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Sample records for bimodal particle size

  1. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ⪢1 and |m-1|⪡1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  2. Modeling the Hydrological Cycle in the Atmosphere of Mars: Influence of a Bimodal Size Distribution of Aerosol Nucleation Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaposhnikov, Dmitry S.; Rodin, Alexander V.; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Fedorova, Anna A.; Kuroda, Takeshi; Hartogh, Paul

    2018-02-01

    We present a new implementation of the hydrological cycle scheme into a general circulation model of the Martian atmosphere. The model includes a semi-Lagrangian transport scheme for water vapor and ice and accounts for microphysics of phase transitions between them. The hydrological scheme includes processes of saturation, nucleation, particle growth, sublimation, and sedimentation under the assumption of a variable size distribution. The scheme has been implemented into the Max Planck Institute Martian general circulation model and tested assuming monomodal and bimodal lognormal distributions of ice condensation nuclei. We present a comparison of the simulated annual variations, horizontal and vertical distributions of water vapor, and ice clouds with the available observations from instruments on board Mars orbiters. The accounting for bimodality of aerosol particle distribution improves the simulations of the annual hydrological cycle, including predicted ice clouds mass, opacity, number density, and particle radii. The increased number density and lower nucleation rates bring the simulated cloud opacities closer to observations. Simulations show a weak effect of the excess of small aerosol particles on the simulated water vapor distributions.

  3. Performance evaluation of bimodal thermite composites : nano- vs miron-scale particles

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K. M.; Pantoya, M.; Son, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years many studies of metastable interstitial composites (MIC) have shown vast combustion improvements over traditional thermite materials. The main difference between these two materials is the size of the fuel particles in the mixture. Decreasing the fuel size from the micron to nanometer range significantly increases the combustion wave speed and ignition sensitivity. Little is known, however, about the critical level of nano-sized fuel particles needed to enhance the performance of the traditional thermite. Ignition sensitivity experiments were performed using Al/MoO{sub 3} pellets at a theoretical maximum density of 50% (2 g/cm{sup 3}). The Al fuel particles weremore » prepared as bi-modal size distributions with micron (i.e., 4 and 20 {micro}m diameter) and nano-scale Al particles. The micron-scale Al was replaced in 10% increments by 80 nm Al particles until the fuel was 100% 80 nm Al. These bi-modal distributions allow the unique characteristics of nano-scale materials to be better understood. The pellets were ignited using a 50-W CO{sub 2} laser. High speed imaging diagnostics were used to measure ignition delay times, and micro-thermocouples were used to measure ignition temperatures. Combustion wave speeds were also examined.« less

  4. Evidence for a bimodal size distribution for the suspended aerosol particles on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, A. A.; Montmessin, F.; Rodin, A. V.; Korablev, O. I.; Määttänen, A.; Maltagliati, L.; Bertaux, J.-L.

    2014-03-01

    First simultaneous analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) atmospheric extinctions from SPICAM/Mars Express solar occultations in the beginning of the Northern summer (Ls = 56-97°) is presented. The two SPICAM channels allow sounding of the martian atmosphere in the spectral range from 0.118 to 1.7 μm at the altitudes from 10 to 80 km. Based on Mie scattering theory with adequate refraction indices for dust and H2O ice, a bimodal distribution of aerosol has been inferred from the SPICAM measurements. The coarser mode is represented by both dust and H2O particles with average radius of 0.7 and 1.2 μm, respectively, with number density from 0.01 to 10 particles in cm3. Clouds belonging to the aphelion cloud belt have been observed in midlatitudes in the Southern and the Northern hemispheres at altitudes of 20-30 km. The clouds are formed of large particles, and their opacity in the UV and the IR is below 0.03. The finer mode with a radius of 0.04-0.07 μm and a number density from 1 cm-3 at 60 km to 1000 cm-3 at 20 km has been detected in both hemispheres. In the Southern hemisphere the finer mode extends up to 70 km, whereas in the Northern hemisphere it is confined below 30-40 km. The lack of condensation nuclei is consistent, but could not fully explain the high water supersaturation observed between 30 and 50 km in the same Northern hemisphere dataset (Maltagliati L., Montmessin, F., Fedorova, A., Korablev, O., Forget, F., Bertaux, J.-L. [2011]. Science 333, 1868-1871). The average size of the fine mode (∼50 nm) and the large number density (up to 1000 cm-3) most likely corresponds to Aitken particles (r < 0.1 μm). This mode is unstable against coagulation and requires a continuous source of particles to be maintained, at least one order of magnitude more than estimations for the meteoric flux. A possible source is the dust lifting from the surface and dust devils. A detailed microphysical modeling is required to study the probability of survival

  5. The effect of crystal shape, size and bimodality on the maximum packing and the rheology of crystal bearing magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moitra, Pranabendu; Gonnermann, Helge

    2014-05-01

    Magma often contains crystals of various shapes and sizes. We present experimental results on the effect of the shape- and size-distribution of solid particles on the rheological properties of solid-liquid suspensions, which are hydrodynamically analogous to crystal-bearing magmas. The suspensions were comprised of either a single particle shape and size (unimodal) or a mixture of two different particle shapes and sizes (bimodal). For each type of suspension we characterized the dry maximum packing fraction of the particle mixture using the tap density method. We then systematically varied the total volume fraction of particles in the suspension, as well as the relative proportion of the two different particle types in the bimodal suspensions. For each of the resultant mixtures (suspensions) we performed controlled shear stress experiments using a rotational rheometer in parallel-plate geometry spanning 4 orders of magnitude in shear stress. The resultant data curves of shear stress as a function of shear rate were fitted using a Herschel-Bulkley rheological model. We find that the dry maximum packing decreases with increasing particle aspect ratio (ar) and decreasing particle size ratio (Λ). The highest dry maximum packing was obtained at 60-75% volume of larger particles for bimodal spherical particle mixture. Normalized consistency, Kr, defined as the ratio of the consistency of the suspension and the viscosity of the suspending liquid, was fitted using a Krieger-Dougherty model as a function of the total solid volume fraction (φ). The maximum packing fractions (φm) obtained from the shear experimental data fitting of the unimodal suspensions were similar in magnitude with the dry maximum packing fractions of the unimodal particles. Subsequently, we used the dry maximum packing fractions of the bimodal particle mixtures to fit Kr as a function of φ for the bimodal suspensions. We find that Kr increases rapidly for suspensions with larger ar and smaller

  6. Bimodal and multimodal plant biomass particle mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H.

    2013-07-09

    An industrial feedstock of plant biomass particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein the particles are individually characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L, wherein the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces, and wherein the particles in the feedstock are collectively characterized by having a bimodal or multimodal size distribution.

  7. Inversion of multiwavelength Raman lidar data for retrieval of bimodal aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, Igor; Kolgotin, Alexei; Griaznov, Vadim; Müller, Detlef; Franke, Kathleen; Whiteman, David N.

    2004-02-01

    We report on the feasibility of deriving microphysical parameters of bimodal particle size distributions from Mie-Raman lidar based on a triple Nd:YAG laser. Such an instrument provides backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm. The inversion method employed is Tikhonov's inversion with regularization. Special attention has been paid to extend the particle size range for which this inversion scheme works to ~10 μm, which makes this algorithm applicable to large particles, e.g., investigations concerning the hygroscopic growth of aerosols. Simulations showed that surface area, volume concentration, and effective radius are derived to an accuracy of ~50% for a variety of bimodal particle size distributions. For particle size distributions with an effective radius of <1 μm the real part of the complex refractive index was retrieved to an accuracy of +/-0.05, the imaginary part was retrieved to 50% uncertainty. Simulations dealing with a mode-dependent complex refractive index showed that an average complex refractive index is derived that lies between the values for the two individual modes. Thus it becomes possible to investigate external mixtures of particle size distributions, which, for example, might be present along continental rims along which anthropogenic pollution mixes with marine aerosols. Measurement cases obtained from the Institute for Tropospheric Research six-wavelength aerosol lidar observations during the Indian Ocean Experiment were used to test the capabilities of the algorithm for experimental data sets. A benchmark test was attempted for the case representing anthropogenic aerosols between a broken cloud deck. A strong contribution of particle volume in the coarse mode of the particle size distribution was found.

  8. Inversion of multiwavelength Raman lidar data for retrieval of bimodal aerosol size distribution.

    PubMed

    Veselovskii, Igor; Kolgotin, Alexei; Griaznov, Vadim; Müller, Detlef; Franke, Kathleen; Whiteman, David N

    2004-02-10

    We report on the feasibility of deriving microphysical parameters of bimodal particle size distributions from Mie-Raman lidar based on a triple Nd:YAG laser. Such an instrument provides backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm. The inversion method employed is Tikhonov's inversion with regularization. Special attention has been paid to extend the particle size range for which this inversion scheme works to approximately 10 microm, which makes this algorithm applicable to large particles, e.g., investigations concerning the hygroscopic growth of aerosols. Simulations showed that surface area, volume concentration, and effective radius are derived to an accuracy of approximately 50% for a variety of bimodal particle size distributions. For particle size distributions with an effective radius of < 1 microm the real part of the complex refractive index was retrieved to an accuracy of +/- 0.05, the imaginary part was retrieved to 50% uncertainty. Simulations dealing with a mode-dependent complex refractive index showed that an average complex refractive index is derived that lies between the values for the two individual modes. Thus it becomes possible to investigate external mixtures of particle size distributions, which, for example, might be present along continental rims along which anthropogenic pollution mixes with marine aerosols. Measurement cases obtained from the Institute for Tropospheric Research six-wavelength aerosol lidar observations during the Indian Ocean Experiment were used to test the capabilities of the algorithm for experimental data sets. A benchmark test was attempted for the case representing anthropogenic aerosols between a broken cloud deck. A strong contribution of particle volume in the coarse mode of the particle size distribution was found.

  9. Primary particle diameter differentiation and bimodality identification by five analytical methods using gold nanoparticle size distributions synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letzel, Alexander; Gökce, Bilal; Menzel, Andreas; Plech, Anton; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2018-03-01

    For a known material, the size distribution of a nanoparticle colloid is a crucial parameter that defines its properties. However, measured size distributions are not easy to interpret as one has to consider weighting (e.g. by light absorption, scattering intensity, volume, surface, number) and the way size information was gained. The radius of a suspended nanoparticle can be given as e.g. sphere equivalent, hydrodynamic, Feret or radius of gyration. In this study, gold nanoparticles in water are synthesized by pulsed-laser ablation (LAL) and fragmentation (LFL) in liquids and characterized by various techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), analytical disc centrifugation (ADC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectroscopy with Mie-Gans Theory) to study the comparability of different analytical techniques and determine the method that is preferable for a given task related to laser-generated nanoparticles. In particular, laser-generated colloids are known to be bimodal and/or polydisperse, but bimodality is sometimes not analytically resolved in literature. In addition, frequently reported small size shifts of the primary particle mode around 10 nm needs evaluation of its statistical significance related to the analytical method. Closely related to earlier studies on SAXS, different colloids in defined proportions are mixed and their size as a function of the nominal mixing ratio is analyzed. It is found that the derived particle size is independent of the nominal mixing ratio if the colloid size fractions do not overlap considerably. Conversely, the obtained size for colloids with overlapping size fractions strongly depends on the nominal mixing ratio since most methods cannot distinguish between such fractions. Overall, SAXS and ADC are very accurate methods for particle size analysis. Further, the ability of different methods to determine the nominal mixing ratio of sizes fractions is studied

  10. Effect of Bimodal Grain Size Distribution on Scatter in Toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Debalay; Strangwood, Martin; Davis, Claire

    2009-04-01

    Blunt-notch tests were performed at -160 °C to investigate the effect of a bimodal ferrite grain size distribution in steel on cleavage fracture toughness, by comparing local fracture stress values for heat-treated microstructures with uniformly fine, uniformly coarse, and bimodal grain structures. An analysis of fracture stress values indicates that bimodality can have a significant effect on toughness by generating high scatter in the fracture test results. Local cleavage fracture values were related to grain size distributions and it was shown that the largest grains in the microstructure, with an area percent greater than approximately 4 pct, gave rise to cleavage initiation. In the case of the bimodal grain size distribution, the large grains from both the “fine grain” and “coarse grain” population initiate cleavage; this spread in grain size values resulted in higher scatter in the fracture stress than in the unimodal distributions. The notch-bend test results have been used to explain the difference in scatter in the Charpy energies for the unimodal and bimodal ferrite grain size distributions of thermomechanically controlled rolled (TMCR) steel, in which the bimodal distribution showed higher scatter in the Charpy impact transition (IT) region.

  11. Ejected Particle Size Distributions from Shocked Metal Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Schauer, M. M.; Buttler, W. T.; Frayer, D. K.; ...

    2017-04-12

    Here, we present size distributions for particles ejected from features machined onto the surface of shocked Sn targets. The functional form of the size distributions is assumed to be log-normal, and the characteristic parameters of the distribution are extracted from the measured angular distribution of light scattered from a laser beam incident on the ejected particles. We also found strong evidence for a bimodal distribution of particle sizes with smaller particles evolved from features machined into the target surface and larger particles being produced at the edges of these features.

  12. Ejected Particle Size Distributions from Shocked Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M. M.; Buttler, W. T.; Frayer, D. K.

    Here, we present size distributions for particles ejected from features machined onto the surface of shocked Sn targets. The functional form of the size distributions is assumed to be log-normal, and the characteristic parameters of the distribution are extracted from the measured angular distribution of light scattered from a laser beam incident on the ejected particles. We also found strong evidence for a bimodal distribution of particle sizes with smaller particles evolved from features machined into the target surface and larger particles being produced at the edges of these features.

  13. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  14. Elaboration of austenitic stainless steel samples with bimodal grain size distributions and investigation of their mechanical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flipon, B.; de la Cruz, L. Garcia; Hug, E.; Keller, C.; Barbe, F.

    2017-10-01

    Samples of 316L austenitic stainless steel with bimodal grain size distributions are elaborated using two distinct routes. The first one is based on powder metallurgy using spark plasma sintering of two powders with different particle sizes. The second route applies the reverse-annealing method: it consists in inducing martensitic phase transformation by plastic strain and further annealing in order to obtain two austenitic grain populations with different sizes. Microstructural analy ses reveal that both methods are suitable to generate significative grain size contrast and to control this contrast according to the elaboration conditions. Mechanical properties under tension are then characterized for different grain size distributions. Crystal plasticity finite element modelling is further applied in a configuration of bimodal distribution to analyse the role played by coarse grains within a matrix of fine grains, considering not only their volume fraction but also their spatial arrangement.

  15. Self-assembly of bimodal particles inside emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sang; Yi, Gi-Ra; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Young-Kuk; Choi, Chul-Jin

    2010-08-01

    Colloidal dispersion of bimodal particles were self-organized inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets by evaporationdriven self-assembly method. After droplet shrinkage by heating the complex fluid system, small numbers of microspheres were packed into minimal second moment clusters, which are partially coated with silica nanospheres, resulting in the generation of patchy particles. The patchy particles in this study possess potential applications for selfassembly of non-isotropic particles such as dimmers or tetramers for colloidal photonic crystals with diamond lattice structures. The composite micro-clusters of amidine polystyrene microspheres and titania nanoparticles were also generated by evaporation-driven self-assembly to fabricate nonspherical hollow micro-particles made of titania shell.

  16. A new mechanistic approach for the further development of a population with established size bimodality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heerman, Lisa; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Borcherding, Jost

    2017-01-01

    Usually, the origin of a within-cohort bimodal size distribution is assumed to be caused by initial size differences or by one discrete period of accelerated growth for one part of the population. The aim of this study was to determine if more continuous pathways exist allowing shifts from the small to the large fraction within a bimodal age-cohort. Therefore, a Eurasian perch population, which had already developed a bimodal size-distribution and had differential resource use of the two size-cohorts, was examined. Results revealed that formation of a bimodal size-distribution can be a continuous process. Perch from the small size-cohort were able to grow into the large size-cohort by feeding on macroinvertebrates not used by their conspecifics. The diet shifts were accompanied by morphological shape changes. Intra-specific competition seemed to trigger the development towards an increasing number of large individuals. A stage-structured matrix model confirmed these assumptions. The fact that bimodality can be a continuous process is important to consider for the understanding of ecological processes and links within ecosystems.

  17. A new mechanistic approach for the further development of a population with established size bimodality

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Borcherding, Jost

    2017-01-01

    Usually, the origin of a within-cohort bimodal size distribution is assumed to be caused by initial size differences or by one discrete period of accelerated growth for one part of the population. The aim of this study was to determine if more continuous pathways exist allowing shifts from the small to the large fraction within a bimodal age-cohort. Therefore, a Eurasian perch population, which had already developed a bimodal size-distribution and had differential resource use of the two size-cohorts, was examined. Results revealed that formation of a bimodal size-distribution can be a continuous process. Perch from the small size-cohort were able to grow into the large size-cohort by feeding on macroinvertebrates not used by their conspecifics. The diet shifts were accompanied by morphological shape changes. Intra-specific competition seemed to trigger the development towards an increasing number of large individuals. A stage-structured matrix model confirmed these assumptions. The fact that bimodality can be a continuous process is important to consider for the understanding of ecological processes and links within ecosystems. PMID:28650963

  18. Bimodality and variability of particle size distributions in high Ice Water Content regions and their implications for microphysical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Leroy, D.; Korolev, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Wu, W.; Strapp, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Aviation records since the 1990s indicate that aircraft engines are facing a threat of occasional power loss due to ice ingestion over tropical oceanic convective clouds. The typical absence of radar echoes greater than 30 dBZ during such incidents suggests the existence of large amounts of small ice particles. The industrial aviation safety concerns inspired the High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC) campaign, whose Phase I was conducted between January and March 2014. A 2-D Stereo (2DS) probe, Precipitation Imaging Probe (PIP) and Isokinetic Evaporator Probe were installed on the French Falcon 20 making in-situ observations off the coast of Darwin, Australia. Composite particle size distributions (PSDs) using 2DS and PIP data were derived for each 5 second period in cloud. Using an automated technique to identify multiple modes in PSDs and an Incomplete Gamma Fit technique, the intercept (N0), slope (λ) and shape parameter (μ) of each mode of a gamma distribution were determined. The variation of PSDs and fit parameters for Ice Water Contents (IWCs) > 1.5 g m-3 with cloud and environmental parameters and their differences from PSDs measured outside of high IWC conditions are summarized here. Two types of HIWC conditions were observed, according to whether the median mass diameters (MMD) were positively or negatively correlated with IWC. The principal findings about high IWC regions are as follows: 1) larger μ and N0 are found in high IWC regions while λ tends to remain unchanged; 2) PSDs are more likely to be bimodal at lower temperatures. 3) Positive MMD-IWC correlations are associated with larger μ and smaller N0; 4) Bimodal distributions are more frequent for positive MMD-IWC correlations; and 5) Positive MMD-IWC correlations are usually associated with longer-aged clouds, but there are exceptions, showing other factors affect the occurrence of frequent small particles in high IWC regions. Implications for modeling of high IWC

  19. Constraining ejecta particle size distributions with light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Martin; Buttler, William; Frayer, Daniel; Grover, Michael; Lalone, Brandon; Monfared, Shabnam; Sorenson, Daniel; Stevens, Gerald; Turley, William

    2017-06-01

    The angular distribution of the intensity of light scattered from a particle is strongly dependent on the particle size and can be calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. For a collection of particles with a range of sizes, the angular intensity distribution will be the sum of the contributions from each particle size weighted by the number of particles in that size bin. The set of equations describing this pattern is not uniquely invertible, i.e. a number of different distributions can lead to the same scattering pattern, but with reasonable assumptions about the distribution it is possible to constrain the problem and extract estimates of the particle sizes from a measured scattering pattern. We report here on experiments using particles ejected by shockwaves incident on strips of triangular perturbations machined into the surface of tin targets. These measurements indicate a bimodal distribution of ejected particle sizes with relatively large particles (median radius 2-4 μm) evolved from the edges of the perturbation strip and smaller particles (median radius 200-600 nm) from the perturbations. We will briefly discuss the implications of these results and outline future plans.

  20. Structure and Dynamics of Bimodal Colloidal Dispersions in a Low-Molecular-Weight Polymer Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J; Levine, Lyle E; Tsai, De-Hao; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-03-21

    We present an experimental study of the structural and dynamical properties of bimodal, micrometer-sized colloidal dispersions (size ratio ≈ 2) in an aqueous solution of low-molecular-weight polymer (polyethylene glycol 2000) using synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and USAXS-based X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We fixed the volume fraction of the large particles at 5% and systematically increased the volume fraction of the small particles from 0 to 5% to evaluate their effects on the structure and dynamics. The bimodal dispersions were homogenous through the investigated parameter space. We found that the partial structure factors can be satisfactorily retrieved for the bimodal colloidal dispersions using a Percus-Yevick hard-sphere potential when the size distributions of the particles were taken into account. We also found that the partial structure factor between the large particles did not exhibit a significant variation with increasing volume fraction of the small particles, whereas the isothermal compressibility of the binary mixture was found to decrease with increasing volume fraction of the small particles. The dynamics of single-component large-particle dispersion obey the principles of de Gennes narrowing, where the wave vector dependence of the interparticle diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interparticle structure factor. The dynamics of the bimodal dispersions demonstrate a strong dependence on the fraction of small particles. We also made a comparison between the experimental effective dynamic viscosity of the bimodal dispersion with the theoretical predictions, which suggest that the complex mutual interactions between the large and small particles have a strong effect on the dynamic behaviors of bimodal dispersions.

  1. Magnetorheological behavior of magnetoactive elastomers filled with bimodal iron and magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Vladislav V.; Stepanov, Gennady V.; Shamonin, Mikhail; Monkman, Gareth J.; Kramarenko, Elena Yu

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAE) based on soft silicone matrices, filled with various proportions of large diameter (approximately 50 μm) iron and small diameter (approximately 0.5 μm) magnetite particles are synthesized. Their rheological behavior in homogeneous magnetic fields up to 600 mT is studied in detail. The addition of small magnetite particles facilitates fabrication of uniformly distributed magnetic elastomer composites by preventing aggregation and sedimentation of large particles during curing. It is shown that using the proposed bimodal filler particles it is possible to tailor various magnetorheological (MR) properties which can be useful for different target applications. In particular, either absolute or relative magnetorheological effects can be tuned. The value of the damping factor as well as the range of deformation amplitudes for the linear viscoelastic regime can be chosen. The interdependencies between different MR properties of bimodal MAEs are considered. The results are discussed in the model framework of particle network formation under the simultaneous influence of external magnetic fields and mechanical deformation.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of Bimodal Colloidal Dispersions in a Low-Molecular-Weight Polymer Solution

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.; ...

    2017-02-24

    We present an experimental study of the structural and dynamical properties of bimodal, micrometersized colloidal dispersions (size ratio ≈ 2) in an aqueous solution of low-molecular weight polymer (polyethylene glycol 2000) using synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and USAXSbased X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We fixed the volume fraction of the large particles at 5 % and systematically increased the volume fraction of the small particles from 0 % to 5 % to evaluate its effect on the structure and dynamics. The bimodal dispersions were homogenous through the investigated parameter space. We found that the partial structure factors can bemore » satisfactorily retrieved for the bimodal colloidal dispersions using a Percus-Yevick hard sphere potential when the particle size distributions of the particles were taken into account. We also found that the partial structure factor between the large particles does not exhibit significant variation with increasing volume fraction of small particles, whereas the isothermal compressibility of the binary mixture was found to decrease with increasing volume fraction of small particles. The dynamics of single-component large particle dispersion obey the principles of de Gennes narrowing, where the wave vector dependence of the interparticle diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interparticle structure factor. The dynamics of the bimodal dispersions demonstrate strong dependence on the fraction of small particles. As a result, we also made a comparison between the experimental effective dynamic viscosity of the bimodal dispersion with theoretical predictions, which suggest that the complex mutual interactions between large and small particles have a strong effect on the dynamic behaviors of bimodal dispersions.« less

  3. Structure and Dynamics of Bimodal Colloidal Dispersions in a Low-Molecular-Weight Polymer Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Allen, Andrew J.; Levine, Lyle E.

    We present an experimental study of the structural and dynamical properties of bimodal, micrometersized colloidal dispersions (size ratio ≈ 2) in an aqueous solution of low-molecular weight polymer (polyethylene glycol 2000) using synchrotron ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and USAXSbased X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We fixed the volume fraction of the large particles at 5 % and systematically increased the volume fraction of the small particles from 0 % to 5 % to evaluate its effect on the structure and dynamics. The bimodal dispersions were homogenous through the investigated parameter space. We found that the partial structure factors can bemore » satisfactorily retrieved for the bimodal colloidal dispersions using a Percus-Yevick hard sphere potential when the particle size distributions of the particles were taken into account. We also found that the partial structure factor between the large particles does not exhibit significant variation with increasing volume fraction of small particles, whereas the isothermal compressibility of the binary mixture was found to decrease with increasing volume fraction of small particles. The dynamics of single-component large particle dispersion obey the principles of de Gennes narrowing, where the wave vector dependence of the interparticle diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interparticle structure factor. The dynamics of the bimodal dispersions demonstrate strong dependence on the fraction of small particles. As a result, we also made a comparison between the experimental effective dynamic viscosity of the bimodal dispersion with theoretical predictions, which suggest that the complex mutual interactions between large and small particles have a strong effect on the dynamic behaviors of bimodal dispersions.« less

  4. Effect of particle size distribution on permeability in the randomly packed porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markicevic, Bojan

    2017-11-01

    An answer of how porous medium heterogeneity influences the medium permeability is still inconclusive, where both increase and decrease in the permeability value are reported. A numerical procedure is used to generate a randomly packed porous material consisting of spherical particles. Six different particle size distributions are used including mono-, bi- and three-disperse particles, as well as uniform, normal and log-normal particle size distribution with the maximum to minimum particle size ratio ranging from three to eight for different distributions. In all six cases, the average particle size is kept the same. For all media generated, the stochastic homogeneity is checked from distribution of three coordinates of particle centers, where uniform distribution of x-, y- and z- positions is found. The medium surface area remains essentially constant except for bi-modal distribution in which medium area decreases, while no changes in the porosity are observed (around 0.36). The fluid flow is solved in such domain, and after checking for the pressure axial linearity, the permeability is calculated from the Darcy law. The permeability comparison reveals that the permeability of the mono-disperse medium is smallest, and the permeability of all poly-disperse samples is less than ten percent higher. For bi-modal particles, the permeability is for a quarter higher compared to the other media which can be explained by volumetric contribution of larger particles and larger passages for fluid flow to take place.

  5. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols II: Particle Size Distributions as a Function of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing depleted uranium from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluated particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using beta spectrometry, and themore » derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements was quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 um and a large size mode between 2 and 15 um. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 um shortly after perforation to around 1 um at the end of the 2-hr sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.« less

  6. Flexible transparent conducting films with embedded silver networks composed of bimodal-sized nanoparticles for heater application.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Song, Yookyung; Park, Daseul; Kim, Yeon-Won; Kim, Yoon Jin

    2018-06-22

    A facile one-pot synthetic method for preparing the Ag nanoparticle inks with a bimodal size distribution was newly devised and they were successfully employed as a conducting filler to form the metal-mesh type transparent conducting electrodes on the flexible substrate. Bimodal-sized Ag nanoparticles were synthesized through the polyol process, and their size variation was occurred via finely tuned composition ratio between Ag + ions and polymeric capping agents. The prepared bimodal-sized Ag nanoparticles exhibited the form of well-dispersed Ag nanoparticle inks without adding any dispersants and dispersion process. By filling the patterned micro-channels engraved on the flexible polymer substrate using a bimodal-sized Ag nanoparticle ink, a metal-mesh type transparent electrode (transmittance: 90% at 550 nm, haze: 1.5, area: 8 × 8 cm 2 ) was fabricated. By applying DC voltage to the mesh type electrode, a flexible transparent joule heater was successfully achieved with a performance of 4.5 °C s -1 heat-up rate at a low input power density.

  7. Flexible transparent conducting films with embedded silver networks composed of bimodal-sized nanoparticles for heater application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Sun; Song, Yookyung; Park, Daseul; Kim, Yeon-Won; Kim, Yoon Jin

    2018-06-01

    A facile one-pot synthetic method for preparing the Ag nanoparticle inks with a bimodal size distribution was newly devised and they were successfully employed as a conducting filler to form the metal-mesh type transparent conducting electrodes on the flexible substrate. Bimodal-sized Ag nanoparticles were synthesized through the polyol process, and their size variation was occurred via finely tuned composition ratio between Ag+ ions and polymeric capping agents. The prepared bimodal-sized Ag nanoparticles exhibited the form of well-dispersed Ag nanoparticle inks without adding any dispersants and dispersion process. By filling the patterned micro-channels engraved on the flexible polymer substrate using a bimodal-sized Ag nanoparticle ink, a metal-mesh type transparent electrode (transmittance: 90% at 550 nm, haze: 1.5, area: 8 × 8 cm2) was fabricated. By applying DC voltage to the mesh type electrode, a flexible transparent joule heater was successfully achieved with a performance of 4.5 °C s‑1 heat-up rate at a low input power density.

  8. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution bymore » analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.« less

  9. Characterizations of particle size distribution of the droplets exhaled by sneeze

    PubMed Central

    Han, Z. Y.; Weng, W. G.; Huang, Q. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the size distribution of sneeze droplets exhaled immediately at mouth. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the experiment and 44 sneezes were measured by using a laser particle size analyser. Two types of distributions are observed: unimodal and bimodal. For each sneeze, the droplets exhaled at different time in the sneeze duration have the same distribution characteristics with good time stability. The volume-based size distributions of sneeze droplets can be represented by a lognormal distribution function, and the relationship between the distribution parameters and the physiological characteristics of the subjects are studied by using linear regression analysis. The geometric mean of the droplet size of all the subjects is 360.1 µm for unimodal distribution and 74.4 µm for bimodal distribution with geometric standard deviations of 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. For the two peaks of the bimodal distribution, the geometric mean (the geometric standard deviation) is 386.2 µm (1.8) for peak 1 and 72.0 µm (1.5) for peak 2. The influences of the measurement method, the limitations of the instrument, the evaporation effects of the droplets, the differences of biological dynamic mechanism and characteristics between sneeze and other respiratory activities are also discussed. PMID:24026469

  10. Photocatalytic Applications of Electrospun TiO2 Nanofibres Embedded with Bimodal Sized and Prismatic Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gopika, G; Asha, A M; Sivakumar, N; Balakrishnan, A; Nair, S V; Subramanian, K R V

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized electrospun TiO2 nanofibers embedded with bimodal sized and prismatic gold nanoparticles. The surface plasmons generated in the gold nanoparticles were used to enhance the performance of photocatalysis. The photocatalytic conversion efficiencies of these bimodal sized/prismatic gold nanoparticles when embedded in electrospun TiO2 fibres showed an enhancement of upto 60% over bare fiber systems and also show higher efficiencies than electrospun fibrous systems embedded with unimodal sized gold nanoparticles. Anisotropic bimodal gold nanoparticles show the highest degree of photocatalytic activity. This may be attributed to greater density/concentration of nanoparticles with higher effective surface area and formation of a junction between the smaller and larger nanoparticles. Such a bimodally distributed range of nanoparticles could also lead to greater trapping of charge carriers at the TiO2 conduction band edge and promoting catalytic reactions on account of these trapped charges. This enhanced photocatalytic activity is explained by invoking different operating mechanisms such as improved surface area, greater trapping, coarse plasmon resonance and band effects. Thus, a useful applicability of the gold nanoparticles is shown in the area of photocatalysis.

  11. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  12. [Study of inversion and classification of particle size distribution under dependent model algorithm].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Gang; Tang, Hong; Yuan, Gui-Bin

    2008-05-01

    For the total light scattering particle sizing technique, an inversion and classification method was proposed with the dependent model algorithm. The measured particle system was inversed simultaneously by different particle distribution functions whose mathematic model was known in advance, and then classified according to the inversion errors. The simulation experiments illustrated that it is feasible to use the inversion errors to determine the particle size distribution. The particle size distribution function was obtained accurately at only three wavelengths in the visible light range with the genetic algorithm, and the inversion results were steady and reliable, which decreased the number of multi wavelengths to the greatest extent and increased the selectivity of light source. The single peak distribution inversion error was less than 5% and the bimodal distribution inversion error was less than 10% when 5% stochastic noise was put in the transmission extinction measurement values at two wavelengths. The running time of this method was less than 2 s. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for on-line particle size measurement.

  13. Effect of particle size distribution on the separation efficiency in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Krisztián; Lukács, Diána; Sepsey, Annamária; Felinger, Attila

    2014-09-26

    In this work, the influence of the width of particle size distribution (PSD) on chromatographic efficiency is studied. The PSD is described by lognormal distribution. A theoretical framework is developed in order to calculate heights equivalent to a theoretical plate in case of different PSDs. Our calculations demonstrate and verify that wide particle size distributions have significant effect on the separation efficiency of molecules. The differences of fully porous and core-shell phases regarding the influence of width of PSD are presented and discussed. The efficiencies of bimodal phases were also calculated. The results showed that these packings do not have any advantage over unimodal phases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, A. A.; Peterson, D. S.; Tandon, L.; LaMont, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid non-distructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

  15. Geometry planning and image registration in magnetic particle imaging using bimodal fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, F., E-mail: f.werner@uke.de; Hofmann, M.; Them, K.

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a quantitative imaging modality that allows the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to be visualized. Compared to other imaging techniques like x-ray radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MPI only provides a signal from the administered tracer, but no additional morphological information, which complicates geometry planning and the interpretation of MP images. The purpose of the authors’ study was to develop bimodal fiducial markers that can be visualized by MPI and MRI in order to create MP–MR fusion images. Methods: A certain arrangement of three bimodal fiducial markers was developed and usedmore » in a combined MRI/MPI phantom and also during in vivo experiments in order to investigate its suitability for geometry planning and image fusion. An algorithm for automated marker extraction in both MR and MP images and rigid registration was established. Results: The developed bimodal fiducial markers can be visualized by MRI and MPI and allow for geometry planning as well as automated registration and fusion of MR–MP images. Conclusions: To date, exact positioning of the object to be imaged within the field of view (FOV) and the assignment of reconstructed MPI signals to corresponding morphological regions has been difficult. The developed bimodal fiducial markers and the automated image registration algorithm help to overcome these difficulties.« less

  16. Laser diffraction particle sizing in STRESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Y. C.; Pottsmith, H. C.

    1994-08-01

    An autonomous instrument system for measuring particle size spectra in the sea is described. The instrument records the small-angle scattering characteristics of the particulate ensemble present in water. The small-angle scattering distribution is inverted into size spectra. The discussion of the instrument in this paper is included with a review of the information content of the data. It is noted that the inverse problem is sensitive to the forward model for light scattering employed in the construction of the matrix. The instrument system is validated using monodisperse polystyrene and NIST standard distributions of glass spheres. Data from a long-term deployment on the California shelf during the field experiment Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) are included. The size distribution in STRESS, measured at a fixed height-above-bed 1.2 m, showed significant variability over time. In particular, the volume distribution sometimes changed from mono-modal to bi-modal during the experiment. The data on particle-size distribution are combined with friction velocity measurements in the current boundary layer to produce a size-dependent estimate of the suspended mass at 10 cm above bottom. It is argued that these concentrations represent the reference concentration at the bed for the smaller size classes. The suspended mass at all sizes shows a strong correlation with wave variance. Using the size distribution, corrections in the optical transmissometry calibration factor are estimated for the duration of the experiment. The change in calibration at 1.2 m above bed (mab) is shown to have a standard error of 30% over the duration of the experiment with a range of 1.8-0.8.

  17. Simultaneous Comparison of Two Roller Compaction Techniques and Two Particle Size Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Tuomas; Antikainen, Osmo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2017-11-01

    A new dry granulation technique, gas-assisted roller compaction (GARC), was compared with conventional roller compaction (CRC) by manufacturing 34 granulation batches. The process variables studied were roll pressure, roll speed, and sieve size of the conical mill. The main quality attributes measured were granule size and flow characteristics. Within granulations also the real applicability of two particle size analysis techniques, sieve analysis (SA) and fast imaging technique (Flashsizer, FS), was tested. All granules obtained were acceptable. In general, the particle size of GARC granules was slightly larger than that of CRC granules. In addition, the GARC granules had better flowability. For example, the tablet weight variation of GARC granules was close to 2%, indicating good flowing and packing characteristics. The comparison of the two particle size analysis techniques showed that SA was more accurate in determining wide and bimodal size distributions while FS showed narrower and mono-modal distributions. However, both techniques gave good estimates for mean granule sizes. Overall, SA was a time-consuming but accurate technique that provided reliable information for the entire granule size distribution. By contrast, FS oversimplified the shape of the size distribution, but nevertheless yielded acceptable estimates for mean particle size. In general, FS was two to three orders of magnitude faster than SA.

  18. Characterization of ambient particles size in workplace of manufacturing physical fitness equipments

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Chih-Chung; CHEN, Mei-Ru; CHANG, Sheng-Lang; LIAO, Wei-Heng; CHEN, Hsiu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The manufacturing of fitness equipment involves several processes, including the cutting and punching of iron tubes followed by welding. Welding operations produce hazardous gases and particulate matter, which can enter the alveolar, resulting in adverse health effects. This study sought to verify the particle size distribution and exposure concentrations of atmospheric air samples in various work areas of a fitness equipment manufacturing industry. Observed particle concentrations are presented by area and in terms of relative magnitude: painting (15.58 mg/m3) > automatic welding (0.66 mg/m3) > manual welding (0.53 mg/m3) > punching (0.18 mg/m3) > cutting (0.16 mg/m3). The concentrations in each of the five work areas were Cinh>Cthor>Cresp. In all areas except the painting area, extra-fine particles produced by welding at high temperatures, and further those coagulated to form larger particles. This study observed bimodal distribution in the size of welding fume in the ranges of 0.7–1 µm and 15–21 µm. Meanwhile, the mass concentrations of particles with different sizes were not consistent across work areas. In the painting area, the mass concentration was higher in Chead>Cth>Calv, but in welding areas, it was found that Calv>Chead>Cth. Particles smaller than 1µm were primarily produced by welding. PMID:25327301

  19. Particle size distributions of currently used pesticides in ambient air of an agricultural Mediterranean area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscollà, Clara; Muñoz, Amalia; Borrás, Esther; Vera, Teresa; Ródenas, Milagros; Yusà, Vicent

    2014-10-01

    This work presents first data on the particle size distribution of 16 pesticides currently used in Mediterranean agriculture in the atmosphere. Particulate matter air samples were collected using a cascade impactor distributed into four size fractions in a rural site of Valencia Region, during July to September in 2012 and from May to July in 2013. A total of 16 pesticides were detected, including six fungicides, seven insecticides and three herbicides. The total concentrations in the particulate phase (TSP: Total Suspended Particulate) ranged from 3.5 to 383.1 pg m-3. Most of the pesticides (such as carbendazim, tebuconazole, chlorpyrifos-ethyl and chlorpyrifos-methyl) were accumulated in the ultrafine-fine (<1 μm) and coarse (2.5-10 μm) particle size fractions. Others like omethoate, dimethoate and malathion were presented only in the ultrafine-fine size fraction (<1 μm). Finally, diuron, diphenylamine and terbuthylazine-desethyl-2-OH also show a bimodal distribution but mainly in the coarse size fractions.

  20. Preparation of Porous Stainless Steel Hollow-Fibers through Multi-Modal Particle Size Sintering towards Pore Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Allioux, Francois-Marie; Etxeberria Benavides, Miren

    2017-01-01

    The sintering of metal powders is an efficient and versatile technique to fabricate porous metal elements such as filters, diffusers, and membranes. Neck formation between particles is, however, critical to tune the porosity and optimize mass transfer in order to minimize the densification process. In this work, macro-porous stainless steel (SS) hollow-fibers (HFs) were fabricated by the extrusion and sintering of a dope comprised, for the first time, of a bimodal mixture of SS powders. The SS particles of different sizes and shapes were mixed to increase the neck formation between the particles and control the densification process of the structure during sintering. The sintered HFs from particles of two different sizes were shown to be more mechanically stable at lower sintering temperature due to the increased neck area of the small particles sintered to the large ones. In addition, the sintered HFs made from particles of 10 and 44 μm showed a smaller average pore size (<1 μm) as compared to the micron-size pores of sintered HFs made from particles of 10 μm only and those of 10 and 20 μm. The novel HFs could be used in a range of applications, from filtration modules to electrochemical membrane reactors. PMID:28777352

  1. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  2. Thermal induced carrier's transfer in bimodal size distribution InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilahi, B.; Alshehri, K.; Madhar, N. A.; Sfaxi, L.; Maaref, H.

    2018-06-01

    This work reports on the investigation of the thermal induced carriers' transfer mechanism in vertically stacked bimodal size distribution InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD). A model treating the QD as a localized states ensemble (LSE) has been employed to fit the atypical temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) emission energies and linewidth. The results suggest that thermally activated carriers transfer within the large size QD family occurs through the neighboring smaller size QD as an intermediate channel before direct carriers redistribution. The obtained activation energy suggests also the possible contribution of the wetting layer (WL) continuum states as a second mediator channel for carriers transfer.

  3. Airborne particle-bound brominated flame retardants: Levels, size distribution and indoor-outdoor exchange.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Shan; Yang, Wan-Dong; Li, Xiu-Wen; Ni, Hong-Gang; Zeng, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The quality of indoor environments has a significant impact on public health. Usually, an indoor environment is treated as a static box, in which physicochemical reactions of indoor air contaminants are negligible. This results in conservative estimates for primary indoor air pollutant concentrations, while also ignoring secondary pollutants. Thus, understanding the relationship between indoor and outdoor particles and particle-bound pollutants is of great significance. For this reason, we collected simultaneous indoor and outdoor measurements of the size distribution of airborne brominated flame retardant (BFR) congeners. The time-dependent concentrations of indoor particles and particle-bound BFRs were then estimated with the mass balance model, accounting for the outdoor concentration, indoor source strength, infiltration, penetration, deposition and indoor resuspension. Based on qualitative observation, the size distributions of ΣPBDE and ΣHBCD were characterized by bimodal peaks. According to our results, particle-bound BDE209 and γ-HBCD underwent degradation. Regardless of the surface adsorption capability of particles and the physicochemical properties of the target compounds, the concentration of BFRs in particles of different size fractions seemed to be governed by the particle distribution. Based on our estimations, for airborne particles and particle-bound BFRs, a window-open ventilated room only takes a quarter of the time to reach an equilibrium between the concentration of pollutants inside and outside compared to a closed room. Unfortunately, indoor pollutants and outdoor pollutants always exist simultaneously, which poses a window-open-or-closed dilemma to achieve proper ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Particle Size of Ceramic Granule Blends on Mechanical Strength and Porosity of 3D Printed Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Spath, Sebastian; Drescher, Philipp; Seitz, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is a promising method for the fabrication of scaffolds in the field of bone tissue engineering. To date, the mechanical strength of 3D printed ceramic scaffolds is not sufficient for a variety of applications in the reconstructive surgery. Mechanical strength is directly in relation with the porosity of the 3D printed scaffolds. The porosity is directly influenced by particle size and particle-size distribution of the raw material. To investigate this impact, a hydroxyapatite granule blend with a wide particle size distribution was fractioned by sieving. The specific fractions and bimodal mixtures of the sieved granule blend were used to 3D print specimens. It has been shown that an optimized arrangement of fractions with large and small particles can provide 3D printed specimens with good mechanical strength due to a higher packing density. An increase of mechanical strength can possibly expand the application area of 3D printed hydroxyapatite scaffolds. PMID:28793467

  5. Multiphase flow modeling of a crude-oil spill site with a bimodal permeability distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillard, Leslie A.; Essaid, Hedeff I.; Herkelrath, William N.

    1997-01-01

    Fluid saturation, particle-size distribution, and porosity measurements were obtained from 269 core samples collected from six boreholes along a 90-m transect at a subregion of a crude-oil spill site, the north pool, near Bemidji, Minnesota. The oil saturation data, collected 11 years after the spill, showed an irregularly shaped oil body that appeared to be affected by sediment spatial variability. The particle-size distribution data were used to estimate the permeability (k) and retention curves for each sample. An additional 344 k estimates were obtained from samples previously collected at the north pool. The 613 k estimates were distributed bimodal lognormally with the two population distributions corresponding to the two predominant lithologies: a coarse glacial outwash deposit and fine-grained interbedded lenses. A two-step geostatistical approach was used to generate a conditioned realization of k representing the bimodal heterogeneity. A cross-sectional multiphase flow model was used to simulate the flow of oil and water in the presence of air along the north pool transect for an 11-year period. The inclusion of a representation of the bimodal aquifer heterogeneity was crucial for reproduction of general features of the observed oil body. If the bimodal heterogeneity was characterized, hysteresis did not have to be incorporated into the model because a hysteretic effect was produced by the sediment spatial variability. By revising the relative permeability functional relation, an improved reproduction of the observed oil saturation distribution was achieved. The inclusion of water table fluctuations in the model did not significantly affect the simulated oil saturation distribution.

  6. Laser diffraction of acicular particles: practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David M.; Matsuyama, Tatsushi

    2014-08-01

    Commercial laser diffraction instruments are widely used to measure particle size distribution (PSD), but the results are distorted for non-spherical (acicular) particles often encountered in practical applications. Consequently the distribution, which is reported in terms of equivalent spherical diameter, requires interpretation. For rod-like and plate-like particles, the PSD tends to be bi-modal, with the two modal sizes closely related to the median length and width, or width and thickness, of the particles. Furthermore, it is found that the bi-modal PSD for at least one instrument can typically be approximated by a bi-lognormal distribution. By fitting such a function to the reported distribution, one may extract quantitative information useful for process or product development. This approach is illustrated by examples of such measurement on industrial samples of polymer particles, crystals, bacteria, and clays.

  7. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Performance of Ionic Liquid-based Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Anthony J. R.; Martins, Vitor L.; Smith, Rachel M.; Hall, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) employing ionic liquid electrolytes are the subject of much research as they promise increased operating potentials, and hence energy densities, when compared with currently available devices. Herein we report on the influence of the particle size distribution of activated carbon material on the performance of ionic liquid based EDLCs. Mesoporous activated carbon was ball-milled for increasing durations and the resultant powders characterized physically (using laser diffraction, nitrogen sorption and SEM) and investigated electrochemically in the form of composite EDLC electrodes. A bi-modal particle size distribution was found for all materials demonstrating an increasing fraction of smaller particles with increased milling duration. In general, cell capacitance decreased with increased milling duration over a wide range of rates using CV and galvanostatic cycling. Reduced coulombic efficiency is observed at low rates (<25 mVs−1) and the efficiency decreases as the volume fraction of the smaller particles increases. Efficiency loss was attributed to side reactions, particularly electrolyte decomposition, arising from interactions with the smaller particles. The effect of reduced efficiency is confirmed by cycling for over 15,000 cycles, which has the important implication that diminished performance and reduced cycle life is caused by the presence of submicron-sized particles. PMID:26911531

  8. Seasonal variability in size-segregated airborne bacterial particles and their characterization at different source-sites.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Smita

    2017-05-01

    Size-segregated aerosol samplings were carried out near the potential sources of airborne biological particles i.e. at a landfill site, an agricultural field and a road side restaurant-cluster site in winter, spring and summer seasons during 2013-2015 in New Delhi. The culturable airborne bacterial (CAB) concentrations showed significant seasonal variation from higher to moderate in spring and winter seasons and lowest during summer. Highest CAB concentrations were observed at the Okhla landfill site followed by restaurant-cluster area and agriculture site. The CAB particles showed bimodal size distribution, abundant in the size ranges of 1.1-2.1, 2.1-3.3 and 4.7-5.8 μm. However, substantial concentrations were also observed in the size bins of 0.43-0.65 and <0.43 μm, which are important for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols in addition to their adverse health effects. In spring, bacterial particles were also maximized in size ranges between 5.8 and >9.0 μm. Fine mode proportions of CAB were found to be higher in winter than other two seasons. Bacterial identification was done by 16s rDNA sequencing, and most abundant identified strains were Bacillus cereus (16%), Bacillus licheniformis (11%), Bacillus thuringiensis (9%), Micrococcus sp. (7%) and Acinetobacter sp. (9%).

  9. Quantifying Young's moduli of protein fibrils and particles with bimodal force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jay; Charnley, Mirren; Cheng, Christopher; Reynolds, Nicholas P; Jones, Owen G

    2017-10-19

    Force spectroscopy is a means of obtaining mechanical information of individual nanometer-scale structures in composite materials, such as protein assemblies for use in consumer films or gels. As a recently developed force spectroscopy technique, bimodal force spectroscopy relates frequency shifts in cantilevers simultaneously excited at multiple frequencies to the elastic properties of the contacted material, yet its utility for quantitative characterization of biopolymer assemblies has been limited. In this study, a linear correlation between experimental frequency shift and Young's modulus of polymer films was used to calibrate bimodal force spectroscopy and quantify Young's modulus of two protein nanostructures: β-lactoglobulin fibrils and zein nanoparticles. Cross-sectional Young's modulus of protein fibrils was determined to be 1.6 GPa while the modulus of zein nanoparticles was determined as 854 MPa. Parallel measurement of β-lactoglobulin fibril by a competing pulsed-force technique found a higher cross-sectional Young's modulus, highlighting the importance of comparative calibration against known standards in both pulsed and bimodal force spectroscopies. These findings demonstrate a successful procedure for measuring mechanical properties of individual protein assemblies with potential use in biological or packaging applications using bimodal force spectroscopy.

