; Chen, L G; Zhang, Y Y

    1994-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture has become a common complication following surgical treatment of upper gastrointestinal cancers. A technique was devised to alleviate the stricture with Nd. YAG laser beam under endoscopy. The laser beam was applied at 3-4 different points near the anastomotic stoma. The thermal effect of the beam would cut the scar tissues in and underneath the mucosa, leading to dilatation of the stoma. A total of 48 patients with cancer of the esophagus (n = 21), gastric cardia (n = 20), body of stomach (n = 6) and gastric stump (n = 1) with postoperative anastomotic stricture was so treated. According to the degree of dilatation, the result of treatment upon longterm follow-up was good (the anastomotic stoma was enlarged more than 6 mm) in 41 (85.4%), fair (the stoma enlarged 4-5 mm) in 5 (10.4%) and poor in the remaining 2. Due precautions should be made to avoid bleeding and perforation.

  10. Newly Designed Y-configured Single-Catheter Stenting for the Treatment of Hilar-Type Nonanastomotic Biliary Strictures After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Changming; Li Xuan; Song Shibing; Lv Xianjun; Luan Jingyuan; Dong Guoxiang

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to introduce our novel technique of percutaneous single catheter placement into the hilar bile ducts strictures while fulfilling the purpose of bilateral biliary drainage and stenting. We investigated the efficacy and safety of the technique for the treatment of hilar nonanastomotic biliary strictures. Methods: Ten patients who were post-orthotopic liver transplantation between July 2000 and July 2010 were enrolled in this study. Percutaneous Y-configured single-catheter stenting for bilateral bile ducts combined with balloon dilation was designed as the main treatment approach. Technical success rate, clinical indicators, complications, and recurrent rate were analyzed. Results: Technical success rate was 100%. Nine of the ten patients had biochemical normalization, cholangiographic improvement, and clinical symptoms relief. None of them experienced recurrence in a median follow-up of 26 months after completion of therapy and removal of all catheters. Complications were minor and limited to two patients. The one treatment failure underwent a second liver transplantation but died of multiple system organ failure. Conclusions: Percutaneous transhepatic Y-configured single-catheter stenting into the hilar bile ducts is technically feasible. The preliminary trial of this technique combined with traditional PTCD or choledochoscopy for the treatment of hilar biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation appeared to be effective and safe. Yet, further investigation is needed.

  11. Preoperative Drainage for Malignant Biliary Strictures: Is It Time for Self-Expanding Metallic Stents?

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Jason; Ho, Shiaw-Hooi

    2015-01-01

    Palliation of jaundice improves the general health of the patient and, therefore, surgical outcomes. Because of the complexity and location of strictures, especially proximally, drainage has been accompanied by increased morbidity due to sepsis. Another concern is the provocation of an inflammatory and fibrotic reaction around the area of stent placement. Preoperative biliary drainage with self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) insertion can be achieved via a percutaneous method or through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A recently published multicenter randomized Dutch study has shown increased morbidity with preoperative biliary drainage. A Cochrane meta-analysis has also shown a significantly increased complication rate with preoperative drainage. However, few of these studies have used a SEMS, which allows better biliary drainage. No randomized controlled trials have compared preoperative deployment of SEMS versus conventional plastic stents. The outcomes of biliary drainage also depend on the location of the obstruction, namely the difficulty with proximal compared to distal strictures. Pathophysiologically, palliation of jaundice will benefit all patients awaiting surgery. However, preoperative drainage often results in increased morbidity because of procedure-related sepsis. The use of SEMS may change the outcome of preoperative biliary drainage dramatically. PMID:25674520

  12. Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Indeterminate Biliary Strictures: Refinement of the Image Interpretation Classification

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, Marc; Jamidar, Priya; Gan, S. Ian; Cesaro, Paola; Caillol, Fabrice; Filoche, Bernard; Karia, Kunal; Smith, Ioana; Slivka, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate diagnosis and clinical management of indeterminate biliary strictures are often a challenge. Tissue confirmation modalities during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suffer from low sensitivity and poor diagnostic accuracy. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) has been shown to be sensitive for malignant strictures characterization (98%) but lacks specificity (67%) due to inflammatory conditions inducing false positives. Methods. Six pCLE experts validated the Paris Classification, designed for diagnosing inflammatory biliary strictures, using a set of 40 pCLE sequences obtained during the prospective registry (19 inflammatory, 6 benign, and 15 malignant). The 4 criteria used included (1) multiple thin white bands, (2) dark granular pattern with scales, (3) increased space between scales, and (4) thickened reticular structures. Interobserver agreement was further calculated on a separate set of 18 pCLE sequences. Results. Overall accuracy was 82.5% (n = 40 retrospectively diagnosed) versus 81% (n = 89 prospectively collected) for the registry, resulting in a sensitivity of 81.2% (versus 98% for the prospective study) and a specificity of 83.3% (versus 67% for the prospective study). The corresponding interobserver agreement for 18 pCLE clips was fair (k = 0.37). Conclusion. Specificity of pCLE using the Paris Classification for the characterization of indeterminate bile duct stricture was increased, without impacting the overall accuracy. PMID:25866506

  13. High-pressure balloon dilation for male anterior urethral stricture: single-center experience*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shi-cheng; Wu, Hai-yang; Wang, Wei; Xu, Li-wei; Ding, Guo-qing; Zhang, Zhi-gen; Li, Gong-hui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We retrospectively reviewed the urethral stricture cases treated in our tertiary center, and assessed the safety and feasibility of the high-pressure balloon dilation (HPBD) technique for anterior urethral stricture. Methods: From January 2009 to December 2012, a total of 31 patients with anterior urethral strictures underwent HPBD at our center, while another 25 cases were treated by direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU). Patient demographics, stricture characteristics, surgical techniques, and operative outcomes were assessed and compared between the two groups. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was applied to evaluate the stricture-free rate for the two surgical techniques. Results: The operation time was much shorter for the HPBD procedure than for the DVIU ((13.19±2.68) min vs. (18.44±3.29) min, P<0.01). For the HPBD group, the major postoperative complications as urethral bleeding and urinary tract infection (UTI) were less frequently encountered than those in DVIU (urethral bleeding: 2/31 vs. 8/25, P=0.017; UTI: 1/31 vs. 6/25 P=0.037). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that there was no significant difference in stricture-free rate at 36 months between the two groups (P=0.21, hazard ratio (HR)=0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.34 to 1.26). However, there was a significantly higher stricture-free survival in the HPBD group at 12 months (P=0.02, HR=0.35, 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.87), which indicated that the stricture recurrence could be delayed by using the HPBD technique. Conclusions: HPBD was effective and safe and it could be considered as an alternative treatment modality for anterior urethral stricture disease. PMID:27604864

  14. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Mariano E; Palermo, Mariano; Houghton, Eduardo; Acquafresca, Pablo; Finger, Caetano; Verde, Juan M; Cúneo, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. Uma vez que lesão biliar ocorreu, o reparo é feito por hepaticojejunostomia. O procedimento mais comum é efetuar dilatação com balão com sucesso de 70%. As taxas de sucesso utilizando stents biodegradáveis ​​é de 85% a 95%. Stents biliares biodegradáveis ​​devem mudar o tratamento desta complicação. Investigar o uso de stents biodegradáveis em um grupo de pacientes com estenose hepaticojejunal. Em estudo prospectivo 16 stents biodegrad

  15. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Prashant; Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@nhs.net

    2015-08-15

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree.

  16. Dilation of simultaneous laryngeal and oesophageal stricture with two T-tubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z

    1994-01-01

    The treatment of double strictures in the airway and the oesophagus has always been time-consuming and causes additional suffering. A new technique using an open approach with the placement of two Montgomery silicone T-tubes to support and dilate the two strictures was successfully performed on a patient after caustic substance ingestion. Scar tissue was incised before two T-tubes were positioned into the larynx and oesophagus through a laryngo-fissure approach. The tubes remained in position for one year and no complications occurred. No foreign body sensation or prosthesis migration was observed and the patient had nearly normal peroral alimentation. After removal of the tubes, follow-up for an additional two years revealed no recurrence of the stenoses and normal alimentation without stridor. This technique permits simultaneous stenting of strictures of the larynx and oesophagus by using a connecting suture between the superior parts of two stents.

  17. Tracheobronchial laceration after balloon dilation for benign strictures: incidence and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shim, Tae Sun; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2007-04-01

    Although balloon dilation is a safe procedure, it can lead to laceration of the airway, causing bleeding, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, or mediastinitis. We therefore determined the incidence and clinical significance of tracheobronchial lacerations after balloon dilation for treatment of benign tracheobronchial strictures. We evaluated 97 patients who had undergone balloon dilation in 124 sessions for the treatment of benign tracheobronchial strictures. The degree of airway laceration was evaluated bronchoscopically. The cumulative airway patency rate after balloon dilation was compared in patients with and without lacerations using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank testing. There were 64 tracheobronchial lacerations (51.6%) during the 124 sessions of balloon dilation. Of these, 60 were superficial and 4 were deep, but there were no incidents of transmural laceration. In patients with lacerations, mild chest pain (n = 5), blood-tinged sputum (n = 21), and pneumomediastinum (n = 2) occurred, but all resolved completely within 24 h. All superficial lacerations healed spontaneously within 1 month, and all deep lacerations healed 2 to 9 months after conservative treatment. During the follow-up period, the median cumulative airway patency period in patients with and without lacerations was 24 and 4 months (p < 0.05), respectively. Laceration secondary to balloon dilation in the tracheobronchial tree is relatively common but rarely progresses to transmural laceration and may improve patency outcomes.

  18. Low Measured Hepatic Artery Flow Increases Rate of Biliary Strictures in Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation: An Age-Dependent Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter T W; Fernandez, Hoylan; Gupta, Amar; Saracino, Giovanna; Ramsay, Michael; McKenna, Gregory J; Testa, Giuliano; Anthony, Tiffany; Onaca, Nicholas; Ruiz, Richard M; Klintmalm, Goran B

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine effect of lower measured hepatic arterial (HA) flow (<400 mL/min) on biliary complications and graft survival after deceased donor liver transplantation. Hepatic artery is the main blood supply to bile duct and lack of adequate HA flow is thought to be a risk factor for biliary complications. A retrospective review of 1300 patients who underwent deceased donor liver transplantation was performed. Patients with arterial complications were excluded to eliminate potential contribution to biliary complications from HA thrombosis. Patients were divided into low (<400 mL/min; N = 201) and high (≥400 mL/min; N = 1099) HA flow groups. Incidence of biliary complications and graft survival were analyzed. HA flows less than 400 mL/min were associated with increased rate of biliary strictures in younger donors (<50 years old), and in patients with duct-to-duct anastomoses (P = 0.028). Lower HA flows were associated with decreased graft survival (P = 0.013). Donor older than 50 years was associated with increased rate of biliary strictures (hazard ratio [HR], 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-2.45; P = 0.0085) and graft failure (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.35-2.1; P <0.0001) on multivariate analyses. HA flow less than 400 mL/min was associated with biliary strictures (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.04-2.24; P = 0.0297) on univariate analysis only. HA flow less than 400 mL/min was associated with higher rate of biliary strictures in younger donors with duct-to-duct reconstruction and lower graft survival. A consideration should be given to increase the intraoperative HA flow to prevent biliary strictures in such patients.

  19. Japanese clinical practice guidelines for congenital biliary dilatation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hiroki; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kamisawa, Terumi; Fujii, Hideki; Hamada, Yoshinori; Kubota, Masayuki; Urushihara, Naoto; Endo, Itaru; Nio, Masaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Ando, Hisami

    2017-01-01

    Until now, there have been no practical clinical guidelines for congenital biliary dilatation (CBD). In this review article, the Japanese Study Group on Congenital Biliary Dilatation (JSCBD) propose to establish clinical practice guidelines for CBD. Because the evidence-based literature is relatively small, we decided to create guidelines based on the consensus of experts, using the medical literature for reference. A total of 20 clinical questions (CQs) were considered by the members of the editorial committee responsible for the guidelines. The CQs included the distinct aspects of CBD: (1) Concepts and Pathology (three CQs); (2) Diagnosis (six CQs); (3) Pancreaticobiliary Complications (three CQs); Treatments and Prognosis (eight CQs). Each statements and comments for CQs were made by the guidelines committee members. CQs were finally approved after review by members of the editorial committee and the guidelines evaluation board of CBD. These guidelines were created to provide assistance in the clinical practice of CBD management; their contents focus on clinical utility, and they include general information on CBD to make this disease more widely recognized. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  20. Successful management of benign biliary strictures with fully covered self-expanding metal stents.

    PubMed

    Devière, Jacques; Nageshwar Reddy, D; Püspök, Andreas; Ponchon, Thierry; Bruno, Marco J; Bourke, Michael J; Neuhaus, Horst; Roy, André; González-Huix Lladó, Ferrán; Barkun, Alan N; Kortan, Paul P; Navarrete, Claudio; Peetermans, Joyce; Blero, Daniel; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Dolak, Werner; Lepilliez, Vincent; Poley, Jan W; Tringali, Andrea; Costamagna, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMS) are gaining acceptance for the treatment of benign biliary strictures. We performed a large prospective multinational study to study the ability to remove these stents after extended indwell and the frequency and durability of stricture resolution. In a nonrandomized study at 13 centers in 11 countries, 187 patients with benign biliary strictures received FCSEMS. Removal was scheduled at 10-12 months for patients with chronic pancreatitis or cholecystectomy and at 4-6 months for patients who received liver transplants. The primary outcome measure was removal success, defined as either scheduled endoscopic removal of the stent with no removal-related serious adverse events or spontaneous stent passage without the need for immediate restenting. Endoscopic removal of FCSEMS was not performed for 10 patients because of death (from unrelated causes), withdrawal of consent, or switch to palliative treatment. For the remaining 177 patients, removal success was accomplished in 74.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.5%-80.8%). Removal success was more frequent in the chronic pancreatitis group (80.5%) than in the liver transplantation (63.4%) or cholecystectomy (61.1%) groups (P = .017). FCSEMS were removed by endoscopy from all patients in whom this procedure was attempted. Stricture resolution without restenting upon FCSEMS removal occurred in 76.3% of patients (95% CI, 69.3%-82.3%). The rate of resolution was lower in patients with FCSEMS migration (odds ratio, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.11-0.46). Over a median follow-up period of 20.3 months (interquartile range, 12.9-24.3 mo), the rate of stricture recurrence was 14.8% (95% CI, 8.2%-20.9%). Stent- or removal-related serious adverse events, most often cholangitis, occurred in 27.3% of patients. There was no stent- or removal-related mortality. In a large prospective multinational study, removal success of FCSEMS after extended indwell and stricture resolution were achieved for

  1. Low symptomatic premature stent occlusion of multiple plastic stents for benign biliary strictures: comparing standard and prolonged stent change intervals.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Payne, K Mark; Hawes, Robert H; Cotton, Peter B

    2010-09-01

    Benign biliary strictures are typically managed endoscopically whereby an increasing size or number of plastic stents is placed at ERCP. Stents are often changed every 3 to 4 months based on the known median patency of a single biliary stent, but patency data for multiple biliary stents are lacking. To assess the incidence of occlusion-free survival of multiple plastic biliary stents and the rate of premature occlusion if left in longer than 6 months. Retrospective. Tertiary-care medical center (Charleston, SC). Consecutive patients who received multiple plastic stents for benign nonhilar biliary strictures from 1994 to 2008 were identified. Exchange of multiple plastic biliary stents within 6 months (group 1) or 6 months or longer (group 2) after placement. Symptomatic stent occlusion. Seventy-nine patients with nonhilar extrahepatic benign biliary stricture underwent 125 ERCPs with multiple plastic biliary stents. Stents were scheduled for removal/exchange within 6 months in 52 patients (86 ERCPs) compared with after 6 months in 22 patients (26 ERCPs). The median interval between multiple stent placement and removal/exchange was 90 days for group 1 and 242 days for group 2. Premature stent occlusion occurred in 4 of 52 (7.7%) patients in group 1 versus 1 of 22 (4.5%) in group 2, with significantly longer occlusion-free survival in group 2 (log-rank P < .0001). Retrospective study at a single tertiary referral center. Multiple plastic biliary stents for benign nonhilar strictures were associated with a low rate of premature symptomatic stent occlusion at more than 6 months and a longer occlusion-free survival. Copyright 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Covered Metallic Stents Compared With Plastic Stents on Benign Biliary Stricture Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Slivka, Adam; Tarnasky, Paul; Mullady, Daniel K.; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Elta, Grace; Fogel, Evan; Lehman, Glen; McHenry, Lee; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Menon, Shyam; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Watkins, James; Lynch, Sheryl; Denski, Cheryl; Xu, Huiping; Sherman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Endoscopic placement of multiple plastic stents in parallel is the first-line treatment for most benign biliary strictures; it is possible that fully covered, self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) may require fewer endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures (ERCPs) to achieve resolution. OBJECTIVE To assess whether use of cSEMS is noninferior to plastic stents with respect to stricture resolution. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter (8 endoscopic referral centers), open-label, parallel, randomized clinical trial involving patients with treatment-naive, benign biliary strictures (N = 112) due to orthotopic liver transplant (n = 73), chronic pancreatitis (n = 35), or postoperative injury (n = 4), who were enrolled between April 2011 and September 2014 (with follow-up ending October 2015). Patients with a bile duct diameter less than 6 mm and those with an intact gallbladder in whom the cystic duct would be overlapped by a cSEMS were excluded. INTERVENTIONS Patients (N = 112) were randomized to receive multiple plastic stents or a single cSEMS, stratified by stricture etiology and with endoscopic reassessment for resolution every 3 months (plastic stents) or every 6 months (cSEMS). Patients were followed up for 12 months after stricture resolution to assess for recurrence. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was stricture resolution after no more than 12 months of endoscopic therapy. The sample size was estimated based on the noninferiority of cSEMS to plastic stents, with a noninferiority margin of −15%. RESULTS There were 55 patients in the plastic stent group (mean [SD] age, 57 [11] years; 17 women [31%]) and 57 patients in the cSEMS group (mean [SD] age, 55 [10] years; 19 women [33%]). Compared with plastic stents (41/48, 85.4%), the cSEMS resolution rate was 50 of 54 patients (92.6%), with a rate difference of 7.2% (1-sided 95% CI, −3.0% to ∞; P < .001). Given the prespecified noninferiority margin of −15%, the

  3. [THE TREATMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE STRICTURE OF BILIARY DUCTS: A 15-YEARS EXPERIENCE AND OBSERVATIONS FROM THE PRACTICE].

    PubMed

    Tishchenko, A M; Boyko, V V; Smachilo, R M; Skoriy, D I

    2015-09-01

    Experience of performance of 160 operations for injuries and stricture of biliary ducts, was analyzed. In 36 patients before admittance to hospital there were performed interventions, which provide correction of injuries or their consequences. In majority (141) of patients hepaticojejunoanastomosis in accordance to Roux method or its reconstruction were performed. Other interventions (right-sided hemihepatectomy) were rarely performed. The procedure of anastomosis formation, permitting to connect the mucosae of joining organs in precision, was proposed. Clinical observations of correction of the biliary ducts stricture were presented.

  4. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass complicated by a mesocolic jejunal stricture successfully treated with endoscopic TTS balloon dilation.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Stephanie Christine; Jackson, Christian; Rendon, Stewart

    2010-12-01

    Even though Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric surgery in the United States, it is not without post surgical complications. The development of a mesocolic jejunal stricture after a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) is a rare complication. We present a patient who manifested, at 5 weeks post-LRYGBP, symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and an inability to tolerate an oral diet. The patient was found to have a stricture at the efferent Roux limb consistent with a mesocolic stricture which was successfully resolved with through the scope (TTS) balloon dilatation. There was no apparent cause of the patient's stenosis with no evidence of an anastomotic breakdown or major inflammatory process. The patient presented for follow-up after her dilatation was noted to have complete resolution of her symptoms and continued to lose weight. This is the first known case of a mesocolic jejunal stricture successfully treated with TTS balloon dilation.

  5. Metallic stents are more efficacious than plastic stents in unresectable malignant hilar biliary strictures: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Ichiro; Nakashima, Masanori; Doi, Shinpei; Iwashita, Takuji; Iwata, Keisuke; Kato, Tomohiro; Tomita, Eiichi; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2013-02-01

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is a well-established palliative treatment for unresectable malignant biliary strictures, for which plastic tube stents (PSs) and self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs) are most commonly used. The efficacy of these stents has been extensively described in distal biliary strictures, but not in hilar biliary strictures. The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of PSs and SEMSs for unresectable malignant hilar biliary strictures. From June 2004 to November 2008, 60 patients were enrolled and prospectively randomized into the PS or SEMS group. The 6-month patency rate was significantly higher in the SEMS group than in the PS group (81 vs. 20%; p = 0.0012). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly longer patency in the SEMS group than in the PS group (p = 0.0002); the 50% patency period was 359 days in the SEMS group and 112 days in the PS group. There was no significant difference in the overall survival period between the PS and SEMS groups (p = 0.2834). The mean number of reinterventions for stent failures was significantly lower in the SEMS group (0.63 times/patient) than in the PS group (1.80 times/patient) (p = 0.0008). The overall total cost for the treatment was significantly lower in the SEMS group than in the PS group (p = 0.0222). SEMSs were associated with a longer patency than PSs in patients with unresectable hilar biliary stricture. SEMSs were also more advantageous in reducing the number of reintervention sessions and the overall treatment cost.

  6. Esophageal rupture during balloon dilation of strictures of benign or malignant causes: prevalence and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Kang, S G; Song, H Y; Lim, M K; Yoon, H K; Goo, D E; Sung, K B

    1998-12-01

    To review the prevalence and clinical importance of esophageal rupture during balloon dilation for treatment of esophageal stricture. Fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilation was performed within 9 years in 96 consecutive patients with esophageal strictures. Esophageal rupture was classified into three types: type 1 was intramural; type 2, transmural; and type 3, transmural with mediastinal leakage. Each patient underwent one to seven procedures, for a total of 191 procedures. Esophageal rupture occurred in 20 patients (21%). Type 1 esophageal rupture occurred in eight patients, type 2 in 11, and type 3 in one. All esophageal ruptures were detected immediately after the procedure. Sixteen patients were treated with fasting, parenteral alimentation, and antibiotics; two were treated surgically; and two were treated with stent placement. No treatment-related deaths occurred. The overall prevalence of esophageal rupture was 21%. A substantial number of patients who developed type 1 rupture had associated clinical symptoms, such as pain and fever, but responded to conservative management and are thus included as having complications of esophageal balloon dilation.

  7. Endoscopic characteristics and usefulness of endoscopic dilatation of anastomotic stricture following pancreaticojejunostomy: case series and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Akihiko; Shirota, Yukihiro; Houdo, Yuji; Wakabayashi, Tokio

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatitis induced by anastomotic stricture following pancreaticodigestive tract anastomosis as a late-onset adverse event has been reported to be 3% or lower, but some cases repeatedly relapse and are difficult to treat. Endoscopic identification and treatment of the anastomotic site are considered to be difficult, and only a small number of cases have been reported. We present three cases with recurrent pancreatitis induced by anastomotic stricture following pancreaticojejunostomy applied after pancreaticoduodenectomy. We successfully identified the anastomotic site and performed endoscopic dilatation of the anastomotic stricture, and pancreatitis has not recurred. We characterized endoscopic features of the anastomotic site, understanding of which is essential to identify the site, and investigated useful techniques to identify the site and perform cannulation for pancreatography. Furthermore, we showed the safety and usefulness of endoscopic dilatation for anastomotic stricture following pancreaticojejunostomy according to our three cases and a review of the literature. PMID:27803744

  8. Endoscopic dilation with Savary-Gilliard bougies of stomal strictures after laparosocopic gastric bypass in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Esparrach, Glòria; Bordas, Josep M; Llach, Josep; Lacy, Antonio; Delgado, Salva; Vidal, Josep; Cárdenas, Andrés; Pellisé, Maria; Ginès, Angels; Sendino, Oriol; Zabalza, Michel; Castells, Antoni

    2008-02-01

    Anastomotic strictures after bariatric surgery are a frequent complication that requires endoscopic management, but the optimal technique for dilation remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of dilation with Savary-Gilliard bougies (SGB) in morbidly obese patients treated with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). Retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a series of 474 consecutive patients with laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Four-hundred twenty four of these patients (90%) underwent a laparoscopic RYGBP. A total of 24 patients were referred for anastomotic stricture dilation with SGB from January 1998 to December 2006. A total of 24/424 patients (6%) developed a stricture that was successfully dilated with SGB. Patients were 17 females (71%) and seven males (29%) with a mean age of 41 +/- 11 years (range 24-63) and a mean BMI of 48 +/- 6 (range 40-69). The time between RYGBP and the appearance of stricture-related symptoms ranged from 29 to 154 days (mean, 69 days). The mean number of dilations was 1.6 +/- 0.6. The majority of patients required one (n = 11; 46%) or two (n = 12; 50%) dilations and only one patient required three dilations. During the initial dilation, a final diameter of 11 +/- 1.7 mm (range 7-12.8 mm) was achieved. In all cases, there was complete resolution of symptoms. There were no complications. Dilation with SGB is an effective, safe, and durable method for managing anastomotic strictures after laparoscopic RYGBP.

  9. Polysomy and p16 deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the diagnosis of indeterminate biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Tamas A; Glick, Michael P; Sethi, Amrita; Poneros, John M; Palmas, Walter; Iqbal, Shahzad; Gonzalez, Susana; Nandula, Subhadra V; Emond, Jean C; Brown, Robert S; Murty, Vundavalli V; Stevens, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of indeterminate biliary strictures is limited because of the low sensitivity of cytology. However, an accurate diagnosis of malignancy is critical in the management of patients with suspected biliary malignancy. Testing for chromosomal aneuploidy by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) may increase the yield. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FISH in indeterminate biliary strictures and the additional value of including deletion of 9p21 (p16) in the diagnostic criteria of malignant biliary strictures. Retrospective review. Academic medical center. This study involved 76 consecutive patients who were seen for the evaluation of indeterminate strictures at our institution. These patients were screened, and 50 patients with either a final pathologic diagnosis or ≥ 12 months' conclusive follow-up were included in the analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve (AUC) analysis of cytology alone compared with the presence of FISH polysomy versus FISH polysomy and 9p21 deletion. The presence of increased copy numbers (polysomy) of chromosome 3, 7, or 17 by FISH increased the sensitivity of brush cytology from 21% to 58%, and when the presence of 9p21 deletion was included, the sensitivity increased to 89%. The specificity of FISH was 97% (vs 100% for cytology). The accuracy of cytology combined with FISH polysomy (AUC = 0.93) or p16 deletion was significantly greater than the accuracy of cytology alone (AUC 0.6; P < .001) or even cytology combined with FISH polysomy (AUC = 0.77; P ≤ .05). Sample size. There is a relatively high incidence of malignant biliary strictures in the entire cohort but low incidence among primary sclerosing cholangitis patients, and the majority of cancers are cholangiocarcinomas (as opposed to pancreatic). FISH significantly improves the diagnostic accuracy of brush cytology in indeterminate biliary strictures. In our series, the addition of 9p21 deletion to FISH polysomy and cytology further improved

  10. Anatomy-shaped design of a fully-covered, biliary, self-expandable metal stent for treatment of benign distal biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Weigt, Jochen; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The treatment success of benign biliary strictures with fully covered metal stents (CSEMS) is altered by high stent dislocation rates. We aimed to evaluate a new stent design to prevent dislocation. Patients and methods: Patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with a newly designed double-coned stent (dcSEMS). Mechanical analysis of the new stent was performed and it was compared with a cylindrical stent. Results: A total of 13 dcCSEMS were implanted in 11 patients (2 female, 9 male, median age 47, range 33 – 71). All patients had distal biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis. No stent migration occurred. In all but one patient the stents were removed. One patient refused stent extraction and was lost to follow up. Stent occlusion occurred twice leading to cholangitis in both cases. The duration of stent treatment was 170 days (range 61 – 254). After extraction only one patient had early recurrent stricture and received the same stent again. Three stents showed minimal tissue granulation at the papilla. One stent presented ingrowth at the proximal end and was removed after implantation of a second fully covered stent. Mechanical examination revealed significantly lower radial expansion force of the new stent as compared to the cylindrical stent. Conclusions: The new stent design has a low rate of migration. Biomechanical properties may explain this effect. PMID:26793789

  11. Incidence and management of oesophageal ruptures following fluoroscopic balloon dilatation in children with benign strictures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Song, Ho-Young; Park, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Kim, Seong-Chul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence and management of oesophageal ruptures following fluoroscopic balloon dilatation (FBD) in children with benign oesophageal strictures. Sixty-two children with benign oesophageal strictures underwent FBDs. Oesophageal rupture was categorized as intramural (type 1), transmural (type 2), or transmural with free leakage (type 3). The possible risk factors for oesophageal ruptures were analyzed. One hundred and twenty-nine FBDs were performed in these patients. The oesophageal rupture rate was 17.1 % (22/129). The majority (21/22) of ruptures were type 1 and type 2, both were treated conservatively. Only one patient had a type 3 rupture and underwent oesophagoesophagostomy. The patient gender, age, and the length and cause of the stricture showed no significant effect on the rupture (P > 0.05). However, for the patients ≤2 years old, the initial balloon with a diameter ≥10 mm showed a higher oesophageal rupture rate than those <10 mm during the first session (P = 0.03). Although the oesophageal rupture rate in children was 17.1 %, the type 3 rupture rate was 0.8 %, which usually requires aggressive treatment. For children ≤2 years old, the initial balloon diameter should be <10 mm in the first session for decreasing the risk of oesophageal rupture. • The oesophageal rupture rate following balloon dilatation in children was 17.1 %. • The incidence of transmural rupture with free leakage is very low. • Only transmural rupture with free leakage needs aggressive treatment. • For children ≤2 years, the initial balloon diameter should be <10 mm.

  12. Risk factors for recurrent biliary obstruction following placement of self-expandable metallic stents in patients with malignant perihilar biliary stricture.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shin; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Hongou, Seiji; Yoshida, Naoki; Nakano, Eriko; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Katayose, Yu; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-06-01

    Self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs) are used for palliation in patients with malignant perihilar biliary strictures. However, recurrent biliary obstruction occasionally causes cholangitis and jaundice. This study aimed to identify risk factors for recurrent biliary obstruction in such patients. Data from consecutive patients with malignant perihilar biliary strictures treated with endoscopic placement of SEMSs between 2007 and 2014 in Tohoku University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Risk factors for recurrent biliary obstruction were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models (with hazard ratios [HRs] and 95 % confidence interval [95 %CIs]), and SEMS patency period was examined using the Kaplan - Meier method. SEMS patency was defined as the period between SEMS insertion and the development of recurrent biliary obstruction. 104 patients were included. Median survival time was 281 days; and 85 patients died during a median follow-up period of 320 days. Recurrent biliary obstruction occurred in 35 patients. Median SEMS patency period was 549 days. Multivariable analyses showed that: compared with bile duct carcinoma, gallbladder carcinoma was associated with shorter SEMS patency (HR 8.18, 95 %CI 2.41 - 26.83); patency of left-sided SEMS was inferior to that of bilateral (HR 0.5, 95 %CI 0.32 - 0.93) and right-sided SEMS (HR 0.1, 95 %CI 0.02 - 0.65). Cholangitis before SEMS placement increased the risk of recurrent biliary obstruction (HR 11.44; 95 %CI 4.48 - 32.35) and reduced the SEMS patency period (746 vs. 210 days). Gallbladder carcinoma, left-sided stent placement, and cholangitis before SEMS placement are risk factors for recurrent biliary obstruction after SEMS placement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis concurrent with biliary stricture after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Zhen; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Liu, Yi-He; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-02-21

    Although the development of de novo autoimmune liver disease after liver transplantation (LT) has been described in both children and adults, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)-primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) overlap syndrome has rarely been seen in liver transplant recipients. Here, we report a 50-year-old man who underwent LT for decompensated liver disease secondary to alcoholic steatohepatitis. His liver function tests became markedly abnormal 8 years after LT. Standard autoimmune serological tests were positive for anti-nuclear and anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and a marked biochemical response was observed to a regimen consisting of prednisone and ursodeoxycholic acid added to maintain immunosuppressant tacrolimus. Liver biopsy showed moderate bile duct lesions and periportal lymphocytes infiltrating along with light fibrosis, which confirmed the diagnosis of AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. We believe that this may be a case of post-LT de novo AIH-PBC overlap syndrome; a novel type of autoimmune overlap syndrome.

  14. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Ulriikka; Vienne, Ariane; Audureau, Etienne; Bauret, Paul; Bichard, Philippe; Coumaros, Dimitri; Napoléon, Bertrand; Ponchon, Thierry; Duchmann, Jean-Christophe; Laugier, René; Lamouliatte, Hervé; Védrenne, Bruno; Gaudric, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas; Robin, Françoise; Leblanc, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) can be challenging. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) in BBS. Methods Ninety-two consecutive patients with BBS (chronic pancreatitis (n = 42), anastomotic after liver transplantation (n = 36), and post biliary surgical procedure (n = 14)) were included. FCSEMS were placed across strictures for 6 months before endoscopic extraction. Early success rate was defined as the absence of biliary stricture or as a minimal residual anomaly on post-stent removal endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Secondary outcomes were the final success and stricture recurrence rates as well as procedure-related morbidity. Results Stenting was successful in all patients. Stenting associated complications were minor and occurred in 22 (23.9%) patients. Migration occurred in 23 (25%) patients. Stent extraction was successful in all but two patients with proximal stent migration. ERCP after the 6 months stenting showed an early success in 84.9% patients (chronic pancreatitis patients: 94.7%, liver transplant: 87.9%, post-surgical: 61.5%) (p = 0.01). Final success was observed in 57/73 (78.1%) patients with a median follow-up of 12 ± 3.56 months. Recurrence of biliary stricture occurred in 16/73 (21.9%) patients. Conclusions FCSEMS placement is efficient for patients with BBS, in particular for chronic pancreatitis patients. Stent extraction after 6 months indwelling, although generally feasible, may fail in a few cases. PMID:27403307

  15. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Ulriikka; Vienne, Ariane; Audureau, Etienne; Bauret, Paul; Bichard, Philippe; Coumaros, Dimitri; Napoléon, Bertrand; Ponchon, Thierry; Duchmann, Jean-Christophe; Laugier, René; Lamouliatte, Hervé; Védrenne, Bruno; Gaudric, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas; Robin, Françoise; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) can be challenging. To evaluate the efficacy of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) in BBS. Ninety-two consecutive patients with BBS (chronic pancreatitis (n = 42), anastomotic after liver transplantation (n = 36), and post biliary surgical procedure (n = 14)) were included. FCSEMS were placed across strictures for 6 months before endoscopic extraction. Early success rate was defined as the absence of biliary stricture or as a minimal residual anomaly on post-stent removal endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Secondary outcomes were the final success and stricture recurrence rates as well as procedure-related morbidity. Stenting was successful in all patients. Stenting associated complications were minor and occurred in 22 (23.9%) patients. Migration occurred in 23 (25%) patients. Stent extraction was successful in all but two patients with proximal stent migration. ERCP after the 6 months stenting showed an early success in 84.9% patients (chronic pancreatitis patients: 94.7%, liver transplant: 87.9%, post-surgical: 61.5%) (p = 0.01). Final success was observed in 57/73 (78.1%) patients with a median follow-up of 12 ± 3.56 months. Recurrence of biliary stricture occurred in 16/73 (21.9%) patients. FCSEMS placement is efficient for patients with BBS, in particular for chronic pancreatitis patients. Stent extraction after 6 months indwelling, although generally feasible, may fail in a few cases.

  16. A meta-analysis and systematic review: Success of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures and a failed ERCP

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Bechtold, Matthew L.; Forcione, David; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: In patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) guided biliary stenting fails in 5% to 10% patients due to difficult anatomy/inability to cannulate the papilla. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been described. Primary outcomes were to evaluate the biliary drainage success rates with EUS and compare it to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Secondary outcomes were to evaluate overall procedure related complications. Methods: Study selection criteria: Studies evaluating the efficacy of EUS-BD and comparing EUS-BD versus PTBD in inoperable malignant biliary stricture patients with a failed ERCP were included in this analysis. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, and Ovid journals. Two authors independently searched and extracted data. The study design was written in accordance to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Subgroup analyses of prospective studies and EUS-BD versus PTBD were performed. Statistical method: Pooled proportions were calculated using fixed and random effects model. I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity among studies. Results: Initial search identified 846 reference articles, of which 124 were selected and reviewed. Sixteen studies (N = 528) that met the inclusion criteria were included in this analysis. In the pooled patient population, the percentage of patients that had a successful biliary drainage with EUS was 90.91% (95% CI = 88.10–93.38). The proportion of patients that had overall procedure related complications with EUS-PD was 16.46% (95% CI = 13.20–20.01). The pooled odds ratio for successful biliary drainage in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was 3.06 (95% CI = 1.11–8.43). The risk difference for overall procedure related complications in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was −0.21 (95% CI = −0

  17. Should plastic stents be avoided in all unresectable malignant perihilar biliary strictures?

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Itoh, Akihiro; Ohno, Eizaburo; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2013-05-01

    Clinical guidelines of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommend the insertion of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) as opposed to plastic stents (PS) in patients with unresectable malignant perihilar stricture (MHS). However, PS are cheaper and easier to insert into the biliary duct compared to SEMS. Furthermore, PS are removable and easy to move into subsequent drainage procedures. We conducted the present retrospective single-center study to elucidate the predictive factors associated with stent patency period duration in patients with unresectable MHS who would benefit from a long patency period after PS placement. This study included 56 consecutive patients with unresectable MHS who were drained using PS. PS failure occurred in 26 (46.4%) patients. The median patency period was 72 days (95% confidence interval: 29.8-114). The only significant predictive factor associated with the length of the stent patency period was history of previous endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Median patency periods with and without previous EST were 28 and 109 days, respectively (P = 0.016). In conclusion, we suggest that conventional biliary drainage with PS is still a suitable option for the treatment of unresectable MHS in patients without previous EST. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  18. Correlations of portal pressure in post-cholecystectomy benign biliary stricture.

    PubMed

    Nag, Hirdaya H; Arora, Asit; Tyagi, Ila; Ramaswamy, Dinesh; Patil, Nilesh; Sakhuja, Puja; Saha, Renuka; Agarwal, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    Presence of portal hypertension (PH) adversely affects perioperative and long-term outcome in patients with post-cholecystectomy benign biliary stricture (PCBBS). Identification of factors related to the development of PH will help to prevent this complication. From September 2010 to December 2012, 30 patients with PCBBS were studied prospectively for correlation of portal pressure (PP) with injury repair interval (IRI), biliary pressure (BP), severity of hepatic fibrosis (FS), severity of hepatic inflammation (IS) and obstructive biliary pathology score (OBPS). Appropriate statistical methods employed and P ≤ 0.05 (two-sided) was considered statistically significant. Mean PP, mean BP and median IRI were 19.4 ± 4.74 mmHg, 20.1 ± 3.99 mmHg and 145 days, respectively. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (P-value) of PP with IRI, FS, IS and OBPS were 0.564 (0.001), 0.502 (0.004), 0.752 (0.0001) and 0.242 (0.19), respectively. Pearson correlation of PP with BP was r = 0.383 (r(2)  = 0.146, P = 0.03). Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (P-value) of FS with IS and OBPS were 0.561 (0.003) and 0.371 (0.04), respectively. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of serum bilirubin with OBPS was 0.550 (P = 0.001). Incidence of PH was 33.3% and mean fall of PP following biliary repair was 6.2 ± 1.98 mmHg (P < 0.0001). PP in patients with PCBBS has a good correlation with IS, and a fair correlation with both FS and IRI whereas PP was not directly related to BP and OBPS; further prospective trials are mandatory to confirm this correlation, and to evaluate mechanism of fall in PP following biliary decompression. © 2014 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  19. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of Crohn’s-associated intestinal strictures: High patient satisfaction and long-term efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rueda Guzmán, Anna; Wehkamp, Jan; Kirschniak, Andreas; Naumann, Aline; Malek, Nisar P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stricture formation is a common long-term complication of Crohn’s disease. Endoscopic balloon dilatation offers a bowel-sparing treatment option, but long-term outcome and its association with patient-, stricture-, and procedure-related factors is only poorly understood. Patient satisfaction with endoscopic balloon dilatation is largely unknown. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all endoscopic balloon dilatation for Crohn’s disease-related strictures between January 2005 and January 2013. Long-term outcome, complication rates and predictive factors were evaluated. Patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire and telephone interviews. Results A total of 118 balloon dilatations were performed for 69 strictures in 46 patients. One patient was excluded from further analysis due to malignancy. Median time from diagnosis of Crohn’s disease to symptomatic stricture formation was 19 years. Technical success, defined as passage of the endoscope after dilatation, was reportedly obtained in 95 of 106 procedures (89.6%). Two perforations occurred, one of which could be managed conservatively. No episodes of severe bleeding were recorded (procedure-related complication rate: 2/118; 1.7%). During a median follow-up of 4.8 years (range 0.4–8.7), 55.6% (25/45) of patients were able to avoid surgery. Of the patients, 35.6% (16/45) did not need any further intervention, 40.0% (18/45) underwent more than one dilatation, and 24.4% (11/45) were operated after the first dilatation. The percentage of patients who were satisfied with the procedure and would again opt for balloon dilation as first line therapy was 83.3% (35/42). None of the risk factors examined in this study correlated with the necessity for subsequent surgery. Discussion Endoscopic balloon dilatation is a safe and effective first line therapy for Crohn’s disease-related strictures. No technical, stenosis-, or patient-related factor reliably predicted sustained dilatation

  20. Effect of Covered Metallic Stents Compared With Plastic Stents on Benign Biliary Stricture Resolution: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Coté, Gregory A; Slivka, Adam; Tarnasky, Paul; Mullady, Daniel K; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Elta, Grace; Fogel, Evan; Lehman, Glen; McHenry, Lee; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Menon, Shyam; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Watkins, James; Lynch, Sheryl; Denski, Cheryl; Xu, Huiping; Sherman, Stuart

    Endoscopic placement of multiple plastic stents in parallel is the first-line treatment for most benign biliary strictures; it is possible that fully covered, self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) may require fewer endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures (ERCPs) to achieve resolution. To assess whether use of cSEMS is noninferior to plastic stents with respect to stricture resolution. Multicenter (8 endoscopic referral centers), open-label, parallel, randomized clinical trial involving patients with treatment-naive, benign biliary strictures (N = 112) due to orthotopic liver transplant (n = 73), chronic pancreatitis (n = 35), or postoperative injury (n = 4), who were enrolled between April 2011 and September 2014 (with follow-up ending October 2015). Patients with a bile duct diameter less than 6 mm and those with an intact gallbladder in whom the cystic duct would be overlapped by a cSEMS were excluded. Patients (N = 112) were randomized to receive multiple plastic stents or a single cSEMS, stratified by stricture etiology and with endoscopic reassessment for resolution every 3 months (plastic stents) or every 6 months (cSEMS). Patients were followed up for 12 months after stricture resolution to assess for recurrence. Primary outcome was stricture resolution after no more than 12 months of endoscopic therapy. The sample size was estimated based on the noninferiority of cSEMS to plastic stents, with a noninferiority margin of -15%. There were 55 patients in the plastic stent group (mean [SD] age, 57 [11] years; 17 women [31%]) and 57 patients in the cSEMS group (mean [SD] age, 55 [10] years; 19 women [33%]). Compared with plastic stents (41/48, 85.4%), the cSEMS resolution rate was 50 of 54 patients (92.6%), with a rate difference of 7.2% (1-sided 95% CI, -3.0% to ∞; P < .001). Given the prespecified noninferiority margin of -15%, the null hypothesis that cSEMS is less effective than plastic stents was rejected. The

  1. Biodegradable stent or balloon dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture: pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Anjan; Close, Helen; Viswanath, Yirupaiahgari K; Rees, Colin J; Hancock, Helen C; Dwarakanath, A Deepak; Maier, Rebecca H; Wilson, Douglas; Mason, James M

    2014-12-28

    To undertake a randomised pilot study comparing biodegradable stents and endoscopic dilatation in patients with strictures. This British multi-site study recruited seventeen symptomatic adult patients with refractory strictures. Patients were randomised using a multicentre, blinded assessor design, comparing a biodegradable stent (BS) with endoscopic dilatation (ED). The primary endpoint was the average dysphagia score during the first 6 mo. Secondary endpoints included repeat endoscopic procedures, quality of life, and adverse events. Secondary analysis included follow-up to 12 mo. Sensitivity analyses explored alternative estimation methods for dysphagia and multiple imputation of missing values. Nonparametric tests were used. Although both groups improved, the average dysphagia scores for patients receiving stents were higher after 6 mo: BS-ED 1.17 (95%CI: 0.63-1.78) P = 0.029. The finding was robust under different estimation methods. Use of additional endoscopic procedures and quality of life (QALY) estimates were similar for BS and ED patients at 6 and 12 mo. Concomitant use of gastrointestinal prescribed medication was greater in the stent group (BS 5.1, ED 2.0 prescriptions; P < 0.001), as were related adverse events (BS 1.4, ED 0.0 events; P = 0.024). Groups were comparable at baseline and findings were statistically significant but numbers were small due to under-recruitment. The oesophageal tract has somatic sensitivity and the process of the stent dissolving, possibly unevenly, might promote discomfort or reflux. Stenting was associated with greater dysphagia, co-medication and adverse events. Rigorously conducted and adequately powered trials are needed before widespread adoption of this technology.

  2. Biliary strictures after liver transplantation: risk factors and prevention by donor treatment with epoprostenol.

    PubMed

    Pirenne, J; Monbaliu, D; Aerts, R; Desschans, B; Liu, Q; Cassiman, D; Laleman, W; Verslype, C; Magdy, M; Van Steenbergen, W; Nevens, F

    2009-10-01

    Biliary strictures (BS), a major complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), cause morbidity, mortality, graft loss, and increased costs. The virtually unchanged incidence of BS (approximately 10%-25%) suggests that they are not simply "technical" in origin, but probably represent a mucosa ischemic injury inherent in the transplantation procedure. To study risk factors for BS, we analyzed 403 OLTs performed between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006, at a single center, excluding cases of regraft or death within 1 month. The average time to the diagnosis of the BS was 253 days (range, 7-1002 days). Upon univariate analysis, the absence of flushing of donor bile ducts, an imported versus a locally procured liver, and rejection were risk factors for BS. In contrast, the following factors were protective: donor cardiac arrest followed by resuscitation (suggesting an ischemic preconditioning effect) as well as addition of epoprostenol to and pressurization of the preservation solution. Patients with higher postoperative peak values of transaminases, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase were at greater risk for later development of BS. Donor hypotension, donor age, donor intensive care unit (ICU) stay, type of preservation, positive cross-match, cold and warm ischemia times, sequential versus simultaneous portal/arterial reperfusion, as well as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were not risk factors for BS. Upon multivariate analysis, only epoprostenol and pressurization offered protection from BS. In conclusion, this study 2 novel points: (1) patients with high(er) transaminase values and cholestasis early postoperatively are at greater risk to develop later BS and require close monitoring and (2) donor maneuvers for better flushing and preserving peribiliary vascular plexus and biliary mucosa (epoprostenol and pressurization of preservation solution) offer protection from BS.

  3. A case of biliary stones and anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplant treated with the rendez - vous technique and electrokinetic lithotritor

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Marta Di; Traina, Mario; Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Volpes, Riccardo; Piazza, Salvatore; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The paper studies the combined radiologic and endoscopic approach (rendez vous technique) to the treatment of the biliary complications following liver transplant. The “rendez-vous” technique was used with an electrokinetic lithotripter, in the treatment of a biliary anastomotic stricture with multiple biliary stones in a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplant. In this patient, endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic management of the biliary complication failed. The combined approach, percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic treatment (rendez-vous technique) with the use of an electrokinetic lithotritor, was used to solve the biliary stenosis and to remove the stones. Technical success, defined as disappearance of the biliary stenosis and stone removal, was obtained in just one session, which definitively solved the complications. The combined approach of percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic (rendez-vous technique) treatment, in association with an electrokinetic lithotritor, is a safe and feasible alternative treatment, especially after the failure of endoscopic and/or percutaneous trans-hepatic isolated procedures. PMID:18473423

  4. Percutaneous “Y” biliary stent placement in palliative treatment of type 4 malignant hilar stricture

    PubMed Central

    Centore, Luca; Soreca, Emilio; Corvino, Antonio; Farbo, Vincenzo; Bencivenga, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the technical and clinical efficacy of percutaneous bilateral biliary stent-in-stent (SIS) deployment technique with a “Y” configuration using open-cell-design stents in type 4 Klatskin tumor patients. Methods Retrospective evaluation ten patients with type IV Bismuth malignant hilar stricture (MHS) treated with percutaneous bilateral “Y” SIS deployment technique placement followed in our institution between March of 2012 and November of 2014. Results Bilateral SIS deployment was technically successful in all patients. One patient (10%) had major complications (episode of cholangitis); one patient (10%) had minor complications, including self-limiting hemobilia. Successful internal drainage was achieved in nine (90%) patients. Stent occlusion by tumor overgrowth and sludge formation occurred in two patient (20%). The median survival and stent patency time were 298 and 315 days respectively. Conclusions Percutaneous bilateral metal stenting using a Y-stent is a valid option for the palliative treatment of type 4 Bismuth MHS, improving quality patient’ life. PMID:27034794

  5. Congenital choledochal dilatation with emphasis on pathophysiology of the biliary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, N; Yanagihara, J; Tokiwa, K; Shimotake, T; Nakamura, K

    1992-01-01

    Of 37 patients with congenital choledochal dilatation, aged 8 days to 12 years, who had undergone excision with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, 26 patients could be analyzed for morphologic abnormalities and pathophysiology of the biliary tract. Of the 26 patients with congenital choledochal dilatation, 25 (96.2%) had an abnormal choledochopancreaticoductal junction. Of the 12 patients with cystic-type choledochal dilatation, 10 had the C-P type of abnormal choledochopancreaticoductal junction, and of the 13 patients with fusiform-type choledochal dilatation, nine had the P-C type. The amylase levels in the choledochal cyst and the gallbladder were elevated regardless of the form of choledochal dilatation. An adenocarcinoma in a cystic choledochal dilatation was found in one child. Therefore, longstanding inflammation of the biliary tract caused by the reflux of pancreatic juice might be one of the factors in carcinogenesis in the biliary tract. This free reflux of pancreatic juice was demonstrated not only by amylase levels in the biliary tract but also by intraoperative biliary manometry. This reflux might be explained by the lack of sphincter function at the junction of the common bile and pancreatic ducts. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. PMID:1370603

  6. Endoscopic management with multiple plastic stents of anastomotic biliary stricture following liver transplantation: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Andrea; Barbaro, Federico; Pizzicannella, Margherita; Boškoski, Ivo; Familiari, Pietro; Perri, Vincenzo; Gigante, Giovanni; Onder, Graziano; Hassan, Cesare; Lionetti, Raffaella; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Costamagna, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Anastomotic biliary stricture (ABS) is the most common biliary complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and can be successfully managed endoscopically. The long-term results of a protocol using placement of multiple plastic stents to treat ABS following OLT were analyzed. All patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for OLT-related biliary complications at our Endoscopy Unit between July 1994 and March 2012 were retrospectively identified from the ERCP database. Patients with an ABS treated with an increasing number of plastic stents were included in the study. Follow-up after stent removal was obtained by telephone contact with the patient and/or referring physician and by liver function tests (LFTs) evaluation. 56 patients, treated with an increasing number of plastic stents until resolution of the stricture, were included. Five patients were then excluded (unrelated death during treatment, n = 3; incomplete treatment because of poor compliance, n = 2), and 51/56 patients reached study end points and were included in the analysis. Resolution of ABS was obtained in 50/51 patients; 1 patient required hepaticojejunostomy because of failure to pass the stricture with the guidewire (per protocol resolution, 98 %). Mean duration of endoscopic treatment was 11.5 months, with a median 4 ERCPs per patient. Immediate ERCP-related adverse events occurred in 3/56 patients (5.4 %). After a median follow-up of 5.8 years from stent removal, 3/50 patients (6 %) had recurrence of ABS. These 3 patients were successfully treated again endoscopically and are asymptomatic after a further median follow-up of 5.6 years. At long-term follow-up, endoscopic treatment with multiple plastic stents of ABS following OLT appeared to be effective in most patients. Stricture recurrence is rare and can be successfully treated again endoscopically. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. mRNA expression of CDH3, IGF2BP3, and BIRC5 in biliary brush cytology specimens is a useful adjunctive tool of cytology for the diagnosis of malignant biliary stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Hee Jin; Kim, Jean A; Lim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chang Whan; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although advances have been made in diagnostic tools, the distinction between malignant and benign biliary strictures still remains challenging. Intraductal brush cytology is a convenient and safe method that is used for the diagnosis of biliary stricture, but, low sensitivity limits its usefulness. This study aimed to demonstrate the usefulness of mRNA expression levels of target genes in brush cytology specimens combined with cytology for the diagnosis of malignant biliary stricture. Immunohistochemistry for cadherin 3 (CDH3), p53, insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), homeobox B7 (HOXB7), and baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat containing 5 (BIRC5) was performed in 4 benign and 4 malignant bile duct tissues. Through endoscopic or interventional radiologic procedures, brush cytology specimens were prospectively obtained in 21 and 35 paitents with biliary strictures. In the brush cytology specimens, the mRNA expressions levels of 5 genes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry for CDH3, p53, IGF2BP3, HOXB7, and BIRC5 all showed positive staining in malignant tissues in contrast to benign tissues, which were negative. In the brush cytology specimens, the mRNA expression levels of CDH3, IGF2BP3, HOXB7, and BIRC5 were significantly higher in cases of malignant biliary stricture compared with cases of benign stricture (P = 0.006, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.001). The receiver-operating characteristic curves of these 4 mRNAs demonstrated that mRNA expression levels are useful for the prediction of malignant biliary stricture (P = 0.006, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.002). The sensitivity and specificity, respectively, for malignant biliary stricture were 57.1% and 100% for cytology, 57.1% and 64.3% for CDH3, 76.2% and 100% for IGF2BP3, 71.4% and 57.1% for HOXB7, and 76.2% and 64.3% for BIRC5. When cytology was combined with the mRNA levels of CDH3, IGF2BP3, or BIRC5, the

  8. Difficult removal of fully covered self expandable metal stents (SEMS) for benign biliary strictures: the "SEMS in SEMS" technique.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Andrea; Blero, Daniel; Boškoski, Ivo; Familiari, Pietro; Perri, Vincenzo; Devière, Jacques; Costamagna, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Removal of biliary Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stents can fail due to stent migration and/or hyperplastic ingrowth/overgrowth. A case series of 5 patients with benign biliary strictures (2 post-cholecystectomy, 2 following liver transplantation and 1 related to chronic pancreatitis) is reported. The biliary stricture was treated by temporary insertion of Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stents. Stent removal failed due to proximal stent migration and/or overgrowth. Metal stent removal was attempted a few weeks after the insertion of another Fully Covered Metal Stent into the first one. The inner Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stent compressed the hyperplastic tissue, leading to the extraction of both the stents in all cases. Two complications were reported as a result of the attempt to stents removal (mild pancreatitis and self-limited haemobilia). In the present series, the "SEMS in SEMS" technique revealed to be effective when difficulties are encountered during Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stents removal. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrahepatic biliary dilatation caused by a small simple hepatic cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Takaharu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kiriyama, Shinsuke; Tabe, Yuichi; Yamauchi, Hayato; Suzuki, Masaki; Yoshida, Tomonori; Sakurai, Shinji; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Biliary obstruction caused by small simple cysts is very rare. We present a case of biliary dilatation caused by a simple cyst with a 4-cm diameter. The patient was a 75-year-old woman referred to our hospital for evaluation of a cystic tumor associated with peripheral biliary duct dilatation in the left segment of the liver. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed that the cyst probably communicated with the intrahepatic bile duct. Malignant tumors, including intrahepatic papillary neoplasms of the bile duct, could not be ruled out; therefore, we performed surgery with the patient's consent. Histopathologic examination of the resected liver showed that the cystic lesion was a simple cyst. The finding that even small simple cysts can obstruct the biliary tract is important for the management of cystic lesions of the liver.