  10. Particle size distribution and respiratory deposition estimates of airborne perfluoroalkyl acids during the haze period in the megacity of Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengjie; Lyu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Yao, Bo; Song, Weihua; Li, Mei; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Tiantao; Li, Xiang

    2018-03-01

    This study presents the particle size distribution and respiratory deposition estimates of airborne perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) during the haze period. Size-segregated haze aerosols were collected from an urban location in Shanghai using an eight-stage air sampler. The samples were analyzed for eight PFAAs using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The quantification results showed that the concentrations of particle-bound Σ 8PFAAs ranged from 0.26 to 1.90 ng m -3 (mean: 1.44 ng m -3 ). All of the measured PFAAs particle size distributions had a bimodal mode that peaked respectively in accumulation size range (0.4 < Dp < 2.1 μm) and coarse size ranges (Dp > 2.1 μm), but the width of each distribution somewhat varied by compound. The emission source, molecular weight, and volatility of the PFAAs were important factors influencing the size distribution of particle-bound PFAAs. Of these compounds, PFUnDA presented a strong accumulation in the fine size range (average 75% associated with particles <2.1 μm), followed by PFOA (69%) and PFDA (64%). The human risk assessment of PFOS via inhalation was addressed and followed the same pattern as the size distribution, with a 2-fold higher risk for the fine particle fraction compared to the coarse particle fraction at urban sites. Approximately 30.3-82.0% of PFAA deposition (∑PFAA: 72.5%) in the alveolar region was associated with particles <2.1 μm, although the contribution of fine particles to the total PFAAs concentration in urban air was only 28-57% (∑8PFAAs: 48%). These results suggested that fine particles are significant contributors to the deposition of PFAAs in the alveolar region of the lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 μm diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  12. Sub-micron particle number size distribution characteristics at two urban locations in Leicester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Sarkawt M. L.; Cordell, Rebecca L.; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Weijers, E. P.; Monks, Paul S.

    2017-09-01

    The particle number size distribution (PNSD) of atmospheric particles not only provides information about sources and atmospheric processing of particles, but also plays an important role in determining regional lung dose. Owing to the importance of PNSD in understanding particulate pollution two short-term campaigns (March-June 2014) measurements of sub-micron PNSD were conducted at two urban background locations in Leicester, UK. At the first site, Leicester Automatic Urban Rural Network (AURN), the mean number concentrations of nucleation, Aitken, accumulation modes, the total particles, equivalent black carbon (eBC) mass concentrations were 2002, 3258, 1576, 6837 # cm-3, 1.7 μg m-3, respectively, and at the second site, Brookfield (BF), were 1455, 2407, 874, 4737 # cm-3, 0.77 μg m-3, respectively. The total particle number was dominated by the nucleation and Aitken modes, with both consisting of 77%, and 81% of total number concentrations at AURN and BF sites, respectively. This behaviour could be attributed to primary emissions (traffic) of ultrafine particles and the temporal evolution of mixing layer. The size distribution at the AURN site shows bimodal distribution at 22 nm with a minor peak at 70 nm. The size distribution at BF site, however, exhibits unimodal distribution at 35 nm. This study has for the first time investigated the effect of Easter holiday on PNSD in UK. The temporal variation of PNSD demonstrated a good degree of correlation with traffic-related pollutants (NOX, and eBC at both sites). The meteorological conditions, also had an impact on the PNSD and eBC at both sites. During the measurement period, the frequency of NPF events was calculated to be 13.3%, and 22.2% at AURN and BF sites, respectively. The average value of formation and growth rates of nucleation mode particles were 1.3, and 1.17 cm-3 s-1 and 7.42, and 5.3 nm h-1 at AURN, and BF sites, respectively. It can suggested that aerosol particles in Leicester originate mainly

  13. Elimination of Bimodal Size in InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots for Preparation of 1.3-μm Quantum Dot Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiang-Bin; Ding, Ying; Ma, Ben; Zhang, Ke-Lu; Chen, Ze-Sheng; Li, Jing-Lun; Cui, Xiao-Ran; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2018-02-01

    The device characteristics of semiconductor quantum dot lasers have been improved with progress in active layer structures. Self-assembly formed InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs had been intensively promoted in order to achieve quantum dot lasers with superior device performances. In the process of growing high-density InAs/GaAs quantum dots, bimodal size occurs due to large mismatch and other factors. The bimodal size in the InAs/GaAs quantum dot system is eliminated by the method of high-temperature annealing and optimized the in situ annealing temperature. The annealing temperature is taken as the key optimization parameters, and the optimal annealing temperature of 680 °C was obtained. In this process, quantum dot growth temperature, InAs deposition, and arsenic (As) pressure are optimized to improve quantum dot quality and emission wavelength. A 1.3-μm high-performance F-P quantum dot laser with a threshold current density of 110 A/cm2 was demonstrated.

  14. Elimination of Bimodal Size in InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots for Preparation of 1.3-μm Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiang-Bin; Ding, Ying; Ma, Ben; Zhang, Ke-Lu; Chen, Ze-Sheng; Li, Jing-Lun; Cui, Xiao-Ran; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2018-02-21

    The device characteristics of semiconductor quantum dot lasers have been improved with progress in active layer structures. Self-assembly formed InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs had been intensively promoted in order to achieve quantum dot lasers with superior device performances. In the process of growing high-density InAs/GaAs quantum dots, bimodal size occurs due to large mismatch and other factors. The bimodal size in the InAs/GaAs quantum dot system is eliminated by the method of high-temperature annealing and optimized the in situ annealing temperature. The annealing temperature is taken as the key optimization parameters, and the optimal annealing temperature of 680 °C was obtained. In this process, quantum dot growth temperature, InAs deposition, and arsenic (As) pressure are optimized to improve quantum dot quality and emission wavelength. A 1.3-μm high-performance F-P quantum dot laser with a threshold current density of 110 A/cm 2 was demonstrated.

  15. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  16. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    compared with 85% and 15% respectively for BC estimated from the aethalometer model. On average, the mass size distribution for EC particles is bimodal; the smaller mode is attributed to locally emitted, mostly externally mixed EC particles, while the larger mode is dominated by aged, internally mixed ECOCNOx particles associated with continental transport events. Periods of continental influence were identified using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) "FLEXPART". A consistent minimum between the two EC mass size modes was observed at approximately 400 nm for the measurement period. EC particles below this size are attributed to local emissions using chemical mixing state information and contribute 79% of the scaled ATOFMS EC particle mass, while particles above this size are attributed to continental transport events and contribute 21% of the EC particle mass. These results clearly demonstrate the potential benefit of monitoring size-resolved mass concentrations for the separation of local and continental EC emissions. Knowledge of the relative input of these emissions is essential for assessing the effectiveness of local abatement strategies.

  17. A HYPOTHESIS FOR THE COLOR BIMODALITY OF JUPITER TROJANS

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Ian; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: iwong@caltech.edu

    One of the most enigmatic and hitherto unexplained properties of Jupiter Trojans is their bimodal color distribution. This bimodality is indicative of two sub-populations within the Trojans, which have distinct size distributions. In this paper, we present a simple, plausible hypothesis for the origin and evolution of the two Trojan color sub-populations. In the framework of dynamical instability models of early solar system evolution, which suggest a common primordial progenitor population for both Trojans and Kuiper Belt objects, we use observational constraints to assert that the color bimodalities evident in both minor body populations developed within the primordial population priormore » to the onset of instability. We show that, beginning with an initial composition of rock and ices, location-dependent volatile loss through sublimation in this primordial population could have led to sharp changes in the surface composition with heliocentric distance. We propose that the depletion or retention of H{sub 2}S ice on the surface of these objects was the key factor in creating an initial color bimodality. Objects that retained H{sub 2}S on their surfaces developed characteristically redder colors upon irradiation than those that did not. After the bodies from the primordial population were scattered and emplaced into their current positions, they preserved this primordial color bimodality to the present day. We explore predictions of the volatile loss model—in particular, the effect of collisions within the Trojan population on the size distributions of the two sub-populations—and propose further experimental and observational tests of our hypothesis.« less

  18. Size distribution and mixing state of black carbon particles during a heavy air pollution episode in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xianda; Zhang, Ci; Chen, Hong; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    A Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS), a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and various meteorological instruments were employed to investigate the chemical and physical properties of black carbon (BC) aerosols during a regional air pollution episode in urban Shanghai over a 5-day period in December 2013. The refractory black carbon (rBC) mass concentrations measured by SP2 averaged 3.2 µg m-3, with the peak value of 12.1 µg m-3 at 04:26 LT on 7 December. The number of BC-containing particles captured by SPAMS in the size range 200-1200 nm agreed very well with that detected by SP2 (R2 = 0.87). A cluster analysis of the single particle mass spectra allowed for the separation of BC-containing particles into five major classes: (1) Pure BC; (2) BC attributed to biomass burning (BBBC); (3) K-rich BC-containing (KBC); (4) BC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (BCOC-SOx); (5) BC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (BCOC-NOx). The size distribution of internally mixed BC particles was bimodal. Detected by SP2, the condensation mode peaked around ˜ 230 nm and droplet mode peaked around ˜ 380 nm, with a clear valley in the size distribution around ˜ 320 nm. The condensation mode mainly consisted of traffic emissions, with particles featuring a small rBC core (˜ 60-80 nm) and a relatively thin absolute coating thickness (ACT, ˜ 50-130 nm). The droplet mode included highly aged traffic emission particles and biomass burning particles. The biomass burning particles had a larger rBC core (˜ 80-130 nm) and a thick ACT (˜ 110-300 nm). The highly aged traffic emissions had a smaller core (˜ 60-80 nm) and a very thick ACT (˜ 130-300 nm), which is larger than reported in any previous literature. A fast growth rate (˜ 20 nm h-1) of rBC with small core sizes was observed during the experiment. High concentrations pollutants like NO2 likely accelerated the aging process and resulted in a continuous size growth of r

  19. Method for producing size selected particles

    DOEpatents

    Krumdick, Gregory K.; Shin, Young Ho; Takeya, Kaname

    2016-09-20

    The invention provides a system for preparing specific sized particles, the system comprising a continuous stir tank reactor adapted to receive reactants; a centrifugal dispenser positioned downstream from the reactor and in fluid communication with the reactor; a particle separator positioned downstream of the dispenser; and a solution stream return conduit positioned between the separator and the reactor. Also provided is a method for preparing specific sized particles, the method comprising introducing reagent into a continuous stir reaction tank and allowing the reagents to react to produce product liquor containing particles; contacting the liquor particles with a centrifugal force for a time sufficient to generate particles of a predetermined size and morphology; and returning unused reagents and particles of a non-predetermined size to the tank.

  20. Influence of Iron Oxide Particles on the Strength of Ball-Milled Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Syn, C K; Sherby, O D

    2005-12-07

    Detailed microstructural and mechanical property studies of ball-milled iron, in the powder and consolidated states, are reviewed and assessed. The analyses cover three and one-half orders of magnitude of grain size (from 6 nm to 20 mm) and focus on the influence of oxide particles on the strength. The study includes the early work of Koch and Yang, Kimura and Takaki and continues with the more recent work of Umemoto et al and Belyakov, Sakai et al. It is shown that the major contributors to strength are the nanooxide particles. These particles are created by adiabatic shear banding during ball-millingmore » leading to a bimodal distribution of particles. The predicted strength from particles, {sigma}{sub p}, is given by {sigma}{sub p} = B {center_dot} (D*{sub S}){sup -1/2} where D*{sub S} is the surface-to-surface interparticle spacing, and B = 395 MPa {center_dot} {micro}m{sup -1/2}. A model is proposed that accounts for the influence of the bimodal particle size distribution on strength.« less

  1. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  2. An alternative method for determining particle-size distribution of forest road aggregate and soil with large-sized particles

    Treesearch

    Hakjun Rhee; Randy B. Foltz; James L. Fridley; Finn Krogstad; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of particle-size distribution (PSD) of soil with large-sized particles (e.g., 25.4 mm diameter) requires a large sample and numerous particle-size analyses (PSAs). A new method is needed that would reduce time, effort, and cost for PSAs of the soil and aggregate material with large-sized particles. We evaluated a nested method for sampling and PSA by...

  3. Hemoglobin level and lipoprotein particle size.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Päivi; Saltevo, Juha; Kautiainen, Hannu; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Vanhala, Mauno

    2018-01-10

    Alterations in lipoprotein size are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Higher hemoglobin levels may indicate a higher risk of atherosclerosis and was previously associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance. No previous studies have investigated an association between hemoglobin concentration and lipoprotein particle size. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study of 766 Caucasian, middle-aged subjects (341 men and 425 women) born in Pieksämäki, Finland, who were categorized into five age groups. The concentrations and sizes of lipoprotein subclass particles were analyzed by high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Larger very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle diameter was associated with higher hemoglobin concentrations in men (p = 0.003). There was a strong relationship between smaller high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size and higher hemoglobin concentration in both men and women as well as with smaller low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and higher hemoglobin concentration in men and women (p < 0.001; p = 0.009, p = 0.008). VLDL particle concentration had a moderate positive correlation with hemoglobin concentration (r = 0.15; p < 0.001). LDL particle concentration showed a statistical trend suggesting increasing particle concentration with increasing hemoglobin levels (r = 0.08; p = 0.05). Higher hemoglobin levels are associated with larger VLDL, smaller LDL, and smaller HDL particle sizes and increasing amounts of larger VLDL and smaller LDL particles. This suggests that a higher hemoglobin concentration is associated with an unfavorable lipoprotein particle profile that is part of states that increase cardiovascular disease risk like diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  4. Fine particles in the soufriere eruption plume.

    PubMed

    Woods, D C; Chuan, R L

    1982-06-04

    The size distributions of fine particles measured at tropospheric altitudes in the periphery of the eruption plume formed during the 17 April 1979 eruption of Soufriere Volcano and in the low-level effluents on 15 May 1979 were found to be bimodal, having peak concentrations at geometric mean diameters of 1.1 and 0.23 micrometers. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of the samples revealed an abundance of aluminum and silicon and traces of sodium, magnesium, chlorine, potassium, calcium, and iron in the large-particle mode. The submicrometer-sized particles were covered with liquid containing sulfur, assumed to be in the form of liquid sulfuric acid.

  5. Fine particles in the Soufriere eruption plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, D. C.; Chuan, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The size distributions of fine particles measured at tropospheric altitudes in the periphery of the eruption plume formed during the April 17, 1979 eruption of Soufriere Volcano and in the low-level effluents on May 15, 1979 were found to be bimodal, having peak concentrations at geometric mean diameters of 1.1 and 0.23 micrometers. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis of the samples revealed an abundance of aluminum and silicon and traces of sodium, magnesium, chlorine, potassium, calcium, and iron in the large-particle mode. The submicrometer-sized particles were covered with liquid containing sulfur, assumed to be in the form of liquid sulfuric acid.

  6. Traffic generated non-exhaust particulate emissions from concrete pavement: A mass and particle size study for two-wheelers and small cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aatmeeyata; Kaul, D. S.; Sharma, Mukesh

    This study aimed to understand the non-exhaust (NE) emission of particles from wear of summer tire and concrete pavement, especially for two wheelers and small cars. A fully enclosed laboratory-scale model was fabricated to simulate road tire interaction with a facility to collect particles in different sizes. A road was cast using the M-45 concrete mixture and the centrifugal casting method. It was observed that emission of large particle non exhaust emission (LPNE) as well as PM 10 and PM 2.5 increased with increasing load. The LPNE was 3.5 mg tire -1 km -1 for a two wheeler and 6.4 mg tire -1 km -1 for a small car. The LPNE can lead to water pollution through water run-off from the roads. The contribution of the PM 10 and PM 2.5 was smaller compared to the LPNE particles (less than 0.1%). About 32 percent of particle mass of PM 10 was present below 1 μm. The number as well as mass size distribution for PM 10 was observed to be bi-modal with peaks at 0.3 μm and 4-5 μm. The NE emissions did not show any significant trend with change in tire pressure.

  7. Effect of particle size distribution on 3D packings of spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Mutabaruka, Patrick; Pellenq, Roland; Radjai, Farhang

    2017-06-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of frictionless spherical particles to investigate a class of polydisperse granular materials in which the particle size distribution is uniform in particle volumes. The particles are assembled in a box by uniaxial compaction under the action of a constant stress. Due to the absence of friction and the nature of size distribution, the generated packings have the highest packing fraction at a given size span, defined as the ratio α of the largest size to the smallest size. We find that, up to α = 5, the packing fraction is a nearly linear function of α. While the coordination number is nearly constant due to the isostatic nature of the packings, we show that the connectivity of the particles evolves with α. In particular, the proportion of particles with 4 contacts represents the largest proportion of particles mostly of small size. We argue that this particular class of particles occurs as a result of the high stability of local configurations in which a small particle is stuck by four larger particles.

  8. Concentration, size distribution and dry deposition of amines in atmospheric particles of urban Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengxian; Bi, Xinhui; Zhang, Guohua; Peng, Long; Lian, Xiufeng; Lu, Huiying; Fu, Yuzhen; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying

    2017-12-01

    Size-segregated PM10 samples were collected in Guangzhou, China during autumn of 2014. Nine amines, including seven aliphatic amines and two heterocyclic amines, were detected using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer after derivatization by benzenesulfonyl chloride. The total concentration of the nine amines (Ʃamines) was 79.6-140.9 ng m-3 in PM10. The most abundant species was methylamine (MA), which had a concentration of 29.2-70.1 ng m-3. MA, dimethylamine (DMA), diethylamine (DEA) and dibutylamine (DBA) were the predominant amines in the samples and accounted for approximately 80% of Ʃamines in each size segment. Two heterocyclic amines, pyrrolidine (PYR) and morpholine (MOR), were detected in all samples and had average concentrations of 1.14 ± 0.37 and 1.89 ± 0.64 ng m-3, respectively, in particles with aerodynamic diameters < 3 μm. More than 80% of Ʃamines were found in particles with diameters <1.5 μm, indicating that amines are mainly enriched in fine particles. All amines exhibited a bimodal distribution with a fine mode at 0.49-1.5 μm and a coarse mode at 7.2-10 μm. The maximum contributions of amines to particles (0.21%) and amines-N to water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) (3.1%) were found at the sizes < 0.49 μm. The maximum contribution of amines-C to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was 1.6% over the size range of 0.95-1.5 μm. The molar ratio of Ʃamines to ammonium ranged from 0.0068 to 0.0107 in particles with diameters <1.5 μm, and the maximum ratio occurred in the smallest particles (diameter< 0.49 μm). The average dry deposition flux and velocity of Ʃamines in PM10 were 7.9 ± 1.6 μg m-2 d-1 and 0.084 ± 0.0021 cm s-1, respectively. The results of this study provide essential information on the contribution of amines to secondary organic aerosols and dry removal mechanisms in urban areas.

  9. Wintertime hygroscopicity and volatility of ambient urban aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enroth, Joonas; Mikkilä, Jyri; Németh, Zoltán; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2018-04-01

    Hygroscopic and volatile properties of atmospheric aerosol particles with dry diameters of (20), 50, 75, 110 and 145 nm were determined in situ by using a volatility-hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (VH-TDMA) system with a relative humidity of 90 % and denuding temperature of 270 °C in central Budapest during 2 months in winter 2014-2015. The probability density function of the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) showed a distinct bimodal distribution. One of the modes was characterised by an overall mean HGF of approximately 1.07 (this corresponds to a hygroscopicity parameter κ of 0.033) independently of the particle size and was assigned to nearly hydrophobic (NH) particles. Its mean particle number fraction was large, and it decreased monotonically from 69 to 41 % with particle diameter. The other mode showed a mean HGF increasing slightly from 1.31 to 1.38 (κ values from 0.186 to 0.196) with particle diameter, and it was attributed to less hygroscopic (LH) particles. The mode with more hygroscopic particles was not identified. The probability density function of the volatility GF (VGF) also exhibited a distinct bimodal distribution with an overall mean VGF of approximately 0.96 independently of the particle size, and with another mean VGF increasing from 0.49 to 0.55 with particle diameter. The two modes were associated with less volatile (LV) and volatile (V) particles. The mean particle number fraction for the LV mode decreased from 34 to 21 % with particle diameter. The bimodal distributions indicated that the urban atmospheric aerosol contained an external mixture of particles with a diverse chemical composition. Particles corresponding to the NH and LV modes were assigned mainly to freshly emitted combustion particles, more specifically to vehicle emissions consisting of large mass fractions of soot likely coated with or containing some water-insoluble organic compounds such as non-hygroscopic hydrocarbon-like organics. The hygroscopic

  10. Particle size and support effects in electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Brian E

    2013-08-20

    Researchers increasingly recognize that, as with standard supported heterogeneous catalysts, the activity and selectivity of supported metal electrocatalysts are influenced by particle size, particle structure, and catalyst support. Studies using model supported heterogeneous catalysts have provided information about these effects. Similarly, model electrochemical studies on supported metal electrocatalysts can provide insight into the factors determining catalytic activity. High-throughput methods for catalyst synthesis and screening can determine systematic trends in activity as a function of support and particle size with excellent statistical certainty. In this Account, we describe several such studies investigating methods for dispersing precious metals on both carbon and oxide supports, with particular emphasis on the prospects for the development of low-temperature fuel-cell electrocatalysts. One key finding is a decrease in catalytic activity with decreasing particle size independent of the support for both oxygen reduction and CO oxidation on supported gold and platinum. For these reactions, there appears to be an intrinsic particle size effect that results in a loss of activity at particle sizes below 2-3 nm. A titania support, however, also increases activity of gold particles in the electrooxidation of CO and in the reduction of oxygen, with an optimum at 3 nm particle size. This optimum may represent the superposition of competing effects: a titania-induced enhanced activity versus deactivation at small particle sizes. The titania support shows catalytic activity at potentials where carbon-supported and bulk-gold surfaces are normally oxidized and CO electrooxidation is poisoned. On the other hand, platinum on amorphous titania shows a different effect: the oxidation reduction reaction is strongly poisoned in the same particle size range. We correlated the influence of the titania support with titania-induced changes in the surface redox behavior of

  11. Effect of varying total mixed ration particle size on rumen digesta and fecal particle size and digestibility in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Maulfair, D D; Fustini, M; Heinrichs, A J

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of feeding rations of different particle sizes on rumen digesta and fecal matter particle size. Four rumen-cannulated, multiparous, Holstein cows (104±15 d in milk) were randomly assigned to treatments in a 4×4 Latin square design. The diets consisted of 29.4% corn silage, 22.9% ground corn, 17.6% alfalfa haylage, and 11.8% dry grass hay [20% of forage dry matter (DM)] on a DM basis. Dry grass hay was chopped to 4 different lengths to vary the total mixed ration (TMR) particle size. Geometric mean particle sizes of the rations were 4.46, 5.10, 5.32, and 5.84 mm for short, medium, long, and extra long diets, respectively. The ration affected rumen digesta particle size for particles ≥3.35 mm, and had no effect on distribution of particles <3.35 mm. All rumen digesta particle size fractions varied by time after feeding, with soluble particle fractions increasing immediately after feeding and 0.15, 0.6, and 1.18-mm particle size fractions decreasing slightly after feeding. Particle fractions >1.18 mm had ration by time interactions. Fecal neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and indigestible NDF concentrations decreased with increasing TMR particle size. Fecal particle size expressed as total geometric mean particle length followed this same tendency. Fecal particle size, expressed as retained geometric mean particle length, averaged 1.13 mm with more than 36% of particles being larger than 1.18 mm. All fecal nutrient concentrations measured were significantly affected by time after feeding, with NDF and indigestible NDF increasing after feeding and peaking at about 12h later and then decreasing to preprandial levels. Starch concentrations were determined to have the opposite effect. Additionally, apparent digestibility of diet nutrients was analyzed and DM digestibility tended to decrease with increasing TMR particle size, whereas other nutrient digestibilities were not different among rations. These results

  12. The biological response to nanometre-sized polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Richards, Laura; Bladen, Catherine L; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L

    2015-09-01

    Recently, nanometre-sized UHMWPE particles generated from hip and knee replacements have been identified in vitro and in vivo. UHMWPE particles in the 0.1-1.0μm size range have been shown to be more biologically active than larger particles, provoking an inflammatory response implicated in late aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. The biological activity of nanometre-sized particles has not previously been studied. The biological response to clinically-relevant UHMWPE wear particles including nanometre-sized and micrometre-sized, along with polystyrene particles (FluoSpheres 20nm, 60nm, 200nm and 1.0μm), and nanometre-sized model polyethylene particles (Ceridust 3615®), was determined in terms of osteolytic cytokine release from primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs). Nanometre-sized UHMWPE wear particles, nanometre-sized Ceridust 3615® and 20nm FluoSpheres had no significant effect on TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 release from PBMNCs at a concentration of 100μm(3) particles per cell after 12 and 24h. The micrometre-size UHMWPE wear particles (0.1-1.0μm) and 60nm, 200nm and 1.0μm FluoSpheres caused significantly elevated osteolytic cytokine release from PBMNCs. These results indicated that particles below circa 50nm fail to activate PBMNCs and that particle size, composition and morphology played a crucial role in cytokine release by particle stimulated macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The biological response to nanometre-sized polymer particles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aiqin; Richards, Laura; Bladen, Catherine L.; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, nanometre-sized UHMWPE particles generated from hip and knee replacements have been identified in vitro and in vivo. UHMWPE particles in the 0.1–1.0 μm size range have been shown to be more biologically active than larger particles, provoking an inflammatory response implicated in late aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. The biological activity of nanometre-sized particles has not previously been studied. The biological response to clinically-relevant UHMWPE wear particles including nanometre-sized and micrometre-sized, along with polystyrene particles (FluoSpheres 20 nm, 60 nm, 200 nm and 1.0 μm), and nanometre-sized model polyethylene particles (Ceridust 3615®), was determined in terms of osteolytic cytokine release from primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs). Nanometre-sized UHMWPE wear particles, nanometre-sized Ceridust 3615® and 20 nm FluoSpheres had no significant effect on TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 release from PBMNCs at a concentration of 100 μm3 particles per cell after 12 and 24 h. The micrometre-size UHMWPE wear particles (0.1–1.0 μm) and 60 nm, 200 nm and 1.0 μm FluoSpheres caused significantly elevated osteolytic cytokine release from PBMNCs. These results indicated that particles below circa 50 nm fail to activate PBMNCs and that particle size, composition and morphology played a crucial role in cytokine release by particle stimulated macrophages. PMID:26004221

  14. Growth Kinetics and Size Distribution Dynamics of Viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol

    DOE PAGES

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Zelenyuk, Alla; ...

    2017-12-15

    Low bulk diffusivity inside viscous semisolid atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can prolong equilibration time scale, but its broader impacts on aerosol growth and size distribution dynamics are poorly understood. In this article, we present quantitative insights into the effects of bulk diffusivity on the growth and evaporation kinetics of SOA formed under dry conditions from photooxidation of isoprene in the presence of a bimodal aerosol consisting of Aitken (ammonium sulfate) and accumulation (isoprene or α-pinene SOA) mode particles. Aerosol composition measurements and evaporation kinetics indicate that isoprene SOA is composed of several semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), with some reversiblymore » reacting to form oligomers. Model analysis shows that liquid-like bulk diffusivities can be used to fit the observed evaporation kinetics of accumulation mode particles but fail to explain the growth kinetics of bimodal aerosol by significantly under-predicting the evolution of the Aitken mode. In contrast, the semisolid scenario successfully reproduces both evaporation and growth kinetics, with the interpretation that hindered partitioning of SVOCs into large viscous particles effectively promotes the growth of smaller particles that have shorter diffusion time scales. This effect has important implications for the growth of atmospheric ultrafine particles to climatically active sizes.« less

  15. Growth Kinetics and Size Distribution Dynamics of Viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    Low bulk diffusivity inside viscous semisolid atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can prolong equilibration time scale, but its broader impacts on aerosol growth and size distribution dynamics are poorly understood. In this article, we present quantitative insights into the effects of bulk diffusivity on the growth and evaporation kinetics of SOA formed under dry conditions from photooxidation of isoprene in the presence of a bimodal aerosol consisting of Aitken (ammonium sulfate) and accumulation (isoprene or α-pinene SOA) mode particles. Aerosol composition measurements and evaporation kinetics indicate that isoprene SOA is composed of several semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), with some reversiblymore » reacting to form oligomers. Model analysis shows that liquid-like bulk diffusivities can be used to fit the observed evaporation kinetics of accumulation mode particles but fail to explain the growth kinetics of bimodal aerosol by significantly under-predicting the evolution of the Aitken mode. In contrast, the semisolid scenario successfully reproduces both evaporation and growth kinetics, with the interpretation that hindered partitioning of SVOCs into large viscous particles effectively promotes the growth of smaller particles that have shorter diffusion time scales. This effect has important implications for the growth of atmospheric ultrafine particles to climatically active sizes.« less

  16. Method for determining aerosol particle size device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data.

  17. Nano-sized and micro-sized polystyrene particles affect phagocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Prietl, B.; Meindl, C.; Roblegg, E.; Pieber, T. R.; Lanzer, G.; Fröhlich, E.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse effect of nanoparticles may include impairment of phagocyte function. To identify the effect of nanoparticle size on uptake, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, nitric oxide production and myeloperoxidase release, leukocytes isolated from human peripheral blood, monocytes and macrophages were studied. Carboxyl polystyrene (CPS) particles in sizes between 20 and 1,000 nm served as model particles. Twenty nanometers CPS particles were taken up passively, while larger CPS particles entered cells actively and passively. Twenty nanometers CPS were cytotoxic to all phagocytes, ≥500 nm CPS particles only to macrophages. Twenty nanometers CPS particles stimulated IL-8 secretion in human monocytes and induced oxidative burst in monocytes. Five hundred nanometers and 1,000 nm CPS particles stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in monocytes and macrophages, chemotaxis towards a chemotactic stimulus of monocytes and phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and provoked an oxidative burst of granulocytes. At very high concentrations, CPS particles of 20 and 500 nm stimulated myeloperoxidase release of granulocytes and nitric oxide generation in macrophages. Cytotoxic effect could contribute to some of the observed effects. In the absence of cytotoxicity, 500 and 1,000 nm CPS particles appear to influence phagocyte function to a greater extent than particles in other sizes. PMID:24292270

  18. Nano-sized and micro-sized polystyrene particles affect phagocyte function.

    PubMed

    Prietl, B; Meindl, C; Roblegg, E; Pieber, T R; Lanzer, G; Fröhlich, E

    2014-02-01

    Adverse effect of nanoparticles may include impairment of phagocyte function. To identify the effect of nanoparticle size on uptake, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, nitric oxide production and myeloperoxidase release, leukocytes isolated from human peripheral blood, monocytes and macrophages were studied. Carboxyl polystyrene (CPS) particles in sizes between 20 and 1,000 nm served as model particles. Twenty nanometers CPS particles were taken up passively, while larger CPS particles entered cells actively and passively. Twenty nanometers CPS were cytotoxic to all phagocytes, ≥500 nm CPS particles only to macrophages. Twenty nanometers CPS particles stimulated IL-8 secretion in human monocytes and induced oxidative burst in monocytes. Five hundred nanometers and 1,000 nm CPS particles stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in monocytes and macrophages, chemotaxis towards a chemotactic stimulus of monocytes and phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and provoked an oxidative burst of granulocytes. At very high concentrations, CPS particles of 20 and 500 nm stimulated myeloperoxidase release of granulocytes and nitric oxide generation in macrophages. Cytotoxic effect could contribute to some of the observed effects. In the absence of cytotoxicity, 500 and 1,000 nm CPS particles appear to influence phagocyte function to a greater extent than particles in other sizes.

  19. Indetermination of particle sizing by laser diffraction in the anomalous size ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linchao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhang, Fugen

    2017-09-01

    The laser diffraction method is widely used to measure particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that the scattering angle becomes smaller and the angles to the location of the main peak of scattered energy distributions in laser diffraction instruments shift to smaller values with increasing particle size. This specific principle forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. However, this principle is not entirely correct for non-absorbing particles in certain size ranges and these particle size ranges are called anomalous size ranges. Here, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the anomalous size ranges and discuss the influence of the width of the size segments on the signature of the Mie scattering kernel. This anomalous signature of the Mie scattering kernel will result in an indetermination of the particle size distribution when measured by laser diffraction instruments in the anomalous size ranges. By using the singular-value decomposition method we interpret the mechanism of occurrence of this indetermination in detail and then validate its existence by using inversion simulations.

  20. Characteristics of atmospheric particulate mercury in size-fractionated particles during haze days in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaojia; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Zhu, Qiongyu; Behera, Sailesh N.; Bo, Dandan; Huang, Xian; Xie, Haiyun; Cheng, Jinping

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate mercury (PHg) is recognized as a global pollutant that requires regulation because of its significant impacts on both human health and wildlife. The haze episodes that occur frequently in China could influence the transport and fate of PHg. To examine the characteristics of PHg during haze and non-haze days, size-fractioned particles were collected using thirteen-stage Nano-MOUDI samplers (10 nm-18 μm) during a severe haze episode (from December 2013 to January 2014) in Shanghai. The PHg concentration on haze days (4.11 ± 0.53 ng m-3) was three times higher than on non-haze days (1.34 ± 0.15 ng m-3). The ratio of the PHg concentration to total gaseous mercury (TGM) ranged from 0.42 during haze days to 0.21 during non-haze days, which was possibly due to the elevated concentration of particles for gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) adsorption, elevated sulfate and nitrate contributing to GEM oxidation, and the catalytic effect of elevated water-soluble inorganic metal ions. PHg/PM10 during haze days (0.019 ± 0.004 ng/μg) was lower than during non-haze days (0.024 ± 0.002 ng/μg), and PHg/PM10 was significantly reduced with an increasing concentration of PM10, which implied a relatively lower growth velocity of mercury than other compositions on particles during haze days, especially in the diameter range of 0.018-0.032 μm. During haze days, each size-fractioned PHg concentration was higher than the corresponding fraction on non-haze days, and the dominant particle size was in the accumulation mode, with constant accumulation to a particle size of 0.56-1.0 μm. The mass size distribution of PHg was bimodal with peaks at 0.32-0.56 μm and 3.1-6.2 μm on non-haze days, and 0.56-1.0 μm and 3.1-6.2 μm on haze days. There was a clear trend that the dominant size for PHg in the fine modes shifted from 0.32-0.56 μm during non-haze days to 0.56-1.0 μm on haze days, which revealed the higher growth velocity of PHg on haze days due to the

  1. Method for determining aerosol particle size, device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.

    1998-10-06

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data. 2 figs.

  2. Metal release from stainless steel particles in vitro-influence of particle size.

    PubMed

    Midander, K; Pan, J; Wallinder, I Odnevall; Leygraf, C

    2007-01-01

    Human inhalation of airborne metallic particles is important for health risk assessment. To study interactions between metallic particles and the human body, metal release measurements of stainless steel powder particles were performed in two synthetic biological media simulating lung-like environments. Particle size and media strongly influence the metal release process. The release rate of Fe is enhanced compared with Cr and Ni. In artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF, pH 4.5), the accumulated amounts of released metal per particle loading increase drastically with decreasing particle size. The release rate of Fe per unit surface area increases with decreasing particle size. Compared with massive sheet metal, fine powder particles (<4 microm) show similar release rates of Cr and Ni, but a higher release rate of Fe. Release rates in Gamble's solution (pH 7.4), for all powders investigated, are significantly lower compared to ALF. No clear trend is seen related to particle size in Gamble's solution.

  3. Recent trends in particle size analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances and developments in the particle-sizing technologies are briefly reviewed in accordance with three operating principles including particle size and shape descriptions. Significant trends of the particle size analysing equipment recently developed show that compact electronic circuitry and rapid data processing systems were mainly adopted in the instrument design. Some newly developed techniques characterizing the particulate system were also introduced.

  4. Random deposition of particles of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Forgerini, F L; Figueiredo, W

    2009-04-01

    We study the surface growth generated by the random deposition of particles of different sizes. A model is proposed where the particles are aggregated on an initially flat surface, giving rise to a rough interface and a porous bulk. By using Monte Carlo simulations, a surface has grown by adding particles of different sizes, as well as identical particles on the substrate in (1+1) dimensions. In the case of deposition of particles of different sizes, they are selected from a Poisson distribution, where the particle sizes may vary by 1 order of magnitude. For the deposition of identical particles, only particles which are larger than one lattice parameter of the substrate are considered. We calculate the usual scaling exponents: the roughness, growth, and dynamic exponents alpha, beta, and z, respectively, as well as, the porosity in the bulk, determining the porosity as a function of the particle size. The results of our simulations show that the roughness evolves in time following three different behaviors. The roughness in the initial times behaves as in the random deposition model. At intermediate times, the surface roughness grows slowly and finally, at long times, it enters into the saturation regime. The bulk formed by depositing large particles reveals a porosity that increases very fast at the initial times and also reaches a saturation value. Excepting the case where particles have the size of one lattice spacing, we always find that the surface roughness and porosity reach limiting values at long times. Surprisingly, we find that the scaling exponents are the same as those predicted by the Villain-Lai-Das Sarma equation.

  5. Particle size, charge and colloidal stability of humic acids coprecipitated with Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Angelico, Ruggero; Ceglie, Andrea; He, Ji-Zheng; Liu, Yu-Rong; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Colombo, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a colloidal character whose size and negative charge are strictly dependent on surface functional groups. They are able to complex large amount of poorly ordered iron (hydr)oxides in soil as a function of pH and other environmental conditions. Accordingly, with the present study we intend to assess the colloidal properties of Fe(II) coprecipitated with humic acids (HA) and their effect on Fe hydroxide crystallinity under abiotic oxidation and order of addition of both Fe(II) and HA. TEM, XRD and DRS experiments showed that Fe-HA consisted of Ferrihydrite with important structural variations. DLS data of Fe-HA at acidic pH showed a bimodal size distribution, while at very low pH a slow aggregation process was observed. Electrophoretic zeta-potential measurements revealed a negative surface charge for Fe-HA macromolecules, providing a strong electrostatic barrier against aggregation. Under alkaline conditions HA chains swelled, which resulted in an enhanced stabilization of the colloid particles. The increasing of zeta potential and size of the Fe-HA macromolecules, reflects a linear dependence of both with pH. The increase in the size and negative charge of the Fe-HA precipitate seems to be more affected by the ionization of the phenolic acid groups, than by the carboxylic acid groups. The main cause of negative charge generation of Fe/HA is due to increased dissociation of phenolic groups in more expanded structure. The increased net negative surface potential induced by coprecipitation with Ferrihydrite and the correspondent changes in configuration of the HA could trigger the inter-particle aggregation with the formation of new negative surface. The Fe-HA coprecipitation can reduce electrosteric repulsive forces, which in turn may inhibit the aggregation process at different pH. Therefore, coprecipitation of Ferrihydrite would be expected to play an important role in the carbon stabilization and persistence not only in organic soils, but

  6. Stratus Cloud Radiative Effects from Cloud Processed Bimodal CCN Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Inability to understand cloud processes is a large component of climate uncertainty. Increases in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations are known to increase cloud droplet number concentrations (Nc). This aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI) produces greater Nc at smaller sizes, which brightens clouds. A lesser understood ACI is cloud processing of CCN. This improves CCN that then more easily activate at lower cloud supersaturations (S). Bimodal CCN distributions thus ensue from these evaporated cloud droplets. Hudson et al. (2015) related CCN bimodality to Nc. In stratus clouds, bimodal CCN created greater Nc whereas in cumulus less Nc. Thus, CCN distribution shape influences cloud properties; microphysics and radiative properties. Measured uni- and bimodal CCN distributions were input into an adiabatic droplet growth model using various specified vertical wind speeds (W). Bimodal CCN produced greater Nc (Fig. 1a) and smaller mean diameters (MD; Fig. 1b) at lower W typical of stratus clouds (<70 cm/s). Improved CCN (low critical S) were more easily activated at the lower S of stratus from low W, thus, creating greater Nc. Competition for condensate thus reduced MD and drizzle. At greater W, typical of cumulus clouds (>70 cm/s), bimodal CCN made lower Nc with larger MD thus enhancing drizzle whereas unimodal CCN made greater Nc with smaller MD, thus reducing drizzle. Thus, theoretical predictions of Nc and MD for uni- and bimodal CCN agree with the sense of the observations. Radiative effects were determined using a cloud grown to a 250-meter thickness. Bimodal CCN at low W reduced cloud effective radius (re), made greater cloud optical thickness (COT), and made greater cloud albedo (Fig. 1c). At very low W changes were as much as +9% for albedo, +17% for COT, and -12% for re. Stratus clouds typically have low W and cover large areas. Thus, these changes in cloud radiative properties at low W impact climate. Stratus cloud susceptibility to CCN distribution thus

  7. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Sizing and Trade Matrix for Lunar, Near Earth Asteroid and Mars Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, David R.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Roche, Joseph M.; Zinolabedini, Reza

    2006-01-01

    The concept of a human rated transport vehicle for various near earth missions is evaluated using a liquid hydrogen fueled Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (BNTP) approach. In an effort to determine the preliminary sizing and optimal propulsion system configuration, as well as the key operating design points, an initial investigation into the main system level parameters was conducted. This assessment considered not only the performance variables but also the more subjective reliability, operability, and maintainability attributes. The SIZER preliminary sizing tool was used to facilitate rapid modeling of the trade studies, which included tank materials, propulsive versus an aero-capture trajectory, use of artificial gravity, reactor chamber operating pressure and temperature, fuel element scaling, engine thrust rating, engine thrust augmentation by adding oxygen to the flow in the nozzle for supersonic combustion, and the baseline turbopump configuration to address mission redundancy and safety requirements. A high level system perspective was maintained to avoid focusing solely on individual component optimization at the expense of system level performance, operability, and development cost.

  8. Frequency-scanning particle size spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A particle size spectrometer having a fixed field of view within the forward light scattering cone at an angle theta sub s between approximately 100 and 200 minutes of arc (preferably at 150 minutes), a spectral range extending approximately from 0.2 to 4.0 inverse micrometers, and a spectral resolution between about 0.1 and 0.2 inverse micrometers (preferably toward the lower end of this range of spectral resolution), is employed to determine the distribution of particle sizes, independently of the chemical composition of the particles, from measurements of incident light, at each frequency, sigma (=1/lambda), and scattered light, I(sigma).

  9. Particle Size Effects on CL-20 Initiation and Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valancius, Cole; Bainbridge, Joe; Love, Cody; Richardson, Duane

    2017-06-01

    Particle size or specific surface area effects on explosives has been of interest to the explosives community for both application and modeling of initiation and detonation. Different particles sizes of CL-20 were used in detonator experiments to determine the effects of particle size on initiation, run-up to steady state detonation, and steady state detonation. Historical tests have demonstrated a direct relationship between particle size and initiation. However, historical tests inadvertently employed density gradients, making it difficult to discern the effects of particle size from the effects of density. Density gradients were removed from these tests using a larger diameter, shorter charge column, allowing for similar loading across different particle sizes. Without the density gradient, the effects of particle size on initiation and detonation are easier to determine. The results of which contrast with historical results, showing particle size does not directly affect initiation threshold.

  10. Effect of polydispersity, bimodality, and aspect ratio on the phase behavior of colloidal platelet suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Velasco, Enrique

    2012-10-01

    We use a fundamental-measure density functional for hard board-like polydisperse particles, in the restricted-orientation approximation, to explain the phase behaviour of platelet colloidal suspensions studied in recent experiments. In particular, we focus our attention on the behavior of the total packing fraction of the mixture, η, in the region of two-phase isotropic-nematic coexistence as a function of mean aspect ratio, polydispersity, and fraction of total volume γ occupied by the nematic phase. In our model, platelets are polydisperse in the square section, of side length σ, but have constant thickness L (and aspect ratio κ ≡ L/⟨σ⟩ < 1, with ⟨σ⟩ the mean side length). Good agreement between our theory and recent experiments is obtained by mapping the real system onto an effective one, with excluded volume interactions but with thicker particles (due to the presence of long-ranged repulsive interactions between platelets). The effect of polydispersity in both shape and particle size has been taken into account by using a size distribution function with an effective mean-square deviation that depends on both polydispersities. We also show that the bimodality of the size distribution function is required to correctly describe the huge two-phase coexistence gap and the nonlinearity of the function γ(η), two important features that these colloidal suspensions exhibit.

  11. [Particle emission characteristics of diesel bus fueled with bio-diesel].

    PubMed

    Lou, Di-Ming; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Hu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    With the use of the Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS), a study on the characteristics of particle emissions was carried out on a China-IV diesel bus fueled with blends of 5% , 10% , 20% , 50% bio-diesel transformed from restaurant waste oil and China-IV diesel (marked separately by BD5, BD10, BD20, BD50), pure bio-diesel (BD100) and pure diesel (BD0). The results indicated that particulate number (PN) and mass (PM) emissions of bio-diesel blends increased with the increase in bus speed and acceleration; with increasing bio-diesel content, particulate emissions displayed a relevant declining trend. In different speed ranges, the size distribution of particulate number emissions (PNSD) was bimodal; in different acceleration ranges, PNSD showed a gradual transition from bimodal shape to unimodal when bus operation was switched from decelerating to accelerating status. Bio-diesel blends with higher mixture ratios showed significant reduction in PN emissions for accumulated modes, and the particulate number emission peaks moved towards smaller sizes; but little change was obtained in PN emissions for nuclei modes; reduction also occurred in particle geometric diameter (Dg).

  12. Method of producing non-agglomerating submicron size particles

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Roy S.; Eichman, Clarence C.; Welbon, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in "metallic inks".

  13. Volatile particles measured by vapor-particle separator

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Meng -Dawn; Corporan, Edwin

    Vapor-Particle Separator (VPS) is a new technology developed for characterization of the volatile fraction of particulate matter in a combustion aerosol population. VPS incorporates a novel metallic membrane and operates in a cross-flow filtration mode for separation of vapor and solid (i.e. non-volatile) particles. Demonstration of the VPS technology on aircraft engine-emitted particles has led to the improvement of the technology and increased confidence on the robustness of its field performance. In this study, the performance of the VPS was evaluated against the Particle Measurement Programme (PMP) volatile particle remover (VPR), a standardized device used in heavy duty diesel enginesmore » for separation and characterization of non-volatile particulate matter. Using tetracontane particles in the laboratory reveals that the VPS performed reasonably well in removing the volatile species. In the field conditions, a single-mode particle size distribution was found for emitted particles from a T63 turboshaft engine at both idle and cruise engine power conditions. Removal of the volatile T63 engine particles by the VPS was consistent with that of PMP VPR. In tests on an F117 turbofan engine, the size distribution at the idle (4% rated) engine power condition was found to be bimodal, with the first mode consisting of particles smaller than 10nm, which are believed to be mostly semi-volatile particles, while the second mode of larger size was a mixture of semi-volatile and non-volatile particles. The distribution was single modal at the 33% rated engine power with no secondary mode observed. Altogether, for particles emitted by both engines, the removal efficiency of the VPS appears to surpass that of the PMP VPR by 8-10%.« less

  14. Volatile particles measured by vapor-particle separator

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Meng -Dawn; Corporan, Edwin

    2016-08-25

    Vapor-Particle Separator (VPS) is a new technology developed for characterization of the volatile fraction of particulate matter in a combustion aerosol population. VPS incorporates a novel metallic membrane and operates in a cross-flow filtration mode for separation of vapor and solid (i.e. non-volatile) particles. Demonstration of the VPS technology on aircraft engine-emitted particles has led to the improvement of the technology and increased confidence on the robustness of its field performance. In this study, the performance of the VPS was evaluated against the Particle Measurement Programme (PMP) volatile particle remover (VPR), a standardized device used in heavy duty diesel enginesmore » for separation and characterization of non-volatile particulate matter. Using tetracontane particles in the laboratory reveals that the VPS performed reasonably well in removing the volatile species. In the field conditions, a single-mode particle size distribution was found for emitted particles from a T63 turboshaft engine at both idle and cruise engine power conditions. Removal of the volatile T63 engine particles by the VPS was consistent with that of PMP VPR. In tests on an F117 turbofan engine, the size distribution at the idle (4% rated) engine power condition was found to be bimodal, with the first mode consisting of particles smaller than 10nm, which are believed to be mostly semi-volatile particles, while the second mode of larger size was a mixture of semi-volatile and non-volatile particles. The distribution was single modal at the 33% rated engine power with no secondary mode observed. Altogether, for particles emitted by both engines, the removal efficiency of the VPS appears to surpass that of the PMP VPR by 8-10%.« less

  15. Size Effect on Specific Energy Distribution in Particle Comminution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongfu; Wang, Yidong

    A theoretical study is made to derive an energy distribution equation for the size reduction process from the fractal model for the particle comminution. Fractal model is employed as a valid measure of the self-similar size distribution of comminution daughter products. The tensile strength of particles varies with particle size in the manner of a power function law. The energy consumption for comminuting single particle is found to be proportional to the 5(D-3)/3rd order of the particle size, D being the fractal dimension of particle comminution daughter. The Weibull statistics is applied to describe the relationship between the breakage probability and specific energy of particle comminution. A simple equation is derived for the breakage probability of particles in view of the dependence of fracture energy on particle size. The calculated exponents and Weibull coefficients are generally in conformity with published data for fracture of particles.

  16. Sheathless Size-Based Acoustic Particle Separation

    PubMed Central

    Guldiken, Rasim; Jo, Myeong Chan; Gallant, Nathan D.; Demirci, Utkan; Zhe, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Particle separation is of great interest in many biological and biomedical applications. Flow-based methods have been used to sort particles and cells. However, the main challenge with flow based particle separation systems is the need for a sheath flow for successful operation. Existence of the sheath liquid dilutes the analyte, necessitates precise flow control between sample and sheath flow, requires a complicated design to create sheath flow and separation efficiency depends on the sheath liquid composition. In this paper, we present a microfluidic platform for sheathless particle separation using standing surface acoustic waves. In this platform, particles are first lined up at the center of the channel without introducing any external sheath flow. The particles are then entered into the second stage where particles are driven towards the off-center pressure nodes for size based separation. The larger particles are exposed to more lateral displacement in the channel due to the acoustic force differences. Consequently, different-size particles are separated into multiple collection outlets. The prominent feature of the present microfluidic platform is that the device does not require the use of the sheath flow for positioning and aligning of particles. Instead, the sheathless flow focusing and separation are integrated within a single microfluidic device and accomplished simultaneously. In this paper, we demonstrated two different particle size-resolution separations; (1) 3 μm and 10 μm and (2) 3 μm and 5 μm. Also, the effects of the input power, the flow rate, and particle concentration on the separation efficiency were investigated. These technologies have potential to impact broadly various areas including the essential microfluidic components for lab-on-a-chip system and integrated biological and biomedical applications. PMID:22368502

  17. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water: particle size effects.

    PubMed

    Winward, G P; Avery, L M; Stephenson, T; Jefferson, B

    2008-02-01

    The impact of water quality on the ultraviolet (UV) disinfection of grey water was investigated with reference to urban water reuse. Direct UV disinfection of grey water did not meet the stringent California State Title 22 criteria for unrestricted urban water reuse due to the presence of particulate material ranging from < 1 to > or = 2000 microm in size. Grey water was manipulated by settling to produce fractions of varying particle size distributions and blending was employed post-disinfection to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs). The efficacy of UV disinfection was found to be linked to the particle size of the grey water fractions. The larger particle size fractions with a mean particle size of 262 microm and above were observed to shield more coliforms from UV light than did the smaller particles with a mean particle size below 119 microm. Up to 70% of total coliforms in the larger particle size fractions were particle-associated following a UV dose (fluence) of 260 mJ.cm(-2) and would remain undetected by standard coliform enumeration techniques. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and recommendations made for grey water treatment to ensure removal of particle-associated indicator bacteria and pathogens prior to UV disinfection.

  18. Calibration of optical particle-size analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Pechin, William H.; Thacker, Louis H.; Turner, Lloyd J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for the calibration of an optical particle-size analyzer of the light-intercepting type for spherical particles, wherein a rotary wheel or disc is provided with radially-extending wires of differing diameters, each wire corresponding to a particular equivalent spherical particle diameter. These wires are passed at an appropriate frequency between the light source and the light detector of the analyzer. The reduction of light as received at the detector is a measure of the size of the wire, and the electronic signal may then be adjusted to provide the desired signal for corresponding spherical particles. This calibrator may be operated at any time without interrupting other processing.

  19. Enhancing magnetorheological effect using bimodal suspensions in the single-multidomain limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, José R.; Bombard, Antonio J. F.; de Vicente, Juan

    2018-07-01

    We demonstrate a new route to enhance the magnetorheological effect using bimodal suspensions in the single-multidomain limit. Experimental results are satisfactorily compared to 3D finite element method simulations. The physical reason behind this enhancement is the coating of the larger particles by the smaller ones due to the remnant magnetization of the latter.

  20. Reduction of glycine particle size by impinging jet crystallization.

    PubMed

    Tari, Tímea; Fekete, Zoltán; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Aigner, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The parameters of crystallization processes determine the habit and particle size distribution of the products. A narrow particle size distribution and a small average particle size are crucial for the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble pharmacons. Thus, particle size reduction is often required during crystallization processes. Impinging jet crystallization is a method that results in a product with a reduced particle size due to the homogeneous and high degree of supersaturation at the impingement point. In this work, the applicability of the impinging jet technique as a new approach in crystallization was investigated for the antisolvent crystallization of glycine. A factorial design was applied to choose the relevant crystallization factors. The results were analysed by means of a statistical program. The particle size distribution of the crystallized products was investigated with a laser diffraction particle size analyser. The roundness and morphology were determined with the use of a light microscopic image analysis system and a scanning electron microscope. Polymorphism was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Headspace gas chromatography was utilized to determine the residual solvent content. Impinging jet crystallization proved to reduce the particle size of glycine. The particle size distribution was appropriate, and the average particle size was an order of magnitude smaller (d(0.5)=8-35 μm) than that achieved with conventional crystallization (d(0.5)=82-680 μm). The polymorphic forms of the products were influenced by the solvent ratio. The quantity of residual solvent in the crystallized products was in compliance with the requirements of the International Conference on Harmonization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-time particle size analysis using focused beam reflectance measurement as a process analytical technology tool for a continuous granulation-drying-milling process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Taylor, Michael K; Mehrotra, Amit; Stagner, William C

    2013-06-01

    Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was used as a process analytical technology tool to perform inline real-time particle size analysis of a proprietary granulation manufactured using a continuous twin-screw granulation-drying-milling process. A significant relationship between D20, D50, and D80 length-weighted chord length and sieve particle size was observed with a p value of <0.0001 and R(2) of 0.886. A central composite response surface statistical design was used to evaluate the effect of granulator screw speed and Comil® impeller speed on the length-weighted chord length distribution (CLD) and particle size distribution (PSD) determined by FBRM and nested sieve analysis, respectively. The effect of granulator speed and mill speed on bulk density, tapped density, Compressibility Index, and Flowability Index were also investigated. An inline FBRM probe placed below the Comil-generated chord lengths and CLD data at designated times. The collection of the milled samples for sieve analysis and PSD evaluation were coordinated with the timing of the FBRM determinations. Both FBRM and sieve analysis resulted in similar bimodal distributions for all ten manufactured batches studied. Within the experimental space studied, the granulator screw speed (650-850 rpm) and Comil® impeller speed (1,000-2,000 rpm) did not have a significant effect on CLD, PSD, bulk density, tapped density, Compressibility Index, and Flowability Index (p value > 0.05).

  2. The Effect of Particle Size on the Biodistribution of Low-modulus Hydrogel PRINT Particles

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Timothy J.; Chen, Kai; Jones, Stephen W.; Pandya, Ashish A.; Tian, Shaomin; Napier, Mary E.; Zamboni, William E.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing recognition that the deformability of particles used for drug delivery plays a significant role on their biodistribution and circulation profile. Understanding these effects would provide a crucial tool for the rational design of drug delivery systems. While particles resembling red blood cells (RBCs) in size, shape and deformability have extended circulation times and altered biodistribution profiles compared to rigid, but otherwise similar particles, the in vivo behavior of such highly deformable particles of varied size has not been explored. We report the fabrication of a series of discoid, monodisperse, low-modulus hydrogel particles with diameters ranging from 0.8 to 8.9 μm, spanning sizes smaller than and larger than RBCs. We injected these particles into healthy mice, and tracked their concentration in the blood and their distribution into major organs. These deformable particles all demonstrated some hold up in filtration tissues like the lungs and spleen, followed by release back into the circulation, characterized by decreases in particles in these tissues with concomitant increases in particle concentration in blood. Particles similar to red blood cells in size demonstrated longer circulation times, suggesting that this size and shape of deformable particle is uniquely suited to avoid clearance. PMID:22705460

  3. Ligand conjugation to bimodal poly(ethylene glycol) brush layers on microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cherry C; Borden, Mark A

    2010-08-17

    Using microbubbles as model systems, we examined molecular diffusion and binding to colloidal surfaces in bimodal poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush layers. A microbubble is a gaseous colloidal particle with a diameter of less than 10 mum, of which the surface comprises amphiphilic phospholipids self-assembled to form a lipid monolayer shell. Due to the compressible gas core, microbubbles provide a sensitive acoustic response and are currently used as ultrasound contrast agents. Similar to the design of long circulating liposomes, PEG chains are typically incorporated into the shell of microbubbles to form a steric barrier against coalescence and adsorption of macromolecules to the microbubble surface. We introduced a buried-ligand architecture (BLA) design where the microbubble surface was coated with a bimodal PEG brush. After microbubbles were generated, fluorescent ligands with different molecular weights were conjugated to the tethered functional groups on the shorter PEG chains, while the longer PEG chains served as a shield to protect these ligands from exposure to the surrounding environment. BLA microbubbles reduced the binding of macromolecules (>10 kDa) to the tethers due to the steric hindrance of the PEG overbrush while allowing the uninhibited attachment of small molecules (<1 kDa). Roughly 40% less fluorescein-conjugated streptavidin (SA-FITC) bound to BLA microbubbles compared to exposed-ligand architecture (ELA) microbubbles. The binding of SA-FITC to BLA microbubbles suggested a possible phase separation between the lipid species on the surface leading to populations of revealed and concealed ligands. Ligand conjugation kinetics was independent of microbubble size, regardless of ligand size or microbubble architecture. We observed, for the first time, streptavidin-induced surface structure formation for ELA microbubbles and proposed that this phenomenon may be correlated to flow cytometry scattering measurements. We therefore demonstrated the

  4. Particles size distribution in diluted magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Constantine V.

    2017-06-01

    Changes in particles and aggregates size distribution in diluted kerosene based magnetic fluids is studied by dynamic light scattering method. It has been found that immediately after dilution in magnetic fluids the system of aggregates with sizes ranging from 100 to 250-1000 nm is formed. In 50-100 h after dilution large aggregates are peptized and in the sample stationary particles and aggregates size distribution is fixed.

  5. Process for preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Kornfeld, D. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Monodisperse latexes having a particle size in the range of 2 to 40 microns are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization in microgravity. A reaction mixture containing smaller monodisperse latex seed particles, predetermined amounts of monomer, emulsifier, initiator, inhibitor and water is placed in a microgravity environment, and polymerization is initiated by heating. The reaction is allowed to continue until the seed particles grow to a predetermined size, and the resulting enlarged particles are then recovered. A plurality of particle-growing steps can be used to reach larger sizes within the stated range, with enlarge particles from the previous steps being used as seed particles for the succeeding steps. Microgravity enables preparation of particles in the stated size range by avoiding gravity related problems of creaming and settling, and flocculation induced by mechanical shear that have precluded their preparation in a normal gravity environment.

  6. Planar particle/droplet size measurement technique using digital particle image velocimetry image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R. (Inventor); Wernet, Mark P. (Inventor); Mielke, Amy F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for determining a mass flux of an entrained phase in a planar two-phase flow records images of particles in the two-phase flow. Respective sizes of the particles (the entrained phase) are determined as a function of a separation between spots identified on the particle images. Respective velocities of the particles are determined. The mass flux of the entrained phase is determined as a function of the size and velocity of the particles.

  7. Filler particle size and composite resin classification systems.

    PubMed

    Lang, B R; Jaarda, M; Wang, R F

    1992-11-01

    The currently used composite resin classification systems need review if they are to continue to serve as descriptives and quantitative parameters denoting the filler particle content of these materials. Examination of the particles in 12 composite resins using a technique of washing the filler particles from the matrix of the composite resin was presented as yet another method of grouping composites according to filler particle content. Light microscopic examination of the filler particles that remained provided a separation of the 12 materials into four easily distinguished groups based on filler particle sizes. The wear of the 12 composite resins determined in a previous study was examined in relation to the classification of the materials by the currently available systems. The wear values were also examined using the groupings of the materials according to their filler particle sizes as determined by separating the particles from the matrix by the washing technique. Grouping composites on the basis of the filler particle sizes found after washing was easily correlated with wear and supported the suggestion that composites with smaller filler particles wear less.

  8. Decomposition of Atmospheric Aerosol Phase Function by Particle Size and Morphology via Single Particle Scattering Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, K. B.; Pan, Y.; Martin, S.; Fernandez, E.; Chang, R.; Pinnick, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    We report upon an experimental approach that provides insight into how particle size and shape affect the scattering phase function of atmospheric aerosol particles. Central to our approach is the design of an apparatus that measures the forward and backward scattering hemispheres (scattering patterns) of individual atmospheric aerosol particles in the coarse mode range. The size and shape of each particle is discerned from the corresponding scattering pattern. In particular, autocorrelation analysis is used to differentiate between spherical and non-spherical particles, the calculated asphericity factor is used to characterize the morphology of non-spherical particles, and the integrated irradiance is used for particle sizing. We found the fraction of spherical particles decays exponentially with particle size, decreasing from 11% for particles on the order of 1 micrometer to less than 1% for particles over 5 micrometer. The average phase functions of subpopulations of particles, grouped by size and morphology, are determined by averaging their corresponding scattering patterns. The phase functions of spherical and non-spherical atmospheric particles are shown to diverge with increasing size. In addition, the phase function of non-spherical particles is found to vary little as a function of the asphericity factor.

  9. Suppression of coffee ring: (Particle) size matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Lalit; Seth, Pranjal; Murugappan, Bhubesh; Basu, Saptarshi

    2018-05-01

    Coffee ring patterns in drying sessile droplets are undesirable in various practical applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that on hydrophobic substrates, the coffee ring can be suppressed just by increasing the particle diameter. Particles with larger size flocculate within the evaporation timescale, leading to a significant gravimetric settling (for Pe > 1) triggering a uniform deposit. Interestingly, the transition to a uniform deposit is found to be independent of the internal flow field and substrate properties. Flocculation of particles also alters the particle packing at the nanoscale resulting in order to disorder transitions. In this letter, we exhibit a physical exposition on how particle size affects morphodynamics of the droplet drying at macro-nano length scales.

  10. Sound absorption by suspensions of nonspherical particles: Measurements compared with predictions using various particle sizing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Simon D.; Leighton, Timothy G.; Brown, Niven R.

    2003-10-01

    Knowledge of the particle size distribution is required in order to predict ultrasonic absorption in polydisperse particulate suspensions. This paper shows that the method used to measure the particle size distribution can lead to important differences in the predicted absorption. A reverberation technique developed for measuring ultrasonic absorption by suspended particles is used to measure the absorption in suspensions of nonspherical particles. Two types of particulates are studied: (i) kaolin (china clay) particles which are platelike in form; and (ii) calcium carbonate particles which are more granular. Results are compared to theoretical predictions of visco-inertial absorption by suspensions of spherical particles. The particle size distributions, which are required for these predictions, are measured by laser diffraction, gravitational sedimentation and centrifugal sedimentation, all of which assume spherical particles. For a given sample, each sizing technique yields a different size distribution, leading to differences in the predicted absorption. The particle size distributions obtained by gravitational and centrifugal sedimentation are reinterpreted to yield a representative size distribution of oblate spheroids, and predictions for absorption by these spheroids are compared with the measurements. Good agreement between theory and measurement for the flat kaolin particles is obtained, demonstrating that these particles can be adequately represented by oblate spheroids.

  11. Enhanced size-dependent trapping of particles using microvortices

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Kasper, Susan; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Inertial microfluidics has been attracting considerable interest for size-based separation of particles and cells. The inertial forces can be manipulated by expanding the microchannel geometry, leading to formation of microvortices which selectively isolate and trap particles or cells from a mixture. In this work, we aim to enhance our understanding of particle trapping in such microvortices by developing a model of selective particle trapping. Design and operational parameters including flow conditions, size of the trapping region, and target particle concentration are explored to elucidate their influence on trapping behavior. Our results show that the size dependence of trapping is characterized by a threshold Reynolds number, which governs the selective entry of particles into microvortices from the main flow. We show that concentration enhancement on the order of 100,000× and isolation of targets at concentrations in the 1/mL is possible. Ultimately, the insights gained from our systematic investigation suggest optimization solutions that enhance device performance (efficiency, size selectivity, and yield) and are applicable to selective isolation and trapping of large rare cells as well as other applications. PMID:24187531

  12. A hybrid artificial bee colony algorithm and pattern search method for inversion of particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Xing, Jian

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm and pattern search (PS) method is proposed and applied for recovery of particle size distribution (PSD) from spectral extinction data. To be more useful and practical, size distribution function is modelled as the general Johnson's ? function that can overcome the difficulty of not knowing the exact type beforehand encountered in many real circumstances. The proposed hybrid algorithm is evaluated through simulated examples involving unimodal, bimodal and trimodal PSDs with different widths and mean particle diameters. For comparison, all examples are additionally validated by the single ABC algorithm. In addition, the performance of the proposed algorithm is further tested by actual extinction measurements with real standard polystyrene samples immersed in water. Simulation and experimental results illustrate that the hybrid algorithm can be used as an effective technique to retrieve the PSDs with high reliability and accuracy. Compared with the single ABC algorithm, our proposed algorithm can produce more accurate and robust inversion results while taking almost comparative CPU time over ABC algorithm alone. The superiority of ABC and PS hybridization strategy in terms of reaching a better balance of estimation accuracy and computation effort increases its potentials as an excellent inversion technique for reliable and efficient actual measurement of PSD.

  13. Artificial neural network based particle size prediction of polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Youshia, John; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Particle size of nanoparticles and the respective polydispersity are key factors influencing their biopharmaceutical behavior in a large variety of therapeutic applications. Predicting these attributes would skip many preliminary studies usually required to optimize formulations. The aim was to build a mathematical model capable of predicting the particle size of polymeric nanoparticles produced by a pharmaceutical polymer of choice. Polymer properties controlling the particle size were identified as molecular weight, hydrophobicity and surface activity, and were quantified by measuring polymer viscosity, contact angle and interfacial tension, respectively. A model was built using artificial neural network including these properties as input with particle size and polydispersity index as output. The established model successfully predicted particle size of nanoparticles covering a range of 70-400nm prepared from other polymers. The percentage bias for particle prediction was 2%, 4% and 6%, for the training, validation and testing data, respectively. Polymer surface activity was found to have the highest impact on the particle size followed by viscosity and finally hydrophobicity. Results of this study successfully highlighted polymer properties affecting particle size and confirmed the usefulness of artificial neural networks in predicting the particle size and polydispersity of polymeric nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  15. Parallel particle impactor - novel size-selective particle sampler for accurate fractioning of inhalable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakumas, S.; Salter, E.

    2009-02-01

    Adverse health effects due to exposure to airborne particles are associated with particle deposition within the human respiratory tract. Particle size, shape, chemical composition, and the individual physiological characteristics of each person determine to what depth inhaled particles may penetrate and deposit within the respiratory tract. Various particle inertial classification devices are available to fractionate airborne particles according to their aerodynamic size to approximate particle penetration through the human respiratory tract. Cyclones are most often used to sample thoracic or respirable fractions of inhaled particles. Extensive studies of different cyclonic samplers have shown, however, that the sampling characteristics of cyclones do not follow the entire selected convention accurately. In the search for a more accurate way to assess worker exposure to different fractions of inhaled dust, a novel sampler comprising several inertial impactors arranged in parallel was designed and tested. The new design includes a number of separated impactors arranged in parallel. Prototypes of respirable and thoracic samplers each comprising four impactors arranged in parallel were manufactured and tested. Results indicated that the prototype samplers followed closely the penetration characteristics for which they were designed. The new samplers were found to perform similarly for liquid and solid test particles; penetration characteristics remained unchanged even after prolonged exposure to coal mine dust at high concentration. The new parallel impactor design can be applied to approximate any monotonically decreasing penetration curve at a selected flow rate. Personal-size samplers that operate at a few L/min as well as area samplers that operate at higher flow rates can be made based on the suggested design. Performance of such samplers can be predicted with high accuracy employing well-established impaction theory.

  16. Laboratory Experiments of Sand Ripples with Bimodal Size Distributions Under Asymmetric Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Landry, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of sand ripples are vital to understanding numerous coastal processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, boundary layer development, and seafloor acoustic properties. Though significant laboratory research has been conducted to elucidate oscillatory flow morphodynamics under various constant and transient forcing conditions, the majority of the previous experiments were conducted only for beds with unimodal size distributions of sediment. Recent oscillatory flow experiments as well as past laboratory observations in uniform flows suggest that the presence of heterogeneous size sand compositions may significantly impact ripple morphology, resulting in a variety of observable effects (e.g., sediment sorting, bed armoring, and altered transport rates). Experimental work was conducted in a small oscillatory flow tunnel at the Sediment Dynamics Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Three different monochromatic oscillatory forcings having velocity asymmetry were used to study sand ripple dynamics over five bimodal and two unimodal sediment beds. The seven different mixtures were composed using two unimodal sands of different colors (blue/white) and median grain diameters (d=0.31 mm / d=0.65 mm) combined into various mixtures by mass (i.e., 0/100; 10/90; 25/75; 50/50; 75/25; 90/10; and 100/0 which denotes mass percentage of blue/white sand, respectively, within each mixture). High-definition video of the sediment bed profile was acquired in conjunction with sediment trap measurements to resolve differences in ripple geometries, migration and evolution rates due to the different sediment mixtures and flow conditions. Observational findings clearly illustrate sediment stratification within ripple crests and the depth of the active mixing layer in addition to supporting sediment sorting in previous research on symmetric oscillatory flows in which the larger grains collect on top of ripple crests and smaller grains in the

  17. Size resolved ultrafine particles emission model--a continues size distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Irina; Janssen, Stijn; Vrancken, Karl; Vos, Peter; Mishra, Vinit; Berghmans, Patrick

    2011-08-15

    A new parameterization for size resolved ultrafine particles (UFP) traffic emissions is proposed based on the results of PARTICULATES project (Samaras et al., 2005). It includes the emission factors from the Emission Inventory Guidebook (2006) (total number of particles, #/km/veh), the shape of the corresponding particle size distribution given in PARTICULATES and data for the traffic activity. The output of the model UFPEM (UltraFine Particle Emission Model) is a sum of continuous distributions of ultrafine particles emissions per vehicle type (passenger cars and heavy duty vehicles), fuel (petrol and diesel) and average speed representative for urban, rural and highway driving. The results from the parameterization are compared with measured total number of ultrafine particles and size distributions in a tunnel in Antwerp (Belgium). The measured UFP concentration over the entire campaign shows a close relation to the traffic activity. The modelled concentration is found to be lower than the measured in the campaign. The average emission factor from the measurement is 4.29E+14 #/km/veh whereas the calculated is around 30% lower. A comparison of emission factors with literature is done as well and in overall a good agreement is found. For the size distributions it is found that the measured distributions consist of three modes--Nucleation, Aitken and accumulation and most of the ultrafine particles belong to the Nucleation and the Aitken modes. The modelled Aitken mode (peak around 0.04-0.05 μm) is found in a good agreement both as amplitude of the peak and the number of particles whereas the modelled Nucleation mode is shifted to smaller diameters and the peak is much lower that the observed. Time scale analysis shows that at 300 m in the tunnel coagulation and deposition are slow and therefore neglected. The UFPEM emission model can be used as a source term in dispersion models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of biochar particle size on hydrophobic organic compound sorption kinetics: Applicability of using representative size.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seju; Jung, Jihyeun; Choe, Jong Kwon; Ok, Yong Sik; Choi, Yongju

    2018-04-01

    Particle size of biochar may strongly affect the kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound (HOC) sorption. However, challenges exist in characterizing the effect of biochar particle size on the sorption kinetics because of the wide size range of biochar. The present study suggests a novel method to determine a representative value that can be used to show the dependence of HOC sorption kinetics to biochar particle size on the basis of an intra-particle diffusion model. Biochars derived from three different feedstocks are ground and sieved to obtain three daughter products each having different size distributions. Phenanthrene sorption kinetics to the biochars are well described by the intra-particle diffusion model with significantly greater sorption rates observed for finer grained biochars. The time to reach 95% of equilibrium for phenanthrene sorption to biochar is reduced from 4.6-17.9days for the original biochars to <1-4.6days for the powdered biochars with <125μm in size. A moderate linear correlation is found between the inverse square of the representative biochar particle radius obtained using particle size distribution analysis and the apparent phenanthrene sorption rates determined by the sorption kinetics experiments and normalized to account for the variation of the sorption rate-determining factors other than the biochar particle radius. The results suggest that the representative biochar particle radius reasonably describes the dependence of HOC sorption rates on biochar particle size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of feedstock particle size on lignocellulose conversion--a review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Bernardo C; Dien, Bruce S; Ting, K C; Singh, Vijay

    2011-08-01

    Feedstock particle sizing can impact the economics of cellulosic ethanol commercialization through its effects on conversion yield and energy cost. Past studies demonstrated that particle size influences biomass enzyme digestibility to a limited extent. Physical size reduction was able to increase conversion rates to maximum of ≈ 50%, whereas chemical modification achieved conversions of >70% regardless of biomass particle size. This suggests that (1) mechanical pretreatment by itself is insufficient to attain economically feasible biomass conversion, and, therefore, (2) necessary particle sizing needs to be determined in the context of thermochemical pretreatment employed for lignocellulose conversion. Studies of thermochemical pretreatments that have taken into account particle size as a factor have exhibited a wide range of maximal sizes (i.e., particle sizes below which no increase in pretreatment effectiveness, measured in terms of the enzymatic conversion resulting from the pretreatment, were observed) from <0.15 to 50 mm. Maximal sizes as defined above were dependent on the pretreatment employed, with maximal size range decreasing as follows: steam explosion > liquid hot water > dilute acid and base pretreatments. Maximal sizes also appeared dependent on feedstock, with herbaceous or grassy biomass exhibiting lower maximal size range (<3 mm) than woody biomass (>3 mm). Such trends, considered alongside the intensive energy requirement of size reduction processes, warrant a more systematic study of particle size effects across different pretreatment technologies and feedstock, as a requisite for optimizing the feedstock supply system.

  20. Anomalous change of Airy disk with changing size of spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linchao; Zhang, Fugen; Meng, Rui; Xu, Jie; Zuo, Chenze; Ge, Baozhen

    2016-02-01

    Use of laser diffraction is considered as a method of reliable principle and mature technique in measurements of particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that for a certain relative refractive index, the size of the scattering pattern (also called Airy disk) of spherical particles monotonically decreases with increasing particle size. This fine structure forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. Here we show that the Airy disk size of non-absorbing spherical particles becomes larger with increasing particle size in certain size ranges. To learn more about this anomalous change of Airy disk (ACAD), we present images of Airy disk and curves of Airy disk size versus particle size for spherical particles of different relative refractive indices by using Mie theory. These figures reveal that ACAD occurs periodically for non-absorbing particles and will disappear when the absorbing efficiency is higher than certain value. Then by using geometrical optics (GO) approximation, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the size ranges where ACAD occurs. From the formulae, we obtain laws of ACAD as follows: (1) for non-absorbing particles, ACAD occurs periodically, and when the particle size tends to infinity, the period tends to a certain value. As the relative refractive index increases, (2) the particle size ranges where ACAD occurs shift to smaller values, (3) the period of ACAD becomes smaller, and (4) the width of the size ranges where ACAD occurs becomes narrower. In addition, we can predict from the formulae that ACAD also exists for particles whose relative refractive index is smaller than 1.

  1. Particle sizing of pharmaceutical aerosols via direct imaging of particle settling velocities.

    PubMed

    Fishler, Rami; Verhoeven, Frank; de Kruijf, Wilbur; Sznitman, Josué

    2018-02-15

    We present a novel method for characterizing in near real-time the aerodynamic particle size distributions from pharmaceutical inhalers. The proposed method is based on direct imaging of airborne particles followed by a particle-by-particle measurement of settling velocities using image analysis and particle tracking algorithms. Due to the simplicity of the principle of operation, this method has the potential of circumventing potential biases of current real-time particle analyzers (e.g. Time of Flight analysis), while offering a cost effective solution. The simple device can also be constructed in laboratory settings from off-the-shelf materials for research purposes. To demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the measurement technique, we have conducted benchmark experiments whereby aerodynamic particle size distributions are obtained from several commercially-available dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Our measurements yield size distributions (i.e. MMAD and GSD) that are closely in line with those obtained from Time of Flight analysis and cascade impactors suggesting that our imaging-based method may embody an attractive methodology for rapid inhaler testing and characterization. In a final step, we discuss some of the ongoing limitations of the current prototype and conceivable routes for improving the technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Particle size analysis of some water/oil/water multiple emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ursica, L; Tita, D; Palici, I; Tita, B; Vlaia, V

    2005-04-29

    Particle size analysis gives useful information about the structure and stability of multiple emulsions, which are important characteristics of these systems. It also enables the observation of the growth process of particles dispersed in multiple emulsions, accordingly, the evolution of their dimension in time. The size of multiple particles in the seven water/oil/water (W/O/W) emulsions was determined by measuring the particles size observed during the microscopic examination. In order to describe the distribution of the size of multiple particles, the value of two parameters that define the particle size was calculated: the arithmetical mean diameter and the median diameter. The results of the particle size analysis in the seven multiple emulsions W/O/W studied are presented as histograms of the distribution density immediately, 1 and 3 months after the preparation of each emulsion, as well as by establishing the mean and the median diameter of particles. The comparative study of the distribution histograms and of the mean and median diameters of W/O/W multiple particles indicates that the prepared emulsions are fine and very fine dispersions, stable, and presenting a growth of the abovementioned diameters during the study.

  3. Monodisperse Block Copolymer Particles with Controllable Size, Shape, and Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, Yongjoo; Kim, Bumjoon; PNEL Team

    Shape-anisotropic particles are important class of novel colloidal building block for their functionality is more strongly governed by their shape, size and nanostructure compared to conventional spherical particles. Recently, facile strategy for producing non-spherical polymeric particles by interfacial engineering received significant attention. However, achieving uniform size distribution of particles together with controlled shape and nanostructure has not been achieved. Here, we introduce versatile system for producing monodisperse BCP particles with controlled size, shape and morphology. Polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) self-assembled to either onion-like or striped ellipsoid particle, where final structure is governed by amount of adsorbed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant at the particle/surrounding interface. Further control of molecular weight and particle size enabled fine-tuning of aspect ratio of ellipsoid particle. Underlying physics of free energy for morphology formation and entropic penalty associated with bending BCP chains strongly affects particle structure and specification.

  4. Auditory, visual, and bimodal data link displays and how they support pilot performance.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Kelly S; Talleur, Donald; Carbonari, Ronald; Yamani, Yusuke; Nunes, Ashley; McCarley, Jason S

    2013-06-01

    The design of data link messaging systems to ensure optimal pilot performance requires empirical guidance. The current study examined the effects of display format (auditory, visual, or bimodal) and visual display position (adjacent to instrument panel or mounted on console) on pilot performance. Subjects performed five 20-min simulated single-pilot flights. During each flight, subjects received messages from a simulated air traffic controller. Messages were delivered visually, auditorily, or bimodally. Subjects were asked to read back each message aloud and then perform the instructed maneuver. Visual and bimodal displays engendered lower subjective workload and better altitude tracking than auditory displays. Readback times were shorter with the two unimodal visual formats than with any of the other three formats. Advantages for the unimodal visual format ranged in size from 2.8 s to 3.8 s relative to the bimodal upper left and auditory formats, respectively. Auditory displays allowed slightly more head-up time (3 to 3.5 seconds per minute) than either visual or bimodal displays. Position of the visual display had only modest effects on any measure. Combined with the results from previous studies by Helleberg and Wickens and Lancaster and Casali the current data favor visual and bimodal displays over auditory displays; unimodal auditory displays were favored by only one measure, head-up time, and only very modestly. Data evinced no statistically significant effects of visual display position on performance, suggesting that, contrary to expectations, the placement of a visual data link display may be of relatively little consequence to performance.

  5. Number Size Distribution of Ambient Particles in a Typical Urban Site: The First Polish Assessment Based on Long-Term (9 Months) Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Krasa, Andrzej; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Błaszczak, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results from the long-term measurements of particle number carried out at an urban background station in Zabrze, Poland. Ambient particles with aerodynamic diameters of between 28 nm and 10 μm were investigated by means of a DEKATI thirteen-stage electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). The particle number-size distribution was bimodal, whilst its density function had the local maxima in the aerodynamic diameter intervals 0.056–0.095 μm and 0.157–0.263 μm. The average particle number in winter was nearly twice as high as in summer. The greatest number concentrations in winter were those of the particles with diameters of between 0.617 and 2.41 μm, that is, the anthropogenic particles from fossil fuel combustion. Approximately 99% of the particles observed in Zabrze had aerodynamic diameters ≤1 μm—they may have originated from the combustion of biomass, liquid, and gaseous fuels in domestic stoves or in car engines. The daily variation of particle number was similar for both seasons—the highest values were observed in the morning (traffic rush hour) and in the afternoon/late evening (traffic and house heating emissions). An additional maximum (0.028–0.056 μm) observed in the early afternoon in summer was due to the intensive formation of new PM particles from gas precursors. PMID:24288492

  6. Particle interaction of lubricated or unlubricated binary mixtures according to their particle size and densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Joiris, Etienne; Martelli, Sante

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess an experimental approach for technological development of a direct compression formulation. A simple formula was considered composed by an active ingredient, a diluent and a lubricant. The active ingredient and diluent were selected as an example according to their typical densification mechanism: the nitrofurantoine, a fragmenting material, and the cellulose microcrystalline (Vivapur), which is a typical visco-elastic material, equally displaying good bind and disintegrant properties. For each ingredient, samples of different particle size distribution were selected. Initially, tabletability of pure materials was studied by a rotary press without magnesium stearate. Vivapur tabletability decreases with increase in particle size. The addition of magnesium stearate as lubricant decreases tabletability of Vivapur of greater particle size, while it kept unmodified that of Vivapur of lower particle size. Differences in tabletability can be related to differences in particle-particle interactions; for Vivapur of higher particle size (Vivapur 200, 102 and 101), the lower surface area develops lower surface available for bonds, while for Vivapur of lower particle size (99 and 105) the greater surface area allows high particle proximity favouring particle cohesivity. Nitrofurantoine shows great differences in compression behaviour according to its particle size distribution. Large crystals show poorer tabletability than fine crystals, further decreased by lubricant addition. The large crystals poor tabletability is due to their poor compactibility, in spite of high compressibility and plastic intrinsic deformability; in fact, in spite of the high densification tendency, the nature of the involved bonds is very weak. Nitrofurantoine samples were then mixed with Vivapurs in different proportions. Compression behaviour of binary mixes (tabletability and compressibility) was then evaluated according to diluents proportion in the mixes. The

  7. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles prepared by microfluidics and conventional methods. Modulated particle size and rheology.

    PubMed

    Perez, Aurora; Hernández, Rebeca; Velasco, Diego; Voicu, Dan; Mijangos, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidic techniques are expected to provide narrower particle size distribution than conventional methods for the preparation of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. Besides, it is hypothesized that the particle size distribution of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles influences the settling behavior and rheological properties of its aqueous dispersions. For the preparation of PLGA particles, two different methods, microfluidic and conventional oil-in-water emulsification methods were employed. The particle size and particle size distribution of PLGA particles prepared by microfluidics were studied as a function of the flow rate of the organic phase while particles prepared by conventional methods were studied as a function of stirring rate. In order to study the stability and structural organization of colloidal dispersions, settling experiments and oscillatory rheological measurements were carried out on aqueous dispersions of PLGA particles with different particle size distributions. Microfluidics technique allowed the control of size and size distribution of the droplets formed in the process of emulsification. This resulted in a narrower particle size distribution for samples prepared by MF with respect to samples prepared by conventional methods. Polydisperse samples showed a larger tendency to aggregate, thus confirming the advantages of microfluidics over conventional methods, especially if biomedical applications are envisaged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured everymore » minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.« less

  9. Particle sizes in slash fire smoke.

    Treesearch

    David V. Sandberg; Robert E. Martin

    1975-01-01

    Particulate emissions are the most objectionable atmospheric contaminant from forest burning. Little is known of the particulate sizes, and this research was done under laboratory conditions to obtain particle size information. Comments are made concerning techniques for future work in this field.

  10. Relationship Between Cirrus Particle Size and Cloud Top Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyuan; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between cirrus particle size and cloud top temperature is surveyed on a near-global scale. The cirrus particle size is retrieved assuming ice crystals are hexagonal columns and the cloud top temperature and the radiances in channel 1 and 3 of AVHRR used to retrieve ice particle sizes are from ISCCP product. The results show that for thick clouds over North America, the relation between particle size and cloud top temperature is consistent with a summary of this relationship based on aircraft measurement over that region for thick clouds. However, this relationship is not universal for other regions especially for for tropical zone, which has been found by other in situ measurements.

  11. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A. M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J. A.; Swietlicki, E.; Williams, P.; Roldin, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C. S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; de Leeuw, G.; Löschau, G.; Bastian, S.

    2012-03-01

    Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer. We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data. Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research) and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the peak particle number concentration

  12. Effect of particle-size dynamics on properties of dense spongy-particle systems: Approach towards equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Monica E A; Anderson, Patrick D; Hütter, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Open-porous deformable particles, often envisaged as sponges, are ubiquitous in biological and industrial systems (e.g., casein micelles in dairy products and microgels in cosmetics). The rich behavior of these suspensions is owing to the elasticity of the supporting network of the particle, and the viscosity of permeating solvent. Therefore, the rate-dependent size change of these particles depends on their structure, i.e., the permeability. This work aims at investigating the effect of the particle-size dynamics and the underlying particle structure, i.e., the particle permeability, on the transient and long-time behavior of suspensions of spongy particles in the absence of applied deformation, using the dynamic two-scale model developed by Hütter et al. [Farad. Discuss. 158, 407 (2012)1359-664010.1039/c2fd20025b]. In the high-density limit, the transient behavior is found to be accelerated by the particle-size dynamics, even at average size changes as small as 1%. The accelerated dynamics is evidenced by (i) the higher short-time diffusion coefficient as compared to elastic-particle systems and (ii) the accelerated formation of the stable fcc crystal structure. Furthermore, after long times, the particle-size dynamics of spongy particles is shown to result in lower stationary values of the energy and normal stresses as compared to elastic-particle systems. This dependence of the long-time behavior of these systems on the permeability, that essentially is a transport coefficient and hence must not affect the equilibrium properties, confirms that full equilibration has not been reached.

  13. Effect of particle-size dynamics on properties of dense spongy-particle systems: Approach towards equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhari, Monica E. A.; Anderson, Patrick D.; Hütter, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Open-porous deformable particles, often envisaged as sponges, are ubiquitous in biological and industrial systems (e.g., casein micelles in dairy products and microgels in cosmetics). The rich behavior of these suspensions is owing to the elasticity of the supporting network of the particle, and the viscosity of permeating solvent. Therefore, the rate-dependent size change of these particles depends on their structure, i.e., the permeability. This work aims at investigating the effect of the particle-size dynamics and the underlying particle structure, i.e., the particle permeability, on the transient and long-time behavior of suspensions of spongy particles in the absence of applied deformation, using the dynamic two-scale model developed by Hütter et al. [Farad. Discuss. 158, 407 (2012), 10.1039/c2fd20025b]. In the high-density limit, the transient behavior is found to be accelerated by the particle-size dynamics, even at average size changes as small as 1 % . The accelerated dynamics is evidenced by (i) the higher short-time diffusion coefficient as compared to elastic-particle systems and (ii) the accelerated formation of the stable fcc crystal structure. Furthermore, after long times, the particle-size dynamics of spongy particles is shown to result in lower stationary values of the energy and normal stresses as compared to elastic-particle systems. This dependence of the long-time behavior of these systems on the permeability, that essentially is a transport coefficient and hence must not affect the equilibrium properties, confirms that full equilibration has not been reached.

  14. Diffractive optics for particle velocimetry and sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. W.; Gogna, P. K.; Chacon, R. J.; Muller, R. E.; Fourguette, D.; Modarress, D.; Taugwalder, F.; Svitek, P.; Gharib, M.

    2002-01-01

    Beam-shaping diffractive optical elements are used to create structured light patterns in fluid flows. Particle scattering results in detected signals that can be used to determine the particle size and velocity.

  15. The kinetics of composite particle formation during mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, B. J. M.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of composite particle formation during attritor milling of insoluble binary elemental powders have been examined. The effects of processing conditions (i.e., mill power, temperature, and charge ratio) on these kinetics were studied. Particle size distributions and fractions of elemental and composite particles were determined as functions of milling time and processing conditions. This allowed the deduction of phenomenological rate constants describing the propensity for fracture and welding during processing. For the mill-operating conditions investigated, the number of particles in the mill generally decreased with milling time, indicating a greater tendency for particle welding than fracture. Moreover, a bimodal size distribution is often obtained as a result of preferential welding. Copper and chromium 'alloy' primarily by encapsulation of Cr particles within Cu. This form of alloying also occurs in Cu-Nb alloys processed at low mill power and/or for short milling times. For other conditions, however, Cu-Nb alloys develop a lamellar morphology characteristic of mechanically alloyed two-phase ductile metals. Increasing mill power or charge (ball-to-powder weight) ratio (CR) increases the rate of composite particle formation.

  16. Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

    1988-05-11

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

  17. Size resolved airborne particulate polysaccharides in summer high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leck, C.; Gao, Q.; Mashayekhy Rad, F.; Nilsson, U.

    2013-04-01

    Size-resolved aerosol samples for subsequent determination of polysaccharides (monosaccharides in combined form) were collected in air over the central Arctic Ocean during the biologically most active period between the late summer melt season and into the transition to autumn freeze-up. The analysis was carried out using liquid chromatography coupled with highly selective and sensitive tandem mass spectrometry. Polysaccharides were detected in all sizes ranging from 0.035 to 10 μm in diameter with distinct features of heteropolysaccharides, enriched in xylose, glucose + mannose as well as a substantial fraction of deoxysugars. Polysaccharides containing deoxysugars showed a bimodal structure with about 60% of their mass found in the Aitken mode over the pack ice area. Pentose (xylose) and hexose (glucose + mannose) showed a weaker bimodal character and were largely found in the coarse mode in addition to a minor fraction apportioned in the sub-micrometer size range. The concentration of total hydrolysable neutral sugars (THNS) in the samples collected varied over 3 orders of magnitude (1 to 692 pmol m-3) in the super-micrometer size fraction and to a lesser extent in sub-micrometer particles (4 to 88 pmol m-3). Lowest THNS concentrations were observed in air masses that had spent more than 5 days over the pack ice. Within the pack ice area, about 53% (by mass) of the total mass of polysaccharides were found in sub-micrometer particles. The relative abundance of sub-micrometer polysaccharides was closely related to the length of time that the air mass spent over pack ice, with highest fraction (> 90%) observed for > 7 days of advection. The ambient aerosol particles collected onboard ship showed similar monosaccharide composition, compared to particles generated experimentally in situ at the open lead site. This supports the existence of a primary source of particulate polysaccharides from open leads by bubble bursting at the air-sea interface. We speculate that

  18. Chromate content versus particle size for aircraft paints.

    PubMed

    LaPuma, Peter T; Rhodes, Brian S

    2002-12-01

    Many industries rely on the corrosion inhibiting properties of chromate-containing primer paints to protect metal from oxidation. However, chromate contains hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)), a known human carcinogen. The concentration of Cr(6+) as a function of paint particle size has important implications to worker health and environmental release from paint facilities. This research examines Cr(6+) content as a function of particle size for three types of aircraft primer paints: solvent-based epoxy-polyamide, water-based epoxy-polyamide, and solvent-based polyurethane. Cascade impactors were used to collect and separate paint particles based on their aerodynamic diameter, from 0.7 to 34.1 microm. The mass of the dry paint collected at each stage was determined and an atomic absorption spectrometer was used to analyze for Cr(6+) content. For all three paints, particles less than 7.0 microm contained disproportionately less Cr(6+) per mass of dry paint than larger particles, and the Cr(6+)concentration decreased substantially as particle size decreased. The smallest particles, 0.7 to 1.0 microm, contained approximately 10% of the Cr(6+) content, per mass of dry paint, compared to particles larger than 7.0 microm. The paint gun settings of air to paint ratio was found to have no influence on the Cr(6+) bias.

  19. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation,more » and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.« less

  20. Size Dependent Elemental Composition of Road-Associated Particles

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Erica R.; Wong, Carol M.; Green, Peter G.; Kayhanian, Masoud; Young, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Stormwater particles often provide transport for metals and other contaminants, however only larger particles are effectively removed by typical best management practices. Fine particles and their associated constituents are more likely to reach receiving waters; this merits further investigation regarding the metal contribution of fine (dp<10 μm) and very fine (dp <1.5 μm) particles. Road associated particles were collected by vacuuming a road surface and by collecting highway stormwater runoff. A cell sorter was employed to sort road associated particles into four size ranges: 0.1–0.3, 0.3–0.5, 0.5–1.0, and 1.0–1.5 μm. These very fine particles, along with six particle size ranges (total range <2–63 μm) separated using a settling column, were analyzed for Al, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Enrichment factors (EFs), calculated using Al as a basis to represent crustal contributions, were similar for the vacuumed road dust and the stormwater runoff. Fe and Mn were minimally depleted (0.1x) or near unity for all size ranges (Fe EF range 0.01–3.7; Mn EF range 0.02–10.6). Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were moderately (10x) to considerably (>100x) enriched for most size ranges; these metals were most enriched in the very fine fractions (max EF~4900 in Zn, 0.1–0.3 μm). Based on this preliminary study, a cell sorter is an acceptable means of fractionating aqueous particles of diameter 0.1–1.5 μm. In spite of their minimal relative mass contribution, the very fine particles are environmentally relevant due to their mobility and enrichment in potentially toxic metals.. PMID:18433840

  1. Seed particle response and size characterization in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, Roger C.; Bachalo, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The response of seed particles ranging between 0.7 and 8.7 micron is determined using a phase Doppler particle analyzer which simultaneously measures particle size and velocity. The stagnant seed particles are entrained into a high speed free jet at velocities ranging from 40 to 300 m/s. The size-mean axial velocity correlation and size-rms velocity correlations are used to determine the particle response to the sudden acceleration. It was determined that at the lower speeds, seed particles up to approximately 5 microns are adequate, but as velocities approach 300 m/s only particles on the order of one micron are suitable. The ability to determine size and velocity simultaneously is essential if seeding with polydispersions is used since it allows the rejection of data which will not accurately represent the flow field.

  2. PROCEDURE FOR DETERMINATION OF SEDIMENT PARTICLE SIZE (GRAIN SIZE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment quality and sediment remediation projects have become a high priority for USEPA. Sediment particle size determinations are used in environmental assessments for habitat characterization, chemical normalization, and partitioning potential of chemicals. The accepted met...

  3. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  4. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A; Cullen, Mark R; Hammond, S Katharine

    2014-10-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM 2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM 2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM 1.0 ) and quasi-ultrafine (PM 0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM 2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM 2.5 was 1.03 mg/m 3 per mg/m 3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM 10 which was PM 1.0 or PM 0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities.

  5. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Bonghwan

    2016-09-01

    Using an ultrasound-assisted sol-gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  6. Use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for size profiling of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Panyabut, Teerawat; Sirirat, Natnicha; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2018-02-13

    Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was applied to investigate the atomization behaviors of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in order to relate with particle size information. At various atomization temperatures from 1400 °C to 2200 °C, the time-dependent atomic absorption peak profiles of AuNPs and AgNPs with varying sizes from 5 nm to 100 nm were examined. With increasing particle size, the maximum absorbance was observed at the longer time. The time at maximum absorbance was found to linearly increase with increasing particle size, suggesting that ETAAS can be applied to provide the size information of nanoparticles. With the atomization temperature of 1600 °C, the mixtures of nanoparticles containing two particle sizes, i.e., 5 nm tannic stabilized AuNPs with 60, 80, 100 nm citrate stabilized AuNPs, were investigated and bimodal peaks were observed. The particle size dependent atomization behaviors of nanoparticles show potential application of ETAAS for providing size information of nanoparticles. The calibration plot between the time at maximum absorbance and the particle size was applied to estimate the particle size of in-house synthesized AuNPs and AgNPs and the results obtained were in good agreement with those from flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Furthermore, the linear relationship between the activation energy and the particle size was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adequacy of laser diffraction for soil particle size analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Peter; Aumann, Colin; Chia, Kohleth; O'Halloran, Nick; Chandra, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentation has been a standard methodology for particle size analysis since the early 1900s. In recent years laser diffraction is beginning to replace sedimentation as the prefered technique in some industries, such as marine sediment analysis. However, for the particle size analysis of soils, which have a diverse range of both particle size and shape, laser diffraction still requires evaluation of its reliability. In this study, the sedimentation based sieve plummet balance method and the laser diffraction method were used to measure the particle size distribution of 22 soil samples representing four contrasting Australian Soil Orders. Initially, a precise wet riffling methodology was developed capable of obtaining representative samples within the recommended obscuration range for laser diffraction. It was found that repeatable results were obtained even if measurements were made at the extreme ends of the manufacturer’s recommended obscuration range. Results from statistical analysis suggested that the use of sample pretreatment to remove soil organic carbon (and possible traces of calcium-carbonate content) made minor differences to the laser diffraction particle size distributions compared to no pretreatment. These differences were found to be marginally statistically significant in the Podosol topsoil and Vertosol subsoil. There are well known reasons why sedimentation methods may be considered to ‘overestimate’ plate-like clay particles, while laser diffraction will ‘underestimate’ the proportion of clay particles. In this study we used Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient to determine the equivalence of laser diffraction and sieve plummet balance results. The results suggested that the laser diffraction equivalent thresholds corresponding to the sieve plummet balance cumulative particle sizes of < 2 μm, < 20 μm, and < 200 μm, were < 9 μm, < 26 μm, < 275 μm respectively. The many advantages of laser diffraction for soil particle

  8. Light Scattering by Wavelength-Sized Particles "Dusted" with Subwavelength-Sized Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    The numerically exact superposition T-matrix method is used to compute the scattering cross sections and the Stokes scattering matrix for polydisperse spherical particles covered with a large number of much smaller grains. We show that the optical effect of the presence of microscopic dust on the surfaces of wavelength-sized, weakly absorbing particles is much less significant than that of a major overall asphericity of the particle shape.