  10. Eversion Technique to Prevent Biliary Stricture After Living Donor Liver Transplantation in the Universal Minimal Hilar Dissection Era.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Shimagaki, Tomonari; Kawasaki, Junji; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Harada, Noboru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Biliary anastomosis stricture (BAS) is still among the major concerns after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), even after the technical refinements including the universal use of the blood flow-preserving hilar dissection technique. The aim of this study is to investigate what are still the factors for BAS after LDLT. An analysis of 279 adult-to-adult LDLT grafts (left lobe, n = 161; right lobe, n = 118) with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction, since the universal application of minimal hilar dissection technique and gradual introduction of eversion technique, was performed. There were 39 patients with BAS. Univariate analysis showed that a right lobe graft (P = 0.008), multiple bile ducts (P < 0.001), ductoplasty (P < 0.001), not using the eversion technique (P = 0.004) and fewer biliary stents than bile duct orifices (P = 0.002) were among the factors associated with BAS. The 1-year and 5-year BAS survival rates were 17.7% and 21.2% in the noneversion group (n = 134), and 6.2% and 7.9% in the eversion group (n = 145), respectively (P = 0.002). The perioperative factors including graft biliary anatomy were not different between everted (n = 134) and noneverted (n = 145) patients. The application of eversion technique under minimal hilar dissection technique could be a key for preventing BAS in duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction in LDLT.

  11. Eosinophilic cholangitis is a potentially underdiagnosed etiology in indeterminate biliary stricture

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Dirk; Hartmann, Sylvia; Herrmann, Eva; Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Bechstein, Wolf O; Zeuzem, Stefan; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Albert, Jörg G

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate presence and extent of eosinophilic cholangitis (EC) as well as IgG4-related disease in patients with indeterminate biliary stricture (IBS). METHODS All patients with diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis (SC) and histopathological samples such as biopsies or surgical specimens at University Hospital Frankfurt from 2005-2015 were included. Histopathological diagnoses as well as further clinical course were reviewed. Tissue samples of patients without definite diagnosis after complete diagnostic work-up were reviewed regarding presence of eosinophilic infiltration and IgG4 positive plasma cells. Eosinophilic infiltration was as well assessed in a control group of liver transplant donors and patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. RESULTS one hundred and thirty-five patients with SC were included. In 10/135 (13.5%) patients, no potential cause of IBS could be identified after complete diagnostic work-up and further clinical course. After histopathological review, a post-hoc diagnosis of EC was established in three patients resulting in a prevalence of 2.2% (3/135) of all patients with SC as well as 30% (3/10) of patients, where no cause of IBS was identified. 2/3 patients with post-hoc diagnosis of EC underwent surgical resection with suspicion for malignancy. Diagnosis of IgG4-related cholangitis was observed in 7/135 patients (5.1%), whereas 3 cases were discovered in post-hoc analysis. 6/7 cases with IgG4-related cholangitis (85.7%) presented with eosinophilic infiltration in addition to IgG4 positive plasma cells. There was no patient with eosinophilic infiltration in the control group of liver transplant donors (n = 27) and patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 14). CONCLUSION EC is an underdiagnosed benign etiology of SC and IBS, which has to be considered in differential diagnosis of IBS. PMID:28246478

  12. Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Tuzzolino, Fabio; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Luca, Angelo

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4-192), and mean weight was 17 kg (range 4-41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure.

  13. Long-term results of endoscopic balloon dilatation of lower gastrointestinal tract strictures in Crohn’s disease: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Stienecker, Klaus; Gleichmann, Daniel; Neumayer, Ulrike; Glaser, H Joachim; Tonus, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the long-term results of endoscopic treatment in a prospective study conducted over a period of 10 years, 1997 to January 2007. METHODS: A total of 25 patients (20 female and five male: aged 18-75 years), with at least one symptom of stricture not passable with the standard colonoscope and with a confirmed scarred Crohn’s stricture of the lower gastrointestinal tract, were included in the study. The main symptom was abdominal pain. The endoscopic balloon dilatation was performed with an 18 mm balloon under endoscopic and radiological control. RESULTS: Eleven strictures were located in the colon, 13 at the anastomosis after ileocecal resection, three at the Bauhin valve and four in the ileum. Four patients had two strictures and one patient had three strictures. Of the 31 strictures, in 30 was balloon dilatation successful in a single endoscopic session, so that eventually the strictures could be passed easily with the standard colonoscope. In one patient with a long stricture of the ileum involving the Bauhin valve and an additional stricture of the ileum which were 15 cm apart, sufficient dilatation was not possible. This patient therefore required surgery. Improvement of abdominal symptoms was achieved in all cases which had technically successful balloon dilatation, although in one case perforation occurred after dilatation of a recurrent stricture. Available follow-up was in the range of 54-118 mo (mean of 81 mo). The relapse rate over this period was 46%, but 64% of relapsing strictures could be successfully dilated again. Only in four patients was surgery required during this follow-up period. CONCLUSION: We conclude from these initial results that endoscopic balloon dilatation, especially for short strictures in Crohn’s disease, can be performed with reliable success. Perforation is a rare complication. It is our opinion that in the long-term, the relapse rate is probably higher than after surgery, but usually a second endoscopic

  14. Endoscopic Management of Post-Liver Transplantation Biliary Strictures With the Use of Fully Covered Metallic Stents.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Pérez, M; Melgar Simón, J M; Durán Campos, A; González Grande, R; Rodrigo López, J M; Manteca González, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) in the treatment of post-liver transplantation biliary strictures. From October 2009 to October 2014, 44 patients with post-liver transplantation biliary stenosis were treated with the use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and placement of FCSEMS after informed consent. The FCSEMS was scheduled to remain in situ for 3-6 months. Patients were followed at regular intervals to evaluate for symptoms and liver function tests. Technical success, complications, and patient outcome were analyzed. All of the strictures were anastomotic, 52% having occurred within the 1st year following the transplantation. Placement of the FCSEMS was possible on the 1st attempt in 54% of patients. Stricture resolution at the time of stent removal was seen in 100% of the cases. During an average follow-up of 27.83 ± 18.3 months after stent removal, stenosis recurred in 9 out of 41 patients (21.9%). The average time of recurrence was 11.78 ± 13.3 months. In all of these cases, the recurrence was resolved by means of placement of another FCSEMS. In 4 cases, the recurrence was associated with a migration of the prosthesis, partial in 2 cases and total in 2 cases. Stent migration occurred in a total of 17 of the 41 patients (41.4%), in 13 of the 32 (40.6%) who had no recurrence of stenosis and in 4 of the 9 (44.4%) of those who experienced recurrence. The average numbers of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography studies required per patient were 2.8 in those with no recurrence and 3.3 in those with recurrence. No death was associated with the process. FCSEMS is a safe effective alternative to plastic stents in the treatment of post-transplantation biliary strictures, resulting in a lower risk of complications and better patient acceptance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Significance of Biliary Dilatation and Cholelithiasis after Subtotal Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Harry; Kwon, Chang Il; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Tae Hoon; Han, Joung Ho; Song, Tae Jun; Hwang, Jae Chul; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-07-01

    The well-organized study to support that increased cholelithiasis and bile duct dilatation can occur after gastrectomy has not been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of cholelithiasis and the degree of common bile duct (CBD) dilatation in patients undergoing subtotal gastrectomy, compared to those undergoing endoscopic treatment for gastric cancer. Patients who diagnosed with gastric cancer and received treatment at six academic referral centers were investigated for the incidence and time of cholelithiasis and the degree of CBD dilatation after treatment by analysis of 5-year follow-up CTs. The operation group underwent subtotal gastrectomy without vagotomy, while in the control group endoscopic treatment was administered for gastric cancer. A total of 802 patients were enrolled in 5-year analysis (735 patients in the operation group and 67 patients in the control group). Cholelithiasis occurred in 47 patients (6.39%) in the operation group and 3 patients (4.48%) in the control group (p=0.7909). The incidences of cholelithiasis were 4.28% in Billoth-I and 7.89% in Billoth-II (p=0.0487). The diameter of proximal CBD and distal CBD increased by 1.11 mm and 1.41 mm, respectively, in the operation group, compared to 0.4 mm and 0.38 mm, respectively, in the control group (pœ0.05). Patients with increased CBD dilatation more than 5 mm showed statistically significant increases in alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase. The incidence of cholelithiasis was not increased due to subtotal gastrectomy without vagotomy, but the incidence was higher after Billoth-II compared to Billoth-I. In addition, significant change in the CBD diameter was observed after subtotal gastrectomy.

  16. Early Gastric Cancer Recurrence Following Curative Resection Presenting as Biliary Tract Dilatation, Pancreatic Duct Dilatation and Intestinal Wall Thickening.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yukiko; Tanaka, Eri; Noguchi, Kensaku; Yamamoto, Shinzo; Taniguchi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Hideo; Kumasaka, Toshio; Nakata, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Early gastric cancer, especially cancer confined to the mucosa (stage T1a), is known to have a high cure rate with rare recurrence. We herein report the case of a 40-year-old female who initially presented with biliary tract dilatation, pancreatic duct dilatation and intestinal wall thickening 3 years after curative resection of pT1aN0 stage gastric cancer. The intestinal resection specimen revealed tumor cells spreading through the subserosa to the submucosa sparing mucosal membrane, which made exploratory laparotomy the only approach to confirm the diagnosis. It is always important to be aware of malignancy recurrence and clinicians should not hesitate to choose exploratory laparotomy to avoid any delay in the diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Ketamine-induced biliary dilatation: from Hong Kong to New York.

    PubMed

    Gutkin, Ellen; Hussain, Syed A; Kim, Sang H

    2012-03-01

    Ketamine is a popular drug of abuse in China, especially for young adults between the 18 and 30 years. It produces desirable short-term sensations of excitement, dream-like states, hallucinations, and vivid imagery, but is also responsible for untoward effects of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. Abusers often present with severe abdominal pain and dysuria. In addition to its excretion in urine, ketamine is also excreted in bile and can lead to biliary dilatation. Sixteen reports of this phenomenon have been described in the literature, mostly in China. To date, this phenomenon has not been described in the United States. We present 2 cases of ketamine-induced biliary dilatation in young adult Asian patients. It is a new entity in the United States but should be recognized early, as it may prevent unnecessary investigation with blood work, imaging, therapeutic endoscopy, or even surgery.

  18. Biodegradable biliary stents have a different effect than covered metal stents on the expression of proteins associated with tissue healing in benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Siiki, Antti; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Löhr, Matthias; Nordback, Isto; Kellomäki, Minna; Gröhn, Heidi; Mikkonen, Joonas; Sand, Juhani; Laukkarinen, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Benign biliary strictures (BBS) are primarily treated endoscopically with covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS). Biodegradable biliary stents (BDBS) may be the future of endoscopic therapy of BBS. The aim was to assess the expression of proteins related to tissue healing in BBS compared with the intact bile duct (BD), and to study the protein expression after therapy with CSEMS or BDBS. Pigs with ischemic BBS were endoscopically treated either with BDBS or CSEMS. Samples were harvested from pigs with intact BD (n = 5), untreated BBS (n = 5), and after six months of therapy with BDBS (n = 4) or CSEMS (n = 5) with subsequent histologic analysis. Two-dimensional electrophoresis with protein identification was performed to evaluate protein expression patterns. In BBS, the expression of galectin-2 and annexin-A4 decreased, compared to intact BD. Treatment with biodegradable stents normalized galectin-2 level; with CSEMS therapy it remained low. Transgelin expression of intact BD and BBS remained low after BDBS treatment but increased after CSEMS therapy. Histologic analysis did not show unwanted foreign body reaction or hyperplasia in the BD in either group. The expression of proteins related to tissue healing in BBS is different after treatment with biodegradable stents and CSEMS. Treatment with biodegradable stents may bring protein expression towards what is seen in intact BD. BDBS seem to have a good biocompatibility.

  19. Complications of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in patients with dilated and nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Weber, Andreas; Gaa, Jochen; Rosca, Bogdan; Born, Peter; Neu, Bruno; Schmid, Roland M; Prinz, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) have been described as an effective technique to obtain biliary access. Between January 1996 and December 2006, a total of 419 consecutive patients with endoscopically inaccessible bile ducts underwent PTBD. The current retrospective study evaluated success and complication rates of this invasive technique. PTBD was successful in 410/419 patients (97%). The success rate was equal in patients with dilated and nondilated bile ducts (p=0.820). In 39/419 patients (9%) procedure related complications could be observed. Major complications occurred in 17/419 patients (4%). Patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts had significantly higher complication rates compared to patients with dilated intrahepatic bile ducts (14.5% vs. 6.9%, respectively [p=0.022]). Procedure related deaths were observed in 3 patients (0.7%). In conclusion, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective procedure in patients with dilated and nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts. However, patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts showed a higher risk for procedure related complications.

  20. For biliary dilatation, a negative endosonography needs additional image studies in weight loss suggesting malignancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Yang, Chi-Chieh; Yeh, Yung-Hsiang

    2013-08-01

    Biliary dilatation frequently raises concerns about the possibility of pancreatobiliary diseases. This study assessed the etiologic yield of endosonography (EUS) in this situation. A retrospective review was completed with 163 consecutive patients who had undergone EUS for a dilated common bile duct (CBD) without definite pathology on ultrasonography. Binary logistic regression analysis disclosed that malignancy was positively related to weight loss and was inversely related to abdominal pain; nevertheless, choledocholithiasis was positively related to fever and elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (p < 0.05). The accuracy of EUS was 95.1 % (155/163) for overall cause of biliary dilatation, 100 % (73/73) for no pathological finding, 96.3 % (26/27) for ampullary cancer, 84.6 % (11/13) for pancreatic cancer, 40.0 % (2/5) for CBD cancer, and 92.6 % (25/27) for choledocholithiasis, respectively. The accuracy of EUS decreased in the presence of malignancy (86.7 %, 39/45 vs. 98.3 %, 116/118, p = 0.006). EUS missed three CBD cancers, two pancreatic cancers, and one ampullary cancer; however, the diagnosis was rescued by computed tomography in two pancreatic cancers and one CBD cancer. EUS is accurate in patients with fever suggestive of choledocholithiasis. However, a negative EUS finding should call for additional image studies in patients with weight loss suggestive of malignancy.

  1. Anomalous pancreatico-biliary ductal union with cystic dilatation of the bile duct.

    PubMed

    Richer, J P; Faure, J P; Morichau-Beauchant, M; Dugue, T; Maillot, N; Kamina, P; Carretier, M

    1998-01-01

    We report, in an adult, an asymptomatic association between cystic dilation of the bile duct (type IV A in Todani's classification) and anomalous pancreatico-biliary ductal union (APBD) with stones in a long common channel. In APBD, the connection between the common bile duct and the main pancreatic duct is located outside the duodenal wall andis therefore not under the influence of the sphincter of Boyden. An abnormally long common channel is in excess of 15 mm. Two types of convergence anomalies are defined according to whether the bile duct opens into the main pancreatic duct (BP) or the main pancreatic duct into the bile duct (PB). In APBD, there is probably a reverse pressure gradient between the bile and pancreatic ducts, with regurgitation of pancreatic juice into the bile duct, repeated attacks of cholangitis, stenosis and cystic dilatation. A long common channel is associated with a higher incidence of carcinoma of the gall bladder of the bile duct.

  2. Multicenter trial evaluating the use of covered self-expanding metal stents in benign biliary strictures: time to revisit our therapeutic options?

    PubMed

    Kahaleh, Michel; Brijbassie, Alan; Sethi, Amrita; Degaetani, Marisa; Poneros, John M; Loren, David E; Kowalski, Thomas E; Sejpal, Divyesh V; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura; McNamara, Kevin N; Raijman, Isaac; Talreja, Jayant P; Gaidhane, Monica; Sauer, Bryan G; Stevens, Peter D

    2013-09-01

    Covered self-expanding metal stents are being used more frequently in benign biliary strictures (BBS). We report the results of a multicenter study with fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS) placement for the management of BBS. : To prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of FCSEMS in the management of BBS. Patients with BBS from 6 tertiary care centers who received FCSEMS with flared ends between April 2009 and October 2010 were included in this retrospective study.Efficacy was measured after removal of FCSEMS by evaluating stricture resolution on the basis of symptom resolution, imaging, laboratory studies, and/or choledochoscopy at removal. Safety profile was evaluated by assessing postprocedural complications. A total of 133 patients (78, 58.6% males) with a mean age of 59.2±14.8 years with BBS received stents. Of the 133 stents placed, 97 (72.9%) were removed after a mean stent duration of 95.5±48.7 days. Stricture resolution after FCSEMS removal was as follows: postsurgical, 11/12 (91.6%); gallstone-related disease, 16/19 (84.2%); chronic pancreatitis, 26/31 (80.7%); other etiology, 4/5 (80.0%); and anastomotic strictures, 19/31(61.2%). Ninety-four patients were included in the logistic regression analyses. Patients who had indwelling stents for >90 days were 4.3 times more likely to have resolved strictures [odds ratio, 4.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.24-15.09)] and patients with nonmigrated stents were 5.4 times more likely to have resolved strictures [odds ratio, 5.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.001-29.29)]. FCSEMS for BBS had an acceptable rate of stricture resolution for postsurgical strictures, gallstone-related strictures, and those due to chronic pancreatitis. Predictors for stricture resolution include longer indwell time and absence of migration. Further study is warranted to assess long-term efficacy in a prospective manner with longer than 3-month time of stent indwelling time.

  3. A US Multicenter Study of Safety and Efficacy of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metallic Stents in Benign Extrahepatic Biliary Strictures.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Diehl, David L; Kumbhari, Vivek; Shieh, Frederick; Buscaglia, Jonathan M; Sze, Wilson; Kapoor, Sumit; Komanduri, Srinadh; Nasr, John; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic therapy is considered first line for management of benign biliary strictures (BBSs). Placement of plastic stents has been effective but limited by their short-term patency and need for repeated procedures. Fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMSs) offer longer-lasting biliary drainage without the need for frequent exchanges. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of FCSEMS in patients with BBS. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent ERCP and FCSEMS placement at five tertiary referral US hospitals was performed. Stricture resolution and adverse events related to ERCP and/or stenting were recorded. A total of 123 patients underwent FCSEMS placement for BBS and 112 underwent a subsequent follow-up ERCP. The mean age was 62 years (±15.6), and 57% were males. Stricture resolution occurred in 81% of patients after a mean of 1.2 stenting procedures (mean stent dwell time 24.4 ± 2.3 weeks), with a mean follow-up of 18.5 months. Stricture recurrence occurred in 5 patients, and 3 patients required surgery for treatment of refractory strictures. Stent migration (9.7%) was the most common complication, followed by stent occlusion (4.9%), cholangitis (4.1%), and pancreatitis (3.3%). There was one case of stent fracture during removal, and one stent could not be removed. There was one death due to cholangitis. Majority of BBS can be successfully managed with 1-2 consecutive FCSEMS with stent dwell time of 6 months.

  4. Outcomes of Percutaneous Management of Anastomotic Ureteral Strictures in Renal Transplantation: Chronic Nephroureteral Stent Placement with and without Balloon Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, A. Sheeran, D. Khaja, M.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed o evaluate outcomes of percutaneous management of anastomotic ureteral strictures in renal transplants using nephroureteral stents with or without balloon dilatation.MethodsA retrospective audit of 1,029 consecutive renal transplants was performed. Anastomotic ureteral strictures were divided into two groups: nephroureteral stent only (NUS) and NUS+PTA (nephroureteral stent plus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), with each cohort subdivided into early versus late presentation (obstructive uropathy occurring <90 day or >90 days from transplant, respectively). Overall and 6-month technical success were defined as removal of NUS any time with <30 % residual stenosis (any time lapse less or more than 6 months) and at >6 months, respectively. Patency was evaluated from NUS removal to last follow-up for both groups and compared.ResultsSixty-seven transplant patients with 70 ureteric anastomotic strictures (6.8 %, n = 70/1,029) underwent 72 percutaneous treatments. 34 % were late (>90 days, n = 24/70), and 66 % were early (<90 days, n = 46/70). Overall technical success was 82 % (n = 59/72) and 6-month success was 58 % (n = 42/72). Major and minor complications were 2.8 % (n = 2/72), and 12.5 % (n = 9/72). NUS+PTA did not improve graft survival (p = 0.354) or patency (p = 0.9) compared with NUS alone. There was no difference in graft survival between treated and nontreated groups (p = 0.74).ConclusionsThere is no advantage to PTA in addition to placement of NUS, although PTA did not negatively impact graft survival or long-term patency and both interventions were safe and effective. Neither the late or early groups benefited from PTA in addition to NUS. Earlier obstructions showed greater improvement in serum creatinine than later obstructions.

  5. A Survival Analysis of Patients with Malignant Biliary Strictures Treated by Percutaneous Metallic Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N. Ptochis, Nikolaos; Panagiotou, Irene; Malagari, Katerina; Tzavara, Chara; Kelekis, Dimitrios

    2007-02-15

    Background. Percutaneous metal stenting is an accepted palliative treatment for malignant biliary obstruction. Nevertheless, factors predicting survival are not known. Methods. Seventy-six patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were treated with percutaneous placement of metallic stents. Twenty patients had non-hilar lesions. Fifty-six patients had hilar lesions classified as Bismuth type I (n = 15 patients), type II (n = 26), type III (n = 12), or type IV (n = 3 patients). Technical and clinical success rates, complications, and long-term outcome were recorded. Clinical success rates, patency, and survival rates were compared in patients treated with complete (n = 41) versus partial (n = 35) liver parenchyma drainage. Survival was calculated and analyzed for potential predictors such as the tumor type, the extent of the disease, the level of obstruction, and the post-intervention bilirubin levels. Results. Stenting was technically successful in all patients (unilateral drainage in 70 patients, bilateral drainage in 6 patients) with an overall significant reduction of the post-intervention bilirubin levels (p < 0.001), resulting in a clinical success rate of 97.3%. Clinical success rates were similar in patients treated with whole-liver drainage versus partial liver drainage. Minor and major complications occurred in 8% and 15% of patients, respectively. Mean overall primary stent patency was 120 days, while the restenosis rate was 12%. Mean overall secondary stent patency was 242.2 days. Patency rates were similar in patients with complete versus partial liver drainage. Mean overall survival was 142.3 days. Survival was similar in the complete and partial drainage groups. The post-intervention serum bilirubin level was an independent predictor of survival (p < 0.001). A cut-off point in post-stenting bilirubin levels of 4 mg/dl dichotomized patients with good versus poor prognosis. Patient age and Bismuth IV lesions were also independent predictors

  6. Percutaneous Balloon Dilatation for the Treatment of Early and Late Ureteral Strictures After Renal Transplantation: Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bachar, Gil N. Mor, E.; Bartal, G.; Atar, Eli; Goldberg, N.; Belenky, A.

    2004-08-15

    We report our experience with percutaneous balloon dilatation (PBD) for the treatment of ureteral strictures in patients with renal allografts. Of the 422 consecutive patients after renal transplantation in our center 10 patients had ureteral strictures. An additional 11 patients were referred from other centers. The 21 patients included 15 men and 6 women aged 16 to 67 years. Strictures were confirmed by sonography and scintigraphy in all cases. Patients underwent 2 to 4 PBDs at 7-10-day intervals. Clinical success was defined as resolution of the stenosis and hydronephrosis on sequential ultrasound and normalization of creatinine levels. Patients were divided into two groups: those who underwent transplantation more than 3 months previously and those who underwent transplantation less than 3 months previously. PBD was successful in 13 of the 21 patients (62%). There was no statistically significant difference in success rate between the patients with early (n 12) and those with late (n = 9) obstruction: 58.4% and 66%, respectively. No major complications were documented. PBD is a safe and simple tool for treating ureteral strictures and procedure-related morbidity is low. It can serve as an initial treatment in patients with early or late ureteral strictures after renal transplantation.

  7. Covered Stents versus Uncovered Stents for Unresectable Malignant Biliary Strictures: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Yu; Lin, Jia-Wei; Zhu, He-Pan; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Guang-Yi; Yan, Pei-Jian; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the covered or uncovered SEMS for treatment of unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction, comparing the stent patency, patient survival, and incidence of adverse events between the two SEMSs. The meta-analysis search was performed independently by two of the authors, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, and Cochrane databases on all studies between 2010 and 2015. Pooled effect was calculated using either the fixed or the random effects model. Statistics shows that there is no difference between SEMSs in the hazard ratio for patient survival (HR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.92-1.17; P = 0.55) and stent patency (HR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.30, P = 0.5). However, incidence of adverse events (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.57 to 0.97, P = 0.03) showed significant different results in the covered SEMS, with dysfunctions events (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.00, P = 0.05) playing a more important role than complications (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.30, P = 0.50). Covered SEMS group had lower incidence of adverse events. There is no significant difference in dysfunctions, but covered SEMS trends to be better, with no difference in stent patency, patient survival, and complications.

  8. Technical feasibility and revision efficacy of the sequential deployment of endoscopic bilateral side-by-side metal stents for malignant hilar biliary strictures: a multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Choi, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jun Kyu; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Jeong, Seok; Park, Sang-Heum; Moon, Jong Ho

    2013-02-01

    Theoretically, the side-by-side bilateral placement of metal stents may be technically easier than stent-in-stent bilateral placement in stent revision. However, side-by-side placement can be technically challenging, as the deployment of the first stent can preclude the passage of the second stent. We explored the technical feasibility and revision efficacy of endoscopic bilateral side-by-side stent placement for malignant hilar biliary strictures. Forty-four patients with Bismuth type II or higher malignant hilar biliary strictures were enrolled in seven academic tertiary referral centers. Endoscopic placement of side-by-side bilateral metal stents with 7F thin delivery shaft was performed. The outcome measurements were the technical and functional success, adverse events, endoscopic revision success rate, and stent patency. Overall, the technical and functional success rates were 91 % (40/44), and 98 % (39/40), respectively. Two of the failed patients were converted successfully with subsequent contralateral stent-in-stent placement, and the other patients underwent percutaneous intervention. Early stent-related adverse events occurred in 10 %. The endoscopic revision rate due to stent malfunction during follow-up (median: 180 days) was 45 % (18/40; tumor ingrowth in 4 and in-stent sludge impaction/stone formation in 14 patients). The endoscopic revision success rate was 92 % (12/13). Five patients with comorbidity underwent initial percutaneous intervention. The median survival and stent patency periods were 180 and 157 days, respectively. The sequential placement of a metal stent with a 7F thin delivery shaft in bilateral side-by-side procedures may be feasible and effective for malignant hilar biliary strictures and for endoscopic stent revision.

  9. Randomized multicenter study of multiple plastic stents vs. covered self-expandable metallic stent in the treatment of biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Haapamäki, Carola; Kylänpää, Leena; Udd, Marianne; Lindström, Outi; Grönroos, Juha; Saarela, Arto; Mustonen, Harri; Halttunen, Jorma

    2015-07-01

    The use of covered self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) in benign biliary indications is evolving. The aim of the study was to assess the safety and feasibility of cSEMS compared with multiple plastic stents in the treatment of benign biliary stricture (BBS) caused by chronic pancreatitis. This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized study of 60 patients with BBS caused by chronic pancreatitis. All patients received an initial plastic stent before randomization. At randomization, the stent was replaced either with a single cSEMS or three plastic stents. After 3 months, the position of the cSEMS was checked or another three plastic stents were added. At 6 months after randomization, all stents were removed. Clinical follow-up including abdominal ultrasound and laboratory tests were performed at 6 months and 2 years after stent removal. Two patients dropped out of the cSEMS group before stent removal. In April 2014, the median follow-up was 40 months (range 1 - 66 months). The 2-year, stricture-free success rate was 90 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 72 % - 97 %) in the plastic stent group and 92 % (95 %CI 70 % - 98 %) in the cSEMS group (P = 0.405). There was one late recurrence in the plastic stent group 50 months after stent removal. Stent migration occurred three times (10 %) in the plastic stent group and twice in the cSEMS group (7 %; P = 1.000). A 6-month treatment with either six 10-Fr plastic stents or with one 10-mm cSEMS produced good long-term relief of biliary stricture caused by chronic pancreatitis.Study registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01085747). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Placement of a new fully covered self-expanding metal stent for postoperative biliary strictures and leaks not responding to plastic stenting.

    PubMed

    Luigiano, Carmelo; Bassi, Marco; Ferrara, Francesco; Fabbri, Carlo; Ghersi, Stefania; Morace, Carmela; Consolo, Pierluigi; Maimone, Antonella; Galluccio, Gabriella; D'Imperio, Nicola; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are now being used to treat postoperative biliary strictures (BSs) and biliary leaks (BLs). The aim of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of a new FCSEMS (Wallflex) in patients with postoperative BSs and BLs after failure of traditional endoscopic treatment. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 16 patients (10 patients with postcholecystectomy BSs, 4 with postcholecystectomy BLs, and 2 with postorthotopic liver transplantation BSs) were enrolled. The technical and clinical success rate was 100%. All FCSEMSs were removed after a mean of 141 days. Complications occurred in 7 cases: 2 postprocedure pain, 2 mild pancreatitis, 1 early distal, and 2 late proximal FCSEMS migration. The overall long-term clinical success rate was 94% after a mean follow-up of 13 months. In our experience, the placement of FCSEMSs is an effective and secure method of treating refractory postoperative BSs or BLs.

  11. Machine perfusion in liver transplantation as a tool to prevent non-anastomotic biliary strictures: Rationale, current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Weeder, Pepijn D; van Rijn, Rianne; Porte, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    The high incidence of non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) after transplantation of livers from extended criteria donors is currently a major barrier to widespread use of these organs. This review provides an update on the most recent advances in the understanding of the etiology of NAS. These new insights give reason to believe that machine perfusion can reduce the incidence of NAS after transplantation by providing more protective effects on the biliary tree during preservation of the donor liver. An overview is presented regarding the different endpoints that have been used for assessment of biliary injury and function before and after transplantation, emphasizing on methods used during machine perfusion. The wide spectrum of different approaches to machine perfusion is discussed, including the many different combinations of techniques, temperatures and perfusates at varying time points. In addition, the current understanding of the effect of machine perfusion in relation to biliary injury is reviewed. Finally, we explore directions for future research such as the application of (pharmacological) strategies during machine perfusion to further improve preservation. We stress the great potential of machine perfusion to possibly expand the donor pool by reducing the incidence of NAS in extended criteria organs.

  12. The Radiological Management of Biliary Complications Following Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Lauchart, Werner

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: Biliary complications contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality in the liver transplant recipient. Surgery has been the mainstay of therapy, but interventional radiological techniques have made significant progress. Methods: Diagnostic percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) was performed in 12 patients; percutaneous transhepatic drainage (PTD) was performed in 10 patients. Additional interventional procedures included laser lithotripsy, biopsy, dilatation, and stent implantation. Results: In 6 patients PTC revealed anastomotic, and in 6 patients nonanastomotic biliary strictures. Four patients had intrahepatic stones. Biliary strictures were treated by implantation of Palmaz stents in 5 of 6 patients with anastomotic strictures, and in 3 of 6 patients with nonanastomotic strictures. The intrahepatic stones were fragmented with dye laser lithotripsy under cholangioscopic control in 3 of 4 patients. One spontaneous stent migration after 24 months and one stent occlusion were observed; the remaining stents are still patent. Patients with anastomotic strictures had a more favorable outcome: 5 of 6 of these patients are still alive and symptom-free after an average of 27.4 months, but only 3 of 6 patients with nonanastomotic strictures are alive after an average of 9.8 months. Conclusion: The different outcomes in patients with anastomotic versus nonanastomotic strictures may be explained by the different causes of these types of stricture.

  13. Comparison of patency and cost-effectiveness of self-expandable metal and plastic stents used for malignant biliary strictures: a Polish single-center study.

    PubMed

    Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Marek, Tomasz; Hartleb, Marek

    2016-10-01

    Most patients with malignant biliary obstruction are suited only for palliation by endoscopic drainage with plastic stents (PS) or self-expandable metal stents (SEMS). To compare the clinical outcome and costs of biliary stenting with SEMS and PS in patients with malignant biliary strictures. A total of 114 patients with malignant jaundice who underwent 376 endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD) were studied. ERBD with the placement of PS was performed in 80 patients, with one-step SEMS in 20 patients and two-step SEMS in 14 patients. Significantly fewer ERBD interventions were performed in patients with one-step SEMS than PS or the two-step SEMS technique (2.0±1.12 vs. 3.1±1.7 or 5.7±2.1, respectively, P<0.0001). The median hospitalization duration per procedure was similar for the three groups of patients. The patients' survival time was the longest in the two-step SEMS group in comparison with the one-step SEMS and PS groups (596±270 vs. 276±141 or 208±219 days, P<0.001). Overall median time to recurrent biliary obstruction was 89.3±159 days for PS and 120.6±101 days for SEMS (P=0.01). The total cost of hospitalization with ERBD was higher for two-step SEMS than for one-step SEMS or PS (1448±312, 1152±135 and 977±156&OV0556;, P<0.0001). However, the estimated annual cost of medical care for one-step SEMS was higher than that for the two-step SEMS or PS groups (4618, 4079, and 3995&OV0556;, respectively). Biliary decompression by SEMS is associated with longer patency and reduced number of auxiliary procedures; however, repeated PS insertions still remain the most cost-effective strategy.

  14. [Postoperative biliary stenosis: long-term results of endoscopic treatment].

    PubMed

    Güitrón-Cantú, Alfredo; Adalid-Martínez, Raúl; Gutiérrez-Bermúdez, José A

    2003-01-01

    Endoscopic stent placement is often the initial therapy in symptomatic patients with postoperative strictures because patients are usually diagnosed at the time of ERCP. Although stent insertion rapidly relieves symptoms of biliary obstruction and can even be live-saving in patients with cholangitis, all stents eventually clog, necessitating regular stent changes every 3 to 4 months. Results from several groups suggested that placing multiple stents for months to years could dilate the stricture permanently and thus also treat patients with postoperative biliary strictures palliatively. The outcome of temporary biliary stent placement for postoperative bile duct stenosis was retrospectively evaluated. This is a review of our experience with endoscopic dilation and stent placement in postoperative biliary strictures. Thirty patients with postoperative strictures diagnosed with ERCP were treated with long-term endoscopic stent placement. One 10 Fr stent was placed at first whenever possible, and stents were exchanged every 3 months for a total of 18 months as median. Four men and 26 women with mean age 42 years (range 16-69 years), and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in six and cholecystectomy (open procedure) in 24; surgical history was reviewed retrospectively. Five patients were lost to follow-up and 25 patients were followed for a median of 18 months. In all 25 patients, previous to stent placement, 8.5 or 10 Fr, a mechanical or hydrostatic dilation was necessary. Stents were exchanged every 3 months to avoid cholangitis caused by clogging. Three 10 Fr stents were inserted in one patient, two 10 Fr stents in 14 patients, one 10 Fr and one 8.5 Fr stent in nine patients, and in one patient, one 10 Fr stent. Six patients (24%) developed recurrent stenosis and required surgery. Endoscopic treatment with mechanical or hydrostatic dilation and stent insertion may improve long-term results for patients with postoperative biliary strictures.

  15. Comparison of the utility of covered metal stents versus uncovered metal stents in the management of malignant biliary strictures in 749 patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey H; Krishna, Somashekar G; Singh, Amanpal; Ladha, Harshad S; Slack, Rebecca S; Ramireddy, Srinivas; Raju, Gottumukkala S; Davila, Marta; Ross, William A

    2013-08-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are used to relieve malignant biliary obstruction. To compare outcomes between covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMSs) and uncovered self-expandable metal stents (USEMSs) in malignant biliary obstruction. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary cancer center. Patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Placement of CSEMS or USEMS. Time to recurrent biliary obstruction (TRO), overall survival (OS), and adverse events. From January 2000 to June 2011, 749 patients received SEMSs: 171 CSEMSs and 578 USEMSs. At 1 year, there was no significant difference in the percentage of patients with recurrent obstruction (CSEMSs, 35% vs USEMSs, 38%) and survival (CSEMSs, 45% vs USEMSs, 49%). There was no significant difference in the median OS (CSEMSs, 10.4 months vs USEMSs, 11.8 months; P = .84) and the median TRO (CSEMSs, 15.4 months vs USEMSs, 26.3 months; P = .61). The adverse event rate was 27.5% for the CSEMS group and 27.7% for the USEMS group. Although tumor ingrowth with recurrent obstruction was more common in the USEMS group (76% vs 9%, P < .001), stent migration (36% vs 2%, P < .001) and acute pancreatitis (6% vs 1%, P < .001) were more common in the CSEMS group. Retrospective study. There was no significant difference in the patency rate or overall survival between CSEMSs and USEMSs for malignant distal biliary strictures. The CSEMS group had a significantly higher rate of migration and pancreatitis than the USEMS group. No significant SEMS-related adverse events were observed in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation or surgical resection. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transplantation of epidermal cell sheets by endoscopic balloon dilatation to avoid esophageal re-strictures: initial experience in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Masanori; Hosoi, Takahiro; Fukai, Fumio; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamato, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Epidermal cell sheet (ECS) transplantation immediately after aggressive endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been shown to be safe and effective in the prevention of esophageal strictures. This study evaluated the feasibility of ECS transplantation after endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) in a porcine model. Methods: Six pigs underwent circumferential esophageal ESD under general anesthesia. Two weeks later, two pigs underwent EBD and transplantation of an autologous ECS, two underwent EBD alone, and two underwent endoscopic observation only (control). Results: The two pigs in the transplantation group underwent six ECS transplants after EBD with five of the six (83 %) being successful, as shown by engraftment of transplanted ECSs after 7 days. No adverse events were observed. Stricture rates were lower in the two transplanted pigs (55 % and 60 %) than in the control (92.2 % and 87.7 %) and EBD-treated (71.7 % and 78.2 %) pigs. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was significantly lower in the transplanted pigs than in the control and EBD-treated pigs. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the stability of the ECS transplantation procedure and the engraftment of transplanted ECS in the tears after EBD. This proof-of-concept study suggests that covering tears with ECSs after EBD may avoid re-strictures. PMID:27853736

  17. Long term follow up of through-the-scope balloon dilation as compared to strictureplasty and bowel resection of intestinal strictures in crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Ekaterina; Agaimy, Abbas; Gottfried, Angelina; Maiss, Juergen; Weidinger, Thomas; Albrecht, Heinz; Hartmann, Arndt; Hohenberger, Werner; Neurath, Markus F; Kessler, Hermann; Mudter, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims: Ileo-colonic strictures are common complication of Crohn’s disease (CD), and may result in repeated endoscopic or surgical therapy with a risk of further complications, such as perforation or short bowel syndrome. Strictures develop as a consequence of tissue remodelling and fibrosis due to chronic inflammation. This study compares the outcome of CD patients undergoing primarily endoscopic treatment with those undergoing surgery at an university hospital. Methods: In this study we retrospectively included 88 CD patients with intestinal strictures (37 males, 51 females, mean age 40 years, range 19-65 years) of both our medical and our surgical department, who underwent either surgical or endoscopic therapy between January 2002 and January 2006 with prospective, controlled follow-up, extended till January 2010 (mean follow-up period: 5 years; range 4-8 years). The primary end-point was operation- and symptom-free time. Patients were primarily divided into four groups: only surgical therapy, only endoscopic therapy, endoscopy with subsequent surgery, and initial surgical therapy followed by endoscopic dilations. Results: 53% of all patients remained surgery-free with mean follow-up of 49 months; a single endoscopic dilation was sufficient enough in 9 patients to achieve a surgery-free time of 51 months, other patients required up to 5 dilations. The average interval between first and second dilation was 6.5 months, between second and third 10.5 months. In the group of patients with only endoscopic therapy, surgery- and symptom-free time was shorter, as compared to the group of only surgical therapy. We found that stenoses in the surgical group with an average length of 6.5 cm were as expected longer, as compared to the endoscopic group (3 cm, ranging from 2-4 cm). The surgery-free time was 49 months (42-71 months, P = 0.723) with a symptom-free time of 12 months (4.5-46 months, P = 0.921). In the group of only surgically treated patients, 68.4% of

  18. Dilated common bile duct in opium addicts with and without biliary symptoms --implication for research in AIDS cholangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chuah, S Y; Leong, C K; Pang, C W

    2003-05-01

    Opium addicts (OA) with no biliary symptoms have been shown to have dilated common bile duct (CBD). Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) without biliary drainage in such asymptomatic OA is hazardous. Hence it is not indicated unless there are clear clinical and laboratory evidences of biliary stasis. To show that even when matched with controls with the same clinical diagnosis of the biliary system, OA still have significantly larger CBD diameters and that OA with biliary symptoms should be treated no differently from non-OA with biliary symptoms. Seven OA (all Chinese males), four of whom had undergone ERCP (three for CBD stones and one for ampullary carcinoma), were compared, using t-test, to 7 age, sex, race and diagnosis-matched controls, four of whom had also undergone ERCP (three for CBD stones and one for ampullary carcinoma). When ERCP was not done, ultrasonography was used to assess the biliary system and measure the CBD diameter. The mean (SD) CBD diameters of OA and controls were 15.7 mm (5.65) and 8.3 mm (5.95) respectively (t = 2.399, p = 0.032). The mean (SD) weight of OA and controls were 55.8 kg (9.22) and 57.3 kg (9.21) respectively (t = -0.305, p = 0.763). Only two of the seven OA were born in China, the remaining five in Malaysia. OA do get CBD pathology like non-OA and if indicated there should be no qualms about performing ERCP in them. When matched for age, sex, race and clinical diagnosis, OA still have a significantly larger CBD despite no difference in body weight.

  19. Protective effect of early placement of nasogastric tube with solid dilator on tissue damage and stricture formation after caustic esophageal burns in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Defagó, Victor; Moyano, Jimena; Bernhardt, Celina; Sambuelli, Gabriela; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    The ingestion of caustic substances remains an important public health issue worldwide. Children represent 80% of the ingestion injury population globally. Accidental alkaline material accounts for most caustic ingestions. There is no conclusive evidence of tissue damage and stricture protection of a nasogastric-tube with a solid dilator in the literature, therefore it was hypothesized that early intraesophageal tube placement does not cause additional histopathologic damage and prevents strictures. An exploratory study on experimental caustic esophageal burns in a rabbit model was designed. In the treated group a silicone tube was placed immediately after causing the burns, while the untreated group followed the natural course of the burn. On the twenty-secondday, an esophagectomy was performed on all animals for microscopic (Histopathologic Damage Score and Stenosis Index) and macroscopic analysis. Forty animals were randomly divided into two groups. The Histopathologic Damage Score was 3.7±1.1 in the treated group versus 3.9±1.2 in the untreated group (p=.9690). The Stenosis Index was 0.6±0.1 in treated rabbits versus 2.3±0.2 in untreated (p<.0001). The early placement of an intraesophageal tube with solid dilator prevents stenosis formation and does not produce greater tissue damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biliary Complications in Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Imaging Findings and the Roles of Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jung Min; Lee, Jeong Min; Suh, Kyung Suk; Yi, Nam Joon; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo Choi, Byung Ihn

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To describe the incidence, types, and findings of biliary complications in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine the roles of interventional procedures. Materials and methods. Twenty-four biliary complications among 161 LDLT patients (24/161, 14.9%) were identified. These complications were divided into two groups according to the initial manifestation time, i.e., 'early' (<60 days) or 'late'. The CT and cholangiographic findings were reviewed regarding the presence of a stricture or leak and the location, and length, shape, and degree of the stricture. Both groups were categorized into three subgroups: leak, stricture, and both. The type of interventional procedures used and their roles were determined. Results. Early complications were identified in 14 of the 24 patients (58%) and late complications in 11 (46%). One patient showed both early and late complications. Biliary stricture was detected in 10 patients, leak in 10, and both in 5. By cholangiography, all strictures were irregular and short (mean length 15 {+-} 6 mm) at the anastomotic site and complete obstruction was observed in 2 patients with late stricture. Twenty-three of the 24 patients were treated using percutaneous and/or endoscopic drainage procedures with or without balloon dilatation. Seventeen (74%) showed a good response, but reoperations were inevitable in 6 (26%). All patients except those with complete obstruction showed a favorable outcome after interventional management. Conclusion. Biliary leaks and strictures are predominant complications in LDLT. Most show good responses to interventional treatment. However, complete obstruction needs additional operative management.

  1. A pilot proof-of-concept study of a modified device for one-step endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage in a new experimental biliary dilatation animal model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Choi, Jun Hyuck; Lee, Sang Soo; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Seo, Dong Wan; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the technical feasibility of a modified tapered metal tip and low profile introducer for one-step endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in a new experimental biliary dilatation porcine model. METHODS: A novel dedicated device for one-step EUS-guided biliary drainage system (DEUS) introducer has size 3F tapered catheter with size 4F metal tip for simple puncture of the intestinal wall and liver parenchyma without graded dilation. A self-expandable metal stent, consisting of both uncovered and nitinol-covered portions, was preloaded into DEUS introducer. After establishment of a biliary dilatation model using endoscopic hemoclips or band ligation with argon plasma coagulation in 9 mini-pigs, EUS-BD using a DEUS was performed following 19-G needle puncture without the use of fistula dilation devices. RESULTS: One-step EUS-BD was technically successful in seven pigs [7/9 (77.8%) as intention to treat] without the aid of devices for fistula dilation from the high body of stomach or far distal esophagus to the intrahepatic (n = 2) or common hepatic (n = 5) duct. Primary technical failure occurred in two cases that did not show adequate biliary dilatation. In seven pigs with a successful bile duct dilatation, the technical success rate was 100% (7/7 as per protocol). Median procedure time from confirmation of the dilated bile duct to successful placement of a metallic stent was 10 min (IQR; 8.9-18.1). There were no immediate procedure-related complications. CONCLUSION: Modified tapered metal tip and low profile introducer may be technically feasible for one-step EUS-BD in experimental porcine model. PMID:24914346

  2. Endoscopic bile duct brushing of malignant pancreatic biliary strictures: retrospective study with comparison of conventional smear and ThinPrep techniques.

    PubMed

    Ylagan, Lourdes R; Liu, Lucy H; Maluf, Horacio M

    2003-04-01

    Endoscopic bile duct brushing (EBDB) is carried out to differentiate benign from malignant biliary strictures in patients who have pancreaticobiliary disease. The sensitivity of this method for the diagnosis of malignancy is relatively low. The aim of this study is to analyze the cytomorphologic features that are helpful in increasing the sensitivity of detecting these lesions on cytologic samples. These features are compared with slides prepared with the ThinPrep technique. The study included 142 patients with bile duct obstruction or pancreatic mass who underwent EBDB and follow-up surgery or biopsy between 1997 to 2000. Twenty-five (18%) of these cases were positive for malignancy in both EBDB and follow-up surgical biopsy; 20 of these cases were used as positive controls (PC). Sixty-one (43%) were negative in both EBDB and follow-up surgical biopsy specimens, and 21 of those cases were used as negative controls (NC). Fifty-six (39%) cases were negative/atypical in EBDB cytology but were suspicious or positive in the surgical or biopsy specimens (false-negative). We identified the cytologic criteria that were helpful in differentiating our positive and negative control groups and applied these criteria to our false-negative group to see whether our sensitivity could be increased, using well-defined cytologic criteria alone. Of the 56 false-negative cases, 9 (16%) were upgraded to suspicious/positive based on the presence of the following features: three-dimensional (3D) micropapillae (95% PC vs 19% NC, P < 0.0001), anisonucleosis (90% PC vs 5% NC, P < 0.0001), high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio (95% PC vs 9% NC, P < 0.0001), nuclear contour irregularity (65% PC vs 24% NC, P = 0.0079), and prominent nucleoli (70% PC vs 38% NC, P = 0.0406). Cytomorphologic features which were not helpful in distinguishing positive and negative cases were: single naked nuclei (50% PC vs 28% NC, P = 0.1597), chromatin granularity (50% PC vs 62% NC, P = 0.54), and necrosis (10

  3. Percutaneous Placement of Metallic Stents in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: One-Stage or Two-Stage Procedure? Pre-Dilate or Not?

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, Mehmet; Aksungur, Erol; Akguel, Erol; Oguz, Mahmut; Seydaoglu, Guelsah

    2003-02-15

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the necessity of percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation procedures performed before stent insertion. One hundred and twenty-six patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction underwent palliative therapy by means of percutaneous transhepatic placement of 183 metallic biliary endoprotheses. Forty-four (35%) patients underwent metallic stent insertion in a one-stage procedure and 82(65%) had undergone percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage before stent insertion. Balloon dilation of the stenosis before stent placement (pre-dilation) was performed in 53 (42%) of 126 patients. The rate of the 30-day mortality was 11%, with no procedure-related deaths. The total rate of early complications was 29%, and 84% of these complications were due to percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and pre-dilation procedures. Percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and pre-dilation had no clinical or statistically significant effect on the patients' survival and stent patency rate. Percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation increased the cost of stent placement 18% and 19%, respectively. Palliation of malignant biliary obstruction with percutaneous transhepatic stent insertion should be done directly, in the simplest way, without performing percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation before stent placement. It is more useful, safe, and cost-effective.

  4. Antireflux stents to reduce the risk of cholangitis in patients with malignant biliary strictures: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Wang, Tian-tian; Wu, Jun; Shi, Zhi-mei; Gao, Dao-jian; Pan, Ya-min

    2014-02-01

    There are limited data on the role of antireflux biliary stents. This single-center randomized trial compared the endoscopic use of partly covered antireflux metal stents (pcARMS) with that of standard uncovered self-expandable metal stents (ucSEMS) for the palliation of nonhilar malignant biliary obstruction. Between August 2007 and February 2012, patients with nonhilar malignant biliary obstruction were randomly assigned to treatment with either pcARMS or ucSEMS. Subsequent follow-up was conducted in clinic or by phone. The primary outcome was onset of cholangitis within 12 months of stenting. Secondary outcomes included other morbidities, stent dysfunctions, and survival. Altogether 112 patients were included, 56 in each group. The stents were successfully deployed in all patients. Satisfactory jaundice control was achieved in 49 cases in the pcARMS group, compared with 47 in the ucSEMS group (P = 0.135). Fewer patients experienced cholangitis in the pcARMS group than in the ucSEMS group (10 vs. 21 patients; P = 0.035), and the frequency of episodes was less (P = 0.022). Respectively, 17 and 29 stent dysfunctions before death were observed in the pcARMS and ucSEMS groups (P = 0.051) and the median stent patency was 13.0 (standard deviation [SD] 3.4) and 10.0 (1.2) months, respectively (P = 0.044). At final follow-up, in January 2013, 50 /52 and 52 /55 patients had died and no difference in median survival was seen between the two groups (8.0 vs. 9.0 months, P = 0.56). Stenting with pcARMS compared with standard ucSEMS reduces risk of ascending cholangitis and has longer stent patency, but does not increase patient survival. Chictr.org. number, ChiCTR-TRC-11001800. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Intestinal Dilation and Platelet:Albumin Ratio Are Predictors of Surgery in Stricturing Small Bowel Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Stidham, Ryan W; Guentner, Amanda S; Ruma, Julie L; Govani, Shail M; Waljee, Akbar K; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-08-01

    It is a challenge to predict how patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) will respond to intensified medical therapy. We aimed to identify factors that predicted surgery within 2 years of hospitalization for CD, to guide medical versus surgical management decisions. We performed a retrospective review of adults hospitalized for small bowel CD from 2004 through 2012 at a single academic referral center. Subjects underwent abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging within 3 weeks of hospitalization. Imaging characteristics of small bowel dilation, bowel wall thickness, and disease activity were assessed by a single, blinded radiologist. Multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards regression techniques was used to generate a prediction model of intestinal resection within 2 years. A total of 221 subjects met selection criteria, with 32.6% undergoing surgery within 2 years of index admission. Bivariate analysis showed high-dose steroid use (>40 mg), ongoing treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents at admission, platelet count, platelet:albumin ratio, small bowel dilation (≥35 mm), and bowel wall thickness to predict surgery (P ≤ .01). Multivariate modeling demonstrated small bowel dilation >35 mm (hazard ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.73-4.94) and a platelet:albumin ratio ≥125 (hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.95) to predict surgery. Treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents at admission conferred a nonsignificant increased trend for risk of surgery (hazard ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.994-2.65). Small bowel dilation >35 mm and high platelet:albumin ratios are independent and synergistic risk factors for future surgery in patients with structuring small bowel CD. Platelet:albumin ratios may capture the relationship between acute inflammation and cumulative damage and serve as markers of intestinal disease that cannot be salvaged with medical therapy. Copyright © 2016 AGA

  6. Endoscopic management of biliary complications after liver transplantation: An evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Gómez, Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Biliary tract diseases are the most common complications following liver transplantation (LT) and usually include biliary leaks, strictures, and stone disease. Compared to deceased donor liver transplantation in adults, living donor liver transplantation is plagued by a higher rate of biliary complications. These may be promoted by multiple risk factors related to recipient, graft, operative factors and post-operative course. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is the first-choice examination when a biliary complication is suspected following LT, in order to diagnose and to plan the optimal therapy; its limitations include a low sensitivity for the detection of biliary sludge. For treating anastomotic strictures, balloon dilatation complemented with the temporary placement of multiple simultaneous plastic stents has become the standard of care and results in stricture resolution with no relapse in > 90% of cases. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) has not been demonstrated to be superior (except in a pilot randomized controlled trial that used a special design of FCSEMSs), mostly because of the high migration rate of current FCSEMSs models. The endoscopic approach of non-anastomotic strictures is technically more difficult than that of anastomotic strictures due to the intrahepatic and/or hilar location of strictures, and the results are less satisfactory. For treating biliary leaks, biliary sphincterotomy and transpapillary stenting is the standard approach and results in leak resolution in more than 85% of patients. Deep enteroscopy is a rapidly evolving technique that has allowed successful treatment of patients who were not previously amenable to endoscopic therapy. As a result, the percutaneous and surgical approaches are currently required in a minority of patients. PMID:26078829

  7. Peribiliary cysts mistaken for a biliary dilatation in a cirrhosis patient.

    PubMed

    Montoriol, Pierre François; Poincloux, Laurent; Petitcolin, Virginie; Da Ines, David

    2012-10-01

    Peribiliary cysts are common in patients with chronic liver disease. Ambiguous imaging features and association with cirrhosis-induced hyperbilirubinemia may lead to misdiagnose an obstructive jaundice. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) may be a useful sequence by showing small cystic structures with a specific periportal distribution on both sides of the portal veins, which do not communicate with the biliary ducts. These abnormalities may be recognized in order to avoid unnecessary endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary and revision efficacy of cross-wired metallic stents for endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement in malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Moon, J H; Kim, J H; Park, D H; Lee, S S; Choi, H J; Cho, Y D; Park, S H; Kim, S J

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic bilateral drainage for inoperable malignant hilar biliary strictures (HBS) using metal stents is considered to be technically difficult. Furthermore, endoscopic revision of bilateral stenting after occlusion can be challenging. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents in high-grade malignant HBS and planned endoscopic bilateral revision. A total of 84 patients with inoperable high-grade malignant HBS were enrolled from three academic tertiary referral centers. Two cross-wired metal stents were inserted using a bilateral stent-in-stent placement method. Bilateral endoscopic revision was also performed during follow-up using either identical metal stents or plastic stents. The main outcome measurements were technical and functional success, complications, stent patency, and endoscopic revision efficacy. The technical and clinical success rates of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents were 95.2% (80/84) and 92.9% (78/84), respectively. Median patency (range) and survival were 238 days (10-429) and 256 days (10-1130), respectively. Obstruction of primary bilateral stents occurred in 30.8% (24/78) of patients with functionally successful stent placement. The technical and clinical success rates of planned bilateral endoscopic revision for occluded stents were 83.3% (20/24) and 79.2% (19/24), respectively. For revision, bilateral metallic stents were placed in 11 patients (55.0%); the remaining patients received plastic stents. Palliative endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents was effective in patients with inoperable HBS. Revision endoscopic bilateral stenting may be feasible and successful in cases where the primary deployed metal stents are occluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Bile Flow Phantom Model and Animal Bile Duct Dilation Model for Evaluating Biliary Plastic Stents with Advanced Hydrophilic Coating.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Won Seop; Lee, Don Haeng; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-07-15

    The efforts to improve biliary plastic stents (PSs) for decreasing biofilm formation and overcome short patency time have been continued. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of advanced hydrophilic coating for patency and biodurability of PS. Using an in vitro bile flow phantom model, we compared patency between prototype PS with hydrophilic coating (PS+HC) and prototype PS without hydrophilic coating (PS-HC). We performed an analysis of the degree of luminal narrowing by microscopic examination. Using an in vivo swine bile duct dilation model made by endoscopic papillary closure and stent insertion, we evaluated biodurability of hydrophilic coating. In the phantom model, PS+HC showed less biofilm formation and luminal narrowing than PS-HC at 8 weeks (p<0.05). A total of 31 stents were inserted into the dilated bile duct of seven swine models, and 24 stents were successfully retrieved 8 weeks later. There was no statistical difference of stent patency between the polyethylene PS+HC and the polyurethane PS+HC. The biodurability of hydrophilic coating was sustained up to 8 weeks, when assessing the coating layer by scanning electron microscopy examination. Advanced hydrophilic coating technology may extend the patency of PS compared to uncoated PS.