  9. Influence of Controlled Cooling in Bimodal Scaffold Fabrication Using Polymers with Different Melting Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lara-Padilla, Hernan; Mendoza-Buenrostro, Christian; Cardenas, Diego; Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Rodriguez, Ciro A

    2017-06-11

    The combination of different materials and capabilities to manufacture at several scales open new possibilities in scaffold design for bone regeneration. This work is focused on bimodal scaffolds that combine polylactic acid (PLA) melt extruded strands with polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun fibers. This type of bimodal scaffold offers better mechanical properties, compared to the use of PCL for the extruded strands, and provides potential a means for controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery through the electrospun fibers. The technologies of fused deposition modeling (FDM) and electrospinning were combined to create 3D bimodal constructs. The system uses a controlled cooling system allowing the combination of polymers with different melting temperatures to generate integrated scaffold architecture. The thermoplastic polymers used in the FDM process enhance the mechanical properties of the bimodal scaffold and control the pore structure. Integrated layers of electrospun microfibers induce an increase of the surface area for cell culture purposes, as well as potential in situ controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery. The proposed bimodal scaffolds (PLA extruded strands and PCL electrospun fibers) show appropriate morphology and better mechanical properties when compared to the use of PCL extruded strands. On average, bimodal scaffolds with overall dimensions of 30 × 30 × 2.4 mm³ (strand diameter of 0.5 mm, strand stepover of 2.5 mm, pore size of 2 mm, and layer height of 0.3 mm) showed scaffold stiffness of 23.73 MPa and compression strength of 3.85 MPa. A cytotoxicity assay based human fibroblasts showed viability of the scaffold materials.

  10. Influence of Controlled Cooling in Bimodal Scaffold Fabrication Using Polymers with Different Melting Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Padilla, Hernan; Mendoza-Buenrostro, Christian; Cardenas, Diego; Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Rodriguez, Ciro A.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of different materials and capabilities to manufacture at several scales open new possibilities in scaffold design for bone regeneration. This work is focused on bimodal scaffolds that combine polylactic acid (PLA) melt extruded strands with polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun fibers. This type of bimodal scaffold offers better mechanical properties, compared to the use of PCL for the extruded strands, and provides potential a means for controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery through the electrospun fibers. The technologies of fused deposition modeling (FDM) and electrospinning were combined to create 3D bimodal constructs. The system uses a controlled cooling system allowing the combination of polymers with different melting temperatures to generate integrated scaffold architecture. The thermoplastic polymers used in the FDM process enhance the mechanical properties of the bimodal scaffold and control the pore structure. Integrated layers of electrospun microfibers induce an increase of the surface area for cell culture purposes, as well as potential in situ controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery. The proposed bimodal scaffolds (PLA extruded strands and PCL electrospun fibers) show appropriate morphology and better mechanical properties when compared to the use of PCL extruded strands. On average, bimodal scaffolds with overall dimensions of 30 × 30 × 2.4 mm3 (strand diameter of 0.5 mm, strand stepover of 2.5 mm, pore size of 2 mm, and layer height of 0.3 mm) showed scaffold stiffness of 23.73 MPa and compression strength of 3.85 MPa. A cytotoxicity assay based human fibroblasts showed viability of the scaffold materials. PMID:28773000

  11. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Tyler Lott; Matthews, Austin Colter; Williams, Christopher Luke

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Bothmore » materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.« less

  12. Size-resolved atmospheric particulate polysaccharides in the high summer Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leck, C.; Gao, Q.; Mashayekhy Rad, F.; Nilsson, U.

    2013-12-01

    Size-resolved aerosol samples for subsequent quantitative determination of polymer sugars (polysaccharides) after hydrolysis to their subunit monomers (monosaccharides) were collected in surface air over the central Arctic Ocean during the biologically most active summer period. The analysis was carried out by novel use of liquid chromatography coupled with highly selective and sensitive tandem mass spectrometry. Polysaccharides were detected in particle sizes ranging from 0.035 to 10 μm in diameter with distinct features of heteropolysaccharides, enriched in xylose, glucose + mannose as well as a substantial fraction of deoxysugars. Polysaccharides, containing deoxysugar monomers, showed a bimodal size structure with about 70% of their mass found in the Aitken mode over the pack ice area. Pentose (xylose) and hexose (glucose + mannose) had a weaker bimodal character and were largely found with super-micrometer sizes and in addition with a minor sub-micrometer fraction. The concentration of total hydrolysable neutral sugars (THNS) in the samples collected varied over two orders of magnitude (1 to 160 pmol m-3) in the super-micrometer size fraction and to a somewhat lesser extent in sub-micrometer particles (4 to 140 pmol m-3). Lowest THNS concentrations were observed in air masses that had spent more than five days over the pack ice. Within the pack ice area, about 53% of the mass of hydrolyzed polysaccharides was detected in sub-micrometer particles. The relative abundance of sub-micrometer hydrolyzed polysaccharides could be related to the length of time that the air mass spent over pack ice, with the highest fraction (> 90%) observed for > 7 days of advection. The aerosol samples collected onboard ship showed similar monosaccharide composition, compared to particles generated experimentally in situ at the expedition's open lead site. This supports the existence of a primary particle source of polysaccharide containing polymer gels from open leads by bubble

  13. Effect of particle size on mixing degree in dispensation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yanagihara, Yoshitsugu; Sekiguchi, Hiroko; Ohtani, Michiteru; Kariya, Satoru; Uchino, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Iga, Tatsuji

    2004-03-01

    By using lactose colored with erythrocin, we examined the effect of particle size on mixing degree during the preparation of triturations with a mortar and pestle. We used powders with different distributions of particle sizes, i.e., powder that passed through 32-mesh but was trapped on a 42-mesh sieve (32/42-mesh powder), powder that passed through a 42-mesh sieve but was trapped on a 60-mesh sieve (42/60-mesh powder), powder that passed through a 60-mesh sieve but was trapped on a 100-mesh sieve (60/100-mesh powder), and powder that passes through a 100-mesh sieve (> 100-mesh powder). The mixing degree of colored powder and non-colored powder whose distribution of particle sizes was the same as that of the colored powder was excellent. The coefficient of variation (CV) value of the mixing degree was 6.08% after 40 rotations when colored powder was mixed with non-colored powder that both passed through a 100-mesh sieve. The CV value of the mixing degree was low in the case of mixing of colored and non-colored powders with different particle size distributions. After mixing, about 50% of 42/60-mesh powder had become smaller particles, whereas the distribution of particle sizes was not influenced by the mixing of 60/100-mesh powder. It was suggested that the mixing degree is affected by distribution of particle sizes. It may be important to determine the mixing degrees for drugs with narrow therapeutic ranges.

  14. The Size of Gelatin Sponge Particles: Differences with Preparation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumori, Tetsuya, E-mail: katsumo@eurus.dti.ne.jp; Kasahara, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To assess whether the size distribution of gelatin sponge particles differed according to the method used to make them and the type of original sheet. Methods. Gelatin sponge particles of approximately 1-1.5 x 1-1.5 x 2 mm were made from either Spongel or Gelfoam sheets by cutting with a scalpel and scissors. Particles were also made of either Spongel or Gelfoam sheets by pumping with two syringes and a three-way stopcock. The size distribution of the particles in saline was compared among the groups. Results. (1) Cutting versus pumping: When Spongel was used, cutting produced lower rates of smallermore » particles {<=}500 {mu}m and larger particles >2000 {mu}m compared with pumping back and forth 30 times (1.1% vs 37.6%, p < 0.0001; 2.2% vs 14.4%, p = 0.008). When Gelfoam was used, cutting produced lower rates of smaller and larger particles compared with pumping (8.5% vs 20.4%, p = 0.1809; 0% vs 48.1%, p < 0.0001). (2) Spongel versus Gelfoam: There was no significant difference in the size distribution of the particles between Spongel and Gelfoam (p = 0.2002) when cutting was used. Conclusion. The size distribution of gelatin sponge particles differed according to the method used to make them. More uniform particle sizes can be achieved by cutting than by pumping.« less

  15. THE BIMODAL DISTRIBUTION: DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONCEPT OF FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES AS SEPARATE AND DISTINCT COMPONENTS OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the early 1970s, it was understood that combustion particles were formed mostly in sizes below 1 um diameter, and windblown dust was suspended in sizes mostly above 1 um diameter. However, particle size distribution was thought of as a single mode. Particles were thought to f...

  16. Real-Time Measurement of Electronic Cigarette Aerosol Size Distribution and Metals Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Marielle C.; Granville, Courtney A.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Clark, Pamela I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing worldwide and is highest among both daily and nondaily smokers. E-cigarettes are perceived as a healthier alternative to combustible tobacco products, but their health risk factors have not yet been established, and one of them is lack of data on aerosol size generated by e-cigarettes. Methods: We applied a real-time, high-resolution aerosol differential mobility spectrometer to monitor the evolution of aerosol size and concentration during puff development. Particles generated by e-cigarettes were immediately delivered for analysis with minimal dilution and therefore with minimal sample distortion, which is critically important given the highly dynamic aerosol/vapor mixture inherent to e-cigarette emissions. Results: E-cigarette aerosols normally exhibit a bimodal particle size distribution: nanoparticles (11–25nm count median diameter) and submicron particles (96–175nm count median diameter). Each mode has comparable number concentrations (107–108 particles/cm3). “Dry puff” tests conducted with no e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) present in the e-cigarette tank demonstrated that under these conditions only nanoparticles were generated. Analysis of the bulk aerosol collected on the filter showed that e-cigarette emissions contained a variety of metals. Conclusions: E-cigarette aerosol size distribution is different from that of combustible tobacco smoke. E-cigarettes generate high concentrations of nanoparticles and their chemical content requires further investigation. Despite the small mass of nanoparticles, their toxicological impact could be significant. Toxic chemicals that are attached to the small nanoparticles may have greater adverse health effects than when attached to larger submicron particles. Implications: The e-cigarette aerosol size distribution is different from that of combustible tobacco smoke and typically exhibits a bimodal behavior with comparable number concentrations

  17. Turbidimetric method for the determination of particle sizes in polypropylene/clay-composites during extrusion.

    PubMed

    Becker, Wolfgang; Guschin, Viktor; Mikonsaari, Irma; Teipel, Ulrich; Kölle, Sabine; Weiss, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposites with polypropylene as matrix material and nanoclay as filler were produced in a double twin screw extruder. The extrusion was monitored with a spectrometer in the visible and near-infrared spectral region with a diode array spectrometer. Two probes were installed at the end at the extruder die and the transmission spectra were measured during the extrusion. After measuring the transmission spectra and converting into turbidity units, the particle distribution density was calculated via numerical linear equation system. The distribution density function shows either a bimodal or mono modal shape in dependence of the processing parameters like screw speed, dosage, and concentration of the nanoclays. The method was verified with SEM measurements which yield comparable results. The method is suitable for industrial in-line processing monitoring of particle radii and dispersion process, respectively.

  18. Language choice in bimodal bilingual development.

    PubMed

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; de Quadros, Ronice M; Chen Pichler, Deborah; Fieldsteel, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Bilingual children develop sensitivity to the language used by their interlocutors at an early age, reflected in differential use of each language by the child depending on their interlocutor. Factors such as discourse context and relative language dominance in the community may mediate the degree of language differentiation in preschool age children. Bimodal bilingual children, acquiring both a sign language and a spoken language, have an even more complex situation. Their Deaf parents vary considerably in access to the spoken language. Furthermore, in addition to code-mixing and code-switching, they use code-blending-expressions in both speech and sign simultaneously-an option uniquely available to bimodal bilinguals. Code-blending is analogous to code-switching sociolinguistically, but is also a way to communicate without suppressing one language. For adult bimodal bilinguals, complete suppression of the non-selected language is cognitively demanding. We expect that bimodal bilingual children also find suppression difficult, and use blending rather than suppression in some contexts. We also expect relative community language dominance to be a factor in children's language choices. This study analyzes longitudinal spontaneous production data from four bimodal bilingual children and their Deaf and hearing interlocutors. Even at the earliest observations, the children produced more signed utterances with Deaf interlocutors and more speech with hearing interlocutors. However, while three of the four children produced >75% speech alone in speech target sessions, they produced <25% sign alone in sign target sessions. All four produced bimodal utterances in both, but more frequently in the sign sessions, potentially because they find suppression of the dominant language more difficult. Our results indicate that these children are sensitive to the language used by their interlocutors, while showing considerable influence from the dominant community language.

  19. Language choice in bimodal bilingual development

    PubMed Central

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; de Quadros, Ronice M.; Chen Pichler, Deborah; Fieldsteel, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Bilingual children develop sensitivity to the language used by their interlocutors at an early age, reflected in differential use of each language by the child depending on their interlocutor. Factors such as discourse context and relative language dominance in the community may mediate the degree of language differentiation in preschool age children. Bimodal bilingual children, acquiring both a sign language and a spoken language, have an even more complex situation. Their Deaf parents vary considerably in access to the spoken language. Furthermore, in addition to code-mixing and code-switching, they use code-blending—expressions in both speech and sign simultaneously—an option uniquely available to bimodal bilinguals. Code-blending is analogous to code-switching sociolinguistically, but is also a way to communicate without suppressing one language. For adult bimodal bilinguals, complete suppression of the non-selected language is cognitively demanding. We expect that bimodal bilingual children also find suppression difficult, and use blending rather than suppression in some contexts. We also expect relative community language dominance to be a factor in children's language choices. This study analyzes longitudinal spontaneous production data from four bimodal bilingual children and their Deaf and hearing interlocutors. Even at the earliest observations, the children produced more signed utterances with Deaf interlocutors and more speech with hearing interlocutors. However, while three of the four children produced >75% speech alone in speech target sessions, they produced <25% sign alone in sign target sessions. All four produced bimodal utterances in both, but more frequently in the sign sessions, potentially because they find suppression of the dominant language more difficult. Our results indicate that these children are sensitive to the language used by their interlocutors, while showing considerable influence from the dominant community language. PMID

  20. Affective and physiological correlates of the perception of unimodal and bimodal emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Pedro J; Oliveira, Jorge; Alghazzawi, Daniyal; Fardoun, Habib; Gamito, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Despite the multisensory nature of perception, previous research on emotions has been focused on unimodal emotional cues with visual stimuli. To the best of our knowledge, there is no evidence on the extent to which incongruent emotional cues from visual and auditory sensory channels affect pupil size. To investigate the effects of audiovisual emotional information perception on the physiological and affective response, but also to determine the impact of mismatched cues in emotional perception on these physiological indexes. Pupil size, electrodermal activity and affective subjective responses were recorded while 30 participants were exposed to visual and auditory stimuli with varied emotional content in three different experimental conditions: pictures and sounds presented alone (unimodal), emotionally matched audio-visual stimuli (bimodal congruent) and emotionally mismatched audio-visual stimuli (bimodal incongruent). The data revealed no effect of emotional incongruence on physiological and affective responses. On the other hand, pupil size covaried with skin conductance response (SCR), but the subjective experience was partially dissociated from autonomic responses. Emotional stimuli are able to trigger physiological responses regardless of valence, sensory modality or level of emotional congruence.

  1. Size distribution spectrum of noninertial particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Izumi; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2018-05-01

    Collision-coalescence growth of noninertial particles in three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence is studied. Smoluchowski's coagulation equation describes the evolution of the size distribution of particles in this system. By applying a methodology based on turbulence theory, the equation is shown to have a steady-state solution, which corresponds to the Kolmogorov-type power-law spectrum. Direct numerical simulations of turbulence and Lagrangian particles are conducted. The result shows that the size distribution in a statistically steady state agrees accurately with the theoretical prediction.

  2. Bimodal Programming: A Survey of Current Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Siburt, Hannah W; Holmes, Alice E

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical practice in approaches to bimodal programming in the United States. To be specific, if clinicians are recommending bimodal stimulation, who programs the hearing aid in the bimodal condition, and what method is used for programming the hearing aid? An 11-question online survey was created and sent via email to a comprehensive list of cochlear implant programming centers in the United States. The survey was sent to 360 recipients. Respondents in this study represented a diverse group of clinical settings (response rate: 26%). Results indicate little agreement about who programs the hearing aids, when they are programmed, and how they are programmed in the bimodal condition. Analysis of small versus large implant centers indicated small centers are less likely to add a device to the contralateral ear. Although a growing number of cochlear implant recipients choose to wear a hearing aid on the contralateral ear, there is inconsistency in the current clinical approach to bimodal programming. These survey results provide evidence of large variability in the current bimodal programming practices and indicate a need for more structured clinical recommendations and programming approaches.

  3. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  4. Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket Analysis Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael; Lavelle, Thomas; Saimento, Charles; Juhasz, Albert; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars and beyond. One concept of operations for these missions utilizes the nuclear reactor to generate electrical power during coast phases, known as bimodal operation. This presentation focuses on the systems modeling and analysis efforts for a NERVA derived concept. The NERVA bimodal operation derives the thermal energy from the core tie tube elements. Recent analysis has shown potential temperature distributions in the tie tube elements that may limit the thermodynamic efficiency of the closed Brayton cycle used to generate electricity with the current design. The results of this analysis are discussed as well as the potential implications to a bimodal NERVA type reactor.

  5. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  6. Computer measurement of particle sizes in electron microscope images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.; Thompson, W. B.; Varsi, G.; Gauldin, R.

    1976-01-01

    Computer image processing techniques have been applied to particle counting and sizing in electron microscope images. Distributions of particle sizes were computed for several images and compared to manually computed distributions. The results of these experiments indicate that automatic particle counting within a reasonable error and computer processing time is feasible. The significance of the results is that the tedious task of manually counting a large number of particles can be eliminated while still providing the scientist with accurate results.

  7. Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Viruses.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C; Davies, Peter R; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens become airborne, they travel associated with particles of different size and composition. Particle size determines the distance across which pathogens can be transported, as well as the site of deposition and the survivability of the pathogen. Despite the importance of this information, the size distribution of particles bearing viruses emitted by infectious animals remains unknown. In this study we characterized the concentration and size distribution of inhalable particles that transport influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) generated by acutely infected pigs and assessed virus viability for each particle size range. Aerosols from experimentally infected pigs were sampled for 24 days using an Andersen cascade impactor able to separate particles by size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 micrometer (μm) in diameter). Air samples collected for the first 9, 20 and the last 3 days of the study were analyzed for IAV, PRRSV and PEDV, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified as geometric mean copies/m(3) within each size range. IAV was detected in all particle size ranges in quantities ranging from 5.5x10(2) (in particles ranging from 1.1 to 2.1 μm) to 4.3x10(5) RNA copies/m(3) in the largest particles (9.0-10.0 μm). PRRSV was detected in all size ranges except particles between 0.7 and 2.1 μm in quantities ranging from 6x10(2) (0.4-0.7 μm) to 5.1x10(4) RNA copies/m(3) (9.0-10.0 μm). PEDV, an enteric virus, was detected in all particle sizes and in higher quantities than IAV and PRRSV (p < 0.0001) ranging from 1.3x10(6) (0.4-0.7 μm) to 3.5x10(8) RNA copies/m(3) (9.0-10.0 μm). Infectious status was demonstrated for the 3 viruses, and in the case of IAV and PRRSV, viruses were isolated from particles larger than 2.1 μm. In summary, our results indicated that airborne PEDV, IAV and PRRSV can be found in a

  8. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration.

  9. Sizes of particles formed during municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lech, Smoczynski; Marta, Kosobucka; Michal, Smoczynski; Harsha, Ratnaweera; Krystyna, Pieczulis-Smoczynska

    2017-02-01

    Volumetric diameters Dv and specific surface area SpS of sludge particles formed during chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation of sewage were determined. The obtained aggregate-flocs differed substantially in both Dv and SpS values. The differences in Dv and SpS values of the analyzed particles were interpreted based on theoretical models for expanding aggregates. The most uniform particles were formed under exposure to: (a) optimal and maximal doses of PIX, (b) optimal doses of PAX, (c) maximal doses of the Al electro-coagulant. The lowest PIX dose produced the least uniform particles. Sludge aggregates-particles produced under exposure to minimal doses of PIX and the Al electro-coagulant were characterized by the lowest SpS values. Sludge particles coagulated by PAX and the particles formed at higher doses of PIX and the Al electro-coagulant had higher SpS values. The particles formed at all doses of the applied coagulants and electro-coagulants were generally classified into two size ranges: the main range and the secondary range. Most particles belonged to the main size range. An increase in the percentage of colloidal hydroxide particles in sewage sludge increased SpS.

  10. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  11. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of size-resolved particles in Hong Kong sub-urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan; Lee, Shun-Cheng; Huang, Yu; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.

    2016-03-01

    Size-resolved particulate matter (PM) samples were collected with a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at a sub-urban site (Tung Chung) in Hong Kong for four non-consecutive months representing four seasons from 2011 to 2012. Major chemical components were water-soluble anions (i.e., Cl-, NO3-, and SO42 -), cations (i.e., NH4+, Na+, K+, and Ca2 +), organic and elemental carbon and elements. Both chemical mass closure and positive matrix factorization (PMF) were employed to understand the chemical composition, resolve particle size modes, and evaluate the PM sources. Tri-modal size distributions were found for PM mass and major chemical components (e.g., SO42 -, NH4+, and OC). Mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMADs) with similar standard deviations (1.32 < σ < 1.42) were 0.4, 0.7 and 3.8 μm, consistent with condensation, droplet and coarse modes. A bi-modal distribution peaking at condensation and droplet modes was found for EC, with a single mode peaking at 3.8 μm for Cl-. Besides secondary SO42 -, carbonaceous aerosol dominated the condensation mode with 27% by engine exhaust and 18-19% each by residual oil combustion (shipping) and coal/biomass burning. Secondary SO42 - is also the most dominant component in the droplet mode, accounting for 23% of PM mass, followed by an industrial source (19%). Engine exhaust, secondary NO3-, and sea salt each accounted for 13-15% of PM mass. Sea salt and soil are the dominated sources in the coarse mode, accounting for 80% of coarse mass.

  12. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  13. Submicrometer Particle Sizing by Multiangle Light Scattering following Fractionation

    PubMed

    Wyatt

    1998-01-01

    The acid test for any particle sizing technique is its ability to determine the differential number fraction size distribution of a simple, well-defined sample. The very best characterized polystyrene latex sphere standards have been measured extensively using transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of a large subpopulation of such samples or by means of the electrostatic classification method as refined at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The great success, in the past decade, of on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS) detection combined with size exclusion chromatography for the measurement of polymer mass and size distributions suggested, in the early 1990s, that a similar attack for particle characterization might prove useful as well. At that time, fractionation of particles was achievable by capillary hydrodynamic chromatography (CHDF) and field flow fractionation (FFF) methods. The latter has proven most useful when combined with MALS to provide accurate differential number fraction size distributions for a broad range of particle classes. The MALS/FFF combination provides unique advantages and precision relative to FFF, photon correlation spectroscopy, and CHDF techniques used alone. For many classes of particles, resolution of the MALS/FFF combination far exceeds that of TEM measurements. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. Copyright 1998Academic Press

  14. Photographic techniques for characterizing streambed particle sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Matthew S.; Moran, Edward H.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2003-01-01

    We developed photographic techniques to characterize coarse (>2-mm) and fine (≤2-mm) streambed particle sizes in 12 streams in Anchorage, Alaska. Results were compared with current sampling techniques to assess which provided greater sampling efficiency and accuracy. The streams sampled were wadeable and contained gravel—cobble streambeds. Gradients ranged from about 5% at the upstream sites to about 0.25% at the downstream sites. Mean particle sizes and size-frequency distributions resulting from digitized photographs differed significantly from those resulting from Wolman pebble counts for five sites in the analysis. Wolman counts were biased toward selecting larger particles. Photographic analysis also yielded a greater number of measured particles (mean = 989) than did the Wolman counts (mean = 328). Stream embeddedness ratings assigned from field and photographic observations were significantly different at 5 of the 12 sites, although both types of ratings showed a positive relationship with digitized surface fines. Visual estimates of embeddedness and digitized surface fines may both be useful indicators of benthic conditions, but digitizing surface fines produces quantitative rather than qualitative data. Benefits of the photographic techniques include reduced field time, minimal streambed disturbance, convenience of postfield processing, easy sample archiving, and improved accuracy and replication potential.

  15. Zooplankton Grazing Effects on Particle Size Spectra under Different Seasonal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamieszkin, K.; Poulton, N.; Pershing, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Oceanic particle size spectra can be used to explain and predict variability in carbon export efficiency, since larger particles are more likely to sink to depth than small particles. The distribution of biogenic particle size in the surface ocean is the result of many variables and processes, including nutrient availability, primary productivity, aggregation, remineralization, and grazing. We conducted a series of grazing experiments to test the hypothesis that mesozooplankton shift particle size spectra toward larger particles, via grazing and egestion of relatively large fecal pellets. These experiments were carried out over several months, and used natural communities of mesozooplankton and their microbial prey, collected offshore of the Damariscotta River in the Gulf of Maine. We analyzed the samples using Fluid Imaging Technologies' FlowCam®, a particle imaging system. With this equipment, we processed live samples, decreasing the likelihood of losing or damaging fragile particles, and thereby lessening sources of error in commonly used preservation and enumeration protocols. Our results show how the plankton size spectrum changes as the Gulf of Maine progresses through a seasonal cycle. We explore the relationship of grazing community size structure to its effect on the overall biogenic particle size spectrum. At some times of year, mesozooplankton grazing does not alter the particle size spectrum, while at others it significantly does, affecting the potential for biogenic flux. We also examine prey selectivity, and find that chain diatoms are the only prey group preferentially consumed. Otherwise, we find that complete mesozooplankton communities are "evolved" to fit their prey such that most prey groups are grazed evenly. We discuss a metabolic numerical model which could be used to universalize the relationships between whole gazer and whole microbial communities, with respect to effects on particle size spectra.

  16. The Influence of Crystal Size Distributions on the Rheology of Magmas: New Insights From Analog Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Johannes; Mueller, Sebastian P.; Castro, Jonathan M.

    2017-11-01

    This study examines the influence of particle-size distributions on the rheology of particle suspensions by using analog experiments with spherical glass beads in silicone oil as a magma equivalent. The analyses of 274 individual particle-bearing suspensions of varying modality (unimodality, bimodality, trimodality, and tetramodality), as well as of polymodal suspensions with specific defined skewness and variance, are the first data set of its kind and provide important insights into the relationship between the solid particles of a suspension and its rheological behavior. Since the relationship between the rheology of particle-bearing suspensions and its maximum packing fraction ϕm is well established by several theoretical models, the results of the analog experiments of this study reveal that the polydispersity γ exerts the largest influence on ϕm. Consequently, the estimation of the polydispersity γ of a particle-size distribution is essential for estimating the viscosity of that given suspension.

  17. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes.

  18. Size distributions of manure particles released under simulated rainfall.

    PubMed

    Pachepsky, Yakov A; Guber, Andrey K; Shelton, Daniel R; McCarty, Gregory W

    2009-03-01

    Manure and animal waste deposited on cropland and grazing lands serve as a source of microorganisms, some of which may be pathogenic. These microorganisms are released along with particles of dissolved manure during rainfall events. Relatively little if anything is known about the amounts and sizes of manure particles released during rainfall, that subsequently may serve as carriers, abode, and nutritional source for microorganisms. The objective of this work was to obtain and present the first experimental data on sizes of bovine manure particles released to runoff during simulated rainfall and leached through soil during subsequent infiltration. Experiments were conducted using 200 cm long boxes containing turfgrass soil sod; the boxes were designed so that rates of manure dissolution and subsequent infiltration and runoff could be monitored independently. Dairy manure was applied on the upper portion of boxes. Simulated rainfall (ca. 32.4 mm h(-1)) was applied for 90 min on boxes with stands of either live or dead grass. Electrical conductivity, turbidity, and particle size distributions obtained from laser diffractometry were determined in manure runoff and soil leachate samples. Turbidity of leachates and manure runoff samples decreased exponentially. Turbidity of manure runoff samples was on average 20% less than turbidity of soil leachate samples. Turbidity of leachate samples from boxes with dead grass was on average 30% less than from boxes with live grass. Particle size distributions in manure runoff and leachate suspensions remained remarkably stable after 15 min of runoff initiation, although the turbidity continued to decrease. Particles had the median diameter of 3.8 microm, and 90% of particles were between 0.6 and 17.8 microm. The particle size distributions were not affected by the grass status. Because manure particles are known to affect transport and retention of microbial pathogens in soil, more information needs to be collected about the

  19. Phase behavior of binary and polydisperse suspensions of compressible microgels controlled by selective particle deswelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, A.; Gasser, U.; Herman, E. S.; Han, Jun; Menzel, A.; Lyon, L. A.; Fernandez-Nieves, A.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the phase behavior of suspensions of poly(N -isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) microgels with either bimodal or polydisperse size distribution. We observe a shift of the fluid-crystal transition to higher concentrations depending on the polydispersity or the fraction of large particles in suspension. Crystallization is observed up to polydispersities as high as 18.5%, and up to a number fraction of large particles of 29% in bidisperse suspensions. The crystal structure is random hexagonal close-packed as in monodisperse pNIPAM microgel suspensions. We explain our experimental results by considering the effect of bound counterions. Above a critical particle concentration, these cause deswelling of the largest microgels, which are the softest, changing the size distribution of the suspension and enabling crystal formation in conditions where incompressible particles would not crystallize.

  20. Particle size analysis of amalgam powder and handpiece generated specimens.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J L; Hathorn, R M; Cailas, M D; Karuhn, R

    2001-07-01

    The increasing interest in the elimination of amalgam particles from the dental waste (DW) stream, requires efficient devices to remove these particles. The major objective of this project was to perform a comparative evaluation of five basic methods of particle size analysis in terms of the instrument's ability to quantify the size distribution of the various components within the DW stream. The analytical techniques chosen were image analysis via scanning electron microscopy, standard wire mesh sieves, X-ray sedigraphy, laser diffraction, and electrozone analysis. The DW particle stream components were represented by amalgam powders and handpiece/diamond bur generated specimens of enamel; dentin, whole tooth, and condensed amalgam. Each analytical method quantified the examined DW particle stream components. However, X-ray sedigraphy, electrozone, and laser diffraction particle analyses provided similar results for determining particle distributions of DW samples. These three methods were able to more clearly quantify the properties of the examined powder and condensed amalgam samples. Furthermore, these methods indicated that a significant fraction of the DW stream contains particles less than 20 microm. The findings of this study indicated that the electrozone method is likely to be the most effective technique for quantifying the particle size distribution in the DW particle stream. This method required a relative small volume of sample, was not affected by density, shape factors or optical properties, and measured a sufficient number of particles to provide a reliable representation of the particle size distribution curve.

  1. Global Particle Size Distributions: Measurements during the Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Williamson, C.; Kupc, A.; Froyd, K. D.; Richardson, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Dollner, M.; Schuh, H.; Erdesz, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) project is a three-year NASA-sponsored program to map the spatial and temporal distribution of greenhouse gases, reactive species, and aerosol particles from the Arctic to the Antarctic. In situ measurements are being made on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, which will make four global circumnavigations of the Earth over the mid-Pacific and mid-Atlantic Oceans while continuously profiling between 0.2 and 13 km altitude. In situ microphysical measurements will provide an unique and unprecedented dataset of aerosol particle size distributions between 0.004 and 50 µm diameter. This unbiased, representative dataset allows investigation of new particle formation in the remote troposphere, placing strong observational constraints on the chemical and physical mechanisms that govern particle formation and growth to cloud-active sizes. Particles from 0.004 to 0.055 µm are measured with 10 condensation particle counters. Particles with diameters from 0.06 to 1.0 µm are measured with one-second resolution using two ultra-high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometers (UHSASes). A laser aerosol spectrometer (LAS) measures particle size distributions between 0.12 and 10 µm in diameter. Finally, a cloud, aerosol and precipitation spectrometer (CAPS) underwing optical spectrometer probe sizes ambient particles with diameters from 0.5 to 50 µm and images and sizes precipitation-sized particles. Additional particle instruments on the payload include a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer and a single particle laser-ablation aerosol mass spectrometer. The instruments are calibrated in the laboratory and on the aircraft. Calibrations are checked in flight by introducing four sizes of polystyrene latex (PSL) microspheres into the sampling inlet. The CAPS probe is calibrated using PSL and glass microspheres that are aspirated into the sample volume. Comparisons between the instruments and checks with the calibration aerosol

  2. [Distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during haze weather in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiu-Fang; Sun, Zai; Xie, Xiao-Fang

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) were monitored with fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) in continuous haze weather and the haze fading process during December 6 to 11, 2013 in Hangzhou. Particle concentration and size distribution were studied associated with meteorological factors. The results showed that number concentrations were the highest at night and began to reduce in the morning. There was a small peak at 8 o'clock in the morning and 18 o'clock in the afternoon. It showed an obvious peak traffic source, which indicated that traffic emissions played a great role in the atmospheric pollution. During haze weather, the highest number concentration of UFPs reached 8 x 10(4) cm(-3). Particle size spectrum distribution was bimodal, the peak particle sizes were 15 nm and 100 nm respectively. Majority of UFPs were Aitken mode and Accumulation mode and the size of most particles concentrated near 100 nm. Average CMD(count medium diameter) was 85.89 nm. During haze fading process, number concentration and particles with size around 100 nm began to reduce and peak size shifted to small size. Nuclear modal particles increased and were more than accumulation mode. Average CMD was 58.64 nm. Meteorological factors such as the visibility and wind were negatively correlated with the particle number concentration. Correlation coefficient R were -0.225 and - 0.229. The humidity was correlated with number concentration. Correlation coefficient R was 0.271. The atmosphere was stable in winter and the level temperature had small correlation with number concentration. Therefore, study on distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during haze weather had the significance on the formation mechanism and control of haze weather.

  3. Particle size distribution: A key factor in estimating powder dustiness.

    PubMed

    López Lilao, Ana; Sanfélix Forner, Vicenta; Mallol Gasch, Gustavo; Monfort Gimeno, Eliseo

    2017-12-01

    A wide variety of raw materials, involving more than 20 samples of quartzes, feldspars, nephelines, carbonates, dolomites, sands, zircons, and alumina, were selected and characterised. Dustiness, i.e., a materials' tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. These raw materials were selected to encompass a wide range of particle sizes (1.6-294 µm) and true densities (2650-4680 kg/m 3 ). The dustiness of the raw materials, i.e., their tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. The influence of some key material parameters (particle size distribution, flowability, and specific surface area) on dustiness was assessed. In this regard, dustiness was found to be significantly affected by particle size distribution. Data analysis enabled development of a model for predicting the dustiness of the studied materials, assuming that dustiness depended on the particle fraction susceptible to emission and on the bulk material's susceptibility to release these particles. On the one hand, the developed model allows the dustiness mechanisms to be better understood. In this regard, it may be noted that relative emission increased with mean particle size. However, this did not necessarily imply that dustiness did, because dustiness also depended on the fraction of particles susceptible to be emitted. On the other hand, the developed model enables dustiness to be estimated using just the particle size distribution data. The quality of the fits was quite good and the fact that only particle size distribution data are needed facilitates industrial application, since these data are usually known by raw materials managers, thus making additional tests unnecessary. This model may therefore be deemed a key tool in drawing up efficient preventive and/or corrective measures to reduce dust emissions during bulk powder processing, both inside and outside industrial facilities. It is recommended, however

  4. Size-Dependent Particle Dynamics in Entangled Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-19

    Polymer-grafted nanoparticles with diameter d homogeneously dispersed in entangled polymer melts with varying random coil radius R0, but fixed entanglement mesh size a(e), are used to study particle motions in entangled polymers. We focus on materials in the transition region between the continuum regime (d > R0), where the classical Stokes-Einstein (S-E) equation is known to describe polymer drag on particles, and the noncontinuum regime (d < a(e)), in which several recent studies report faster diffusion of particles than expected from continuum S-E analysis, based on the bulk polymer viscosity. Specifically, we consider dynamics of particles with sizes d ≥ a(e) in entangled polymers with varying molecular weight M(w) in order to investigate how the transition from noncontinuum to continuum dynamics occur. We take advantage of favorable enthalpic interactions between SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with PEO molecules and entangled PMMA host polymers to create model nanoparticle-polymer composites, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in entangled polymers. Investigation of the particle dynamics via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements reveals a transition from fast to slow particle motion as the PMMA molecular weight is increased beyond the entanglement threshold, with a much weaker M(w) dependence for M(w) > M(e) than expected from S-E analysis based on bulk viscosity of entangled PMMA melts. We rationalize these observations using a simple force balance analysis around particles and find that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts can be described using a variant of the S-E analysis in which motion of particles is assumed to only disturb subchain entangled host segments with sizes comparable to the particle diameter.

  5. Size-Dependent Particle Dynamics in Entangled Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Narayanan, Suresh

    Polymer-grafted nanoparticles with diameter d homogeneously dispersed in entangled polymer melts with varying random coil radius R0, but fixed entanglement mesh size ae, are used to study particle motions in entangled polymers. We focus on materials in the transition region between the continuum regime (d > R0), where the classical Stokes-Einstein (S-E) equation is known to describe polymer drag on particles, and the non-continuum regime (d < ae), in which several recent studies report faster diffusion of particles than expected from continuum S-E analysis, based on the bulk polymer viscosity. Specifically, we consider dynamics of particles with sizes d ≥more » ae in entangled polymers with varying molecular weight Mw in order to investigate how the transition from non-continuum to continuum dynamics occur. We take advantage of favorable enthalpic interactions between SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with PEO molecules and entangled PMMA host polymers to create model nanoparticle-polymer composites, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in entangled polymers. Investigation of the particle dynamics via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements reveal a transition from fast to slow particle motion as the PMMA molecular weight is increased beyond the entanglement threshold, with a much weaker Mw dependence for Mw>Me than expected from S-E analysis based on bulk viscosity of entangled PMMA melts. We rationalize these observations using a simple force balance analysis around particles and find that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts can be described using a variant of the S-E analysis in which motion of particles is assumed to only disturb sub-chain entangled host segments with sizes comparable to the particle diameter.« less

  6. Experimental study of the effect of grain sizes in a bimodal mixture on bed slope, bed texture, and the transition to washload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Kimberly M.; Gaffney, John; Baumgardner, Sarah; Wilcock, Peter; Paola, Chris

    2017-01-01

    When fine sediment is added to a coarse-grained system, the mobility and composition of the bed can change dramatically. We conducted a series of flume experiments to determine how the size of fine particles introduced to an active gravel bed influences the mobility and composition of the bed. We initiated our experiments using a constant water discharge and feed rate of gravel. After the system reached steady state, we doubled the feed rate by supplying a second sediment of equal or lesser size, creating size ratios from 1:1 to 1:150. As we decreased the relative size of the fine particles, the system transitioned among three regimes: (1) For particle size ratios close to one, the bed slope increased to transport the additional load of similar-sized particles. The bed surface remained planar and unchanged. (2) For intermediate particle size ratios, the bed slope decreased with the additional fines. The bed surface became patchy with regions of fine and coarse grains. (3) For the largest particle size ratios (the smallest fines), the bed slope remained relatively unchanged. The subsurface became clogged with fine sediment, but fine particles were not present in the surface layer. This third regime constitutes washload, defined by those fractions that do not affect bed-material transport conditions. Our results indicate washload should be defined in terms of three conditions: small grain size relative to that of the bed material, full suspension based on the Rouse number, and a small rate of fine sediment supply relative to transport capacity.

  7. Size-based sorting of micro-particles using microbubble streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Jalikop, Shreyas; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2009-11-01

    Oscillating microbubbles driven by ultrasound have shown great potential in microfluidic applications, such as transporting particles and promoting mixing [1-3]. The oscillations generate secondary steady streaming that can also trap particles. We use the streaming to develop a method of sorting particles of different sizes in an initially well-mixed solution. The solution is fed into a channel consisting of bubbles placed periodically along a side wall. When the bubbles are excited by an ultrasound piezo-electric transducer to produce steady streaming, the flow field is altered by the presence of the particles. This effect is dependent on particle size and results in size-based sorting of the particles. The effectiveness of the separation depends on the dimensions of the bubbles and particles as well as on the ultrasound frequency. Our experimental studies are aimed at a better understanding of the design and control of effective microfluidic separating devices. Ref: [1] P. Marmottant and S. Hilgenfeldt, Nature 423, 153 (2003). [2] P. Marmottant and S. Hilgenfeldt, Proc. Natl. Acad. Science USA, 101, 9523 (2004). [3] P. Marmottant, J.-P. Raven, H. Gardeniers, J. G. Bomer, and S. Hilgenfeldt, J. Fluid Mech., vol.568, 109 (2006).

  8. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    PubMed

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  9. Characterization of Raman Scattering in Solid Samples with Different Particle Sizes and Elucidation on the Trends of Particle Size-Dependent Intensity Variations in Relation to Changes in the Sizes of Laser Illumination and Detection Area.

    PubMed

    Duy, Pham K; Chun, Seulah; Chung, Hoeil

    2017-11-21

    We have systematically characterized Raman scatterings in solid samples with different particle sizes and investigated subsequent trends of particle size-induced intensity variations. For this purpose, both lactose powders and pellets composed of five different particle sizes were prepared. Uniquely in this study, three spectral acquisition schemes with different sizes of laser illuminations and detection windows were employed for the evaluation, since it was expected that the experimental configuration would be another factor potentially influencing the intensity of the lactose peak, along with the particle size itself. In both samples, the distribution of Raman photons became broader with the increase in particle size, as the mean free path of laser photons, the average photon travel distance between consecutive scattering locations, became longer under this situation. When the particle size was the same, the Raman photon distribution was narrower in the pellets since the individual particles were more densely packed in a given volume (the shorter mean free path). When the size of the detection window was small, the number of photons reaching the detector decreased as the photon distribution was larger. Meanwhile, a large-window detector was able to collect the widely distributed Raman photons more effectively; therefore, the trends of intensity change with the variation in particle size were dissimilar depending on the employed spectral acquisition schemes. Overall, the Monte Carlo simulation was effective at probing the photon distribution inside the samples and helped to support the experimental observations.

  10. Particle Size Reduction in Geophysical Granular Flows: The Role of Rock Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, G.; Sklar, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Particle size reduction in geophysical granular flows is caused by abrasion and fragmentation, and can affect transport dynamics by altering the particle size distribution. While the Sternberg equation is commonly used to predict the mean abrasion rate in the fluvial environment, and can also be applied to geophysical granular flows, predicting the evolution of the particle size distribution requires a better understanding the controls on the rate of fragmentation and the size distribution of resulting particle fragments. To address this knowledge gap we are using single-particle free-fall experiments to test for the influence of particle size, impact velocity, and rock properties on fragmentation and abrasion rates. Rock types tested include granodiorite, basalt, and serpentinite. Initial particle masses and drop heights range from 20 to 1000 grams and 0.1 to 3.0 meters respectively. Preliminary results of free-fall experiments suggest that the probability of fragmentation varies as a power function of kinetic energy on impact. The resulting size distributions of rock fragments can be collapsed by normalizing by initial particle mass, and can be fit with a generalized Pareto distribution. We apply the free-fall results to understand the evolution of granodiorite particle-size distributions in granular flow experiments using rotating drums ranging in diameter from 0.2 to 4.0 meters. In the drums, we find that the rates of silt production by abrasion and gravel production by fragmentation scale with drum size. To compare these rates with free-fall results we estimate the particle impact frequency and velocity. We then use population balance equations to model the evolution of particle size distributions due to the combined effects of abrasion and fragmentation. Finally, we use the free-fall and drum experimental results to model particle size evolution in Inyo Creek, a steep, debris-flow dominated catchment, and compare model results to field measurements.

  11. Metrological assessment of a portable analyzer for monitoring the particle size distribution of ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Stabile, Luca; Cauda, Emanuele; Marini, Sara; Buonanno, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Adverse health effects caused by worker exposure to ultrafine particles have been detected in recent years. The scientific community focuses on the assessment of ultrafine aerosols in different microenvironments in order to determine the related worker exposure/dose levels. To this end, particle size distribution measurements have to be taken along with total particle number concentrations. The latter are obtainable through hand-held monitors. A portable particle size distribution analyzer (Nanoscan SMPS 3910, TSI Inc.) was recently commercialized, but so far no metrological assessment has been performed to characterize its performance with respect to well-established laboratory-based instruments such as the scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer. The present paper compares the aerosol monitoring capability of the Nanoscan SMPS to the laboratory SMPS in order to evaluate whether the Nanoscan SMPS is suitable for field experiments designed to characterize particle exposure in different microenvironments. Tests were performed both in a Marple calm air chamber, where fresh diesel particulate matter and atomized dioctyl phthalate particles were monitored, and in microenvironments, where outdoor, urban, indoor aged, and indoor fresh aerosols were measured. Results show that the Nanoscan SMPS is able to properly measure the particle size distribution for each type of aerosol investigated, but it overestimates the total particle number concentration in the case of fresh aerosols. In particular, the test performed in the Marple chamber showed total concentrations up to twice those measured by the laboratory SMPS-likely because of the inability of the Nanoscan SMPS unipolar charger to properly charge aerosols made up of aggregated particles. Based on these findings, when field test exposure studies are conducted, the Nanoscan SMPS should be used in tandem with a condensation particle counter in order to verify and correct the particle size distribution data

  12. Counting particles emitted by stratospheric aircraft and measuring size of particles emitted by stratospheric aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1994-01-01

    The ER-2 condensation nuclei counter (CNC) has been modified to reduce the diffusive losses of particles within the instrument. These changes have been successful in improving the counting efficiency of small particles at low pressures. Two techniques for measuring the size distributions of particles with diameters less than 0.17 micrometers have been evaluated. Both of these methods, the differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and the diffusion battery, have fundamental problems that limit their usefulness for stratospheric applications. We cannot recommend either for this application. Newly developed, alternative methods for measuring small particles include inertial separation with a low-loss critical orifice and thin-plate impactor device. This technique is now used to collect particles in the multisample aerosol collector housed in the ER-2 CNC-2, and shows some promise for particle size measurements when coupled with a CNC as a counting device. The modified focused-cavity aerosol spectrometer (FCAS) can determine the size distribution of particles with ambient diameters as small as about 0.07 micrometers. Data from this instrument indicates the presence of a nuclei mode when CNC-2 indicates high concentrations of particles, but cannot resolve important parameters of the distribution.

  13. High-resolution, submicron particle size distribution analysis using gravitational-sweep sedimentation.

    PubMed Central

    Mächtle, W

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity is a powerful tool for the analysis of complex solutions of macromolecules. However, sample turbidity imposes an upper limit to the size of molecular complexes currently amenable to such analysis. Furthermore, the breadth of the particle size distribution, combined with possible variations in the density of different particles, makes it difficult to analyze extremely complex mixtures. These same problems are faced in the polymer industry, where dispersions of latices, pigments, lacquers, and emulsions must be characterized. There is a rich history of methods developed for the polymer industry finding use in the biochemical sciences. Two such methods are presented. These use analytical ultracentrifugation to determine the density and size distributions for submicron-sized particles. Both methods rely on Stokes' equations to estimate particle size and density, whereas turbidity, corrected using Mie's theory, provides the concentration measurement. The first method uses the sedimentation time in dispersion media of different densities to evaluate the particle density and size distribution. This method works provided the sample is chemically homogeneous. The second method splices together data gathered at different sample concentrations, thus permitting the high-resolution determination of the size distribution of particle diameters ranging from 10 to 3000 nm. By increasing the rotor speed exponentially from 0 to 40,000 rpm over a 1-h period, size distributions may be measured for extremely broadly distributed dispersions. Presented here is a short history of particle size distribution analysis using the ultracentrifuge, along with a description of the newest experimental methods. Several applications of the methods are provided that demonstrate the breadth of its utility, including extensions to samples containing nonspherical and chromophoric particles. PMID:9916040

  14. Size-resolved particle emission factors for individual ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Åsa M.; Westerlund, Jonathan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2011-07-01

    In these experiments size-resolved emission factors for particle number (EFPN) and mass (EFPM) have been determined for 734 individual ship passages for real-world dilution. The method used is an extractive sampling method of the passing ship plumes where particle number/mass and CO2 were measured with high time resolution (1 Hz). The measurements were conducted on a small island located in the entrance to the port of Gothenburg (N57.6849, E11.838), the largest harbor in Scandinavia. This is an emission control area (ECA) and in close vicinity to populated areas. The average EFPN and EFPM were 2.55 ± 0.11 × 1016 (kg fuel)-1 and 2050 ± 110 mg (kg fuel)-1, respectively. The determined EF for ships with multiple passages showed a great reproducibility. Size-resolved EFPN were peaking at small particle sizes ˜35 nm. Smaller particle sizes and hence less mass were observed by a gas turbine equipped ship compared to diesel engine equipped ships. On average 36 to 46% of the emitted particles by number were non-volatile and 24% by mass (EFPN 1.16 ± 0.19 × 1016 [kg fuel]-1 and EFPM 488 ± 73 mg [kg fuel]-1, respectively). This study shows a great potential to gain large data-sets regarding ship emission determining parameters that can improve current dispersion modeling for health assessments on local and regional scales. The global contributions of total and non-volatile particle mass from shipping using this extensive data-set from an ECA were estimated to be at least 0.80 Tgy-1 and 0.19 Tgy-1.

  15. Size-selective separation of submicron particles in suspensions with ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Nii, Susumu; Oka, Naoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions containing silica or polystyrene latex were ultrasonically atomized for separating particles of a specific size. With the help of a fog involving fine liquid droplets with a narrow size distribution, submicron particles in a limited size-range were successfully separated from suspensions. Performance of the separation was characterized by analyzing the size and the concentration of collected particles with a high resolution method. Irradiation of 2.4MHz ultrasound to sample suspensions allowed the separation of particles of specific size from 90 to 320nm without regarding the type of material. Addition of a small amount of nonionic surfactant, PONPE20 to SiO2 suspensions enhanced the collection of finer particles, and achieved a remarkable increase in the number of collected particles. Degassing of the sample suspension resulted in eliminating the separation performance. Dissolved air in suspensions plays an important role in this separation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J.

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  17. Particles influence allergic responses in mice--role of gender and particle size.

    PubMed

    Alberg, Torunn; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Lovik, Martinus; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggesting that exposure to traffic air pollution may enhance sensitization to common allergens in children is increasing, and animal studies support biological plausibility and causality. The effect of air pollution on respiratory symptoms was suggested to be gender dependent. Previous studies showed that allergy-promoting activity of polystyrene particles (PSP) increased with decreasing particle size after footpad injection of mice. The primary aim of this study was to confirm the influence of particle size on the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-promoting capacity of particles in an airway allergy model. A second aim was to examine whether the allergy-promoting capacity of particles was influenced by gender. Female and male mice were intranasally exposed to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) with or without ultrafine, fine, or coarse PSP modeling the core of ambient air particles. After intranasal booster immunizations with OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgE antibodies, and also markers of airway inflammation and cellular responses in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN), were determined. PSP of all sizes promoted allergic responses, measured as increased serum concentrations of OVA-specific IgE antibodies. Further, PSP produced eosinophilic airway inflammation and elevated MLN cell numbers as well as numerically reducing the percentage of regulatory T cells. Ultrafine PSP produced stronger allergic responses to OVA than fine and coarse PSP. Although PSP enhanced sensitization in both female and male mice, significantly higher IgE levels and numbers of eosinophils were observed in females than males. However, the allergy-promoting effect of PSP was apparently independent of gender. Thus, our data support the notion that ambient air particle pollution may affect development of allergy in both female and male individuals.

  18. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J

    2015-06-07

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.

  19. Enhancement of fluorescence intensity by silicon particles and its size effect.

    PubMed

    Saitow, Ken-ichi; Suemori, Hidemi; Tamamitsu, Hironori

    2014-02-04

    Fluorescence-intensity enhancement of dye molecules was investigated using silicon submicron particles as a function of the particle size. Silicon particles with a size of 500 nm gave an enhancement factor up to 180. Measurement of scattering spectra revealed that the localized electric field at the particle enhances the fluorescence intensity.

  20. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  1. Size-resolved ultrafine particle composition analysis 1. Atlanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, K. P.; Phares, D. J.; Wexler, A. S.; Johnston, M. V.

    2003-04-01

    During August 1999 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study Supersite Experiment, our group collected size-resolved measurements of the chemical composition of single ambient aerosol particles with a unique real-time laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry technique. The rapid single-particle mass spectrometry instrument is capable of analyzing "ultrafine" particles with aerodynamic diameters ranging from 0.01 to 1.5 μm. Under the heaviest loading observed in Atlanta, particles were analyzed at a rate of roughly one per second in sizes ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 μm. Nearly 16,000 individual spectra were recorded over the course of the month during both daytime and nighttime sampling periods. Evaluation of the data indicates that the composition of the ultrafine (less than 100 nm) particles is dominated by carbon-containing compounds. Larger particles show varied compositions but typically appeared to have organic carbon characteristics mixed with an inorganic component (e.g., crustal materials, metals, etc.). During the experiment, 70 composition classes were identified. In this paper we report the average spectra and correlations with various meteorological parameters for all major compound classes and a number of minor ones. The major composition classes are identified from the primary peaks in their spectra as organic carbon (about 74% of the particles), potassium (8%), iron (3%), calcium (2%), nitrate (2%), elemental carbon (1.5%), and sodium (1%). Many of these compound classes appeared in repeatable size ranges and quadrants of the wind rose, indicating emission from specific sources.

  2. Importance of aggregation and small ice crystals in cirrus clouds, based on observations and an ice particle growth model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David L.; Chai, Steven K.; Dong, Yayi; Arnott, W. Patrick; Hallett, John

    1993-01-01

    The 1 November 1986 FIRE I case study was used to test an ice particle growth model which predicts bimodal size spectra in cirrus clouds. The model was developed from an analytically based model which predicts the height evolution of monomodal ice particle size spectra from the measured ice water content (IWC). Size spectra from the monomodal model are represented by a gamma distribution, N(D) = N(sub o)D(exp nu)exp(-lambda D), where D = ice particle maximum dimension. The slope parameter, lambda, and the parameter N(sub o) are predicted from the IWC through the growth processes of vapor diffusion and aggregation. The model formulation is analytical, computationally efficient, and well suited for incorporation into larger models. The monomodal model has been validated against two other cirrus cloud case studies. From the monomodal size spectra, the size distributions which determine concentrations of ice particles less than about 150 mu m are predicted.

  3. Particle size-dependent radical generation from wildland fire smoke.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Castranova, Vince; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hoover, Mark; Piacitelli, Chris; Gaughan, Denise M

    2007-07-01

    Firefighting, along with construction, mining and agriculture, ranks among the most dangerous occupations. In addition, the work environment of firefighters is unlike that of any other occupation, not only because of the obvious physical hazards but also due to the respiratory and systemic health hazards of smoke inhalation resulting from combustion. A significant amount of research has been devoted to studying municipal firefighters; however, these studies may not be useful in wildland firefighter exposures, because the two work environments are so different. Not only are wildland firefighters exposed to different combustion products, but their exposure profiles are different. The combustion products wildland firefighters are exposed to can vary greatly in characteristics due to the type and amount of material being burned, soil conditions, temperature and exposure time. Smoke inhalation is one of the greatest concerns for firefighter health and it has been shown that the smoke consists of a large number of particles. These smoke particles contain intermediates of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen free radicals, which may pose a potential health risk. Our investigation looked into the involvement of free radicals in smoke toxicity and the relationship between particle size and radical generation. Samples were collected in discrete aerodynamic particle sizes from a wildfire in Alaska, preserved and then shipped to our laboratory for analysis. Electron spin resonance was used to measure carbon-centered as well as hydroxyl radicals produced by a Fenton-like reaction with wildfire smoke. Further study of reactive oxygen species was conducted using analysis of cellular H(2)O(2) generation, lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes and DNA damage. Results demonstrate that coarse size-range particles contained more carbon radicals per unit mass than the ultrafine particles; however, the ultrafine particles generated more *OH radicals in the acellular Fenton-like reaction. The

  4. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  5. Counting Particles Emitted by Stratospheric Aircraft and Measuring Size of Particles Emitted by Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James Charles

    1994-01-01

    There were two principal objectives of the cooperative agreement between NASA and the University of Denver. The first goal was to modify the design of the ER-2 condensation nuclei counter (CNC) so that the effective lower detection limit would be improved at high altitudes. This improvement was sought because, in the instrument used prior to 1993, diffusion losses prevented the smallest detectable particles from reaching the detection volume of the instrument during operation at low pressure. Therefore, in spite of the sensor's ability to detect particles as small as 0.008 microns in diameter, many of these particles were lost in transport to the sensing region and were not counted. Most of the particles emitted by aircraft are smaller than 0.1 micron in diameter. At the start date of this work, May 1990, continuous sizing techniques available on the ER-2 were only capable of detecting particles larger than 0.17 micron. Thus, the second objective of this work was to evaluate candidate sizing techniques in an effort to gain additional information concerning the size of particles emitted by aircraft.

  6. Application of a simple power law for transport ratio with bimodal distributions of spherical grains under oscillatory forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holway, Kevin; Thaxton, Christopher S.; Calantoni, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    Morphodynamic models of coastal evolution require relatively simple parameterizations of sediment transport for application over larger scales. Calantoni and Thaxton (2008) [6] presented a transport parameterization for bimodal distributions of coarse quartz grains derived from detailed boundary layer simulations for sheet flow and near sheet flow conditions. The simulation results, valid over a range of wave forcing conditions and large- to small-grain diameter ratios, were successfully parameterized with a simple power law that allows for the prediction of the transport rates of each size fraction. Here, we have applied the simple power law to a two-dimensional cellular automaton to simulate sheet flow transport. Model results are validated with experiments performed in the small oscillating flow tunnel (S-OFT) at the Naval Research Laboratory at Stennis Space Center, MS, in which sheet flow transport was generated with a bed composed of a bimodal distribution of non-cohesive grains. The work presented suggests that, under the conditions specified, algorithms that incorporate the power law may correctly reproduce laboratory bed surface measurements of bimodal sheet flow transport while inherently incorporating vertical mixing by size.

  7. Cytotoxicity evaluation of ceramic particles of different sizes and shapes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Honma, Rieko; Sumita, Masae; Hanawa, Takao

    2004-02-01

    When artificial hip or knee joints are implanted in the human body, they release metallic, ceramic, and polymeric debris into the surrounding tissues. The toxicity of the released particles is of two types: chemical, caused by the released soluble ions and monomers, and mechanical, a result of mechanical stimulation produced by the insoluble particles. In this study, the cytotoxicity of particles of TiO2, Al2O3, ZrO2, Si3N4, and SiC for murine fibroblasts and macrophages were examined to evaluate just their mechanical toxicity because these particles are not expected to release soluble metal ions. Different sizes and shapes of TiO2 particles were used to evaluate the effect of size and shape on particle cytotoxicity. The results suggest that the cytotoxicity of ceramic particles does not depend on their chemical species. Cytotoxicity levels were lower than those of corresponding metal ions, indicating that the mechanical toxicity of particles is lower than the chemical toxicity of released soluble ions and monomers. The differences in size did not affect the mechanical toxicity of these particles. The dendritic particles had a higher cytotoxicity level for macrophages than did spindle and spheric particles. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 68A: 244-256, 2004

  8. The influences of ambient particle composition and size on particle infiltration in Los Angeles, CA, residences.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Coull, Brent A; Ruiz, Pablo A; Koutrakis, Petros; Suh, Helen H

    2006-02-01

    Particle infiltration is a key determinant of the indoor concentrations of ambient particles. Few studies have examined the influence of particle composition on infiltration, particularly in areas with high concentrations of volatile particles, such as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3). A comprehensive indoor monitoring study was conducted in 17 Los Angeles-area homes. As part of this study, indoor/outdoor concentration ratios during overnight (nonindoor source) periods were used to estimate the fraction of ambient particles remaining airborne indoors, or the particle infiltration factor (FINF), for fine particles (PM2.5), its nonvolatile (i.e., black carbon [BC]) and volatile (i.e., nitrate [NO3-]) components, and particle sizes ranging between 0.02 and 10 microm. FINF was highest for BC (median = 0.84) and lowest for NO3- (median = 0.18). The low FINF for NO3- was likely because of volatilization of NO3- particles once indoors, in addition to depositional losses upon building entry. The FINF for PM2.5 (median = 0.48) fell between those for BC and NO3-, reflecting the contributions of both particle components to PM25. FINF varied with particle size, air-exchange rate, and outdoor NO3- concentrations. The FINF for particles between 0.7 and 2 microm in size was considerably lower during periods of high as compared with low outdoor NO3- concentrations, suggesting that outdoor NO3- particles were of this size. This study demonstrates that infiltration of PM2.5 varies by particle component and is lowest for volatile species, such as NH4NO3. Our results suggest that volatile particle components may influence the ability for outdoor PM concentrations to represent indoor and, thus, personal exposures to particles of ambient origin, because volatilization of these particles causes the composition of PM2.5 to differ indoors and outdoors. Consequently, particle composition likely influences observed epidemiologic relationships based on outdoor PM concentrations, especially in areas

  9. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Jin, Tingting; Jin, Yachao; Wu, Leihong; Hu, Bin; Tian, Yu; Fan, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury.

  10. Influence of particle size on physical and sensory attributes of mango pulp powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Kadam, D. M.; Chadha, S.; Wilson, R. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation was aimed to observe the effect of particle size on physical, sensory and thermal properties of foam-mat dried mango pulp powder. Mango pulp of Dussehri variety was foam-mat dried using 3% egg white at 65ºC. Dried foam-mats were pulverized and passed through a sieve shaker for obtaining three grades of powder with 50, 60, and 85 mesh size sieves. The particle size of these samples measured using laser diffraction particle size analyzer ranged from 191.26 to 296.19 μm. The data was analysed statistically using ANOVA of SAS. There was a linear increase in lightness (`L' value) with a decrease in particle size, however, `a' value decreased with a decrease in particle size, indicating the decrease in redness. An increase in bulk density and decrease in water solubility index and water absorption index % were observed with a decrease in particle size. Particle size had a significant effect on sensory parameters. Particle size in the range of 258.01 to 264.60μmwas found most acceptable with respect to sensory characteristics. This finding can be exploited for various commercial applicationswhere powder quality is dependent on the particle size and has foremost priority for end users.

  11. BRL Particle Sizing Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    satisfy the counting constraints required for entry into the ■ Histogran Counter. ACQUISITION TIME -~ The tiwe which elapsed during data acquistion ...weighted population (i.e., Measured population tines the weighting factor) of a bin in the particle size histogran acquistion . Does not include data...1000.0 40.0 3000 1 ZING FROM PSI OMHZ M MHZ MHZ V. VOLTS PED HZ ODE ON PAD ZCD=3.7 ADJUST OFF; IRIG HISTOGRAM E:ET 42.0 CLOCK

  12. Preparation of gold nanoparticles and determination of their particles size via different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Usanase, Gisele; Oulmi, Kafia

    Graphical abstract: Preparation of gold nanoparticles via NaBH{sub 4} reduction method, and determination of their particle size, size distribution and morphology by using different techniques. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH{sub 4} reduction method. • Excess of reducing agent leads to tendency of aggregation. • The particle size, size distribution and morphology were investigated. • Particle size was determined both experimentally as well as theoretically. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been used in various applications covering both electronics, biosensors, in vivo biomedical imaging and in vitro biomedical diagnosis. As a general requirement, gold nanoparticles should be preparedmore » in large scale, easy to be functionalized by chemical compound of by specific ligands or biomolecules. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared by using different concentrations of reducing agent (NaBH{sub 4}) in various formulations and their effect on the particle size, size distribution and morphology was investigated. Moreover, special attention has been dedicated to comparison of particles size measured by various techniques, such as, light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, UV spectrum using standard curve and particles size calculated by using Mie theory and UV spectrum of gold nanoparticles dispersion. Particle size determined by various techniques can be correlated for monodispersed particles and excess of reducing agent leads to increase in the particle size.« less

  13. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Alsomore » disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.« less

  14. Size limits for rounding of volcanic ash particles heated by lightning.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Fabian B; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W; Genareau, Kimberly; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic ash particles can be remelted by the high temperatures induced in volcanic lightning discharges. The molten particles can round under surface tension then quench to produce glass spheres. Melting and rounding timescales for volcanic materials are strongly dependent on heating duration and peak temperature and are shorter for small particles than for large particles. Therefore, the size distribution of glass spheres recovered from ash deposits potentially record the short duration, high-temperature conditions of volcanic lightning discharges, which are hard to measure directly. We use a 1-D numerical solution to the heat equation to determine the timescales of heating and cooling of volcanic particles during and after rapid heating and compare these with the capillary timescale for rounding an angular particle. We define dimensionless parameters-capillary, Fourier, Stark, Biot, and Peclet numbers-to characterize the competition between heat transfer within the particle, heat transfer at the particle rim, and capillary motion, for particles of different sizes. We apply this framework to the lightning case and constrain a maximum size for ash particles susceptible to surface tension-driven rounding, as a function of lightning temperature and duration, and ash properties. The size limit agrees well with maximum sizes of glass spheres found in volcanic ash that has been subjected to lightning or experimental discharges, demonstrating that the approach that we develop can be used to obtain a first-order estimate of lightning conditions in volcanic plumes.

  15. Size limits for rounding of volcanic ash particles heated by lightning

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W.; Genareau, Kimberly; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Volcanic ash particles can be remelted by the high temperatures induced in volcanic lightning discharges. The molten particles can round under surface tension then quench to produce glass spheres. Melting and rounding timescales for volcanic materials are strongly dependent on heating duration and peak temperature and are shorter for small particles than for large particles. Therefore, the size distribution of glass spheres recovered from ash deposits potentially record the short duration, high‐temperature conditions of volcanic lightning discharges, which are hard to measure directly. We use a 1‐D numerical solution to the heat equation to determine the timescales of heating and cooling of volcanic particles during and after rapid heating and compare these with the capillary timescale for rounding an angular particle. We define dimensionless parameters—capillary, Fourier, Stark, Biot, and Peclet numbers—to characterize the competition between heat transfer within the particle, heat transfer at the particle rim, and capillary motion, for particles of different sizes. We apply this framework to the lightning case and constrain a maximum size for ash particles susceptible to surface tension‐driven rounding, as a function of lightning temperature and duration, and ash properties. The size limit agrees well with maximum sizes of glass spheres found in volcanic ash that has been subjected to lightning or experimental discharges, demonstrating that the approach that we develop can be used to obtain a first‐order estimate of lightning conditions in volcanic plumes. PMID:28781929

  16. Size limits for rounding of volcanic ash particles heated by lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W.; Genareau, Kimberly; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic ash particles can be remelted by the high temperatures induced in volcanic lightning discharges. The molten particles can round under surface tension then quench to produce glass spheres. Melting and rounding timescales for volcanic materials are strongly dependent on heating duration and peak temperature and are shorter for small particles than for large particles. Therefore, the size distribution of glass spheres recovered from ash deposits potentially record the short duration, high-temperature conditions of volcanic lightning discharges, which are hard to measure directly. We use a 1-D numerical solution to the heat equation to determine the timescales of heating and cooling of volcanic particles during and after rapid heating and compare these with the capillary timescale for rounding an angular particle. We define dimensionless parameters—capillary, Fourier, Stark, Biot, and Peclet numbers—to characterize the competition between heat transfer within the particle, heat transfer at the particle rim, and capillary motion, for particles of different sizes. We apply this framework to the lightning case and constrain a maximum size for ash particles susceptible to surface tension-driven rounding, as a function of lightning temperature and duration, and ash properties. The size limit agrees well with maximum sizes of glass spheres found in volcanic ash that has been subjected to lightning or experimental discharges, demonstrating that the approach that we develop can be used to obtain a first-order estimate of lightning conditions in volcanic plumes.

  17. Radial particle-size segregation during packing of particulates into cylindrical containers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; James, R.V.; Rubin, J.

    1973-01-01

    In a series of experiments, soil materials were placed in long cylindrical containers, using various packing procedures. Soil columns produced by deposition and simultaneous vibratory compaction were dense and axially uniform, but showed significant radial segregation of particle sizes. Similar results were obtained with deposition and simultaneous impact-type compaction when the impacts resulted in significant container "bouncing". The latter procedure, modified to minimize "bouncing" produced dense, uniform soil columns, showing little radial particle-size segregation. Other procedures tested (deposition alone and deposition followed by compaction) did not result in radial segregation, but produced columns showing either relatively low or axially nonuniform densities. Current data suggest that radial particle-size segregation is mainly due to vibration-induced particle circulation in which particles of various sizes have different circulation rates and paths. ?? 1973.

  18. Gaze-independent ERP-BCIs: augmenting performance through location-congruent bimodal stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Thurlings, Marieke E.; Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Van Erp, Jan B. F.; Werkhoven, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gaze-independent event-related potential (ERP) based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) yield relatively low BCI performance and traditionally employ unimodal stimuli. Bimodal ERP-BCIs may increase BCI performance due to multisensory integration or summation in the brain. An additional advantage of bimodal BCIs may be that the user can choose which modality or modalities to attend to. We studied bimodal, visual-tactile, gaze-independent BCIs and investigated whether or not ERP components’ tAUCs and subsequent classification accuracies are increased for (1) bimodal vs. unimodal stimuli; (2) location-congruent vs. location-incongruent bimodal stimuli; and (3) attending to both modalities vs. to either one modality. We observed an enhanced bimodal (compared to unimodal) P300 tAUC, which appeared to be positively affected by location-congruency (p = 0.056) and resulted in higher classification accuracies. Attending either to one or to both modalities of the bimodal location-congruent stimuli resulted in differences between ERP components, but not in classification performance. We conclude that location-congruent bimodal stimuli improve ERP-BCIs, and offer the user the possibility to switch the attended modality without losing performance. PMID:25249947

  19. Effect of particle size of parenteral suspensions on in vitro muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Gayle; Sauberan, Shauna L; Gatlin, Larry; Wisniecki, Peter; Shah, Jaymin

    2011-01-01

    Suspension particle size plays a key role in the release and stability of drugs for oral and parenteral formulations. However, the role of particle size in suspension formulations on tissue damage (myotoxicity) following intramuscular (IM) injection has not been systematically investigated. Myotoxicity was assessed by the release of cumulative creatine kinase (CCK) from the isolated extensor digitorium longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) rat muscles for selected suspensions of phenytoin, bupivicane and diazepam. Particle size effects on myotoxicity, independent of any specific drug, were also investigated using characterized non-dissolving polystyrene beads. Myotoxicity was quantitated by the cumulative release of creatine kinase (CCK) from these isolated muscles over 90 or 120 min. The relationship between particle size and myotoxicity was dependent upon the drug in these suspensions. Diazepam and phenytoin suspensions were found to be less myotoxic than bupivicaine. Using unmodified and carboxy modified polystyrene beads, an optimal particle size for reduced myotoxicity following IM injection ranges from approx. 500 nm to 1 µM. The relationship between myotoxicity of IM suspensions and particle size is dependent upon the particular drug and suspension particle size.

  20. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J., E-mail: bje@utk.edu

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated withmore » the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.« less

  1. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  2. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-03-02

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated.

  3. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-03-01

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated.

  4. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated. PMID:28252033

  5. Real-Time Measurement of Electronic Cigarette Aerosol Size Distribution and Metals Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mikheev, Vladimir B; Brinkman, Marielle C; Granville, Courtney A; Gordon, Sydney M; Clark, Pamela I

    2016-09-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing worldwide and is highest among both daily and nondaily smokers. E-cigarettes are perceived as a healthier alternative to combustible tobacco products, but their health risk factors have not yet been established, and one of them is lack of data on aerosol size generated by e-cigarettes. We applied a real-time, high-resolution aerosol differential mobility spectrometer to monitor the evolution of aerosol size and concentration during puff development. Particles generated by e-cigarettes were immediately delivered for analysis with minimal dilution and therefore with minimal sample distortion, which is critically important given the highly dynamic aerosol/vapor mixture inherent to e-cigarette emissions. E-cigarette aerosols normally exhibit a bimodal particle size distribution: nanoparticles (11-25nm count median diameter) and submicron particles (96-175nm count median diameter). Each mode has comparable number concentrations (10(7)-10(8) particles/cm(3)). "Dry puff" tests conducted with no e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) present in the e-cigarette tank demonstrated that under these conditions only nanoparticles were generated. Analysis of the bulk aerosol collected on the filter showed that e-cigarette emissions contained a variety of metals. E-cigarette aerosol size distribution is different from that of combustible tobacco smoke. E-cigarettes generate high concentrations of nanoparticles and their chemical content requires further investigation. Despite the small mass of nanoparticles, their toxicological impact could be significant. Toxic chemicals that are attached to the small nanoparticles may have greater adverse health effects than when attached to larger submicron particles. The e-cigarette aerosol size distribution is different from that of combustible tobacco smoke and typically exhibits a bimodal behavior with comparable number concentrations of nanoparticles and submicron particles. While vaping the e

  6. Morphology of single inhalable particle inside public transit biodiesel fueled bus.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    In an urban-transit bus, fueled by biodiesel in Toledo, Ohio, single inhalable particle samples in October 2008 were collected and detected by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Particle size analysis found bimodal distribution at 0.2 and 0.5 microm. The particle morphology was characterized by 14 different shape clusters: square, pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, agglomerate, sphere, triangle, oblong, strip, line or stick, and unknown, by quantitative order. The square particles were common in the samples. Round and triangle particles are more, and pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, decagon, strip, line or sticks are less. Agglomerate particles were found in abundance. The surface of most particles was coarse with a fractal edge that can provide a suitable chemical reaction bed in the polluted atmospheric environment. The three sorts of surface patterns of squares were smooth, semi-smooth, and coarse. The three sorts of square surface patterns represented the morphological characteristics of single inhalable particles in the air inside the bus in Toledo. The size and shape distribution results were compared to those obtained for a bus using ultra low sulfur diesel.

  7. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  8. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Somik; Le Bihan, Olivier; Fischer, Marc; Morgeneyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  9. Nature of alpha and beta particles in glycogen using molecular size distributions.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Mitchell A; Vilaplana, Francisco; Cave, Richard A; Stapleton, David; Gray-Weale, Angus A; Gilbert, Robert G

    2010-04-12

    Glycogen is a randomly hyperbranched glucose polymer. Complex branched polymers have two structural levels: individual branches and the way these branches are linked. Liver glycogen has a third level: supramolecular clusters of beta particles which form larger clusters of alpha particles. Size distributions of native glycogen were characterized using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to find the number and weight distributions and the size dependences of the number- and weight-average masses. These were fitted to two distinct randomly joined reference structures, constructed by random attachment of individual branches and as random aggregates of beta particles. The z-average size of the alpha particles in dimethylsulfoxide does not change significantly with high concentrations of LiBr, a solvent system that would disrupt hydrogen bonding. These data reveal that the beta particles are covalently bonded to form alpha particles through a hitherto unsuspected enzyme process, operative in the liver on particles above a certain size range.

  10. Mass-specific scattering coefficient for natural minerogenic particle populations: particle size distribution effect and closure analyses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Effler, Steve W

    2012-05-01

    The relationship between the particulate scattering coefficient (b(p)) and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM), as represented by the mass-specific scattering coefficient of particulates (b(p)*=b(p)/SPM), depends on particle size distribution (PSD). This dependence is quantified for minerogenic particle populations in this paper through calculations of b(p)* for common minerals as idealized populations (monodispersed spheres); contemporaneous measurements of b(p), SPM, and light-scattering attributes of mineral particles with scanning electron microscopy interfaced with automated image and x-ray analyses (SAX), for a connected stream-reservoir system where minerogenic particles dominate b(p); and estimates of b(p) and its size dependency (through SAX results-driven Mie theory calculations), particle volume concentration, and b(p)*. Modest changes in minerogenic PSDs are shown to result in substantial variations in b(p)*. Good closure of the SAX-based estimates of b(p) and particle volume concentration with bulk measurements is demonstrated. Converging relationships between b(p)* and particle size, developed from three approaches, were well described by power law expressions.

  11. Quantitative Reflectance Spectra of Solid Powders as a Function of Particle Size

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; ...

    2015-05-19

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance vs. particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for mostmore » wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate- and large-sized sample fractions; that is, > ~150 microns. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance vs. particle diameter.« less

  12. Quantitative Reflectance Spectra of Solid Powders as a Function of Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance vs. particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for mostmore » wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate- and large-sized sample fractions; that is, > ~150 microns. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance vs. particle diameter.« less

  13. Combinative Particle Size Reduction Technologies for the Production of Drug Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Jaime; Müller, Rainer H.; Möschwitzer, Jan P.

    2014-01-01

    Nanosizing is a suitable method to enhance the dissolution rate and therefore the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. The success of the particle size reduction processes depends on critical factors such as the employed technology, equipment, and drug physicochemical properties. High pressure homogenization and wet bead milling are standard comminution techniques that have been already employed to successfully formulate poorly soluble drugs and bring them to market. However, these techniques have limitations in their particle size reduction performance, such as long production times and the necessity of employing a micronized drug as the starting material. This review article discusses the development of combinative methods, such as the NANOEDGE, H 96, H 69, H 42, and CT technologies. These processes were developed to improve the particle size reduction effectiveness of the standard techniques. These novel technologies can combine bottom-up and/or top-down techniques in a two-step process. The combinative processes lead in general to improved particle size reduction effectiveness. Faster production of drug nanocrystals and smaller final mean particle sizes are among the main advantages. The combinative particle size reduction technologies are very useful formulation tools, and they will continue acquiring importance for the production of drug nanocrystals. PMID:26556191

  14. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  15. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  16. The origins of particle size effects in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Geoffrey C.

    1985-06-01

    Model calculations are presented to show how the fraction of atoms at the surface of small metal particles increases as their size diminishes in the range 10 to 2 nm. Such particles are prepared either by condensing atoms or aggregates from the vapour phase onto a support, or by chemical methods in the liquid phase, i.e. the traditional routes for preparing supported metal catalysts. The first group of methods leads to artificially pure materials in which the contact between metal and support is poor. The second group of methods leads to the introduction of impurities, to a greater variety of forms of particle, but to a generally firmer binding of metal to support: this permits electronic interactions between the components to occur. Recent literature on the chemisorptive and catalytic properties of metal particles, usually less than 10 nm in size, suggests that certain classes of reaction may be designated as "structure-insensitive" in that their rates depend only minimally on particle size, whereas others, denoted as "structure-sensitive", have rates which either increase or decrease with size. After discounting trivial effects, a hard core of results remains, demanding explanation. Although certain hydrocarbon transformations appear to need sites comprising more than a certain minimum number of atoms, it is thought that the electronic character of surface atoms plays a greater role than their geometric disposition.

  17. Phenol-formaldehyde carbon with ordered/disordered bimodal mesoporous structure as high-performance electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tingwei; Zhou, Min; Han, Guangshuai; Guan, Shiyou

    2013-11-01

    A novel phenol-formaldehyde carbon with ordered/disordered bimodal mesoporous structure is synthesized by the facile evaporation induced self-assembly strategy under a basic aqueous condition with SiO2 particles as template. The prepared bimodal mesoporous carbons (BMCs) are composed of ordered mesoporous and disordered mesoporous with diameter of about 3.5 nm and 7.0 nm, respectively. They can be employed as supercapacitor electrodes in H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte after the simple acid-treatment. BMC exhibits an exceptional specific capacitance of 344 F g-1 at the current density of 0.1 A g-1, although it has a relatively low surface area of 722 m2 g-1. And the BMC electrode displays an excellent cycling stability over 10,000 cycles.

  18. Particulate mercury in ambient air in Shanghai, China: Size-specific distribution, gas-particle partitioning, and association with carbonaceous composition.

    PubMed

    Han, Deming; Zhang, Jiaqi; Hu, Zihao; Ma, Yingge; Duan, Yusen; Han, Yan; Chen, Xiaojia; Zhou, Yong; Cheng, Jinping; Wang, Wenhua

    2018-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) has a complex atmospheric transformation cycle and acts as a global pollutant. Size-specific particle bound mercury (PBM) was implemented in different functional (industrial, urban and suburban) areas in Shanghai, China. The total concentration of 13-staged PBM (rang of 0.01-18.0 μm) varied of 99.0-611 pg/m 3 , with an average value of 318 ± 144 pg/m 3 . The Gaoqiao petrochemical industry (GQPI) site showed the highest concentrations, whereas the suburban Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) displayed the lowest. The PBM in nucleation, accumulation and coarse modes were 7.63-96.7, 69.5-455, and 9.43-176 pg/m 3 , respectively, and the fractions of 0.56-1.00 and 0.32-0.56 μm were the two most abundant. Both OC and EC displayed unimodal distribution patterns (peak of 0.56-1.00 μm) at GQPI, while bimodal distributions were observed at urban and suburban sites. Statistically positive correlations between the overall PBM and the corresponding PM and carbonaceous compounds (r = 0.38-0.54, p < 0.01), indicating their similar origins and OC/EC enhanced gaseous mercury forming PBM. The gas-particle partition model predicted gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) were 253 ± 133, 237 ± 122, and 257 ± 144 pg/m 3 for GQPI, SAES and SJTU, respectively. The particle proportions of divalent mercury in the fraction of 0.32-1.00 μm were substantial (>80%), but smaller (<50%) for nucleation and coarse modes. The fraction of 9.90-18.00 μm occupied nearly 50% of the overall dry deposition fluxes of mercury. These finding highlight the emissions from different mercury and OC/EC origins, caused different size-specific distributions of PBM, which further affect their gas-particle partitioning and dry deposition of mercury species. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Particle Size on the Attenuated Total Reflection Spectrum of Minerals.

    PubMed

    Udvardi, Beatrix; Kovács, István J; Fancsik, Tamás; Kónya, Péter; Bátori, Miklósné; Stercel, Ferenc; Falus, György; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on particle size effect on monomineralic powders recorded using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Six particle size fractions of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and dolomite were prepared (<2, 2-4, 4-8, 8-16, 16-32, and 32-63 µm). It is found that the width, intensity, and area of bands in the ATR FT-IR spectra of minerals have explicit dependence on the particle size. As particle size increases, the intensity and area of IR bands usually decrease while the width of bands increases. The band positions usually shifted to higher wavenumbers with decreasing particle size. Infrared spectra of minerals are the most intensive in the particle size fraction of 2-4 µm. However, if the particle size is very small (<2 µm), due to the wavelength and penetration depth of the IR light, intensity decreases. Therefore, the quantity of very fine-grained minerals may be underestimated compared to the coarser phases. A nonlinear regression analysis of the data indicated that the average coefficients and indices of the power trend line equation imply a very simplistic relationship between median particle diameter and absorbance at a given wavenumber. It is concluded that when powder samples with substantially different particle size are compared, as in regression analysis for modal predictions using ATR FT-IR, it is also important to report the grain size distribution or surface area of samples. The band area of water (3000-3620 cm -1 ) is similar in each mineral fraction, except for the particles below 2 µm. It indicates that the finest particles could have disproportionately more water adsorbed on their larger surface area. Thus, these higher wavenumbers of the ATR FT-IR spectra may be more sensitive to this spectral interference if the number of particles below 2 µm is considerable. It is also concluded that at least a proportion of the moisture could be very adhesive to the particles due to the band

  20. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  1. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  2. Production of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. L.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.

    1984-01-01

    The research program achieved two objectives: (1) it has refined and extended the experimental techniques for preparing monodisperse latexes in quantity on the ground up to a particle diameter of 10 microns; and (2) it has demonstrated that a microgravity environment can be used to grow monodisperse latexes to larger sizes, where the limitations in size have yet to be defined. The experimental development of the monodisperse latex reactor (MLR) and the seeded emulsion polymerizations carried out in the laboratory prototype of the flight hardware, as a function of the operational parameters is discussed. The emphasis is directed towards the measurement, interpretation, and modeling of the kinetics of seeded emulsion polymerization and successive seeded emulsion polymerization. The recipe development of seeded emulsion polymerization as a function of particle size is discussed. The equilibrium swelling of latex particles with monomers was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Extensive studies are reported on both the type and concentration of initiators, surfactants, and inhibitors, which eventually led to the development of the flight recipes. The experimental results of the flight experiments are discussed, as well as the experimental development of inhibition of seeded emulsion polymerization in terms of time of inhibition and the effect of inhibitors on the kinetics of polymerization.

  3. Assessment of air sampling methods and size distribution of virus-laden aerosols in outbreaks in swine and poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C; Goyal, Sagar; Olson, Bernard A; Alba, Anna; Davies, Peter R; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2017-05-01

    Swine and poultry viruses, such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), are economically important pathogens that can spread via aerosols. The reliability of methods for quantifying particle-associated viruses as well as the size distribution of aerosolized particles bearing these viruses under field conditions are not well documented. We compared the performance of 2 size-differentiating air samplers in disease outbreaks that occurred in swine and poultry facilities. Both air samplers allowed quantification of particles by size, and measured concentrations of PRRSV, PEDV, and HPAIV stratified by particle size both within and outside swine and poultry facilities. All 3 viruses were detectable in association with aerosolized particles. Proportions of positive sampling events were 69% for PEDV, 61% for HPAIV, and 8% for PRRSV. The highest virus concentrations were found with PEDV, followed by HPAIV and PRRSV. Both air collectors performed equally for the detection of total virus concentration. For all 3 viruses, higher numbers of RNA copies were associated with larger particles; however, a bimodal distribution of particles was observed in the case of PEDV and HPAIV.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic and non-magnetic core-shell polyepoxide micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution.

    PubMed

    Omer-Mizrahi, Melany; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-01-15

    Core polystyrene microspheres of narrow size distribution were prepared by dispersion polymerization of styrene in a mixture of ethanol and 2-methoxy ethanol. Uniform polyglycidyl methacrylate/polystyrene core-shell micrometer-sized particles were prepared by emulsion polymerization at 73 degrees C of glycidyl methacrylate in the presence of the core polystyrene microspheres. Core-shell particles with different properties (size, surface morphology and composition) have been prepared by changing various parameters belonging to the above seeded emulsion polymerization process, e.g., volumes of the monomer glycidyl methacrylate and the crosslinker monomer ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Magnetic Fe(3)O(4)/polyglycidyl methacrylate/polystyrene micrometer-sized particles were prepared by coating the former core-shell particles with magnetite nanoparticles via a nucleation and growth mechanism. Characterization of the various particles has been accomplished by routine methods such as light microscopy, SEM, FTIR, BET and magnetic measurements.

  5. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    Treesearch

    S Hosseini; L. Qi; D. Cocker; D. Weise; A. Miller; M. Shrivastava; J.W. Miller; S. Mahalingam; M. Princevac; H. Jung

    2010-01-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in...

  6. Using portable particle sizing instrumentation to rapidly measure the penetration of fine and ultrafine particles in unoccupied residences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Stephens, B

    2017-01-01

    Much of human exposure to particulate matter of outdoor origin occurs inside buildings, particularly in residences. The particle penetration factor through leaks in a building's exterior enclosure assembly is a key parameter that governs the infiltration of outdoor particles. However, experimental data for size-resolved particle penetration factors in real buildings, as well as penetration factors for fine particles less than 2.5 μm (PM 2.5 ) and ultrafine particles less than 100 nm (UFPs), remain limited, in part because of previous limitations in instrumentation and experimental methods. Here, we report on the development and application of a modified test method that utilizes portable particle sizing instrumentation to measure size-resolved infiltration factors and envelope penetration factors for 0.01-2.5 μm particles, which are then used to estimate penetration factors for integral measures of UFPs and PM 2.5 . Eleven replicate measurements were made in an unoccupied apartment unit in Chicago, IL to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the test procedure and solution methods. Mean estimates of size-resolved penetration factors ranged from 0.41 ± 0.14 to 0.73 ± 0.05 across the range of measured particle sizes, while mean estimates of penetration factors for integral measures of UFPs and PM 2.5 were 0.67 ± 0.05 and 0.73 ± 0.05, respectively. Average relative uncertainties for all particle sizes/classes were less than 20%. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Bimodal metal micro-nanopowders for powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervikov, Aleksandr; Rodkevich, Nikolay; Glazkova, Elena; Lerner, Marat

    2017-12-01

    The paper studies a bimodal metal powder composition designed to prepare feedstock for powder injection molding, as well as microstructure and porosity of sintered pats. Two kinds of metal powder compositions are used, in particular, a mixture of micro- and nanopowders and a bimodal powder prepared with dispersion of steel wire. The feedstock is prepared by mixing a bimodal metal powder composition with acetylacetone and paraffin wax. The microstructure of the debound parts is observed by scanning electron microscopy. The sintered parts are characterized by density measurements and metallographic analysis. The technique of the metal powder composition proves to affect the characteristics of sintered parts. Nanoparticles are shown in the interstitial spaces among the microparticles upon mixing micro- and nanopowders, but the regular distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of microparticles is observed in the bimodal powder providing the reduction of the porosity of sintered parts and increasing the density to the proper density of steel.

  8. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  9. Light absorption by coated nano-sized carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangl, Martin; Kocifaj, Miroslav; Videen, Gorden; Horvath, Helmuth

    The optical properties of strongly absorbing soot particles coated by transparent material are investigated experimentally and described by several modeling approaches. Soot is produced by spark discharge and passed through a Sinclair-La Mer generator where non-absorbing carnauba wax is condensed onto it to obtain internal soot-wax mixtures in a controlled way. Measurements of the extinction and volume scattering coefficient show an amplification of absorption by a factor of approximately 1.8. This behavior was described by different approaches of internally mixed materials for the modal diameters of the measured size distributions: concentric-sphere model, effective medium approximations and heterogeneous ellipsoids. The concentric-sphere model describes the absorption increase quantitatively; and hence, it is chosen to be applied to the entire particle population in the size distribution. The growth of the soot particles by condensing wax is described by a simplified growth model to estimate the different contributions of several soot particle diameters to the overall absorption cross-section.

  10. Light scattering by lunar-like particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Jay D.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental input to models of light scattering from planetary regoliths is the mean phase function of the regolith particles. Using the known size distribution for typical lunar soils, the mean phase function and mean linear polarization for a regolith volume element of spherical particles of any composition were calculated from Mie theory. The two contour plots given here summarize the changes in the mean phase function and linear polarization with changes in the real part of the complex index of refraction, n - ik, for k equals 0.01, the visible wavelength 0.55 micrometers, and the particle size distribution of the typical mature lunar soil 72141. A second figure is a similar index-phase surface, except with k equals 0.1. The index-phase surfaces from this survey are a first order description of scattering by lunar-like regoliths of spherical particles of arbitrary composition. They form the basis of functions that span a large range of parameter-space.

  11. Photometric imaging in particle size measurement and surface visualization.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Niklas

    2011-09-30

    The aim of this paper is to give an insight into photometric particle sizing approaches, which differ from the typical particle size measurement of dispersed particles. These approaches can often be advantageous especially for samples that are moist or cohesive, when dispersion of particles is difficult or sometimes impossible. The main focus of this paper is in the use of photometric stereo imaging. The technique allows the reconstruction of three-dimensional images of objects using multiple light sources in illumination. The use of photometric techniques is demonstrated in at-line measurement of granules and on-line measurement during granulation and dry milling. Also, surface visualization and roughness measurements are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Particle size distributions in chondritic meteorites: Evidence for pre-planetesimal histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. I.; Cuzzi, J. N.; McCain, K. A.; Cato, M. J.; Christoffersen, P. A.; Fisher, K. R.; Srinivasan, P.; Tait, A. W.; Olson, D. M.; Scargle, J. D.

    2018-07-01

    Magnesium-rich silicate chondrules and calcium-, aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) are fundamental components of primitive chondritic meteorites. It has been suggested that concentration of these early-formed particles by nebular sorting processes may lead to accretion of planetesimals, the planetary bodies that represent the building blocks of the terrestrial planets. In this case, the size distributions of the particles may constrain the accretion process. Here we present new particle size distribution data for Northwest Africa 5717, a primitive ordinary chondrite (ungrouped 3.05) and the well-known carbonaceous chondrite Allende (CV3). Instead of the relatively narrow size distributions obtained in previous studies (Ebel et al., 2016; Friedrich et al., 2015; Paque and Cuzzi, 1997, and references therein), we observed broad size distributions for all particle types in both meteorites. Detailed microscopic image analysis of Allende shows differences in the size distributions of chondrule subtypes, but collectively these subpopulations comprise a composite "chondrule" size distribution that is similar to the broad size distribution found for CAIs. Also, we find accretionary 'dust' rims on only a subset (∼15-20%) of the chondrules contained in Allende, which indicates that subpopulations of chondrules experienced distinct histories prior to planetary accretion. For the rimmed subset, we find positive correlation between rim thickness and chondrule size. The remarkable similarity between the size distributions of various subgroups of particles, both with and without fine grained rims, implies a common size sorting process. Chondrite classification schemes, astrophysical disk models that predict a narrow chondrule size population and/or a common localized formation event, and conventional particle analysis methods must all be critically reevaluated. We support the idea that distinct "lithologies" in NWA 5717 are nebular aggregates of chondrules. If ≥cm-sized

  13. Particle Size Distributions in Chondritic Meteorites: Evidence for Pre-Planetesimal Histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. I.; Cuzzi, J. N.; McCain, K. A.; Cato, M. J.; Christoffersen, P. A.; Fisher, K. R.; Srinivasan, P.; Tait, A. W.; Olson, D. M.; Scargle, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    Magnesium-rich silicate chondrules and calcium-, aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) are fundamental components of primitive chondritic meteorites. It has been suggested that concentration of these early-formed particles by nebular sorting processes may lead to accretion of planetesimals, the planetary bodies that represent the building blocks of the terrestrial planets. In this case, the size distributions of the particles may constrain the accretion process. Here we present new particle size distribution data for Northwest Africa 5717, a primitive ordinary chondrite (ungrouped 3.05) and the well-known carbonaceous chondrite Allende (CV3). Instead of the relatively narrow size distributions obtained in previous studies (Ebel et al., 2016; Friedrich et al., 2015; Paque and Cuzzi, 1997, and references therein), we observed broad size distributions for all particle types in both meteorites. Detailed microscopic image analysis of Allende shows differences in the size distributions of chondrule subtypes, but collectively these subpopulations comprise a composite "chondrule" size distribution that is similar to the broad size distribution found for CAIs. Also, we find accretionary 'dust' rims on only a subset (approximately 15-20 percent) of the chondrules contained in Allende, which indicates that subpopulations of chondrules experienced distinct histories prior to planetary accretion. For the rimmed subset, we find positive correlation between rim thickness and chondrule size. The remarkable similarity between the size distributions of various subgroups of particles, both with and without fine grained rims, implies a common size sorting process. Chondrite classification schemes, astrophysical disk models that predict a narrow chondrule size population and/or a common localized formation event, and conventional particle analysis methods must all be critically reevaluated. We support the idea that distinct "lithologies" in NWA 5717 are nebular aggregates of

  14. Size, shape and flow characterization of ground wood chip and ground wood pellet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, Hamid; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, Anthony

    Size, shape and density of biomass particles influence their transportation, fluidization, rates of drying and thermal decomposition. Pelleting wood particles increases the particle density and reduces the variability of physical properties among biomass particles. In this study, pine chips prepared for pulping and commercially produced pine pellets were ground in a hammer mill using grinder screens of 3.2, 6.3, 12.7 and 25.4mmperforations. Pellets consumed about 7 times lower specific grinding energy than chips to produce the same size of particles. Grinding pellets produced the smaller particles with narrower size distribution than grinding chips. Derived shape factors in digital image analysismore » showed that chip particles were rectangular and had the aspect ratios about one third of pellet particles. Pellet particles were more circular shape. The mechanical sieving underestimated the actual particle size and did not represent the size of particles correctly. Instead, digital imaging is preferred. Angle of repose and compressibility tests represented the flow properties of ground particles. Pellet particles made a less compacted bulk, had lower cohesion and did flow easier in a pile of particles. In conclusion, particle shape affected the flow properties more than particle size« less

  15. Size, shape and flow characterization of ground wood chip and ground wood pellet particles

    DOE PAGES

    Rezaei, Hamid; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, Anthony; ...

    2016-07-11

    Size, shape and density of biomass particles influence their transportation, fluidization, rates of drying and thermal decomposition. Pelleting wood particles increases the particle density and reduces the variability of physical properties among biomass particles. In this study, pine chips prepared for pulping and commercially produced pine pellets were ground in a hammer mill using grinder screens of 3.2, 6.3, 12.7 and 25.4mmperforations. Pellets consumed about 7 times lower specific grinding energy than chips to produce the same size of particles. Grinding pellets produced the smaller particles with narrower size distribution than grinding chips. Derived shape factors in digital image analysismore » showed that chip particles were rectangular and had the aspect ratios about one third of pellet particles. Pellet particles were more circular shape. The mechanical sieving underestimated the actual particle size and did not represent the size of particles correctly. Instead, digital imaging is preferred. Angle of repose and compressibility tests represented the flow properties of ground particles. Pellet particles made a less compacted bulk, had lower cohesion and did flow easier in a pile of particles. In conclusion, particle shape affected the flow properties more than particle size« less

  16. Effect of four different size reduction methods on the particle size, solubility enhancement and physical stability of nicergoline nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Martena, Valentina; Shegokar, Ranjita; Di Martino, Piera; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nicergoline, a poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient, possesses vaso-active properties which causes peripheral and central vasodilatation. In this study, nanocrystals of nicergoline were prepared in an aqueous solution of polysorbate 80 (nanosuspension) by using four different laboratory scale size reduction techniques: high pressure homogenization (HPH), bead milling (BM) and combination techniques (high pressure homogenization followed by bead milling HPH + BM, and bead milling followed by high pressure homogenization BM + HPH). Nanocrystals were investigated regarding to their mean particles size, zeta potential and particle dissolution. A short term physical stability study on nanocrystals stored at three different temperatures (4, 20 and 40 °C) was performed to evaluate the tendency to change in particle size, aggregation and zeta potential. The size reduction technique and the process parameters like milling time, number of homogenization cycles and pressure greatly affected the size of nanocrystals. Among the techniques used, the combination techniques showed superior and consistent particle size reduction compared to the other two methods, HPH + BM and BM + HPH giving nanocrystals of a mean particle size of 260 and 353 nm, respectively. The particle dissolution was increased for any nanocrystals samples, but it was particularly increased by HPH and combination techniques. Independently to the production method, nicergoline nanocrystals showed slight increase in particle size over the time, but remained below 500 nm at 20 °C and refrigeration conditions.