  10. Bile Flow Phantom Model and Animal Bile Duct Dilation Model for Evaluating Biliary Plastic Stents with Advanced Hydrophilic Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Won Seop; Lee, Don Haeng; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The efforts to improve biliary plastic stents (PSs) for decreasing biofilm formation and overcome short patency time have been continued. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of advanced hydrophilic coating for patency and biodurability of PS. Methods Using an in vitro bile flow phantom model, we compared patency between prototype PS with hydrophilic coating (PS+HC) and prototype PS without hydrophilic coating (PS−HC). We performed an analysis of the degree of luminal narrowing by microscopic examination. Using an in vivo swine bile duct dilation model made by endoscopic papillary closure and stent insertion, we evaluated biodurability of hydrophilic coating. Results In the phantom model, PS+HC showed less biofilm formation and luminal narrowing than PS−HC at 8 weeks (p<0.05). A total of 31 stents were inserted into the dilated bile duct of seven swine models, and 24 stents were successfully retrieved 8 weeks later. There was no statistical difference of stent patency between the polyethylene PS+HC and the polyurethane PS+HC. The biodurability of hydrophilic coating was sustained up to 8 weeks, when assessing the coating layer by scanning electron microscopy examination. Conclusions Advanced hydrophilic coating technology may extend the patency of PS compared to uncoated PS. PMID:27021507

  11. Aluminum phosphide-induced esophageal strictures: a new cause of benign esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients presenting with dysphagia due to aluminum phosphide (AP)-induced esophageal strictures were studied retrospectively to elucidate the natural history of AP-induced esophageal strictures and to evaluate the efficacy of bougie dilation. The median time lag between consumption of AP and occurrence of dysphagia was 3 weeks. All patients had a single stricture and could be dilated using a bougie dilator. Thirteen patients were relieved of dysphagia on a mean (SD) follow-up of 18 (7.3) months. Two patients had recalcitrant strictures and needed needle-knife incision of the stricture followed by balloon dilation. The strictures opened up well in both the patients and they were relieved of dysphagia. AP-induced esophageal stricture is a new cause of benign esophageal stricture. Most patients present with dysphagia around 3 weeks after consumption of AP tablets. A single esophageal stricture is found in these patients. Most strictures respond very well to bougie dilation. However, some of the strictures may be recalcitrant and may require needle-knife incision and balloon dilation.

  12. Iatrogenic Biliary Injuries: Multidisciplinary Management in a Major Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ibrahim Abdelkader; Shoreem, Hany Abdelmeged; Saleh, Sherif Mohamed; Hegazy, Osama; Housseni, Mohamed; Abbasy, Mohamed; Badra, Gamal; Ibrahim, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Background. Iatrogenic biliary injuries are considered as the most serious complications during cholecystectomy. Better outcomes of such injuries have been shown in cases managed in a specialized center. Objective. To evaluate biliary injuries management in major referral hepatobiliary center. Patients & Methods. Four hundred seventy-two consecutive patients with postcholecystectomy biliary injuries were managed with multidisciplinary team (hepatobiliary surgeon, gastroenterologist, and radiologist) at major Hepatobiliary Center in Egypt over 10-year period using endoscopy in 232 patients, percutaneous techniques in 42 patients, and surgery in 198 patients. Results. Endoscopy was very successful initial treatment of 232 patients (49%) with mild/moderate biliary leakage (68%) and biliary stricture (47%) with increased success by addition of percutaneous (Rendezvous technique) in 18 patients (3.8%). However, surgery was needed in 198 patients (42%) for major duct transection, ligation, major leakage, and massive stricture. Surgery was urgent in 62 patients and elective in 136 patients. Hepaticojejunostomy was done in most of cases with transanastomotic stents. There was one mortality after surgery due to biliary sepsis and postoperative stricture in 3 cases (1.5%) treated with percutaneous dilation and stenting. Conclusion. Management of biliary injuries was much better with multidisciplinary care team with initial minimal invasive technique to major surgery in major complex injury encouraging early referral to highly specialized hepatobiliary center. PMID:25435672

  13. Considerable Risk of Restenosis After Endoscopic Treatment for Hepaticojejunostomy Stricture After Living-Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kamei, H; Imai, H; Onishi, Y; Ishihara, M; Nakamura, M; Kawashima, H; Ishigami, M; Ito, A; Ohmiya, N; Hirooka, Y; Goto, H; Ogura, Y

    2015-10-01

    There are few reports on the short- and long-term follow-up of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) in adult patients with hepaticojejunostomy (HJS) stricture after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Nine LDLT recipients underwent ERC with the use of double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) for HJS stricture at Nagoya University Hospital. We assessed the rate of reaching biliary anastomosis, procedure success rate, procedure duration, complications, improvement in liver function test results, and biliary anastomosis patency. In total, 19 ERC procedures with the use of DBE were performed for 9 adult LDLT recipients with HJS stricture from June 2006 to September 2014. Balloon dilation with the use of DBE was successfully performed in 5 of the 9 patients during the 1st procedure. Of the 4 patients in whom DBE-ERC failed to be completed, 3 patients underwent 2nd procedures successfully. Liver function test results were significantly improved in the successful cases. Four patients underwent 2nd DBE-ERC for stricture recurrence at a mean time of 2.3 years after the 1st successful procedure. Of those, 2 patients required 3rd procedures for stricture recurrence after the 2nd procedure. DBE-ERC is promising as a treatment for HJS stricture in adult LDLT recipients in the short term. However, the DBE-ERC procedure may have a considerable risk of restenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Covered self-expandable metal stents for benign biliary tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Baron, Todd H

    2011-05-01

    Benign biliary diseases are often managed endoscopically using plastic stents. Benign biliary strictures (BBS) respond to placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents, though requiring multiple procedures to place stents, and to exchange stents to prevent and/or treat stent occlusion. Bile leaks close using plastic stents, which divert bile away from the leak into the duodenum. Covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS), intended for palliation of malignant biliary obstruction, have been used to treat benign biliary diseases. Advantages include small predeployment and large postexpansion diameters. Lack of imbedding of the metal into the bile duct wall enables removability. For strictures, one CSEMS is inserted without need for dilation and remains in place for up to 6 months. Successful removal has been reported in all cases. Long-term stricture resolution is achieved in up to 92%. Adverse events include migration and new stricture formation. For treatment of complex bile leaks, the covering and large diameter allow successful closure in nearly all cases. Other uses of CSEMS include treatment of postsphincterotomy bleeding and closure of perforations. CSEMS show promise for treatment of BBS and complex biliary leaks. Successful resolution can be achieved in the majority of patients with the advantage of fewer procedures, which offsets their higher cost.

  15. Cutting balloon treatment of anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fan; Tang, Hui; Xu, Chi; Jiang, Zai-Bo; Yi, Shu-Hong; Li, Hua; Jiang, Nan; Chen, Wen-Jie; Yang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Biliary stenosis is a common complication after liver transplantation, and has an incidence rate ranging from 4.7% to 12.5% based on our previous study. Three types of biliary stenosis (anastomotic stenosis, non-anastomotic peripheral stenosis and non-anastomotic central hilar stenosis) have been identified. We report the outcome of two patients with anastomotic stricture after liver transplantation who underwent successful cutting balloon treatment. Case 1 was a 40-year-old male transplanted due to subacute fulminant hepatitis C. Case 2 was a 57-year-old male transplanted due to hepatitis B virus-related end-stage cirrhosis associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Both patients had similar clinical scenarios: refractory anastomotic stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation and failure of balloon dilation of the common bile duct to alleviate biliary stricture. PMID:28104994

  16. Endoscopic Treatment of Anastomotic Biliary Stenosis in Patients With Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Claudio; Zanasi, Giulio; Gambitta, Pietro; Bini, Marta; de Carlis, Luciano; Arcidiacono, Raffaele

    1995-01-01

    The choledocho-choledochostomy stricture is one of the most frequent complications occurring after liver transplantation. Today endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered one of the most common methodologic approaches for the diagnosis; at the same time it provides an effective treatment of the stenosis, avoiding more invasive surgery. Biliary flow through a strictured anastomosis definitely improves after endoscopic stenting which, in most cases, resolves the biliary obstruction syndrome; moreover, the stent could allow restoration of the anatomical and functional integrity of the common bile duct. We have successfully treated eight liver transplanted patients with biliary anastomotic stenosis by endoscopic stenting of the common bile duct or by balloon dilation (one patient). The stents were replaced every 3 to 4 months and then removed after 1 year of follow-up. We observed one patient with acute cholangitis due to the clogging of the prosthetic device. PMID:18493388

  17. Cutting balloon treatment of anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fan; Tang, Hui; Xu, Chi; Jiang, Zai-Bo; Yi, Shu-Hong; Li, Hua; Jiang, Nan; Chen, Wen-Jie; Yang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2017-01-07

    Biliary stenosis is a common complication after liver transplantation, and has an incidence rate ranging from 4.7% to 12.5% based on our previous study. Three types of biliary stenosis (anastomotic stenosis, non-anastomotic peripheral stenosis and non-anastomotic central hilar stenosis) have been identified. We report the outcome of two patients with anastomotic stricture after liver transplantation who underwent successful cutting balloon treatment. Case 1 was a 40-year-old male transplanted due to subacute fulminant hepatitis C. Case 2 was a 57-year-old male transplanted due to hepatitis B virus-related end-stage cirrhosis associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Both patients had similar clinical scenarios: refractory anastomotic stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation and failure of balloon dilation of the common bile duct to alleviate biliary stricture.

  18. Covered metal stents in endoscopic therapy of biliary complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantù, Paolo; Tenca, Andrea; Parzanese, Ilaria; Penagini, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in using covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary conditions, and the presence of anastomotic biliary strictures and leaks after liver transplantation provide a valuable opportunity for testing them. The performance of the stents is encouraging, and the technical success rate is high. They provide larger diameter dilation and are easily removed, and can potentially limit costs by reducing the number of procedures needed to treat anastomotic biliary strictures. However, drawbacks such as sub-optimal tolerability and migration may affect both patient management and costs. New stent designs are currently being evaluated. Randomized controlled trials and cost-effectiveness analyses comparing covered metal stents with multiple plastic stent endotherapy are warranted in order to define the role of the former as first-line or rescue treatment. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Limited precut sphincterotomy combined with endoscopic papillary balloon dilation for common bile duct stone removal in patients with difficult biliary cannulation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Mou; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Liang, Chih-Ming; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Tai, Wei-Chen; Kuo, Yuan-Hung; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Kuo, Chung-Huang

    2016-07-12

    Difficult biliary cannulation in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can result in failure of common bile duct (CBD) stone removal and pancreatitis. The present study aimed to report the efficacy and safety of limited precut sphincterotomy (PS) combined with endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) for CBD stone removal in patients with difficult biliary cannulation, and the complications associated with this combined procedure. A total of 3305 patients underwent ERCP in our hospital between October 2009 and September 2014 and 258 were diagnosed with difficult biliary cannulation. Of these 258 patients, 58 underwent limited PS combined with EPBD for CBD stone removal, and these 58 patients were included in this retrospective study. The overall success rate was 94.8 % (55/58), and the success rate for single-session removal was 87.9 % (51/58). The mean procedure time was 41 ± 11.48 min (range, 20-72 min). Mechanical lithotripsy was needed in 10.3 % (6/58) of patients. Procedure-related complications included bleeding in 3.4 % (2/58), pancreatitis in 8.6 % (5/58) and biliary tract infection (BTI) in 1.7 % (1/58) of patients. The therapeutic outcome of limited PS combined with EPBD for CBD stone removal in patients with difficult biliary cannulation was good with an acceptable complication rate. It could be an alternative to PS and "early" limited PS should be used for prompt identification of the bile duct. Limited PS combined with EPBD is safe and effective for CBD stone removal in patients with difficult biliary cannulation.

  20. [Urethral stricture after radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, C M; Engel, O; Fisch, M; Kluth, L A

    2017-03-01

    Radiation-induced urethral stricture occurs most often due to radiation for prostate cancer. It is one of the most common side effects of radiotherapy. Stricture rates are lowest in patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy, occur more frequently in those who require brachytherapy and show highest stricture rates in patients receiving a combination of external beam radiation and brachytherapy. Strictures are mostly located at the bulbomembranous part of the urethra. Diagnostic work-up should include basic urologic work-up, ultrasound, uroflowmetric assessment, urethroscopy, retrograde urethrogram and voiding cystourethrography. Endoscopic management such as dilatation and internal urethrotomy has been proposed in short strictures. However these therapies have a high risk for recurrence. The success rate of urethroplasty is higher. Success rates of primary end-to-end anastomosis (EPA) have been reported to be 70-95 %; rates of incontinence are 7-40 %. While success rates of buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (BMGU) range from 71-78 %, postoperative incontinence occurs in 10.5-44 %. Usually, postoperative incontinence can successfully be treated with an artificial urinary sphincter. It seems like EPA is the treatment of choice for short urethral strictures, whereas BMGU is indicated in longer, more complex strictures. Patients should be counselled with regard to length and location of strictures as well as with regard to postoperative incontinence.

  1. Urethral stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... and not near the muscles that control the exit from the bladder, the stricture may be cut ... work, a urinary diversion called an appendicovesicostomy (Mitrofanoff procedure) may be done. This lets you drain your ...

  2. Interesting rendezvous location in a liver transplantation patient with anastomosis stricture.

    PubMed

    Odemis, Bulent; Oztas, Erkin; Yurdakul, Mehmet; Torun, Serkan; Suna, Nuredtin; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2014-11-14

    An endoscopic or radiologic percutaneous approach may be an initial minimally invasive method for treating biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation; however, cannulation of biliary strictures is sometimes difficult due to the presence of a sharp or twisted angle within the stricture or a complete stricture. When an angulated or twisted biliary stricture interrupts passage of a guidewire over the stricture, it is difficult to replace the percutaneous biliary drainage catheter with inside stents by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The rendezvous technique can be used to overcome this difficulty. In addition to the classical rendezvous method, in cases with complete transection of the common bile duct a modified technique involving the insertion of a snare into the subhepatic space has been successfully performed. Herein, we report a modified rendezvous technique in the duodenal bulb as an extraordinary location for a patient with duct-to-duct anastomotic complete stricture after liver transplantation.

  3. [Proximal migration of biliary prosthesis. Endoscopic extraction techniques].

    PubMed

    Alfredo, G; Raúl, A; Barinagarrementeria, R; Gutiérrez-Bermúdez, J A; Martínez-Burciaga, J

    2001-01-01

    Proximal migration of a biliary stent is an uncommon event, but its management can present a technical challenge to the therapeutic endoscopist. We reviewed the methods that have been used for retrieval of proximally migrated biliary stents in a referral endoscopic center. PATIENTS-METHOD, AND RESULTS: From January 1995 to December 1998, there were 410 procedures for insertion of biliary stents. Eighteen patients had migrated biliary stents; 15 stents (83%) were extracted successfully. One half of the stents were retrieved by grasping the stent directly with a wire basket. Four were recovered using the Soehendra device, and a stone retrieval balloon alongside the stents to provide traction indirectly in two patients. Surgical techniques were necessary in three cases. In patients with a dilated duct, indirect traction with a balloon or direct grasping of the stent with a wire basket is usually successful. Cannulating the stent lumen with a wire is often the best approach in patients with biliary stricture or nondilated duct. Using these techniques, most proximally migrated biliary stents can be retrieved endoscopically.

  4. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in evaluation of unexplained common bile duct dilatation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Sharma, Vishal; Rao, Chalapathi; Gupta, Rajesh; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Dilated common bile duct (CBD) without obvious cause is a not uncommon finding on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with unexplained dilated CBD on MRCP. Patients referred for EUS evaluation of a dilated CBD were retrospectively analyzed with respect to serum alkaline phosphatase prior to EUS and subsequent outcome after EUS. Over a 3-year period, 40 patients (24 males; mean age 38.9±9.9 years) with dilated CBD were retrospectively identified. Ten patients had elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. The diagnosis reached after EUS examination was: CBD stones in 15 (37.5%) with largest size of CBD stone being 9 mm, mass in CBD in 2 (5%), benign biliary stricture in 2 (5%), biliary stricture with underlying chronic pancreatitis in 1 (2.5%) patient respectively. EUS examination revealed normal CBD in 20 (50%) patients and two of these patients had periampullary diverticulum. All the patients with abnormal liver function tests had a detectable CBD pathology whereas 20/30 (66.6%) patients with normal liver biochemistry had normal EUS findings. There was no significant difference in the mean CBD diameter between the groups with demonstrable pathology compared with those without (P=0.64). EUS is a useful investigational modality for patients with unexplained dilated CBD on MRCP. The mean CBD diameter and the presence of normal liver function tests are not predictive of underlying pathology.

  5. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in evaluation of unexplained common bile duct dilatation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Sharma, Vishal; Rao, Chalapathi; Gupta, Rajesh; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Background Dilated common bile duct (CBD) without obvious cause is a not uncommon finding on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with unexplained dilated CBD on MRCP. Methods Patients referred for EUS evaluation of a dilated CBD were retrospectively analyzed with respect to serum alkaline phosphatase prior to EUS and subsequent outcome after EUS. Results Over a 3-year period, 40 patients (24 males; mean age 38.9±9.9 years) with dilated CBD were retrospectively identified. Ten patients had elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. The diagnosis reached after EUS examination was: CBD stones in 15 (37.5%) with largest size of CBD stone being 9 mm, mass in CBD in 2 (5%), benign biliary stricture in 2 (5%), biliary stricture with underlying chronic pancreatitis in 1 (2.5%) patient respectively. EUS examination revealed normal CBD in 20 (50%) patients and two of these patients had periampullary diverticulum. All the patients with abnormal liver function tests had a detectable CBD pathology whereas 20/30 (66.6%) patients with normal liver biochemistry had normal EUS findings. There was no significant difference in the mean CBD diameter between the groups with demonstrable pathology compared with those without (P=0.64). Conclusion EUS is a useful investigational modality for patients with unexplained dilated CBD on MRCP. The mean CBD diameter and the presence of normal liver function tests are not predictive of underlying pathology. PMID:24714761

  6. Evaluation and management of anterior urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangera, Altaf; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture disease affects many men worldwide. Traditionally, the investigation of choice has been urethrography and the management of choice has been urethrotomy/dilatation. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind the use of ultrasonography in stricture assessment. We also discuss the factors a surgeon should consider when deciding the management options with each individual patient. Not all strictures are identical and surgeons should appreciate the poor long-term results of urethrotomy/dilatation for strictures longer than 2 cm, strictures in the penile urethra, recurrent strictures, and strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus. These patients may benefit from primary urethroplasty if they have many adverse features or secondary urethroplasty after the first recurrence. PMID:26918169

  7. Safety and efficacy of minimal biliary sphincterotomy with papillary balloon dilation (m-EBS+EPBD) in patients using clopidogrel or anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Shaffer R. S.; Arif, Murtaza; Diehl, David L; Khara, Harshit S; Ho, Henry C; Elfant, Adam B

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy (EBS) or endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) are common techniques of biliary decompression. Potential risks include gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which can be increased by antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants (AC) and/or novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) (ie. apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban). The study aim is to evaluate the safety/efficacy of an alternative technique, minimal-EBS plus EPBD (m-EBS + EPBD), in individuals for whom clopidogrel, AC, and/or NOACs cannot be interrupted due to high cardiovascular or thromboembolic risk. Patients and methods Patients undergoing m-EBS + EPBD while taking clopidogrel and/or AC were retrospectively evaluated at two United States tertiary care centers for efficacy, GIB and procedure-related, cardiovascular and thromboembolic adverse events (AE). Results Ninety-five patients were identified [55 = clopidogrel and 45 = AC (31.1 % NOACs)]. The main indication for ERCP was choledocholithiasis (34 %). 100 % clinical improvement and 97.9 % endoscopic success were found. The incidence of AE was 5.3 %. There was a 4.2 % incidence of gastrointestinal hemorrhage (2 cases requiring endoscopic intervention). Both severe gastrointestinal hemorrhages also experienced the cases of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and 2 /3 of cholangitis (all aspirin + AC). There was 1cardiovascular event (non-ST elevation myocardial infarction), and no thromboembolic events. Conclusions Minimal-EBS + EPBD is an effective and safe therapy with an incidence of gastrointestinal hemorrhage of 4.2 %, (2.1 % requiring endoscopic intervention), for patients on clopidogrel and/or AC, with a high risk for cardiovascular/thromboembolic events. PMID:28337485

  8. Outcome of hepaticojejunostomy for biliary tract obstruction following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Langer, F B; Györi, G P; Pokorny, H; Burghuber, C; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, S; Berlakovich, G A; Mühlbacher, F; Steininger, R

    2009-01-01

    Strictures and concrements are the most common biliary complications following liver transplantation. Endoscopic treatment might not lead to a definitive cure in all patients, especially in strictures involving the biliary bifurcation. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and the long-term outcome of hepaticojejunostomy (HJS) for post-transplant biliary tract obstruction. Thirty-seven patients were retrospectively studied for resolving of cholestasis and the incidence of recurring biliary obstruction. Surgery was performed because of anastomotic strictures in 11, ischemic strictures at the donor common bile duct in seven, strictures involving the bile duct bifurcation in 10, hepatolithiasis without strictures in one and biliary cast formation diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography or T-tube cholangiography in eight patients. Cholestasis instantly improved in 82% of the patients. After a long-term follow-up of median 33 months (range 3-149), 28 of the patients (76%) required no further intervention for recurring biliary obstruction following HJS. Anastomotic strictures were observed in six (16%), recurring biliary concrements in two patients (5%). HJS did prevent recurrent biliary obstruction in the majority of the patients. We therefore recommend early HJS for complicated post-transplant biliary tract obstruction not treatable by a limited number of endoscopic interventions.

  9. Anchoring of a fully covered self-expandable metal stent with a 5F double-pigtail plastic stent to prevent migration in the management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Kyu; Moon, Jong Ho; Choi, Hyun Jong; Min, Seul Ki; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cheon, Gab Jin; Cheon, Young Koog; Cho, Young Deok; Park, Sang-Heum; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2011-10-01

    Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMSs) can be effectively placed in patients with benign biliary stricture (BBS). However, stent migration is an inherent problem of FCSEMSs. We evaluated the efficacy of anchoring with a 5F double-pigtail plastic stent (anchoring stent) to prevent migration of an FCSEMS in patients with BBS. Between January 2007 and December 2009, 33 of 37 consecutive patients with BBS who had experienced treatment failure of at least one plastic stent placement were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients with BBS were randomly assigned to undergo FCSEMS placement with or without an anchoring stent (anchoring group: 16 patients; non-anchoring group: 17 patients). The main outcome measures were the stent migration rate and success rates. The technical success rate was 100% in both groups. Significantly less stent migration occurred in the anchoring group (6.3%, 1/16) than in the non-anchoring group (41.2%, 7/17; P=0.024). The median indwelling time was significantly longer in the anchoring group (154 days; range, 86-176 days) than in the non-anchoring group (114 days; range, 19-162 days; P=0.010). Improvement or resolution of the BBS was confirmed in 15 of 16 patients (93.8%) in the anchoring group, and in 12 of 17 patients (70.6%) in the non-anchoring group (P=0.101). The placement of an anchoring stent appears to be a simple and effective method of preventing premature migration of FCSEMSs in patients with BBS. Appropriately powered studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  10. Safety and Efficacy of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Patients with Post-Liver Transplant Biliary Complications: Results of a Cohort Study with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Claudia; Giordanino, Chiara; Giono, Ilaria; Barletti, Claudio; Ferrari, Arnaldo; Recchia, Serafino; Reggio, Dario; Repici, Alessandro; Ricchiuti, Alessandro; Salizzoni, Mauro; Baldi, Ileana; Ciccone, Giovannino; Rizzetto, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the standard approach for the management of biliary complications in liver transplant patients; however, its safety and efficacy have not been established in this setting. This study was performed to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of ERCP in transplant patients. Methods The case reports of 1,500 liver transplant patients were reviewed. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) patients were matched 1:2 with non-OLT patients and followed-up for long-term outcome (median, 7.4 years). Results Of the 1,500 liver transplant patients, 94 (6.3%) underwent 150 ERCPs after OLT. Anastomotic strictures were present in 45 patients, biliary stones in 24, biliary leaks in 7, papillary stenosis in 2, and primary sclerosing cholangitis in 1. An ERCP success rate of 90.7% was achieved; biliary stenting led to resolution of the bile leak in 7/7 (100%) patients, and biliary stones were removed in 21/24 (87.5%) patients. In addition, 34 of 45 patients with anastomotic stricture underwent endoscopic dilation. We obtained complete resolution in 22/34 (64.7%) patients. OLT patients did not show a higher probability of complications (odds ratio [OR], 1.04), of pancreatitis (OR, 0.80) or of bleeding (OR, 1.34). Conclusions ERCP is safe and effective for the treatment of post-OLT biliary complications, has a low rate of pancreatitis and results in a durable effect. PMID:21927662

  11. Safety and efficacy of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with post-liver transplant biliary complications: results of a cohort study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Claudia; Giordanino, Chiara; Giono, Ilaria; Barletti, Claudio; Ferrari, Arnaldo; Recchia, Serafino; Reggio, Dario; Repici, Alessandro; Ricchiuti, Alessandro; Salizzoni, Mauro; Baldi, Ileana; Ciccone, Giovannino; Rizzetto, Mario; Saracco, Giorgio

    2011-09-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the standard approach for the management of biliary complications in liver transplant patients; however, its safety and efficacy have not been established in this setting. This study was performed to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of ERCP in transplant patients. The case reports of 1,500 liver transplant patients were reviewed. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) patients were matched 1:2 with non-OLT patients and followed-up for long-term outcome (median, 7.4 years). Of the 1,500 liver transplant patients, 94 (6.3%) underwent 150 ERCPs after OLT. Anastomotic strictures were present in 45 patients, biliary stones in 24, biliary leaks in 7, papillary stenosis in 2, and primary sclerosing cholangitis in 1. An ERCP success rate of 90.7% was achieved; biliary stenting led to resolution of the bile leak in 7/7 (100%) patients, and biliary stones were removed in 21/24 (87.5%) patients. In addition, 34 of 45 patients with anastomotic stricture underwent endoscopic dilation. We obtained complete resolution in 22/34 (64.7%) patients. OLT patients did not show a higher probability of complications (odds ratio [OR], 1.04), of pancreatitis (OR, 0.80) or of bleeding (OR, 1.34). ERCP is safe and effective for the treatment of post-OLT biliary complications, has a low rate of pancreatitis and results in a durable effect.

  12. Multi-disciplinary approach for management of refractory benign occlusive esophageal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Syed S.; Cohen, Dan C.; Pfanner, Timothy; Reznik, Scott; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Benign occlusive esophageal strictures create substantial morbidity and have poor surgical outcomes. Various endoscopic techniques have been described to manage these strictures. The challenge remains to maintain adequate long-term esophageal patency and to limit the need for serial endoscopic dilations. Little has been reported regarding the management of these benign occlusive strictures. Methods: We report a case series describing the management of technically challenging benign occlusive esophageal strictures. Three patients with occlusive esophageal strictures of differing etiologies were treated using a variety of endoscopic methodologies. Results: The first patient sustained a caustic oropharyngeal injury resulting in a proximal esophageal stricture which was treated by using a combined antegrade retrograde dilation (CARD) with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and needle knife dissection resulting in the successful recanalization and patency of his stricture. A second patient developed an esophageal stricture following radiotherapy, and was treated with a CARD procedure and serial balloon dilations in combination with APC to successfully achieve esophageal luminal patency. The final patient acquired an occlusive esophageal stricture after treatment for thyroid cancer which was treated with endoscopic needle knife dissection followed by serial balloon dilations to successfully manage this stricture. Conclusions: Occlusive esophageal strictures pose a difficult challenge to gastroenterologists and little has been reported with regards to their endoscopic management. Using the CARD technique, needle knife dissection and APC, individually or in combination, luminal patency of occlusive esophageal strictures can be accomplished safely with good results. PMID:24003337

  13. Multi-disciplinary approach for management of refractory benign occlusive esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Shashideep; Hasan, Syed S; Cohen, Dan C; Pfanner, Timothy; Reznik, Scott; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2013-09-01

    Benign occlusive esophageal strictures create substantial morbidity and have poor surgical outcomes. Various endoscopic techniques have been described to manage these strictures. The challenge remains to maintain adequate long-term esophageal patency and to limit the need for serial endoscopic dilations. Little has been reported regarding the management of these benign occlusive strictures. We report a case series describing the management of technically challenging benign occlusive esophageal strictures. Three patients with occlusive esophageal strictures of differing etiologies were treated using a variety of endoscopic methodologies. The first patient sustained a caustic oropharyngeal injury resulting in a proximal esophageal stricture which was treated by using a combined antegrade retrograde dilation (CARD) with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and needle knife dissection resulting in the successful recanalization and patency of his stricture. A second patient developed an esophageal stricture following radiotherapy, and was treated with a CARD procedure and serial balloon dilations in combination with APC to successfully achieve esophageal luminal patency. The final patient acquired an occlusive esophageal stricture after treatment for thyroid cancer which was treated with endoscopic needle knife dissection followed by serial balloon dilations to successfully manage this stricture. Occlusive esophageal strictures pose a difficult challenge to gastroenterologists and little has been reported with regards to their endoscopic management. Using the CARD technique, needle knife dissection and APC, individually or in combination, luminal patency of occlusive esophageal strictures can be accomplished safely with good results.

  14. Advances in urethral stricture management

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Maxx A.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture/stenosis is a narrowing of the urethral lumen. These conditions greatly impact the health and quality of life of patients. Management of urethral strictures/stenosis is complex and requires careful evaluation. The treatment options for urethral stricture vary in their success rates. Urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy are the most commonly performed procedures but carry the lowest chance for long-term success (0–9%). Urethroplasty has a much higher chance of success (85–90%) and is considered the gold-standard treatment. The most common urethroplasty techniques are excision and primary anastomosis and graft onlay urethroplasty. Anastomotic urethroplasty and graft urethroplasty have similar long-term success rates, although long-term data have yet to confirm equal efficacy. Anastomotic urethroplasty may have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. Posterior urethral stenosis is typically caused by previous urologic surgery. It is treated endoscopically with radial incisions. The use of mitomycin C may decrease recurrence. An exciting area of research is tissue engineering and scar modulation to augment stricture treatment. These include the use of acellular matrices or tissue-engineered buccal mucosa to produce grafting material for urethroplasty. Other experimental strategies aim to prevent scar formation altogether. PMID:28105329

  15. Advances in urethral stricture management.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Maxx A; Santucci, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture/stenosis is a narrowing of the urethral lumen. These conditions greatly impact the health and quality of life of patients. Management of urethral strictures/stenosis is complex and requires careful evaluation. The treatment options for urethral stricture vary in their success rates. Urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy are the most commonly performed procedures but carry the lowest chance for long-term success (0-9%). Urethroplasty has a much higher chance of success (85-90%) and is considered the gold-standard treatment. The most common urethroplasty techniques are excision and primary anastomosis and graft onlay urethroplasty. Anastomotic urethroplasty and graft urethroplasty have similar long-term success rates, although long-term data have yet to confirm equal efficacy. Anastomotic urethroplasty may have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. Posterior urethral stenosis is typically caused by previous urologic surgery. It is treated endoscopically with radial incisions. The use of mitomycin C may decrease recurrence. An exciting area of research is tissue engineering and scar modulation to augment stricture treatment. These include the use of acellular matrices or tissue-engineered buccal mucosa to produce grafting material for urethroplasty. Other experimental strategies aim to prevent scar formation altogether.

  16. Mitomycin-C: 'a ray of hope' in refractory corrosive esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    Nagaich, N; Nijhawan, S; Katiyar, P; Sharma, R; Rathore, M

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly frequent dilation may become a self-defeating cycle in refractory stricture as recurrent trauma enhance, scar formation, and ultimately recurrence and potential worsening of the stricture. In 12 patients of caustic induced esophageal stricture, who failed to respond despite rigorous dilatation regimen for more than one year, a trial of topical mitomycin-C application to improve dilatation results was undertaken, considering the recently reported efficacy and safety of this agent. Mitomycin-C was applied for 2-3 minutes at the strictured esophageal segment after dilation with wire-guided Savary-Gilliard dilator. Patient was kept nil by mouth for 2-3 hours. After 4-6 sessions of mitomycin-C treatment, resolution of symptoms and significant improvement in dysphagia score and periodic dilatation index was seen in all 12 patients. Mitomycin-C topical application may be a useful strategy in refractory corrosive esophageal strictures and salvage patients from surgery.

  17. Biliary Tract Anatomy and its Relationship with Venous Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh Babu, Chittapuram S.; Sharma, Malay

    2013-01-01

    Portal cavernoma develops as a bunch of hepatopetal collaterals in response to portomesenteric venous obstruction and induces morphological changes in the biliary ducts, referred to as portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. This article briefly reviews the available literature on the vascular supply of the biliary tract in the light of biliary changes induced by portal cavernoma. Literature pertaining to venous drainage of the biliary tract is scanty whereas more attention was focused on the arterial supply probably because of its significant surgical implications in liver transplantation and development of ischemic changes and strictures in the bile duct due to vasculobiliary injuries. Since the general pattern of arterial supply and venous drainage of the bile ducts is quite similar, the arterial supply of the biliary tract is also reviewed. Fine branches from the posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal, retroportal, gastroduodenal, hepatic and cystic arteries form two plexuses to supply the bile ducts. The paracholedochal plexus, as right and left marginal arteries, run along the margins of the bile duct and the reticular epicholedochal plexus lie on the surface. The retropancreatic, hilar and intrahepatic parts of biliary tract has copious supply, but the supraduodenal bile duct has the poorest vascularization and hence susceptible to ischemic changes. Two venous plexuses drain the biliary tract. A fine reticular epicholedochal venous plexus on the wall of the bile duct drains into the paracholedochal venous plexus (also called as marginal veins or parabiliary venous system) which in turn is connected to the posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal vein, gastrocolic trunk, right gastric vein, superior mesenteric vein inferiorly and intrahepatic portal vein branches superiorly. These pericholedochal venous plexuses constitute the porto-portal collaterals and dilate in portomesenteric venous obstruction forming the portal cavernoma. PMID:25755590

  18. Biliary tract anatomy and its relationship with venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Babu, Chittapuram S; Sharma, Malay

    2014-02-01

    Portal cavernoma develops as a bunch of hepatopetal collaterals in response to portomesenteric venous obstruction and induces morphological changes in the biliary ducts, referred to as portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. This article briefly reviews the available literature on the vascular supply of the biliary tract in the light of biliary changes induced by portal cavernoma. Literature pertaining to venous drainage of the biliary tract is scanty whereas more attention was focused on the arterial supply probably because of its significant surgical implications in liver transplantation and development of ischemic changes and strictures in the bile duct due to vasculobiliary injuries. Since the general pattern of arterial supply and venous drainage of the bile ducts is quite similar, the arterial supply of the biliary tract is also reviewed. Fine branches from the posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal, retroportal, gastroduodenal, hepatic and cystic arteries form two plexuses to supply the bile ducts. The paracholedochal plexus, as right and left marginal arteries, run along the margins of the bile duct and the reticular epicholedochal plexus lie on the surface. The retropancreatic, hilar and intrahepatic parts of biliary tract has copious supply, but the supraduodenal bile duct has the poorest vascularization and hence susceptible to ischemic changes. Two venous plexuses drain the biliary tract. A fine reticular epicholedochal venous plexus on the wall of the bile duct drains into the paracholedochal venous plexus (also called as marginal veins or parabiliary venous system) which in turn is connected to the posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal vein, gastrocolic trunk, right gastric vein, superior mesenteric vein inferiorly and intrahepatic portal vein branches superiorly. These pericholedochal venous plexuses constitute the porto-portal collaterals and dilate in portomesenteric venous obstruction forming the portal cavernoma.

  19. Use of Cutting Balloon in the Treatment of Urethral Stricture: A Novel Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, Erkan; Cicek, Tufan; Istanbulluoglu, Okan; Ozturk, Bulent

    2009-05-15

    The peripheral cutting balloon has been used to treat various nonvascular strictures as well as vascular stenosis. In this article, we describe for the first time the use of the cutting balloon in the treatment of patients with urethral stricture. Four patients with bulbar urethral stricture were included in the study. All strictures were successfully dilated with the cutting balloon, and patients were free of symptoms at 6-month follow-up. Cutting-balloon dilatation is a safe, easy-to-perform, and effective treatment for patients with tight urethral strictures.

  20. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  1. Percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrahepatic and choledochal biliary stones.

    PubMed

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-01

    To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-μm holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive "balloon push" (n = 4) and "rendezvous" (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  2. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in management of benign esophageal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Bhasin, Deepak K.; Singh, Kartar

    2011-01-01

    Background EUS, as it images the full thickness of the gastrointestinal tract wall, could provide more detailed information on benign esophageal strictures. Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of EUS in predicting the response to endoscopic dilatation in benign esophageal strictures. Methods 27 patients with benign strictures (corrosive 14, peptic 10 & post-radiation 3) were prospectively studied with radial EUS. Results The maximum esophageal wall thickness was significantly greater in patients with corrosive and post-radiation strictures in comparison to patients with peptic strictures. In patients with peptic stricture, the mucosal thickness involved either the mucosa (n=2) or submucosa (n=8) and in none of the patients was the muscularis propria involved. However, muscularis propria was involved in all 3 patients with post-radiation strictures and in 11/14 (78.5%) patients with corrosive strictures. Two peptic stricture patients with only mucosal thickening required a single session of dilatation whereas patients with involvement of submucosa required 2-4 sessions of dilatation. Patients with corrosive stricture having only involvement of submucosa required significantly fewer sessions in comparison to patients having muscularis propria involvement (2.67±0.58 vs. 6.30±1.16 sessions, respectively; p=0.0003). Conclusion EUS by delineating the extent of wall involvement in benign esophageal strictures predicts the response to endoscopic dilatation. PMID:24713797

  3. Early bougienage for relief of stricture formation following caustic esophageal burns.

    PubMed

    Tiryaki, Tuğrul; Livanelioğlu, Ziya; Atayurt, Halil

    2005-02-01

    Accidental ingestion of corrosive substances remains a major health hazard in children. Most infants and children who ingest caustic substances present with very few symptoms or signs. Approximately 40% of caustic substance ingestions result in esophageal injury, but the optimal management of caustic esophageal burns remains controversial, with different treatment modalities in use. The aim of this study was to compare the results of prophylactic early bougienage with dilatation that was begun after stricture development. We retrospectively analyzed the management of 125 pediatric cases of corrosive substance ingestion. For children seen primarily at our institution, initial management consisted of prompt endoscopy. Of 125 children admitted with a history of caustic substance ingestion, 54 were found to have esophageal burns, and 32 underwent treatment for stricture formation. Patients with severe injury were divided into two groups: In group A, consisting of 20 patients, prophylactic early dilatation had been done. In the eight patients in group B, dilatation had begun after stricture development. The strictures had resolved after 6 months of dilatation in patients initially treated with prophylactic early bougienage, whereas in patients in whom dilatation began after stricture development, stricture resolution did not occur for more than a year. The goal of initial treatment is to avoid stricture formation. Although early dilatations do not eliminate stricture formation completely, the stricture can resolve more easily with early bougienage.

  4. Future developments in biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  5. Obstructive Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas Taylor

    1982-01-01

    The techniques that have come into general use for diagnosing problems of obstructive jaundice, particularly in the past ten years, have been ultrasonography, computerized tomography, radionuclide imaging, transhepatic percutaneous cholangiography using a long thin needle, transhepatic percutaneous drainage for obstructive jaundice due to malignancy, endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the papilla (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy and choledochoscopy. It is helpful to review obstructive jaundice due to gallstones from a clinical point of view and the use of the directable stone basket for the retrieval of retained stones, choledochoscopy for the same purpose using the rigid versus flexible choledochoscopes and dissolution of stones using various fluids through a T tube. The use of dilation of the sphincter for the treatment of stenosis or stricture of the bile duct is now frowned on; rather, treatment choices are between the use of sphincteroplasty versus choledochoduodenostomy and choledochojejunostomy. Any patient with obstructive jaundice or anyone undergoing manipulation of the bile ducts should have prophylactic antibiotic therapy. The current literature regarding treatment of cancer of the bile ducts is principally devoted to the new ideas relative to treatment of tumors of the upper third, especially the bifurcation tumors that are now being resected rather than bypassed. Tumors of the distal bile duct are still being resected by focal operations. Finally, it is now felt that early operation for congenital biliary atresia and choledochal cysts gives the best prognosis, with preoperative diagnosis now possible with the use of ultrasonography and ERCP. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:7051569

  6. Sharp recanalization of an esophageal occlusion after repair of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nghia-Jack; Racadio, John M; Inge, Thomas H

    2005-10-01

    Esophageal atresia with an associated tracheoesophageal fistula is a congenital anomaly requiring surgical correction. Recurrent stricture is the most common complication of surgical repair and is usually treated with mechanical dilation. Rarely, a recurrent completely obstructive stricture can cause obliteration of the anastomosis, preventing passage of a wire for dilation. This condition requires operative correction. In the case presented herein, the obliterated esophageal lumen from an obstructing stricture was operatively corrected with use of a novel transluminal technique. The obstruction was successfully crossed with a modified Chiba biopsy needle covered in a dilator through a gastrostomy. After subsequent balloon dilation, the lumen has remained patent for more than 3 years without significant complication.

  7. B Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Presenting as a Bile Duct Stricture Diagnosed With Cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Michael J.; Jiang, Liuyan; Lukens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Indeterminate biliary strictures represent a diagnostic challenge requiring further work-up, which encompasses a variety of diagnostic modalities. We report a very rare case of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia presenting as a biliary stricture following remission of acute myeloid leukemia, which was initially treated with allogenic stem cell transplant. After multiple diagnostic modalities were implemented with no success, the use of cholangioscopy-guided biopsies was the key for the final diagnosis. PMID:27807569

  8. Esophageal stricture in a cougar (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion; Lair, Stéphane; Defarges, Alice; Lécuyer, Manon; Langlois, Isabelle

    2009-06-01

    A 7-mo-old female cougar (Puma concolor) was presented with a 2-wk history of anorexia and a 1-wk history of regurgitation. Barium contrast esophagogram and gastroesophagoscopy revealed the presence of a segmental intraluminal esophageal stricture in the middle third of the esophagus. The stricture was potentially secondary to a previous anesthetic episode. Three endoscopic balloon dilations allowed increasing the luminal diameter to a size that enabled the cougar to eat food softened with water without any signs of discomfort or regurgitation. Two months after being discharged, the cougar was doing well, had gained weight and was eating horsemeat softened with water.

  9. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  10. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-12-25

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki's rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency.

  11. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki’s rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency. PMID:26722613

  12. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  13. Self-expandable biodegradable biliary stents in porcine model.

    PubMed

    Grolich, Tomáš; Crha, Michal; Novotný, Ladislav; Kala, Zdeněk; Hep, Aleš; Nečas, Alois; Hlavsa, Jan; Mitáš, Ladislav; Misík, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Treatment or prevention of a benign biliary tree stricture is an unresolved problem. A novel self-expandable biodegradable polydioxanon biliary stent in a porcine model was studied. This new stent was used in 23 pigs. Feasibility and safety of surgical stenting, time of biodegradation, and histologic reaction in 2, 8, 13, and 20 wk of a follow-up were studied. All stents were inserted into a common bile duct through a duodenal papilla following small dilatation. After surgical evaluation of abdominal cavities, the pigs were sacrificed to remove common bile ducts with the stents. All bile ducts were assessed by macroscopic and histopathologic examination. Self-expansion was correct in all cases. Neither bile duct obstruction nor postsurgical complications were observed. Macroscopic evaluation indicated lightening of the stent color in 2 wk, a partial disintegration in 8 wk, and a complete absorption in 13 and 20 wk. Histologic evaluation in general substantiated a mild-to-moderate inflammatory reaction in the lamina propria during the whole follow up and had no clinical consequences. No cholangitis, necrosis, abscess, or excessive fibroplasia was found in a hepatoduodenal ligament. Our results suggest that polydioxanon biodegradable self-expanding stents seem to be useful for biliary system implantation, offer a good biocompatibility, and completely degrade within 13 wk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  15. Do transurethral treatments increase the complexity of urethral strictures?

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Akio; Shinchi, Masayuki; Masunaga, Ayako; Ito, Keiichi; Asano, Tomohiko; Azuma, Ryuichi

    2017-08-30

    We examined the impact on urethral stricture complexity at urethroplasty of previous transurethral treatments such as dilation, urethrotomy, and stenting which are used most commonly when treating male urethral stricture. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 45 males who had undergone transurethral treatments before urethroplasty and compared their urethrography findings at initial diagnosis with those at urethroplasty. Males with failed hypospadias repair, lichen sclerosis, or history of prior urethroplasty were excluded. We considered stricture complexity increased if the number of strictures and/or stricture length on the urethrography at urethroplasty was greater than that at initial diagnosis or if false passage was newly identified. Thirty-nine (87%), 32 (71%), and 13 (29%) had received urethral dilation, urethrotomy, and urethral stenting, respectively, and 39 (87%) had received repeated or multiple kinds of transurethral treatments. Stricture complexity was increased in 22 (49%), and seven (16%) required an urethroplasty more complex than that anticipated from urethrography findings at initial diagnosis. Increased stricture complexity was significantly associated with histories of urethrotomy (p = 0.03), urethral stenting (p = 0.0002), and repeated transurethral treatments (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed that urethral stenting (p = 0.01) and repeated transurethral treatments (p = 0.01) were independent predictors of increased stricture complexity. Repeated transurethral treatments increase stricture complexity and are potentially counterproductive. Even a single use of temporary urethral stenting has a high risk of complicating the stricture and requiring the use of a complex urethroplasty. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. EUS-guided recanalization of complete gastrointestinal strictures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guillén, Miguel; Gornals, Joan B; Consiglieri, Claudia F; Castellvi, Josep M; Loras, Carme

    2017-09-01

    Complete gastrointestinal strictures are a technically demanding problem. In this setting, an anterograde technique is associated with a high risk of complications and a combined anterograde-retrograde technique requires a prior ostomy. Our aim was to assess the outcome of a first case series for the management of complete gastrointestinal strictures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided puncture as a novel endoscopic approach. This retrospective case-series describes four cases that were referred for treatment of complete benign gastrointestinal strictures, three upper and one lower. Recanalization was attempted with EUS-guided puncture using a 22G or 19G needle and contrast filling was visualized by fluoroscopy. Afterwards, a cystotome and/or a dilator balloon were used under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. A fully covered metal stent was placed in two cases, keeping the strictures open in order to prevent another stricture. Feasibility, adverse events, efficacy and the number of dilations required after recanalization were evaluated. Technical and clinical success was achieved in three of the four cases (75%). A first dilation was performed using a dilator balloon in all successful cases and fully covered metal stents were used in two cases. These patients underwent a consecutive number of balloon dilatations (range 1-4) and all three were able to eat a soft diet. No adverse events were related to the EUS-guided approach. In the failed case with a long stricture (> 3 cm), an endoscopic rendezvous technique was attempted which caused a pneumothorax requiring a chest tube placement. EUS-guided recanalization, as a first approach in the treatment of complete digestive stricture, is a feasible and promising procedure that can help to avoid major surgery.

  17. Cologastric strictures: What is the best treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Richard; Brown, Kimberly; Okereke, Ikenna

    2017-01-01

    A 31-year-old gentleman who had undergone an emergent esophagectomy and reconstruction with a colon interposition graft, presented with a long-standing cologastric stricture. He had undergone multiple attempts at endoscopic dilation over multiple decades with little symptomatic relief. He underwent a resection and reconstruction of the anastomosis entirely through an abdominal approach. He did well from surgery and experienced complete symptomatic relief immediately. Complications of colon interposition grafts can occasionally be treated using an abdominal incision only. PMID:28069881

  18. Importance of common bile duct stricture associated with chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Gregg, J A; Carr-Locke, D L; Gallagher, M M

    1981-02-01

    Twenty-one patients with common bile duct strictures associated with chronic pancreatitis are described in whom ERCP was the principal diagnostic method used. In 5 of the 11 patients who had had previous pancreatic or biliary surgery, a common bile duct stricture was overlooked. Nine patients had one or more attacks of cholangitis which were severe in seven and caused death in one. Endoscopically aspirated bile cultures showed heavy gram-negative infection in four patients with previous cholangitis. Two patients developed stones above the strictures, and in one this led to obstruction of a previous cholecystjejunostomy. Although strictures may be discovered at an asymptomatic stage, there should be careful follow-up to detect the appearance of any symptoms or objective signs of stricture progression, when surgery should be offered without delay. Direct biliary-enteric anastomosis is the procedure of choice when possible to relieve symptoms and prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of cholangitis and septicemia.

  19. Management of Recurrent Stricture Formation after Transverse Vaginal Septum Excision

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Bozzay, Joseph D.; Williams, David L.; DePond, Robert T.; Gantt, Pickens A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A transverse vaginal septum (TVS) is a rare obstructing anomaly, caused due to improper fusion of Müllerian ducts and urogenital sinus during embryogenesis. Case. A 15-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea. She had multiple congenital anomalies. Initial examination and imaging investigation revealed the presence of a unicornuate uterus and a TVS. The TVS was excised; however the patient was unable to perform vaginal dilation postoperatively leading to recurrent stricture formation. She underwent multiple surgeries for excision of the stricture. The patient was eventually evaluated every day in the clinic until she was able to demonstrate successful vaginal dilatation in the presence of a clinician. Summary and Conclusion. Properly guided regular and intensive vaginal dilation after TVS excision may decrease the need of reoperations due to recurrent stricture formation. PMID:26078895

  20. Management of Recurrent Stricture Formation after Transverse Vaginal Septum Excision.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ridhima; Bozzay, Joseph D; Williams, David L; DePond, Robert T; Gantt, Pickens A

    2015-01-01

    Background. A transverse vaginal septum (TVS) is a rare obstructing anomaly, caused due to improper fusion of Müllerian ducts and urogenital sinus during embryogenesis. Case. A 15-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea. She had multiple congenital anomalies. Initial examination and imaging investigation revealed the presence of a unicornuate uterus and a TVS. The TVS was excised; however the patient was unable to perform vaginal dilation postoperatively leading to recurrent stricture formation. She underwent multiple surgeries for excision of the stricture. The patient was eventually evaluated every day in the clinic until she was able to demonstrate successful vaginal dilatation in the presence of a clinician. Summary and Conclusion. Properly guided regular and intensive vaginal dilation after TVS excision may decrease the need of reoperations due to recurrent stricture formation.

  1. Novel Biliary Reconstruction Techniques During Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Ian C.; Romano, John; Bohorquez, Humberto; Bugeaud, Emily; Bruce, David S.; Cohen, Ari J.; Seal, John; Reichman, Trevor W.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Biliary complications remain a significant problem following liver transplantation. Several surgical options can be used to deal with a significant size mismatch between the donor and recipient bile ducts during the biliary anastomosis. We compared biliary transposition to recipient biliary ductoplasty in cadaveric liver transplant. Methods: A total of 33 reconstructions were performed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2013. In the biliary transposition group (n=23), 5 reconstructions were performed using an internal stent (5 or 8 French pediatric feeding tube), and 18 were performed without. Of the 10 biliary ductoplasties, 2 were performed with a stent. All patients were managed with standard immunosuppression and ursodiol. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years. Results: No patients in the biliary transposition group required reoperation; 1 patient had an internal stent removed for recurrent unexplained leukocytosis, and 2 patients required endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and stent placement for evidence of stricture. Three anastomotic leaks occurred in the biliary ductoplasty group, and 2 patients in the biliary ductoplasty group required reoperation for biliary complications. Conclusion: Our results indicate that biliary reconstruction can be performed with either biliary transposition or biliary ductoplasty. These techniques are particularly useful when a significant mismatch in diameter exists between the donor and recipient bile ducts. PMID:28331447

  2. Refractory strictures despite steroid injection after esophageal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Noboru; Ishihara, Ryu; Uedo, Noriya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Noriko; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Hamada, Kenta; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although steroid injection prevents stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), some patients require repeated sessions of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). We investigated the risk for refractory stricture despite the administration of steroid injections to prevent stricture in patients undergoing esophageal ESD. Refractory stricture was defined as the requirement for more than three sessions of EBD to resolve the stricture. In addition, the safety of steroid injections was assessed based on the rate of complications. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from 127 consecutive patients who underwent esophageal ESD and had mucosal defects with a circumferential extent greater than three-quarters of the esophagus. To prevent stricture, steroid injection was performed. EBD was performed whenever a patient had symptoms of dysphagia. Results: The percentage of patients with a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was significantly higher in those with refractory stricture than in those without stricture (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, history of radiation therapy, tumor location, and tumor diameter showed that a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was an independent risk factor for refractory stricture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.49 [95 %CI 1.91 – 15.84], P = 0.002). Major adverse events occurred in 3 patients (2.4 %): perforation during EBD in 2 patients and delayed perforation after EBD in 1 patient. The patient with delayed perforation underwent esophagectomy because of mediastinitis. Conclusions: A tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % is an independent risk factor for refractory stricture despite steroid injections. The development of more extensive interventions is warranted to prevent refractory stricture. PMID:27004256

  3. Advances in endoscopic management of biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation: Comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Milljae; Joh, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Apart from noticeable improvements in surgical techniques and immunosuppressive agents, biliary complications remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Bile leakage and stricture are the predominant complications. The reported incidence of biliary complications is 15%-40%, and these are known to occur more frequently in living donors than in deceased donors. Despite the absence of a confirmed therapeutic algorithm, many approaches have been used for treatment, including surgical, endoscopic, and percutaneous transhepatic techniques. In recent years, nonsurgical approaches have largely replaced reoperation. Among these, the endoscopic approach is currently the preferred initial treatment for patients who undergo duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction. Previously, endoscopic management was achieved most optimally through balloon dilatation and single or multiple stents placement. Recently, there have been significant developments in endoscopic devices, such as novel biliary stents, as well as advances in endoscopic technologies, including deep enteroscopy, the rendezvous technique, magnetic compression anastomosis, and direct cholangioscopy. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. Multiple recent publications suggest superior long-term results, with overall success rates ranging from 58% to 75%. This article summarizes the advances in endoscopic management of patients with biliary complications after LDLT. PMID:27468208

  4. Wire-guided balloon coloplasty--a new treatment for colorectal strictures?

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A K; Walters, T K; Wilkins, R; Burke, M

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for dilatation of colorectal anastomotic strictures--wire-guided balloon coloplasty--is described. It is suitable for high strictures, may be performed without general anaesthetic and is repeatable. It does not require endoscopy and may be used to relieve obstructive symptoms in both benign and malignant strictures so avoiding the need for a defunctioning colostomy. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:2013892

  5. Laparoscopic transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for benign common bile duct stricture after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Peters, M; Papasavas, P K; Caushaj, P F; Kania, R J; Gagné, D J

    2002-07-01

    Access to the gastric remnant and duodenum is lost after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Traditionally, a percutaneous transhepatic access to the common bile duct has been used to manage choledocholithiasis and duct strictures. We present a novel method of laparoscopic transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for managing a benign biliary stricture after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

  6. Computed tomography of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Furui, S.; Yashiro, N.; Ohtomo, K.; Iio, M.

    1983-05-01

    Fifteen patients with primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy (cholangiocarcinoma in 13, biliary cystadenocarcinoma in two) were examined by computed tomography (CT). The CT features were classified into three types: (A) a well-defined round cystic mass with internal papillary projections, (B) a localized intrahepatic biliary dilatation without a definite mass lesion, and (C) miscellaneous low-density masses. Intraphepatic biliary dilatation was noted in all cases of Types A and B and half of those of Type C; dilatation of extrahepatic bile ducts occurred in 4/4, 1/3, and 0/8, respectively. CT patterns, such as a well-defined round cystic mass with papillary projections or dilatation of intra- and extrahepatic ducts, give important clues leading to a correct diagnosis of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy.

  7. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture.

  8. Direct cholangiography and biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Burcharth, F; Kruse, A

    1996-01-01

    Direct cholangiography by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography has greatly improved diagnostic work-up of patients with known or suspected biliary obstruction. These diagnostic procedures were introduced in Denmark in the early 1970s, and technical refinements and clinical research of the methods were initiated. The Danish contribution led to definition of indications for direct cholangiography and general acceptance of the methods in daily clinical practice; nationally as well as internationally. The transhepatic cholangiography with selective catheterization of the biliary ducts permitted external drainage of obstructed ducts. The disadvantages of this technique inspired the innovation of internal biliary drainage and the invention of the biliary endoprosthesis. The endoscopic approach to the biliary tract and the technical improvements of accessory instruments led to the early introduction of therapeutic procedures, i.e. papillotomy, stone removal, biliary drainage and treatment of strictures and post-traumatic lesions. Experimental and clinical research with endoprostheses improved their function and prevented dislodgment. Clinical research documented that biliary drainage by endoprosthesis is a valuable alternative to surgical bypass in patients with inoperable biliary obstructions. Endoscopic therapeutic procedures for common bile duct stones have almost replaced conventional surgical treatment. Endoluminal imaging techniques are under evaluation and may contribute to future improvements.

  9. Prevention of esophageal strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Ohki, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Hosoi, Takahiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have recently been accepted as less invasive methods for treating patients with early esophageal cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia of Barrett’s esophagus. However, the large defects in the esophageal mucosa often cause severe esophageal strictures, which dramatically reduce the patient’s quality of life. Although preventive endoscopic balloon dilatation can reduce dysphagia and the frequency of dilatation, other approaches are necessary to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. This review describes several strategies for preventing esophageal strictures after ESD, with a particular focus on anti-inflammatory and tissue engineering approaches. The local injection of triamcinolone acetonide and other systemic steroid therapies are frequently used to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. Tissue engineering approaches for preventing esophageal strictures have recently been applied in basic research studies. Scaffolds with temporary stents have been applied in five cases, and this technique has been shown to be safe and is anticipated to prevent esophageal strictures. Fabricated autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets to cover the defective mucosa similarly to how commercially available skin products fabricated from epidermal cells are used for skin defects or in cases of intractable ulcers. Fabricated autologous oral-mucosal-epithelial cell sheets have already been shown to be safe. PMID:25386058

  10. Biliary Stent Migration with Duodenal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Muhittin; Mesci, Ayhan; Colak, Taner; Yildirim, Bulent

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal perforation from a migrated biliary stent is a known complication of endoscopic biliary stent placement. We present a case of stent migration and resultant duodenal perforation after stent placement for a malignant biliary stricture in a 52-year-old woman. We review the current literature on the diagnosis and management of stent migration and intestinal perforation after endoscopic stent placement for biliary strictures. A plain abdominal radiograph is necessary for early diagnosis of biliary stent migration. If a stent becomes lodged in the gastrointestinal tract, endoscopic or operative extraction of the stent is necessary to prevent subsequent intestinal perforation and peritonitis. Intestinal perforation secondary to biliary stent dislocation should be considered in all patients presenting with fever and abdominal pain after biliary stent insertion. Any abnormality that prevents stent migration through the intestinal tract such as gastroenterostomy, abdominal wall hernia, extensive adhesions or colonic divertucula may be a contraindication for insertion of a plastic biliary stent because of increased perforation risk. PMID:25610053

  11. Prophylactic stenting for esophageal stricture prevention after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ke-Da; Ji, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of superficial esophageal cancer has been increasingly used as an alternative to surgery because it is minimally invasive and has a high rate of en bloc resection. However, a high rate of esophageal stricture is observed after ESD for large lesions, which can dramatically decrease the patient’s quality of life. Stricture prevention is necessary to allow for endoscopic therapy to expand. We, herein, review the most recent evidence and discuss the role of the metallic self-expandable stent and the biodegradable stent in esophageal stricture prevention. Limited studies suggested that prophylactic stenting could reduce the stricture rate without increasing the number of complications. In addition, the number of bougie dilation procedures was significantly lower with stent placement. Esophageal stenting is a promising option for post-ESD stricture prevention. However, current evidence is too preliminary to formulate practice standards. Future studies are needed to further validate the efficacy and safety of prophylactic stenting and determine the best strategy for stricture prevention. Stent migration is the most common complication. A new stent that has advantages of a low migration rate and minimal tissue reaction will need to be developed. Therefore, randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up periods are required before prophylactic stenting could be considered a valid option to prevent post-ESD stricture. PMID:28246466

  12. Clinical profile and outcome of aluminum phosphide-induced esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Rakesh; Dutta, Usha; Poornachandra, Kuchhangi Sureshchandra; Vaiphei, Kim; Bhagat, Suraj; Nagi, Birinder; Singh, Kartar

    2010-09-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a lethal solid fumigant pesticide which has been recently linked to esophageal stricture formation. This paper aims to study the clinical profile and response to treatment of AlP-induced esophageal strictures. Data on all patients of AlP-induced strictures seen between January 2004 and June 2008 were retrieved and analyzed for clinical parameters and response to endoscopic dilation. Each patient underwent barium swallow to define the site and length of stricture and then was dilated endoscopically. Twelve patients of AlP-induced esophageal stricture (seven males) with a mean age of 26.83+/-8.43 years were evaluated. They had consumed one to three AlP tablets, 4-156 weeks before reporting to us. They had onset of dysphagia within 2 to 8 weeks of ingestion of AlP. Of 14 strictures in 12 patients, seven were in upper third, two in middle third, and five in lower third of esophagus with a mean length of 1.96+/-0.75 cm. Nine patients responded to dilation requiring 5.56+/-2.65 dilations. Four patients were given intralesional steroids to augment the effect of dilation. Three patients failed and were operated upon. All patients remained symptom free over a follow-up of 3-30 (15.67+/-9.41) months. AlP-induced esophageal strictures can be dilated endoscopically in a majority of patients; however, 25% of them require surgical intervention. AlP-induced esophageal strictures, thus, behave like caustic-induced strictures.

  13. [Implantation of plastic and metal stents to biliary tract in obstructive jaundice in material of Surgery Department of 4th Military Clinical Hospital in Wroclaw].

    PubMed

    Janczak, Dariusz; Wieraszko, Artur; Kabziński, Piotr; Janus, Werner; Rać, Jacek; Debski, Jacek; Malinowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    A method of treatment for malignant bile duct strictures depends on early diagnosis, location and extent of tumor infiltration. Patients eligible for radical surgery should be operated. The authors used plastic and metal prostheses in the treatment of biliary tract cancer cholestasis. Retrospective analysis was done in 2730 endoscopies performed in the Laboratory of the Department of Endoscopic Surgery, 4th Military Hospital in Wroclaw in 2008-2011. The authors analyzed 441 cases of prosthetic biliary cancer. 223 patients (51%) were treated for pancreatic head tumor, 98 pts (22%)--for papilla of Vater tumor, 85 pts (19%)--due to Klatskin tumor and 35 pts (8%)--due to tumor of the gallbladder. Plastic prostheses were inserted in 228 (65.4%) patients, self-expanding metal prostheses--in 21 patients (4.9%). Dilatation of the bile duct or the inserted prosthesis was performed in 48 (11.1%) pts. 27 patients (6.1%) had endoscopic treatment failure. 32 patients (7.3%) had following complications of biliary prosthesis: bleeding into the bile duct, into the digestive tract--4 cases (1%), the migration of the prosthesis--7 (1.6%), cholangitis--21 cases (4.7%). Palliative biliary stenting is a safe method that provides efficient drainage of bile. It shows a definitive advantage over percutaneous, biliary transhepatic drainage.

  14. Early biliary complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Malgras, Brice; Duron, Sandrine; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Dokmak, Safi; Aussilhou, Béatrice; Rebours, Vinciane; Palazzo, Maxime; Belghiti, Jacques; Sauvanet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background Early biliary complications (EBC) following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly known. This study aimed to assess incidence, predictive factors, and treatment of EBC including bilio-enteric stricture, transient jaundice, biliary leak, and cholangitis. Method From 2007 to 2011, 352 patients underwent PD. Statistical analysis including logistic regression was performed to determine EBC predictive factors. Results 49 patients (14%) developed 51 EBC, including 7(2%) bilio-enteric strictures, 15(4%) transient jaundices, 9(3%) biliary leaks, and 20(6%) cholangitis with no mortality and a 18% reoperation rate. In multivariate analysis, male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and common bile duct (CBD) diameter ≤5 mm were predictive of EBC. Of the 7 strictures, all were associated with CBD ≤5 mm and 5(71%) required reoperation. Transient jaundice resolved spontaneously in all 15 cases. Among 8 patients with serum bilirubin level >50 μmol/L (3 mg/dL) at POD3, 7(88%) developed bilio-enteric stricture. Biliary leak resolved spontaneously in 5(56%); otherwise, it required reoperation. Cholangitis recurred after antibiotics discontinuation in 5(25%). Conclusions EBC following PD do not increase mortality. EBC are more frequent with male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and CBD ≤5 mm. Transient jaundice or cholangitis has a favorable outcome, whereas bilio-enteric stricture or biliary leak can require reintervention. PMID:27037207

  15. Self-expandable metal stents in malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Jaganmohan, Sathya; Lee, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction can be due to direct tumor infiltration, extrinsic compression, adjacent inflammation, desmoplastic reaction from tumors or, more commonly, a combination of the above factors. Pancreatic cancer is the most common cause of malignant biliary obstruction, and jaundice occurs in 70-90% of the patients during the course of the disease. Compared with the uncovered metal stents, covered metal stents have longer patency and a lower rate of tumor ingrowth, but have a higher rate of stent migration. To combat the occlusion and provide an antitumor effect, drug-eluting stents were developed. A duodenal stricture complicates biliary stent placement in 10-20% of patients with distal biliary obstruction due to pancreatic cancer. When both strictures are considered, a biliary stent can be placed either preceding or following duodenal stent placement. Complications of self-expandable metal stents include stent occlusion, stent migration, cholecystitis and pancreatitis.

  16. Inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment on biliary anatomy not increases biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Wei, Xuyong; Ling, Qi; Wang, Kai; Bao, Haiwei; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2012-04-01

    Accurate assessment of graft bile duct is important to plan surgical procedure. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has become an important diagnostic procedure in evaluation of pancreaticobiliary ductal abnormalities and has been reported as highly accurate. We aim to estimate the efficacy of preoperative MRCP on depicting biliary anatomy in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and to determine whether inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment would increase the biliary complications after LDLT. The data of 118 cases LDLT were recorded. Information from preoperative MRCP was assessed using intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) as the gold standard. The possible risk factors of recipient biliary complications were analyzed. Of 118 donors, 84 had normal anatomy (type A) and 34 had anatomic variants (19 cases of type B, 9 cases of type C, 1 case of type E, 2 cases of type F and 3 cases of type I) confirmed by IOC. MRCP correctly predicted all 84 normal cases and 17 of 34 variant cases, and showed an accuracy of 85.6% (101/118). The incidence of biliary complications was comparable between cases with accurate and inaccurate classification of biliary tree from MRCP, and between cases with normal and variant anatomy of bile duct. While cases with graft duct opening ≤5mm showed a significant higher incidence of total biliary complications (21.1% vs. 6.6%, P=0.028) and biliary stricture (10.5% vs. 1.6%, P=0.041) compared with cases with large duct opening >5mm. MRCP could correctly predict normal but not variant biliary anatomy. Inaccurate assessment of biliary anatomy from MRCP not increases the rate of biliary complications, while small-sized graft duct may cause an increase in biliary complications particularly biliary stricture after LDLT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-Term Results of Percutaneous Bilioenteric Anastomotic Stricture Treatment in Liver-Transplanted Children

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Airton Mota Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Tannuri, Uenis; Suzuki, Lisa; Gibelli, Nelson; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage in children with isolated bilioenteric anastomotic stenosis (BAS) after pediatric liver transplantation. Sixty-four children underwent PTC from March 1993 to May 2008. Nineteen cholangiograms were normal; 10 showed intrahepatic biliary stenosis and BAS, and 35 showed isolated BAS. Cadaveric grafts were used in 19 and living donor grafts in 16 patients. Four patients received a whole liver, and 31 patients received a left lobe or left lateral segment. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed in all patients. Indication for PTC was based on clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings. In patients with isolated BAS, dilation and biliary catheter placement, with changes every 2 months, were performed. Patients were separated into 4 groups according to number of treatment sessions required. The drainage catheter was removed if cholangiogram showed no significant residual stenosis and normal biliary emptying time after a minimum of 6 months. The relationship between risk factors (recipient's weight <10 kg, previous exposure to Cytomegalovirus, donor-recipient sex and weight relations, autoimmune disease as indication for transplantion, previous Kasai's surgery, use of reduced liver grafts, chronic or acute rejection occurrence) and treatment was evaluated. Before PTC, fever was observed in 46%, biliary dilation in 23%, increased bilirubin in 57%, and increased gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in 100% of patients. In the group with BAS, 24 of 35 (69%) patients had histopathologic findings of cholestasis as did 9 of 19 (47%) patients in the group with normal PTC. Of the 35 patients, 23 (65.7%) needed 1 (group I), 7 needed 2 (group II), 4 needed 3 (group III), and 1 needed 4 treatment sessions (group IV). The best results were observed after 1 treatment session, and the mean duration of catheter placement and replacement

  18. Biliary system

    MedlinePlus

    The biliary system creates, moves, stores, and releases bile into the duodenum . This helps the body digest food. It also assists ... from the liver to the duodenum. The biliary system includes: The gallbladder Bile ducts and certain cells ...

  19. Functional Self-Expandable Metal Stents in Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stents are widely used not only for palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction but also for benign biliary diseases. Each plastic stent or self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has its own advantages, and a proper stent should be selected carefully for individual condition. To compensate and overcome several drawbacks of SEMS, functional self-expandable metal stent (FSEMS) has been developed with much progress so far. This article looks into the outcomes and defects of each stent type for benign biliary stricture and describes newly introduced FSEMSs according to their functional categories. PMID:24143314

  20. Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy in segmental biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Gold, J.A.; Gluck, L.; Caride, V.J.; Burrell, M.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    Segmental biliary obstruction as a result of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy has been reported with increasing frequency. For two representative patients, the clinical and Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphic findings in segmetal biliary obstruction are described. The presence of photon-deficient dilated bile ducts in one segment of the biliary tree is highly suggestive of localized biliary obstruction and should be considered in the patient with suspected or proven hepatic malignancy despite the absence of jaundice.

  1. Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy in segmental biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Gold, J.A.; Gluck, L.; Caride, V.J.; Burrell, M.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    Segmental biliary obstruction as a result of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy has been reported with increasing frequency. For two representative patients, the clinical and Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphic findings in segmental biliary obstruction are described. The presence of photon-deficient dilated bile ducts in one segment of the biliary tree is highly suggestive of localized biliary obstruction and should be considered in the patient with suspected or proven hepatic malignancy despite the absence of jaundice.

  2. External biliary fistula.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K

    2001-01-01

    A biliary fistula is almost invariably related to gallstone disease and commonly follows a hurried cholecystectomy by an inexperienced surgeon. This catastrophy which is largely preventable, often necessitates repeated surgical intervention and accrues an estimated 5-year mortality rate approaching 30%. Published series only show a slight increase in the incidence (one per 150-200) after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The injury results from imprecise dissection and inadequate demonstration of the anatomical structures. The diagnosis is usually obvious and persistent tachycardia and hypotension inspite of an adequate intravenous infusion and a normal central venous pressure is another well known indicator of subhepatic collection of bile, which indicates an urgent ultrasonographic scanning of the upper abodmen. ERCP is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool when the continuity of the extra-hepatic biliary system has not been disrupted. An endobiliary stent can be placed across the defect in the same sitting, to tide over the immediate crisis and perhaps treat the patient on a permanent basis. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a non-invasive technique of outlining both the intra and extrahepatic biliary tree, which can provide a better road map of the fistula than an ERCP. The management has to be tailored to the patient's condition and the expertise available. A bilio-enteric anastomosis, performed 4 to 6 months after the initial surgery on a dilated common hepatic duct is more likely to succeed than an operation on a septic, hypoproteinemic patient with sodden, friable, non-dilated bile ducts. On the other hand, waiting for the ducts to dilate in a patient with a complete transection of the bile ducts with complete biliary diversion only leads to depletion of the bile acid pool, severe electrolyte derangement and nutritional failure, leading on to sepsis and death.

  3. Surgical treatment of biliary tract complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lladó, L; Fabregat, J; Baliellas, C; Gonzalez-Castillo, A; Ramos, E; Gonzalez-Vilatarsana, E; Torras, J; Rafecas, A

    2012-01-01

    Biliary strictures are the most common biliary tract complication after liver transplantation. There are scarce data on the results of hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) in the management of biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Thus, the role of surgery in this setting remains to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of patients with biliary complications at our institution. We reviewed 1000 consecutive liver transplantations performed at our institution from 1984 to 2007. We used a prospectively recorded database to identify patients who underwent HJ to treat any biliary tract complication. Overall, 62 patients (6.2%) underwent HJ, 40 for an anastomotic and 7 for a non-anastomotic stricture as well as 15 for biliary leaks. Postoperative morbidity was 16%, and postoperative mortality 1.6%. There were 7 cases of anastomotic stenosis (11.3%). Four patients (5%) required retransplantation. HJ is a safe procedure to manage biliary complications after OLT. It may be the first treatment choice especially for cases with anastomotic strictures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linhui; Wang, Zhixiang; Yang, Bo; Yang, Qing; Sun, Yinghao

    2010-09-01

    The outcome of thulium laser urethrotomy for patients with urethral stricture had not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome of endourethrotomy with the thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. Twenty-one consecutive patients with urethral stricture were evaluated by retrograde uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life preoperatively at a single academic center. All patients were treated with thulium laser urethrotomy. All patients were followed up for 12-24 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram every 3 months. And all patients were followed up by mailed questionnaire, including IPSS and quality of life. Retrograde endoscopic thulium laser urethrotomy was performed in all 21 patients. Most patients (N = 16; 76.2%) did not need any reintervention. Five patients developed recurrent strictures, of them two patients were treated by another laser urethrotomy, one patient was treated by open urethroplasty with buccal mucosa and the other two patients' reintervention were treated by urethral dilation. No intraoperative complications were encountered, although in 9.5% (N = 2) of patients, a urinary tract infection was diagnosed postoperatively. No gross hematuria occurred. Including two patients treated with repeat laser urethrotomy, 17(81.0%) showed good flow of urine (Q(ave)>16.0 ml/second) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU) 12 months after operation. Three (14.3%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Q(ave)<8.0 ml/second) and urethral dilation was done every month or 2 months. There was one patient whose Q(ave) was between 8.0 and 16.0 ml/second. And this patient was treated by neither urethral dilation nor another laser urethrotomy. The thulium laser urethrotomy was a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral stricture. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting in the Management of a Benign Colonic Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ozden, Nuri; Simon, Howard M.; Kobrossi, Semaan; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya

    2016-01-01

    Colonic postanastomotic strictures occur in 1.5–8% of patients following colorectal surgery. Traditionally, colonic strictures were treated by multiple modalities including endoscopic dilatation. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been indicated in the management of benign colonic strictures; however, there are limited available data with regard to their efficacy. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who had perforated sigmoid diverticulitis followed by Hartmann's procedure with eventual reanastomosis 6 months later. He subsequently developed benign colonic stricture, which was treated with a metal stent. SEMS are associated with a low mortality rate and are appropriate in treating acute colonic obstruction as a result of benign stricture in the setting of postanastomosis. PMID:27403114

  6. Classification of Esophageal Strictures following Esophageal Atresia Repair.

    PubMed

    Macchini, Francesco; Parente, Giovanni; Morandi, Anna; Farris, Giorgio; Gentilino, Valerio; Leva, Ernesto

    2017-03-06

    Introduction The aim of this study was to stratify anastomotic strictures (AS) following esophageal atresia (EA) repair and to establish predictors for the need of dilations. Material and Methods A retrospective study on children operated on for EA between 2004 and 2014 was conducted. The stricture index (SI) was measured both radiologically (SIXR) and endoscopically (SIEND). A correlation analysis between the SI and the number of dilations was performed using Spearman's test and linear regression analysis. Results In this study, 40 patients were included: 35 (87.5%) presented with Gross's type C EA, 3 (7.5%) type A, 1 (2.5%) type B, and 1 (2.5%) type D. The mean follow-up time was 101 ± 71.1 months (range: 7.8-232.5, median: 97.6). The mean SIXR was 0.56 ± 0.16 (range: 0.15-0.86). The mean SIEND was 0.45 ± 0.22 (range: 0.15-0.85). Twenty-four patients (60%) underwent a mean of 2 endoscopic dilations (range: 1-9). The number of dilations was poorly correlated with SIXR, while significantly correlated with SIEND. Patients who did not need dilations had a SIEND < 0.33, patients who needed only one dilation had 0.33 ≤ SIEND < 0.44, and those with SIEND ≥ 0.44 needed two or more dilations. No significant association with other clinical variables was found. All patients were asymptomatic at the time of the first endoscopy. Conclusion SIEND is a useful tool to classify AS and can represent a predictor of the need for endoscopic dilation. The role of the SIEND becomes even more important as clinical characteristics have a low predictive value for the development of an AS and the need for subsequent endoscopic esophageal dilatations.

  7. Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent and 6-Year Follow-Up of Biliary Complication After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Doros, Attila Nemeth, Andrea; Deak, Akos Pal; Hartmann, Erika; Gerlei, Zsuzsa; Fazakas, Janos; Kobori, Laszlo

    2010-04-15

    The role of covered stent in the management of biliary complications is not yet defined in liver transplant recipients. This Case Report presents a patient with anastomotic stricture and leakage with biloma treated with a covered stent 32 months following liver transplantation. Signs of in-stent restenosis developed 52 months following covered stent placement, which was resolved by balloon dilation. There were no complications during the interventions. The latest follow-up, at 69 months following primary and 19 months following secondary percutaneous intervention, shows a patent covered stent without any clinical or morphological sign of further restenosis. The clinical success with long-term follow-up data suggests that covered stent implantation can be a rational, minimally invasive option for simultaneous treatment of bile duct stenosis and bile leak following liver transplantation in selected cases.

  8. Double-balloon enteroscopy for ERCP in patients with Billroth II anatomy: results of a large series of papillary large-balloon dilation for biliary stone removal

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Liang; Liu, Nai-Jen; Tang, Jui-Hsiang; Yu, Ming-Chin; Tsui, Yi-Ning; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Lee, Ching-Song; Lin, Cheng-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Data on double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE)-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrphy (ERCP) in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy and the use of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilation (EPLBD) for the removal of common bile duct stones in Billroth II anatomy are limited. The aims of the study were to evaluate the success of DBE-assisted ERCP in patients with Billroth II gastrectomy and examine the efficacy of EPLBD ( ≥ 10 mm) for the removal of common bile duct stones. Patients and methods: A total of 77 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy in whom standard ERCP had failed underwent DBE-assisted ERCP. DBE success was defined as visualizing the papilla and ERCP success as completing the intended intervention. The clinical results of EPLBD for the removal of common bile duct stones were analyzed. Results: DBE was successful in 73 of 77 patients (95 %), and ERCP success was achieved in 67 of these 73 (92 %). Therefore, the rate of successful DBE-assisted ERCP was 87 % (67 of a total of 77 patients). The reasons for ERCP failure (n = 10) included tumor obstruction (n = 2), adhesion obstruction (n = 2), failed cannulation (n = 3), failed stone removal (n = 2), and bowel perforation (n = 1). Overall DBE-assisted ERCP complications occurred in 5 of 77 patients (6.5 %). A total of 48 patients (34 male, mean age 75.5 years) with common bile duct stones underwent EPLBD. Complete stone removal in the first session was accomplished in 36 patients (75 %); mechanical lithotripsy was required in 1 patient. EPLBD-related mild perforation occurred in 2 patients (4 %). No acute pancreatitis occurred. Conclusions: DBE permits therapeutic ERCP in patients who have a difficult Billroth II gastrectomy with a high success rate and acceptable complication rates. EPLBD is effective and safe for the removal of common bile duct stones in patients with Billroth II anatomy. PMID:26171434

  9. [Biliary ascariasis].

    PubMed

    Mensing, M; Cruz y Rivero, M A; Alarcon Hernandez, C; Garcia Himmelstine, L; Vogel, H

    1986-06-01

    Biliary ascariasis is a complication of intestinal ascariasis. This results in characteristic findings in the intravenous cholangiocholecystogram and in the sonogram. Characteristic signs of biliary ascariasis are, in the longitudinal section, the "strip sign", "spaghetti sign", "inner tube sign", and in transverse section "a bull's eye in the triple O". The helminth can travel from out of the biliary duct system back into the intestines, so that control examinations can even be negative.

  10. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  11. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  12. A novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles prolongs the unobstructed period and survival via anti-bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuchun; Ren, Zhigang; Chai, Qinming; Cui, Guangying; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hanjian; Feng, Zhiying; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic biliary stricture causes life-threatening complications, such as jaundice, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are gaining acceptance for treatments of benign biliary stricture and palliative management of malignant biliary obstructions. However, the high rate of FCSEMS obstruction limits their clinic use. In this study, we developed a novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and investigated its efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We first identified properties of the AgNP complex using ultraviolet detection. The AgNP complex was stable without AgNP agglomeration, and Ag abundance was correspondingly increased with an increased bilayer number. The AgNP biliary stent demonstrated good performance in the spin-assembly method based on topographic observation. The AgNP biliary stent also exhibited a long-term anti-coagulation effect and a slow process of Ag+ release. In vitro anti-bacteria experiments indicated that the AgNP biliary stent exhibited high-efficiency anti-bacterial activity for both short- and long-term periods. Importantly, application of the AgNP biliary stent significantly prolonged the unobstructed period of the biliary system and improved survival in preclinical studies as a result of its anti-microbial activity and decreased granular tissue formation on the surface of the anastomotic biliary, providing a novel and effective treatment strategy for symptomatic biliary strictures. PMID:26883081

  13. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Mehmet; Sertkaya, Zulfu; Koca, Orhan; Calıskan, Selahattin; Kutluhan, Musab Ali; Karaman, Muhammet Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US) were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors. PMID:27256189

  14. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  15. Topical mitomycin C can effectively alleviate dysphagia in children with long-segment caustic esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    El-Asmar, K M; Hassan, M A; Abdelkader, H M; Hamza, A F

    2015-07-01

    Caustic ingestion in children and the resulting long esophageal strictures are usually difficult to be managed, and eventually, esophageal replacement was required for cases refractory to frequent dilatation sessions. Topical mitomycin C (MMC) application has been used recently to improve the results of endoscopic dilatation for short esophageal strictures. The study aims to assess the role of MMC application in management of long-segment caustic esophageal strictures. From January 2009 to June December 2013, patients presented with long caustic esophageal stricture (>3 cm in length) were included in this study and subjected to topical MMC application after endoscopic esophageal dilatation on multiple sessions. Regular follow-up and re-evaluation were done. A dysphagia score was used for close follow-up clinically; verification was done radiologically and endoscopically. During the specified follow-up period, 21 patients with long caustic esophageal stricture were subjected to topical MMC application sessions. Clinical, radiological, and endoscopic resolution of strictures occurred in 18 patients (85.7% cure rate). Number of dilatation sessions to achieve resolution of dysphagia was (n = 14.3 ± 5.7) with application of mitomycin two to six times. There was no recurrence in short- and mid-term follow-up. No complications were encountered related to topical MMC application. MMC is a promising agent in management of long-segment caustic esophageal strictures. Long-term follow-up is needed to prove its efficacy and to evaluate potential long-term side-effects of MMC application.

  16. Diagnosis of pancreaticobiliary malignancy by detection of minichromosome maintenance protein 5 in biliary brush cytology

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Margaret G; Huggett, Matthew T; Chapman, Michael H; Johnson, Gavin J; Webster, George J; Thorburn, Douglas; Mackay, James; Pereira, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    Background: Biliary brush cytology is the standard method of evaluating biliary strictures, but is insensitive at detecting malignancy. In pancreaticobiliary cancer minichromosome maintenance replication proteins (MCM 2–7) are dysregulated in the biliary epithelium and MCM5 levels are elevated in bile samples. This study aimed to validate an immunocolorimetric ELISA assay for MCM5 as a pancreaticobiliary cancer biomarker in biliary brush samples. Methods: Biliary brush specimens were collected prospectively at ERCP from patients with a biliary stricture. Collected samples were frozen at −80 °C. The supernatant was washed and lysed cells incubated with HRP-labelled anti-MCM5 mouse monoclonal antibody. Test positivity was determined by optical density absorbance. Patients underwent biliary brush cytology or additional investigations as per clinical routine. Results: Ninety-seven patients were included in the study; 50 had malignant strictures. Median age was 65 years (range 21–94) and 51 were male. Compared with final diagnosis the MCM5 assay had a sensitivity for malignancy of 65.4% compared with 25.0% for cytology. In the 72 patients with paired MCM5 assay and biliary brush cytology, MCM5 demonstrated an improved sensitivity (55.6% vs 25.0% P=0.0002) for the detection of malignancy. Conclusions: Minichromosome maintenance replication protein5 is a more sensitive indicator of pancreaticobiliary malignancy than standard biliary brush cytology. PMID:28081547

  17. Endoscopic Stents for the Biliary Tree and Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthi, Rajesh; Jayaraj, Mahendran; Kozarek, Richard

    2017-07-20

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the recently published literature on biliary and pancreatic stents. Covered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are increasingly being used in the endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures. Given the costs associated with SEMS, plastic stents are still the most commonly used stents. In this setting, SEMS are preferred over plastic stents for palliation of malignant biliary strictures due to superior patency and have a role in preoperative management of malignant biliary strictures. While plastic stents are predominantly used for management of pancreatic strictures, newer endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided lumen-apposing SEMS have been increasingly used in management of pancreatic fluid collections. EUS-guided SEMS also enable safe transmural drainage of gall bladder and bile ducts in benign and malignant conditions. Endoscopic management is the first line treatment for multiple pancreatobiliary disorders. EUS-guided interventions have widened the scope of endoscopic management and decreased the need for surgical intervention. Further studies are needed to determine the safety and cost effectiveness of SEMS in benign pancreatic disorders.

  18. Establishment of the U.L.T.R.A. measurement rating system for anterior urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Hou, Rui; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Xinru; Li, Diancheng; Chen, Jie; Hu, Bing

    2017-07-01

    Anterior urethral stricture treatments are various, and comprehensive consideration should be given in selecting individualized treatment programs, which must be combined with the patient's stricture, length, complexity, and other factors. At present, there is no standard for the clinical description of the anterior urethral stricture for the selection of the characteristic index, and most of the indicators are qualitative information. In order to achieve consistent decisions and effective comparisons, it is imperative to establish a standardized description system. We used ultrasound contrast technology in the diagnosis of urethral stricture to establish a reliable measurement scoring system, for the refinement grading of the treatment, so as to objectively guide the establishment of treatment decisions. A retrospective search of PubMed English literatures on anterior urethral stricture (January 1975-September 2016) was conducted, combined with a large number of clinical practice experience. We screened the five most closely related and highly repeatable anatomical characteristic indicators of anterior urethral stricture as a base of establishing the U.L.T.R.A. measurement scoring system. With the evaluation system, individualized cases can be made according to the severity of the stenosis preoperative pathological state from the five aspects of refinement grading, and estimated results of the success rate and prognosis of different surgical treatments for patients according to the score. The evaluation system consists of five indicators: (U) urethral stricture site, (L) length, (T) urethral stricture scar thickness, (R) stricture and stricture with a 10-mm proximal urethral dilatation ratio (stricture diameter ratio for short), and (A) alone urethral stricture or multiple urethral stricture; as well as other characteristics. Suffix (l) refers specifically to anterior urethral stricture due to the lichen sclerosus. The U.L.T.R.A. measurement scoring system

  19. Management of biliary and duodenal complications of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vijungco, Joseph D; Prinz, Richard A

    2003-11-01

    Biliary stricture and duodenal obstruction have been increasingly recognized as complications of chronic pancreatitis. The anatomical relationship of the distal common bile duct and the duodenum with the head of the pancreas is the main factor for their involvement in chronic pancreatitis. In hospitalized patients with pancreatitis, the incidence of biliary stricture and duodenal obstruction is reported to be about 6% and 1.2%, respectively. For patients requiring an operation for chronic pancreatitis the incidence increases to 35% for biliary stricture and 12% for duodenal obstruction. Fibrosis around the distal common bile duct can cause stenosis with obstruction of bile flow. Clinically, the presentation of these patients ranges from being asymptomatic with elevated alkaline phosphatase or bilirubin, or both, to being septic with cholangitis. Jaundice, cholangitis, hyperbilirubinemia, and persistent elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase occur more frequently in patients with pancreatitis with a biliary stricture. A twofold elevation of alkaline phosphatase is a marker of possible common duct stenosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of both biliary cirrhosis and cholangitis in these patients is about 10%. ERCP reveals a characteristic long, smoothly tapered stricture of the intrapancreatic common bile duct. In duodenal obstruction, the factors that convert self-limiting edema to chronic fibrosis and stricture formation are unknown, but ischemia superimposed on inflammation may be the major cause. These patients present with a prolonged history of nausea and vomiting. Barium studies typically show a long constricting lesion of the duodenum, and endoscopy reveals reactive inflammatory changes in a narrowed duodenum. Operation is indicated in patients with common bile duct strictures secondary to chronic pancreatitis when there is evidence of cholangitis, biliary cirrhosis, common duct stones, progression of stricture, elevation of alkaline

  20. A retrospective analysis of early and late outcome of biodegradable stent placement in the management of refractory anastomotic colorectal strictures.

    PubMed

    Repici, A; Pagano, N; Rando, G; Carlino, A; Vitetta, E; Ferrara, E; Strangio, G; Zullo, A; Hassan, C

    2013-07-01

    Benign colorectal strictures are treated conventionally by endoscopic dilation. Experience using SEMS for benign colonic strictures is limited, and outcomes to date have been disappointing. Refractory colorectal strictures remain challenging to be treated with surgery. Polydioxanone-based stent are biodegradable (BD) stent CE approved for esophageal strictures. This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the safety and the efficacy of these stents for the management of strictures refractory to multiple sessions of dilation. Patients with postsurgical benign strictures located within 20 cm from anal verge, refractory to mechanical or pneumatic dilation (at least 3 sessions) were included in this analysis. Clinical success was defined as the absence of occlusive symptoms and the ability to pass through the stricture with a regular size colonoscope. All patients were predilated before stent placement. Stents were released under fluoroscopic control. All patients were under stool softeners for 3 months. Follow-up was scheduled with endoscopic and fluoroscopic controls within 90 days from stent deployment and afterwards by telephone interview and/or ambulatory consultation. Eleven patients (7 males, mean age 62.3 ± 8.5 years) were included. Technical success was achieved in all the patients. Stent migration was observed in four patients within the first 2 weeks after stent placement. Stent migration was followed by recurrence of stricture and obstructive symptoms in all the cases. Among the seven patients who completed the process of stent biodegradation, five of them had complete resolution of the stricture and relief of symptoms. Two of 11 patients required surgical treatment during the follow-up period (mean 19.8 (range 42-15) months). The overall success rate of the BD stent was 45 %. This retrospective analysis of a limited number of patients demonstrated that nondedicated esophageal BD stents are associated with high risk of migration and clinical

  1. Evaluation of risk factors and treatment options in patients with ureteral stricture disease at a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Henry; Arsovska, Olga; Paterson, Ryan F.; Chew, Ben H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ureteral strictures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, resulting in potential kidney damage requiring several surgical procedures. Non-malignant causes include radiation, trauma from calculi impaction, pelvic surgery, or ureteroscopy (URS). We identified risk factors in our patients with ureteral strictures and the success of their treatment outcomes. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 25 patients with 29 ureteral strictures was performed to determine the success of their treatment. Results: Twenty-five (25) patients with 29 benign ureteral strictures were identified. Most cases (60%) were caused by impacted stones where the median stone size was 1.15 cm (0.37–1.8 cm). Intervention for stones prior to stricture development included shockwave lithotripsy, URS, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Five patients with strictures from impacted stones had ureteric complications during stone treatment including perforation +/− urinoma (n=3), fractured guidewire left in situ (n=1), and ureteric orifice resection (n=1). Other stricture etiologies included radiation (28%) and endometriosis (4%). Treatment modalities used included ureteroureterostomy (n=2), ureteral re-implant (n=3), urinary diversion (n=3), autotrasplant (n=1), laser endoureterotomy +/− balloon dilation (n=8), nephrectomy (n=2), balloon dilation +/− stent (n=3), ureterovesical junction (UVJ) resection + stent (n=1), chronic stent changes (n=4), or surveillance (n=3). Conclusions: Our evaluation highlights important principles. Patients with complicated ureteroscopies or severely impacted calculi warrant close followup with imaging after stone treatment due to possibility of rapid renal deterioration from stricture formation. Radiation-induced strictures are difficult to manage, possibly requiring subsequent urinary diversion. Finally, endoscopic management of benign ureteral strictures via balloon dilation and laser endoureterotomy is an excellent choice in properly

  2. Health-Care Utilization and Complications of Endoscopic Esophageal Dilation in a National Population

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Yadlapati, Sujani; Singh, Shailender

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal stricture is usually managed with outpatient endoscopic dilation. However, patients with food impaction or failure to thrive undergo inpatient dilation. Esophageal perforation is the most feared complication, and its risk in inpatient setting is unknown. Methods We used National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for 2007–2013. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify patients with esophageal strictures. Logistic regression was used to assess association between hospital/patient characteristics and utilization of esophageal dilation. Results There were 591,187 hospitalizations involving esophageal stricture; 4.2% were malignant. Endoscopic dilation was performed in 28.7% cases. Dilation was more frequently utilized (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; p<0.001), had higher in-hospital mortality (3.1% vs. 1.4%, p<0.001), and resulted in longer hospital stays (5 days vs. 4 days, p=0.01), among cases of malignant strictures. Esophageal perforation was more common in the malignant group (0.9% vs. 0.5%, p=0.007). Patients with malignant compared to benign strictures undergoing dilation were more likely to require percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/J) tube (14.1% vs. 4.5%, p<0.001). Palliative care services were utilized more frequently in malignant stricture cases not treated with dilation compared to those that were dilated. Conclusions Inpatient endoscopic dilation was utilized in 29% cases of esophageal stricture. Esophageal perforation, although infrequent, is more common in malignant strictures. PMID:28301921

  3. Long-Term Placement of Subcutaneous Ruesch-Type Stents for Double Biliary Stenosis in a Living-Donor Liver Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Adani, Gian Luigi Baccarani, Umberto; Lorenzin, Dario; Risaliti, Andrea; Como, Giuseppe; Gasparini, Daniele; Sponza, Massimo; Bresadola, Vittorio; Bresadola, Fabrizio

    2007-04-15

    Biliary reconstruction continues to be a major source of morbidity following liver transplantation. The spectrum of biliary complications is evolving due to the increasing number of split-liver and living-donor liver transplantation, which are even associated with a higher incidence of biliary complications. Bile duct strictures are the most common cause of late biliary complications and account for up to 40% of all biliary complications. Optimal therapy for posttransplantation anastomotic biliary strictures remains uncertain and requires a multidisciplinary approach. We report the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male affected by hepatocarcinoma and hepatitis C-related cirrhosis who underwent right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation from his son complicated by double anastomotic stenosis of the main right hepatic duct and of an accessory biliary duct draining segments 6 and 7 of the graft that was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with long-term subcutaneous placement of two internal Ruesch-type biliary stents.

  4. Surgical tips and tricks during urethroplasty for bulbar urethral strictures focusing on accurate localisation of the stricture: results from a tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tricia L C; Venugopal, Suresh; Inman, Richard D; Chapple, Christopher R

    2015-04-01

    There are several techniques for characterising and localising an anterior urethral stricture, such as preoperative retrograde urethrography, ultrasonography, and endoscopy. However, these techniques have some limitations. The final determinant is intraoperative assessment, as this yields the most information and defines what surgical procedure is undertaken. We present our intraoperative approach for localising and operating on a urethral stricture, with assessment of outcomes. A retrospective review of urethral strictures operated was carried out. All patients had a bulbar or bulbomembranous urethroplasty. All patients were referred to a tertiary centre and operated on by two urethral reconstructive surgeons. Intraoperative identification of the stricture was performed by cystoscopy. The location of the stricture is demonstrated externally on the urethra by external transillumination of the urethra and comparison with the endoscopic picture. This is combined with accurate placement of a suture through the urethra, at the distal extremity of the stricture, verified precisely by endoscopy. Clinical data were collected in a dedicated database. Intraoperative details and postoperative follow-up data for each patient were recorded and analysed. A descriptive data analysis was performed. A representative group of 35 male patients who had surgery for bulbar stricture was randomly selected from January 2010 to December 2013. Mean follow-up was 13.8 mo (range 2-43 mo). Mean age was 46.5 yr (range 17-70 yr). Three patients had undergone previous urethroplasty and 26 patients had previous urethrotomy or dilatation. All patients had preoperative retrograde urethrography and most (85.7%) had endoscopic assessment. The majority of patients (48.6%) had a stricture length of >2-7 cm and 45.7% of patients required a buccal mucosa graft. There were no intraoperative complications. Postoperatively, two patients had a urinary tract infection. All patients were assessed

  5. Biliary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 356. Suchy FJ. Anatomy, histology, embryology, developmental anomalies, and pediatric disorders of the biliary ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Total laparoscopic Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunostomy for the treatment of biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dexing; Zhu, Andong; Zhang, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunostomy (RCJS) has been widely used in biliary bypass surgeries, but in most reported literature, an assisted miniincision was needed, and studies reporting total laparoscopic Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunostomy (TLRCJS) are rare. The goal of this study was to investigate how to treat hepatic portal bile duct diseases and perform jejunojejunostomy and cholangiojejunostomy totally laparoscopically. We evaluated the feasibility of TLRCJS in treating biliary tract diseases. TLRCJS were performed in 103 patients from January 2000 to August 2011. There were 28 cases of recurrent choledocholithiasis combined with stricture of the common bile duct (CBD) after several stone extractions, 3 patients with iatrogenic bile duct injury, 24 patients with choledochal cyst, 36 patients with hepatic portal cholangiocarcinoma, and 12 patients with cancer of the pancreatic head and periampullary cancer. All surgeries were performed through 5 trocars. First, laparoscopic surgery on the CBD was performed according to the original disease. The CBD was opened and stones were extracted in choledocholithiasis patients. In iatrogenic injury patients, strictured CBD was resected and repaired. Dilated CBD or choledochal cyst with tumor was transected. In patients with malignant jaundice, the CBD was opened longitudinally. At the same time, the bile duct was prepared for cholangiojejunostomy. Second, the positions of the laparoscope and surgeons were altered. The jejunal mesentery and jejunum were transected, and side-to-side jejunojejunostomy (JJS) was performed. The laparoscope and surgeon positions were exchanged again; the Rouxen-Y biliary limb was lifted close to the residual bile duct; and side-to-side or end-to-side choledochojejunostomy (CJS) was performed. Finally, an abdominal drainage tube was placed. All the surgeries were performed successfully. The diameter of the residual bile duct ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 cm (average, 0.9 cm). Three patients had postoperative

  7. Hybrid therapy with locoregional steroid injection and polyglycolic acid sheets to prevent stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nagami, Yasuaki; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Ominami, Masaki; Fukunaga, Shusei; Sugimori, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Toshio; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The incidence of stricture formation caused by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for widespread lesions is high, and stricture formation can reduce quality of life. We evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of hybrid therapy using a locoregional steroid injection and polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets with fibrin glue to prevent stricture formation after esophageal ESD in high risk patients in whom we predicted stricture formation would be difficult to prevent with a single prophylactic steroid injection. Methods: Ten patients who underwent esophageal ESD were enrolled (entire-circumference: n = 6; sub-circumference, more than 5/6 of the circumference: n = 4). A single locoregional steroid injection and PGA sheets with fibrin glue were used after ESD. We evaluated the incidence of stricture formation, the number of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) procedures needed to treat the stricture formation, and adverse events of the therapy. Results: Esophageal stricture formation occurred in 50.0 % of patients (5/10) (median EBD sessions 0.5, range 0 – 16). Subanalysis showed that stricture formation occurred in 37.5 % of patients (3/8) excluded the lesions located near a previous scar from ESD or surgical anastomosis site (median EBD sessions 0, range 0 – 4). Conclusion: Hybrid therapy using a locoregional steroid injection and PGA sheets with fibrin glue may have the potential to prevent esophageal stricture formation after esophageal ESD in high risk patients. PMID:27652294

  8. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  9. [An unusual complication of hepatocellular carcinoma: the pleuro-biliary fistula].

    PubMed

    Tirotta, Daniela; Durante, Vittorio

    2009-02-01

    A patient with hepatocellular carcinoma had fever, cough, dyspnea. The analysis and the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) showed leucocytosis, cholestasis and pleural viscous fluid with bilirubin. The patient was stabilized and two chest tube were placed. Abdomen CT demonstrated dilated bile duct and pleuro-biliary fistula: dilated bile duct, necrosis and portal thrombus were predictive for TACE-induced pleuro-biliary fistula.

  10. Role of endoscopy in the conservative management of biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lisotti, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Caletti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients receiving liver transplantation could be significantly affected by biliary complications, including strictures, leaks, stones and bilomas; early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions lead to markedly reduction in morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic gold standard is represented by conservative approaches, both endoscopic and percutaneous, based on the type of biliary reconstruction, the local availability of the procedures and specific expertise. In patients with previous transplantation, the difficult biliary access and the possible presence of concomitant complications (mainly strictures) further restrict the efficacy of the endoscopic and percutaneous treatments; on the other hand, surgery should generally be avoided because of the even increased morbidity and mortality due to technical and clinical issues. Here we review the most common biliary complications occurring after liver transplantation and discuss available treatment options including future perspectives such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access in patients with Roux-en-Y choledocho-jejunostomy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for difficult stones. PMID:26730271

  11. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  12. Biliary complications after right lobe living donor liver transplantation: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Onur; Dayangac, Murat; Akyildiz, Murat; Demirbas, Tolga; Guler, Necdet; Bulutcu, Fisun; Bassullu, Nuray; Akun, Elif; Yuzer, Yildiray; Tokat, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Background Biliary complications that developed after right lobe liver transplantation from living donors were studied in a single centre. Methods From 2004 to 2010, 200 consecutive living donor right lobe liver transplantations were performed. The database was evaluated retrospectively. Biliary complications were diagnosed according to clinical, biochemical and radiological tests. The number of biliary ducts in the transplanted graft, the surgical techniques used for anastomosis, biliary strictures and bile leakage rates were analysed. Results Of a total of 200 grafts, 117 invloved a single bile duct, 77 had two bile ducts and in six grafts there were three bile ducts. In 166 transplants, the anastomosis was performed as a single duct to duct, in 21 transplants double duct to ducts, in one transplant, three duct to ducts and in 12 transplants as a Roux-en-Y reconstruction. In all, 40 bile leakages (20%) and 17 biliary strictures (8.5%) were observed in 49 patients resulting in a total of 57 biliary complications (28.5%). Seventeen patients were re-operated (12 as a result of bile leakages and five owing to biliary strictures). Conclusion Identification of more than one biliary orifice in the graft resulted in an increase in the complication rates. In grafts containing multiple orifices, performing multiple duct-to-duct (DD) or Roux-en-Y anastomoses led to a lower number of complications. PMID:22151451

  13. Completely obstructed colorectal anastomosis: a new non-electrosurgical endoscopic approach before balloon dilatation.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Gabriele; Spada, Marco; di Francesco, Fabrizio; Tarantino, Ilaria; Barresi, Luca; Burgio, Gaetano; Traina, Mario

    2010-10-07

    Benign stricture is a relatively common complication of colorectal anastomosis after low anterior resection. On occasion, the anastomosis may close completely. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been described, but there is a lack of data from controlled prospective trials as to the optimal approach. Through-the-scope balloon dilatation is well known and easy to perform. Some case reports describe different endoscopic approaches, including endoscopic electrocision with a papillotomy knife or hook knife. We report a case of a colorectal anastomosis web occlusion, treated without electrocision. Gastrografin enema and sigmoidoscopy showed complete obstruction at the anastomotic site due to the presence of an anastomotic occlusive web. In order to avoid thermal injuries, we decided to use a suprapapillary biliary puncture catheter. The Artifon catheter was inserted into the center of the circular staple line at the level of the anastomosis, and fluoroscopic identification of the proximal bowel was obtained with dye injection. A 0.025-inch guidewire was then passed through the catheter into the colon and progressive pneumatic dilatation was performed. The successful destruction of the occlusive web facilitated passage of the colonoscope, allowing evaluation of the entire colon and stoma closure after three months of follow-up. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with no complications. This report highlights an alternative non-electrosurgical approach that uses a new device that proved to be safe and useful.

  14. The management of bulbar urethral stricture disease before referral for definitive repair: have practice patterns changed?