  17. Endotoxin in Size-Separated Metal Working Fluid Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Lindgren, Åsa; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2016-08-01

    Patients with airway symptoms working in metal working industries are increasing, despite efforts to improve the environmental air surrounding the machines. Our aim was to analyse the amount of endotoxin in size-separated airborne particles of metal working fluid (MWF) aerosol, by using the personal sampler Sioutas cascade impactor, to compare filter types, and to compare the concentration of airborne endotoxin to that of the corresponding MWFs. In a pilot field study, aerosols were collected in two separate machine halls on totally 10 occasions, using glass fibre and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters in parallel at each station. Airborne endotoxin was distributed over all size fractions. While a major part was found in the largest size fraction (72%, 2.5-10 µm), up to 8% of the airborne endotoxin was detected in the smallest size fraction (<0.25 µm). Comparing the efficiency of the filter types, a significantly higher median endotoxin level was found with glass fibres filters collecting the largest particle-size fraction (1.2-fold) and with PTFE filters collecting the smallest ones (5-fold). The levels of endotoxin in the size-separated airborne particle fractions correlated to those of the MWFs supporting the aerosol-generating machines. Our study indicates that a significant part of inhalable aerosols of MWFs consists of endotoxin-containing particles below the size of intact bacteria, and thus small enough to readily reach the deepest part of the lung. Combined with other chemical irritants of the MWF, exposure to MWF aerosols containing endotoxin pose a risk to respiratory health problems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  18. Dealing with non-unique and non-monotonic response in particle sizing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Phil

    2017-04-01

    A number of instruments used as de-facto standards for measuring particle size distributions are actually incapable of uniquely determining the size of an individual particle. This is due to non-unique or non-monotonic response functions. Optical particle counters have non monotonic response due to oscillations in the Mie response curves, especially for large aerosol and small cloud droplets. Scanning mobility particle sizers respond identically to two particles where the ratio of particle size to particle charge is approximately the same. Images of two differently sized cloud or precipitation particles taken by an optical array probe can have similar dimensions or shadowed area depending upon where they are in the imaging plane. A number of methods exist to deal with these issues, including assuming that positive and negative errors cancel, smoothing response curves, integrating regions in measurement space before conversion to size space and matrix inversion. Matrix inversion (also called kernel inversion) has the advantage that it determines the size distribution which best matches the observations, given specific information about the instrument (a matrix which specifies the probability that a particle of a given size will be measured in a given instrument size bin). In this way it maximises use of the information in the measurements. However this technique can be confused by poor counting statistics which can cause erroneous results and negative concentrations. Also an effective method for propagating uncertainties is yet to be published or routinely implemented. Her we present a new alternative which overcomes these issues. We use Bayesian methods to determine the probability that a given size distribution is correct given a set of instrument data and then we use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to sample this many dimensional probability distribution function to determine the expectation and (co)variances - hence providing a best guess and an uncertainty for

  19. Digital image processing of nanometer-size metal particles on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soria, F.; Artal, P.; Bescos, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The task of differentiating very small metal aggregates supported on amorphous films from the phase contrast image features inherently stemming from the support is extremely difficult in the nanometer particle size range. Digital image processing was employed to overcome some of the ambiguities in evaluating such micrographs. It was demonstrated that such processing allowed positive particle detection and a limited degree of statistical size analysis even for micrographs where by bare eye examination the distribution between particles and erroneous substrate features would seem highly ambiguous. The smallest size class detected for Pd/C samples peaks at 0.8 nm. This size class was found in various samples prepared under different evaporation conditions and it is concluded that these particles consist of 'a magic number' of 13 atoms and have cubooctahedral or icosahedral crystal structure.

  20. Particle mobility size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A. M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J. A.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Williams, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R. M.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C. S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; de Leeuw, G.

    2010-12-01

    Particle mobility size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide application in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. This article results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research). Under controlled laboratory conditions, the number size distribution from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. Instruments with identical design agreed within ±3% in the peak number concentration when all settings were done carefully. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry for atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations are given for atmospheric measurements including continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyser. In cooperation with EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Program), a new uniform data structure was introduced for saving and disseminating the data within EMEP. This structure contains three levels: raw data, processed data, and final particle size distributions. Importantly, we recommend reporting raw measurements including all relevant instrument parameters as well as a complete documentation on all data transformation and correction steps. These technical and data structure standards aim to enhance the quality of long-term size distribution measurements, their comparability between

  1. How do dairy cows chew?--particle size analysis of selected feeds with different particle length distributions and of respective ingested bolus particles.

    PubMed

    Schadt, I; Ferguson, J D; Azzaro, G; Petriglieri, R; Caccamo, M; Van Soest, P; Licitra, G

    2012-08-01

    Not only feed but also respective bolus particle size could alter diet efficiency and cow performance. The objective of this project was to characterize particle size of selected feeds and respective swallowed boli. Feed samples included 6 different particle length rye grass hay samples, 1 grass silage, 1 corn silage, and 1 total mixed ration (TMR). Rye grass hay samples consisted of long hay and chopped hay particles retained on the 19- (19_PSPS hay), 8- (8_PSPS hay), and 1.18-mm (1.18_PSPS hay) Penn State Particle Separator (PSPS) screens and those collected on the pan (PSPS_pan hay). A sixth hay treatment was rye grass forage cut at 50-mm lengths and dried to hay (50-mm hay). Treatments were offered to 4 nonlactating and 4 lactating cows following rumen evacuation. Swallowed boli were collected and the number of chews per gram of ingested feed dry matter was determined. Feed and bolus particles of lengths ≥5mm were collected on a 1.6-mm screen using a horizontal wet sieving technique. This cut point was chosen, as the literature suggests that most fecal particles are shorter than 5mm. Dry matter proportions on this screen (PROP_1.6) were determined and particle lengths of retained particles were measured by image analysis. Mean particle lengths (ML) were calculated considering particles ≥5mm in length. Boli of long hay, of 19_PSPS hay, of 8_PSPS hay, and of 50-mm hay had similar ML of 10 to 11mm. Bolus PROP_1.6 were also similar between these treatments, ranging from 0.54 to 0.69. Bolus particle lengths and distributions of these treatments were not related to respective hay particles. Bolus of 1.18_PSPS hay had PROP_1.6 of 0.51 and a smaller ML of 8mm. The PSPS_pan hay had PROP_1.6 of only 0.33, but was still chewed intensely. Apparently, little particle size reduction occurred when cows ate the TMR or the silages. Feed and respective bolus PROP_1.6 were as follows: 0.66 and 0.59 in grass silage, 0.52 and 0.55 in corn silage, and 0.44 and 0.38 in the TMR

  2. Determining suspended sediment particle size information from acoustical and optical backscatter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, James F.; Irish, James D.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Agrawal, Yogesh C.

    1994-08-01

    During the winter of 1990-1991 an Acoustic BackScatter System (ABSS), five Optical Backscatterance Sensors (OBSs) and a Laser In Situ Settling Tube (LISST) were deployed in 90 m of water off the California coast for 3 months as part of the Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) experiment. By looking at sediment transport events with both optical (OBS) and acoustic (ABSS) sensors, one obtains information about the size of the particles transported as well as their concentration. Specifically, we employ two different methods of estimating "average particle size". First, we use vertical scattering intensity profile slopes (acoustical and optical) to infer average particle size using a Rouse profile model of the boundary layer and a Stokes law fall velocity assumption. Secondly, we use a combination of optics and acoustics to form a multifrequency (two frequency) inverse for the average particle size. These results are compared to independent observations from the LISST instrument, which measures the particle size spectrum in situ using laser diffraction techniques. Rouse profile based inversions for particle size are found to be in good agreement with the LISST results except during periods of transport event initiation, when the Rouse profile is not expected to be valid. The two frequency inverse, which is boundary layer model independent, worked reasonably during all periods, with average particle sizes correlating well with the LISST estimates. In order to further corroborate the particle size inverses from the acoustical and optical instruments, we also examined size spectra obtained from in situ sediment grab samples and water column samples (suspended sediments), as well as laboratory tank experiments using STRESS sediments. Again, good agreement is noted. The laboratory tank experiment also allowed us to study the acoustical and optical scattering law characteristics of the STRESS sediments. It is seen that, for optics, using the cross

  3. Measurements of ultrafine particles from a gas-turbine burning biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Allouis, C.; Beretta, F.; Minutolo, P.

    2010-04-15

    Measurements of ultrafine particles have been performed at the exhaust of a low emission microturbine for power generation. This device has been fuelled with liquid fuels, including a commercial diesel oil, a mixture of the diesel oil with a biodiesel and kerosene, and tested under different loads. Primarily attention has been focused on the measurements of the size distribution functions of the particles emitted from the system by using particle differential mobility analysis. A bimodal size distribution function of the particle emitted has been found in all the examined conditions. Burning diesel oil, the first mode of the size distributionmore » function of the combustion-formed particles is centered at around 2-3 nm, whereas the second mode is centered at about 20-30 nm. The increase of the turbine load and the addition of 50% of biodiesel has not caused changes in the shape of size distribution of the particles. A slightly decrease of the amount of particle formed has been found. By using kerosene the amount of emitted particles increases of more than one order of magnitude. Also the shape of the size distribution function changes with the first mode shifted towards larger particles of the order of 8-10 nm but with a lower emission of larger 20-30 nm particles. Overall, in this conditions, the mass concentration of particles is increased respect to the diesel oil operation. Particle sizes measured with the diesel oil have been compared with the results on a diesel engine operated in the same power conditions and with the same fuel. Measurements have showed that the mean sizes of the formed particles do not change in the two combustion systems. However, diesel engine emits a number concentration of particles more than two orders of magnitude higher in the same conditions of power and with the same fuel. By running the engine in more premixed-like conditions, the size distribution function of the particles approaches that measured by burning kerosene in the

  4. Effect of Particle Size and Impact Velocity on Collision Behaviors Between Nano-Scale TiN Particles: MD Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hai-Long; Hu, Xiao-Zhen; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-06-01

    Inter-particle bonding formation which determines qualities of nano-scale ceramic coatings is influenced by particle collision behaviors during high velocity collision processes. In this study, collision behaviors between nano-scale TiN particles with different diameters were illuminated by using Molecular Dynamics simulation through controlling impact velocities. Results show that nano-scale TiN particles exhibit three states depending on particle sizes and impact velocities, i.e., bonding, bonding with localized fracturing, and rebounding. These TiN particles states are summarized into a parameter selection map providing an overview of the conditions in terms of particle sizes and velocities. Microstructure results show that localized atoms displacement and partial fracture around the impact region are main reasons for bonding formation of nano-scale ceramic particles, which shows differences from conventional particles refining and amorphization. A relationship between the adhesion energy and the rebound energy is established to understand bonding formation mechanism for nano-scale TiN particle collision. Results show that the energy relationship is depended on the particle sizes and impact velocities, and nano-scale ceramic particles can be bonded together as the adhesion energy being higher than the rebound energy.

  5. Laser Doppler spectrometer method of particle sizing. [for air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, F. N.

    1976-01-01

    A spectrometer for the detection of airborne particulate pollution in the submicron size range is described. In this device, airborne particles are accelerated through a supersonic nozzle, with different sizes achieving different velocities in the gas flow. Information about the velocities of the accelerated particles is obtained with a laser-heterodyne optical system through the Doppler shift of light scattered from the particles. Detection is accomplished by means of a photomultiplier. Nozzle design and signal processing techniques are also discussed.

  6. Experimental Effects on IR Reflectance Spectra: Particle Size and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Beiswenger, Toya N.; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    For geologic and extraterrestrial samples it is known that both particle size and morphology can have strong effects on the species’ infrared reflectance spectra. Due to such effects, the reflectance spectra cannot be predicted from the absorption coefficients alone. This is because reflectance is both a surface as well as a bulk phenomenon, incorporating both dispersion as well as absorption effects. The same spectral features can even be observed as either a maximum or minimum. The complex effects depend on particle size and preparation, as well as the relative amplitudes of the optical constants n and k, i.e. the realmore » and imaginary components of the complex refractive index. While somewhat oversimplified, upward-going amplitude in the reflectance spectrum usually result from surface scattering, i.e. rays that have been reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. While the effects are well known, we report seminal measurements of reflectance along with quantified particle size of the samples, the sizing obtained from optical microscopy measurements. The size measurements are correlated with the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. We report results for both sodium sulfate Na2SO4 as well as ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4; the optical constants have been measured for (NH4)2SO4. To go a step further from the field to the laboratory we explore our understanding of particle size effects on reflectance spectra in the field using standoff detection. This has helped identify weaknesses and strengths in detection using standoff distances of up 160 meters away from the Target. The

  7. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  8. Size exclusion chromatography with superficially porous particles.

    PubMed

    Schure, Mark R; Moran, Robert E

    2017-01-13

    A comparison is made using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) of synthetic polymers between fully porous particles (FPPs) and superficially porous particles (SPPs) with similar particle diameters, pore sizes and equal flow rates. Polystyrene molecular weight standards with a mobile phase of tetrahydrofuran are utilized for all measurements conducted with standard HPLC equipment. Although it is traditionally thought that larger pore volume is thermodynamically advantageous in SEC for better separations, SPPs have kinetic advantages and these will be shown to compensate for the loss in pore volume compared to FPPs. The comparison metrics include the elution range (smaller with SPPs), the plate count (larger for SPPs), the rate production of theoretical plates (larger for SPPs) and the specific resolution (larger with FPPs). Advantages to using SPPs for SEC are discussed such that similar separations can be conducted faster using SPPs. SEC using SPPs offers similar peak capacities to that using FPPs but with faster operation. This also suggests that SEC conducted in the second dimension of a two-dimensional liquid chromatograph may benefit with reduced run time and with equivalently reduced peak width making SPPs advantageous for sampling the first dimension by the second dimension separator. Additional advantages are discussed for biomolecules along with a discussion of optimization criteria for size-based separations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Generating Color from Polydisperse, Near Micron-Sized TiO2 Particles.

    PubMed

    Alam, Al-Mahmnur; Baek, Kyungnae; Son, Jieun; Pei, Yi-Rong; Kim, Dong Ha; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hyun, Jerome K

    2017-07-19

    Single particle Mie calculations of near micron-sized TiO 2 particles predict strong light scattering dominating the visible range that would give rise to a white appearance. We demonstrate that a polydisperse collection of these "white" particles can result in the generation of visible colors through ensemble scattering. The weighted averaging of the scattering over the particle size distribution modifies the sharp, multiple, high order scattering modes from individual particles into broad variations in the collective extinction. These extinction variations are apparent as visible colors for particles suspended in organic solvent at low concentration, or for a monolayer of particles supported on a transparent substrate viewed in front of a white light source. We further exploit the color variations on optical sensitivity to the surrounding environment to promote micron-sized TiO 2 particles as stable and robust agents for detecting the optical index of homogeneous media with high contrast sensitivities. Such distribution-modulated scattering properties provide TiO 2 particles an intriguing opportunity to impart color and optical sensitivity to their widespread electronic and chemical platforms such as antibacterial windows, catalysis, photocatalysis, optical sensors, and photovoltaics.

  10. A technique to measure the size of particles in laser Doppler velocimetry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    A method to measure the size of particles in Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) applications is discussed. Since in LDV the velocity of the flow is assocated with the velocity of particles to establish how well they follow the flow, in the present method the interferometric probe volume is surrounded by a larger beam of different polarization or wavelength. The particle size is then measured from the absolute intensity scattered from the large beam by particles crossing the fringes. Experiments using polystrene particles between 1.1 and 3.3 microns and larger glass beads are reported. It is shown that the method has an excellent size resolution and its accuracy is better than 10% for the particle size studied.

  11. LDL Particle Size and Reactive Oxygen Metabolites in Dyslipidemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Sakane, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) which has a small LDL particle size with greater susceptibility to oxidation is regarded as a risk marker for cardiovascular disease. The diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) test has recently been introduced as an oxidative stress-related marker in the clinic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the mean LDL particle size and the oxidative stress status as evaluated by the d-ROMs in dyslipidemic patients. Methods: The study included 278 dyslipidemic patients (121 male and 157 female, mean age, 60 years). Clinical data including the conventional atherosclerotic risk factors in addition to the mean LDL particle size measured with the gel electrophoresis and the d-ROMs were collected. Results: Male patients had a significantly smaller mean LDL particle size than females (262.2 ± 7.5 [SD] vs. 264.3 ± 6.7 Å, P<0.05), while female patients had a significantly higher d-ROMs level than males (318 ± 68 vs. 350 ± 72 U. Carr., P<0.01). A multiple regression analysis revealed that there was an independent, significant, and inverse correlation between the mean LDL particle size and the d-ROMs (β=−0.19, P<0.05). Conclusions: These findings of the co-existence of both markers suggest that sdLDL and oxidative stress can be cooperative in atherogenesis, possibly leading to the incidence of CVD, in dyslipidemic patients. PMID:22448308

  12. LDL Particle Size and Reactive Oxygen Metabolites in Dyslipidemic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Sakane, Naoki

    2012-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) which has a small LDL particle size with greater susceptibility to oxidation is regarded as a risk marker for cardiovascular disease. The diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) test has recently been introduced as an oxidative stress-related marker in the clinic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the mean LDL particle size and the oxidative stress status as evaluated by the d-ROMs in dyslipidemic patients. The study included 278 dyslipidemic patients (121 male and 157 female, mean age, 60 years). Clinical data including the conventional atherosclerotic risk factors in addition to the mean LDL particle size measured with the gel electrophoresis and the d-ROMs were collected. Male patients had a significantly smaller mean LDL particle size than females (262.2 ± 7.5 [SD] vs. 264.3 ± 6.7 Å, P<0.05), while female patients had a significantly higher d-ROMs level than males (318 ± 68 vs. 350 ± 72 U. Carr., P<0.01). A multiple regression analysis revealed that there was an independent, significant, and inverse correlation between the mean LDL particle size and the d-ROMs (β=-0.19, P<0.05). These findings of the co-existence of both markers suggest that sdLDL and oxidative stress can be cooperative in atherogenesis, possibly leading to the incidence of CVD, in dyslipidemic patients.

  13. Size-dependent microstructures in rapidly solidified uranium-niobium powder particles

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Hsiung, Luke L.; Park, Jong M.; ...

    2016-06-14

    The microstructures of rapidly solidified U-6wt%Nb powder particles synthesized by centrifugal atomization were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Observed variations in microstructure are related to particle sizes. All of the powder particles exhibited a two-zone microstructure. The formation of this two-zone microstructure is described by a transition from solidification controlled by internal heat flow and high solidification rate during recalescence (micro-segregation-free or partitionless growth) to solidification controlled by external heat flow with slower solidification rates (dendritic growth with solute redistribution). The extent of partitionless solidification increased with decreasing particle size due to larger undercoolings in smallermore » particles prior to solidification. The metastable phases that formed are related to variations in Nb concentration across the particles. Lastly, the microstructures of the powders were heavily twinned.« less

  14. Size-controlled synthesis, surface functionalization, and biological applications of thiol-organosilica particles.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Michihiro; Ozaki, Shuji; Abe, Masahiro; Doi, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio; Ishimura, Kazunori

    2010-08-01

    Thiol-organosilica particles of a narrow size distribution, made from 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPMS), were prepared by means of a one-pot synthesis. We examined three synthetic conditions at high temperature (100 degrees C), including the Stöber synthesis and two entirely aqueous syntheses. Under all conditions, the sizes of MPMS particles were well controlled, and the average of the coefficient of variation for the size distribution was less than 20%. The incubation times required for formation of MPMS particles were shorter at high temperature than at low temperature. MPMS particles internally functionalized with fluorescent dye were also prepared by means of the same one-pot synthesis. On flow cytometry analysis these MPMS particles showed distinct peaks of scattering due to well-controlled sizes of particles as well as due to fluorescence signals. Real-time observation of interaction between fluorescent MPMPS particles and cultured cells could be observed under fluorescent microscopy with bright light. The surface of the as-prepared MPMS particles contained exposed mercaptopropyl residues, and the ability to adsorb proteins was at least 6 times higher than that of gold nanopaticles. In addition, fluorescein-labeled proteins adsorbed to the surface of the particles were quantitatively detected at the pg/ml level by flow cytometry. MPMS particles surface functionalized with anti-CD20 antibody using adsorption could bind with lymphoma cells expressing CD20 specifically. In this paper, we demonstrated the possibility of size-controlled thiol-organosilica particles for wild range of biological applications. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous sizing and electrophoretic mobility measurement of sub-micron particles using Brownian motion

    PubMed Central

    Palanisami, Akilan; Miller, John H.

    2011-01-01

    The size and surface chemistry of micron scale particles are of fundamental importance in studies of biology and air particulate pollution. However, typical electrophoretic measurements of these and other sub-micron scale particles (300 nm – 1 μm) cannot resolve size information within heterogeneous mixtures unambiguously. Using optical microscopy, we monitor electrophoretic motion together with the Brownian velocity fluctuations—using the latter to measure size by either the Green-Kubo relation or by calibration from known size standards. Particle diameters are resolved to ±12% with 95% confidence. Strikingly, the size resolution improves as particle size decreases due to the increased Brownian motion. The sizing ability of the Brownian assessed electrophoresis method described here complements the electrophoretic mobility resolution of traditional capillary electrophoresis. PMID:20882556

  16. Particle size effects on viscosity of silver pastes: A manufacturer's view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provance, J.; Allison, K.

    1983-01-01

    Particles from a variety of silver powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and particle size analyses. Particle size distribution curves and volume population graphs were prepared for these silver powders and for glass powders with optimum, extra fine and coarse particle sizes. The viscosity at a given shear rate and slope of viscosity over a range of shear rates were determined for thick film pastes made with these powders. Because of particle anomalies and variations, the need for flexibility to achieve the best printing qualities for silver pastes was evident. It was established that print quality, dried and fired film density and optimum contact of silver particles with silicon, important for cell electrical output, could be achieved by adjusting the slope of viscosity that fell outside of the range, -0.550 to -0.650. This was accomplished through organic vehicle technology that permitted a change in the slope of viscosity, up or down, while maintaining a constant silver and total solids content.

  17. The immersion freezing behavior of size-segregated soot and kaolinite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Niedermeier, D.; Raddatz, M.; Wex, H.; Shaw, R. A.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a crucial role for ice formation in mixed-phase and cirrus clouds and has an important impact on precipitation formation, global radiation balances, and therefore Earth's climate (Cantrell and Heymsfield, 2005). Mineral dust and soot particles are found to be a major component of ice crystal residues (e.g., Pratt et al., 2009) so these substances are potential sources of atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). Experimental studies investigating the immersion freezing behavior of size-segregated soot and kaolinite particles conducted at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) are presented. In our measurements only one aerosol particle is immersed in an air suspended water droplet which can trigger ice nucleation. The method facilitates very precise examinations with respect to temperature, ice nucleation time and ice nucleus size. Considering laboratory studies, the picture of the IN ability of soot particles is quite heterogeneous. Our studies show that submicron flame, spark soot particles and optionally coated with sulfuric acid to simulate chemically aging do not act as IN at temperatures higher than homogeneous freezing taking place. Therefore soot particles might not be an important source of IN for immersion freezing in the atmosphere. In contrast, kaolinite being representative for natural mineral dust with a well known composition and structure is found to be very active in forming ice for all freezing modes (e.g., Mason and Maybank, 1958). Analyzing the immersion freezing behavior of different sized kaolinite particles (300, 500 and 700 nm in diameter) the size effect was clearly observed, i.e. the ice fraction (number of frozen droplets per total number) scales with particle surface, i.e. the larger the ice nucleus surface the higher the ice fraction. The slope of the logarithm of the ice fraction as function of temperature is similar for all particle sizes investigated and fits very well with the results of L

  18. Characterization of particle number size distribution and new particle formation in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Chuan; Peng, Jianfei; He, Lingyan; Cao, Liming; Zhu, Qiao; Cui, Jie; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of particle number size distribution (PND) and new particle formation (NPF) events in Southern China is essential for mitigation strategies related to submicron particles and their effects on regional air quality, haze, and human health. In this study, seven field measurement campaigns were conducted from December 2013 to May 2015 using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) at four sites in Southern China, including three urban sites and one background site. Particles were measured in the size range of 15-615nm, and the median particle number concentrations (PNCs) were found to vary in the range of 0.3×10 4 -2.2×10 4 cm -3 at the urban sites and were approximately 0.2×10 4 cm -3 at the background site. The peak diameters at the different sites varied largely from 22 to 102nm. The PNCs in the Aitken mode (25-100nm) at the urban sites were up to 10 times higher than they were at the background site, indicating large primary emissions from traffic at the urban sites. The diurnal variations of PNCs were significantly influenced by both rush hour traffic at the urban sites and NPF events. The frequencies of NPF events at the different sites were 0%-30%, with the highest frequency occurring at an urban site during autumn. With higher SO 2 concentrations and higher ambient temperatures being necessary, NPF at the urban site was found to be more influenced by atmospheric oxidizing capability, while NPF at the background site was limited by the condensation sink. This study provides a unique dataset of particle number and size information in various environments in Southern China, which can help understand the sources, formation, and the climate forcing of aerosols in this quickly developing region, as well as help constrain and validate NPF modeling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  20. Tuning Aerosol Particle Size Distribution of Metered Dose Inhalers Using Cosolvents and Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Imran Y.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of these studies was to understand the influence of cosolvent and surfactant contributions to particle size distributions emitted from solution metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) based on the propellant HFA 227. Methods. Two sets of formulations were prepared: (a) pMDIs-HFA 227 containing cosolvent (5–15% w/w ethanol) with constant surfactant (pluronic) concentration and (b) pMDIs-HFA 227 containing surfactant (0–5.45% w/w pluronic) with constant cosolvent concentration. Particle size distributions emitted from these pMDIs were analyzed using aerodynamic characterization (inertial impaction) and laser diffraction methods. Results. Both cosolvent and surfactant concentrations were positively correlated with median particle sizes; that is, drug particle size increased with increasing ethanol and pluronic concentrations. However, evaluation of particle size distributions showed that cosolvent caused reduction in the fine particle mode magnitude while the surfactant caused a shift in the mode position. These findings highlight the different mechanisms by which these components influence droplet formation and demonstrate the ability to utilize the different effects in formulations of pMDI-HFA 227 for independently modulating particle sizes in the respirable region. Conclusion. Potentially, the formulation design window generated using these excipients in combination could be used to match the particle size output of reformulated products to preexisting pMDI products. PMID:23984381

  1. The effect of reducing alfalfa haylage particle size on cows in early lactation.

    PubMed

    Kononoff, P J; Heinrichs, A J

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate effects of reducing forage particle size on cows in early lactation based on measurements of the Penn State Particle Separator (PSPS). Eight cannulated, multiparous cows averaging 19 +/- 4 d in milk and 642 +/- 45 kg BW were assigned to one of two 4 x 4 Latin Squares. During each of the 23-d periods, animals were offered one of four diets, which were chemically identical but included alfalfa haylage of different particle size; short (SH), mostly short (MSH), mostly long (MLG), and long (LG). Physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) was determined by measuring the amount of neutral detergent fiber retained on a 1.18 mm screen and was similar across diets (25.7, 26.2, 26.4, 26.7%) but the amount of particles >19.0 mm significantly decreased with decreasing particle size. Reducing haylage particle size increased dry matter intake linearly (23.3, 22.0, 20.9, 20.8 kg for SH, MSH, MLG, LG, respectively). Milk production and percentage fat did not differ across treatments averaging 35.5 +/- 0.68 kg milk and 3.32 +/- 0.67% fat, while a quadratic effect was observed for percent milk protein, with lowest values being observed for LG. A quadratic effect was observed for mean rumen pH (6.04, 6.15, 6.13, 6.09), while A:P ratio decreased linearly (2.75, 2.86, 2.88, 2.92) with decreasing particle size. Total time ruminating increased quadratically (467, 498, 486, 468 min/d), while time eating decreased linearly (262, 253, 298, 287 min/d) with decreasing particle size. Both eating and ruminating per unit of neutral detergent fiber intake decreased with reducing particle size (35.8, 36.7, 44.9, 45.6 min/kg; 19.9, 23.6, 23.5, 23.5 min/kg). Although chewing activity was closely related to forage particle size, effects on rumen pH were small, indicating factors other than particle size are critical in regulating pH when ration neutral detergent fiber met recommended levels. Feeding alfalfa haylage based rations of reduced

  2. A bimodal biometric identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghari, Mohammad S.; Khuwaja, Gulzar A.

    2013-03-01

    Biometrics consists of methods for uniquely recognizing humans based upon one or more intrinsic physical or behavioral traits. Physicals are related to the shape of the body. Behavioral are related to the behavior of a person. However, biometric authentication systems suffer from imprecision and difficulty in person recognition due to a number of reasons and no single biometrics is expected to effectively satisfy the requirements of all verification and/or identification applications. Bimodal biometric systems are expected to be more reliable due to the presence of two pieces of evidence and also be able to meet the severe performance requirements imposed by various applications. This paper presents a neural network based bimodal biometric identification system by using human face and handwritten signature features.

  3. Measurement of Size-dependent Dynamic Shape Factors of Quartz Particles in Two Flow Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Bell, David M.; Imre, D.

    2016-08-02

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of quartz dust particles, commonly found in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of many relevant particles properties, including particle shape. This study uses a single particle mass spectrometer, a differential mobility analyzer, and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to measure quartz aerosol particles mobility, aerodynamic, and volume equivalent diameters, mass, composition, effective density, and dynamic shape factor as a function of particle size, in both the free molecular and transition flow regimes. The results clearly demonstrate that dynamic shape factors can vary significantly as a function of particle size. For the quartz samples studied here, themore » dynamic shape factors increase with size, indicating that larger particles are significantly more aspherical than smaller particles. In addition, dynamic shape factors measured in the free-molecular (χv) and transition (χt) flow regimes can be significantly different, and these differences vary with the size of the quartz particles. For quartz, χv of small (d < 200 nm) particles is 1.25, while χv of larger particles (d ~ 440 nm) is 1.6, with a continuously increasing trend with particle size. In contrast χt, of small particles starts at 1.1 increasing slowly to 1.34 for 550 nm diameter particles. The multidimensional particle characterization approach used here goes beyond determination of average properties for each size, to provide additional information about how the particle dynamic shape factor may vary even for particles with the same mass and volume equivalent diameter.« less

  4. Size Limit for Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Droplets under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavacoli, J. W.; Katgert, G.; Kim, E. G.; Cates, M. E.; Clegg, P. S.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that emulsion droplets stabilized by interfacial particles become unstable beyond a size threshold set by gravity. This holds not only for colloids but also for supracolloidal glass beads, using which we directly observe the ejection of particles near the droplet base. The number of particles acting together in these ejection events decreases with time until a stable acornlike configuration is reached. Stability occurs when the weight of all remaining particles is less than the interfacial binding force of one particle. We also show the importance of the curvature of the droplet surface in promoting particle ejection.

  5. Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, Martin Michael; Buttler, William Tillman; Frayer, Daniel K.

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of extracting the size of particles ejected from shocked metal surfaces (ejecta) from the angular distribution of light scattered by a cloud of such particles. The basis of the technique is the Mie theory of scattering, and implicit in this approach are the assumptions that the scattering particles are spherical and that single scattering conditions prevail. The meaning of this latter assumption, as far as experimental conditions are concerned, will become clear later. The solution to Maxwell’s equations for spherical particles illuminated by a plane electromagnetic wave was derived bymore » Gustav Mie more than 100 years ago, but several modern treatises discuss this solution in great detail. The solution is a complicated series expansion of the scattered electric field, as well as the field within the particle, from which the total scattering and absorption cross sections as well as the angular distribution of scattered intensity can be calculated numerically. The detailed nature of the scattering is determined by the complex index of refraction of the particle material as well as the particle size parameter, x, which is the product of the wavenumber of the incident light and the particle radius, i.e. x = 2rπ= λ. Figure 1 shows the angular distribution of scattered light for different particle size parameters and two orthogonal incident light polarizations as calculated using the Mie solution. It is obvious that the scattering pattern is strongly dependent on the particle size parameter, becoming more forward-directed and less polarizationdependent as the particle size parameter increases. This trend forms the basis for the diagnostic design.« less

  6. Powder compaction in systems of bimodal distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, A. K.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The compaction of mixtures involving different particle sizes is discussed. The various stages of the compaction process include the rearrangement of particles, the filling of the interstices of the large particles by the smaller ones, and the change in particle size and shape upon further densification through the application of pressure. Experimental approaches and equipment used for compacting material are discussed together with the theoretical relations of the compacting process.

  7. Bottles as models: predicting the effects of varying swimming speed and morphology on size selectivity and filtering efficiency in fishes.

    PubMed

    Paig-Tran, E W Misty; Bizzarro, Joseph J; Strother, James A; Summers, Adam P

    2011-05-15

    We created physical models based on the morphology of ram suspension-feeding fishes to better understand the roles morphology and swimming speed play in particle retention, size selectivity and filtration efficiency during feeding events. We varied the buccal length, flow speed and architecture of the gills slits, including the number, size, orientation and pore size/permeability, in our models. Models were placed in a recirculating flow tank with slightly negatively buoyant plankton-like particles (~20-2000 μm) collected at the simulated esophagus and gill rakers to locate the highest density of particle accumulation. Particles were captured through sieve filtration, direct interception and inertial impaction. Changing the number of gill slits resulted in a change in the filtration mechanism of particles from a bimodal filter, with very small (≤ 50 μm) and very large (>1000 μm) particles collected, to a filter that captured medium-sized particles (101-1000 μm). The number of particles collected on the gill rakers increased with flow speed and skewed the size distribution towards smaller particles (51-500 μm). Small pore sizes (105 and 200 μm mesh size) had the highest filtration efficiencies, presumably because sieve filtration played a significant role. We used our model to make predictions about the filtering capacity and efficiency of neonatal whale sharks. These results suggest that the filtration mechanics of suspension feeding are closely linked to an animal's swimming speed and the structural design of the buccal cavity and gill slits.

  8. Aggressive Bimodal Communication in Domestic Dogs, Canis familiaris.

    PubMed

    Déaux, Éloïse C; Clarke, Jennifer A; Charrier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of animal multimodal signalling is widespread and compelling. Dogs' aggressive vocalisations (growls and barks) have been extensively studied, but without any consideration of the simultaneously produced visual displays. In this study we aimed to categorize dogs' bimodal aggressive signals according to the redundant/non-redundant classification framework. We presented dogs with unimodal (audio or visual) or bimodal (audio-visual) stimuli and measured their gazing and motor behaviours. Responses did not qualitatively differ between the bimodal and two unimodal contexts, indicating that acoustic and visual signals provide redundant information. We could not further classify the signal as 'equivalent' or 'enhancing' as we found evidence for both subcategories. We discuss our findings in relation to the complex signal framework, and propose several hypotheses for this signal's function.

  9. Raman lidar observations of a Saharan dust outbreak event: Characterization of the dust optical properties and determination of particle size and microphysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Bhawar, Rohini; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Cacciani, Marco; Veselovskii, Igor; Dubovik, Oleg; Kolgotin, Alexey

    2012-04-01

    The Raman lidar system BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The system performed continuous measurements over a period of approx. 36 h from 06:22 UTC on 1 August to 18:28 UTC on 2 August 2007, capturing the signature of a severe Saharan dust outbreak episode. The data clearly reveal the presence of two almost separate aerosol layers: a lower layer located between 1.5 and 3.5 km above ground level (a.g.l.) and an upper layer extending between 3.0 and 6.0 km a.g.l. The time evolution of the dust cloud is illustrated and discussed in the paper in terms of several optical parameters (particle backscatter ratio at 532 and 1064 nm, the colour ratio and the backscatter Angström parameter). An inversion algorithm was used to retrieve particle size and microphysical parameters, i.e., mean and effective radius, number, surface area, volume concentration, and complex refractive index, as well as the parameters of a bimodal particle size distribution (PSD), from the multi-wavelength lidar data of particle backscattering, extinction and depolarization. The retrieval scheme employs Tikhonov's inversion with regularization and makes use of kernel functions for randomly oriented spheroids. Size and microphysical parameters of dust particles are estimated as a function of altitude at different times during the dust outbreak event. Retrieval results reveal the presence of a fine mode with radii of 0.1-0.2 μm and a coarse mode with radii of 3-5 μm both in the lower and upper dust layers, and the dominance in the upper dust layer of a coarse mode with radii of 4-5 μm. Effective radius varies with altitude in the range 0.1-1.5 μm, while volume concentration is found to not exceed 92 μm3 cm-3. The real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index vary in the range 1.4-1.6 and 0.004-0.008, respectively.

  10. Characterization and variability of particle size distributions in Hudson Bay, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hongyan; Larouche, Pierre; Tang, Shilin; Michel, Christine

    2014-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) plays a significant role in many aspects of aquatic ecosystems, including phytoplankton dynamics, sediment fluxes, and optical scattering from particulates. As of yet, little is known on the variability of particle size distribution in marine ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the PSD properties and variability in Hudson Bay based on measurements from a laser diffractometer (LISST-100X Type-B) in concert with biogeochemical parameters collected during summer 2010. Results show that most power-law fitted PSD slopes ranged from 2.5 to 4.5, covering nearly the entire range observed for natural waters. Offshore waters showed a predominance of smaller particles while near the coast, the effect of riverine inputs on PSD were apparent. Particulate inorganic matter contributed more to total suspended matter in coastal waters leading to lower PSD slopes than offshore. The depth distribution of PSD slopes shows that larger particles were associated with the pycnocline. Below the pycnocline, smaller particles dominated the spectra. A comparison between a PSD slope-based method to derive phytoplankton size class (PSC) and pigment-based derived PSC showed the two methods agreed relatively well. This study provides valuable baseline information on particle size properties and phytoplankton composition estimates in a sub-arctic environment subject to rapid environmental change.

  11. Wheat bran particle size influence on phytochemical extractability and antioxidant properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is unknown if particle size plays a role in extracting health promoting compounds in wheat bran because the extraction of antioxidant and phenolic compounds with particle size reduction has not been well documented. In this study, unmilled whole bran (coarse treatment) was compared to whole bran ...

  12. STREAMBED PARTICLE SIZE FROM PEBBLE COUNTS USING VISUALLY ESTIMATED SIZE CLSASES: JUNK OR USEFUL DATA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In large-scale studies, it is often neither feasible nor necessary to obtain the large samples of 400 particles advocated by many geomorphologists to adequately quantify streambed surface particle-size distributions. Synoptic surveys such as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  13. Size and shape of uniform particles precipitated in homogeneous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.

    The assembly of nanosize crystals into larger uniform colloids is a fundamental process that plays a critical role in the formation of a very broad range of fine-particles used in numerous applications in technology, medicine, and national security. It is widely accepted that, along with size, in most of these applications the shape of the particles represents a critical factor. In the current research, we investigate the size and shape control of uniform particles prepared by precipitation in homogeneous solutions. In the first---theoretical---part a combinational mechanism of the shape control during particle growth was proposed and analyzed numerically. The main finding of our simulation is that a proper balance of two processes, preferential attachment of transported monomers at the protruding features of the growing cluster and monomer rearrangement at the cluster surface, can yield a well-defined particle shape that persist for sizes much larger than the original seed over a large interval of time. In the experimental part, three chemically simple systems were selected MgF2, NaMgF3, and PbS for defining and evaluating the key parameters of the shape and size control of the precipitates. Thus, uniform dispersions of particles of different morphologies (spherical, cubic, platelet, and prismatic) were prepared by precipitation in aqueous solutions. The mechanisms of the formation of the resulting particles of different shapes are explained by the role of the pH, temperature, solubility, and ionic strength. Stages of particles growth were evaluated on short and long time scales, winch allowed to propose multistage mechanisms of NaMgF3 growth and estimate induction time and critical nuclei size for MgF2. In addition, for prospective numerical modeling the surface tensions of spherical and platelet particles of MgF2 were evaluated from the X-ray data by a lattice parameter change method. Also, a new method for the evaluation of the variation in the density

  14. Rock sampling. [apparatus for controlling particle size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    An apparatus for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The device includes grinding means for cutting grooves in the rock surface and to provide a grouping of thin, shallow, parallel ridges and cutter means to reduce these ridges to a powder specimen. Collection means is provided for the powder. The invention relates to rock grinding and particularly to the sampling of rock specimens with good size control.

  15. Characterizing Particle Size Distributions of Crystalline Silica in Gold Mine Dust

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, Lauren G.; Cauda, Emanuele G.

    2017-01-01

    Dust containing crystalline silica is common in mining environments in the U.S. and around the world. The exposure to respirable crystalline silica remains an important occupational issue and it can lead to the development of silicosis and other respiratory diseases. Little has been done with regard to the characterization of the crystalline silica content of specific particle sizes of mine-generated dust. Such characterization could improve monitoring techniques and control technologies for crystalline silica, decreasing worker exposure to silica and preventing future incidence of silicosis. Three gold mine dust samples were aerosolized in a laboratory chamber. Particle size-specific samples were collected for gravimetric analysis and for quantification of silica using the Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Dust size distributions were characterized via aerodynamic and scanning mobility particle sizers (APS, SMPS) and gravimetrically via the MOUDI. Silica size distributions were constructed using gravimetric data from the MOUDI and proportional silica content corresponding to each size range of particles collected by the MOUDI, as determined via X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopic quantification of silica. Results indicate that silica does not comprise a uniform proportion of total dust across all particle sizes and that the size distributions of a given dust and its silica component are similar but not equivalent. Additional research characterizing the silica content of dusts from a variety of mine types and other occupational environments is necessary in order to ascertain trends that could be beneficial in developing better monitoring and control strategies. PMID:28217139

  16. Particle-Size-Grouping Model of Precipitation Kinetics in Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Thomas, Brian G.

    2012-03-01

    The formation, growth, and size distribution of precipitates greatly affects the microstructure and properties of microalloyed steels. Computational particle-size-grouping (PSG) kinetic models based on population balances are developed to simulate precipitate particle growth resulting from collision and diffusion mechanisms. First, the generalized PSG method for collision is explained clearly and verified. Then, a new PSG method is proposed to model diffusion-controlled precipitate nucleation, growth, and coarsening with complete mass conservation and no fitting parameters. Compared with the original population-balance models, this PSG method saves significant computation and preserves enough accuracy to model a realistic range of particle sizes. Finally, the new PSG method is combined with an equilibrium phase fraction model for plain carbon steels and is applied to simulate the precipitated fraction of aluminum nitride and the size distribution of niobium carbide during isothermal aging processes. Good matches are found with experimental measurements, suggesting that the new PSG method offers a promising framework for the future development of realistic models of precipitation.

  17. Laboratory and field evaluations of the LISST-100 instrument for suspended particle size determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Cheng, R.T.; Wang, P.-F.; Richter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology have resulted in a new instrument that is designed for in-situ determination of particle size spectra. Such an instrument that can measure undisturbed particle size distributions is much needed for sediment transport studies. The LISST-100 (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry) uses the principle of laser diffraction to obtain the size distribution and volume concentration of suspended material in 32 size classes logarithmically spaced between 1.25 and 250 ??m. This paper describes a laboratory evaluation of the ability of LISST-100 to determine particle sizes using suspensions of single size, artificial particles. Findings show the instrument is able to determine particle size to within about 10% with increasing error as particle size increases. The instrument determines volume (or mass) concentration using a volume conversion factor Cv. This volume conversion factor is theoretically a constant. In the laboratory evaluation Cv is found to vary by a factor of about three over the particle size range between 5 and 200 ??m. Results from field studies in South San Francisco Bay show that values of mass concentration of suspended marine sediments estimated by LISST-100 agree favorably with estimates from optical backscatterance sensors if an appropriate value of Cv, according to mean size, is used and the assumed average particle (aggregate) density is carefully chosen. Analyses of size distribution of suspended materials in South San Francisco Bay over multiple tide cycles suggest the likelihood of different sources of sediment because of different size characteristics during flood and ebb cycles. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Kristiansen, Helge; Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contactmore » behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.« less

  19. Polymer-Particle Nanocomposites: Size and Dispersion Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Joseph

    Polymer-particle nanocomposites are used in industrial processes to enhance a broad range of material properties (e.g. mechanical, optical, electrical and gas permeability properties). This dissertation will focus on explanation and quantification of mechanical property improvements upon the addition of nanoparticles to polymeric materials. Nanoparticles, as enhancers of mechanical properties, are ubiquitous in synthetic and natural materials (e.g. automobile tires, packaging, bone), however, to date, there is no thorough understanding of the mechanism of their action. In this dissertation, silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, both bare and grafted with polystyrene (PS), are studied in polymeric matrices. Several variables of interest are considered, including particle dispersion state, particle size, length and density of grafted polymer chains, and volume fraction of SiO2. Polymer grafted nanoparticles behave akin to block copolymers, and this is critically leveraged to systematically vary nanoparticle dispersion and examine its role on the mechanical reinforcement in polymer based nanocomposites in the melt state. Rheology unequivocally shows that reinforcement is maximized by the formation of a transient, but long-lived, percolating polymer-particle network with the particles serving as the network junctions. The effects of dispersion and weight fraction of filler on nanocomposite mechanical properties are also studied in a bare particle system. Due to the interest in directional properties for many different materials, different means of inducing directional ordering of particle structures are also studied. Using a combination of electron microscopy and x-ray scattering, it is shown that shearing anisotropic NP assemblies (sheets or strings) causes them to orient, one in front of the other, into macroscopic two-dimensional structures along the flow direction. In contrast, no such flow-induced ordering occurs for well dispersed NPs or spherical NP aggregates! This work

  20. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; ...

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agentsmore » for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.« less

  1. Study on the Particle Size Distribution Nano-Particles of Mining Minerals on Whiteness of Triaxial Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Ravi; Soni, Aditi

    White wares produced worldwide represent the foundation of much of the ceramic industry; Porcelain bodies fabricated from triaxial mixtures of clay, quartz and feldspar with different size and amounts of nano particles were investigated. Although the purity of raw materials has a strong effect on the colour of the fired bodies, the particle size of raw materials also effect the whiteness The raw material mining minerals china Clay, Feldspar, quarts were prepared of various sized nano particles contains 10.60 -20.22%, 56.84- 70.80 % and 34.87-50.76 % of 100nm respectively. The fired bodies of raw mining minerals and triaxial bodies were subjected to colour measurement. The differences in whiteness were compared and discussed. The studies so far carried out is upto 400 mesh size while the present study has included up to 100nm particle size. A statistical correlation between whiteness of feldspar and triaxial body was also carried out. The correlation between china clay and triaxial body are 0.53, 0.57 and 0.66 for china clay similarly correlation for feldspar is 0.49, 0.73 and 0.83 for triaxial body it are 0.97, 0.84 and 0.75 for A1, A2 and A3 samples. Correlation between china clay and feldspar with triaxial body are 0.79 and 0.92 respectively.

  2. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  3. Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

  4. Particle Size, Composition, and Ocean Temperature Govern the Global Distribution of Particle Transfer Efficiency to the Mesopelagic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cram, J. A.; Weber, T. S.; Leung, S.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    New analyses of geochemical tracer data detect significant differences between ocean basins in the depth scale of particle remineralization, with deepest in high latitudes, shallowest in the subtropical gyres, and intermediate in the tropics. We evaluate the possible causes of this pattern using a mechanistic model of particle dynamics that includes microbial colonization, detachment, and degradation of sinking particles. The model represents the size structure of particles, the effects of mineral ballast (diagnosed from alkalinity and silicate distributions) and seawater temperature (which influences particle velocity and microbial metabolic rates). We find that diagnosed spatial patterns in particle flux profiles can be best reproduced through a combination of surface particle size distribution and temperature, which both favor low transfer efficiency in subtropical gyres, and high transfer efficiency in higher latitudes and intermediate tropical values. Particle mineral content is shown to significantly modulate these patterns, albeit with a high remaining uncertainty. Implications of these mechanisms for changes in biological carbon storage in a warmer ocean are examined.

  5. Size-sensitive particle trajectories in three-dimensional micro-bubble acoustic streaming flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Andreas; Rossi, Massimiliano; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Kähler, Christian; Marin, Alvaro

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating microbubbles generate steady streaming flows with interesting features and promising applications for microparticle manipulation. The flow around oscillating semi-cylindrical bubbles has been typically assumed to be independent of the axial coordinate. However, it has been recently revealed that particle motion is strongly three-dimensional: Small tracer particles follow vortical trajectories with pronounced axial displacements near the bubble, weaving a toroidal stream-surface. A well-known consequence of bubble streaming flows is size-dependent particle migration, which can be exploited for sorting and trapping of microparticles in microfluidic devices. In this talk, we will show how the three-dimensional toroidal topology found for small tracer particles is modified as the particle size increases up to 1/3 of the bubble radius. Our results show size-sensitive particle positioning along the axis of the semi-cylindrical bubble. In order to analyze the three-dimensional sorting and trapping capabilities of the system, experiments with an imposed flow and polydisperse particle solutions are also shown.

  6. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  7. Development of iron-doped silicon nanoparticles as bimodal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mani P; Atkins, Tonya M; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2012-06-26

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine-terminated Fe-doped Si (Si(xFe)) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single-source iron-containing precursor, Na(4)Si(4) with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH(4)Br to produce hydrogen-terminated Si(xFe) nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that the average particle diameter is ∼3.0 ± 1.0 nm. The Si(5Fe) nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (∼10%) with significant T(2) contrast (r(2)/r(1) value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity.

  8. Probability density functions characterizing PSC particle size distribution parameters for NAT and STS derived from in situ measurements between 1989 and 2010 above McMurdo Station, Antarctica, and between 1991-2004 above Kiruna, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshler, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Balloon-borne optical particle counters were used to make in situ size resolved particle concentration measurements within polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) over 20 years in the Antarctic and over 10 years in the Arctic. The measurements were made primarily during the late winter in the Antarctic and in the early and mid-winter in the Arctic. Measurements in early and mid-winter were also made during 5 years in the Antarctic. For the analysis bimodal lognormal size distributions are fit to 250 meter averages of the particle concentration data. The characteristics of these fits, along with temperature, water and nitric acid vapor mixing ratios, are used to classify the PSC observations as either NAT, STS, ice, or some mixture of these. The vapor mixing ratios are obtained from satellite when possible, otherwise assumptions are made. This classification of the data is used to construct probability density functions for NAT, STS, and ice number concentration, median radius and distribution width for mid and late winter clouds in the Antarctic and for early and mid-winter clouds in the Arctic. Additional analysis is focused on characterizing the temperature histories associated with the particle classes and the different time periods. The results from theses analyses will be presented, and should be useful to set bounds for retrievals of PSC properties from remote measurements, and to constrain model representations of PSCs.

  9. Aggressive Bimodal Communication in Domestic Dogs, Canis familiaris

    PubMed Central

    Déaux, Éloïse C.; Clarke, Jennifer A.; Charrier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of animal multimodal signalling is widespread and compelling. Dogs’ aggressive vocalisations (growls and barks) have been extensively studied, but without any consideration of the simultaneously produced visual displays. In this study we aimed to categorize dogs’ bimodal aggressive signals according to the redundant/non-redundant classification framework. We presented dogs with unimodal (audio or visual) or bimodal (audio-visual) stimuli and measured their gazing and motor behaviours. Responses did not qualitatively differ between the bimodal and two unimodal contexts, indicating that acoustic and visual signals provide redundant information. We could not further classify the signal as ‘equivalent’ or ‘enhancing’ as we found evidence for both subcategories. We discuss our findings in relation to the complex signal framework, and propose several hypotheses for this signal’s function. PMID:26571266

  10. Efficient and reusable polyamide-56 nanofiber/nets membrane with bimodal structures for air filtration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bowen; Zhang, Shichao; Wang, Xueli; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Nanofibrous media that both possess high airborne particle interception efficiency and robust air permeability would have broad technological implications for areas ranging from individual protection and industrial security to environmental governance; however, creating such filtration media has proved extremely challenging. Here we report a strategy to construct the bio-based polyamide-56 nanofiber/nets (PA-56 NFN) membranes with bimodal structures for effective air filtration via one-step electrospinning/netting. The PA-56 membranes are composed of completely covered two-dimensional (2D) ultrathin (∼20 nm) nanonets which are optimized by facilely regulating the solution concentration, and the bonded scaffold fibers constructed cavity structures which are synchronously created by using the CH3COOH inspiration. With integrated properties of small aperture, high porosity, and bonded scaffold, the resulting PA-56 NFN membranes exhibit high filtration efficiency of 99.995%, low pressure drop of 111 Pa, combined with large dust holding capacity of 49 g/m(2) and dust-cleaning regeneration ability, for filtrating ultrafine airborne particles in the most safe manner involving sieving principle and surface filtration. The successful synthesis of PA-56 NFN medium would not only make it a promising candidate for air filtration, but also provide new insights into the design and development of nanonet-based bimodal structures for various applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Particle size, size distribution and morphological evaluation of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) industrial by-product.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Alida; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    The waste management of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) materials, in particular those made with thermosetting resins, is a critical issue for the composites industry because these materials cannot be reprocessed. Therefore, most thermosetting GRP waste is presently sent to landfill, in spite of the significant environmental impact caused by their disposal in this way. The limited GRP waste recycling worldwide is mostly due to its intrinsic thermosetting properties, lack of characterization data and unavailability of viable recycling and recovery routes. One of the possibility for re-using GRP industrial by-product is in form of powder as a partial aggregate replacement or filler addition in cement based composites for applications in sustainable construction materials and technologies. However, the feasibility of this kind of reutilization strongly depends on the morphology and particle size distribution of a powder made up of polymer granules and glass fibers. In the present study, the use of image analysis method, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ImageJ processing program, is proposed in order to evaluate the morphology of the particles and measure the particle size and size distribution of fine GRP waste powder. The obtained results show a great potential of such a method in order to be considered as a standardized method of measurement and analysis in order to characterize the grain size and size distribution of GRP particles before exploiting any compatibility issue for its recycling management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Size-exclusion chromatography using core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Pirok, Bob W J; Breuer, Pascal; Hoppe, Serafine J M; Chitty, Mike; Welch, Emmet; Farkas, Tivadar; van der Wal, Sjoerd; Peters, Ron; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-02-24

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is an indispensable technique for the separation of high-molecular-weight analytes and for determining molar-mass distributions. The potential application of SEC as second-dimension separation in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography demands very short analysis times. Liquid chromatography benefits from the advent of highly efficient core-shell packing materials, but because of the reduced total pore volume these materials have so far not been explored in SEC. The feasibility of using core-shell particles in SEC has been investigated and contemporary core-shell materials were compared with conventional packing materials for SEC. Columns packed with very small core-shell particles showed excellent resolution in specific molar-mass ranges, depending on the pore size. The analysis times were about an order of magnitude shorter than what could be achieved using conventional SEC columns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The size distribution and origin of elements bound to ambient particles: a case study of a Polish urban area.

    PubMed

    Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Majewski, Grzegorz; Czechowski, Piotr Oskar

    2015-05-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) was sampled in Zabrze (southern Poland) in the heating period of 2009. It was investigated for distribution of its mass and of the masses of its 18 component elements (S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, As, Br, Sr, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) among 13 PM size fractions. In the paper, the distribution modality of and the correlations between the ambient concentrations of these elements are discussed and interpreted in terms of the source apportionment of PM emissions. By weight, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, As, Br, Sr, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb were 10% of coarse and 9% of ultrafine particles. The collective mass of these elements was no more than 3.5 % of the mass of the particles with the aerodynamic diameter D p between 0.4 and 1.0 μm (PM₀.₄₋₁), whose ambient mass concentration was the highest. The PM mass size distribution for the sampling period is bimodal; it has the accumulation and coarse modes. The coarse particles were probably of the mineral/soil origin (characteristic elements: Ca, Fe, Sr, and Ba), being re-suspended polluted soil or road dust (characteristic elements: Ca, Fe, Sr, Ba, S, K, Cr, Cu, Zn, Br, Sb, Pb). The maxima of the density functions (modes) of the concentration distributions with respect to particle size of PM-bound S, Cl, K, Cu, Zn, Ge, Br, Cd, Sb, and Pb within the D p interval from 0.108 to 1.6 μm (accumulation PM particles) indicate the emissions from furnaces and road traffic. The distributions of PM-bound As, Mn, Ba, and Sr concentrations have their modes within D p ≤ 0.108 μm (nucleation PM particles), indicating the emissions from high-temperature processes (industrial sources or car engines). In this work, principal component analysis (PCA) is applied separately to each of the 13 fraction-related sets of the concentrations of the 18 PM-bound elements, and further, the fractions are grouped by their origin using cluster analysis (CA) applied to the 13 fraction-related first

  14. Process R&D for Particle Size Control of Molybdenum Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Sujat; Dzwiniel, Trevor; Pupek, Krzysztof

    The primary goal of this study was to produce MoO 3 powder with a particle size range of 50 to 200 μm for use in targets for production of the medical isotope 99Mo. Molybdenum metal powder is commercially produced by thermal reduction of oxides in a hydrogen atmosphere. The most common source material is MoO 3, which is derived by the thermal decomposition of ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM). However, the particle size of the currently produced MoO 3 is too small, resulting in Mo powder that is too fine to properly sinter and press into the desired target. In this study,more » effects of heating rate, heating temperature, gas type, gas flow rate, and isothermal heating were investigated for the decomposition of AHM. The main conclusions were as follows: lower heating rate (2-10°C/min) minimizes breakdown of aggregates, recrystallized samples with millimeter-sized aggregates are resistant to various heat treatments, extended isothermal heating at >600°C leads to significant sintering, and inert gas and high gas flow rate (up to 2000 ml/min) did not significantly affect particle size distribution or composition. In addition, attempts to recover AHM from an aqueous solution by several methods (spray drying, precipitation, and low temperature crystallization) failed to achieve the desired particle size range of 50 to 200 μm. Further studies are planned.« less

  15. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  16. Particle size distribution in effluent of trickling filters and in humus tanks.

    PubMed

    Schubert, W; Günthert, F W

    2001-11-01

    Particles and aggregates from trickling filters must be eliminated from wastewater. Usually this happens through sedimentation in humus tanks. Investigations to characterize these solids by way of particle size measurements, image analysis and particle charge measurements (zeta potential) are made within the scope of Research Center for Science and Technology "Fundamentals of Aerobic biological wastewater treatment" (SFB 411). The particle size measuring results given within this report were obtained at the Ingolstadt wastewater treatment plant, Germany, which served as an example. They have been confirmed by similar results from other facilities. Particles flushed out from trickling filters will be partially destroyed on their way to the humus tank. A large amount of small particles is to be found there. On average 90% of the particles are smaller than 30 microm. Particle size plays a decisive role in the sedimentation behaviour of solids. Small particles need sedimentation times that cannot be provided in settling tanks. As a result they cause turbidity in the final effluent. Therefore quality of sewage discharge suffers, and there are hardly advantages of the fixed film reactor treatment compared to the activated sludge process regarding sedimentation behaviour.

  17. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  18. Relationship between regolith particle size and porosity on small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, M.; Nakamura, A.

    2014-07-01

    Small planetary bodies are covered by a particle layer called the regolith. The particle size and porosity of the regolith surface of the small bodies are important physical properties. The responses of the surface to solar irradiation depend on the particle size and porosity. The particle size and porosity have influences on the dynamic responses of the surface, such as cratering efficiency. In previous studies, these two quantities were measured or estimated by various methods. Here we propose a semi-empirical relationship between the particle size and porosity for small bodies' surfaces. An empirical relationship between the porosity of granular materials in loose packing state under 1G and the ratio of the magnitudes of the interparticle force and gravity which act on a particle was presented in a previous study [1]. In this study, we assume that the van der Waals force F_{V} is predominant in the interparticle forces and adopt a model formula [2] which is different from that adopted in the previous study [1]: F_{V} = {AS^{2}}/{48Ω ^{2}}r, where A is the Hamaker constant, r is the particle radius, Ω is the diameter of an O^{-2} ion, and S is the cleanliness ratio which shows the smallness of a number of the adsorbate molecules [2]. It was shown that the cleanliness ratio S is approximately 0.1 on the Earth, and is almost unity in the interplanetary space. In addition to the data of the several previous studies, our own measurement result for micron-sized fly-ash particles in atmospheric conditions is used in the present analysis. We calculate F_{V} using Eq. (1), and obtain a relationship between porosity and the ratio R_{F} = F_{V}/F_{g}, where F_{g} is gravity. An empirical formula used in the previous study [1], p = p_{0}+(1-p_{0})exp(-m{R_{F}}^{-n}), is applied to fit the data, where p is the porosity and p_{0}, m and n are constants. We assume that p_{0} is 0.36. By substituting Eq. (1) to Eq. 2, we obtain p = p_{0}+(1-p_{0})exp {-m({AS^{2}}/{64πΩ ^{2

  19. The Effectiveness of Bimodal Text Presentation for Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Emily; And Others

    A study explored the effects of bimodal (concurrent auditory and visual stimulus modes) versus unimodal reading on 8 poor readers between the ages of 9 and 12 years. An alternating treatments design was used to compare student performance on 12 passages, 45 in each of 3 presentations modes: bimodal, visual, and auditory. Session measures included…

  20. The Bimodal Bilingual Brain: Effects of Sign Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmorey, Karen; McCullough, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Bimodal bilinguals are hearing individuals who know both a signed and a spoken language. Effects of bimodal bilingualism on behavior and brain organization are reviewed, and an fMRI investigation of the recognition of facial expressions by ASL-English bilinguals is reported. The fMRI results reveal separate effects of sign language and spoken…

  1. Comparison of ice particle size variations across Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Hoffmann, Harald; Hibbitts, Karl; Wagner, Roland; Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Ratios of band depths of different H2O ice absorptions as measured by the Near Infrared Spectrometer NIMS onboard the Galileo spacecraft [1] have been found to be semi-quantitative indicator of changes in the particle size of ice across the surfaces of the Jovian satellite Ganymede [2]. This method is now applied to Ganymede's neighboring satellite Callisto. On Ganymede, sizes reach from 1 μm near the poles to 1 mm near the equator [2]. Smallest particles occur at latitudes higher than ±30° where the closed magnetic field lines of Ganymede's magnetic field change into open ones and Ganymede's polar caps become apparent. Thus, the formation of these polar caps has often been attributed to brightening effects due to plasma bombardment of the surface [3,4]. Callisto, which does not exhibit an intrinsic magnetic field, however, also shows the same trend as observed on Ganymede with slightly larger particle sizes on Callisto than on Ganymede at low and mid latitude but similar particle sizes in the polar regions. Similar trends in the particle size variations on Callisto and on Ganymede imply that these variations are caused by similar surface processes. Our measurements rather point to a continuous decreasing of ice particle sizes toward the poles on both satellites related to changes of the surface temperatures [5]. Maximum temperatures during the day reach 150 K and 165 K near the equator of Ganymede and Callisto [6, 7], respectively and sublimation of ice particles and crystal growth [8] is expected to be the dominant surface process in these regions. In contrast, polar temperatures do not exceed 80 ± 5 K [5]. Larger particles in the equatorial region of Callisto than on Ganymede could be explained due to the slight higher maximum temperature but also a longer Callistoan day (Callisto: ~ 17 Earth days; Ganymede: ~ 7 Earth days). References: [1] Carlson et al.. (1999) Science 274, 385-388, 1996; [2] Stephan et al., 2009, EPSC, Abstract #EPSC2009-633; [3] Johnson

  2. Effects of particle size on magnetostrictive properties of magnetostrictive composites with low particulate volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xufeng; Guan, Xinchun; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    In the past ten years, there have been several investigations on the effects of particle size on magnetostrictive properties of polymer-bonded Terfenol-D composites, but they didn't get an agreement. To solve the conflict among them, Terfenol-D/unsaturated polyester resin composite samples were prepared from Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2 powder with 20% volume fraction in six particle-size ranges (30-53, 53-150, 150-300, 300-450, 450-500 and 30-500μm). Then their magnetostrictive properties were tested. The results indicate the 53-150μm distribution presents the largest static and dynamic magnetostriction among the five monodispersed distribution samples. But the 30-500μm (polydispersed) distribution shows even larger response than 53-150μm distribution. It indicates the particle size level plays a doubleedged sword on magnetostrictive properties of magnetostrictive composites. The existence of the optimal particle size to prepare polymer-bonded Terfenol-D, whose composition is Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2, is resulted from the competition between the positive effects and negative effects of increasing particle size. At small particle size level, the voids and the demagnetization effect decrease significantly with increasing particle size and leads to the increase of magnetostriction; while at lager particle size level, the percentage of single-crystal particles and packing density becomes increasingly smaller with increasing particle size and results in the decrease of magnetostriction. The reason for the other scholars got different results is analyzed.

  3. Factors controlling particle number concentration and size at metro stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reche, C.; Moreno, T.; Martins, V.; Minguillón, M. C.; Jones, T.; de Miguel, E.; Capdevila, M.; Centelles, S.; Querol, X.

    2017-05-01

    An extensive air quality campaign was performed at differently designed station platforms in the Barcelona metro system, aiming to investigate the factors governing airborne particle number (N) concentrations and their size distributions. The study of the daily trends of N concentrations by different size ranges shows that concentrations of N0.3-10 are closely related with the schedule of the metro service. Conversely, the hourly variation of N0.007-10 (mainly composed of ultrafine particles) could be partly governed by the entrance of particles from outdoor emissions through mechanical ventilation. Measurements under different ventilation settings at three metro platforms reveal that the effect on air quality linked to changes in the tunnel ventilation depends on the station design. Night-time maintenance works in tunnels are frequent activities in the metro system; and after intense prolonged works, these can result in higher N concentrations at platforms during the following metro operating hours (by up to 30%), this being especially evident for N1-10. Due to the complex mixture of factors controlling N, together with the differences in trends recorded for particles within different size ranges, developing an air quality strategy at metro systems is a great challenge. When compared to street-level urban particles concentrations, the priority in metro air quality should be dealing with particles coarser than 0.3 μm. In fact, the results suggest that at narrow platforms served by single-track tunnels the current forced tunnel ventilation during operating hours is less efficient in reducing coarse particles compared to fine.

  4. Bimodal benefits on objective and subjective outcomes for adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jae-Hee; Lee, Won-Sang

    2013-09-01

    Given that only a few studies have focused on the bimodal benefits on objective and subjective outcomes and emphasized the importance of individual data, the present study aimed to measure the bimodal benefits on the objective and subjective outcomes for adults with cochlear implant. Fourteen listeners with bimodal devices were tested on the localization and recognition abilities using environmental sounds, 1-talker, and 2-talker speech materials. The localization ability was measured through an 8-loudspeaker array. For the recognition measures, listeners were asked to repeat the sentences or say the environmental sounds the listeners heard. As a subjective questionnaire, three domains of Korean-version of Speech, Spatial, Qualities of Hearing scale (K-SSQ) were used to explore any relationships between objective and subjective outcomes. Based on the group-mean data, the bimodal hearing enhanced both localization and recognition regardless of test material. However, the inter- and intra-subject variability appeared to be large across test materials for both localization and recognition abilities. Correlation analyses revealed that the relationships were not always consistent between the objective outcomes and the subjective self-reports with bimodal devices. Overall, this study supports significant bimodal advantages on localization and recognition measures, yet the large individual variability in bimodal benefits should be considered carefully for the clinical assessment as well as counseling. The discrepant relations between objective and subjective results suggest that the bimodal benefits in traditional localization or recognition measures might not necessarily correspond to the self-reported subjective advantages in everyday listening environments.

  5. Bimodal Benefits on Objective and Subjective Outcomes for Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Given that only a few studies have focused on the bimodal benefits on objective and subjective outcomes and emphasized the importance of individual data, the present study aimed to measure the bimodal benefits on the objective and subjective outcomes for adults with cochlear implant. Subjects and Methods Fourteen listeners with bimodal devices were tested on the localization and recognition abilities using environmental sounds, 1-talker, and 2-talker speech materials. The localization ability was measured through an 8-loudspeaker array. For the recognition measures, listeners were asked to repeat the sentences or say the environmental sounds the listeners heard. As a subjective questionnaire, three domains of Korean-version of Speech, Spatial, Qualities of Hearing scale (K-SSQ) were used to explore any relationships between objective and subjective outcomes. Results Based on the group-mean data, the bimodal hearing enhanced both localization and recognition regardless of test material. However, the inter- and intra-subject variability appeared to be large across test materials for both localization and recognition abilities. Correlation analyses revealed that the relationships were not always consistent between the objective outcomes and the subjective self-reports with bimodal devices. Conclusions Overall, this study supports significant bimodal advantages on localization and recognition measures, yet the large individual variability in bimodal benefits should be considered carefully for the clinical assessment as well as counseling. The discrepant relations between objective and subjective results suggest that the bimodal benefits in traditional localization or recognition measures might not necessarily correspond to the self-reported subjective advantages in everyday listening environments. PMID:24653909

  6. Effect of drug particle size in ultrasound compacted tablets. Continuum percolation model approach.

    PubMed

    Millán, Mónica; Caraballo, Isidoro

    2006-03-09

    The main objective of this work is to study the influence of the drug particle size on the pharmaceutical availability of ultrasound compacted tablets. Inert matrix systems containing different drug particle sizes were prepared using both, an ultrasound-assisted press and a traditional eccentric machine. Potassium chloride was used as drug model and Eudragit RS-PM as matrix forming excipient. The excipient particle size was kept constant. The cross-sectional microphotographs of ultrasound tablets show the existence of a quasi-continuum medium. Keeping constant the drug load, US-tablets showed very similar release rates, whereas for traditional tablets, an increase in the particle size resulted in a clear decrease in the release rate. In these tablets, the excipient forms an almost continuum medium. In an infinite theoretical system of these characteristics, the size of the drug particles will not modify the percolation threshold. The percolation of the excipient in this system can be assimilated to a continuum percolation model. In accordance with the proposed model, a lower influence of the drug particle size on the drug release rate was obtained for the US-tablets in comparison with traditional tablets. This fact can be indicative of the similarity of the drug percolation thresholds in these systems.

  7. [Analysis of particle size characteristics of road sediments in Beijing Olympic Park].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-yan; Shi, An-bang; Qu, Yang-sheng; Yue, Jing-lin

    2014-09-01

    Particle size analysis of road sediment collected in October and November in Beijing Olympic Park indicates that most of the sediments are 76-830 μm; the grain size of the sediments in the area of large population flow is mainly coarse but the grain size in the area of large traffic volume is fine relatively while most of the sediments are <300 p.m. Moreover, sediments of size range <300 μm can be easily accumulated on the road with moderate traffic density. The results demonstrate that the effect of pedestrian flow on the composition of the particles is unobvious and the main influences are the traffic density, extensive construction. With the length of dry period increasing, the content of sediments of size range >300 μm decreases and the content of sediments of size range < 150 μm increases, however, the change of the content of sediments of size range 150-300 μm is not obvious. The results indicate that the effectiveness of the road sediment removal depends on the length of dry period, and the accumulation of different size particles varies differently under the different dry days. Compared with the stone road, surface particles can accumulate on the asphalt road more easily as the accumulation of particles is affected by the road material significantly. Therefore, to reduce the urban surface water pollution, it is necessary to improve the design of park road such as using the stone road, which can decrease the roughness of the road.

  8. Particle Transport and Size Sorting in Bubble Microstreaming Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic driving of sessile semicylindrical bubbles results in powerful steady streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. In a microchannel, this flow field pattern can be fine-tuned to achieve size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles at scales much smaller than the bubble itself; the sorting mechanism has been successfully described based on simple geometrical considerations. We investigate the sorting process in more detail, both experimentally (using new parameter variations that allow greater control over the sorting) and theoretically (incorporating the device geometry as well as the superimposed channel flow into an asymptotic theory). This results in optimized criteria for size sorting and a theoretical description that closely matches the particle behavior close to the bubble, the crucial region for size sorting.

  9. Effect of particle size distribution on the hydrodynamics of dense CFB risers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, Akhilesh; Khanna, Samir; Venuturumilli, Raj; Altantzis, Christos; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Circulating Fluidized Beds (CFB) are favorable in the energy and chemical industries, due to their high efficiency. While accurate hydrodynamic modeling is essential for optimizing performance, most CFB riser simulations are performed assuming equally-sized solid particles, owing to limited computational resources. Even though this approach yields reasonable predictions, it neglects commonly observed experimental findings suggesting the strong effect of particle size distribution (psd) on the hydrodynamics and chemical conversion. Thus, this study is focused on the inclusion of discrete particle sizes to represent the psd and its effect on fluidization via 2D numerical simulations. The particle sizes and corresponding mass fluxes are obtained using experimental data in dense CFB riser while the modeling framework is described in Bakshi et al 2015. Simulations are conducted at two scales: (a) fine grid to resolve heterogeneous structures and (b) coarse grid using EMMS sub-grid modifications. Using suitable metrics which capture bed dynamics, this study provides insights into segregation and mixing of particles as well as highlights need for improved sub-grid models.

  10. Drug particle size influence on enteric beads produced by a droplet extrusion/precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Cerdeira, A M; Gouveia, L F; Goucha, P; Almeida, A J

    2000-01-01

    The influence of drug particle size on the production of enteric beads by a polymer precipitation technique was investigated. Drug particle dimensions are known to play an important role in most microencapsulation techniques. Bead morphology was greatly influenced by drug particle size, and spherical shaped beads could only be obtained after size reduction of nimesulide crystals. This is confirmed by the angle of repose measurements, which show a significant decrease in theta values when beads are formulated with smaller drug particles. Furthermore, results show that drug encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release rates are also greatly dependent on both drug particle size and drug/polymer ratio in the initial suspension. Preparations containing 10.2 microm drug particles show a two-fold increase in the release rates when compared to those prepared with 40 microm particles.

  11. Numerical modeling of the tensile strength of a biological granular aggregate: Effect of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Karsta; Frank, Xavier; Lullien-Pellerin, Valérie; George, Matthieu; Radjai, Farhang; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Wheat grains can be considered as a natural cemented granular material. They are milled under high forces to produce food products such as flour. The major part of the grain is the so-called starchy endosperm. It contains stiff starch granules, which show a multi-modal size distribution, and a softer protein matrix that surrounds the granules. Experimental milling studies and numerical simulations are going hand in hand to better understand the fragmentation behavior of this biological material and to improve milling performance. We present a numerical study of the effect of granule size distribution on the strength of such a cemented granular material. Samples of bi-modal starch granule size distribution were created and submitted to uniaxial tension, using a peridynamics method. We show that, when compared to the effects of starch-protein interface adhesion and voids, the granule size distribution has a limited effect on the samples' yield stress.

  12. Size-Fractionated Particle Number Concentrations and Daily Mortality in a Chinese City

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xia; Ma, Yanjun; Chen, Renjie; Zhou, Zhijun; Chen, Bingheng

    2013-01-01

    Background: Associations between airborne particles and health outcomes have been documented worldwide; however, there is limited information regarding health effects associated with different particle sizes. Objectives: We explored the association between size-fractionated particle number concentrations (PNCs) and daily mortality in Shenyang, China. Methods: We collected daily data on cause-specific mortality and PNCs for particles measuring 0.25–10 μm in diameter between 1 December 2006 and 30 November 2008. We used quasi-Poisson regression generalized additive models to estimate associations between PNCs and mortality, and we used natural spline smoothing functions to adjust for time-varying covariates and long-term and seasonal trends. Results: Mean numbers of daily deaths were 67, 32, and 7 for all natural causes, cardiovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases, respectively. Interquartile range (IQR) increases in PNCs for particles measuring 0.25–0.50 μm were significantly associated with total and cardiovascular mortality, but not respiratory mortality. Effect estimates were larger for PNCs during the warm season than the cool season, and increased with decreasing particle size. IQR increases in PNCs of 0.25–0.28 μm, 0.35–0.40 μm, and 0.45–0.50 μm particles were associated with 2.41% (95% CI: 1.23, 3.58%), 1.31% (95% CI: 0.52, 2.09%), and 0.45% (95% CI: 0.04, 0.87%) higher total mortality, respectively. Associations were generally stable after adjustment for mass concentrations of ambient particles and gaseous pollutants. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that particles < 0.5 μm in diameter may be most responsible for adverse health effects of particulate air pollution and that adverse health effects may increase with decreasing particle size. Citation: Meng X, Ma Y, Chen R, Zhou Z, Chen B, Kan H. 2013. Size-fractionated particle number concentrations and daily mortality in a Chinese city. Environ Health Perspect 121:1174–1178;

  13. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  14. Perception of Sung Speech in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users.

    PubMed

    Crew, Joseph D; Galvin, John J; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2016-11-11

    Combined use of a hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) has been shown to improve CI users' speech and music performance. However, different hearing devices, test stimuli, and listening tasks may interact and obscure bimodal benefits. In this study, speech and music perception were measured in bimodal listeners for CI-only, HA-only, and CI + HA conditions, using the Sung Speech Corpus, a database of monosyllabic words produced at different fundamental frequencies. Sentence recognition was measured using sung speech in which pitch was held constant or varied across words, as well as for spoken speech. Melodic contour identification (MCI) was measured using sung speech in which the words were held constant or varied across notes. Results showed that sentence recognition was poorer with sung speech relative to spoken, with little difference between sung speech with a constant or variable pitch; mean performance was better with CI-only relative to HA-only, and best with CI + HA. MCI performance was better with constant words versus variable words; mean performance was better with HA-only than with CI-only and was best with CI + HA. Relative to CI-only, a strong bimodal benefit was observed for speech and music perception. Relative to the better ear, bimodal benefits remained strong for sentence recognition but were marginal for MCI. While variations in pitch and timbre may negatively affect CI users' speech and music perception, bimodal listening may partially compensate for these deficits. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Gas/particle partitioning, particle-size distribution of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers in southeast Shanghai rural area and size-resolved predicting model.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng-Hao; Tomy, Gregg T; Hou, Chun-Yan; Yin, Fang; Feng, Dao-Lun; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Li, Yi-Fan

    2018-04-01

    A size-segregated gas/particle partitioning coefficient K Pi was proposed and evaluated in the predicting models on the basis of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) field data comparing with the bulk coefficient K P . Results revealed that the characteristics of atmospheric PBDEs in southeast Shanghai rural area were generally consistent with previous investigations, suggesting that this investigation was representative to the present pollution status of atmospheric PBDEs. K Pi was generally greater than bulk K P , indicating an overestimate of TSP (the mass concentration of total suspended particles) in the expression of bulk K P . In predicting models, K Pi led to a significant shift in regression lines as compared to K P , thus it should be more cautious to investigate sorption mechanisms using the regression lines. The differences between the performances of K Pi and K P were helpful to explain some phenomenon in predicting investigations, such as P L 0 and K OA models overestimate the particle fractions of PBDEs and the models work better at high temperature than at low temperature. Our findings are important because they enabled an insight into the influence of particle size on predicting models. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspects of droplet and particle size control in miniemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygi-Arslan, Oznur

    Miniemulsion polymerization has become increasingly popular among researchers since it can provide significant advantages over conventional emulsion polymerization in certain cases, such as production of high-solids, low-viscosity latexes with better stability and polymerization of highly water-insoluble monomers. Miniemulsions are relatively stable oil (e.g., monomer) droplets, which can range in size from 50 to 500 nm, and are normally dispersed in an aqueous phase with the aid of a surfactant and a costabilizer. These droplets are the primary locus of the initiation of the polymerization reaction. Since particle formation takes place in the monomer droplets, theoretically, in miniemulsion systems the final particle size can be controlled by the initial droplet size. The miniemulsion preparation process typically generates broad droplet size distributions and there is no complete treatment in the literature regarding the control of the mean droplet size or size distribution. This research aims to control the miniemulsion droplet size and its distribution. In situ emulsification, where the surfactant is synthesized spontaneously at the oil/water interface, has been put forth as a simpler method for the preparation of miniemulsions-like systems. Using the in situ method of preparation, emulsion stability and droplet and particle sizes were monitored and compared with conventional emulsions and miniemulsions. Styrene emulsions prepared by the in situ method do not demonstrate the stability of a comparable miniemulsion. Upon polymerization, the final particle size generated from the in situ emulsion did not differ significantly from the comparable conventional emulsion polymerization; the reaction mechanism for in situ emulsions is more like conventional emulsion polymerization rather than miniemulsion polymerization. Similar results were found when the in situ method was applied to controlled free radical polymerizations (CFRP), which have been advanced as a

  17. Evaluating Unsupervised Methods to Size and Classify Suspended Particles Using Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, E. J.; Buscombe, D.; Graham, G.; Nimmo-Smith, A.

    2013-12-01

    The use of digital holography to image suspended particles in-situ using submersible systems is on the ascendancy. Such systems allow visualization of the in-focus particles without the depth-of-field issues associated with conventional imaging. The size and concentration of all particles, and each individual particle, can be rapidly and automatically assessed. The automated methods by which to extract these quantities can be readily evaluated using manual measurements. These methods are not possible using instruments based on optical and acoustic (back- or forward-) scattering, so-called 'sediment surrogate' methods, which are sensitive to the bulk quantities of all suspended particles in a sample volume, and rely on mathematically inverting a measured signal to derive the property of interest. Depending on the intended application, the number of holograms required to elucidate a process could range from tens to millions. Therefore manual particle extraction is not feasible for most data-sets. This has created a pressing need among the growing community of holography users, for accurate, automated processing which is comparable in output to more well-established in-situ sizing techniques such as laser diffraction. Here we discuss the computational considerations required to focus and segment individual particles from raw digital holograms, and then size and classify these particles by type; all using unsupervised (automated) image processing. To do so, we draw upon imagery from both controlled laboratory conditions to near-shore coastal environments, using different holographic system designs, and constituting a significant variety in particle types, sizes and shapes. We evaluate the success of these techniques, and suggest directions for future developments.

  18. Particle size effects on bioaccessible amounts of ingestible soil-borne toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Qin, Junhao; Nworie, Obinna Elijah; Lin, Chuxia

    2016-09-01

    The unified BARGE method was used to examine the effects of soil particle size on the bioaccessible amounts of potentially toxic elements in multi-contaminated soils from a closed landfill site. The results show that bioaccessible As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn increased with decreasing soil particle size and the <0.002 mm soil fraction contained much greater amounts of the bioaccessible elements, as compared to other soil fractions (0.002-0.063 mm, 0.063-0.125 mm, and 0.125-0.250 mm). As, Al and Cr had much lower bioaccessibility, as compared to the six cationic heavy metals. In contrast with other elements, As bioaccessibility tended to be higher in the gastrointestinal phase than in the gastric phase. There was a significant soil particle size effect on bioaccessibility of As and Al in the gastrointestinal phase: As bioaccessibility decreased with decreasing particle size, and the finer soil fractions tended to have a higher Al bioaccessibility, as compared to the coarser soil fractions. The research findings prompt the need for further division of soil particle size fractions in order to more accurately assess the bioaccessible amounts of soil-borne potentially toxic elements in contaminated lands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Particle size distribution and gas-particle partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls in the atmosphere in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingqing; Zheng, Minghui; Liu, Guorui; Zhang, Xian; Dong, Shujun; Gao, Lirong; Liang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Size-fractionated samples of urban particulate matter (PM; ≤1.0, 1.0-2.5, 2.5-10, and >10 μm) and gaseous samples were simultaneously obtained to study the distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the atmosphere in Beijing, China. Most recent investigations focused on the analysis of gaseous PCBs, and much less attention has been paid to the occurrence of PCBs among different PM fractions. In the present study, the gas-particle partitioning and size-specific distribution of PCBs in atmosphere were investigated. The total concentrations (gas + particle phase fractions) of Σ 12 dioxin-like PCBs, Σ 7 indicator PCBs, and ΣPCBs were 1.68, 42.1, and 345 pg/m 3 , respectively. PCBs were predominantly in the gas phase (86.8-99.0 % of the total concentrations). The gas-particle partition coefficients (K p ) of PCBs were found to be a significant linear correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressures (P L 0 ) (R 2  = 0.83, P < 0.01). The slope (m r ) implied that the gas-particle partitioning of PCBs was affected both by the mechanisms of adsorption and absorption. In addition, the concentrations of PCBs increased as the particle size decreased (>10, 2.5-10, 1.0-2.5, and ≤1.0 μm), with most of the PCBs contained in the fraction of ≤1.0 μm (53.4 % of the total particulate concentrations). Tetra-CBs were the main homolog in the air samples in the gas phase and PM fractions, followed by tri-CBs. This work will contribute to the knowledge of PCBs among different PM fractions and fill the gap of the size distribution of particle-bound dioxin-like PCBs in the air.

  20. Size effects in PbTiO3 nanocrystals: Effect of particle size on spontaneous polarization and strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Rawn, C. J.; Porter, W. D.; Payzant, E. A.; Safari, A.

    2005-04-01

    The spontaneous polarization (Ps) and spontaneous strains (xi) in mechanically unclamped and surface charge compensated PbTiO3 nanocrystals were determined as a function of particle size in the range <150nm by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray powder diffraction, respectively. Significant deviations from bulk order parameters (P,xi) have been observed as the particle size decreased below ˜100nm. The critical size (rc) below which the ferroelectric tetragonal phase transforms to the paraelectric cubic phase was determined as ˜15nm. The depression in transition temperature with particle size is 14 °C at 28 nm. No change in the order of m3m →4mm ferrodistortive phase transition is observed. A simple analysis showed that ΔHtr/(kBT )˜103 at 25 °C for r =16nm, indicating that the stabilization of the cubic phase at rc cannot be linked to an instability in dipolar ordering due to thermal agitations. Comparison of the spontaneous volumetric strains with the strain induced by surface stress indicated that the effect of surface stress on ferroelectric phase stability was negligible. Anomalies in electrostrictive properties were determined for r →rc. The observed size dependence of PS is attributed to the reduced extent of long-range dipole-dipole interactions that arise due to the changes in bonding characteristics of ions with decreasing particle size in the perovskite lattice, in conformity with a recent study by Tsunekawa et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (16), 4340 (2000)].

  1. Numerical sedimentation particle-size analysis using the Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, R.; Pérez-Aparicio, J. L.; Gómez-Hernández, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentation tests are widely used to determine the particle size distribution of a granular sample. In this work, the Discrete Element Method interacts with the simulation of flow using the well known one-way-coupling method, a computationally affordable approach for the time-consuming numerical simulation of the hydrometer, buoyancy and pipette sedimentation tests. These tests are used in the laboratory to determine the particle-size distribution of fine-grained aggregates. Five samples with different particle-size distributions are modeled by about six million rigid spheres projected on two-dimensions, with diameters ranging from 2.5 ×10-6 m to 70 ×10-6 m, forming a water suspension in a sedimentation cylinder. DEM simulates the particle's movement considering laminar flow interactions of buoyant, drag and lubrication forces. The simulation provides the temporal/spatial distributions of densities and concentrations of the suspension. The numerical simulations cannot replace the laboratory tests since they need the final granulometry as initial data, but, as the results show, these simulations can identify the strong and weak points of each method and eventually recommend useful variations and draw conclusions on their validity, aspects very difficult to achieve in the laboratory.

  2. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds.

  3. Ion size effects on the electrokinetics of spherical particles in salt-free concentrated suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Rafael; Carrique, Felix; Ruiz-Reina, Emilio

    2012-02-01

    In this work we study the influence of the counterion size on the electrophoretic mobility and on the dynamic mobility of a suspended spherical particle in a salt-free concentrated colloidal suspension. Salt-free suspensions contain charged particles and the added counterions that counterbalance their surface charge. A spherical cell model approach is used to take into account particle-particle electro-hydrodynamic interactions in concentrated suspensions. The finite size of the counterions is considered including an entropic contribution, related with the excluded volume of the ions, in the free energy of the suspension, giving rise to a modified counterion concentration profile. We are interested in studying the linear response of the system to an electric field, thus we solve the different electrokinetic equations by using a linear perturbation scheme. We find that the ionic size effect is quite important for moderate to high particles charges at a given particle volume fraction. In addition for such particle surface charges, both the electrophoretic mobility and the dynamic mobility suffer more important changes the larger the particle volume fraction for each ion size. The latter effects are more relevant the larger the ionic size.

  4. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  5. Probe measurements and numerical model predictions of evolving size distributions in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, A.; Sgro, L.A.; Lanzuolo, G.

    2009-09-15

    Particle size distributions (PSDs), measured with a dilution probe and a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA), and numerical predictions of these PSDs, based on a model that includes only coagulation or alternatively inception and coagulation, are compared to investigate particle growth processes and possible sampling artifacts in the post-flame region of a C/O = 0.65 premixed laminar ethylene-air flame. Inputs to the numerical model are the PSD measured early in the flame (the initial condition for the aerosol population) and the temperature profile measured along the flame's axial centerline. The measured PSDs are initially unimodal, with a modal mobility diameter ofmore » 2.2 nm, and become bimodal later in the post-flame region. The smaller mode is best predicted with a size-dependent coagulation model, which allows some fraction of the smallest particles to escape collisions without resulting in coalescence or coagulation through the size-dependent coagulation efficiency ({gamma}{sub SD}). Instead, when {gamma} = 1 and the coagulation rate is equal to the collision rate for all particles regardless of their size, the coagulation model significantly under predicts the number concentration of both modes and over predicts the size of the largest particles in the distribution compared to the measured size distributions at various heights above the burner. The coagulation ({gamma}{sub SD}) model alone is unable to reproduce well the larger particle mode (mode II). Combining persistent nucleation with size-dependent coagulation brings the predicted PSDs to within experimental error of the measurements, which seems to suggest that surface growth processes are relatively insignificant in these flames. Shifting measured PSDs a few mm closer to the burner surface, generally adopted to correct for probe perturbations, does not produce a better matching between the experimental and the numerical results. (author)« less

  6. Size Segregation and Number Density Enhancement of Particles in Accretion Disk Eddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klahr, H. H.; Henning, Th.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the conditions for trapping solid dust particles in eddies and discuss the behavior of particles in a non-laminar protoplanetary accretion disk. We considered particle sizes from small dust grains to larger objects, 10(exp -4) cm less than a(sub p) less than 10(exp 2) cm. Independent of the source of turbulence, one can expect eddies to exist in the gas flow of a accretion disk, in the form of randomly occurring turbulent features or as convective cells. Due to the centrifugal force, solid particles are driven out of an eddy. It will be shown that this process is inhibited by the gravitational force induced by the protostar. Because of the mass dependence of the friction time, a given eddy becomes a trap for particles of a characteristic size and causes a local change in the dust density. Thus, the size distribution of the grains is no longer spatially homogeneous on small scales. Our general estimates do not depend on special turbulence or convection models. We calculate the maximal inhomogeneity due to this process. The strongest effect was observed for mm-sized particles, which can be concentrated by a factor of 100 within only 100 years.

  7. How does dietary particle size affect carnivore gastrointestinal transit: A dog model.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, A; Hesta, M; Tibosch, S; Wanke, C; Clauss, M; Janssens, G P J

    2018-04-01

    The effect of dietary particle size on gastrointestinal transit in carnivores has not been studied and might offer more insight into their digestive physiology. This study evaluated the effect of two dietary particle sizes (fine = 7.8 mm vs. coarse = 13 mm) of chunked day-old chicks on transit parameters in dogs. Six beagle dogs were fed both dietary treatments in a crossover design of 7 days with transit testing on the fifth day. Transit parameters were assessed using two markers, that is a wireless motility capsule (IntelliCap ® ) and titanium oxide (TiO 2 ). Dietary particle size did not affect gastric emptying time (GRT), small bowel transit time (SBTT), colonic transit time (CTT) and total transit time (aTTT) of the capsule (p > .05). There was no effect of dietary particle size on TiO 2 mean retention time (MRT) (p > .05). The time of last TiO 2 excretion (MaxRT) differed (p = .013) between diets, being later for the coarse diet. Both MRT (R = 0.617, p = .032) and MaxRT (R = 0.814; p = .001) were positively correlated to aTTT. The ratio MRT/aTTT tended towards a difference between diets (p = .059) with the coarse diet exceeding fine diet values. Results show that the difference between capsule measurements and TiO 2 is larger for the fine than the coarse diet suggesting that the capsule becomes more accurate when dietary particle size approaches marker size. Dietary particle size might have affected transit parameters but differences are too small to claim major physiological consequences. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Characterization of the Particle Size and Polydispersity of Dicumarol Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dempah, Kassibla Elodie; Lubach, Joseph W; Munson, Eric J

    2017-03-06

    A variety of particle sizes of a model compound, dicumarol, were prepared and characterized in order to investigate the correlation between particle size and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) proton spin-lattice relaxation ( 1 H T 1 ) times. Conventional laser diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used as particle size measurement techniques and showed crystalline dicumarol samples with sizes ranging from tens of micrometers to a few micrometers. Dicumarol samples were prepared using both bottom-up and top-down particle size control approaches, via antisolvent microprecipitation and cryogrinding. It was observed that smaller particles of dicumarol generally had shorter 1 H T 1 times than larger ones. Additionally, cryomilled particles had the shortest 1 H T 1 times encountered (8 s). SSNMR 1 H T 1 times of all the samples were measured and showed as-received dicumarol to have a T 1 of 1500 s, whereas the 1 H T 1 times of the precipitated samples ranged from 20 to 80 s, with no apparent change in the physical form of dicumarol. Physical mixtures of different sized particles were also analyzed to determine the effect of sample inhomogeneity on 1 H T 1 values. Mixtures of cryoground and as-received dicumarol were clearly inhomogeneous as they did not fit well to a one-component relaxation model, but could be fit much better to a two-component model with both fast-and slow-relaxing regimes. Results indicate that samples of crystalline dicumarol containing two significantly different particle size populations could be deconvoluted solely based on their differences in 1 H T 1 times. Relative populations of each particle size regime could also be approximated using two-component fitting models. Using NMR theory on spin diffusion as a reference, and taking into account the presence of crystal defects, a model for the correlation between the particle size of dicumarol and its 1 H T 1 time was proposed.

  9. High-resolution extraction of particle size via Fourier Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengfu; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Guanghua; Luo, Zhenxiong; Ye, Yan

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a method which can extract the particle size information with a resolution beyond λ/NA. This is achieved by applying Fourier Ptychographic (FP) ideas to the present problem. In a typical FP imaging platform, a 2D LED array is used as light sources for angle-varied illuminations, a series of low-resolution images was taken by a full sequential scan of the array of LEDs. Here, we demonstrate the particle size information is extracted by turning on each single LED on a circle. The simulated results show that the proposed method can reduce the total number of images, without loss of reliability in the results.

  10. Event-related potentials to visual, auditory, and bimodal (combined auditory-visual) stimuli.

    PubMed

    Isoğlu-Alkaç, Ummühan; Kedzior, Karina; Keskindemirci, Gonca; Ermutlu, Numan; Karamursel, Sacit

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the response properties of event related potentials to unimodal and bimodal stimulations. The amplitudes of N1 and P2 were larger during bimodal evoked potentials (BEPs) than auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in the anterior sites and the amplitudes of P1 were larger during BEPs than VEPs especially at the parieto-occipital locations. Responses to bimodal stimulation had longer latencies than responses to unimodal stimulation. The N1 and P2 components were larger in amplitude and longer in latency during the bimodal paradigm and predominantly occurred at the anterior sites. Therefore, the current bimodal paradigm can be used to investigate the involvement and location of specific neural generators that contribute to higher processing of sensory information. Moreover, this paradigm may be a useful tool to investigate the level of sensory dysfunctions in clinical samples.

  11. Interference from Proteins and Surfactants on Particle Size Distributions Measured by Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA).

    PubMed

    Bai, Kelvin; Barnett, Gregory V; Kar, Sambit R; Das, Tapan K

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of submicron protein particles continues to be challenging despite active developments in the field. NTA is a submicron particle enumeration technique, which optically tracks the light scattering signal from suspended particles undergoing Brownian motion. The submicron particle size range NTA can monitor in common protein formulations is not well established. We conducted a comprehensive investigation with several protein formulations along with corresponding placebos using NTA to determine submicron particle size distributions and shed light on potential non-particle origin of size distribution in the range of approximately 50-300 nm. NTA and DLS are performed on polystyrene size standards as well as protein and placebo formulations. Protein formulations filtered through a 20 nm filter, with and without polysorbate-80, show NTA particle counts. As such, particle counts above 20 nm are not expected in these solutions. Several other systems including positive and negative controls were studied using NTA and DLS. These apparent particles measured by NTA are not observed in DLS measurements and may not correspond to real particles. The intent of this article is to raise awareness about the need to interpret particle counts and size distribution from NTA with caution.

  12. Effects of varying particle size of forage on digestion and chewing behavior of dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Jaster, E H; Murphy, M R

    1983-04-01

    Eighteen Holstein heifers were fed long and chopped coarse and fine alfalfa hay ad libitum to evaluate effects of physical form on digestion and chemical composition of feed and fecal particles and to examine the applicability of a sinusoidal model to chewing behavior. Recordings of jaw movement were divided into 1-h segments for analysis. Least square mean size of fecal particles from coarse and finely chopped diets were 290 and 297 micrometers as compared to 227 micrometers on long hay. Intakes of dry matter were greater an digestibilities lower for chopped as compared to long hay. Crude protein content of separated feed and fecal particles increased as particle size decreased. Neural and acid detergent fiber concentrations decreased in feed and feces with decreasing particle size. Lignin content of feed particles decreased as particle size decreased, whereas for fecal particles lignin as a percent of cell wall followed a "U" shaped pattern of declining then increasing as size decreased. Patterns were sinusoidal for eating and ruminating long and chopped hays and total chewing (eating and ruminating) of long hay. Our results suggest a gradual effect on chemical degradation and physical detrition of digesta particles and chewing behavior as forage particle size decreased.