    PubMed

    Granieri, Michael A; Peterson, Andrew C

    2014-10-01

    To describe the management of patients with bulbar urethral stricture disease before referral for definitive urethroplasty and determine if practice patterns have changed with respect to endoscopic interventions. We performed an institutional review board-approved retrospective review and recorded patient demographics, stricture-related information, and all procedures performed for bulbar urethral stricture disease before initial presentation at our institution. Included procedures were: UroLume stent (AMS, Minnetonka, MN), laser urethrotomy, direct visual urethrotomy (DVIU), and dilation of urethral stricture. Patients with prior urethroplasty were excluded. We compared the differences between procedures when stratified by stricture length. We identified 363 men who underwent urethroplasty for bulbar urethral stricture disease from January 1996 to September 2011. Of the total, 235 men (65%) had a prior DVIU, whereas 65 of these men (28%) had multiple DVIUs. One hundred ninety-nine men (55%) had a prior dilation and 155 of these men (78%) had multiple dilations. The remaining procedures consisted of laser urethrotomy (6; 2%), and UroLume stent (4; 1%). Twenty-four patients (6%) had no procedures before referral. There was no statistically significant difference between numbers of prior procedures when stratified by stricture length. From 1996 to 2010, there was no appreciable change in number of procedures before referral, with ∼ 70% of patients with ≥ 2 prior procedures. Our institution has not seen a measurable change in practice patterns before referral from 1996 to 2010. Future studies are needed to determine if the change in referral patterns in 2011 represents a future trend. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Percutaneous Transhepatic Use of a Cutting Balloon in the Treatment of a Benign Common Bile Duct Stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Kakani, Nirmal K.; Puckett, Mark; Cooper, Martin; Watkinson, Anthony

    2006-06-15

    Benign biliary strictures (BBS) are difficult to treat. The majority of them are treated either endoscopically or using percutaneous techniques either with stents or conventional angioplasty balloons. To our knowledge we present the first case of use of a cutting balloon in the treatment of BBS through a percutaneous approach.

  16. Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Itai Y.; Tasaka, A.

    1981-12-01

    Twenty-nine patients showed localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts on computed tomography, usually unaccompanied by jaundice. Congenital dilatation was diagnosed when associated with a choledochal cyst, while cholangiographic contrast material was helpful in differentiating such dilatation from a simple cyst by showing its communication with the biliary tract when no choledochal cyst was present. Obstructive dilatation was associated with intrahepatic calculi in 4 cases, hepatoma in 9, cholangioma in 5, metastatic tumor in 5, and polycystic disease in 2. Cholangioma and intrahepatic calculi had a greater tendency to accompany such localized dilatation; in 2 cases, the dilatation was the only clue to the underlying disorder.

  17. Biliary mucinous cystic neoplasm: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mohammad Taghi; Shahrokh, Shabnam; Miri, Mohammad Bagher; Foroughi, Forough; Sadeghi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary cystadenomas (HBC) is a rare neoplasm which comprising less than one percent of liver cystic neoplasms. Although it’s known as a benign tumor, but they have a potential for neoplastic transformation. Making a proper diagnosis and ruling out of other differential diagnosis is important because of different treatment. In the present study, we described a case of HBC manifested as idiopathic dominant biliary stricture in common hepatic duct (CHD), on the basis of spiral CT scan and MRI, and elevated CA19-9. With a probable diagnosis of malignant biliary stricture, she underwent ERCP and cholangioscopy that were non-diagnostic and final diagnosis was made surgically. HBCs usually found incicentally as a cystic lesion and biliary stricture without visible cyst in imaging like that seen in cholangiocarcinoma is very unlikely. In truth, this patient is an unusual manifestation of one rare disease. PMID:28224034

  18. Radiopaque biodegradable stent for duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yoshisato; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Mikuriya, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Shintaro; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Taniura, Tokunori; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    Biliary stricture is a common cause of morbidity after liver transplantation. We previously developed a duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis technique using a biodegradable stent tube and confirmed the feasibility and safety of biliary stent use. However, the duration and mechanism of biliary stent absorption in the common bile duct remain unclear. Radiopaque biodegradable biliary stents were created using a copolymer of L-lactide and ε-caprolactone (70: 30) and coated with barium sulfate. Stents were surgically implanted in the common bile duct of 11 pigs. Liver function tests and computed tomography (CT) scans were performed postoperatively, and autopsies were conducted 6 months after biliary stent implantation. After the surgery, all 11 pigs had normal liver function and survived without any significant complications such as biliary leakage. A CT scan at 2 months post-procedure showed that the biliary stents were located in the hilum of the liver. The stents were not visible by CT scan at the 6-month follow-up examination. The surgical implantation of radiopaque biodegradable biliary stents in biliary surgery represents a new option for duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction. This technique appears to be feasible and safe and is not associated with any significant biliary complications. The advantage of coated biliary stent use is that it may be visualized using abdominal radiography such as CT.

  19. Biliary cystadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bartolome, Miguel A Hernandez; Ruiz, Sagrario Fuerte; Romero, Israel Manzanedo; Lojo, Beatriz Ramos; Prieto, Ignacio Rodriguez; Alvira, Luis Gimenez; Carreño, Rosario Granados; Esteban, Manuel Limones

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of cystadenoma is rare, even more so when located in the extrahepatic bile duct. Unspecific clinical signs may lead this pathology to be misdiagnosed. The need for pathological anatomy in order to distinguish cystadenomas from simple biliary cysts is crucial. The most usual treatment nowadays is resection of the bile duct, together with cholecystectomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction. PMID:19630118

  20. Biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chardot, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease characterised by a biliary obstruction of unknown origin that presents in the neonatal period. It is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in this age group. BA occurs in approximately 1/18,000 live births in Western Europe. In the world, the reported incidence varies from 5/100,000 to 32/100,000 live births, and is highest in Asia and the Pacific region. Females are affected slightly more often than males. The common histopathological picture is one of inflammatory damage to the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts with sclerosis and narrowing or even obliteration of the biliary tree. Untreated, this condition leads to cirrhosis and death within the first years of life. BA is not known to be a hereditary condition. No primary medical treatment is relevant for the management of BA. Once BA suspected, surgical intervention (Kasai portoenterostomy) should be performed as soon as possible as operations performed early in life is more likely to be successful. Liver transplantation may be needed later if the Kasai operation fails to restore the biliary flow or if cirrhotic complications occur. At present, approximately 90% of BA patients survive and the majority have normal quality of life. PMID:16872500

  1. Urethral Strictures and Stenoses Caused by Prostate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mang L.; Correa, Andres F.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is on the rise. As a result, the volume of prostate treatment and treatment-related complications is also increasing. Urethral strictures and stenoses are relatively common complications that require individualized management based on the length and location of the obstruction, and the patient’s overall health, and goals of care. In general, less invasive options such as dilation and urethrotomy are preferred as first-line therapy, followed by more invasive substitution, flap, and anastomotic urethroplasty. PMID:27601967

  2. A comparative evaluation of early stent occlusion among biliary conventional versus wing stents.

    PubMed

    Khashab, Mouen A; Hutfless, Susan; Kim, Katherine; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Jagannath, Sanjay B; Okolo, Patrick I; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-06-01

    Conventional plastic stents with a lumen typically have limited patency. The lumenless wing stent was engineered to overcome this problem. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of early stent occlusion (symptomatic occlusion/cholangitis necessitating re-insertion within 90 days) for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Patients with biliary pathology treated with plastic biliary stenting during the period 2003-2009 comprised the study cohort. Patients who had at least one biliary wing stent placed comprised the wing stent group, whereas patients who underwent only conventional stent plastic placement comprised the conventional stent group. Patients were stratified by indication: benign biliary strictures (group 1), malignant biliary strictures (group 2), or benign biliary non-stricture pathology (group 3). The association of stent type with the occurrence of primary outcome by indication was analyzed by use of multivariable logistic regression. Three-hundred and forty-six patients underwent 612 ERCP procedures with placement of plastic biliary stent(s). On multivariate analysis, early stent occlusion did not differ between the wing and conventional groups in groups 1, 2, and 3. Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 2, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (6.7% vs. 39.1%, P = 0.03). Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 3, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (10% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). Early stent occlusion was similar for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Wing stents, however, were associated with a lower incidence of cholangitis in patients with malignant biliary obstruction and benign non-stricturing biliary pathology.

  3. Challenges in the Diagnosis and Management of Acquired Nontraumatic Urethral Strictures in Boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mouafo Tambo, F. F.; Fossi kamga, G.; Kamadjou, C.; Mbouche, L.; Nwaha Makon, A. S.; Birraux, J.; Andze, O. G.; Angwafo, F. F.; Mure, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Urethral strictures in boys denote narrowing of the urethra which can be congenital or acquired. In case of acquired strictures, the etiology is iatrogenic or traumatic and rarely infectious or inflammatory. The aim of this study was to highlight the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of acquired nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methodology. The authors report five cases of nontraumatic urethral strictures managed at the Pediatric Surgery Department of the YGOPH over a two-year period (November 2012–November 2014). In order to confirm the diagnosis of urethral stricture, all patients were assessed with both cystourethrography and urethrocystoscopy. Results. In all the cases the urethra was inflammatory with either a single or multiple strictures. The surgical management included internal urethrotomy (n = 1), urethral dilatation (n = 1), vesicostomy (n = 2), and urethral catheterization (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 8.2 months (4–16 months) all patients remained symptoms-free. Conclusion. The authors report the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis and management of nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys at a tertiary hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The existence of an inflammatory etiology of urethral strictures in boys deserves to be considered. PMID:27239364

  4. Topical application of mitomycin C in the treatment of esophageal and tracheobronchial stricture: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Daher, Paul; Riachy, Edward; Georges, Beyrouthy; Georges, Dabar; Adib, Moukarzel

    2007-09-01

    We present 2 cases of successful treatment of recurrent anastomotic strictures using a topical application of mitomycin C. In the first case, a 4-year-old boy had a cervical cyst excised, which appeared to be an ectopic gastric mucosa. He consequently presented severe stenosis at the origin of the cervical esophagus that needed repeated balloon dilatations. The second case is about a 12-year-old girl who presented a traumatic complete rupture of the right mainstem bronchus managed by primary repair, with subsequent anastomotic stricture. Both patients were successfully managed with topical application of mitomycin C (1 mg/mL), and needed no more dilatations.

  5. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  6. Usefulness of biodegradable polydioxanone stents in the treatment of postsurgical colorectal strictures and fistulas.

    PubMed

    Pérez Roldán, F; González Carro, P; Villafáñez García, M C; Aoufi Rabih, S; Legaz Huidobro, M L; Sánchez-Manjavacas Múñoz, N; Roncero García-Escribano, O; Ynfante Ferrús, M; Bernardos Martín, E; Ruiz Carrillo, F

    2012-03-01

    Benign colonic strictures and fistulas are a growing problem presenting most commonly after bowel resection. Standard treatment is with endoscopic bougies or, more usually, balloon dilation. When these approaches are not successful, other solutions are available and different endoscopic and surgical approaches have been used to treat fistulas. We present an additional option--biodegradable stents--for the treatment of colonic strictures and fistulas that have proven refractory to other endoscopic interventions. We analyzed the results from 10 patients with either a postsurgical colorectal stricture (n =7) or rectocutaneous fistula (n =3) treated with the biodegradable SX-ELLA esophageal stent (covered or uncovered). Stents were successfully placed in nine patients, although early migration subsequently occurred in one. Placement was impossible in one patient due to deformity of the area and the fact that the stricture was approximately 30cm from the anus. The fistulas were successfully closed in all patients, although symptoms reappeared in one patient. In the six patients who received stents for strictures, symptoms resolved in five; in the remaining patient, the stent migrated shortly after the endoscopy. Treatment of colonic strictures and rectocutaneous fistulas with biodegradable stents is an effective alternative in the short-to-medium term. The stent does not have to be removed and is subject to very few complications. The drawbacks of this approach are the need to repeat the procedure in some patients and the lack of published series on efficacy.

  7. Congenital Midureteric Stricture: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Raashid; Bhat, Nisar A.; Rashid, Kumar Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital midureteric stricture (MUS) is a rare malformation. We report our experience with five cases seen over a period of 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Materials and Methods. The study was based on the retrospective analysis of five patients diagnosed as having MUS. Diagnosis was suspected after fetal ultrasonography (USG) in one patient and magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in four patients. Retrograde pyelography (RGP) was performed on three patients. The final diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in all the patients. Results. MRU was found to be a good investigation method. It showed the site of obstruction in the ureter in all instances. Intravenous urography detected proximal ureteric dilatation present in two of the patients. RGP delineates the level of stricture and the course of ureter, as shown in our cases. All patients had significant obstruction on the affected side. Four patients underwent ureteroureterostomy, all of whom had satisfactory results. In one patient, ureteric reimplantation was carried out due to distal small ureteric caliber. Conclusion. This rare entity is often misdiagnosed initially as pelviureteric junction obstruction. MRU is an excellent option for the anatomical location and functional assessment of the involved system. At the time of surgical correction of a ureteral obstruction, RGP is a useful adjunct for delineating the stricture level and morphology. PMID:25922784

  8. Congenital midureteric stricture: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Raashid; Bhat, Nisar A; Rashid, Kumar Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital midureteric stricture (MUS) is a rare malformation. We report our experience with five cases seen over a period of 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Materials and Methods. The study was based on the retrospective analysis of five patients diagnosed as having MUS. Diagnosis was suspected after fetal ultrasonography (USG) in one patient and magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in four patients. Retrograde pyelography (RGP) was performed on three patients. The final diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in all the patients. Results. MRU was found to be a good investigation method. It showed the site of obstruction in the ureter in all instances. Intravenous urography detected proximal ureteric dilatation present in two of the patients. RGP delineates the level of stricture and the course of ureter, as shown in our cases. All patients had significant obstruction on the affected side. Four patients underwent ureteroureterostomy, all of whom had satisfactory results. In one patient, ureteric reimplantation was carried out due to distal small ureteric caliber. Conclusion. This rare entity is often misdiagnosed initially as pelviureteric junction obstruction. MRU is an excellent option for the anatomical location and functional assessment of the involved system. At the time of surgical correction of a ureteral obstruction, RGP is a useful adjunct for delineating the stricture level and morphology.

  9. The role of sonography in imaging of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Foley, W Dennis; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2007-06-01

    Sonography is the recommended initial imaging test in the evaluation of patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain or jaundice. Dependent upon clinical circumstances, the differential diagnosis includes choledocholithiasis, biliary stricture, or tumor. Sonography is very sensitive in detection of mechanical biliary obstruction and stone disease, although less sensitive for detection of obstructing tumors, including pancreatic carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. In patients with sonographically documented cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis, laparoscopic cholecystectomy with operative clearance of the biliary stone disease is usually performed. In patients with clinically suspected biliary stone disease, without initial sonographic documentation of choledocholithiasis, endoscopic ultrasound or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is the next logical imaging step. Endoscopic ultrasound documentation of choledocholithiasis in a postcholecystectomy patient should lead to retrograde cholangiography, sphincterotomy, and clearance of the ductal calculi by endoscopic catheter techniques. In patients with clinical and sonographic findings suggestive of malignant biliary obstruction, a multipass contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examination to detect and stage possible pancreatic carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, or periductal neoplasm is usually recommended. Assessment of tumor resectability and staging can be performed by CT or a combination of CT and endoscopic ultrasound, the latter often combined with fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspected periductal tumor. In patients whose CT scan suggests hepatic hilar or central intrahepatic biliary tumor, percutaneous cholangiography and transhepatic biliary stent placement is usually followed by brushing or fluoroscopically directed fine needle aspiration biopsy for tissue diagnosis. Sonography is the imaging procedure of choice for biliary tract intervention, including cholecystostomy, guidance for

  10. Biodegradable esophageal stents in benign and malignant strictures – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Sigounas, Dimitrios E.; Siddhi, Sandeep; Plevris, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Biodegradable (BD) esophageal stents were recently developed mainly for refractory benign strictures, but experience and available literature are limited. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective observational study. All patients who had BD stents inserted due to refractory benign esophageal strictures or malignant strictures, or were awaiting radical radiotherapy/chemotherapy or neo-adjuvant therapy and esophagectomy between March 2011 and July 2015 were included. Results: Stent placement was successful in all patients. Ten patients with benign strictures (3 male, median age 80.5 years, IQR: 68.75 – 89.5) were followed-up for a median of 171.5 weeks (IQR: 24 – 177.25). The interval between dilatations prior to the first BD stent placement (median: 34.25 days, IQR: 23.06 – 48.29) was significantly shorter than the interval between the first BD stent placement and the first intervention required (median: 149.5 days, IQR: 94.25 – 209.5) and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.012). Ten patients with esophageal cancer (8 male, median age: 69 years, IQR: 59.25 – 80.75) were included and they were followed up for a median of 36 weeks (IQR: 26 – 58). Only 1 completed radical radiotherapy successfully, but developed refractory post-radiotherapy stricture. No one proceeded to esophagectomy and 50 % required a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) at a median of 134 days (IQR: 100 – 263) following stent placement. Conclusions: BD stents were successfully deployed in both benign and malignant strictures. They offered a prolonged dilatation-free interval in benign strictures, yet in the majority of patients, strictures recurred. In malignant strictures, stent patency was similar to that of benign strictures, which suggests a potential value in ensuring adequate oral intake during oncologic therapy. In our cohort, however, use of stents did not contribute to improved outcome. PMID

  11. Dorsal buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for anterior urethral stricture by Asopa technique.

    PubMed

    Pisapati, V L N Murthy; Paturi, Srimannarayana; Bethu, Suresh; Jada, Srikanth; Chilumu, Ramreddy; Devraj, Rahul; Reddy, Bhargava; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar

    2009-07-01

    Buccal mucosal graft (BMG) substitution urethroplasty has become popular in the management of intractable anterior urethral strictures with good results. Excellent long-term results have been reported by both dorsal and ventral onlay techniques. Asopa reported a successful technique for dorsal placement of BMG in long anterior urethral strictures through a ventral sagittal approach. To evaluate prospectively the results and advantages of dorsal BMG urethroplasty for recurrent anterior urethral strictures by a ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach (Asopa technique). From December 2002 to December 2007, a total of 58 men underwent dorsal BMG urethroplasty by a ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach for recurrent urethral strictures. Forty-five of these patients with a follow-up period of 12-60 mo were prospectively evaluated, and the results were analysed. The urethra was split twice at the site of the stricture both ventrally and dorsally without mobilising it from its bed, and the buccal mucosal graft was secured in the dorsal urethral defect. The urethra was then retubularised in one stage. The overall results were good (87%), with a mean follow-up period of 42 mo. Seven patients developed minor wound infection, and five patients developed fistulae. There were six recurrences (6:45, 13%) during the follow-up period of 12-60 mo. Two patients with a panurethral stricture and four with bulbar or penobulbar strictures developed recurrences and were managed by optical urethrotomy and self-dilatation. The medium-term results were as good as those reported with the dorsal urethrotomy approach. Long-term results from this and other series are awaited. More randomised trials and meta-analyses are needed to establish this technique as a procedure of choice in future. The ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach is easier to perform than the dorsal urethrotomy approach, has good results, and is especially useful in long anterior urethral strictures.

  12. Forgotten biliary stents: ignorance is not bliss.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saket; Chandra, Abhijit; Kulkarni, Rugved; Maurya, Ajeet Pratap; Gupta, Vishal

    2017-06-22

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is a common procedure in routine gastroenterology practice. Plastic stents are the most common type of stents used and are indicated mainly for short-term biliary drainage. Prolonged indwelling plastic stents can result in disastrous complications. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who presented with complications of forgotten biliary stents in a tertiary care hospital during January 2010 to October 2016. All patients were managed either by endoscopic or surgical means. Details of these patients were obtained from departmental patient database, endoscopy records, and surgical register. A total of 21 cases of retained biliary stents were managed in the study period and their outcome was analyzed. The median age was 47 years (range 17-70 years) and 17 (80.9%) patients were female. Primary indication of biliary stenting was stone disease in 76.2% (n = 16), while benign biliary stricture accounted for 19% of cases (n = 4). Mean duration at presentation to hospital after ERCP stenting was 3.53 years (range 1-14 years), with cholangitis being the most common presentation (66.67%). Definitive endoscopic treatment for forgotten stent and its associated complication was possible only in five patients (23.8%); in remaining 16 (76.2%) cases, surgical exploration was required. Despite life-threatening complications and major surgical interventions, no mortality was recorded. Instances of forgotten biliary stents presenting with serious complications are not uncommon in Indian setup. Patients either ignore advice for timely stent removal or are unaware of the presence of endoprosthesis or need for removal. Adequate patient counseling, information, and proper documentation are essential to avoid this condition.

  13. Resolution of constipation, anal stricture, and iron deficiency anemia after iron infusion: an analogy with Plummer Vinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vijaypal; Singh, Shikha; Agarwal, Shashank; Ohri, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Anal stricture is a disabling condition which is often unresponsive to conservative medical management. The complications of surgical procedures such as dilatations and anoplasty make it a formidable treatment challenge. Through this case, we report and explore a new medical treatment for ano-rectal strictures with an analogy to Plummer Vinson syndrome. A 69-year-old male presented with chronic constipation, rectal pain, and easy fatigability. The physical exam was negative for anal fissure and a digital rectal examination could not be completed because an index finger could not be advanced through the narrowed anus. Laboratory reports revealed microcytic hypochromic anemia with iron deficiency. A colonoscopy performed with a GIF XQ180 OLYMPUS scope, confirmed anal stricture with non-specific colitis. Conservative management with laxatives, high fiber diet, local anesthetics with a trial of mesalamine was initiated but the patient continued to have symptoms. He was referred to a hematologist for an evaluation of anemia and was started on intravenous (IV) iron infusion. The patient's symptoms of constipation, anal stricture and iron deficiency anemia resolved with iron infusion over 3 months. A repeat rectal exam was painless and confirmed resolution of anal stricture. IV iron supplementation combined with conventional anal dilatation presents as a promising approach toward the treatment of anal strictures.

  14. [Treatment of atresia ani type I by balloon dilatation in 5 kittens and one puppy].

    PubMed

    Tomsa, K; Major, A; Glaus, T M

    2011-06-01

    Atresia ani is the most common anorectal anomaly in small animals. In the present study, an anal stricture (atresia ani type I) in five 3 to 8 weeks old kittens and one 4 month old puppy was treated by balloon dilation. In 4 kittens and the puppy the stricture was eliminated permanently and without complications by a single intervention. Only the smallest kitten with the most severe stenosis developed a rectal fistula as a complication of repeated balloon dilation, which necessitated surgical correction. Balloon dilation proved to be an efficient therapeutic method for anal atresia type I, and can be recommended as the treatment of choice.

  15. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  16. Salvage therapy using self-expandable metal stents for recalcitrant anastomotic strictures after living-donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ill; Sung, Se Yong; Park, Hyunsung; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Joo, Seung-Moon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recently, there has been an increase in clinical success rates using nonsurgical methods to resolve anastomotic biliary strictures (ABSs) that develop after liver transplantation (LT). However, some strictures are particularly refractory and cannot be completely resolved by an endoscopic or percutaneous procedure. Consequently, the aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and efficacy of using a newly designed fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) to resolve refractory ABS. Methods: A total of 35 patients with an ABS that developed after LT, but could not be resolved by an endoscopic or percutaneous procedure, were included in this study. FCSEMSs were positioned endoscopically and removed after 2–3 months. After stent removal, the patients were followed to assess complications, including re-stenosis. Results: The mean period from LT to stricture was 13.7 months, and the mean duration of the stricture was 31.8 months. The type and mean number of procedures previously attempted were endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) (9.1 ± 5.1) in 19 patients and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (9.2 ± 4.8) in 16 patients. All patients had successful FCSEMS insertions and removals; the mean stent indwelling time was 3.2 months. The mean follow-up period was 18.7 months (range: 6.4–37.8 months). Stricture recurrence was observed in 6 of 29 patients (recurrence rate: 20.7%). The anastomotic stricture resolved with the FCSEMS insertion in 29 of 35 patients (clinical success rate: 82.9%). Conclusions: The newly designed FCSEMS is a potentially feasible and effective treatment for anastomotic strictures that develop after LT but are not amenable to treatment by conventional procedures. PMID:28246547

  17. New diagnosis and therapy model for ischemic-type biliary lesions following liver transplantation--a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-cai; Qu, En-ze; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Rong-qin; Yang, Yang; Chen, Gui-hua

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic-type biliary lesions (ITBLs) are a major cause of graft loss and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Impaired blood supply to the bile ducts may cause focal or extensive damage, resulting in intra- or extrahepatic bile duct strictures or dilatations that can be detected by ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography. However, the radiographic changes occur at an advanced stage, after the optimal period for therapeutic intervention. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD) are the gold standard methods of detecting ITBLs, but these procedures cannot be used for continuous monitoring. Traditional methods of follow-up and diagnosis result in delayed diagnosis and treatment of ITBLs. Our center has used the early diagnosis and intervention model (EDIM) for the diagnosis and treatment of ITBLs since February 2008. This model mainly involves preventive medication to protect the epithelial cellular membrane of the bile ducts, regular testing of liver function, and weekly monitor of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) to detect ischemic changes to the bile ducts. If the liver enzyme levels become abnormal or CEUS shows low or no enhancement of the wall of the hilar bile duct during the arterial phase, early ERCP and PTCD are performed to confirm the diagnosis and to maintain biliary drainage. Compared with patients treated by the traditional model used prior to February 2008, patients in the EDIM group had a lower incidence of biliary tract infection (28.6% vs. 48.6%, P = 0.04), longer survival time of liver grafts (24±9.6 months vs. 17±12.3 months, P = 0.02), and better outcomes after treatment of ITBLs.

  18. Predictors of early stent occlusion among plastic biliary stents.

    PubMed

    Khashab, Mouen A; Kim, Katherine; Hutfless, Susan; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-09-01

    A major disadvantage of plastic biliary stents is their short patency rates. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of early stent occlusion among patients receiving conventional plastic biliary stents. Early stent occlusion was defined as worsening cholestatic liver test results of a severity sufficiently significant to warrant ERCP with stent exchange prior to the planned stent exchange, or as symptoms of cholangitis. The association of cumulative stent diameter, demographics, stricture location, procedure indication, Charlson comorbidity index, history of prior early stent occlusion, presence of gallbladder, and performance of sphincteromy with the occurrence of early stent occlusion was studied using logistic regression and multivariate analysis. Our patient cohort comprised 343 patients (mean age 59.3 years) who underwent 561 ERCP procedures with the placement of one or more plastic biliary stents (mean number of stents per procedure 1.2, mean total diameter of stents per procedure 12 Fr). Early stent occlusion occurred in 73 (13 %) procedures. Female gender was protective against early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.32-0.90, p = 0.02), while hilar stricture location was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 3.41, 95 % CI 1.68-6.90, p = 0.0007). Early occlusion of conventional biliary stents occurred in 13 % of cases. While female gender decreased the risk of early stent occlusion, hilar stricture location was a significant predictor of early stent occlusion. Our results suggest that physicians should consider early elective stent exchange in patients with hilar strictures.

  19. Innovative approaches for complex penile urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jordan; Tausch, Timothy J.; Simhan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Urethral strictures are a common urologic disease that arises from varied etiologies. These strictures range in severity from simple, short lesions to complex, long defects. Likewise, the management approach varies based on the complexity of the lesion. We reviewed the literature of urethral stricture disease and its management. In particular we have focused on complex strictures of the male penile urethra. Often these cases cannot be managed with traditional reconstructive techniques and require newer approaches. Furthermore tissue engineered graft materials provide a possible tissue source for future reconstructive endeavors. PMID:26816766

  20. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  1. Endoscopic and retrograde cholangiographic appearance of hepaticojejunostomy strictures: A practical classification

    PubMed Central

    Mönkemüller, Klaus; Jovanovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the endoscopic and radiological characteristics of patients with hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) and propose a practical HJ stricture classification. METHODS: In a retrospective observational study, a balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE)-endoscopic retrograde cholangiography was performed 44 times in 32 patients with surgically-altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy. BAE-endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) was performed 23 times in 18 patients with HJ. The HJ was carefully studied with the endoscope and using cholangiography. RESULTS: The authors observed that the hepaticojejunostomies have characteristics that may allow these to be classified based on endoscopic and cholangiographic appearances: the HJ orifice aspect may appear as small (type A) or large (type B) and the stricture may be short (type 1), long (type 2) and type 3, intrahepatic biliary strictures not associated with anastomotic stenosis. In total, 7 patients had type A1, 4 patients A2, one patient had B1, one patient had B (large orifice without stenosis) and one patient had type B3. CONCLUSION: This practical classification allows for an accurate initial assessment of the HJ, thus potentially allowing for adequate therapeutic planning, as the shape, length and complexity of the HJ and biliary tree choice may mandate the type of diagnostic and therapeutic accessories to be used. Of additional importance, a standardized classification may allow for better comparison of studies of patients undergoing BAE-ERCP in the setting of altered upper GI anatomy. PMID:22110837

  2. Holmium Laser Incision Technique for Ureteral Stricture Using a Small-Caliber Ureteroscope

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Kenji; Taki, Tomohiro; Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Yoshiaki, Yamamda; Honda, Nobuaki; Fukatsu, Hidetoshi

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The holmium laser has a short absorption depth in tissue and possesses excellent properties both in ablation and hemostasis. We have performed endoscopic incision for ureteral stricture using the holmium laser through a small-caliber ureteroscope. Methods: This method was used on five patients and seven ureters. The etiology of the stricture was stone scar in two patients, ureteroenteroanastomosis of Indiana urinary pouch in two, and primary in one. We used an 8F semi-rigid or 6.9F flexible ureteroscope. No prior procedures, such as balloon dilation, were necessary in any of the cases. The stricture was incised with the holmium laser using a 365-μm fiber through the working channel of the ureteroscope. The holmium laser operated at a wavelength of 2100 nm, with an output of 1.0J/pulse at a rate of 10 Hz. After completion of the incision, a 12F Double-J catheter was left in for six weeks. Results: The mean operative time was 89 minutes. The stricture resolved completely in all cases at an average follow-up of 8.6 months. Conclusions: The holmium laser incision for ureteral stricture using a small-caliber ureteroscope is an easy-to-perform, safe and effective procedure. PMID:10987397

  3. Penile inversion through a penoscrotal incision for the treatment of penile urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, James M; Zhumkhawala, Ali A; Chan, Kevin G.; Lau, Clayton S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a novel technique for the repair of penile urethral strictures and establishes the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of this innovative surgical approach. Materials and Methods Patients with urethral strictures underwent a one-sided anterior dorsal oral mucosal graft urethroplasty through a penoscrotal inversion technique. The clinical outcome was considered a failure when any instrumentation was needed postoperatively, including dilatation. Results Five patients underwent the novel procedure. The patients' mean age was 58 years. The cause of stricture was instrumentation in 2 cases (40%), lichen sclerosis in 1 case (20%), and failed hypospadias repair in 2 cases (40%). The mean stricture length was 3 cm. The overall mean (range) follow-up was 6 months (range, 3–9 months). Of the 5 patients, 4 (80%) had a successful outcome and 1 (20%) had a failed outcome. The failure was successfully treated by use of a meatotomy. Conclusions The penile inversion technique through a penoscrotal incision is a viable option for the management of penile urethral strictures with several advantages to other techniques: namely, no penile skin incision, a single-stage operation, and supine positioning. PMID:26981596

  4. Clinical significance of main pancreatic duct dilation on computed tomography: Single and double duct dilation

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Mark D; Hoteit, Maarouf; Patel, Amil P; Wang, Xiaoping; Baumgarten, Deborah A; Cai, Qiang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the patients with main pancreatic duct dilation on computed tomography (CT) and thereby to provide the predictive criteria to identify patients at high risk of significant diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, and to avoid unnecessary work up for patients at low risk of such diseases. METHODS: Patients with dilation of the main pancreatic duct on CT at Emory University Hospital in 2002 were identified by computer search. Clinical course and ultimate diagnosis were obtained in all the identified patients by abstraction of their computer database records. RESULTS: Seventy-seven patients were identified in this study. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were the most common causes of the main pancreatic duct dilation on CT. Although the majority of patients with isolated dilation of the main pancreatic duct (single duct dilation) had chronic pancreatitis, one-third of patients with single duct dilation but without chronic pancreatitis had pancreatic malignancies, whereas most of patients with concomitant biliary duct dilation (double duct dilation) had pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Patients with pancreatic double duct dilation need extensive work up and careful follow-up since a majority of these patients are ultimately diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Patients with single duct dilation, especially such patients without any evidence of chronic pancreatitis, also need careful follow-up since the possibility of pancreatic malignancy, including adenocarcinoma and intraductal papillary mucinous tumors, is still high. PMID:17461473

  5. Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Mikelle D.; Murray, Karen F.

    2011-01-01

    Extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), an inflammatory sclerosing cholangiopathy, is the leading indication for liver transplantation in children. The cause is still unknown, although possible infectious, genetic, and immunologic etiologies have received much recent focus. These theories are often dependent on each other for secondary or coexisting mechanisms. Concern for EHBA is raised by a cholestatic infant, but the differential diagnosis is large and the path to diagnosis remains varied. Current treatment is surgical with an overall survival rate of approximately 90%. The goals of this article are to review the important clinical aspects of EHBA and to highlight some of the more recent scientific and clinical developments contributing to our understanding of this condition. PMID:18496390

  6. Useful strategies to prevent severe stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) prompted us to apply this technique to large-size early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and Barrett’s adenocarcinoma, despite the limitations in the study population and surveillance duration. A post-ESD ulceration of greater than three-fourths of esophageal circumference was advocated as an important risk factor for refractory strictures that require several sessions of dilation therapy. Most of the preoperative conditions are asymptomatic, but dilatation treatment for dysphagia associated with the stricture has potential risks of severe complications and a worsening of quality of life. Possible mechanisms of dysphasia were demonstrated based on dysmotility and pathological abnormalities at the site: (1) delayed mucosal healing; (2) severe inflammation and disorganized fibrosis with abundant extracellular matrices in the submucosa; and (3) atrophy in the muscularis proper. However, reports on the administration of anti-scarring agents, preventive dilation therapies, and regenerative medicine demonstrated limited success in stricture prevention, and there were discrepancies in the study designs and protocols of these reports. The development and consequent long-term assessments of new prophylactic technologies on the promotion of wound healing and control of the inflammatory/tumor microenvironment will require collaboration among various research fields because of the limited accuracy of preoperative staging and high-risk of local recurrence. PMID:26109798

  7. Per oral cholangiopancreatoscopy in pancreatico biliary diseases - Expert consensus statements

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, Duvvur Nageshwar; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Tandan, Manu; Maydeo, Amit; Chandrashekhar, Thoguluva Seshadri; Kumar, Ajay; Sud, Randhir; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Makmun, Dadang; Khor, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide consensus statements on the use of per-oral cholangiopancreatoscopy (POCPS). METHODS: A workgroup of experts in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endosonography, and POCPS generated consensus statements summarizing the utility of POCPS in pancreaticobiliary disease. Recommendation grades used validated evidence ratings of publications from an extensive literature review. RESULTS: Six consensus statements were generated: (1) POCPS is now an important additional tool during ERCP; (2) in patients with indeterminate biliary strictures, POCS and POCS-guided targeted biopsy are useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis; (3) POCS and POCS-guided lithotripsy are recommended for treatment of difficult common bile duct stones when standard techniques fail; (4) in patients with main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) POPS may be used to assess extent of tumor to assist surgical resection; (5) in difficult pancreatic ductal stones, POPS-guided lithotripsy may be useful in fragmentation and extraction of stones; and (6) additional indications for POCPS include selective guidewire placement, unexplained hemobilia, assessing intraductal biliary ablation therapy, and extracting migrated stents. CONCLUSION: POCPS is important in association with ERCP, particularly for diagnosis of indeterminate biliary strictures and for intra-ductal lithotripsy when other techniques failed, and may be useful for pre-operative assessment of extent of main duct IPMN, for extraction of difficult pancreatic stones, and for unusual indications involving selective guidewire placement, assessing unexplained hemobilia or intraductal biliary ablation therapy, and extracting migrated stents. PMID:25914484

  8. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures. PMID:27044769

  9. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-03-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures.

  10. Epithelial Dysplasia and Cancer in IBD Strictures.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Colonic strictures and epithelial dysplasia are both known risk factors for the occurrence of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The aim of the present work was to study colonic stricture as a risk factor for the occurrence of epithelial dysplasia and colonic adenocarcinoma. In a case-control study among 53568 IBD patients undergoing colonoscopy, we compared the prevalence of strictures among cases with dysplasia or adenocarcinoma and controls without such complications by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess the joint influence of multiple predictor variables (age, sex, IBD type and stricture) on the occurrence of colonic dysplasia or adenocarcinoma. The prevalence of strictures was 1.06% in ulcerative colitis (UC) and 8.71% in Crohn's disease (CD, OR 11.09, 95% CI 9.72-12.70). The prevalence of dysplasia was 3.22% in UC and 2.08% in CD (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65-0.86). The prevalence of dysplasia was similar in IBD patients with and without stricture: 2.82 and 2.41%, respectively. The prevalence of cancer was higher in IBD patients with than without stricture: 0.78 and 0.11%, respectively (OR 6.87, 95% CI 3.30-12.89). In the multivariate analysis, old age, male sex and UC, but not stricture, were all significantly and independently associated with dysplasia. Old age, dysplasia and stricture were significantly and independently associated with cancer. The prevalence of epithelial dysplasia is not generally increased in IBD patients with strictures. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) 2015. This work is written by US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but without substantial clinical success. In this review, the authors discuss the history of plastic biliary stent development and the current use of plastic stents for malignant biliary diseases.

  12. Covered biliary stents with proximal bare stent extension for the palliation of malignant biliary disease: can we reduce tumour overgrowth rate?

    PubMed

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2017-08-01

    Covered biliary stents have shown significant effectiveness in the palliative management of patients with malignant biliary disease due to prevention of tumour ingrowth. However, stent dysfunction may still occur due to growth of tumour at the borders of the covered stent (tumour overgrowth). The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a bare extension in the prevention of tumour overgrowth when covered stents are used in the palliative treatment of malignant biliary strictures. This is a prospective, single arm, cohort study. Twenty-two patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures in the distal common bile duct (Bismuth I-II) and life expectancy more than 6 months were included in the study. The combination of a fully covered biliary stent and a bare proximal and distal extension was used in all cases. All patients were followed-up until death. Primary patency, survival, complication rates and dysfunction cause were assessed. Mean survival was 263.7 days (median 255, SD: 77.6). Mean patency was 240 days (median: 237, SD: 87). The primary patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months was 90%, 86% and 86% respectively. Tumour inor overgrowth did not occur in any of the patients. Dysfunction due to sludge formation occurred in three cases; all three were treated with bilioplasty. The combined use of a covered biliary stent and a bare extension appears to be a very effective tool in the palliation of malignant biliary disease, offering long-term patency for patients with inoperable malignant distal common bile duct strictures and increasing the quality of life of such patients.

  13. Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease & NASH Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis) Hepatitis ...

  14. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000282.htm Primary biliary cirrhosis To use the sharing features on this page, ... and leads to scarring of the liver called cirrhosis. This is called biliary cirrhosis. Causes The cause ...

  15. Biodegradable esophageal stent placement does not prevent high-grade stricture formation after circumferential mucosal resection in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Schomisch, Steve J.; Furlan, Joseph P.; Marks, Andrea S.; Chak, Amitabh; Lash, Richard H.; Ponsky, Jeffrey L.; Marks, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced esophageal dysplasia and early cancers have been treated traditionally with esophagectomy. Endoscopic esophageal mucosectomy (EEM) offers less-invasive therapy, but high-degree stricture formation limits its applicability. We hypothesized that placement of a biodegradable stent (BD-stent) immediately after circumferential EEM would prevent stricturing. Methods Ten pigs (five unstented controls, five BD-stent) were utilized. Under anesthesia, a flexible endoscope with a band ligator and snare was used to incise the mucosa approximately 20 cm proximal to the lower esophageal sphincter. A 10-cm, circumferential, mucosal segment was dissected and excised by using snare electrocautery. In the stented group, an 18-×120-mm, self-expanding, woven polydioxanone stent (ELLA-CS, Hradec-Kralove) was deployed. Weekly esophagograms evaluated for percent reduction in esophageal diameter, stricture length, and proximal esophageal dilation. Animals were euthanized when the stricture exceeded 80 % and were unable to gain weight (despite high-calorie liquid diet) or at 14 weeks. Results The control group rapidly developed esophageal strictures; no animal survived beyond the third week of evaluation. At 2 weeks post-EEM, the BD-stent group had a significant reduction in esophageal diameter (77.7 vs. 26.6 %, p < 0.001) and degree of proximal dilation (175 vs. 131 %, p = 0.04) compared with controls. Survival in the BD-stent group was significantly longer than in the control group (9.2 vs. 2.4 weeks, p = 0.01). However, all BD-stent animals ultimately developed clinically significant strictures (range, 4–14 weeks). Comparison between the maximum reduction in esophageal diameter and stricture length (immediately before euthanasia) demonstrated no differences between the groups. Conclusions Circumferential EEM results in severe stricture formation and clinical deterioration within 3 weeks. BD-stent placement significantly delays the time of clinical deterioration

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Robert G; Semsarian, Christopher; Macdonald, Peter

    2017-02-09

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and contractile dysfunction. Genetic mutations involving genes that encode cytoskeletal, sarcomere, and nuclear envelope proteins, among others, account for up to 35% of cases. Acquired causes include myocarditis and exposure to alcohol, drugs and toxins, and metabolic and endocrine disturbances. The most common presenting symptoms relate to congestive heart failure, but can also include circulatory collapse, arrhythmias, and thromboembolic events. Secondary neurohormonal changes contribute to reverse remodelling and ongoing myocyte damage. The prognosis is worst for individuals with the lowest ejection fractions or severe diastolic dysfunction. Treatment of chronic heart failure comprises medications that improve survival and reduce hospital admission-namely, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β blockers. Other interventions include enrolment in a multidisciplinary heart failure service, and device therapy for arrhythmia management and sudden death prevention. Patients who are refractory to medical therapy might benefit from mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. Treatment of preclinical disease and the potential role of stem-cell therapy are being investigated.

  17. Rapid Resolution of Cholangitic Abscess and Biliary Sepsis in a Liver Transplant Recipient after Hepatic Artery Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Trakroo, Sushrut; Qureshi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic arterial flow is paramount in preserving biliary integrity. We present an interesting clinical scenario of a liver transplant recipient with biliary anastomotic stricture who developed biliary abscess and sepsis after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography. The abscess did not respond to maximal medical management, percutaneous drainage, and adequate endoscopic biliary drainage. Clinically, patient continued to deteriorate and imaging identified hepatic artery stenosis which was treated with percutaneous intra-arterial stenting. Revascularization and perfusion of infected area led to rapid resolution of abscess and sepsis. This case emphasizes the anatomic basis of biliary ductal pathology. An important educational point is to understand that interrupted hepatic arterial supply can lead to biliary complications in liver transplant recipients and early correction of perfusion deficit should be pursued in such cases. In nonresolving hepatobiliary infections after liver transplantation, hepatic arterial compromise should be looked for and if present promptly treated. Reperfusion of biliary system in our patient led to improved antibiotics penetration, resolution of abscess and sepsis, and healing of biliary stricture.

  18. Surgical treatment of 31 complex traumatic posterior urethral strictures associated with urethrorectal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue-Min; Sa, Ying-Long; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Jiong; Jin, San-Bao

    2010-03-01

    Urethrorectal fistulas (URF) in patients with complex posterior urethral strictures are rare and difficult to repair surgically. There is no widely accepted standard approach described in the published literature. The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes of various operative approaches for the repair of URFs in patients with complex posterior urethral strictures. From January 1985 to December 2007, 31 patients (age: 6-61 yr; mean: 28.4) with URFs secondary to posterior urethral strictures were treated using a perineal or combined abdominal transpubic-perineal approach. A simple perineal approach was used in 4 patients; a transperineal inferior pubectomy approach was used in 18 patients; and a combined transpubic-perineal approach was used in 9 patients. A bulbospongiosus muscle and subcutaneous dartos pedicle flaps were interposed between the repaired rectum and urethra in 22 patients. The combined transpubic-perineal approach used either a gracilis muscle flap (one patient) or a rectus muscle flap (eight patients). Suprapubic catheterisation was used for bladder drainage, and a urethral silicone stent was left indwelling for 4 wk. One-stage repair was successful in 4 patients (100%) using the perineal approach, in 16 of 18 patients (88.9%) using the transperineal-inferior pubectomy approach, and in 7 of 9 patients (77.8%) using the transpubic-perineal approach. Recurrent urethral strictures developed in two cases; one patient required regular dilation, and the other patient was treated successfully with tubed perineoscrotal flap urethroplasty. Recurrent URFs developed in two additional patients. Surgical approaches for the treatment of URFs associated with complex urethral strictures should be based on a number of considerations including the location of the URF, its aetiology, the length of the urethral strictures, and a history of previous unsuccessful repairs. These results demonstrate that the transperineal-inferior pubic approach may be appropriate

  19. Ileocecocolic strictures in two captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus).

    PubMed

    Travis, Erika K; Duncan, Mary; Weber, Martha; Adkesson, Michael J; Junge, Randall E

    2007-12-01

    Intestinal strictures were diagnosed in two captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus). The cheetahs presented with lethargy, anorexia, diarrhea, and weight loss. The first cheetah had a stricture of the ileocecocolic junction diagnosed at necropsy. The second had an ileocecocolic stricture causing obstruction that was diagnosed at surgery. After resection and anastomosis, the cheetah recovered well. The etiology of the strictures remains undetermined. Intestinal stricture, particularly of the ileocecocolic junction, should be considered as a differential diagnosis for cheetahs with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs.

  20. Malignant Esophagogastric Junction Obstruction: Efficacy of Balloon Dilation Combined with Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Gi-Young; Song, Ho-Young Hong, Heuk-Jin; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Seo, Tae-Seok; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for palliation of dysphagia due to malignant esophagogastric junction strictures. Methods: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was attempted in 20 patients. The causes of strictures were gastric adenocarcinoma (n = 10) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (n = 10). Scheduled chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy followed balloon dilation in all patients. Results: There were no technical failures or major complications. After balloon dilation, 15 (75%) patients showed improvement of dysphagia. No patient complained of reflux esophagitis during the follow-up period. Among the 15 patients, seven needed no further treatment for palliation of dysphagia until their deaths. The remaining eight patients underwent repeat balloon dilation(n = 4) or stent placement (n = 4)3-43 weeks (mean 15 weeks) after the initial balloon dilation because of recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: Balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy seems to be an easy and reasonably effective palliative treatment for malignant esophagogastric strictures.

  1. Use of fully covered self-expanding metal stents for the management of benign biliary conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, J; Taberna-Arana, L; Jimeno-Ayllón, C; Martínez-Fernández, R; Serrano-Sánchez, L; Reyes-Guevara, A K; Viñuelas-Chicano, M; Gómez-Ruiz, C J; Morillas-Ariño, M J; Pérez-García, J I; Pérez-Vigara, G; Pérez-Sola, A

    2010-09-01

    biliary self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have the advantage of being inserted undeployed with very small sizes and provide, when fully opened, large diameters for biliary drainage. However, their use in benign conditions has been very limited, mainly because of difficulty in their extraction. We present our initial experience with a fully covered SEMS (Wallflex) for the management of benign problems of the bile duct. in a prospective study, stents of 8 mm in diameter and 4, 6 or 8 cm long were inserted by means of ERCP. These SEMS were chosen when according to medical judgement it was thought that diameters greater than 10 French (3.3 mm) were needed for proper biliary drainage. Stents were extracted also endoscopically, several months later when deemed clinically appropriate. twenty biliary SEMS were inserted. Reasons for insertion were: large intrahepatic biliary fistula after hydatid cyst surgery (1), perforation of the papillary area following endoscopic sphincterotomy (2), coaxial insertion to achieve patency in obstructed uncovered stents inserted in benign conditions (3), benign strictures (7), multiple and large common bile duct stones that could not be extracted because of tapering and stricturing of the distal common bile duct (7). In all cases, successful biliary drainage was achieved and there were no complications from insertion. Stents were easily extracted after a mean time of 132 days (36-270) in place. Complete resolution of biliary problems was obtained in 14 patients (70%). in our initial experience, the fully covered Wallflex biliary stent was removed without any complication after being in place in the common bile duct for a mean time of over four months. Therefore, it could be used in the management of benign biliary conditions.

  2. Development, management, and resolution of biliary complications after living and deceased donor liver transplantation: a report from the A2ALL consortium

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Michael A.; Baker, Talia; Goodrich, Nathan P.; Freise, Chris; Hong, Johnny C.; Kumer, Sean; Abt, Peter; Cotterell, Adrian H.; Samstein, Benjamin; Everhart, James E.; Merion, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplant (LDLT) recipients have a higher incidence of biliary complications than deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) recipients. Our objective was to define the intensity of intervention and time to resolution after diagnosis of biliary complications after liver transplantation. We analyzed the management and resolution of post-transplant biliary complications and investigated the comparative effectiveness of interventions in LDLT and DDLT recipients. Analysis of biliary complications (leak or stricture) used a retrospective cohort of liver transplant recipients at 8 centers between 1998–2006 (median follow-up was 4.7 years from onset). Number, procedure types, and time to resolution were compared between LDLT and DDLT recipients. Post-transplant biliary complications occurred among 47/189 [25%] DDLT recipients and 141/356 [40%] of LDLT recipients. Biliary leaks comprised 38% (n=18) of post-DDLT and 65% (n=91) of post-LDLT biliary complications. Median times to first biliary complication were similar (DDLT vs. LDLT: leak: 11 vs. 14 days, p=0.6; stricture: 69 vs. 107 days, p=0.3, respectively). There were 1225 diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed, including re-operation and retransplant (mean: 6.5±5.4 per recipient; DDLT: 5.4±3.6 vs. LDLT: 6.8±5.8, p=0.5). The median number of months to resolution of a biliary complication (tube/stent/drain-free) was not significantly different between DDLT and LDLT for leaks (DDLT: 2.3; LDLT: 1.3; p=0.3) or strictures (DDLT: 4.9; LDLT: 2.3; p=0.6). Although the incidence of biliary complications after LDLT is higher than after DDLT, treatment requirements and time to resolution after development of a biliary complication are similar in LDLT and DDLT recipients. PMID:23495079

  3. MR enterography-histology comparison in resected pediatric small bowel Crohn disease strictures: can imaging predict fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Daniel T; Dillman, Jonathan R; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud; Heider, Amer; Davenport, Matthew S; Smith, Ethan A; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that can lead to intestinal strictures. The presence of fibrosis within strictures alters optimal management but is not reliably detected by current imaging methods. To correlate the MRI features of surgically resected small-bowel strictures in pediatric Crohn disease with histological inflammation and fibrosis scoring. We included children with Crohn disease who had symptomatic small-bowel strictures requiring surgical resection and had preoperative MR enterography (MRE) within 3 months of surgery (n = 20). Two blinded radiologists reviewed MRE examinations to document stricture-related findings. A pediatric pathologist scored stricture histological specimens for fibrosis (0-4) and inflammation (0-4). MRE findings were correlated with histological data using Spearman correlation (ρ) and exact logistic regression analysis. There was significant positive correlation between histological bowel wall fibrosis and inflammation in resected strictures (ρ = 0.55; P = 0.01). Confluent transmural histological fibrosis was associated with pre-stricture upstream small-bowel dilatation >3 cm at univariate (odds ratio [OR] = 51.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.6- > 999.9; P = 0.0002) and multivariate (OR = 43.4; 95% CI: 6.1- > 999.9; P = 0.0006, adjusted for age) analysis. The degree of bowel wall T2-weighted signal intensity failed to correlate with histological bowel wall fibrosis or inflammation (P-values >0.05). There were significant negative correlations between histological fibrosis score and patient age at resection (ρ = -0.48, P = 0.03), and time from diagnosis to surgery (ρ = -0.73, P = 0.0002). Histological fibrosis and inflammation co-exist in symptomatic pediatric Crohn disease small-bowel strictures and are positively correlated. Pre-stenotic upstream small-bowel dilatation greater than 3 cm is significantly associated with confluent transmural fibrosis.

  4. Novel biliary self-expanding metal stents: indications and applications.

    PubMed

    Blero, Daniel; Huberty, Vincent; Devière, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic insertion of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) through a malignant common bile duct stricture is the first line of palliation for malignant jaundice. Patency of these stents remains a major concern. SEMS dysfunction can result from tumor ingrowth, overgrowth and/or clogging. Initial SEMS modifications involved covering the central part of the stent in order to reduce ingrowth and ultimately increase patency. Fully covered stents became available shortly after reports of their use in human patients. The potential removability and radial strength of SEMS have led to evaluation of their use in new indications including benign biliary strictures, post sphincterotomy bleeding and perforation. Other aspects of development include the addition of features such as anti-reflux valves, drug elution and spontaneous biodegradability. These aspects and their clinical implications are reviewed and discussed.

  5. Incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm in patients after major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong Min; Cho, Chol Kyoon; Koh, Yang Seok; Kim, Hee Joon; Park, Eun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Despite hepatolithiasis being a risk factor for biliary neoplasm including cholangiocarcinoma, the incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm is unknown in patients with preoperative benign hepatolithiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm in patients who underwent major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis. Methods Between March 2005 and December 2015, 73 patients who underwent major hepatectomy for preoperative benign hepatolithiasis were enrolled in this study. The incidence and pathological differentiation of concomitant biliary neoplasm were retrospectively determined by review of medical records. Postoperative complications after major hepatectomy were evaluated. Results Concomitant biliary neoplasm was pathologically confirmed in 20 patients (27.4%). Biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BIN) was detected in 12 patients (16.4%), and 1 patient (1.4%) had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), as the premalignant lesion. Cholangiocarcinoma was pathologically confirmed in 7 patients (9.6%). Preoperative imaging of the 73 patients revealed biliary stricture at the first branch of bile duct in 31 patients (42.5%), and at the second branch of bile duct in 39 patients (53.4%). Postoperative complications developed in 14 patients (19.1%). Almost all patients recovered from complications, including intra-abdominal abscess (9.6%), bile leakage (4.1%), pleural effusion (2.7%), and wound infection (1.4%). Only 1 patient (1.4%) died from aspiration pneumonia. Conclusions The incidence of underlying biliary neoplasm was not negligible in the patients with hepatolithiasis, despite meticulous preoperative evaluations. PMID:28261696

  6. [Biliary atresia in children].

    PubMed

    Famulski, W; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Sulkowski, S; Ostapiuk, H; Kemona, A

    1989-05-01

    Congenital biliary tract atresia was found in 0.58% of children dying in the first year of life. Most frequently atresia included the extrahepatic bile ducts, among them the common bile duct. Five cases (35.7%) had atresia associated with other developmental anomalies, which may suggest a genetic determination of the atresia. The most frequent cause of death of the newborns and infants with congenital biliary tract atresia was bronchopneumonia with associated biliary cirrhosis of the liver.

  7. Intestinal and cloacal strictures in free-ranging and aquarium-maintained green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Erlacher-Reid, Claire D; Norton, Terry M; Harms, Craig A; Thompson, Rachel; Reese, David J; Walsh, Michael T; Stamper, M Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal or cloacal strictures that resulted in intestinal obstruction were diagnosed in six green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) from three rehabilitation facilities and two zoologic parks. The etiologies of the strictures were unknown in these cases. It is likely that anatomic adaptations of the gastrointestinal tract unique to the green sea turtle's herbivorous diet, paired with causes of reduced intestinal motility, may predispose the species to intestinal damage and subsequent obstructive intestinal disease. In aquarium-maintained green sea turtles, obesity, diet, reduced physical activity, chronic intestinal disease, and inappropriate or inadequate antibiotics might also be potential contributing factors. Clinical, radiographic, and hematologic abnormalities common among most of these sea turtles include the following: positive buoyancy; lethargy; inappetence; regurgitation; obstipation; dilated bowel and accumulation of oral contrast material; anemia; hypoglycemia; hypoalbuminemia; hypocalcemia; and elevated creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and blood urea nitrogen. Although these abnormalities are nonspecific with many possible contributing factors, intestinal disease, including strictures, should be considered a differential in green sea turtles that demonstrate all or a combination of these clinical findings. Although diagnostic imaging, including radiographs, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging, are important in determining a cause for suspected gastrointestinal disease and identifying an anatomic location of obstruction, intestinal strictures were not successfully identified when using these imaging modalities. Lower gastrointestinal contrast radiography, paired with the use of oral contrast, was useful in identifying the suspected site of intestinal obstruction in two cases. Colonoscopy was instrumental in visually diagnosing intestinal stricture in one case. Therefore, lower gastrointestinal contrast radiography and

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis: strictures, impactions, dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Seema; Orenstein, Susan R; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Kocoshis, Samuel A; Putnam, Philip E; Sigurdsson, Luther; Shalaby, Theresa M

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, long known to be a feature of acid reflux, has recently been described in patients with food allergies and macroscopically furrowed esophagus. The pathophysiology and optimal management of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis is unclear. We describe our clinical experience related to eosinophilic esophagitis and obstructive symptoms in children and propose etiopathogenesis and management guidelines. Twelve children with obstructive esophageal symptoms (11 male), median age 5 years, and identified to have eosinophilic esophagitis with > 5 eosinophils per high-power field (eos/hpf) are reported. Of these, four had strictures, six had impactions, and two had only dysphagia. A diagnostic evaluation included esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies in all and upper gastrointestinal series, IgE, radioallergosorbent tests, and skin tests for food allergies in some cases. Esophageal histology specimens were independently analyzed for eosinophil density by two authors. Four of five children with > 20 eos/hpf responded to elimination diets/steroids. The fifth child responded to a fundoplication. Seven children had 5-20 eos/hpf and three of them with no known food allergies responded to antireflux therapy alone. Three others in this group with positive food allergies responded to treatment with elimination diets and/or steroids. The seventh patient in this group was lost to follow-up. In conclusion, on the basis of response to therapy, eosinophilic esophagitis can be subdivided into two groups: those with likely gastroesophageal reflux disease if < 20 eos/hpf and no food allergies, and others with allergic eosinophilic esophagitis associated with food allergies and often with > 20 eos/hpf.

  9. How Should Biliary Stones be Managed?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy is currently invaluable for the treatment of biliary stones. Clinicians should be familiar with the various endoscopic modalities that have been evolving. I reviewed the treatment of biliary stones from the common practice to pioneering procedures, and here I also briefly summarize the results of many related studies. Lithotripsy involves procedures that fragment large stones, and they can be roughly classified into two groups: intracorporeal modalities and extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Intracorporeal modalities are further divided into mechanical lithotripsy (ML), electrohydraulic lithotripsy, and laser lithotripsy. ESWL can break stones by focusing high-pressure shock-wave energy at a designated target point. Balloon dilation after minimal endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is effective for retrieving large biliary stones without the use of ML. Peroral cholangioscopy provides direct visualization of the bile duct and permits diagnostic procedures or therapeutic interventions. Biliary stenting below an impacted stone is sometimes worth considering as an alternative treatment in elderly patients. This article focuses on specialized issues such as lithotripsy rather than simple EST with stone removal in order to provide important information on state-of-the-art procedures. PMID:20559517

  10. The role of stents in the treatment of Crohn’s disease strictures

    PubMed Central

    Loras Alastruey, Carme; Andújar Murcia, Xavier; Esteve Comas, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Stenosis is one of the most frequent local complications in Crohn’s disease (CD). Surgery is not the ideal treatment because of the high rate of postoperative recurrence. Endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) currently is the current treatment of choice for short strictures amenable to the procedure. However, it is not applicable or effective in all the cases, and it is not without related complications. Our goal was to summarize the published information regarding the use and the role of the stents in the treatment of CD stricture. A Medline search was performed on the terms “stricture,” “stenosis,” “stent” and “Crohn’s disease.” Results: a total of 19 publications met our search criteria for an overall number of 65 patients. Placing a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) may be a safe and effective alternative to EBD and/or surgical intervention in the treatment of short stenosis in patients with CD. Indications are the same as those for EBD. In addition, SEMS may be useful in stenosis refractory to EBD and may be suitable in the treatment of longer or more complex strictures that cannot be treated by EBD. With the current information, it seems that the best treatment option is the placement of a fully covered stent for a mean time of 4 weeks. Regarding the use of biodegradable stents, the information is limited and showing poor results. Conclusions: the use of stents in the treatment of strictures in CD should be taken into account either as a first endoscopic therapy or in case of EBD failure. PMID:27014743

  11. Benign esophageal stricture after thermal injury treated with esophagectomy and ileocolon interposition

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Momose, Kota; Lee, Seigi; Haruta, Shusuke; Shinohara, Hisashi; Ueno, Masaki; Fujii, Takeshi; Udagawa, Harushi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal injuries of the esophagus are rare causes of benign esophageal stricture, and all published cases were successfully treated with conservative management. A 28-year-old Japanese man with a thermal esophageal injury caused by drinking a cup of hot coffee six months earlier was referred to our hospital. The hot coffee was consumed in a single gulp at a party. Although the patient had been treated conservatively at another hospital, his symptoms of dysphagia gradually worsened after discharge. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a pin-hole like area of stricture located 19 cm distally from the incisors to the esophagogastric junction, as well as circumferential stenosis with notable wall thickness at the same site. The patient underwent a thoracoscopic esophageal resection with reconstruction using ileocolon interposition. The pathological findings revealed wall thickening along the entire length of the esophagus, with massive fibrosis extending to the muscularis propria and adventitia at almost all levels. Treatment with balloon dilation for long areas of stricture is generally difficult, and stent placement in patients with benign esophageal stricture, particularly young patients, is not yet widely accepted due to the incidence of late adverse events. Considering the curability and quality-of-life associated with a long expected prognosis, we determined that surgery was the best treatment option for this young patient. In this case, we decided to perform an esophagectomy and reconstruction with ileocolon interposition in order to preserve the reservoir function of the stomach and to avoid any problems related to the reflux of gastric contents. In conclusion, resection of the esophagus is a treatment option in patients with benign esophageal injury, especially in cases involving young patients with refractory esophageal stricture. In addition, ileocolon interposition may help to improve the quality-of-life of patients. PMID

  12. The current role of direct vision internal urethrotomy and self-catheterization for anterior urethral strictures.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Deepak

    2011-07-01

    Direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) followed by intermittent self-dilatation (ISD) is the most commonly performed intervention for urethral stricture disease. The objective of this paper is to outline the current scientific evidence supporting this approach for its use in the management of anterior urethral strictures. A Pubmed database search was performed with the words "internal urethrotomy" and "internal urethrotomy" self-catheterization. All papers dealing with this subject were scrutinized. Cross-references from the retrieved articles were also viewed. Only English language articles were included in the analyses. Studies were analyzed to identify predictors for success for DVIU. Initial studies showed excellent outcomes with DVIU with success rates ranging from 50% to 85%. However, these studies reported only short-term results. Recent studies with longer followup have shown a poor success rate ranging from 6% to 28%. Stricture length and degree of fibrosis (luminal narrowing) were found to be predictors of response. Repeated urethrotomies were associated with poor results. Studies involving intermittent self-catheterization following DVIU have shown no role in short-term ISD with one study reporting beneficial effects if continued for more than a year. A significant number of studies have shown long-term complications with SC and high dropout rates. DVIU is associated with poor long-term cure rates. It remains as a treatment of first choice for bulbar urethral strictures <1 cm with minimal spongiofibrosis. There is no role for repeated urethrotomy as outcomes are uniformly poor. ISD, when used for more than a year on a weekly or biweekly basis may delay the onset of stricture recurrence.

  13. Newly designed “pieced” stent in a rabbit model of benign esophageal stricture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Shang, Liang; Liu, Ji-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a newly designed stent and its dilatation effect in a rabbit model of benign esophageal stricture. METHODS: Thirty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent a corrosive injury in the middle esophagus for esophageal stricture formation. Thirty rabbits with a successful formation of esophageal strictures were randomly allocated into two groups. The control group (n = 15) was implanted with a conventional stent, and the study group (n = 15) was implanted with a detachable “pieced” stent. The study stent (30 mm in length, 10 mm in diameter) was composed of three covered metallic pieces connected by surgical suture lines. The stent was collapsed by pulling the suture lines out of the mesh. Two weeks after stricture formation, endoscopic placement of a conventional stent or the new stent was performed. Endoscopic extraction was carried out four weeks later. The extraction rate, ease of extraction, migration, complications, and survival were evaluated. RESULTS: Stent migration occurred in 3/15 (20%) animals in the control group and 2/15 (13%) animals in the study group; the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. At the end of four weeks, the remaining stents were successfully extracted with the endoscope in 100% (11/11) of the animals in the study group, and 60% (6/10) of the animals in the control group; this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the mean number of follow-up days between the control and study groups (25.33 vs 25.85). Minor bleeding was reported in five cases in the study group and four in the control group. There were no severe complications directly associated with stent implantation or extraction in either of the two groups. CONCLUSION: In this experimental protocol of benign esophageal strictures, the novel “pieced” stent demonstrated a superior removal rate with a similar migration rate compared to a conventional stent. PMID:26229404

  14. Treatment for long bulbar urethral strictures with membranous involvement using urethroplasty with oral mucosa graft.

    PubMed

    Gimbernat, H; Arance, I; Redondo, C; Meilán, E; Andrés, G; Angulo, J C

    2014-10-01

    Urethroplasty with oral mucosa grafting is the most popular technique for treating nontraumatic bulbar urethral strictures; however, cases involving the membranous portion are usually treated using progressive perineal anastomotic urethroplasty. We assessed the feasibility of performing dorsal (or ventral) graft urethroplasty on bulbar urethral strictures with mainly membranous involvement using a modified Barbagli technique. This was a prospective study of 14 patients with bulbomembranous urethral strictures who underwent dilation urethroplasty with oral mucosa graft between 2005 and 2013, performed using a modified technique Barbagli, with proximal anchoring of the graft and securing of the graft to the tunica cavernosa in 12 cases (85.7%) and ventrally in 2 (14.3%). The minimum follow-up time was 1 year. We evaluated the subjective (patient satisfaction) and objective (maximum flow [Qmax] and postvoid residual volume [PVRV], preoperative and postoperative) results and complications. Failure was defined as the need for any postoperative instrumentation. A total of 14 patients (median age, 64+13 years) underwent surgery. The main antecedent of note was transurethral resection of the prostate in 9 cases (64.3%). The median length of the stenosis was 45+26.5mm. Prior to surgery, 50% of the patients had been subjected to dilatations and 4% to endoscopic urethrotomy. The mean surgical time and hospital stay were was 177+76min and 1.5+1 day, respectively. The preoperative Qmax and PVRV values were 4.5+4.45mL/sec and 212.5+130 cc, respectively. The postoperative values were 15.15+7.2mL/sec and 6+21.5cc, respectively (P<.01 for both comparisons). Surgery was successful in 13 cases (92.9%). None of the patients had major complications. There were minor complications in 1 (7.1%) patient, but reintervention was no required. The repair of long bulbar urethral strictures with membranous involvement using urethroplasty with free oral mucosa grafts represents a viable

  15. Long-Term Outcome of Endoscopic Balloon Dilation in Obstructive Gastrointestinal Crohn's Disease: A Prospective Long-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Tsuda, Sumio; Yao, Kenshi; Sou, Suketo; Satoh, Shigeru; Hatakeyama, Sadamune; Matake, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Yao, Tsuneyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Background The short- and long-term results of balloon dilation therapy in Crohn's patients with non-anastomotic obstructive gastrointestinal lesions are investigated. Materials and methods Fifty-five patients with Crohn's disease who had obstructive gastrointestinal lesions were treated prospectively by endoscopic balloon dilation. Short-term results Eight of the initial dilations were unsuccessful giving no symptomatic relief (14.5%). Long-term results The subjects of the long-term prognosis were 40 cases followed up for more than 6 months (average 37 months) and their strictures were non-anastomotic in more than half (59%). Avoidance of surgery, was possible in 31 of 40 patients (78%). Surgery was avoided in 92%, 81% and 77% of patients after one, two, and three years, respectively (Kaplan–Meier's method). There was no difference in long-term outcome between anastomotic strictures and strictures in the absence of prior surgery. Conclusion Our results suggest that, (1) strictures in the absence of prior surgery might be treated in this way as well as anastomotic strictures; (2) if followed for a prolonged time period, more than 70% of patients, who have undergone balloon dilation for obstructive gastrointestinal Crohn's disease, may be able to avoid surgery. PMID:18493528

  16. [Stricture recanalisation of the distal urether with various endoprothesis].

    PubMed

    Mladenović, A; Davidović, K; Marković, B; Anojcić, P; Stojadinović, M; Maksimović, H

    2010-01-01

    Application of the metallic stents in the interventional uroradioligy is the result of continous development of the new generation methods percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN), ballon catheter dilatation (BCD), methal and covered stent application. Application of metal stents in the renal canal system was attempted in order to eliminate BCD and PCN--related limitations as well as poor therapeutic results of these methods in a number of etiopathogenic groups of urinary stasis. Years--long application of interventional uroradiology methods, until the development of metallic stengts had shown the following therapeutics facts: PCN is incapable to resolve the caus of urinary obstruction. Permanent good therapeutic BCD results mostly depend on pathohistological aspect of the stricture, metallic stents are most frequently the last choice in therapeutics approch to urinary tract obstructions and their application is directly dependent on previous therapeutics results accomplished by PCN and BCD. In therapeutical sequences new generation of covered stents have important place as method of selection in patients of irreversibile uroopstruction of distal ureter. The main goal of this study was to analize therapeutics results, advanteges and shortages of insercion plastics and opened metallic endoprothesis, and to analize results of covered methal applications on the contrary of using older interventional uroradiology methods. Sixthytwo patients with distal urether strictures threated in the Deparment of interventional uroradiology Institute od Radiology Clinical centre of Serbia in Belgrade, participated in the study. Results were analized with Person's 2-test, Fisher test and Student T-test. In our study we had highly significant differences in comparison with number of patients and type of stents during the time after recanalization was reached. Also it was highly significant differences acorrding the type od used interventional uroradiology method that treated proliferation and

  17. Use of fully covered self-expanding metal stents in benign biliary diseases

    PubMed Central

    García-Cano, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Biliary fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMS) are now being used to treat several benign biliary conditions. Advantages include small predeployment and large postexpansion diameters in addition to an easy insertion technique. Lack of imbedding of the metal into the bile duct wall enables removability. In benign biliary strictures that usually require multiple procedures, despite the substantially higher cost of FCSEMS compared with plastic stents, the use of FCSEMS is offset by the reduced number of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography interventions required to achieve stricture resolution. In the same way, FCSEMS have also been employed to treat complex bile leaks, perforation and bleeding after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and as an aid to maintain permanent drainage tracts obtained by means of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided biliary drainage. Good success rates have been achieved in all these conditions with an acceptable number of complications. FCSEMS were successfully removed in all patients. Comparative studies of FCSEMS and plastic stents are needed to demonstrate efficacy and cost-effectiveness PMID:22523615

  18. Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis as a Premalignant Biliary Tract Disease: Surveillance and Management.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sumera; Eaton, John E; Gores, Gregory J

    2015-11-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a premalignant biliary tract disease that confers a significant risk for the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The chronic biliary tract inflammation of PSC promotes pro-oncogenic processes such as cellular proliferation, induction of DNA damage, alterations of the extracellular matrix, and cholestasis. The diagnosis of malignancy in PSC can be challenging because inflammation-related changes in PSC may produce dominant biliary tract strictures mimicking CCA. Biomarkers such as detection of methylated genes in biliary specimens represent noninvasive techniques that may discriminate malignant biliary ductal changes from PSC strictures. However, conventional cytology and advanced cytologic techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization for polysomy remain the practice standard for diagnosing CCA in PSC. Curative treatment options of malignancy arising in PSC are limited. For a subset of patients selected by using stringent criteria, liver transplantation after neoadjuvant chemoradiation is a potential curative therapy. However, most patients have advanced malignancy at the time of diagnosis. Advances directed at identifying high-risk patients, early cancer detection, and development of chemopreventive strategies will be essential to better manage the cancer risk in this premalignant disease. A better understanding of dysplasia definition and especially its natural history is also needed in this disease. Herein, we review recent developments in our understanding of the risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms of PSC associated with CCA, as well as advances in early detection and therapies. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endoscopic diagnosis and management of biliary complications following orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Zibari, G; McDonald, J C

    1996-06-01

    Nonoperative management of biliary complications (BC) with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a natural sequel to the emergence of choledochocholedochostomy as the preferred biliary reconstruction for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Overall, therapeutic ERCP's efficacy for posttransplant BC is difficult to assess because most published data are retrospective, anecdotal, or in abstract form, and there are no prospective, randomized studies. Thus, endoscopic management of posttransplant BC must be individualized. While T-tube-related late bile leaks and ductal calculi are amenable to endoscopic therapy, its efficacy for strictures is more difficult to define. Refined surgical technique has prevented many unifocal anastomotic lesions, while multifocal strictures (for which endoscopic therapeutic experience is minimal) are increasingly prevalent. Whether endoscopic sphincterotomy is appropriate for posttransplant sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is controversial, because the disorder may be transient and the risk significant. Multicenter, prospective studies are needed to determine more accurately the optimal role of endoscopic therapy after OLT.

  20. Laparoscopic T-Tube Choledochotomy for Biliary Lithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Alejandro Weber; López Acosta, María Elena

    2008-01-01

    T-tube choledochotomy has been an established practice in common bile duct exploration for many years. Although bile leaks, biliary peritonitis, and long-term postoperative strictures have been reported and are directly associated with the placement or removal of the T-tube, the severity of these complications may often be underestimated by surgeons. We present the case of a 31-year-old male patient who developed biliary peritonitis and septic shock after removal of a T-tube and illustrate one of the catastrophic events that may follow such procedures. Literature shows that these complications may occur more frequently and have higher morbidity and mortality than other less invasive procedures. This article reviews the advances in laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques, which provide alternative therapeutic approaches to choledocholithiasis and allow the surgeon to avoid having to perform a choledochotomy with T-tube drainage. PMID:18765064

  1. Treatment of a Ruptured Anastomotic Esophageal Stricture Following Bougienage with a Dacron-Covered Nitinol Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Heindel, Walter; Gossmann, Axel; Fischbach, Roman; Michel, Olaf; Lackner, Klaus

    1996-11-15

    A patient suffering from esophagorespiratory fistula after bougienage of a benign stricture at the site of the anastomosis between a jejunal interposition and the esophagus was referred for interventional treatment. A prototype nitinol stent centrally covered with Dacron was implanted under regional anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. The self-expanding prosthesis dilated the stenosis completely and closed the fistula, with consequent improvement in respiratory and nutritional status and thus the general quality of life. The patient was able to eat and drink normally until death 3 months later due to progression of his underlying malignant disease.

  2. Management of iatrogenic porto-biliary fistula following biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Chaitowitz, I M; Heng, R; Bell, K W

    2007-12-01

    We describe a case of cystic pancreatic disease causing biliary obstruction requiring percutaneous biliary stenting. The patient subsequently re-presented with severe melaena shown to be due to a rare complication of biliary stenting with development of a porto-biliary fistula from stent erosion, successfully managed with a 'stent-within-stent'.

  3. Metallic stents in malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. Retrospective analysis of our results with metallic stent placement for malignant biliary strictures. We sought to determine parameters that influence stent patency. Methods. A total of 95 Wallstents were implanted in 65 patients (38 men, 27 women; mean age, 65.1 years) with malignant biliary obstruction. Serum bilirubin levels were assessed in 48 patients; the mean value prior to intervention was 15.0 mg/dl. Results. In 12 patients (21%) complications occurred as a result of percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Stent implantation was complicated in 13 patients, but was possible in all patients. A significant decrease in bilirubin level was seen in 83.3% of patients following stent implantation. Approximately 30% of patients developed recurrent jaundice after a mean 97.1 days. In 9 patients (15%) the recurrent jaundice was caused by stent occlusion due to tumor growth. The mean follow-up was 141.8 days, the mean survival 118.7 days. Patients with cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas had the best results. Worse results were seen in patients with pancreatic tumors and with lymph node metastases of colon and gastric cancers. Conclusions. The main predictive factors for occlusion rate and survival are the type of primary tumor, tumor stage, the decrease in bilirubin level, and the general condition of the patient.

  4. Review article: oesophageal dilation in adults with eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Bohm, M E; Richter, J E

    2011-04-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus, characterised by the proton pump inhibitor-refractory accumulation of eosinophils in the oesophageal epithelium (>15 intraepithelial eosinophils/high powered field). Adults present with solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. Oesophageal remodelling produces the characteristic endoscopic feature of adult eosinophilic oesophagitis including strictures, rings and a narrow calibre oesophagus. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of oesophageal dilation as the initial therapy for adults with eosinophilic oesophagitis. Medline search from 1975 to November 2010 for all reports of the treatment of patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis using search words: eosinophilic oesophagitis treatment, dilation and eosinophilic oesophagitis, steroids and eosinophilic oesophagitis. Our systematic review found that 92% of patients treated with oesophageal dilation had improvement in their dysphagia symptoms for up to 1-2 years. Three case series clearly showed clinical resolution of dysphagia symptoms, independent of the degree of eosinophil infiltration, which was unchanged after dilation. Postprocedure pain for several days is common, due to some degree of mucosal tear, but true perforation very rare (<0.1%). Oesophageal dilation is an acceptable option for healthy adult eosinophilic oesophagitis patients with anatomic narrowing, possibly followed by a course of topical steroids to reduce inflammation and retard remodelling. Future studies should include a head-to-head comparison of topical steroids and oesophageal dilation, bougie vs through-the-scope balloon dilation and maintenance topical steroids compared with on-demand treatment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Reconstruction of the mouse extrahepatic biliary tree using primary human extrahepatic cholangiocyte organoids.

    PubMed

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Justin, Alexander W; Tysoe, Olivia C; Sawiak, Stephen; Godfrey, Edmund M; Upponi, Sara S; Gieseck, Richard L; de Brito, Miguel Cardoso; Berntsen, Natalie Lie; Gómez-Vázquez, María J; Ortmann, Daniel; Yiangou, Loukia; Ross, Alexander; Bargehr, Johannes; Bertero, Alessandro; Zonneveld, Mariëlle C F; Pedersen, Marianne T; Pawlowski, Matthias; Valestrand, Laura; Madrigal, Pedro; Georgakopoulos, Nikitas; Pirmadjid, Negar; Skeldon, Gregor M; Casey, John; Shu, Wenmiao; Materek, Paulina M; Snijders, Kirsten E; Brown, Stephanie E; Rimland, Casey A; Simonic, Ingrid; Davies, Susan E; Jensen, Kim B; Zilbauer, Matthias; Gelson, William T H; Alexander, Graeme J; Sinha, Sanjay; Hannan, Nicholas R F; Wynn, Thomas A; Karlsen, Tom H; Melum, Espen; Markaki, Athina E; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Vallier, Ludovic

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of common bile duct (CBD) disorders, such as biliary atresia or ischemic strictures, is restricted by the lack of biliary tissue from healthy donors suitable for surgical reconstruction. Here we report a new method for the isolation and propagation of human cholangiocytes from the extrahepatic biliary tree in the form of extrahepatic cholangiocyte organoids (ECOs) for regenerative medicine applications. The resulting ECOs closely resemble primary cholangiocytes in terms of their transcriptomic profile and functional properties. We explore the regenerative potential of these organoids in vivo and demonstrate that ECOs self-organize into bile duct-like tubes expressing biliary markers following transplantation under the kidney capsule of immunocompromised mice. In addition, when seeded on biodegradable scaffolds, ECOs form tissue-like structures retaining biliary characteristics. The resulting bioengineered tissue can reconstruct the gallbladder wall and repair the biliary epithelium following transplantation into a mouse model of injury. Furthermore, bioengineered artificial ducts can replace the native CBD, with no evidence of cholestasis or occlusion of the lumen. In conclusion, ECOs can successfully reconstruct the biliary tree, providing proof of principle for organ regeneration using human primary cholangiocytes expanded in vitro.

  6. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  7. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  8. The glucose breath test: a diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, Daniel; Boston, Francis M; Blank, David; Yalovsky, Morty; Mishkin, Seymour

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an indirect noninvasive indicator of proximal bacterial overgrowth, the glucose breath test, was of diagnostic value in inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty four of 71 Crohn's disease patients tested had a positive glucose breath test. No statistical conclusions could be drawn between the Crohn's disease activity index and glucose breath test status. Of patients with radiologic evidence of small bowel stricture(s), 96.0% had a positive glucose breath test, while only one of 46 negative glucose breath test patients had a stricture. The positive and negative predictive values for a positive glucose breath test as an indicator of stricture formation were 96.0% and 97.8%, respectively. This correlation was not altered in Crohn's disease patients with fistulae or status postresection of the terminal ileum. The data in ulcerative colitis were nondiagnostic. In conclusion, the glucose breath test appears to be an accurate noninvasive inexpensive diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) and secondary bacterial overgrowth in Crohn's disease.

  9. Effectiveness of endoscopic balloon dilatation in grade 2a and 2b esophageal burns in children.

    PubMed

    Taşkinlar, Hakan; Bahadir, Gökhan Berktuğ; Yiğit, Doğakan; Erdoğan, Cankat; Avlan, Dinçer; Nayci, Ali

    2017-03-10

    To evaluate the predictability of the initial endoscopic evaluation of the effectiveness of endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) in childhood esophageal strictures caused by corrosive ingestion. Medical records of 635 endoscopies caused by corrosive ingestion between January 2000 and December 2015 in children between the ages of 0 and 18 years were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, five children with grade 2a and 15 with grade 2 b who developed esophageal strictures were evaluated for the effectiveness of endoscopic balloon dilatation. The stricture rate was 5/136 (3.6%) in grade 2a and 17/25 (68%) in grade 2 b esophageal burns. Strictures with grade 2a burn had seven (1-10) EBD sessions, and grade 2 b had 8.8 (1-30) EBD sessions. For grade 2a burns, the treatment period was 15 months and 18.8 months for grade 2 b burns. Three patients with grade 2 b and two patients with grade 2a are still on the EBD program. Initial endoscopy for caustic ingestion and esophageal injury grading may help to provide healthcare givers with information about future stricture formation and management.

  10. Vaginal dilator therapy for women receiving pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Tracie; Johnson, Nick

    2014-09-08

    vagina to a functional length. There is no reliable evidence to show that routine, regular vaginal dilation during radiotherapy treatment prevents stenosis or improves quality of life. Several observational studies have examined the effect of dilation therapy after radiotherapy. They suggest that frequent dilation practice is associated with lower rates of self reported stenosis. This could be because dilation is effective or because women with a healthy vagina are more likely to comply with dilation therapy instructions compared to women with strictures. We would normally suggest that a RCT is needed to distinguish between a casual and causative link, but pilot studies highlight many reasons why RCT methodology is challenging in this area.

  11. Single-operator cholangioscopy for biliary complications in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing-Kabar, Anna; Heinzow, Hauke Sebastian; Schmidt, Hartmut Hans-Jürgen; Stenger, Carina; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pohlen, Michele; Thölking, Gerold; Wilms, Christian; Kabar, Iyad

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate cholangioscopy in addition to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for management of biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT). METHODS Twenty-six LT recipients with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction who underwent ERCP for suspected biliary complications between April and December 2016 at the university hospital of Muenster were consecutively enrolled in this observational study. After evaluating bile ducts using fluoroscopy, cholangioscopy using a modern digital single-operator cholangioscopy system (SpyGlass DS™) was performed during the same procedure with patients under conscious sedation. All patients received peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis and bile was collected during the intervention for microbial analysis and for antibiotic susceptibility testing. RESULTS Thirty-three biliary complications were found in a total of 22 patients, whereas four patients showed normal bile ducts. Anastomotic strictures were evident in 14 (53.8%) patients, non-anastomotic strictures in seven (26.9%), biliary cast in three (11.5%), and stones in six (23.1%). A benefit of cholangioscopy was seen in 12 (46.2%) patients. In four of them, cholangioscopy was crucial for selective guidewire placement prior to planned intervention. In six patients, biliary cast and/or stones failed to be diagnosed by ERCP and were only detectable through cholangioscopy. In one case, a bile duct ulcer due to fungal infection was diagnosed by cholangioscopy. In another case, signs of bile duct inflammation caused by acute cholangitis were evident. One patient developed post-interventional cholangitis. No further procedure-related complications occurred. Thirty-seven isolates were found in bile. Sixteen of these were gram-positive (43.2%), 12 (32.4%) were gram-negative bacteria, and Candida species accounted for 24.3% of all isolated microorganisms. Interestingly, only 48.6% of specimens were sensitive to prophylactic antibiotics. CONCLUSION

  12. Single-operator cholangioscopy for biliary complications in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hüsing-Kabar, Anna; Heinzow, Hauke Sebastian; Schmidt, Hartmut Hans-Jürgen; Stenger, Carina; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pohlen, Michele; Thölking, Gerold; Wilms, Christian; Kabar, Iyad

    2017-06-14

    To evaluate cholangioscopy in addition to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for management of biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT). Twenty-six LT recipients with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction who underwent ERCP for suspected biliary complications between April and December 2016 at the university hospital of Muenster were consecutively enrolled in this observational study. After evaluating bile ducts using fluoroscopy, cholangioscopy using a modern digital single-operator cholangioscopy system (SpyGlass DS™) was performed during the same procedure with patients under conscious sedation. All patients received peri-interventional antibiotic prophylaxis and bile was collected during the intervention for microbial analysis and for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Thirty-three biliary complications were found in a total of 22 patients, whereas four patients showed normal bile ducts. Anastomotic strictures were evident in 14 (53.8%) patients, non-anastomotic strictures in seven (26.9%), biliary cast in three (11.5%), and stones in six (23.1%). A benefit of cholangioscopy was seen in 12 (46.2%) patients. In four of them, cholangioscopy was crucial for selective guidewire placement prior to planned intervention. In six patients, biliary cast and/or stones failed to be diagnosed by ERCP and were only detectable through cholangioscopy. In one case, a bile duct ulcer due to fungal infection was diagnosed by cholangioscopy. In another case, signs of bile duct inflammation caused by acute cholangitis were evident. One patient developed post-interventional cholangitis. No further procedure-related complications occurred. Thirty-seven isolates were found in bile. Sixteen of these were gram-positive (43.2%), 12 (32.4%) were gram-negative bacteria, and Candida species accounted for 24.3% of all isolated microorganisms. Interestingly, only 48.6% of specimens were sensitive to prophylactic antibiotics. Single-operator cholangioscopy can

  13. Use of Fully Covered Self-Expanding Metal Biliary Stents in Pediatrics: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Mark, Jacob A; Mack, Cara L; Marwan, Ahmed I; Kramer, Robert E

    2017-08-23

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is used to manage biliary pathology in pediatric patients. Plastic biliary stents have been utilized in this population for obstructive lesions and bile leaks, however they are sometimes not effective due to migration, occlusion, or ineffective sealing. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMS) have larger diameters making them more suitable for some situations. However, their use in pediatrics has not been defined. The aim of this study is to describe our experience with FCSEMS at our institution. We present a series of all patients who underwent FCSEMS placement at Children's Hospital Colorado including three adolescents and one young adult with complex medical needs. Patient age range was 12-24 years and the weight ranged between 36-75 kg. All patients underwent previous ERCP and one or more rounds of plastic stenting without adequate clinical response prior to consideration of FCSEMS placement. Indications included: 1) Recalcitrant biliary anastomotic stricture post liver transplant, 2) Persistent bile leak after needle perforation, 3) Recurrent obstructive choledocholithiasis after cholecystectomy, and 4) Malignant biliary stricture. Sizes of FCSEMS depended on patient bile duct size and biliary pathology. Dwell time was 6-8 weeks. Three patients had resolution of biliary pathology after FCSEMS therapy. One patient had distal migration of FCSEMS necessitating repeat stenting. There were no adverse events from FCSEMS placement or removal. FCSEMS therapy should be considered in appropriate pediatric patients when plastic biliary stents are not effective. Further studies are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of FCSEMS in the pediatric age group.

  14. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes used to treat eye diseases, such as amblyopia and inflammation. How long do dilating drops last? ... used to treat certain eye diseases, such as amblyopia and inflammation in the eye. These therapeutic dilating ...

  15. Efficacy of Retrievable Metallic Stent with Fixation String for Benign Stricture after Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Myungsu; Hur, Saebeom; Kim, Minuk; Lee, Sang Hwan; Cho, Soo Buem; Kim, Chan Sun; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of retrievable metallic stent with fixation string for benign anastomotic stricture after upper gastrointestinal (UGI) surgery. Materials and Methods From June 2009 to May 2015, a total of 56 retrievable metallic stents with fixation string were placed under fluoroscopy guidance in 42 patients who were diagnosed with benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. Clinical success was defined as achieving normal regular diet (NRD). Results The clinical success rate after the first stent placement was 57.1% (24/42). After repeated stent placement and/or balloon dilation, the clinical success rate was increased to 83.3% (35/42). Six (14.3%) patients required surgical revision to achieve NRD. One (2.4%) patient failed to achieve NRD. Stent migration occurred in 60.7% (34/56) of patients. Successful rate of removing the stent using fixation string and angiocatheter was 94.6% (53/56). Distal migration occurred in 12 stents. Of the 12 stents, 10 (83.3%) were successfully removed whereas 2 could not be removed. No complication occurred regarding distal migration. Conclusion Using retrievable metallic stent with a fixation string is a feasible option for managing early benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. It can reduce complications caused by distal migration of the stent. PMID:27833405

  16. Monitoring Hepatocyte Dysfunction and Biliary Complication After Liver Transplantation Using Quantitative Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Si-Juan; Chen, Dong; Li, Yan-Zhao; Du, Dun-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Shui; Zhu, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The significance of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for hepatic graft function assessment was established mostly on retrospective studies and was not widely recognized due to the lack of quantitative data and variation in accuracy. This prospective study was performed to investigate the effectiveness of quantitative HBS for assessing hepatocyte dysfunction and biliary complication in liver transplant recipients. In 57 recipients who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation, a total of 67 dynamic 99mTc-EHIDA scans were performed and quantitative parameters including the hepatocyte extraction fraction (HEF), time to maximum hepatic radioactivity (Tmax), and time for peak activity to decrease by 50% (T1/2) were calculated. The scintigraphic results based on the 3 parameters were compared against the final diagnosis. A ROC curve analysis was carried out to identify the cutoff value of Tmax for diagnosis of biliary stricture. Correlation between the parameters of postoperative HBS and conventional biochemical liver function indices were also analyzed. Quantitative 99mTc-EHIDA HBS had an overall sensitivity of 94.12% (16/17), specificity of 93.33% (42/45), and diagnostic accuracy of 93.55% (58/62) for detecting hepatocyte dysfunction and biliary complication in liver transplant recipients. The recommended cutoff value of Tmax for diagnosis of post-transplant biliary stricture was set at 15.75 min with a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 94.0%. The scintigraphic parameters (HEF, Tmax) were statistically significantly associated with the conventional liver function parameters. Quantitative 99mTc-EHIDA HBS offers a noninvasive imaging modality with high sensitivity and specificity to diagnose hepatocyte dysfunction as well as distinguish between patients with or without biliary stricture following liver transplantation. Furthermore, HEF and Tmax values obtained from dynamic HBS show good correlation with conventional liver function parameters

  17. Monitoring Hepatocyte Dysfunction and Biliary Complication After Liver Transplantation Using Quantitative Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Zou, Si-Juan; Chen, Dong; Li, Yan-Zhao; Du, Dun-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Shui; Zhu, Xiao-Hua

    2015-11-01

    The significance of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for hepatic graft function assessment was established mostly on retrospective studies and was not widely recognized due to the lack of quantitative data and variation in accuracy. This prospective study was performed to investigate the effectiveness of quantitative HBS for assessing hepatocyte dysfunction and biliary complication in liver transplant recipients.In 57 recipients who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation, a total of 67 dynamic Tc-EHIDA scans were performed and quantitative parameters including the hepatocyte extraction fraction (HEF), time to maximum hepatic radioactivity (Tmax), and time for peak activity to decrease by 50% (T1/2) were calculated. The scintigraphic results based on the 3 parameters were compared against the final diagnosis. A ROC curve analysis was carried out to identify the cutoff value of Tmax for diagnosis of biliary stricture. Correlation between the parameters of postoperative HBS and conventional biochemical liver function indices were also analyzed.Quantitative Tc-EHIDA HBS had an overall sensitivity of 94.12% (16/17), specificity of 93.33% (42/45), and diagnostic accuracy of 93.55% (58/62) for detecting hepatocyte dysfunction and biliary complication in liver transplant recipients. The recommended cutoff value of Tmax for diagnosis of post-transplant biliary stricture was set at 15.75 min with a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 94.0%. The scintigraphic parameters (HEF, Tmax) were statistically significantly associated with the conventional liver function parameters.Quantitative Tc-EHIDA HBS offers a noninvasive imaging modality with high sensitivity and specificity to diagnose hepatocyte dysfunction as well as distinguish between patients with or without biliary stricture following liver transplantation. Furthermore, HEF and Tmax values obtained from dynamic HBS show good correlation with conventional liver function parameters.

  18. Esophageal stents for severe strictures in young children: experience, benefits, and risk.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robert E; Quiros, J Antonio

    2010-06-01

    The use of esophageal stents has been commonplace in adults for many years and for a variety of indications, including palliative care for malignant lesions involving the esophagus. The use of esophageal stents in the pediatric population, however, was limited by the inability to remove them and the implications this has for the growing child, especially for primarily benign esophageal lesions. With the advent of removable, covered stents, the potential uses for stents in children expanded to include treatment of a wide variety of congenital and acquired esophageal strictures. Stenting offers tremendous potential advantage over more traditional pneumatic or bougie dilation in its ability to provide continuous, radially oriented dilation pressure sustained over a period of time. This review examines the published pediatric literature on stents, discusses the indications for their use, outlines the types of stents available, offers technical guidance for proper placement, and reviews subsequent management and complications.

  19. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case with biliary microhamartomas.

    PubMed

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Yüksel, Ilhami; Damar, Cagrı; Ayaz, Sevin; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2012-01-01

    Biliary microhamartomas, also known as bile duct hamartomas and von Meyenburg complexes, are benign neoplasms containing cystic dilated bile ducts embedded in fibrous stroma. They develop in hepatobiliary system, do not generally give clinical outcomes, and are detected incidentally. However, they can rarely show malignant transformation. Our aim was to report the contribution of computed tomography, routine magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of biliary microhamartomas in a 61-year-old woman.

  20. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in a Case with Biliary Microhamartomas

    PubMed Central

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Yüksel, Ilhami; Damar, Cagrı; Ayaz, Sevin; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2012-01-01

    Biliary microhamartomas, also known as bile duct hamartomas and von Meyenburg complexes, are benign neoplasms containing cystic dilated bile ducts embedded in fibrous stroma. They develop in hepatobiliary system, do not generally give clinical outcomes, and are detected incidentally. However, they can rarely show malignant transformation. Our aim was to report the contribution of computed tomography, routine magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of biliary microhamartomas in a 61-year-old woman. PMID:22431945

  1. Complications and management of forgotten long-term biliary stents

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Se Hoon; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Kook Hyun; Kim, Tae Nyeun

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate complications and management outcomes of retained long-term plastic biliary stents. METHODS Endoscopic plastic biliary stent placement was performed in 802 patients at Yeungnam University Hospital between January 2000 and December 2014. Follow-up loss with a subsequently forgotten stent for more than 12 mo occurred in 38 patients. We retrospectively examined the cause of biliary stent insertion, status of stents, complications associated with biliary stents and management outcomes of long-term plastic biliary stents. Continuous variables were analyzed using the t test. Observed frequencies in subsets of the study population were compared using Fisher’s exact test and χ2 tests. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05 (two-tailed). RESULTS Mean age of patients was 73.7 ± 12 years and male-to-female ratio was 2.2:1. Indications of plastic biliary stent insertion were bile duct stones (63.2%, 24/38) and benign bile duct stricture (52.6%, 20/38). Mean duration of retained plastic stent was 22.6 ± 12.2 mo, and in 10 cases (26.3%), stents were retained for more than 24 mo. Common bile duct (CBD) stones or sludge were found in most cases (92.1%, 35/38). The most common complication was acute cholangitis (94.7%, 36/38). Stent removal by endoscopic approach was successfully performed in 92.1% (35/38) of the cases. In 3 cases, an additional plastic stent was inserted alongside the previous stent due to failure of the stent removal. Endoscopic removal of bile duct stones was successful in 73.7% (28/38) of the cases. When patients were divided into two groups by duration of stent placement (12 to 24 mo vs over 24 mo), there were no differences in the development of cholangitis, presence of biliary stones, and success rate of endoscopic removal of stones and biliary stents. CONCLUSION The most common complication of retained long-term plastic biliary stents was acute cholangitis associated with CBD stones. Endoscopic management was successfully

  2. Complications and management of forgotten long-term biliary stents.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Se Hoon; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Kook Hyun; Kim, Tae Nyeun

    2017-01-28

    To evaluate complications and management outcomes of retained long-term plastic biliary stents. Endoscopic plastic biliary stent placement was performed in 802 patients at Yeungnam University Hospital between January 2000 and December 2014. Follow-up loss with a subsequently forgotten stent for more than 12 mo occurred in 38 patients. We retrospectively examined the cause of biliary stent insertion, status of stents, complications associated with biliary stents and management outcomes of long-term plastic biliary stents. Continuous variables were analyzed using the t test. Observed frequencies in subsets of the study population were compared using Fisher's exact test and χ(2) tests. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05 (two-tailed). Mean age of patients was 73.7 ± 12 years and male-to-female ratio was 2.2:1. Indications of plastic biliary stent insertion were bile duct stones (63.2%, 24/38) and benign bile duct stricture (52.6%, 20/38). Mean duration of retained plastic stent was 22.6 ± 12.2 mo, and in 10 cases (26.3%), stents were retained for more than 24 mo. Common bile duct (CBD) stones or sludge were found in most cases (92.1%, 35/38). The most common complication was acute cholangitis (94.7%, 36/38). Stent removal by endoscopic approach was successfully performed in 92.1% (35/38) of the cases. In 3 cases, an additional plastic stent was inserted alongside the previous stent due to failure of the stent removal. Endoscopic removal of bile duct stones was successful in 73.7% (28/38) of the cases. When patients were divided into two groups by duration of stent placement (12 to 24 mo vs over 24 mo), there were no differences in the development of cholangitis, presence of biliary stones, and success rate of endoscopic removal of stones and biliary stents. The most common complication of retained long-term plastic biliary stents was acute cholangitis associated with CBD stones. Endoscopic management was successfully performed in most cases.

  3. The use of stents for duct-to-duct anastomoses of biliary reconstruction in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Toshiomi; Randall, Henry B; Roberts, John P; Ascher, Nancy L

    2005-01-01

    Biliary anastomotic complications remain a major cause of morbidity in liver transplant recipients. The objective of this retrospective study is to reassess the use of anastomotic stents for biliary reconstruction while focusing on an end-to-end choledochocholedochostomy (EECC) in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). EECC for the biliary reconstruction in OLT was performed in 115 patients. Sixty-three had their bile duct reconstructed over a T-tube stent (S group) while the remaining 52 patients underwent the same procedure without the stent (non-S group). The two groups were compared in terms of biliary complications and the conversion rate to a hepaticojejunostomy (HJS). Twenty-three biliary complications were observed in the OLT patients. In the S group, the incidence of a biliary leak was 12.7%, 8 of 63 patients in which 5 patients showed a bile leak when T tubes were removed. The rate of biliary stricture in the S group was 25.4%, or 16 patients. This stricture rate was not significantly different from the 13.5% rate observed in the non-S group (p=0.086). In the non-S group, 7 patients showed a biliary stricture. Four of 7 patients also developed a bile leak identified to be an anastomotic leak, which consequently resulted in HJS. A total of 6 patients, 5.2% of all OLT patients, underwent a subsequent revision of their primary anastomoses. The incidence of conversion from EECC to HJS in the non-S group, 57.1% was significantly higher than that in the S group, 12.5% (p=0.046). EECC (i.e. with or without a T-tube stent) is both a safe and effective technique for biliary reconstruction in OLT. However, the conversion rate from EECC to HJS in the non-S group was significantly higher than that in the S group. An indwelling T-tube stent is therefore considered to be useful for both achieving the lowest possible rate of severe anastomotic stricture and to prevent any subsequent intervention.

  4. Gallbladder and Biliary Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... switch to the Professional version Home Digestive Disorders Biology of the Digestive System Gallbladder and Biliary Tract ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of the Digestive System Overview of the Digestive ...

  5. A review of the management of 100 cases of benign stricture of the oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Raptis, S.; Milne, D. Mearns

    1972-01-01

    One hundred cases of benign stricture of the oesophagus treated over a period of 11 years from 1960 to 1971 under the care of the senior author (D.M.M.) at Frenchay Hospital Thoracic Unit are reviewed. The results indicate that the commonest site of the lesion is in the lower third of the oesophagus and that the commonest cause is peptic oesophagitis due to gastric reflux and associated hiatus hernia. As the disease is commoner in the elderly a conservative medical regimen of dilatation, antacids, and posturing is recommended as the first line of treatment. When this fails surgery is necessary. Collis (1965) managed 69 patients by gastroplasty. Belsey (1965) reported his experience with colon transplants, while Brain (1967) and Allison (1970) advised jejunal transplantation. Our experience has shown that in view of the old age and often poor physical condition of these patients resection of the stricture and oesophagogastric anastomosis is a relatively safe and simple procedure. The results obtained indicate that 25% of patients operated on will require future dilatations. PMID:4538878

  6. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options.

  7. Biliary complications after pediatric liver transplantation: Risk factors, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Feier, Flavia H; da Fonseca, Eduardo A; Seda-Neto, Joao; Chapchap, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The expanded indications of partial grafts in pediatric liver transplantation have reduced waiting list mortality. However, a higher morbidity is observed, including an increased rate of biliary complications (BCs). Factors such as the type of graft, the preservation methods applied, the donor characteristics, the type of biliary reconstruction, and the number of bile ducts in the liver graft influences the occurrence of these complications. Bile leaks and strictures comprise the majority of post-transplant BCs. Biliary strictures require a high grade of suspicion, and because most children have a bileo-enteric anastomosis, its diagnosis and management rely on percutaneous hepatic cholangiography and percutaneous biliary interventions (PBI). The success rates with PBI range from 70% to 90%. Surgery is reserved for patients who have failed PBI. BCs in children after liver transplantation have a prolonged treatment and are associated with a longer length of stay and higher hospital costs. However, with early diagnosis and aggressive treatment, patient and graft survival are not significantly compromised. PMID:26328028

  8. Ultrasonographic features of extrahepatic biliary obstruction in 30 cats.

    PubMed

    Gaillot, Hugues A; Penninck, Dominique G; Webster, Cynthia R L; Crawford, Sybil

    2007-01-01

    The goals of our study were to review the ultrasonographic features of spontaneous extrahepatic biliary obstruction in cats and to determine whether these features can assist in differentiating tumor, inflammation, and choleliths as the cause of obstruction. Thirty cats with a presurgical ultrasound examination an dconfirmed extrahepatic biliary obstruction were studied. A common bile duct diameter over 5 mm was present in 97% of the cats with extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Gallbladder dilation was seen in < 50% of the cats. Ultrasound identified all obstructive choleliths (calculus or plugs) in the common bile duct. However, neither common bile duct diameter nor appearance or any other ultrasonographic feature allowed differentiation between tumor and inflammation as the cause of obstruction. A short duration of clinical signs (10 days or less) seemed to be associated with obstructive cholelithiasis.

  9. [Predictors of choledocholithiasis in patients sustaining acute biliary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Parreira, José Gustavo; Rego, Ronaldo Elias Carnut; Campos, Tercio de; Moreno, Cristina Hachul; Pacheco, Adhemar Monteiro; Rasslan, Samir

    2004-01-01

    To assess the role of alkaline phosphatase (AP), gamil-glutamyltransferase (gammaGT) and abdominal ultrasound (US) as predictors of choledocholithiasis in patients sustaining acute biliary pancreatitis. Data was prospectively collected during a period of 31 months. Forty patients were included, 30 were female and the mean age was 49 +/- 16. All patients sustaining acute biliary pancreatitis were enrolled. Patients with clinical jaundice and severe pancreatitis were excluded. Serum content of AP and gGT as well as US were assessed at admission and 48 hours before cholecistectomy. All patients underwent intra-operative cholangiography (IOC) or pre-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP), which was indicated based on the odds of choledocholithiasis. In order to identify the predictors of choledocholithiasis, variables were compared between patients sustaining or not such alteration in cholangiography. Student t, Fisher and chi square tests were used for statistical analysis, considering p<0.05 as significant. Positive (PPV) and negative predictor values (NPV) were calculated for each variable. Upon admission, 15 (37%) patients sustained biliary tract dilatation and 5 (12%) choledocholithiasis at the US. Forty eight hours before the operation, 34 (85%) patients had altered levels of gGT and 16 (40%) of AP. Pre-operative US showed biliary tract dilatation in nine patients and choledocholithiasis in three. ERCP was performed in 15 (37%) cases. Higher PPV (55%) was attributed to pre-operative US, which had also a NPV of 96%. The best predictor of choledocholithiasis in patients sustaining mild acute pancreatitis was the biliary tract dilatation in pre-operative US.

  10. Jejunal Epiphany: Diverticulae, Enteroliths and Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Rehmani, Babar; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple jejunal diverticulae represent a rare entity and are usually asymptomatic. This case report is about one such jejunal diverticulae along with multiple enteroliths and jejunal strictures. All these three different findings in a short segment of jejunum is a very rare finding with all three variants seen in a segment of jejunum. We herein present a case of a 45-year-old male, who presented with vague abdominal pain for one and half years associated with nausea and vomiting and altered bowel habits. Laparotomy revealed multiple large jejunal diverticulae compressing the bowel with multiple enteroliths and two strictures in a short segment of jejunum leading to intestinal obstruction. Patient underwent resection of the involved jejunal segment and then repair by anastomosis. Post-operative period was uneventful. PMID:28208925

  11. Urethral strictures incident to bicycle motocross racing.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Daniel P; Carr, Michael C

    2005-04-01

    A dramatic shift from traditional team to alternative or "extreme" sports has given rise to a new generation of nontraditional athletes and sports-related injuries in the pediatric population. We present a case of 2 brothers who developed urethral strictures believed incident to BMX racing. We address current demographics and the general presentation and course of treatment to aid both the pediatric urologist and the general practitioner in prompt and proper diagnosis.

  12. Antireflux Versus Conventional Plastic Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Vihervaara, Hanna; Grönroos, Juha M; Hurme, Saija; Gullichsen, Risto; Salminen, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic stents are used to relieve obstructive jaundice. The purpose of this prospective randomized study was to compare the patency of antireflux and conventional plastic biliary stent in relieving distal malignant biliary obstruction. All jaundiced patients admitted to hospital with suspected unresectable malignant distal biliary stricture between October 2009 and September 2010 were evaluated for the study. Eligible patients were randomized either to antireflux or conventional plastic stent arms. The primary endpoint was stent patency and the follow-up was continued either until the stent was occluded or until 6 months after the stent placement. At an interim analysis, antireflux stents (ARSs; n = 6) had a significantly shorter median patency of 34 (8-49) days compared with the conventional stent (n = 7) patency of 167 (38-214) days (P = .0003). Based on these results, the study was terminated due to ethical concerns. According to these results, the use of this ARS is not recommended.

  13. Role of biliary tract cytology in the evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mamta; Pai, Radha R.; Dileep, Devi; Gopal, Sandeep; Shenoy, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic evaluation is critical in assessing the cause of obstructive jaundice. Cytological techniques including bile aspiration and biliary brushings have become the initial diagnostic modality. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of endoscopic biliary tract cytology as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 biliary tract specimens including 34 bile aspirations and 22 biliary brushings from 41 consecutive patients who had presented with obstructive jaundice and underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were assessed by cytological examination. The smears prepared were analyzed for standard cytological features. Results: Cytologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma in 13 (31.7%) cases, atypical in 2 (4.9%), reactive in 3 (7.3%) and benign changes in 19 (46.3%) cases. 4 (9.8%) cases were non-diagnostic. Serum bilirubin was significantly elevated in the malignant group. Biliary stricture was the most common finding on ERCP (68.3%). On cytological examination, presence of solitary, intact atypical cells, enlarged nuclei, irregular nuclear membrane, coarse chromatin and nucleoli were important cytologic criteria for differentiating malignant from benign biliary specimens. Conclusions: Regular use of bile cytology and brushings during ERCP evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice is invaluable in obtaining a morphologic diagnosis. A systematic approach, use of strict cytomorphologic criteria and inclusion of significant atypia as malignant diagnosis may improve the sensitivity. PMID:24130407

  14. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Pai, Madhava Xi Feng; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Ao Guokun; Kyriakides, Charis; Dickinson, Robert; Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  15. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  16. [Surgical treatment for cicatrix strictures of anal canal].

    PubMed

    Pomazkin, V I; Mansurov, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Classification of anal canal strictures with gradation of intensity, extent and localization is proposed. In 12 patients with compensated strictures combination of stenosis and anal fissure served as an indication for operation. These patients underwent fissure excision with dosed sphincterotomy. Anoplasty with displacement of island skin flaps to anal canal defects was carried out to 29 patients with sub-or decompensated strictures after dissection of scarry stricture. Good direct results were achieved in 38 patients. Compensated re-stenosis treated conservatively was observed in 3 patients after anoplasty. It is drawn a conclusion about necessity of differential approach to choice of treatment mode for anal scarry strictures. Anoplasty according to proposed method is considered to be optimal for marked strictures.

  17. The current role of U tubes for benign and malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Millikan, K W; Gleason, T G; Deziel, D J; Doolas, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The recent experience with U tubes at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Lukes Medical Center was reviewed in order to assess their current role in hepatobiliary surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. Transhepatic intubation by a variety of methods has been used routinely for biliary decompression and inhibition of anastomotic stricture since the 1960s. U tubes were popularized in the early 1970s. However, little has been written about their use and efficacy in recent years. Because of the apparent benefits associated with the use of U tubes versus other stenting techniques, the authors performed this study. METHODS. The hospital and office charts of all patients who had U tubes placed between 1980 and 1992 were reviewed retrospectively. Between 1980 and 1992, U tubes were placed intraoperatively in 54 patients for biliary decompression and/or stenting. Twelve patients were operated on for benign causes of obstruction. Forty-two patients with malignant tumors underwent surgery for U tube placement in conjunction with or without tumor resection and anastomotic bypass. RESULTS. There was a 0% operative mortality rate in the benign group. In six patients, the U tube played a major role in the long-term management of their disease processes. None of these patients has had restricture since removal of the tube. In the malignant group, the 30-day operative mortality rate was 12%. After 3 months, marked clinical improvement and complete biliary decompression were achieved, with mean bilirubin levels dropping from 14.0 mg/dL to 1.3 mg/dL. No patients in the malignant group required reoperation for recurrent biliary obstruction after U tube placement. CONCLUSIONS. The use of U tubes is advocated for biliary decompression and/or anastomotic stenting in patients with benign stricture or resectable malignancy and in patients with nonresectable, malignant biliary obstruction for adequate palliation of intractable jaundice. PMID:8239776

  18. Differentiation of infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma from benign common bile duct stricture using three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with MRCP.

    PubMed

    Yu, X-R; Huang, W-Y; Zhang, B-Y; Li, H-Q; Geng, D-Y

    2014-06-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the criteria for discriminating infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma from benign common bile duct (CBD) stricture using three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D-DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) imaging and to determine the predictors for cholangiocarcinoma versus benign CBD stricture. 3D-DCE MRI and MRCP images in 28 patients with infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma and 23 patients with benign causes of CBD stricture were reviewed retrospectively. The final diagnosis was based on surgical or biopsy records. Two radiologists analysed the MRI images for asymmetry, including the wall thickness, length, and enhancement pattern of the narrowed CBD segment, and upstream CBD dilatation. MRI findings that could be used as predictors were identified by univariate analysis and multivariable stepwise logistic regression analysis. Malignant strictures were significantly thicker (4.4 ± 1.2 mm) and longer (16.7 ± 7.7 mm) than the benign strictures (p < 0.05), and upstream CBD dilatation was larger in the infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma cases (20.7 ± 5.7 mm) than in the benign cases (16.5 ± 5.2 mm; p = 0.018). During both the portal venous and equilibrium phases, hyperenhancement was more frequently observed in malignant cases than in benign cases (p < 0.001). The results of the multivariable stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that both hyperenhancement of the involved CBD during the equilibrium phase and the ductal thickness were significant predictors for malignant strictures. When two diagnostic predictive values were used in combination, almost all patients with malignant strictures (n = 26, 92.9%) and benign strictures (n = 21, 91.3%) were correctly identified; the overall accuracy was 92.2% with correct classifications in 47 of the 51 patients. Infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma and benign CBD strictures could be effectively differentiated using DCE-MRI and MRCP based

  19. Air cholangiogram is not inferior to dye cholangiogram for malignant hilar biliary obstruction: a randomized study of efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Sud, Randhir; Puri, Rajesh; Choudhary, Narendra S; Mehta, Ashish; Jain, Parvesh Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Endoscopic biliary drainage is the palliative treatment of choice in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. Contrast injection can lead to cholangitis, whereas air cholangiography may have a lesser incidence of cholangitis. The objective of the present study is to prospectively compare the efficacy and safety of air vs. dye cholangiogram in malignant hilar biliary obstruction. Patients with type II and III malignant hilar biliary stricture were included in a prospectively randomized manner at a tertiary care center. Unilateral self-expanding metal stent was placed in patients with a malignant hilar block using either air or dye as a contrast medium. Outcome measures were successful deployment, successful drainage, early complications, and procedure-related and 30-day mortality. Forty-nine patients were randomized to air cholangiogram (25 patients, group A) or dye cholangiogram (24 patients, group B). Most of the patients had type II stricture (19 in group A and 20 in group B). Successful stenting and drainage were achieved in 25 (100 %) and 24 (96 %) in group A and 23 (95.8 %) and 22 (91.6 %) (p = ns), respectively. Cholangitis developed in 1 (4 %) and 4 (16.6 %) in group A and B, respectively (p < 0.05). There was no procedure-related or 30-day mortality. Use of air cholangiography was as safe and as effective as dye cholangiography in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction, and it decreased the risk of post-ERCP cholangitis.

  20. Neonatal dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paulo; Rocha, Gustavo; Pissarra, Susana; Soares, Henrique; Flôr-de-Lima, Filipa; Costa, Sandra; Moura, Cláudia; Dória, Sofia; Guimarães, Hercília

    2017-03-01

    Cardiomyopathies are rare diseases of the heart muscle, of multiple causes, that manifest with various structural and functional phenotypes but are invariably associated with cardiac dysfunction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the commonest cardiomyopathy in children, and the majority present before one year of age. Its etiology may be acquired or genetic. Myocarditis is an important cause and is responsible for the majority of acquired cases. Inherited (familial) forms of dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in 25-50% of patients. Echocardiographic and tissue Doppler studies are the basis for diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in most patients. Marked dilatation of the left ventricle with global hypokinesis is the hallmark of the disease. This review will cover the classification, epidemiology and management of newborns with dilated cardiomyopathy. In particular, a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the genetic study of dilated cardiomyopathy and of detailed echocardiographic assessment of these patients will be presented.

  1. Choledocholithiasis in anomalous biliary system.

    PubMed

    Leung, L C; Wong, C Y; Wong, C M; Cheung, K K

    1996-06-01

    Although congenital biliary abnormalities are common, preduodenal portal vein is very rare, not to mention preduodenal common bile duct (CBD) which has not been described before in the literature. A case with both anomalies complicated by biliary tract stones is reported. A brief review of embryonic development is also presented to explain the unusual biliary anatomy of this patient.

  2. Ultrasonographic and clinicopathologic features of segmental dilatations of the common bile duct in four cats

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Heather N; Penninck, Dominique G; Webster, Cynthia RL; Daure, Evence; Jennings, Samuel H

    2017-01-01

    Case series summary This case series documents ultrasonographic and clinicopathologic features of four cats with marked segmental dilatations of the common bile duct (CBD). All cats had additional ultrasonographic changes to the hepatobiliary system, including hepatomegaly, tubular to saccular intra/extrahepatic biliary duct dilatation and biliary debris accumulation. Based on all available data the presence of extrahepatic biliary duct obstruction (EHBDO) was ruled out in 3/4 cases and was equivocal in one case. One cat underwent re-routing surgery to address the CBD dilatation after multiple recurrent infections, one cat was euthanized and had a post-mortem examination and two cats were medically managed with antibiotics, liver protectants, gastroprotectants and cholerectics. Relevance and novel information The ultrasonographic features of the CBD in this population of cats were supportive of choledochal cysts (CCs). The maximal diameter of the CBD dilatations exceeded 5 mm in all cases, a sign that has been previously reported to be consistent with EHBDO. In our study, dilatations were segmental rather than diffuse. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with hepatobiliary surgery in cats, segmental dilatation of the CBD should not prompt emergency surgery. Some cats may respond to medical management. Careful planning for cyst resection was beneficial in one cat. Evaluation of CC morphology (eg, size, location, concurrent intrahepatic anomalies) may assist in selecting cats that could benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:28680700

  3. Main Bile Duct Stricture Occurring After Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Ikeno, Hiroshi; Orito, Nobuaki; Notsumata, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Toya, Daisyu; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical course of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among 446 consecutive patients with HCC treated by TACE, main bile duct stricture developed in 18 (4.0%). All imaging and laboratory data, treatment course, and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had 1 to 2 tumors measuring 10 to 100 mm in diameter (mean {+-} SD 24.5 {+-} 5.4 mm) near the hepatic hilum fed by the caudate arterial branch (A1) and/or medial segmental artery (A4) of the liver. During the TACE procedure that caused bile duct injury, A1 was embolized in 8, A4 was embolized in 5, and both were embolized in 5 patients. Nine patients (50.0%) had a history of TACE in either A1 or A4. Iodized oil accumulation in the bile duct wall was seen in all patients on computed tomography obtained 1 week later. Bile duct dilatation caused by main bile duct stricture developed in both lobes (n = 9), in the right lobe (n = 3), in the left lobe (n = 4), in segment (S) 2 (n = 1), and in S3 (n = 1). Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase increased in 13 patients. Biloma requiring drainage developed in 2 patients; jaundice developed in 4 patients; and metallic stents were placed in 3 patients. Complications after additional TACE sessions, including biloma (n = 3) and/or jaundice (n = 5), occurred in 7 patients and were treated by additional intervention, including metallic stent placement in 2 patients. After initial TACE of A1 and/or A4, 8 patients (44.4%), including 5 with uncontrollable jaundice or cholangitis, died at 37.9 {+-} 34.9 months after TACE, and 10 (55.6%) have survived for 38.4 {+-} 37.9 months. Selective TACE of A1 and/or A4 carries a risk of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum. Biloma and jaundice are serious complications associated with bile duct strictures.

  4. En Bloc Hilar Dissection of the Right Hepatic Artery in Continuity with the Bile Duct: a Technique to Reduce Biliary Complications After Adult Living-Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Gazala, Samir; Olthoff, Kim M; Goldberg, David S; Shaked, Abraham; Abt, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Techniques that preserve the right hepatic artery and the common bile duct in continuity during the dissection may be associated with lower rates of biliary complications in living-donor liver transplants. This study sought to determine whether en bloc hilar dissections were associated with fewer biliary complications in living-donor liver transplants. This was a retrospective review of 41 adult LDLTs performed in a single, liver transplant center between February 2007 and September 2014. The primary outcome of interest was the occurrence of at least one of the following biliary complications: anastomotic leak, stricture, or biloma. The primary predictor of interest was the hilar dissection technique: conventional hilar dissection vs. en bloc hilar dissection. A total of 41 LDLTs were identified, 24 had a conventional, and 17 an en bloc hilar biliary dissection. The occurrence of any biliary complication was significantly more common in the conventional hilar dissection group compared to the en bloc hilar dissection group (66.7 vs. 35.3%, respectively, p = 0.047). In particularly, anastomotic strictures were significantly more common in the conventional hilar dissection group compared to the en bloc hilar dissection group (54.2 vs. 23.5%., respectively, p = 0.049). En bloc hilar dissection technique may decrease biliary complication rates in living donor liver transplants.

  5. Impact of graft steatosis on the post-transplantation biliary complications for living donor liver transplant recipients in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yong-Gang; Li, Bo; Yan, Lv-Nan; Wen, Tian-Fu; Zhao, Ji-Chun; Xu, Ming-Qing; Wang, Wen-Tao; Ma, Yu-Kui; Yang, Jia-Yin

    2012-06-01

    After living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), the prevalence of complications related to the biliary system is 6-35%. In spite of great improvements in both surgical techniques and postoperative and long-term medical treatment, the biliary complications are still considered a relatively high risk for LDLT. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the incidence of biliary complications and identify predisposing risk factors. The clinical and follow-up data of 175 adult patients receiving LDLT (right lobe or left lobe) between 2002 and December 2008 were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups: with biliary complications (n=30) and without biliary complications (n=145). Thirty patients (17.1%) had post-transplantation biliary complications. Eight patients (4.6%) were diagnosed with bile leakage, while 24 patients (13.7%) developed biliary stricture. Percentage of steatosis of the graft and hepatic artery thrombosis after LDLT were two factors upon univariate analysis (p=0.034, p=0.01, respectively). In multivariate logistic analysis, 20-50% macrovesicular steatosis emerged as a new defined risk factor by us (p=0.001). There was no difference in patient survival rate in different groups and sorts of graft steatosis (p>0.05). We consider that using a graft with macro-vesicular steatosis in 20-50% should be put on the table carefully, balancing both sides of positive and negative.

  6. Outcomes after discontinuation of routine use of transanastomotic biliary stents in pediatric liver transplantation at a single site.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Pamela L; Jonas, Maureen M; Lee, Christine K; Kim, Heung B; Vakili, Khashayar; Elisofon, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Routine use of transanastomotic biliary stents (RTBS) for biliary reconstruction in liver transplantation (LT) is controversial, with conflicting outcomes in adult randomized trials. Pediatric literature contains limited data. This study is a retrospective review of 99 patients who underwent first LT (2005-2014). In 2011, RTBS was discontinued at our center. This study describes biliary complications following LT with and without RTBS. 56 (56%) patients had RTBS. Median age at LT was 1.9 yr (IQR 0.7, 8.6); 55% were female. Most common indication for LT was biliary atresia (36%). Most common biliary reconstruction was Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy (75% with RTBS, 58% without RTBS, p = 0.09). Biliary complications (strictures, bile leaks, surgical revision) occurred in 23% without significant difference between groups (20% with RTBS, 28% without RTBS, p = 0.33). Patients with RTBS had routine cholangiography via the tube at 6-8 wk; thus, significantly more patients with RTBS had cholangiograms (91% vs. 19%, p < 0.0001). There was no difference in the number of patients who required therapeutic intervention via endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (11% with RTBS, 19% no RTBS, p = 0.26). Routine use of RTBS for biliary reconstruction in pediatric LT may not be necessary, and possibly associated with need for costlier, invasive imaging without improvement in outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Spontaneous external biliary fistula: a rare complication of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, In Do; Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Do, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Lae Ik; Kim, Beom Jin; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kim, Jae Gyu; Chi, Kyong Choun; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2011-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented with yellowish discharge oozing from a fistula opening in the upper epigastric area that had persisted for one month prior to her visit. The patient had undergone a left lateral segmentectomy of the liver ten years prior for treatment of intrahepatic duct (IHD) stones. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed focal stricture and proximal dilatation of remnant IHD and a 1 cm-sized rim-enhancing lesion located under the surgical bed of the abdominal wall surrounding the dilated remnant IHD. Despite conservative management including nasobiliary drainage, no further improvement was anticipated. Partial hepatectomy and fistulectomy were performed for pathologic diagnosis and treatment of the enhancing lesion. Histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma. In this case, cholangiocarcinoma might have arisen in association with IHD stones and then developed a choledocho-cutaneous fistula as a clinical manifestation.

  8. Synchronous perforations of the oesophagus and stomach by air insufflation: an uncommon complication of endoscopic dilation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Arthur M; Chan, Fion S; Wong, Ian Y; Law, Simon

    2016-10-31

    A 72-year-old woman had a history of carcinoma of the hypopharynx treated by total laryngectomy, circumferential pharyngectomy and free jejunal graft. Endoscopic dilation of the pharyngojejunal anastomotic stricture resulted in synchronous perforations of the oesophagus and stomach. We postulate that the perforations were caused by high intraoesophageal and intragastric pressure resulted from air insufflation during the procedure; in a situation simulating closed-loop obstruction, because of proximal obstruction by the endoscope at the stricture site and distal obstruction by pylorospasm. The sites of perforations were inherent points of weakness at the left side of the distal oesophagus and at the high lesser curve of stomach. Satisfactory outcome of our patient was attributed to prompt diagnosis and surgical repair. Endoscopists should be aware of this possibility during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy and dilation. Rapid and over insufflation of air should be avoided. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Magnetic resonance urography for diagnosis of pediatric ureteral stricture.

    PubMed

    Arlen, Angela M; Kirsch, Andrew J; Cuda, Scott P; Little, Stephen B; Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Cerwinka, Wolfgang H

    2014-10-01

    Ureteral stricture is a rare cause of hydronephrosis in children and is often misdiagnosed on ultrasound (US) and diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), requiring intraoperative diagnosis. We evaluated ureteral strictures diagnosed by magnetic resonance urography (MRU) at our institution. Children with ureteral stricture who underwent MRU were identified. Patient demographics, prior imaging, MRU findings, and management were assessed. The efficacy of MRU in diagnosis of stricture was compared with US and DRS. Patients with ureteropelvic or ureterovesical junction obstruction were excluded. Twenty-eight ureteral strictures diagnosed by MRU between 2003 and 2013 were identified; 22% of strictures were diagnosed by DRS ± US. The mean age at MRU diagnosis was 2.4 years (range 4 weeks-15 years). Hydronephrosis was the most common presentation, accounting for 20 (71%) cases. Other etiologies included pain (3), incontinence (2), and urinary tract infection, cystic kidney, and absent kidney, present in one case each. A mean of 2.7 imaging studies was obtained prior to MRU diagnosis. Twenty-one (75%) ureteral strictures required surgical intervention, with the approach dependent upon location. MRU provides excellent anatomic and functional detail of the collecting system, leading to accurate diagnosis and management of ureteral stricture in children. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Approach to bulbar urethral strictures: Which technique and when?

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pankaj; Kaya, Cevdet; Kulkarni, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Bulbar urethra is the most common site of anterior urethral stricture and this stricture develops secondary to idiopathic (40%), iatrogenic (35%), inflammatory (10%), and traumatic (15%) causes. Various techniques and approaches with buccal mucosal graft have been described. We wanted to describe different techniques of repair with specific advantages. PMID:27274887

  11. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and personality change. An increased risk of other disease. In addition to bile duct and liver damage, people with primary biliary cirrhosis are likely to have other metabolic or immune system disorders, including thyroid problems, limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome) and rheumatoid arthritis. ...

  12. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... make the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  13. Biliary obstruction - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100199.htm Biliary obstruction - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  14. [Hydropneumatic dilatation of the ureter: A technical option in ureteropyeloplasty].

    PubMed

    Gallego-Grijalva, Jorge E; Jaimes-Jiménez, Ricardo; Alvarado-García, Rafael; Terriquez-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    The pyeloureteric junction (UP) is the site of obstruction commonest in the upper tract urinary. Several surgical techniques exist and the main complication is the stricture by the disproportion between both ends. The hydropneumatic dilatation of the ureteric would increase of the 5:1 to 2:1 the light of the ureter, improving technically anastomosis and reducing complications. They studied 27 patients with diagnose of Estenosis UP in the Paediatric Urologist Service of CMN 20 of November of the ISSSTE, being made dismembered Pyeloplasty pyeloureteric in all, introducing Fogarty catheter in the Ureter carrying out the hydropneumatic dilatation of the same one, introduction of catheter double J in ureter and in the last patient without this, previous one to the anastomosis. All had a pursuit of 6 months. Of the 27 patients, 21 masculine ones (77.78%), 6 feminine ones (22.22%), of the right side 10 (37.04%), left 14 (51.85%) and bilateral 3 (11.11%). In the 27 studied patients postoperating complications did not appear. To all the patients I am made the dilatation to them hydropneumatics of the Ureter during UP plasty, did not present/display postoperating complications, the anastomosis is carried out with greater technical facility since the light of the Ureteric increase from 5:1 in 2:1, and in I complete case without ferulization of the Ureter, I do not present/display complications. DOSCUSSION: The hydropneumatics dilatation of the Ureter is a technical option in the Surgical handling of stricture UP, facilitating the anastomosis, diminishing the postoperating complications, making the ferulization do withoutible of the Ureter.

  15. [Possibilities of endoscopic stenting in the treatment of gastrointestinal and biliary system diseases].

    PubMed

    Sarian, I V; Solovĭov, V V

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of endoscopic treatment of patients for stenosis and stricture of the gut organs and biliary ducts, using stents, was analyzed. In 48 patients, suffering tumoral and inflammatory diseases of the gut, biliary ducts and respiratory ways, selfexpanding metal stents, produced by firm Sooho M.I.-Tech. Co, Diagmed (Southern Korea), were introduced to reduce the severity of dysphagia, jaundice and the intestinal passability restoration. This had promoted the passability disorders elimination and the organs wall integrity restoration. In 16.6% of patients the immediate postinterventional period was complicated by occurrence of a short-term pain syndrome. In 6.2% of patients in 5-6 months the additional stenting intervention "stent into the stent" was performed for the stent restenosing. In 7-8 months the recurrent dysphagia have had occurred in 4.2% of patients. Endoscopic treatment of stenosis and stricture of the gut organs and biliary ducts, using self-expanding metal stents, is an effective, safe and secure procedure.

  16. Biliary tract complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: still the "Achilles heel"?

    PubMed

    Perrakis, A; Förtsch, T; Schellerer, V; Hohenberger, W; Müller, V

    2010-12-01

    Postoperative biliary tract complications after liver transplantation (LT) still lead to early and late morbidity and mortality. Modern interventional endoscopic techniques can replace surgical repair as the first line of treatment. Nevertheless surgical intervention plays an important role in specific situations. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with biliary complications after LT over a 12-year period. We compared treatment programs based on duration and success rate. The rate of biliary complications was 24.5% (60/245). The side-to-side choledocholedochostomy (CDC) technique showed the significantly lowest rate. The rate of complications after hepaticojejunostomy (HJS) was considerably lower, albeit not significantly. Eighty-one percent of complications after CDC were treated with interventional endoscopy. The duration of treatment of strictures, was 10 times greater than that of leakages. Surgical repair was necessary for 19% of complications occurring after CDC. The treatment options after HJS largely comprised surgical repairs. From a surgical standpoint, choosing the correct method for biliary reconstruction and ensuring normal arterial flow are the best preventive techniques to avoid biliary complications. Over the past 10 years, the primary treatment regimen has moved from surgical repair to interventional endoscopy. Only when endoscopy fails, should one consider surgical repair. The treatment after HJS is still primarily surgical. Percutaneous transhepatic approaches should be avoided. Creation of an inspection stoma to allow endoscopic access is an option. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Choledochal cyst with bile duct dilatation: sonography and /sup 99m/Tc IDA cholescintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.K.; Babcock, D.S.; Gelfand, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Three cases of choledochal cyst associated with intrahepatic biliary dilatation are presented. Findings on sonography included a large cystic mass in the porta hepatis separate from the gallbladder; a dilated common hepatic or common bile duct entering directly into the cyst; and smaller cystic masses of dilated central intrahepatic ducts. All three patients underwent operation with intraoperative cholangiography. Two patients had /sup 99m/Tc IDA cholescintigraphy which confirmed the diagnosis of choledochal cyst by demonstrating filling of the cyst with stasis and delayed intestinal activity. The accurate preoperative diagnosis of choledochal cyst, made by sonography combined with /sup 99m/Tc IDA cholescintigraphy, obviated invasive studies.

  18. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  19. Evaluation of pCLE in the bile duct: final results of EMID study : pCLE: impact in the management of bile duct strictures.

    PubMed

    Caillol, Fabrice; Bories, Erwan; Autret, Aurelie; Poizat, Flora; Pesenti, Christian; Ewald, Jacques; Turrini, Olivier; Delpero, Jean Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Giovannini, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Pre-operative histology of bile duct stenosis is associated with low accuracy. Probe confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) enables optical biopsy or in vivo histology. The definitive results of the EMID study are presented here, comparing optical biopsies with definitive histology. Sixty one patients with a biliary stricture without any previous histology were included (July 2007-May 2012). An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) had to be conducted before the ERCP procedure. pCLE was done using CholangioFlex during the ERCP procedure. Results were compared to those of definitive histology obtained by biopsy or surgery in case of malignant lesions, and by surgery or 1-year follow-up in case of benign lesions. Six patients were excluded because no definitive histology was available. There were 41 malignant lesions and 14 benign lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy with combination of pCLE with endobiliary and EUS biopsies were 100, 71, 91, 100, and 93%, respectively (with a significant increase of accuracy compared with endobiliary and EUS biopsies without pCLE, p = 0.03). 19 patients had a biliary stricture without individualized mass (6 malignant lesions, 13 benign lesions). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for pCLE were 83, 77, 62, 91, and 79%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for combination of pCLE with endobiliary and EUS biopsies were 100, 69, 60, 100, and 79%, respectively. The addition of a pCLE procedure in the diagnostic histologic examination of a biliary stricture permits a significant increase in diagnostic reliability and allows for a VPN of 100%.

  20. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for caustic ingestion after 73 years and over 200 endoscopic dilations: is it just a matter of time?

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Federico; Rapacchi, Chiara; Pattonieri, Vittoria; Tartamella, Francesco; Mita, Maria Teresa; Cecchini, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    Refractory esophageal strictures are a common sequela of caustic ingestion. If endoscopic dilation becomes ineffective, esophagectomy represents the only therapeutic option. The minimally invasive approach, specifically the thoracoscopic access in prone position, may allow postoperative morbidity to be reduced. We present the first case described in the Literature of minimally invasive esophagectomy in prone position for a long-term failure of endoscopic dilation after caustic ingestion.

  1. Trps1 Regulates Biliary Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Has Roles during Biliary Fibrosis in Liver Grafts: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhe, Cheng; Yu, Fan; Tian, Ju; Zheng, Shuguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role(s) of Trps1 in non-anastomotic biliary stricture (NABS) following liver transplantation. Methods Immunohistochemical and histological techniques were used to detect Trps1, E-cadherin, CK19, vimentin, α-SMA, and collagen deposition. Human intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HIBECs) were infected with a Trps1 adenovirus, or transfected with Trps1 short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays and western blotting were used to determine expression levels of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and Trps1 in HIBECs. Results Expression of Trps1 and epithelial markers was down-regulated or absent in NABS liver samples. Mesenchymal markers were seen in biliary epithelial cells (BECs), with collagen deposited around the bile duct. Trps1 expression positively correlated with epithelial markers. Expression of epithelial marker mRNAs and proteins in HIBECs decreased with prolonged cold preservation (CP), while mesenchymal marker expression increased. A 12-h CP period led to increased Trps1 mRNA and protein levels. Expression of E-cadherin was increased in HIBECs following Trps1 adenovirus infection and CP/reperfusion injury (CPRI), with vimentin expression levels reduced and CPRI-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inhibited. Transfection of HIBECs with Trps1 siRNAs in conjunction with CPRI revealed that E-cadherin expression was decreased, vimentin expression was increased, and CPRI-mediated EMT was promoted. Conclusion Trps1 is involved in NABS pathogenesis following liver transplantation and negatively correlates with BEC EMT and biliary fibrosis in liver grafts. Trps1 demonstrates antagonistic effects that could reverse EMT. PMID:25886207

  2. Trps1 regulates biliary epithelial-mesenchymal transition and has roles during biliary fibrosis in liver grafts: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zhe, Cheng; Yu, Fan; Tian, Ju; Zheng, Shuguo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role(s) of Trps1 in non-anastomotic biliary stricture (NABS) following liver transplantation. Immunohistochemical and histological techniques were used to detect Trps1, E-cadherin, CK19, vimentin, α-SMA, and collagen deposition. Human intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HIBECs) were infected with a Trps1 adenovirus, or transfected with Trps1 short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays and western blotting were used to determine expression levels of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and Trps1 in HIBECs. Expression of Trps1 and epithelial markers was down-regulated or absent in NABS liver samples. Mesenchymal markers were seen in biliary epithelial cells (BECs), with collagen deposited around the bile duct. Trps1 expression positively correlated with epithelial markers. Expression of epithelial marker mRNAs and proteins in HIBECs decreased with prolonged cold preservation (CP), while mesenchymal marker expression increased. A 12-h CP period led to increased Trps1 mRNA and protein levels. Expression of E-cadherin was increased in HIBECs following Trps1 adenovirus infection and CP/reperfusion injury (CPRI), with vimentin expression levels reduced and CPRI-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inhibited. Transfection of HIBECs with Trps1 siRNAs in conjunction with CPRI revealed that E-cadherin expression was decreased, vimentin expression was increased, and CPRI-mediated EMT was promoted. Trps1 is involved in NABS pathogenesis following liver transplantation and negatively correlates with BEC EMT and biliary fibrosis in liver grafts. Trps1 demonstrates antagonistic effects that could reverse EMT.

  3. Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Gunay, Emre; Tekesin, Kemal; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients' demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient.

  4. Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Akbulut, Sami; Abuoglu, Haci Hasan; Ozkan, Erkan; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Gunay, Emre; Tekesin, Kemal; Muftuoglu, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients’ demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient. PMID:25232385

  5. Transperineal bulbo-prostatic anastomosis for posterior urethral stricture associated with false passage: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Jiong; Sa, Ying-long; Jin, San-bao; Xu, Yue-min

    2011-10-01

    • To evaluate the management of traumatic posterior urethral stricture associated with false passage, as this remains a challenge for urologists. • From January 2000 to February 2010, 19 patients (mean (range) age 34 [25-52] years) with traumatic posterior urethral obliteration associated with false passage were evaluated and treated at our centre. • All patients underwent perineal excision and primary anastomotic urethroplasty using cystoscopy by the suprapubic route to insert a guidewire into the original bladder neck, allowing exposure of the normal posterior urethra. • Patients underwent voiding cysto-urethrography 1 month after the procedure. When symptoms of decreased force of stream were present and uroflowmetry was <15 mL/s, urethrography and urethroscopy were repeated. • Clinical outcome was considered a failure when any postoperative instrumentation was needed, including dilatation. • The mean (range) follow-up was 12 (9-14) months. The overall success rate was 84%. • Three patients (16%) with persistent voiding difficulty developed a short anastomotic stricture 1-3 months after surgery. • The mean maximum urinary flow rate after surgery was 20.01 mL/s and no patient had urinary incontinence. • The preoperative use of flexible cystoscopy via the suprapubic route represented a successful key point of urethroplasty for posterior urethral stricture associated with false passage. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  6. Liver cyst with biliary communication successfully treated with laparoscopic deroofing: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Furukawa, Kiyonori; Yokoi, Kimiyoshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Kanazawa, Yoshikazu; Tajiri, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    A 56-year-old woman visited our hospital because of high fever and right hypochondralgia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a liver cyst 10 cm in diameter and dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the cyst guided by ultrasonography disclosed that the cyst contained a brown milky fluid, and cystography showed biliary communication. Thus, the cyst was diagnosed as an infectious hepatic cyst with biliary communication. Treatments for liver cysts include aspiration therapy, alcoholic sclerotherapy, laparoscopic fenestration, fenestration by laparotomy, cystojejunostomy, cystectomy, and hepatectomy. Because a simple liver cyst is benign, treatments should be low-risk and minimally invasive; thus, we performed laparoscopic fenestration. Fenestration should not be performed if the case is complicated by infection or biliary communication. Although cystography showed biliary communication, the cyst was not visualized with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, and we concluded that the biliary communication was small. Operation time was 95 minutes, and blood loss was 10 g. Pathological findings of the liver cyst were consistent with a simple cyst. The postoperative course was good, and the patient left the hospital 10 days after the operation. Eighteen months have passed since the operation, and no recurrent cysts have been detected with computed tomography. This is the second report of liver cyst with biliary communication successfully treated with laparoscopic deroofing. Laparoscopic fenestration is a useful method for treating simple benign liver cysts because of its minimal invasiveness and may be useful in cases with small biliary communication.

  7. [Experimental atrophy/hypertrophy complex of the liver after portal and/or biliary ligation in the rat].

    PubMed

    Schweizer, W; Duda, P; Tanner, S; Balsiger, D; Höflin, F; Zimmermann, A; Blumgart, L H

    1992-08-01

    Patients with lobar or segmental, benign or malignant strictures of the biliary tree (with or without impairment of the portal blood flow) show a considerable atrophy of the involved area of the liver with a compensatory hypertrophy/hyperplasia of the remaining non affected liver. To investigate the importance of the biliary and portal obstruction for the development of this process, we used a rat model, with selective biliary and/or portal ligation of the anterior liver lobes (two thirds of the liver mass). Weight measurements, morphometry, functional scintigraphy (Hepatoiodida-scan) and blood enzyme analyses were done immediately postoperatively, at 30 hours and 4, 8 and 28 days after the operation. The major findings were: 1. 28 days after biliary and/or portal ligation there was no difference between the body weight of the four groups, all ligated animals having compensated for an initial greater percentage body-weight loss. 2. Total liver weight remained constant, while atrophy and hypertrophy/hyperplasia occurred although a progressive derangement of liver morphology was observed during that time. 3. A severe atrophy-hypertrophy-complex (AHC) developed after selective portal ligation, which in our experiment did not appear after selective biliary ligation. 4. Morphometrical changes after selective biliary ligation were reversible, whereas in liver lobes with selective portal ligation a progressive parenchymal destruction and involution with subsequent impairment of hepatic function of the concerned lobe was observed.

  8. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  9. Transplantation of tissue-engineered cell sheets for stricture prevention after endoscopic submucosal dissection of the oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Elbe, Peter; Kanai, Nobuo; Enger, Jenny; Haas, Stephan L; Mohkles-Barakat, Ammar; Okano, Teruo; Takagi, Ryo; Ohki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Kondo, Makoto; Markland, Katrin; Lim, Mei Ling; Yamato, Masayuki; Nilsson, Magnus; Permert, Johan; Blomberg, Pontus; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Endoscopic mucosal dissection (ESD) is a treatment option for oesophagus tumours localized to the mucosa enabling en bloc removal of large lesions. The resulting larger mucosal defects have resulted in an increase in the occurrence of post-treatment strictures. Transplantation of autologous cell sheets, cultured from oral mucosa, has been shown to prevent post-ESD strictures. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cell sheet transplantation after oesophageal ESD in a Western patient population where reflux-associated pre-malignant and malignant conditions predominate. Methods Patients with Barrett’s oesophagus associated high-grade dysplasia or early adenocarcinoma where ESD entailed a resection >3 cm in length and ≥75% of the circumference were eligible for treatment under hospital exemption. Cell sheets were cultured from buccal mucosa according to Good Manufacturing Practice and were endoscopically applied to the post-ESD defect directly after resection. Patients were followed with weekly endoscopy examinations, including confocal laser microscopy, for a total of four weeks. Results Five patients were treated. ESD was extensive with resections being circumferential in three patients and 9–10 cm in length in two. The number of transplanted cell sheets ranged from two to six. Three patients developed strictures requiring two to five dilatation sessions. Conclusions Cell sheet transplantation shows to be safe and feasible in a Western population. Results suggest that transplantation has a protective effect on the mucosal defect after ESD, decreasing both the risk for and extent of stricture formation. PMID:28408991

  10. Characterizing intestinal strictures with acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hao; Xu, Guan; Liu, Shengchun; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease, which may cause obstructing intestinal strictures due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Identifying the different stages of the disease progression is still challenging. In this work, we indicated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI), utilizing the uniquely optical absorption of hemoglobin and collagen. Surgically removed human intestinal stricture specimens were investigated with a prototype PAI system. 2D PA images with acoustic resolution at wavelength 532, 1210 and 1310 nm were formulated, and furthermore, the PA histochemical components images which show the microscopic distributions of histochemical components were solved. Imaging experiments on surgically removed human intestinal specimens has demonstrated the solved PA images were significantly different associated with the presence of fibrosis, which could be applied to characterize the intestinal strictures for given specimens.

  11. Buccal mucosal graft in reconstructive urology: uses beyond urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Abhishek; Dican, Razvan; Beier, Jörn; Keller, Hansjörg

    2014-07-01

    The use of buccal mucosal grafts for the reconstruction of urethral strictures is an established procedure. Because of its robustness, the buccal mucosal graft could also potentially provide an alternative for other indications in reconstructive urology. We report here six consecutive patients who received a buccal mucosal graft for ureteral strictures, glans reconstruction and stoma stenosis. The follow up for all patients ranged from 26 to 50 months. The buccal mucosal graft showed excellent functional results for the ureteral strictures and stenosis from ureterocutaneostomy. For glans reconstructions, the buccal mucosal grafts delivered excellent cosmetic and functional results without causing meatal stenosis. We conclude the buccal mucosal graft can be used in reconstructive surgery beyond the reconstruction of urethral strictures.

  12. A preliminary clinical study of endoscopic minimally-invasive surgery in urethral stricture complicated with false passage.

    PubMed

    Le, Wei; Zhou, Weidong; Li, Chao; Wu, Denglong; Zhang, Jinfu; Bian, Cuidong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the clinical effect of endoscopic minimal invasive surgery on posterior urethral stricture with false passage. Twenty-one patients suffering from posterior urethral stricture with false passage were involved in the study. All the patients received pre-operative urethrography and flexible cystoscopy to make sure that the distance between the blind end of the proximal normal urethra and the distal urethra was <1 cm. Ten patients received open operation and eleven patients underwent endoscopic minimally-invasive surgery. All the patients in both groups had their catheters removed 4 weeks after operations, and improvements in urination and incontinence were observed. Urethrography was performed and urine flow rate was measured 1 month after catheter removal. In the open-operation group, nine patients showed unobstructed urinary tracts in the urethrography, and one, after his catheter removal, experienced dysuresia, which was improved after urethral dilatation. In the minimally-invasive operation group, nine patients showed patent urinary tracts in the urethrography, and two experienced post-operation dysuresia, of whom, open-operation treatment and urethral dilatation were performed respectively. In the minimally-invasive operation group, the average urine flow rate was significantly increased. Patients in both groups obtained obvious improvement in post-operation urinary incontinence, and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in urine flow rate and index for urinary incontinence. Endoscopic minimally-invasive operation had similar effects to open operation in treatment of posterior urethra stricture with <1 cm in length and false passage.

  13. Endoscopic management of malignant biliary obstruction by means of covered metallic stents: primary stent placement vs. re-intervention.

    PubMed

    Kida, M; Miyazawa, S; Iwai, T; Ikeda, H; Takezawa, M; Kikuchi, H; Watanabe, M; Imaizumi, H; Koizumi, W

    2011-12-01

    Recent progress in chemotherapy has prolonged the survival of patients with malignant biliary strictures, leading to increased rates of stent occlusion. Occlusion of covered metallic stents now occurs in about half of all patients with malignant biliary strictures. The removal of metallic stents followed by placement of a second stent has been attempted, but outcomes remain controversial. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the primary placement and secondary placement (re-intervention) of covered metallic stents and to assess the feasibility and safety of stent removal. The study included 186 patients with unresectable malignant biliary strictures who underwent primary stent placement between October 2001 and March 2010.  Covered biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) were removed in 39 of these patients, and 36 underwent re-intervention. The patency times, occlusion rates of the first stent and re-intervention, success rates of stent removal, and complications were investigated. Covered SEMSs were placed in 186 patients. The median patency time of the first stent was 352 days. Stent occlusion occurred in 48.9 % of the patients and was mainly caused by debris or food residue (37 %), dislocation (19 %), and migration with hyperplasia (19 %). Stent removal was attempted in 50 patients and was successful without complication in 39 (78 %). Most of the patients in whom stent removal was unsuccessful had migration with hyperplasia. The median patency time of the second stent was 263 days. The stent patency time did not significantly differ between the first and the second stent. Covered SEMSs could be safely removed at the time of stent occlusion. Patency rates were similar for initial stent placement and re-intervention. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Current status of minimally invasive endoscopic management of ureteric strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kachrilas, Stefanos; Karaolides, Theocharis; Nikitopoulou, Stavroula; Papadopoulos, George; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Endourological techniques are used more often nowadays in the treatment of ureteric strictures of various etiologies. Advances in technology have provided new tools to the armamentarium of the endoscopic urological surgeon. Numerous studies exist that investigate the efficiency and safety of each of the therapeutic modalities available. In this review, we attempt to demonstrate the available and contemporary evidence supporting each minimally invasive modality in the management of ureteric strictures. PMID:24294293

  15. Biliary obstruction: findings at MR cholangiography and cross-sectional MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Soto, J A; Alvarez, O; Lopera, J E; Múnera, F; Restrepo, J C; Correa, G

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with malignant biliary obstruction and 21 patients with suspected obstruction of biliary-enteric anastomoses were evaluated over a 12-month period with magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiography and cross-sectional MR imaging. In patients with malignant obstruction, MR cholangiography helped accurately determine the status of the biliary ductal system by identifying the exact location and extent of the obstruction and the severity of duct dilatation. In so doing, MR cholangiography helped determine whether percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with antegrade stent placement or retrograde cholangiography with stent placement constituted the more suitable treatment. Cross-sectional MR imaging was necessary to identify the organ of tumor origin, define the tumor margins, and determine the stage of disease. This information helped evaluate the appropriateness of curative surgical therapy versus palliative drainage procedures. In patients with biliary-enteric anastomoses, MR cholangiography clearly depicted the site of the anastomosis and demonstrated the status of the intrahepatic ducts, thereby helping determine which patients would benefit from undergoing antegrade duct cannulation with a drainage procedure or perhaps balloon dilation. In some of these patients, MR cholangiography was sufficient to help plan therapeutic intervention. MR cholangiography also demonstrates the presence and size of biliary stones and associated findings such as intraductal tumor growth. In addition, MR cholangiography may obviate retrograde cholangiography, which can be technically difficult to perform.

  16. Clinical outcome of simultaneous self-expandable metal stents for palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kaw, M; Singh, S; Gagneja, H

    2003-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that self-expanding metal stents are an effective method for palliation of malignant biliary or duodenal obstruction. We present our experience with the use of simultaneous self-expandable metal stents for palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction. We performed a retrospective review of all patients undergoing simultaneous biliary and duodenal self-expandable metal stent placement between November 98 and May 2001. All the patients had documented evidence of biliary obstruction and symptomatic duodenal obstruction. The patients received endoscopic biliary stenting with biliary Ultraflex or Wallstents, and endoscopic duodenal stenting using enteral Wallstents. They were followed until their death. We identified 18 patients (11 men and 7 women) whose mean age was 65 years, (range, 46-85 years). Malignancies included pancreatic 14 (78%), biliary 2 (11%), lymphoma 1 (5%), and metastatic 1 (5%) disorders. Ten patients previously had plastic biliary stents placed for past malignant biliary obstruction (4 patients had recurrent biliary obstruction). All the patients had evidence of duodenal obstruction. Combined metal stenting was successful in 17 patients. One procedure failed due to a tortuous duodenal stricture. All the patients had effective palliation of biliary obstruction, as evidenced by a decrease in the level of total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. Of the 17 patients with successful duodenal stenting, 16 had a good clinical outcome, with relief of obstructive symptoms. No immediate stent-related complications were noted. During the follow-up period, 12 patients died of progression of the underlying malignancy. None of the deaths were stent related. Median survival time was 78 days. Two patients had recurrent biliary obstruction from tumor ingrowth at 45 and 68 days, respectively. Both underwent restenting: one by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and the other by percutaneous transhepatic

  17. A Systematic Review of the Risk of Perforation During Esophageal Dilation for Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John William

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is associated with tissue remodeling that can result in esophageal mucosal fragility, and esophageal dilation for patients with EoE is known to cause painful mucosal lacerations. Clinicians have been admonished that patients with EoE may be exceptionally predisposed to perforation with esophageal dilation, a notion supported primarily by case reports. We have conducted a systematic review of literature on esophageal dilation in EoE in an attempt to better define the risk of perforation. Methods We searched PubMed and abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Gastroenterology to identify reports on esophageal dilation in EoE. We analyzed reports meeting the following criteria: (1) the diagnosis was established from esophageal biopsy specimens revealing ≥15 eosinophils/hpf, (2) esophageal dilation was described, (3) esophageal perforations described were the result of esophageal dilation. Results We identified 18 reports for inclusion in our systematic review. The studies comprised 468 patients who underwent a total of 671 endoscopic dilations. Esophageal mucosal tears were described in most cases, but there was only one perforation among the 671 dilations (0.1%). Conclusions Our systematic review does not reveal an inordinate frequency of esophageal perforation from dilation in patients with EoE, and it is not clear that dilation is any more hazardous for patients with EoE than for patients with other causes of esophageal stricture. Although esophageal dilation must be performed with caution in all patients, the risk of perforation in EoE appears to have been exaggerated. PMID:20238250

  18. Esophageal stricture secondary to drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis presenting in an adult: an unusual complication of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Njei, Basile; Schoenfeld, Adam; Vaziri, Haleh

    2013-10-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an idiosyncratic, potentially life-threatening skin disease characterized by widespread inflammation and necrosis of the epidermis and mucous membranes. It may result in narrowing of the esophageal lumen through fibrosis and esophageal stricture in rare situations, mostly encountered in children. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of esophageal stricture secondary to allopurinol-induced TEN in an adult patient. A 70-year-old male presented to our clinic with severe dysphagia secondary to allopurinol-induced TEN involving his mouth and esophagus. At the time of presentation the patient had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube and was unable to handle his oral secretions. Endoscopy revealed near complete proximal esophageal stricture. A bidirectional esophageal dilatation procedure via the mouth and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy site was successfully performed over a guidewire for treatment of this patient. The patient tolerated the procedure well. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy with dilation was performed in a regular anterograde fashion five times over the next three months. Triamcinolone acetonide was injected using Carr-Locke injection needle from ultrasound endoscopy during the last three sessions. He currently tolerates a regular diet without difficulty.

  19. Advanced Cytologic Techniques for the Detection of Malignant Pancreatobiliary Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Luna, Laura E.; Kipp, Benjamin; Halling, Kevin C.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Kremers., Walter K.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Levy, Michael J.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims Two advanced cytologic techniques for detecting aneuploidy, digital image analysis (DIA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have recently been developed to help identify malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of cytology, DIA, and FISH for the identification of malignant pancreatobiliary strictures. Methods Brush cytologic specimens from 233 consecutive patients undergoing ERCP for pancreatobiliary strictures were examined by all three techniques. Strictures were stratified as proximal (n=33) or distal (n=114) based on whether they occurred above or below the cystic duct, respectively. Strictures in patients with PSC (n=86) were analyzed separately. Results Despite the stratification, the performances of the tests were similar. Routine cytology has a low sensitivity (5–20%) but 100% specificity. Because of the high specificity for cytology, we assessed the performance of the other tests when routine cytology was negative. In this clinical context, FISH had an increased sensitivity (35–60%) when assessing for chromosomal gains (polysomy) while preserving the specificity of cytology. The sensitivity and specificity of DIA was intermediate as compared to routine cytology and FISH, but was additive to FISH values demonstrating only trisomy of chromosome 7 or chromosome 3. Conclusions These findings suggest that FISH and DIA increase the sensitivity for the diagnosis of malignant pancreatobiliary tract strictures over that obtained by conventional cytology while maintaining an acceptable specificity. PMID:17030177

  20. Imaging of autoimmune biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Melinda J; Kim, So Yeon; Jhaveri, Kartik S; Behr, Spencer C; Seo, Nieun; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune biliary diseases are poorly understood but important to recognize. Initially, autoimmune biliary diseases are asymptomatic but may lead to progressive cholestasis with associated ductopenia, portal hypertension, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. The three main forms of autoimmune biliary disease are primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and IgG4-associated cholangitis. Although some overlap may occur between the three main autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts, each disease typically affects a distinct demographic group and requires a disease-specific diagnostic workup. For all the autoimmune biliary diseases, imaging provides a means to monitor disease progression, assess for complications, and screen for the development of hepatobiliary malignancies that are known to affect patients with these diseases. Imaging is also useful to suggest or corroborate the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis and IgG4-associated cholangitis. We review the current literature and emphasize radiological findings and considerations for these autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts.

  1. Continuous controllable balloon dilation: a novel approach for cervix dilation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical dilation using mechanical dilators is associated with various complications, such as uterine perforation, cervical laceration, infections and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. To achieve safe and painless cervical dilation, we constructed a new medical device to achieve confident mechanical cervical dilation: a continuous controllable balloon dilator (CCBD). Methods Controlled pumping of incompressible fluid into the CCBD increases the pressure and outer diameter of the CCBD, continuously dilating the cervical canal. The reliability of the CCBD was confirmed in vitro (testing for consistency and endurance, with no detected risk for breakage) and in vivo. A multi-center clinical study was conducted,with 120 pregnant women randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group I,control group, no dilation;Group II,mechanical dilation, Hegar dilator (HeD); and Group III,CCBD. The tissue material for histological evaluation was obtained from the endocervical mucosa before and after dilation using the HeD or CCBD. Results The CCBD dilations were successful and had no complications in all 40 patients of Group III. The cervical tissue was markedly less damaged after CCBD dilation compared with HeD dilation (epithelium damage: 95% (HeD) vs. 45% (CCBD), P <0.001; basal membrane damage: 82.5% (HeD) vs. 27.5% (CCBD), P <0.001; stromal damage: 62.5% (HeD) vs. 37.5% (CCBD), P <0.01). Cervical hemorrhagia was observed in 90% of the patients after HeD dilation versus in 32.5% of the patients after CCBD dilation. Conclusions The CCBD should be used as a replacement for mechanical dilators to prevent uterine and cervical injury during cervical dilation. Trial registration ISRCTN54007498 PMID:23088906

  2. Reoperation of biliary tract by laparoscopy: experiences with 39 cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Cai, Xiu-Jun; Mou, Yi-Ping; Wei, Qi

    2008-05-21

    To evaluate the safety and feasibility of biliary tract reoperation by laparoscopy for the patients with retained or recurrent stones who failed in endoscopic sphincterotomy. A retrospective analysis of data obtained from attempted laparoscopic reoperation for 39 patients in a single institution was performed, examining open conversion rates, operative times, complications, and hospital stay. Out of the 39 cases, 38 (97%) completed laparoscopy, 1 required conversion to open operation because of difficulty in exposing the common bile duct. The mean operative time was 135 min. The mean post-operative hospital stay was 4 d. Procedures included laparoscopic residual gallbladder resection in 3 cases, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration and primary duct closure at choledochotomy in 13 cases, and laparoscopic common bile duct exploration and choledochotomy with T tube drainage in 22 cases. Duodenal perforation occurred in 1 case during dissection and was repaired laparoscopically. Retained stones were found in 2 cases. Postoperative asymptomatic hyperamlasemia occurred in 3 cases. There were no complications due to port placement, postoperative bleeding, bile or bowel leakage and mortality. No recurrence or formation of duct stricture was observed during a mean follow-up period of 18 mo. Laparoscopic biliary tract reoperation is safe and feasible if it is performed by experienced laparoscopic surgeons, and is an alternative choice for patients with choledocholithiasis who fail in endoscopic sphincterectomy.

  3. Biliary atresia in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Youson, J H

    1993-01-01

    The preceding pages have described an organism that is far removed from mammals on the taxonomic scale of vertebrates but one that has proven to have a unique and most useful system for studies of liver function and, in particular, bile product transport and excretion. It is also an organism in which iron loading can be studied in the liver and other organs and tissues. Many of the events that occur in this animal during its life cycle with regard to bile pigment metabolism as normal programmed phenomena are unparalleled among the vertebrates. In the larval (ammocoete) period of lampreys, there is an intrahepatic gallbladder and a biliary tree that is well equipped for the storage, transport, and elimination of bile products into the intestine for ultimate excretion with the feces. The importance of the patency of these bile ducts to bile excretion is illustrated in one species of lampreys in which the bile ducts of young ammocoetes become infested with larval nematodes to a degree that bile pigment regurgitation into the blood results in a green serum that is identified as biliverdin. Despite having serum levels of biliverdin that would be toxic to humans, these individuals live a complete larval life. The larvae of all lamprey species undergo a phase of metamorphosis in which they transform into adults. During this phase the larval gallbladder, the bile canaliculi of the hepatocytes, and all the intrahepatic bile ducts completely regress in a developmental process called lamprey biliary atresia. The epithelium of the extrahepatic common bile duct transforms and expands into a caudal portion of the endocrine pancreas of the adult. Many of the events of lamprey biliary atresia resemble events occurring during experimental and pathological conditions of mammalian cholestasis, including disruption to the bile-blood barrier (intercellular junctions), accumulation of bile components in the cytoplasmic inclusions, and alteration of the distribution of membrane enzymes

  4. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  5. Umbilical cord stricture and intrauterine fetal death.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Arbuckle, S; Hocking, G; Billson, V

    1995-01-01

    Umbilical cord stricture is an uncommon but distinctive condition associated with intrauterine fetal death. Although cases have been reported periodically since the last century, there has been considerable speculation as to whether the condition is real or a postmortem artifact. In the present study, 25 cases reported since 1925 are reviewed and 8 new cases are described. Clinically, a decrease in fetal movements is usually the only symptom during the second or third trimester of pregnancy and fetal death occurs soon after. The women's age, health, and previous history have shown no link with this condition, but a higher incidence is noted in twin pregnancies. Morphologically, most infants are macerated and an extremely narrow segment of umbilical cord is usually seen at the fetal end and rarely at the placental end or in multiple sites along the cord. Absence of Wharton's jelly, stenosis, or obliteration of cord vessels at the narrow segment and intravascular cord thrombosis are the major pathological features. The findings of this study support the view that the condition can cause fetal death and alerts both pathologists and clinicians to the important features identifying this cause of perinatal wastage.

  6. Reoperation of the biliary tract by laparoscopy: an analysis of 39 cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Cai, Xiujun; Mou, Yiping; Wei, Qi

    2008-10-01

    Previously, prior biliary tract surgery was considered a contraindication to laparoscopic biliary tract reoperation. In this paper, we present our experience with laparoscopic biliary tract reoperation for patients with the choledocholithiasis for whom the endoscopic sphincterotomy has failed or is contraindicated. A retrospective analysis was performed on data from the attempted laparoscopic reoperation of 39 patients, examining open conversion rates, operative times, complications, and length of hospital stay. Of 39 cases, 38 were completed laparoscopically: 1 case required a conversion to the open operation because of difficulty in exposing the common bile duct. Mean operative time was 135 minutes. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 4 days. Procedures included 3 cases of laparoscopic residual gallbladder resection, 13 cases of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration and primary duct closure of choledochotomy, and 22 cases of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration and choledochotomy with T-tube drainage. There was 1 case of duodenal perforation during dissection, which was repaired laparoscopically. There were 2 cases of retained stones. Postoperative asymptomatic hypermalasia occurred in 3 cases. There were no complications due to port placement, no postoperative bleeding, bile or bowel leakage, and no mortality. At a mean follow-up time of 18 months, there was no recurrence or formation of duct stricture. The laparoscopic biliary tract reoperation is safe and feasible for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and is an alternative choice for patients with choledocholithiasis for whom the endoscopic sphincterectomy has failed or is contraindicated.

  7. Dilated common duct sign. A potential indicator of a sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    DeRidder, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1984-05-01

    The cholescintigraphic findings of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia (SOD) in a 45-year-old woman with persistent right upper quadrant pain and biliary colic are reported. After an overnight fast, the patient was injected with 5 mCi of Tc-99 disofenin and .02 micrograms/kg of cholecystokinin (CCK) post maximal gallbladder filling. Pre and postcholescintiscans were obtained and gallbladder ejection fractions determined. The hepatobiliary scan was normal, except for a delay in biliary-bowel transit. The gallbladder responded normally to CCK, however, the Sphincter of Oddi responded abnormally, as there was a paradoxical response to CCK manifested by a marked dilatation of the common bile duct. It was postulate that this dilatation (the dilated common duct sign) was due to an inappropriate response of the smooth muscle of the Sphincter of Oddi (contraction vs relaxation) to CCK and was the cause of this patient's biliary colic. The dilated common duct sign should alert the physician to the possibility of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

  8. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kasper S

    2015-12-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child's native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States.

  9. Anatomy and embryology of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Kara M; Bloomston, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Working knowledge of extrahepatic biliary anatomy is of paramount importance to the general surgeon. The embryologic development of the extrahepatic biliary tract is discussed in this article as is the highly variable anatomy of the biliary tract and its associated vasculature. The salient conditions related to the embryology and anatomy of the extrahepatic biliary tract, including biliary atresia, choledochal cysts, gallbladder agenesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and ducts of Luschka, are addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ceruletide analgesia in biliary colic.

    PubMed

    Pardo, A; Celotti, F; De Paolis, C

    1984-10-01

    Ceruletide is a decapeptide isolated from the skin of an Australian frog. Its chemical and biologic relationship to cholecystokinin and its potent relaxant effect on the sphincter of Oddi makes it useful in biliary colic. In this double-blind placebo-controlled experiment, 60 subjects with moderate to severe pain caused by biliary colic were injected with ceruletide, 1 ng/kg iv or with an equal volume of saline solution. Pain in the right hypochondrium, referred pain, and Murphy's sign were scored before and after treatment. Data indicate that ceruletide is effective in biliary colic.

  11. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Johan; Chee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS) by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. Materials and Methods We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. Results The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. Conclusions This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula. PMID:27437540

  12. Partially covered self-expanding metal stent for unresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction: results of a large prospective series.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliva, Cristina; Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Concepción, Mar; Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez, Sarbelio; Gonzalez-Huix, Ferran; Mugica, Fernando; Cabriada, José Luis; Rodríguez, Claudio; Aguilar, Carlos Guarner

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is a well-established palliative treatment in patients with unresectable malignant biliary strictures. Obstruction of uncovered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) due to tumor ingrowth is the most frequent complication. Partially covered SEMS might increase stent patency but could favor complications related to stent covering, such as pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of partially covered SEMS in patients with an unresectable malignant biliary stricture. Patients with malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction treated endoscopically with partially covered SEMS were included in this multicenter, prospective, nonrandomized study. One hundred ninety-nine patients were endoscopically treated with partially covered SEMS in 32 Spanish hospitals. Clinical success after deep cannulation was 96%. Early complications occurred in 4% (3 pancreatitis, 2 cholangitis, 1 hemorrhage, 1 perforation, and 1 cholecystitis). Late complications occurred in 19.5% (18 obstructions, 10 migrations, 6 cholangitis without obstruction, 3 acute cholecystitis, and 2 pancreatitis), with no tumor ingrowth in any case. Median stent patency was 138.9 ± 112.6 days. One-year actuarial probability of stent patency was 70% and that of nonmigration was 86%. Multivariate analysis showed adjuvant radio- or chemotherapy as the only independent predictive factor of stent patency and previous insertion of a biliary stent was the only predictive factor of migration. The partially covered SEMS was easily inserted, had a high clinical success rate, and prevented tumor ingrowth. The incidence of possible complications related to stent coverage, namely, migration, pancreatitis, and cholecystitis, was lower than in previously published series.

  13. Aspirin Use Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Occlusion of Metallic Biliary Stents.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sunguk; Stevens, Tyler; Parsi, Mansour A; Lopez, Rocio; Vargo, John J

    2017-03-01

    Biliary self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs) are widely used to treat malignant and benign conditions of bile duct. Despite their lower rate of occlusion and longer patency than plastic stents, SEMSs still have significant rates of occlusion. We aimed to identify factors associated with occlusion of biliary SEMS. We performed a retrospective study of consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with biliary SEMS placement at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation from March 2011 to April 2016. We collected clinical, endoscopic, radiographic, and surgical data from medical records and performed multivariable analysis to identify factors associated with SEMS patency. Subjects that received minimal daily dose of 81 mg at the time of stent placement until the end of follow-up were assigned to the aspirin exposure group (n = 157) and compared with subjects with no aspirin exposure (n = 436). Patients were followed for a median 81 days. The primary outcome was hazard ratio for SEMS occlusion requiring an interventional maneuver for biliary drainage. We analyzed data from patients receiving a total of 593 biliary SEMS for treatment of malignant and benign conditions of bile duct. Stent occlusion was observed in 126 cases. Multivariable analysis showed that daily use of aspirin (81 mg or more) was associated with 51% lower risk of stent occlusion than in patients without daily use of aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.75). Furthermore, SEMSs had a longer duration of stent patency in patients in the aspirin exposure group (434.4 days) versus the no aspirin exposure group (339.9 days) (P < .001). Stricture location limited to distal bile duct (in comparison with strictures involving proximal extrahepatic duct) was associated with lower risk of stent occlusion (hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22-0.71). In an analysis of a large cohort of subjects with metallic biliary stent placement for malignant and benign

  14. [Etiopathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathies].

    PubMed

    Petronio, A S; Manes, M T; Di Meco, F; Nardini, V; Pecori, F; Ceccherini-Nellis, L; Barsotti, A; Mariani, M

    1993-12-01

    This study was carried out on 43 patients affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to investigate some of the etiopathological hypotheses on this illness. The Authors investigated: the persistence of virus genoma (coxsackie, HBV) on endomyocardial biopsies; the pattern of the II class major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were in the blood lymphocytes; the microvascular aspect of coronary circulation in the endomyocardial biopsies. Finally, in a separated group of 19 patients, the microvascular circulation was studied on skin biopsies and correlated with diabetic, valvular and normal subject. The results showed a 14% positivity for the presence of the virus genoma and a significant predominate of DR5 in the II class MHC of patients with a worse ventricular function. Capillary vessels of the coronary microcirculation were dilated in the 48% of the patients, especially in more compromised subjects. Viral myocarditis seem to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM) and the pattern of MHC could influence the progression of the illness. The microcirculation is probably a pathophysiological aspect. No etiological hypothesis seems to predominate.

  15. Biliary hypoplasia in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K; Ahmed, S F; Murday, V; McGrogan, P

    2006-05-01

    Neonatal hepatitis and biliary hypoplasia are not recognised features of Williams syndrome. A case of Williams syndrome, presenting with neonatal conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia leading to an initial misdiagnosis is reported.

  16. Choledochal cyst with bile duct dilatation: sonography and /sup 99/mTc IDA cholescintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.K.; Babcock, D.S.; Gelfand, M.H.

    1981-06-01

    Three cases of choledochal cyst associated with intrahepatic biliary dilatation are presented. Findings on sonography included a large cystic mass in the porta hepatis separate from the gallbladder; a dilated common hepatic or common bile duct entering directly into the cyst; the smaller cystic masses of dilated central intrahepatic ducts. The dilatation of the central intrahepatic bile ducts was moderate in two patients and massive in one patient. All three patients underwent operation with intraoperative cholangiography. Two patients had /sup 99/mTc IDA cholescintigraphy which confirmed the diagnosis of choledochal cyst by demonstrating filling of the cyst with stasis and delayed intestinal activity. The accurate preoperative diagnosis of choledochal cyst, made by sonography combined with /sup 99/mTc IDA cholescintigraphy, obviated invasive studies.

  17. Biliary stents in the millennium.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Indu; Kahaleh, Michel

    2011-11-01

    Biliary stents have now been in use for over two decades. Although a plethora of literature has been published on them, this review article is unique in its attempt to summarize important landmark trials and their implications on the management of various pancreatico-biliary disorders. This article will cover the various types of stents currently being used, established and upcoming indications, techniques of placement, and complications associated with stent use.

  18. Scintiscanning in the evaluation of biliary enteric anastomoses

    SciTech Connect

    Tidmore, H.; Ram, M.D.

    1985-03-01

    The evaluation of symptomatic patients who have undergone biliary enteric anastomoses, particularly when the diversion was into the jejunum, is difficult. Conventional techniques for evaluation, such as oral cholecystography (OCG), intravenous cholangiography (IVC), ultrasonography (US), computer-assisted tomography scanning (CT scanning), or endoscopy are not adequate to provide definitive information on the patency of the anastomoses. Hepatobiliary scintiscanning using /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA and BIDA (iminodiacetic acid derivatives) was performed on 12 patients. The patients were from 11 to 72 years of age and included ten men and two women. The scan results were correlated with US, CT scan, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), operative findings, and final diagnosis. Scanning was highly accurate in this group and could be performed successfully even in jaundiced patients (total serum bilirubin level up to 20.0 mg/dl). In patients in whom dilated bile ducts were demonstrated (by US, CT scan, or scintiscan), only the scintiscan revealed the true patency of the anastomoses. The advantages of the technique are that it is simple and noninvasive. Delayed transit of bile (scanning agent) to bowel is a very reliable indication of partial or complete obstruction. Scintiscanning is the only technique that demonstrated the functional state of biliary secretion and excretion into bowel in patients with previous biliary enteric anastomoses.

  19. Esophageal dilation in head and neck cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moss, William J; Pang, John; Orosco, Ryan K; Weissbrod, Philip A; Brumund, Kevin T; Weisman, Robert A; Brigger, Matthew T; Coffey, Charles S

    2017-05-12

    To characterize the safety profile and effectiveness of esophageal dilation in head and neck cancer patients. A systematic review was undertaken for articles reporting outcomes of esophageal dilation in head and neck cancer patients. The Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases were searched in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Complications related to esophageal dilation in head and neck cancer patients was the primary outcome of interest. Success rates, demographic data, cancer staging, and treatment data were assessed secondarily. Statistical analyses included both qualitative and quantitative assessments. A limited meta-analysis and pooling of the data was performed using a random effects model. Of the collective 8,243 initial candidate articles, 15 retrospective studies containing data for a collective 449 patients were ultimately included in the analysis. There was significant heterogeneity in the outcomes data. With an overall complication rate of 10.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.1%,17%) and a pooled success rate of 72.9% (95% CI: 65.7%,80.1%) per patient, the articles generally supported the use of dilation. Head and neck cancer patients experience a higher rate of complications following dilation compared to patients with other causes of benign stricture. Esophageal dilation is effective in improving dysphagia, but these benefits are often transient and thus necessitate repeat interventions. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Endoscopic minor papilla balloon dilation for the treatment of symptomatic pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sasahira, Naoki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Miyabayashi, Koji; Mizuno, Suguru; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-08-01

    A subpopulation of patients with pancreas divisum experience symptomatic events such as recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Minor papilla sphincterotomy has been reported as being an effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic balloon dilation for the minor papilla. Between 2000 and 2012, 16 patients were retrospectively included in this study. After endoscopic balloon dilation for the minor papilla was received, a pancreatic stent or a nasal pancreatic drainage catheter was placed for 1 week. If a stricture or obstruction was evident, it was treated with balloon dilation followed by long-term stent placement (1 year). When an outflow of pancreatic juice was disturbed by a pancreatic stone, endoscopic stone extraction was performed. Balloon dilation and stent placement were achieved and were successful in all the cases (16/16; 100%). Clinical improvement was achieved in 7 (84.7%) of the 9 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis and in 6 (85.7%) of the 7 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Early complications were observed in 1 (6.3%) patient. Pancreatitis or bleeding related to balloon dilation was not observed. Endoscopic balloon dilation for the minor papilla is feasible for the management of symptomatic pancreas divisum.

  1. Suspected biliary complications after laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy leading to endoscopic cholangiography: a retrospective comparison.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Dungan, C; Neff, G; Ferguson, R; Favrot, D; Nandy, I; Banish, P; Sittig, K

    1998-03-01

    To study how suspected postoperative biliary complications are influenced by surgical technique, we compared clinical profiles of 63 patients referred for ERCP after open (OC) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) over a four-year period. ERCP was not performed for postoperative pain alone and only six (9.5%) studies were normal. Referrals after LC were younger (mean 39.1 vs 53.6 years, P < 0.001) and ERCP was requested earlier (mean 71.6 vs 2360 days, P < 0.001) in the postoperative course. Choledocholithiasis (CDL) alone, the most common finding, was successfully managed with a single ERCP in 97.2% of cases. CDL after LC occurred in younger patients (35.5 vs 58.9 years, P < 0.01) who presented earlier (mean 98.6 days vs 5.1 years, P < 0.01), without biliary ductal dilatation (P < 0.01). Although CDL after LC was associated with higher ALT and bilirubin levels than after OC, the difference was not statistically significant. Cystic duct leaks (LC: six patients, OC: four patients) were typically associated with CDL after OC and 90% resolved with endoscopic therapy. Biliary ligation (four cases) was managed successfully with choledochojejunostomy. We conclude that findings at ERCP for suspected biliary obstruction or injury after OC or LC are similar and usually can be endoscopically managed. After LC, referrals currently are younger, present much earlier, and retained stones are less likely to be associated with ductal dilatation than after OC.

  2. Evolution from primary biliary cirrhosis to primary biliary cirrhosis/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Twaddell, William S; Lefkowitch, Jay; Berk, Paul D

    2008-02-01

    An asymptomatic 70-year-old Hispanic woman with type 2 diabetes was found in 2004 to have an AST of 132 U/L, ALT 146 U/L, alkaline phosphatase 1107 U/L, total serum bilirubin 3.5 mg/dL, and albumin 2.9 g/dL. Viral hepatitis testing was negative. Serum IgG, IgA, and IgM were all elevated, antimitochondrial antibody was weakly positive, and antinuclear antibody was negative. Liver biopsy was reported to show "evolving cirrhosis with marked lymphoid hyperplasia." Although the indication was nowhere stated, she was prescribed ursodeoxycholic acid 500 mg b.i.d, on which her biochemical tests initially improved. One year later she developed itching and jaundice. Imaging studies revealed multiple gallstones. An MRCP was suggestive of cirrhosis with a questionable common bile duct stricture, and she underwent ERCP with removal of gallbladder and common bile duct stones and placement of a biliary stent. A periampullary mass, which proved to be a somatostatinoma, was excised in 2006 via an open laparotomy, at which the stent was removed and a second liver biopsy performed. It was reported as showing chronic active hepatitis, activity stage 2, and fibrosis grade 3 with bridging. Her subsequent course was complicated by recurrent bleeding from small bowel arteriovenous malformations. Seen for the first time at Columbia University Medical Center in January 2007, she complained of continuing pruritus. AST was 69 U/L, ALT 43 U/L, alkaline phosphatase 491 U/L, and total bilirubin 3.3 mg/dL. Serum albumin was 2.6 g/dL. Antinuclear antibodies, negative in 2004, were now positive at 1:320, and antimitochondrial M2 antibodies were strongly positive. Serum IgG and IgA, but NOT IgM, were elevated. Review of her outside liver biopsies revealed features of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) in the first, and of both PBC and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in the second. The patient exhibits an overlap syndrome, in which both histologic and serologic features of AIH evolved in a setting initially

  3. Percutaneous Embolization of Transhepatic Tracks for Biliary Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stuart M.; Terhaar, Olaf; Given, Mark F.; O'Dwyer, Helena M.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2006-12-15

    Significant pain can occur after removing transhepatic catheters from biliary access tracks, after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) or stenting. We undertook a randomized prospective study to ascertain whether track embolization decreases the amount of pain or analgesic requirement after PBD. Fifty consecutive patients (M:F, 22:28; age range:29-85 years; mean age: 66.3 years) undergoing PBD were randomized to receive track embolization or no track embolization after removal of biliary drainage catheters. A combination of Lipoidol and n-butyl cyanoacrylate were used to embolize transhepatic tracks using an 8F dilator. The patients who did not have track embolization performed had biliary drainage catheters removed over a guide wire. A visual analog scoring (VAS) system was used to grade pain associated with catheter removal, 24 h afterward. A required analgesic score (RAS) was devised to tabulate the analgesia required. No analgesia had a score of 0, oral or rectal nonopiate analgesics had a score of 1, oral opiates had a score of 2, and parenteral opiates had a score of 3. The average VAS and RAS for both groups were calculated and compared.Seven patients were excluded for various reasons, leaving 43 patients in the study group. Twenty-one patients comprised the embolization group and 22 patients comprised the nonembolization group. The mean biliary catheter dwell time was not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the embolization group and nonembolization (mean: 5.4 days vs 6.9 days, respectively). In the nonembolization group, the mean VAS was 3.4. Eight patients required parenteral opiates, three patients required oral opiates, and five patients required oral or rectal analgesics, yielding a mean RAS of 1.6. In the embolization group, the mean VAS was 0.9. No patient required parenteral opiates, six patients required oral opiates, and two patients had oral analgesia. The average RAS was 0.6. Both the VAS and the RAS were significantly lower in the

  4. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Douglas L.; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the etiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month’s duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  5. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Cisco; Unruh, William G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer (Gooding and Unruh in Phys Rev D 90:044071, 2014). The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation (Pikovski et al in Nat Phys, 2015). We note that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, emphasizing that the effect can be attributed entirely to proper time differences, and thus is not necessarily related to gravity. Whereas the effect described in (Pikovski et al in Nat Phys, 2015) vanishes in the absence of an external gravitational field, our approach bootstraps the gravitational contribution to the time dilation decoherence by including self-interaction, yielding a fundamentally gravitational intrinsic decoherence effect.

  6. Fetal demise by umbilical cord around abdomen and stricture.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chi-Huang; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Chen, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord abnormalities are accepted as conditions associated with intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD), and umbilical cord stricture is most frequently encountered. In addition, although cord entanglement with multiple loops rarely increases the perinatal mortality, it is associated with a significant increase in variable kind of morbidity such as growth restriction. We describe a 27-year-old woman, with a missed abortion history at about 10 weeks' gestation in her first pregnancy, who presented to our outpatient department at 34 4/7 weeks of gestation due to decreased fetal activity during the preceding week. No fetal heart activity and blood flow had been detected by ultrasonography and pulsed-wave Doppler. A demised fetus with umbilical cord stricture and three loops around abdomen was delivered and was weighted 1,830 g that was below the tenth percentile for the gestational age. Either umbilical cord stricture or entanglement around the body can affect the development of the fetus and even be lethal. The former might play a more important role in this case. Their etiology and the sequence of the events are still undetermined, and additional evaluation such as autopsy and further research may be needed. In addition, counsel and frequent fetal surveillance should be done in patients with previous IUFD attributed to cord stricture during next pregnancy because of undetermined risk of recurrence.

  7. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  8. Crohn’s disease complicated by strictures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Zimmermann, Ellen M; Remzi, Feza H; Sandborn, William J

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of strictures as a complication of Crohn’s disease is a significant clinical problem. No specific antifibrotic therapies are available. This systematic review comprehensively addresses the pathogenesis, epidemiology, prediction, diagnosis and therapy of this disease complication. We also provide specific recommendations for clinical practice and summarise areas that require future investigation. PMID:23626373

  9. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    PubMed Central

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  10. Linear stapled gastrojejunostomy results in fewer strictures compared to circular stapled gastrojejunostomy in laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Vines, Larissa; Frick, Thomas; Aczél, Stefan; L'Allemand, Dagmar; Borovicka, Jan; Schiesser, Marc

    2017-07-08

    Currently, there are two laparoscopic stapling techniques to perform the gastrojejunostomy in gastric bypass surgery: the linear stapling and circular stapling techniques. The aim of the study was to compare the two techniques regarding postoperative morbidity and weight loss at an accredited bariatric reference center in Switzerland. We compared two consecutive cohorts at a single institution between November 2012 and June 2014 undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. The frequency of complications and weight loss at 1 year was assessed in 109 patients with the 21-mm circular stapling technique (CSA) and 134 patients with the linear stapling technique (LSA). Postoperative complications were more frequent in the CSA group with 23.9 versus 4.5% in the LSA group (p = <0.0001). The main difference was the frequency of strictures, which occurred in 15.6% in the CSA group versus 0% in the LSA group. As a result, endoscopic dilation was required at least once in 15 patients. There was no statistically significant difference in percentage of excessive weight loss (EWL) in both groups; EWL was 74% in the CSA group and 73% in the LSA group (p = 0.68). Linear stapled laparoscopic gastric bypass had fewer stenotic strictures with similar weight loss at 1 year compared to circular stapling technique.

  11. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  12. Evaluation of biliary disease by scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, M.D.; Hagihara, P.F.; Kim, E.E.; Coupal, J.; Griffen, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    The value of biliary scintigraphy was studied in 180 patients with suspected biliary tract disease. Most of the patients were investigated additionally by conventional techniques such as cholecystography, cholangiography and ultrasonography. It is concluded that biliary scintigraphy is a simple and safe technique for visualization of the biliary tract. It is particularly useful in the evaluation of acute cholecystitis, in patients with iodine sensitivity obstructive from nonobstructive jaundice.

  13. The Hepaticojejunostomy Technique with Intra-Anastomotic Stent in Biliary Diseases and Its Evolution throughout the Years: A Technical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Papalampros, Alexandros; Vailas, Michail; Petrou, Athanasios; Kontos, Michael; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (RYHJ) is currently considered as the definitive treatment for iatrogenic bile duct injuries and the principal representative of biliary diversion procedures. This technique has met many milestones of extensive evolution, particularly the last years of concomitant technological evolution (laparoscopic/robotic approach). Anastomotic strictures and leaks, which may have deleterious effects on the survival and quality of life of a patient with biliary obstruction of any cause, made the need of the development of a safe and efficient RYHJ compulsory. The aim of this technical analysis and the juxtaposed discussions is to elucidate with the most important milestones and technical tips and tricks all aspects of a feasible and reliable RYHJ technique that is performed in our center for the last 25 years in around 400 patients. PMID:27190504

  14. Biliary complications following liver transplantation: Single-center experience over three decades and recent risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Gutcke, André; Gwiasda, Jill; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify independent risk factors for biliary complications in a center with three decades of experience in liver transplantation. METHODS A total of 1607 consecutive liver transplantations were analyzed in a retrospective study. Detailed subset analysis was performed in 417 patients, which have been transplanted since the introduction of Model of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD)-based liver allocation. Risk factors for the onset of anastomotic biliary complications were identified with multivariable binary logistic regression analyses. The identified risk factors in regression analyses were compiled into a prognostic model. The applicability was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analyses with the log rank test were applied where appropriate. RESULTS Biliary complications were observed in 227 cases (14.1%). Four hundred and seventeen (26%) transplantations were performed after the introduction of MELD-based donor organ allocation. Since then, 21% (n = 89) of the patients suffered from biliary complications, which are further categorized into anastomotic bile leaks [46% (n = 41)], anastomotic strictures [25% (n = 22)], cholangitis [8% (n = 7)] and non-anastomotic strictures [3% (n = 3)]. The remaining 18% (n = 16) were not further classified. After adjustment for all univariably significant variables, the recipient MELD-score at transplantation (P = 0.006; OR = 1.035; 95%CI: 1.010-1.060), the development of hepatic artery thrombosis post-operatively (P = 0.019; OR = 3.543; 95%CI: 1.233-10.178), as well as the donor creatinine prior to explantation (P = 0.010; OR = 1.003; 95%CI: 1.001-1.006) were revealed as independent risk factors for biliary complications. The compilation of these identified risk factors into a prognostic model was shown to have good prognostic abilities in the investigated cohort with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.702. CONCLUSION The parallel occurrence of high

  15. Biliary complications following liver transplantation: Single-center experience over three decades and recent risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Gutcke, André; Gwiasda, Jill; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2017-01-28

    To identify independent risk factors for biliary complications in a center with three decades of experience in liver transplantation. A total of 1607 consecutive liver transplantations were analyzed in a retrospective study. Detailed subset analysis was performed in 417 patients, which have been transplanted since the introduction of Model of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD)-based liver allocation. Risk factors for the onset of anastomotic biliary complications were identified with multivariable binary logistic regression analyses. The identified risk factors in regression analyses were compiled into a prognostic model. The applicability was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analyses with the log rank test were applied where appropriate. Biliary complications were observed in 227 cases (14.1%). Four hundred and seventeen (26%) transplantations were performed after the introduction of MELD-based donor organ allocation. Since then, 21% (n = 89) of the patients suffered from biliary complications, which are further categorized into anastomotic bile leaks [46% (n = 41)], anastomotic strictures [25% (n = 22)], cholangitis [8% (n = 7)] and non-anastomotic strictures [3% (n = 3)]. The remaining 18% (n = 16) were not further classified. After adjustment for all univariably significant variables, the recipient MELD-score at transplantation (P = 0.006; OR = 1.035; 95%CI: 1.010-1.060), the development of hepatic artery thrombosis post-operatively (P = 0.019; OR = 3.543; 95%CI: 1.233-10.178), as well as the donor creatinine prior to explantation (P = 0.010; OR = 1.003; 95%CI: 1.001-1.006) were revealed as independent risk factors for biliary complications. The compilation of these identified risk factors into a prognostic model was shown to have good prognostic abilities in the investigated cohort with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.702. The parallel occurrence of high recipient MELD and impaired donor

  16. Multidetector CT of emergent biliary pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel B; Oto, Aytekin; Thomas, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Various biliary pathologic conditions can lead to acute abdominal pain. Specific diagnosis is not always possible clinically because many biliary diseases have overlapping signs and symptoms. Imaging can help narrow the differential diagnosis and lead to a specific diagnosis. Although ultrasonography (US) is the most useful imaging modality for initial evaluation of the biliary system, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is helpful when US findings are equivocal or when biliary disease is suspected. Diagnostic accuracy can be increased by optimizing the CT protocol and using multiplanar reformations to localize biliary obstruction. CT can be used to diagnose and stage acute cholecystitis, including complications such as emphysematous, gangrenous, and hemorrhagic cholecystitis; gallbladder perforation; gallstone pancreatitis; gallstone ileus; and Mirizzi syndrome. CT also can be used to evaluate acute biliary diseases such as biliary stone disease, benign and malignant biliary obstruction, acute cholangitis, pyogenic hepatic abscess, hemobilia, and biliary necrosis and iatrogenic complications such as biliary leaks and malfunctioning biliary drains and stents. Treatment includes radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical intervention. Familiarity with CT imaging appearances of emergent biliary pathologic conditions is important for prompt diagnosis and appropriate clinical referral and treatment.

  17. Efficacy and safety of biodegradable stents for refractory benign esophageal strictures: the BEST (Biodegradable Esophageal Stent) study.

    PubMed

    Repici, Alessandro; Vleggaar, Frank P; Hassan, Cesare; van Boeckel, Petra G; Romeo, Fabio; Pagano, Nicola; Malesci, Alberto; Siersema, Peter D

    2010-11-01

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to standard dilation therapy present a challenging problem. Temporary plastic and metal stents have been proposed with inconclusive results. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new biodegradable stent for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures (RBESs). Prospective study from 2 European endoscopy centers. Twenty-one patients (11 men/10 women, mean age 60.2 ± 17.6 years) with RBESs defined according to the Kochman criteria treated by placement of a biodegradable stent (Ella stent). Clinical and endoscopic follow-up was scheduled at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months and later only in case of dysphagia recurrence. Pre- and poststenting dysphagia status was graded according to a 5-point scale. Minor and major complication rates were prospectively assessed. Stent insertion was technically successful in all of the patients. At 4 and 7 weeks, stent migration occurred in 2 patients (9.5%). At 3-month endoscopy, the stent appeared to be almost completely fragmented in all remaining patients. The median pre- and poststenting dysphagia scores were 3 (range 3-4) and 1 (range 0-2), respectively (P < .01), with a median follow-up of 53 weeks (range 25-88 weeks). In detail, 9 of 20 patients (45%) were dysphagia free at the end of the follow-up. No major complications occurred. Severe poststenting pain requiring analgesics developed in 3 patients, and minor bleeding was observed in 1 patient. Limited follow-up; nonrandomized study. In this preliminary study, the biodegradable stent showed a favorable risk/benefit ratio, achieving complete relief of dysphagia in nearly 50% of RBES patients without the occurrence of major complications. The use of this stent may be a valuable alternative to repeat endoscopic dilation. Larger studies with longer follow-up are needed. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term results of endoscopic balloon dilation for treatment of colorectal anastomotic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Biraima, Magdalena; Adamina, Michel; Jost, Res; Breitenstein, Stefan; Soll, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Despite standardized techniques, anastomotic complications after colorectal resection remain a challenging problem. Among those, anastomotic stricture is a debilitating outcome which often requires multiple interventions and which is prone to recur. The present series investigates the long-term results of endoscopic balloon dilation for stenotic colorectal anastomosis. Consecutive patients from a single institution who presented with an anastomotic stenosis after a colorectal resection were identified using a prospective clinical database. Medical records were systematically reviewed to detail patients' outcomes. Over 17 years (1988-2015), 2361 consecutive patients underwent a colorectal anastomosis. Of those, 76 patients (3.2 %) suffered a symptomatic anastomotic stenosis within a median of 5 months (interquartile range (IQR) 2-13) of the index procedure. All stenoses were primarily treated by endoscopic balloon dilation. Median follow-up was 11 years (IQR 7-14). In half the patients, one to two attempts at endoscopic balloon dilation definitively relieved the stenosis. Overall, the median number of endoscopic balloon dilation required was 3 (IQR 2-3). Recurrence rates at 1 year, 3 year, and 5 year were 11, 22, and 25 %, respectively. Median time to recurrence was 12 months (IQR 3-24). Ultimately, two patients (2.6 %) underwent an operation due to failure of endoscopic treatment. All other patients (97.4 %) were treated successfully with endoscopic balloon dilation. A total of 12 patients (15.7 %) suffered a complication from endoscopic dilation. Of those, 11 were minor bleeding and one was a perforation at the level of the anastomosis. All complications were managed conservatively, and no emergency procedure was required as a consequence of attempted endoscopic balloon dilation. Endoscopic balloon dilation is a safe approach to effectively relieve an anastomotic stenosis following a colorectal resection.

  19. Cytological Sampling Versus Forceps Biopsy During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage and Analysis of Factors Predicting Success

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Byass, O. R.; Cast, J. E. I.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of cytological sampling and forceps biopsy in obstructing biliary lesions and to identify factors predictive of success. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 119) with suspected malignant inoperable obstructive jaundice treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during 7 years were included (60 male; mean age 72.5 years). All patients underwent forceps biopsy plus cytological sampling by washing the forceps device in cytological solution. Patient history, procedural and pathological records, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Histological diagnosis after forceps biopsy was more successful than cytology: Sensitivity was 78 versus 61%, and negative predictive value was 30 versus 19%. Cytology results were never positive when the forceps biopsy was negative. The cytological sample was negative and forceps sample positive in 2 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 16 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, and 1 case of benign disease. Diagnostic accuracy was predicted by low bilirubin (p < 0.001), aspartate transaminase (p < 0.05), and white cell count (p {<=} 0.05). Conclusions: This technique is safe and effective and is recommended for histological diagnosis during PTBD in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures. Diagnostic yield is greater when bilirubin levels are low and there is no sepsis; histological diagnosis by way of forceps biopsy renders cytological sampling unnecessary.

  20. Percutaneous Cholangioscopy in the Management of Biliary Disease: Experience in 25 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Alexandrakis, George; Kouroumalis, Helias; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: To present our experience performing percutaneous cholangioscopy in the management of 25 patients with biliary disease.Methods: During the last 3 years, 26 percutaneous cholangioscopies were performed in 25 patients with common bile duct disease (n = 16), intrahepatic ducts disease (n = 6), and gallbladder disease (n = 4). Our patient population group included seven with common bile duct stones, three with intrahepatic lithiasis, and eight with benign strictures (six iatrogenic and two postinflammatory). In four patients malignancy was to be excluded, in two the tumor extent was to be evaluated, whereas in one case the correct placement of a metallic stent needed to be controlled. A 9.9 Fr flexible endoscope URF-P (Olympus, 1.2 mm working channel, 70-cm length) was used.Results: In total, percutaneous cholangioscopy answered 30 diagnostic questions, was technically helpful in 19 cases (performing lithotripsy or biopsy or guiding a wire), and of therapeutic help in 12 (performing stone retrieval). In 24 of 26 cases the therapeutic decision and the patient management changed because of the findings or because of the help of the method. In two cases biliary intervention failed to treat the cause of the disease. No major complication due to the use of the endoscopy was noted.Conclusions: Percutaneous cholangioscopy is a very useful tool in the management of patients with biliary disease. The method can help in diagnosis, in performing complex interventional procedures, and in making or changing therapeutic decisions.

  1. Reconstructing single hepatic artery with two arterial stumps: biliary complications in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Julka, Karan D; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Chen, Chao-Long; Wang, Chih-Chi; Komorowski, Andrzej L

    2014-01-01

    Liver grafts can at times have two hepatic arterial stumps. This can result in a dilemma whether to reconstruct single or both the arteries. Hepatic artery (HA) thrombosis is the most dreaded complication in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) as it can result in biliary complications and subsequent graft loss. We herein report the feasibility of reconstructing single hepatic artery in pediatric living donor liver transplantation having two arterial stumps in the liver graft. From 2008 to 2010, 87 pediatric patients undergoing LDLT were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 20): two HA stumps with two HA reconstruction, Group 2 (n = 22): two HA stumps with one HA reconstruction and Group 3 (n = 45): one HA stump with one HA reconstruction. The decision regarding the reconstruction of single or multiple HAs was made depending on the pre-operative radiological and intraoperative assessments. The incidence of HA thrombosis (p = 0.126) and biliary complications (p = 0.617), was similar in the three groups. Single HA reconstruction does not increase the risk of biliary strictures in pediatric LDLT recipients having dual hepatic arterial stumps in the liver graft.

  2. [Endoscopic management of postoperative biliary fistulas].

    PubMed

    Farca, A; Moreno, M; Mundo, F; Rodríguez, G

    1991-01-01

    Biliary fistulas have been managed by surgical correction with no good results. From 1986 to 1990, endoscopic therapy was attempted in 24 patients with postoperative persistent biliary-cutaneous fistulas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography demonstrated residual biliary stones in 19 patients (79%). The mean fistula drainage was 540 ml/day, and in 75% the site of the fistula was near the cistic duct stump. Sphincterotomy with or without biliary stent placement resulted in rapid resolution of the fistula in 23 patients (95.8%). In those patients treated with biliary stents the fistula healed spectacularly in 24-72 hrs.

  3. Nasogastric tube as protection for recurrent oesophageal stricture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Woynarowski, Marek; Dądalski, Maciej; Wojno, Violetta; Teisseyre, Mikołaj; Szymczak, Marek; Chyżyńska, Anna; Hurkała, Leszek; Płowiecki, Emil; Kmiotek, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the case of an 8.5-year-old boy with Down syndrome after experiencing extensive caustic injury to the oesophagus and stomach resulting from the accidental ingestion of concentrated sulphuric acid. The patient had undergone 32 unsuccessful endoscopic oesophageal stricture dilatations and stenting procedures performed over a period of 15 mo following the accident. Surgical reconstruction of the oesophagus was not possible due to previous gastric and cardiac surgeries for congenital conditions. Before referring the patient for salivary fistula surgery, the patient received a nasogastric tube with perforations located above the upper margin of the oesophageal stenosis for the passage of saliva and fluid. The tube was well tolerated and improved swallowing; however the backflow of gastric contents caused recurrent infections of the respiratory tract. To overcome these problems, we developed a double lumen, varying diameter, perforated tube for protection of the oesophageal closure. This nasogastric tube was found to be safe and decreased the need for hospitalization and further endoscopic procedures. This newly developed tube can thus be considered as a treatment option for patients with recurrent oesophageal stenosis and contraindications for surgical oesophageal reconstruction. PMID:24782635

  4. Incidence and predictors of severe acute esophagitis and subsequent esophageal stricture in patients treated with accelerated hyperfractionated chemoradiation for limited-stage small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jonathan D; Shirvani, Shervin M; Tang, Chad; Juloori, Aditya; Rebueno, Neal C; Allen, Pamela K; Chang, Joe Y

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and dosimetric predictors of severe (grade 3 or greater) acute esophageal toxicity and subsequent esophageal dilation were explored in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated with accelerated hyperfractionated chemoradiation. A total of 130 patients were identified who were treated to 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy twice-daily fractions with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy between 2000 and 2009. Data on clinical, disease-related, and treatment-related variables were collected. Patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion or intravenous hydration because of poor oral intake were designated as having acute grade 3 esophagitis. Univariate and multivariate analyses that associated treatment characteristics with esophagitis were assessed via logistic regression, and optimal cut points were identified with recursive partitioning analysis. Twenty-five patients developed severe acute esophagitis, at a rate of 26% (18/69) in patients treated with earlier 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy techniques and 11.5% (7/61) in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques and omission of elective nodal irradiation. The incidence of esophageal stricture was 6% overall (8 of 128 eligible) but 26% (6/23) among those who experienced prior grade 3 acute esophagitis and 2% (2/105) among those with acute esophagitis less than or equal to grade 2. Significant multivariate predictors of acute esophagitis were mean dose and volume of esophagus receiving at least 5% to 35% of the prescribed dose (V5 to V40). Patients with V5 ≥ 74% had a 44.4% risk of severe acute esophagitis (12/27) versus 12.6% (13/103) among those with V5 < 74%. V45 was the only dosimetric predictor for esophageal stricture, with 13.7% of patients in whom V45 was ≥37.5% requiring subsequent dilation. Modern radiation techniques are associated with a lower frequency of severe acute esophagitis than previous paradigms. The proportion of esophagus

  5. [The method of biliary tracts drainage of patients with biliodigestive anastomosis at obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Agaev, B A; Agaev, R M; Gasymov, R Sh

    2011-01-01

    The internal draining of biliary tracts of patients with obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis is considered most acceptable, but deficiency of this method is anastomosis failure, stricture and purulent-septic complications hazard. The investigations performed on 79 patients with obstructive jaundice, 36 of which were included in control group, 43 - in main group. To patients of main group with internal draining intraoperatively through the nose and biliodigestive anastomosis into the biliary tract transmitted tube with quartz optical monofiber for endocholedocheal laser irradiation in one lumen and hollow other, serve for drainage and irrigation of bile-excreting way with ozonized physiological solution. The application of endocholedocheal laser radiation and ozonetherapy in combination with suggested at biliodigestive anastomosis biliary tract drainage method allowed to earlier elimination of inflammatory process biliary tract, correct the bile lipids per oxidations disturbances and elevate activity of antioxidant protection system, to reduced the time of patients stay at hospital after surgery period from 20,3±1,24 day in control group to 12,7±0,653 day in main group (p<0,001), to prevent purulent-septic and scarry complications in complex treatment of patients with obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis.

  6. Management of patients with biliary sphincter of Oddi disorder without sphincter of Oddi manometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The paucity of controlled data for the treatment of most biliary sphincter of Oddi disorder (SOD) types and the incomplete response to therapy seen in clinical practice and several trials has generated controversy as to the best course of management of these patients. In this observational study we aimed to assess the outcome of patients with biliary SOD managed without sphincter of Oddi manometry. Methods Fifty-nine patients with biliary SOD (14% type I, 51% type II, 35% type III) were prospectively enrolled. All patients with a dilated common bile duct were offered endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy whereas all others were offered medical treatment alone. Patients were followed up for a median of 15 months and were assessed clinically for response to treatment. Results At follow-up 15.3% of patients reported complete symptom resolution, 59.3% improvement, 22% unchanged symptoms, and 3.4% deterioration. Fifty-one percent experienced symptom resolution/improvement on medical treatment only, 12% after sphincterotomy, and 10% after both medical treatment/sphincterotomy. Twenty percent experienced at least one recurrence of symptoms after initial response to medical and/or endoscopic treatment. Fifty ERCP procedures were performed in 24 patients with an 18% complication rate (16% post-ERCP pancreatitis). The majority of complications occurred in the first ERCP these patients had. Most complications were mild and treated conservatively. Age, gender, comorbidity, SOD type, dilated common bile duct, presence of intact gallbladder, or opiate use were not related to the effect of treatment at the end of follow-up (p > 0.05 for all). Conclusions Patients with biliary SOD may be managed with a combination of endoscopic sphincterotomy (performed in those with dilated common bile duct) and medical therapy without manometry. The results of this approach with regards to symptomatic relief and ERCP complication rate are comparable

  7. Single-operator cholangioscopy-guided laser lithotripsy in patients with difficult biliary and pancreatic ductal stones (with videos).

    PubMed

    Maydeo, Amit; Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bapat, Mukta; Dhir, Vinay

    2011-12-01

    Scant data exist on the utility of the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser for the treatment of biliary or pancreatic duct stones. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fiberoptic probe and catheter system-guided holmium laser lithotripsy of difficult biliary and pancreatic duct stones. Prospective study. Tertiary-care referral center. This study involved 64 patients who underwent holmium laser stone fragmentation. A total of 64 patients (60 bile duct stones, 4 pancreatic duct stones) underwent endoscopic retrograde stone fragmentation with a holmium laser and a fiberoptic probe and catheter system. The inclusion criterion for bile duct stones was stones not amenable to retrieval by mechanical lithotripsy and/or balloon sphincteroplasty or standard techniques. Pancreatic duct stones included in this study were not amenable to removal by stone retrieval basket or balloon. Rates of ductal clearance and procedural complications. All 64 patients had successful fragmentation of biliary and pancreatic duct stones with the holmium laser. Fifty of 60 patients (83.3%) had complete biliary duct clearance after a single session; 10 patients required an additional session. All pancreatic duct stones were fragmented in a single session. Mean duration of ERCP sessions was 45.9 minutes (range 30-90 minutes). Complications were mild and were encountered in 13.5% of patients; fever (n = 3), transient abdominal pain (n = 4), and biliary stricture (n = 1). No comparative treatment group. The fiberoptic probe and catheter system facilitates transpapillary access for holmium laser fragmentation of difficult biliary and pancreatic duct stones. The technique is safe and highly effective for single-setting duct clearance. Complications are minimal and transient. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI).

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Richter, Anette; Sandmöller, Andrea; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are heart muscle diseases, which have been defined by their central hemodynamics and macropathology and divided in five major forms: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), right ventricular (RVCM), and nonclassifiable cardiomyopathies (NCCM). Furthermore, the most recent WHO/WHF definition also comprises, among the specific cardiomyopathies, inflammatory cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity, defined as myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune, and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy were recognized. Viral cardiomyopathy has been defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (< 14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm(2)), the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in DCM should be applied according to the WHF Task Force recommendations. Within the German heart failure net it is the authors' working hypothesis, that DCM shares genetic risk factors with other diseases of presumed autoimmune etiology and, therefore, the same multiple genes in combination with environmental factors lead to numerous different autoimmune diseases including DCM. Therefore, the authors' primary goal is to acquire epidemiologic data of patients with DCM regarding an infectious and inflammatory etiology of the disease. Circumstantial evidence points to a major role of viral myocarditis in the etiology of DCM. The common presence of viral genetic material in the myocardium of patients with DCM provides the most compelling evidence, but proof of causality is still lacking. In addition, autoimmune reactions have been described in many studies, indicating them as an important etiologic factor. Nevertheless, data on the proportion of patients, in whom both mechanisms play a role are still missing.A pivotal role for

  9. [Biliary atresia and polysplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Yosra; Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayet; Belghith, Mohsen; Lassad, Sahnoun; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare malformation characterized by the association of multiple rates and other congenital anomalies dominated by cardiac, vascular, intestinal and bile malformations. We report the observation of a patient operated in the neonatal period (3 days) for an upper intestinal obstruction with situs inversus. Surgical exploration noted the presence of multiple rates, a preduodenal vein, a biliary atresia and a duodenal atresia. The surgical procedures performed were a latero-lateral duodeno-duodenostomy and hepatoportoenterostomy of KASAI with simple immediate and delayed outcomes. The follow up was of 23 years. We recall the epidemiological characteristics of this malformative association and we discuss the role played by the prognosis of polysplenia syndrome in the evolution of biliary atresia. The diagnosis and treatment of biliary atresia are always urgent to increase the chances of success of the Kasai, and the chances of prolonged survival with native liver. However, almost all long-term survivors (even anicteric) have biliary cirrhosis, which requires lifelong follow up.

  10. Late Development of Bile Duct Cancer in Patients Who Had Biliary-Enteric Drainage for Benign Disease: A Follow-Up Study of More Than 1,000 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tocchi, Adriano; Mazzoni, Gianluca; Liotta, Gianluca; Lepre, Luca; Cassini, Diletta; Miccini, Michelangelo

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between biliary-enteric surgical drainage and the late development of cholangiocarcinoma of the biliary tract. Summary Background Data In patients with biliary-enteric drainage, reflux of intestinal contents into the bile duct may occur and cause cholangitis, which is regarded as the most serious complication of these procedures. Lithiasis of the biliary tract and a previous biliary-enteric anastomosis have both been suggested to favor the late onset of cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 1,003) undergoing three different procedures of biliary-enteric anastomosis (transduodenal sphincteroplasty, choledochoduodenostomy, and hepaticojejunostomy) between 1967 and 1997 were included in this study. The postoperative clinical course and long-term outcome were evaluated by a retrospective review of the hospital records and follow-up. Mean follow-up was 129.6 months. Results Fifty-five (5.5%) cases of primary bile duct cancer were found among the 1,003 patients at intervals of 132 to 218 months from biliary-enteric anastomosis. The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in the three groups was 5.8% in transduodenal sphincteroplasty patients, 7.6% in choledochoduodenostomy patients, and 1.9% in hepaticojejunostomy patients. The incidence of malignancy related to the different underlying diagnosis was 5.9%, 7.2%, and 1.9% in patients with choledocholithiasis, sphincter of Oddi stenosis, and postoperative benign stricture, respectively. Although only one patient who developed cholangiocarcinoma had previous concurrent lithiasis of the biliary tract, 40 patients had experienced mostly severe, recurrent cholangitis. No case of malignancy occurred in patients scored as having no cholangitis in the early and long-term postoperative outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses have shown the presence of cholangitis as the only factor affecting the incidence of cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions Chronic inflammatory changes consequent

  11. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  12. SIU/ICUD Consultation on Urethral Strictures: The management of anterior urethral stricture disease using substitution urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Christopher; Andrich, Daniela; Atala, Anthony; Barbagli, Guido; Cavalcanti, André; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mangera, Altaf; Nakajima, Yosuke

    2014-03-01

    In this systematic review of the literature, a search of the PubMed database was conducted to identify articles dealing with augmentation/substitution urethral reconstruction of the anterior urethral stricture. The evidence was categorized by stricture site, surgical technique, and the type of tissue used. The committee appointed by the International Consultation on Urological Disease reviewed this data and produced a consensus statement relating to the augmentation and substitution of the anterior urethra. In this review article, the background pathophysiology is discussed. Most cases of urethral stricture disease in the anterior urethra are consequent on an ischemic spongiofibrosis. The choice of technique and the surgical approach are discussed along with the potential pros and cons of the use of a graft vs a flap. There is research potential for tissue engineering. The efficacy of the surgical approach to the urethra is reviewed. Whenever possible, a 1-stage approach is preferable from the patient's perspective. In some cases, with complex penile urethral strictures, a 2-stage procedure might be appropriate, and there is an important potential role for the use of a perineal urethrostomy in cases where there is an extensive anterior urethral stricture or where the patient does not wish to undergo complex surgery, or medical contraindications make this hazardous. It is important to have accurate outcome measures for the follow-up of patients, and in this context, a full account needs to be taken of patients' perspectives by the use of appropriate patient-reported outcome measures. The use of symptoms and a flow rate can be misleading. It is well established that with a normally functioning bladder, the flow rate does not diminish until the caliber of the urethra falls below 10F. The most accurate means of following up patients after stricture surgery are by the use of endoscopy or visualization by urethrography. Careful consideration needs to be made of the

  13. Palliative intubation for malignant strictures of the oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Leverment, J. N.; Milne, D. Mearns

    1974-01-01

    Leverment, J. N. and Mearns Milne, D. (1974).Thorax, 29, 228-231. Palliative intubation for malignant strictures of the oesophagus. Over a 16-year period the Mousseau-Barbin tube was used for palliation in 50 patients suffering from malignant stricture of the oesophagus. In only two cases was the Souttar tube used. Thirty-seven cases were intubated as a primary method of treatment—21 cases without preliminary exploration, 13 cases following exploration, and three cases as a `delayed' procedure. Twelve cases were secondarily intubated as a result of recurrence of malignancy following an earlier oesophagogastrectomy. In three cases perforation of the oesophagus was recognized at the time of intubation, following which palliative oesophagogastrectomies were attempted. Intubation remains one method of relieving the patient's most distressing symptom, but in the majority of cases prolongation of life was seldom for more than three months. The hazards of this form of treatment are discussed. PMID:4133968

  14. Metallic stents in the management of ureteric strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Management of ureteric strictures is a challenging task. Subtle presentation, silent progression and complex aetiology may delay diagnosis. A wide range of available treatment options combined with the lack of adequate randomised trials has led to the introduction of personal bias in the management of this difficult group of patients. Metallic ureteric stents offer an alternative to the conventional treatment modalities. A review of the currently available metallic stents and their role in the long-term management of ureteric strictures is presented. Materials used in the manufacture of indwelling urological devices are evolving all the time. Improved endo-urological techniques combined with new devices made from better compounds will continue to improve patient experience. PMID:24497686

  15. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2011-11-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

  16. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon

    2011-01-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema. PMID:22148129

  17. Fasciocutaneous flap in esophageal stricture with ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yong Won; Kang, Chang Hyun; Chang, Hak; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Young Tae

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal surgery in a patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt may increase the risk of shunt malfunction and infection. We present a successful case of resection and reconstruction of the cervical esophagus by rolled lateral thoracic artery fasciocutaneous flap in a patient with corrosive esophageal stricture and preexisting ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Follow-up esophagogastroscopy after 3 months revealed wide patent graft. Rolled fasciocutaneous flap may be a safe alternative treatment without risk of shunt-associated complications in a patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

  18. Cytomegalovirus: a cause of colonic stricture in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Anjali; Barnes, Rosemary; Lazda, Ed; Doherty, Cora; Maxwell, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    A 27-week-old infant developed symptoms of bowel obstruction when full enteral feeds were started. Laparotomy revealed strictures in the ascending and proximal transverse colon. Right hemicolectomy was performed. Histological examination of the resected large bowel demonstrated the presence of Cytomegalovirus inclusion bodies. Cytomegalovirus infections of the gut are extremely rare in neonates. This case report alerts neonatologists and microbiologists to consider Cytomegalovirus infection as a possible cause of bowel obstruction and necrotising enterocolitis like symptoms.

  19. Incidental adenocarcinoma in patients undergoing surgery for stricturing Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kristo, Ivan; Riss, Stefan; Argeny, Stanislaus; Maschke, Svenja; Chitsabesan, Praminthra; Stift, Anton

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate frequency and clinical course of incidental adenocarcinoma in patients with stricturing Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS In this study, consecutive patients, who were operated on for stricturing CD between 1997-2012, were included at an academic tertiary referral center. Demographic data and clinical course were obtained by an institutional database and individual chart review. Besides baseline characteristics, intraoperative findings and CD related history were also recorded. Colorectal cancer was classified and staged according to the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC). RESULTS During the study period 484 patients underwent resections due to stricturing CD. Incidental adenocarcinoma was histologically confirmed in 6 (1.2%) patients (4 males, 2 females). Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer had a median age of 43 (27-66) years and a median history of CD of 16 (7-36) years. Malignant lesions were found in the rectum (n = 4, 66.7%), descending colon (n = 1, 16.7%) and ileocolon (n = 1, 16.7%). According to the UICC classification two patients were stages as I (33.3%), whereas the other patients were classified as stage IIA (16.7%), stage IIIB (16.7%), stage IIIC (16.7%) and stage IV (16.7%), respectively. After a median follow-up of 2 (0.03-8) years only 1 patient is still alive. CONCLUSION The frequency of incidental colorectal cancer in patients, who undergo surgery for stenotic CD, is low but associated with poor prognosis. However, surgeons need to be aware about the possibility of malignancy in stricturing CD, especially if localized in the rectum. PMID:28210083

  20. Common bile duct stones associated with pancreatobiliary reflux and disproportionate bile duct dilatation.

    PubMed

    Huh, Cheal Wung; Kim, Hee Wook; Yi, Seung Woo; Lee, Dong Ki; Lee, Se Joon

    2017-08-01

    Occult pancreatobiliary reflux (PBR) in patients with a normal pancreatobiliary junction has been studied by various methods, but the exact etiology, mechanisms, and implications of this reflux have not yet been clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of PBR and patterns of biliary ductal dilatation in patients with acute calculous cholangitis by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).We retrospectively evaluated the degree of PBR and pattern of bile duct dilatation in patients with acute calculous cholangitis due to distal CBD (common bile duct) stones (Group A) as compared with patients with malignant CBD obstruction due to distal CBD cancer (Group B). All related data were prospectively collected. Bile juice was aspirated at the proximal CBD for measurement of biliary amylase and lipase before the injection of contrast dye. The diameters of the CBD and the peripheral intrahepatic duct (IHD) were calculated after contrast dye injection. Patients with pancreatobiliary maljunction and/or gallstone pancreatitis were excluded from the study.ERCP was performed on 33 patients with calculous cholangitis (Group A) and 12 patients with malignant CBD obstruction (Group B). Mean levels of bile amylase and lipase were significantly higher (P < .05) in group A (1387 and 6737 U/l, respectively) versus those in group B (32 and 138 U/l, respectively). Thirty patients in group A (90.9%) showed disproportionate dilatation (i.e., CBD was and IHD was not dilated), whereas only 4 patients in group B (33%) showed disproportionate dilatation.The results of this study suggest that patients with calculous cholangitis exhibit PBR that is associated with disproportionate bile duct dilatation.

  1. Management of Long-Segment and Panurethral Stricture Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Francisco E.; Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj; Warner, Jonathan; Martins, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Long-segment urethral stricture or panurethral stricture disease, involving the different anatomic segments of anterior urethra, is a relatively less common lesion of the anterior urethra compared to bulbar stricture. However, it is a particularly difficult surgical challenge for the reconstructive urologist. The etiology varies according to age and geographic location, lichen sclerosus being the most prevalent in some regions of the globe. Other common and significant causes are previous endoscopic urethral manipulations (urethral catheterization, cystourethroscopy, and transurethral resection), previous urethral surgery, trauma, inflammation, and idiopathic. The iatrogenic causes are the most predominant in the Western or industrialized countries, and lichen sclerosus is the most common in India. Several surgical procedures and their modifications, including those performed in one or more stages and with the use of adjunct tissue transfer maneuvers, have been developed and used worldwide, with varying long-term success. A one-stage, minimally invasive technique approached through a single perineal incision has gained widespread popularity for its effectiveness and reproducibility. Nonetheless, for a successful result, the reconstructive urologist should be experienced and familiar with the different treatment modalities currently available and select the best procedure for the individual patient. PMID:26779259

  2. External biliary fistula in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilbo, N; Mirabella, S; Strignano, P; Ricchiuti, A; Lupo, F; Giono, I; Sanna, C; Fop, F; Salizzoni, M

    2009-05-01

    During orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), various s