  13. A new apparatus for real-time assessment of the particle size distribution of disintegrating tablets.

    PubMed

    Quodbach, Julian; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is the introduction of a novel apparatus that is capable of continuously measuring the particle size reduction of disintegrating tablets and analysis of the obtained results. The apparatus is constructed such that no particles pass directly through the pumping system. Thereby, the overall energy input into the particle suspension is reduced, and continuous measurement is possible without rapid destruction of the generated particles. The detected particle sizes at the beginning and at the end of the measurement differ greatly, depending on the applied disintegrant. The median particle sizes at the end of the measurement vary between 621.5 and 178.0 μm for different disintegrants. It is demonstrated that the particle size reduction follows an exponential function and that the fit parameters can be used to describe the disintegration behavior. A strong correlation between the median particle size of crospovidone disintegrants and generated particle size of the tablets is observed. This could be due to a more homogeneous distribution of the disintegrant particles in the tablets. Similar trends are observed for sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium. The new apparatus provides an innovative method to describe disintegrant effectiveness and efficiency. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Wheat bran particle size influence on phytochemical extractability and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Lauren Renee; Kubola, Jittawan; Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Herald, Thomas J; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown if particle size plays a role in extracting health promoting compounds in wheat bran because the extraction of antioxidant and phenolic compounds with particle size reduction has not been well documented. In this study, unmilled whole bran (coarse treatment) was compared to whole bran milled to medium and fine treatments from the same wheat bran. Antioxidant properties (capacity, ability, power), carotenoids and phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins) were measured and compared. The ability of whole bran fractions of differing particle size distributions to inhibit free radicals was assessed using four in vitro models, namely, diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity, ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and total antioxidant capacity. Significant differences in phytochemical concentrations and antioxidant properties were observed between whole bran fractions of reduced particle size distribution for some assays. The coarse treatment exhibited significantly higher antioxidant properties compared to the fine treatment; except for the ORAC value, in which coarse was significantly lower. For soluble and bound extractions, the coarse treatment was comparatively higher in total antioxidant capacity (426.72 mg ascorbic acid eq./g) and FRAP value (53.04 μmol FeSO4/g) than bran milled to the finer treatment (314.55 ascorbic acid eq./g and 40.84 μmol FeSO4/g, respectively). Likewise, the fine treatment was higher in phenolic acid (7.36 mg FAE/g), flavonoid (206.74 μg catechin/g), anthocyanin (63.0 μg/g), and carotenoid contents (beta carotene, 14.25 μg/100 g; zeaxanthin, 35.21 μg/100 g; lutein 174.59 μg/100 g) as compared to the coarse treatment. An increase of surface area to mass increased the ORAC value by over 80%. With reduction in particle size, there was a significant increase in extracted anthocyanins, carotenoids and ORAC value. Particle size does effect the

  15. Interaction of micron and nano-sized particles with cells of the dura mater.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Iraklis; Marsh, Rainy; Tipper, Joanne L; Hall, Richard M; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-10-01

    Intervertebral total disc replacements (TDR) are used in the treatment of degenerative spinal disc disease. There are, however, concerns that they may be subject to long-term failure due to wear. The adverse effects of TDR wear have the potential to manifest in the dura mater and surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological structure of the dura mater, isolate the resident dural epithelial and stromal cells and analyse the capacity of these cells to internalise model polymer particles. The porcine dura mater was a collagen-rich structure encompassing regularly arranged fibroblastic cells within an outermost epithelial cell layer. The isolated dural epithelial cells had endothelial cell characteristics (positive for von Willebrand factor, CD31, E-cadherin and desmoplakin) and barrier functionality whereas the fibroblastic cells were positive for collagen I and III, tenascin and actin. The capacity of the dural cells to take up model particles was dependent on particle size. Nanometer sized particles readily penetrated both types of cells. However, dural fibroblasts engulfed micron-sized particles at a much higher rate than dural epithelial cells. The study suggested that dural epithelial cells may offer some barrier to the penetration of micron-sized particles but not nanometer sized particles. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of airborne particles at a high-btu coal-gasification pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C I; Santhanam, S; Stetter, J R; Flotard, R D; Gebert, E

    1982-12-01

    Airborne particles in fugitive emissions have been measured at a slagging fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant using lignite. Sampling was conducted during shutdown operations and opening of the gasifier following an aborted startup. Aerosol collected with a Sierra high-volume impactor was subjected to analysis by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy; aerosol collected with an Andersen low-volume impactor was subjected to flameless atomic absorption analysis. The data show that the bulk of the trace organic material is associated with small particles: these data are similar to data on ambient air reported in the literature. Particle morphologies resemble those of fly ash from coal combustion, including smooth spheres, vesicular spheres, and crystalline material. Trace element size distributions are bimodal and resemble data for ambient air. Pb-containing particles are generally submicron, while particles containing Al, Fe, and other crustal species are mostly of supermicron size. Aluminum-based aerosol enrichment factors calculated from the lignite composition show that the composition of the aerosol resembles that of the coal, with the exception of modest enrichments of Mg, Na, As, and Pb in the submicron size range. Aerosol enrichment factors based on the earth's crustal composition are somewhat greater than those based on coal composition for several elements, suggesting potential errors in using crustal enrichment data to investigate chemical fractionation during aerosol formation.

  17. How comparable are size-resolved particle number concentrations from different instruments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The need for comparability of particle size resolved measurements originates from multiple drivers including: (i) Recent suggestions that air quality standards for particulate matter should migrate from being mass-based to incorporating number concentrations. This move would necessarily be predicated on measurement comparability which is absolutely critical to compliance determination. (ii) The need to quantify and diagnose causes of variability in nucleation and growth rates in nano-particle experiments conducted in different locations. (iii) Epidemiological research designed to identify key parameters in human health responses to fine particle exposure. Here we present results from a detailed controlled laboratory instrument inter-comparison experiment designed to investigate data comparability in the size range of 2.01-523.3 nm across a range of particle composition, modal diameter and absolute concentration. Particle size distributions were generated using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS) diluted using zero air, and sampled using four TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) configurations and a TSI model 3091 Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The SMPS configurations used two Electrostatic Classifiers (EC) (model 3080) attached to either a Long DMA (LDMA) (model 3081) or a Nano DMA (NDMA) (model 3085) plumbed to either a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensed Particle Counting (CPC) or a TSI model 3788 Water CPC. All four systems were run using both high and low flow conditions, and were operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The particle compositions tested were sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate and olive oil diluted in ethanol. Particles of all three were generated at three peak concentration levels (spanning the range observed at our experimental site), and three modal particle diameters. Experimental conditions were maintained for a period of 20 minutes to ensure experimental

  18. Recovering 3D Particle Size Distributions from 2D Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible and practical method to do this, show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions, and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D- 3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter. Proper determination of particle size distributions in chondrites - for chondrules, CAIs, and metalgrains - is of basic importance for assessing the processes of formation and/or of accretion of theseparticles into their parent bodies. To date, most information of this sort is gathered from 2D samplescut from a rock such as in microscopic analysis of thin sections, or SEM maps of planar surfaces(Dodd 1976, Hughes 1978a,b; Rubin and Keil 1984, Rubin and Grossman 1987, Grossman et al1988, Rubin 1989, Metzler et al 1992, Kuebler et al 1999, Nelson and Rubin 2002, Schneider et al 2003, Hezel et al 2008; Fisher et al 2014; for an exhaustive review with numerous references seeFriedrich et al 2014). While qualitative discrimination between chondrite types can readily be doneusing data of this sort, any deeper exploration of the processes by which chondrite constituents werecreated or emplaced into their parent requires a more quantitative approach.

  19. Uniform nano-sized valsartan for dissolution and bioavailability enhancement: influence of particle size and crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuping; Sun, Hongrui; Che, Erxi; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Sun, Changshan; Wang, Siling

    2013-01-30

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of drug particle size and crystalline state on valsartan (VAL) formulations in order to improve its dissolution and bioavailability. VAL microsuspension (mean size 22 μm) and nanosuspension (30-80nm) were prepared by high speed dispersing and anti-solvent precipitation method and converted into powders through spray drying. Differential scanning calorimetry studies indicated amorphization of VAL in the spray-dried valsartan nanosuspension (SD-VAL-Nano) but recrystallization occurred after 6 months storage at room temperature. The spray-dried valsartan microsuspension (SD-VAL-Micro) conserved the crystalline form. The VAL dissolution rate and extent were markedly enhanced with both SD-VAL-Micro and SD-VAL-Nano as compared to crude VAL crystals over the pH range of 1.2-6.8. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in oral bioavailability in the case of SD-VAL-Nano compared with the commercial product while the SD-VAL-Micro provided a much less desirable pharmacokinetic profile. In conclusion, reducing particle size to the nano-scale appears to be a worthwhile and promising approach to obtain VAL products with optimum bioavailability. In addition, the impact of crystalline state on the bioavailability of nano-sized VAL might be not as big as that of particle size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nonlatching positive feedback enables robust bimodality by decoupling expression noise from the mean

    SciTech Connect

    Razooky, Brandon S.; Cao, Youfang; Hansen, Maike M. K.

    Fundamental to biological decision-making is the ability to generate bimodal expression patterns where two alternate expression states simultaneously exist. Here in this study, we use a combination of single-cell analysis and mathematical modeling to examine the sources of bimodality in the transcriptional program controlling HIV’s fate decision between active replication and viral latency. We find that the HIV Tat protein manipulates the intrinsic toggling of HIV’s promoter, the LTR, to generate bimodal ON-OFF expression, and that transcriptional positive feedback from Tat shifts and expands the regime of LTR bimodality. This result holds for both minimal synthetic viral circuits and full-lengthmore » virus. Strikingly, computational analysis indicates that the Tat circuit’s non-cooperative ‘non-latching’ feedback architecture is optimized to slow the promoter’s toggling and generate bimodality by stochastic extinction of Tat. In contrast to the standard Poisson model, theory and experiment show that non-latching positive feedback substantially dampens the inverse noise-mean relationship to maintain stochastic bimodality despite increasing mean-expression levels. Given the rapid evolution of HIV, the presence of a circuit optimized to robustly generate bimodal expression appears consistent with the hypothesis that HIV’s decision between active replication and latency provides a viral fitness advantage. More broadly, the results suggest that positive-feedback circuits may have evolved not only for signal amplification but also for robustly generating bimodality by decoupling expression fluctuations (noise) from mean expression levels.« less

  1. Size distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban atmosphere: sorption mechanism and source contributions to respiratory deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yan; Li, Xiang; Xu, Ting Ting; Cheng, Tian Tao; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jian Min; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    In order to better understand the particle size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their source contribution to human respiratory system, size-resolved PAHs have been studied in ambient aerosols at a megacity Shanghai site during a 1-year period (2012-2013). The results showed the PAHs had a bimodal distribution with one mode peak in the fine-particle size range (0.4-2.1 µm) and another mode peak in the coarse-particle size range (3.3-9.0 µm). Along with the increase in ring number of PAHs, the intensity of the fine-mode peak increased, while the coarse-mode peak decreased. Plotting of log(PAH / PM) against log(Dp) showed that all slope values were above -1, suggesting that multiple mechanisms (adsorption and absorption) controlled the particle size distribution of PAHs. The total deposition flux of PAHs in the respiratory tract was calculated as being 8.8 ± 2.0 ng h-1. The highest lifetime cancer risk (LCR) was estimated at 1.5 × 10-6, which exceeded the unit risk of 10-6. The LCR values presented here were mainly influenced by accumulation mode PAHs which came from biomass burning (24 %), coal combustion (25 %), and vehicular emission (27 %). The present study provides us with a mechanistic understanding of the particle size distribution of PAHs and their transport in the human respiratory system, which can help develop better source control strategies.

  2. Biodiesel production from transesterification of palm oil with methanol over CaO supported on bimodal meso-macroporous silica catalyst.

    PubMed

    Witoon, Thongthai; Bumrungsalee, Sittisut; Vathavanichkul, Peerawut; Palitsakun, Supaphorn; Saisriyoot, Maythee; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak

    2014-03-01

    Calcium oxide-loaded porous materials have shown promise as catalysts in transesterification. However, the slow diffusion of bulky triglycerides through the pores limited the activity of calcium oxide (CaO). In this work, bimodal meso-macroporous silica was used as a support to enhance the accessibility of the CaO dispersed inside the pores. Unimodal porous silica having the identical mesopore diameter was employed for the purpose of comparison. Effects of CaO content and catalyst pellet size on the yield of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) were investigated. The basic strength was found to increase with increasing the CaO content. The CaO-loaded bimodal porous silica catalyst with the pellet size of 325μm achieved a high %FAME of 94.15 in the first cycle, and retained an excellent %FAME of 88.87 after five consecutive cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Defining the sizes of airborne particles that mediate influenza transmission in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Wei, Jianjian; Choy, Ka-Tim; Sia, Sin Fun; Rowlands, Dewi K; Yu, Dan; Wu, Chung-Yi; Lindsley, William G; Cowling, Benjamin J; McDevitt, James; Peiris, Malik; Li, Yuguo; Yen, Hui-Ling

    2018-03-06

    Epidemics and pandemics of influenza are characterized by rapid global spread mediated by non-mutually exclusive transmission modes. The relative significance between contact, droplet, and airborne transmission is yet to be defined, a knowledge gap for implementing evidence-based infection control measures. We devised a transmission chamber that separates virus-laden particles by size and determined the particle sizes mediating transmission of influenza among ferrets through the air. Ferret-to-ferret transmission was mediated by airborne particles larger than 1.5 µm, consistent with the quantity and size of virus-laden particles released by the donors. Onward transmission by donors was most efficient before fever onset and may continue for 5 days after inoculation. Multiple virus gene segments enhanced the transmissibility of a swine influenza virus among ferrets by increasing the release of virus-laden particles into the air. We provide direct experimental evidence of influenza transmission via droplets and fine droplet nuclei, albeit at different efficiency. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Dermally adhered soil: 2. Reconstruction of dry-sieve particle-size distributions from wet-sieve data.

    PubMed

    Choate, LaDonna M; Ranville, James F; Bunge, Annette L; Macalady, Donald L

    2006-10-01

    In the evaluation of soil particle-size effects on environmental processes, particle-size distributions are measured by either wet or dry sieving. Commonly, size distributions determined by wet and dry sieving differ because some particles disaggregate in water. Whereas the dry-sieve distributions are most relevant to the study of soil adherence to skin, soil can be recovered from skin only by washing with the potential for disaggregation whether or not it is subsequently wet or dry sieved. Thus, the possibility exists that wet-sieving measurements of the particle sizes that adhered to the skin could be skewed toward the smaller fractions. This paper provides a method by which dry-sieve particle-size distributions can be reconstructed from wet-sieve particle-size distributions for the same soil. The approach combines mass balances with a series of experiments in which wet sieving was applied to dry-sieve fractions from the original soil. Unless the soil moisture content is high (i.e., greater than or equal to the water content after equilibration with water-saturated air), only the soil particles of diameters less than about 63 microm adhere to the skin. Because of this, the adhering particle-size distribution calculated using the reconstruction method was not significantly different from the wet-sieving determinations.

  5. Optimum Particle Size for Gold-Catalyzed CO Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of gold-catalyzed CO oxidation is presented by analyzing in detail the dependence of CO oxidation rate on particle size. Clusters with less than 14 gold atoms adopt a planar structure, whereas larger ones adopt a three-dimensional structure. The CO and O2 adsorption properties depend strongly on particle structure and size. All of the reaction barriers relevant to CO oxidation display linear scaling relationships with CO and O2 binding strengths as main reactivity descriptors. Planar and three-dimensional gold clusters exhibit different linear scaling relationship due to different surface topologies and different coordination numbers of the surface atoms. On the basis of these linear scaling relationships, first-principles microkinetics simulations were conducted to determine CO oxidation rates and possible rate-determining step of Au particles. Planar Au9 and three-dimensional Au79 clusters present the highest CO oxidation rates for planar and three-dimensional clusters, respectively. The planar Au9 cluster is much more active than the optimum Au79 cluster. A common feature of optimum CO oxidation performance is the intermediate binding strengths of CO and O2, resulting in intermediate coverages of CO, O2, and O. Both these optimum particles present lower performance than maximum Sabatier performance, indicating that there is sufficient room for improvement of gold catalysts for CO oxidation. PMID:29707098

  6. Multiscaling properties of coastal waters particle size distribution from LISST in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannimpullath Remanan, R.; Schmitt, F. G.; Loisel, H.; Mériaux, X.

    2013-12-01

    An eulerian high frequency sampling of particle size distribution (PSD) is performed during 5 tidal cycles (65 hours) in a coastal environment of the eastern English Channel at 1 Hz. The particle data are recorded using a LISST-100x type C (Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry, Sequoia Scientific), recording volume concentrations of particles having diameters ranging from 2.5 to 500 mu in 32 size classes in logarithmic scale. This enables the estimation at each time step (every second) of the probability density function of particle sizes. At every time step, the pdf of PSD is hyperbolic. We can thus estimate PSD slope time series. Power spectral analysis shows that the mean diameter of the suspended particles is scaling at high frequencies (from 1s to 1000s). The scaling properties of particle sizes is studied by computing the moment function, from the pdf of the size distribution. Moment functions at many different time scales (from 1s to 1000 s) are computed and their scaling properties considered. The Shannon entropy at each time scale is also estimated and is related to other parameters. The multiscaling properties of the turbidity (coefficient cp computed from the LISST) are also consider on the same time scales, using Empirical Mode Decomposition.

  7. Bidirectional particle transport and size selective sorting of Brownian particles in a flashing spatially periodic energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Massana-Cid, Helena; Ziegler, Till; Johansen, Tom H; Straube, Arthur V; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-09-29

    We demonstrate a size sensitive experimental scheme which enables bidirectional transport and fractionation of paramagnetic colloids in a fluid medium. It is shown that two types of magnetic colloidal particles with different sizes can be simultaneously transported in opposite directions, when deposited above a stripe-patterned ferrite garnet film subjected to a square-wave magnetic modulation. Due to their different sizes, the particles are located at distinct elevations above the surface, and they experience two different energy landscapes, generated by the modulated magnetic substrate. By combining theoretical arguments and numerical simulations, we reveal such energy landscapes, which fully explain the bidirectional transport mechanism. The proposed technique does not require pre-imposed channel geometries such as in conventional microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip systems, and permits remote control over the particle motion, speed and trajectory, by using relatively low intense magnetic fields.

  8. Evolution of Size and Chemical Composition of Copper Concentrate Particles Oxidized Under Simulated Flash Smelting Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Tello, Manuel; Parra-Sánchez, Víctor R.; Sánchez-Corrales, Víctor M.; Gómez-Álvarez, Agustín; Brown-Bojórquez, Francisco; Parra-Figueroa, Roberto A.; Balladares-Varela, Eduardo R.; Araneda-Hernández, Eugenia A.

    2018-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the evolution of size and chemical composition of La Caridad copper concentrate particles during oxidation under simulated flash smelting conditions. Input variables tested included particle size and oxygen concentration in the process gas. The response variables included the size distributions, chemical composition, and morphology of the reacted particles at seven locations along a laboratory reactor. Particles with initial size < 45 µm contained mostly chalcopyrite, they increased their mean size and decreased the amount of dust in the population during oxidation. This was explained by a reaction path involving rapid melting followed by collision and coalescence of reacting droplets during flight. Particles with sizes > 45 µm contained varying amounts of chalcopyrite and pyrite, and tended to either maintain or decrease their mean size upon oxidation. When size reduction was observed, dust was produced because of fragmentation, and the particles showed no evidence of collisions during flight. The main oxidation products detected in the particles consisted of matte, cuprospinel, and magnetite. A plot of the mean size divided by the mean size in the feed against the fraction of sulfur eliminated generalized the experimental data so far reported in the literature, and helped identify the reaction path followed by the particles.

  9. Fabrication, Characterization, and Biological Activity of Avermectin Nano-delivery Systems with Different Particle Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anqi; Wang, Yan; Sun, Changjiao; Wang, Chunxin; Cui, Bo; Zhao, Xiang; Zeng, Zhanghua; Yao, Junwei; Yang, Dongsheng; Liu, Guoqiang; Cui, Haixin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-delivery systems for the active ingredients of pesticides can improve the utilization rates of pesticides and prolong their control effects. This is due to the nanocarrier envelope and controlled release function. However, particles containing active ingredients in controlled release pesticide formulations are generally large and have wide size distributions. There have been limited studies about the effect of particle size on the controlled release properties and biological activities of pesticide delivery systems. In the current study, avermectin (Av) nano-delivery systems were constructed with different particle sizes and their performances were evaluated. The Av release rate in the nano-delivery system could be effectively controlled by changing the particle size. The biological activity increased with decreasing particle size. These results suggest that Av nano-delivery systems can significantly improve the controllable release, photostability, and biological activity, which will improve efficiency and reduce pesticide residues.

  10. A new approach to fluid-structure interaction within graphics hardware accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics considering heterogeneous particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghtesad, Adnan; Knezevic, Marko

    2018-07-01

    A corrective smooth particle method (CSPM) within smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to study the deformation of an aircraft structure under high-velocity water-ditching impact load. The CSPM-SPH method features a new approach for the prediction of two-way fluid-structure interaction coupling. Results indicate that the implementation is well suited for modeling the deformation of structures under high-velocity impact into water as evident from the predicted stress and strain localizations in the aircraft structure as well as the integrity of the impacted interfaces, which show no artificial particle penetrations. To reduce the simulation time, a heterogeneous particle size distribution over a complex three-dimensional geometry is used. The variable particle size is achieved from a finite element mesh with variable element size and, as a result, variable nodal (i.e., SPH particle) spacing. To further accelerate the simulations, the SPH code is ported to a graphics processing unit using the OpenACC standard. The implementation and simulation results are described and discussed in this paper.

  11. A new approach to fluid-structure interaction within graphics hardware accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics considering heterogeneous particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghtesad, Adnan; Knezevic, Marko

    2017-12-01

    A corrective smooth particle method (CSPM) within smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to study the deformation of an aircraft structure under high-velocity water-ditching impact load. The CSPM-SPH method features a new approach for the prediction of two-way fluid-structure interaction coupling. Results indicate that the implementation is well suited for modeling the deformation of structures under high-velocity impact into water as evident from the predicted stress and strain localizations in the aircraft structure as well as the integrity of the impacted interfaces, which show no artificial particle penetrations. To reduce the simulation time, a heterogeneous particle size distribution over a complex three-dimensional geometry is used. The variable particle size is achieved from a finite element mesh with variable element size and, as a result, variable nodal (i.e., SPH particle) spacing. To further accelerate the simulations, the SPH code is ported to a graphics processing unit using the OpenACC standard. The implementation and simulation results are described and discussed in this paper.

  12. Particle size concentration distribution and influences on exhaled breath particles in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Wu, Chieh-Liang; Chen, Yi-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chun-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Humans produce exhaled breath particles (EBPs) during various breath activities, such as normal breathing, coughing, talking, and sneezing. Airborne transmission risk exists when EBPs have attached pathogens. Until recently, few investigations had evaluated the size and concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients with different ventilation mode settings. This study thus broke new ground by not only evaluating the size concentration distributions of EBPs in mechanically ventilated patients, but also investigating the relationship between EBP level and positive expiratory end airway pressure (PEEP), tidal volume, and pneumonia. This investigation recruited mechanically ventilated patients, with and without pneumonia, aged 20 years old and above, from the respiratory intensive care unit of a medical center. Concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed with an optical particle analyzer. This study finds that EBP concentrations from mechanically ventilated patients during normal breathing were in the range 0.47-2,554.04 particles/breath (0.001-4.644 particles/mL). EBP concentrations did not differ significantly between the volume control and pressure control modes of the ventilation settings in the mechanically ventilated patients. The patient EBPs were sized below 5 µm, and 80% of them ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 µm. The EBPs concentrations in patients with high PEEP (> 5 cmH₂O) clearly exceeded those in patients with low PEEP (≤ 5 cmH₂O). Additionally, a significant negative association existed between pneumonia duration and EBPs concentration. However, tidal volume was not related to EBPs concentration.

  13. Size-uniform 200 nm particles: fabrication and application to magnetofection.

    PubMed

    Mair, Lamar; Ford, Kris; Alam, M d Rowshon; Kole, Ryszard; Fisher, Michael; Superfine, Richard

    2009-04-01

    We report on the fabrication of arrays of mono- and multimetallic particles via metal evaporation onto lithographically patterned posts, as well as the magnetic force calibration and successful magnetofection of iron particles grown via this method. This work represents the first instance in which metal evaporation onto post structures was used for the formation of released, shape-defined metal particles. Also, our work represents the first use of lithographically defined particles as agents of magnetofection. Using these techniques it is possible to create particles with complex shapes and lateral dimensions as small as 40 nm. Our demonstrated compositionally flexible particles are highly size-uniform due to their photolithographically defined growth substrates, with particle dimensions along two axes fixed at 200 nm; the third axis dimension can be varied from 20 nm to 300 nm during the deposition procedure. Atomic percent of metals incorporated into the particle volume is highly tunable and particles have been synthesized with as many as four different metals. We performed magnetic force calibrations on a single particle size for iron particles using an axially magnetized NeFeB permanent magnet and comparisons are made with commercially available magnetic beads. In order to evalutate their usefulness as magnetofection agents, an antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) designed to correct the aberrant splicing of enhanced green fluorescent protein mRNA, was successfully transfected into a modified HeLa cell line. Magnetically enhanced gene delivery was accomplished in vitro using antisense ODN-laden iron particles followed by application of a field gradient. Magnetically enhanced transfection resulted in a 76% and 139% increase in fluorescence intensity when compared to Lipofectamine and antisense ODN-loaded particles delivered without magnetic treatment, respectively. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first use of lithographically defined particles as

  14. Size-Uniform 200 nm Particles: Fabrication and Application to Magnetofection

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Lamar; Ford, Kris; Alam, Rowshon; Kole, Ryszard; Fisher, Michael; Superfine, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of arrays of mono- and multimetallic particles via metal evaporation onto lithographically patterned posts, as well as the magnetic force calibration and successful magnetofection of iron particles grown via this method. This work represents the first instance in which metal evaporation onto post structures was used for the formation of released, shape-defined metal particles. Also, our work represents the first use of lithographically defined particles as agents of magnetofection. Using these techniques it is possible to create particles with complex shapes and lateral dimensions as small as 40 nm. Our demonstrated compositionally flexible particles are highly size-uniform due to their photolithographically defined growth substrates, with particle dimensions along two axes fixed at 200 nm; the third axis dimension can be varied from 20 nm to 300 nm during the deposition procedure. Atomic percent of metals incorporated into the particle volume is highly tunable and particles have been synthesized with as many as four different metals. We performed magnetic force calibrations on a single particle size for iron particles using an axially magnetized NeFeB permanent magnet and comparisons are made with commercially available magnetic beads. In order to evalutate their usefulness as magnetofection agents, an antisense oligonucleotide (ODN) designed to correct the aberrant splicing of enhanced green fluorescent protein mRNA, was successfully transfected into a modified HeLa cell line. Magnetically enhanced gene delivery was accomplished in vitro using antisense ODN-laden iron particles followed by application of a field gradient. Magnetically enhanced transfection resulted in a 76% and 139% increase in fluorescence intensity when compared to Lipofectamine and antisense ODN-loaded particles delivered without magnetic treatment, respectively. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first use of lithographically defined particles as

  15. The effect of particle size on the dehydration/rehydration behaviour of lactose.

    PubMed

    Crisp, J L; Dann, S E; Edgar, M; Blatchford, C G

    2010-05-31

    Ethanolic suspensions of spray dried and micronized alpha lactose monohydrate (L(alpha)xH(2)O) with average particle size between 3 and 200 microm, have been prepared and their dehydration behaviour was investigated by (13)C CP-MASNMR spectroscopy. Sub-micron lactose suspension prepared by a novel high pressure homogenisation method has been compared with the standard ethanolic suspensions of (L(alpha).H(2)O prepared by reflux or static room temperature methods. In all cases, suspensions were shown to contain the stable anhydrous form of lactose ((L(alpha)(S)). Several approaches were employed to remove ethanol from these suspensions and the resulting dry lactose powders were then analysed by FT-IR, PXRD and SEM to evaluate the effect of drying procedure on type and distribution of lactose polymorphs and particle size. For samples with mean particle size greater than 1 microm, the stable anhydrous polymorphic form of lactose was retained on removal of the ethanol, although differences in the morphology and particle size of the crystals were apparent depending on method of suspension formation. Sub-micron (L(alpha)(S), while stable in dry conditions, has been shown to be less stable to atmospheric water vapour than (L(alpha)(S) with particle size between 3 and 200 microm. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. WOOD STOVE EMISSIONS: PARTICLE SIZE AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes wood stove particle size and chemical composition data gathered to date. [NOTE: In 1995, EPA estimated that residential wood combustion (RWC), including fireplaces, accounted for a significant fraction of national particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter...

  17. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  18. Effects of nano-SiO(2) and different ash particle sizes on sludge ash-cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Lin, K L; Chang, W C; Lin, D F; Luo, H L; Tsai, M C

    2008-09-01

    The effects of nano-SiO(2) on three ash particle sizes in mortar were studied by replacing a portion of the cement with incinerated sewage sludge ash. Results indicate that the amount of water needed at standard consistency increased as more nano-SiO(2) was added. Moreover, a reduction in setting time became noticeable for smaller ash particle sizes. The compressive strength of the ash-cement mortar increased as more nano-SiO(2) was added. Additionally, with 2% nano-SiO(2) added and a cure length of 7 days, the compressive strength of the ash-cement mortar with 1 microm ash particle size was about 1.5 times better that of 75microm particle size. Further, nano-SiO(2) functioned to fill pores for ash-cement mortar with different ash particle sizes. However, the effects of this pore-filling varied with ash particle size. Higher amounts of nano-SiO(2) better influenced the ash-cement mortar with larger ash particle sizes.

  19. Characteristics of dimethylaminium and trimethylaminium in atmospheric particles ranging from supermicron to nanometer sizes over eutrophic marginal seas of China and oligotrophic open oceans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peiran; Hu, Qingjing; Li, Kai; Zhu, Yujiao; Liu, Xiaohuan; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we characterized dimethylaminium (DMA + ) and trimethylaminium (TMA + ) in size-segregated atmospheric particles during three cruise campaigns in the marginal seas of China and one cruise campaign mainly in the northwest Pacific Ocean (NWPO). An 14-stage nano-MOUDI sampler was utilized for sampling atmospheric particles ranging from 18μm to 0.010μm. Among the four cruise campaigns, the highest concentrations of DMA + and TMA + in PM 10 were observed over the South Yellow Sea (SYS) in August 2015, i.e., 0.76±0.12nmolm -3 for DMA + (average value±standard deviation) and 0.93±0.13nmolm -3 for TMA + . The lowest values were observed over the NWPO in April 2015, i.e., 0.28±0.16nmolm -3 for DMA + and 0.22±0.12nmolm -3 for TMA + . In general, size distributions of the two ions exhibited a bi-modal pattern, i.e., one mode at 0.01-0.1μm and the other at 0.1-1.8μm. The two ions' mode at 0.01-0.1μm was firstly observed. The mode was largely enhanced in samples collected over the SYS in August 2015, leading to high mole ratios of (DMA + +TMA + )/NH 4 + in PM 0.1 (0.4±0.8, median value±standard deviation) and the ions' concentrations in PM 0.1 accounting for ~10% and ~40% of their corresponding concentrations in PM 10 . This implied that (DMA + +TMA + ) likely played an important role in neutralizing acidic species in the smaller particles. Using SO 4 2- , NO 3 - and NH 4 + as references, we confirm that the elevated concentrations of DMA + and TMA + in the 0.01-0.1μm size range were probably real signals rather than sampling artifacts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploring the effects of temperature and grain size on plumes associated with PDCs through analogue experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. J.; Eychenne, J.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) often loft upwards into convective, buoyant co-PDC plumes. Recent analogue experiments using a unimodal grain size of 22 ± 6 μm (Andrews & Manga, 2012) have established that plume generation is aided by PDC interaction with a topographic barrier. Here, we have simulated the onset of co-PDC plumes from the collapse of concentrated particle-gas mixtures comprised of unimodal or bimodal grain size distributions (GSD) of glass beads, using combinations of lognormal populations with modes of 35, 195 and 590 μm. The collapse of a mixture, with constant mass 2950 ± 150 g, induced the propagation of a gravity current channelized down a 13° sloping tank; a barrier in the tank caused the gravity current to produce a plume of particles. Experiments were recorded with high speed visible and thermal-infrared cameras. Initial GSD and temperature of the mixture were varied to assess the effects of the addition of a coarser component on plume generation. Analogue co-PDC plumes were only produced when a proportion of fine grains (35 μm) was present in the initial granular mixture. Sampling of the particles entrained in the co-PDC plumes revealed that fine grains (35 μm) are preferentially lofted, although a few coarser particles (195 or 590 μm) are also entrained in the co-PDC plumes and settle closer to the area of uplift. Increasing the initial temperature of the mixture increases plume height measured at 1 and 2s after onset; this is supported by repeat experiments at specific conditions. Bimodal mixtures containing both fine (35 μm) and coarser (195 or 590 μm) grains result in plume heights and initial flow velocities higher than observed in unimodal fine-grained experiments of the same total mass of particles. Repeat experiments identify the natural variability in plume generation under the same nominal conditions, which is likely due to the combined variations of momentum during flow propagation and heat-driven buoyancy, as well

  1. BDVC (Bimodal Database of Violent Content): A database of violent audio and video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Martínez, Jose Luis; Mijes Cruz, Mario Humberto; Rodríguez Vázqu, Manuel Antonio; Rodríguez Espejo, Luis; Montoya Obeso, Abraham; García Vázquez, Mireya Saraí; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro Álvaro

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays there is a trend towards the use of unimodal databases for multimedia content description, organization and retrieval applications of a single type of content like text, voice and images, instead bimodal databases allow to associate semantically two different types of content like audio-video, image-text, among others. The generation of a bimodal database of audio-video implies the creation of a connection between the multimedia content through the semantic relation that associates the actions of both types of information. This paper describes in detail the used characteristics and methodology for the creation of the bimodal database of violent content; the semantic relationship is stablished by the proposed concepts that describe the audiovisual information. The use of bimodal databases in applications related to the audiovisual content processing allows an increase in the semantic performance only and only if these applications process both type of content. This bimodal database counts with 580 audiovisual annotated segments, with a duration of 28 minutes, divided in 41 classes. Bimodal databases are a tool in the generation of applications for the semantic web.

  2. Particle Size Effects on Flow Properties of PS304 Plasma Spray Feedstock Powder Blend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Eylon, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The effects of BaF2-CaF2 particle size and size distribution on PS304 feedstock powder flowability have been investigated. Angular BaF2-CaF2 eutectic powders were produced by comminution and classified by screening to obtain 38 to 45 microns 45 to 106 microns, 63 to 106 microns, 45 to 53 microns, 63 to 75 microns, and 90 to 106 microns particle size distributions. The fluorides were added incrementally from 0 to 10 wt% to the other powder constituents of the PS304 feedstock: nichrome, chromia, and silver powders. The flow rate of the powder blends decreased linearly with increasing concentration of the fluorides. Flow was degraded with decreasing BaF2-CaF2 particle size and with increasing BaF2-CaF2 particle size distribution. A semiempirical relationship is offered to describe the PS304 powder blend flow behavior. The Hausner Ratio confirmed the funnel flow test results, but was slightly less sensitive to differences in BaF2-CaF2 particle size and size distribution. These findings may have applicability to other powders that do not flow easily, such as ceramic powders.

  3. Size-selective sorting in bubble streaming flows: Particle migration on fast time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Steady streaming from ultrasonically driven microbubbles is an increasingly popular technique in microfluidics because such devices are easily manufactured and generate powerful and highly controllable flows. Combining streaming and Poiseuille transport flows allows for passive size-sensitive sorting at particle sizes and selectivities much smaller than the bubble radius. The crucial particle deflection and separation takes place over very small times (milliseconds) and length scales (20-30 microns) and can be rationalized using a simplified geometric mechanism. A quantitative theoretical description is achieved through the application of recent results on three-dimensional streaming flow field contributions. To develop a more fundamental understanding of the particle dynamics, we use high-speed photography of trajectories in polydisperse particle suspensions, recording the particle motion on the time scale of the bubble oscillation. Our data reveal the dependence of particle displacement on driving phase, particle size, oscillatory flow speed, and streaming speed. With this information, the effective repulsive force exerted by the bubble on the particle can be quantified, showing for the first time how fast, selective particle migration is effected in a streaming flow. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under grant number CBET-1236141.

  4. FILTER PACK TECHNIQUE FOR CLASSIFYING RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS BY PARTICLE SIZE. PART 1 PRELIMINARY EVALUATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    radon daughters is associated have greater ability to penetrate the variousfilter media than has the fission product debris in the atmosphere; therefore the former is associated with aerosols of smaller size. A preliminary evaluation of the techniques of employing packs of filters of different retentivity characteristics to determine the particle size and/or particle size distribution of radioactive aerosols has been made which indicates the feasibility of the method. It is recommended that a series of measurements be undertaken to determine the relative particle size

  5. Interaction of micron and nano-sized particles with cells of the dura mater

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Iraklis; Marsh, Rainy; Tipper, Joanne L; Hall, Richard M; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral total disc replacements (TDR) are used in the treatment of degenerative spinal disc disease. There are, however, concerns that they may be subject to long-term failure due to wear. The adverse effects of TDR wear have the potential to manifest in the dura mater and surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological structure of the dura mater, isolate the resident dural epithelial and stromal cells and analyse the capacity of these cells to internalise model polymer particles. The porcine dura mater was a collagen-rich structure encompassing regularly arranged fibroblastic cells within an outermost epithelial cell layer. The isolated dural epithelial cells had endothelial cell characteristics (positive for von Willebrand factor, CD31, E-cadherin and desmoplakin) and barrier functionality whereas the fibroblastic cells were positive for collagen I and III, tenascin and actin. The capacity of the dural cells to take up model particles was dependent on particle size. Nanometer sized particles readily penetrated both types of cells. However, dural fibroblasts engulfed micron-sized particles at a much higher rate than dural epithelial cells. The study suggested that dural epithelial cells may offer some barrier to the penetration of micron-sized particles but not nanometer sized particles. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1496–1505, 2014. PMID:24604838

  6. Impact of particle concentration and out-of-range sizes on the measurements of the LISST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Conmy, Robyn; Lee, Kenneth

    2018-05-01

    The instrument LISST (laser in situ scattering and transmissiometry) has been widely used for measuring the size of oil droplets in relation to oil spills and sediment particles. Major concerns associated with using the instrument include the impact of high concentrations and/or out-of-range particle (droplet) sizes on the LISST reading. These were evaluated experimentally in this study using monosized microsphere particles. The key findings include: (1) When high particle concentration reduced the optical transmission (OT) to below 30%, the measured peak value tended to underestimate the true peak value, and the accuracy of the LISST decreased by ~8% to ~28%. The maximum concentration to reach the 30% OT was about 50% of the theoretical values, suggesting a lower concentration level should be considered during the instrument deployment. (2) The out-of-range sizes of particles affected the LISST measurements when the sizes were close to the LISST measurement range. Fine below-range sizes primarily affected the data in the lowest two bins of the LISST with  >75% of the volume at the smallest bin. Large out-of-range particles affected the sizes of the largest 8–10 bins only when very high concentration was present. The out-of-range particles slightly changed the size distribution of the in-range particles, but their concentration was conserved. An approach to interpret and quantify the effects of the out-of-range particles on the LISST measurement was proposed.

  7. Critical conditions for particle motion in coarse bed materials of nonuniform size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathurst, James C.

    2013-09-01

    Initiation of particle motion in a bed material of nonuniform size distribution may be quantified by (qci/qcr) = (Di/Dr)b, where qci is the critical unit discharge at which particle size Di enters motion, qcr is the critical condition for a reference size Dr unaffected by the hiding/exposure effects associated with nonuniform size distributions, i and r refer to percentiles of the distribution and b varies from 0 (equal mobility in entrainment of all particle sizes) to 1.5-2.5 (full size selective transport). Currently there is no generally accepted method for predicting the value of b. Flume and field data are therefore combined to investigate the above relationship. Thirty-seven sets of flume data quantify the relationship between critical unit discharge and particle size for bed materials with uniform size distributions (used here to approximate full size selective transport). Field data quantify the relationship for bed materials of nonuniform size distribution at 24 sites, with b ranging from 0.15 to 1.3. Intersection of the two relationships clearly demonstrates the hiding/exposure effect; in some but not all cases, Dr is close to the median size D50. The exponent has two clusters of values: b > 1 for sites subject to episodic rain-fed floods and data collected by bedload pit trap and tracers; and b < 0.7 for sites with seasonal snowmelt/glacial melt flow regimes and data collected by bedload sampler and large aperture trap. Field technique appears unlikely to cause variations in b of more than about 0.25. However, the clustering is consistent with possible variations in bed structure distinguishing: for b > 1, sites with relatively infrequent bedload transport where particle embedding and consolidation could reduce the mobility of coarser particles; and, for b < 0.7, a looser bed structure with frequent transport events allowing hiding/exposure and size selection effects to achieve their balance. As yet there is no firm evidence for such a dependency on bed

  8. Ideal Particle Sizes for Inhaled Steroids Targeting Vocal Granulomas: Preliminary Study Using Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Elizabeth L; Basu, Saikat; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Buckmire, Robert A; Shah, Rupali N; Kimbell, Julia S

    2018-03-01

    Objectives Vocal fold granulomas are benign lesions of the larynx commonly caused by gastroesophageal reflux, intubation, and phonotrauma. Current medical therapy includes inhaled corticosteroids to target inflammation that leads to granuloma formation. Particle sizes of commonly prescribed inhalers range over 1 to 4 µm. The study objective was to use computational fluid dynamics to investigate deposition patterns over a range of particle sizes of inhaled corticosteroids targeting the larynx and vocal fold granulomas. Study Design Retrospective, case-specific computational study. Setting Tertiary academic center. Subjects/Methods A 3-dimensional anatomically realistic computational model of a normal adult airway from mouth to trachea was constructed from 3 computed tomography scans. Virtual granulomas of varying sizes and positions along the vocal fold were incorporated into the base model. Assuming steady-state, inspiratory, turbulent airflow at 30 L/min, computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate respiratory transport and deposition of inhaled corticosteroid particles ranging over 1 to 20 µm. Results Laryngeal deposition in the base model peaked for particle sizes 8 to 10 µm (2.8%-3.5%). Ideal sizes ranged over 6 to 10, 7 to 13, and 7 to 14 µm for small, medium, and large granuloma sizes, respectively. Glottic deposition was maximal at 10.8% for 9-µm-sized particles for the large posterior granuloma, 3 times the normal model (3.5%). Conclusion As the virtual granuloma size increased and the location became more posterior, glottic deposition and ideal particle size generally increased. This preliminary study suggests that inhalers with larger particle sizes, such as fluticasone propionate dry-powder inhaler, may improve laryngeal drug deposition. Most commercially available inhalers have smaller particles than suggested here.

  9. Evaluating unsupervised methods to size and classify suspended particles using digital in-line holography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Emlyn J.; Buscombe, Daniel D.; Graham, George W.; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial information can be gained from digital in-line holography of marine particles, eliminating depth-of-field and focusing errors associated with standard lens-based imaging methods. However, for the technique to reach its full potential in oceanographic research, fully unsupervised (automated) methods are required for focusing, segmentation, sizing and classification of particles. These computational challenges are the subject of this paper, in which we draw upon data collected using a variety of holographic systems developed at Plymouth University, UK, from a significant range of particle types, sizes and shapes. A new method for noise reduction in reconstructed planes is found to be successful in aiding particle segmentation and sizing. The performance of an automated routine for deriving particle characteristics (and subsequent size distributions) is evaluated against equivalent size metrics obtained by a trained operative measuring grain axes on screen. The unsupervised method is found to be reliable, despite some errors resulting from over-segmentation of particles. A simple unsupervised particle classification system is developed, and is capable of successfully differentiating sand grains, bubbles and diatoms from within the surf-zone. Avoiding miscounting bubbles and biological particles as sand grains enables more accurate estimates of sand concentrations, and is especially important in deployments of particle monitoring instrumentation in aerated water. Perhaps the greatest potential for further development in the computational aspects of particle holography is in the area of unsupervised particle classification. The simple method proposed here provides a foundation upon which further development could lead to reliable identification of more complex particle populations, such as those containing phytoplankton, zooplankton, flocculated cohesive sediments and oil droplets.

  10. Two size-selective mechanisms specifically trap bacteria-sized food particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2009-11-24

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharynx. A complex sequence of contractions and relaxations transports food particles in two successive trap stages before passage into the terminal bulb and intestine. Filtering occurs at each trap as bacteria are concentrated in the central lumen while fluids are expelled radially through three apical channels. Experiments with microspheres show that the C. elegans pharynx, in combination with the buccal cavity, is tuned to specifically catch and transport particles of a size range corresponding to most soil bacteria.

  11. Two size-selective mechanisms specifically trap bacteria-sized food particles in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.

    2009-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharynx. A complex sequence of contractions and relaxations transports food particles in two successive trap stages before passage into the terminal bulb and intestine. Filtering occurs at each trap as bacteria are concentrated in the central lumen while fluids are expelled radially through three apical channels. Experiments with microspheres show that the C. elegans pharynx, in combination with the buccal cavity, is tuned to specifically catch and transport particles of a size range corresponding to most soil bacteria. PMID:19903886

  12. Equations for hydraulic conductivity estimation from particle size distribution: A dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Peng; François, Bertrand; Lambert, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Estimating hydraulic conductivity from particle size distribution (PSD) is an important issue for various engineering problems. Classical models such as Hazen model, Beyer model, and Kozeny-Carman model usually regard the grain diameter at 10% passing (d10) as an effective grain size and the effects of particle size uniformity (in Beyer model) or porosity (in Kozeny-Carman model) are sometimes embedded. This technical note applies the dimensional analysis (Buckingham's ∏ theorem) to analyze the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and particle size distribution (PSD). The porosity is regarded as a dependent variable on the grain size distribution in unconsolidated conditions. It indicates that the coefficient of grain size uniformity and a dimensionless group representing the gravity effect, which is proportional to the mean grain volume, are the main two determinative parameters for estimating hydraulic conductivity. Regression analysis is then carried out on a database comprising 431 samples collected from different depositional environments and new equations are developed for hydraulic conductivity estimation. The new equation, validated in specimens beyond the database, shows an improved prediction comparing to using the classic models.

  13. Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Håkan; Johansson, Björn; Magnusson, Lennart; Lyxell, Björn; Ellis, Rachel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relation between speech recognition and cognitive skills in bimodal cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid users. Method: Seventeen bimodal CI users (28-74 years) were recruited to the study. Speech recognition tests were carried out in quiet and in noise. The cognitive tests employed included the Reading Span Test and the…

  14. Small-sized microplastics and pigmented particles in bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Oßmann, Barbara E; Sarau, George; Holtmannspötter, Heinrich; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Christiansen, Silke H; Dicke, Wilhelm

    2018-09-15

    Up to now, only a few studies about microparticle contamination of bottled mineral water have been published. The smallest analysed particle size was 5 μm. However, due to toxicological reasons, especially microparticles smaller than 1.5 μm are critically discussed. Therefore, in the present study, 32 samples of bottled mineral water were investigated for contamination by microplastics, pigment and additive particles. Due to the application of aluminium coated polycarbonate membrane filters and micro-Raman spectroscopy, a lowest analysed particle size of 1 μm was achieved. Microplastics were found in water from all bottle types: in single use and reusable bottles made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as well as in glass bottles. The amount of microplastics in mineral water varied from 2649 ± 2857 per litre in single use PET bottles up to 6292 ± 10521 per litre in glass bottles. While in plastic bottles, the predominant polymer type was PET; in glass bottles various polymers such as polyethylene or styrene-butadiene-copolymer were found. Hence, besides the packaging itself, other contamination sources have to be considered. Pigment particles were detected in high amounts in reusable, paper labelled bottles (195047 ± 330810 pigment particles per litre in glass and 23594 ± 25518 pigment particles per litre in reusable paper labelled PET bottles). Pigment types found in water samples were the same as used for label printing, indicating the bottle cleaning process as possible contamination route. Furthermore, on average 708 ± 1024 particles per litre of the additive Tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphite were found in reusable PET bottles. This additive might be leached out from the bottle material itself. Over 90% of the detected microplastics and pigment particles were smaller than 5 μm and thus not covered by previous studies. In summary, this is the first study reporting about microplastics, pigment and additive particles

  15. Measuring oxygen uptake in fishes with bimodal respiration.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, S; Bayley, M; McKenzie, D J

    2016-01-01

    Respirometry is a robust method for measurement of oxygen uptake as a proxy for metabolic rate in fishes, and how species with bimodal respiration might meet their demands from water v. air has interested researchers for over a century. The challenges of measuring oxygen uptake from both water and air, preferably simultaneously, have been addressed in a variety of ways, which are briefly reviewed. These methods are not well-suited for the long-term measurements necessary to be certain of obtaining undisturbed patterns of respiratory partitioning, for example, to estimate traits such as standard metabolic rate. Such measurements require automated intermittent-closed respirometry that, for bimodal fishes, has only recently been developed. This paper describes two approaches in enough detail to be replicated by the interested researcher. These methods are for static respirometry. Measuring oxygen uptake by bimodal fishes during exercise poses specific challenges, which are described to aid the reader in designing experiments. The respiratory physiology and behaviour of air-breathing fishes is very complex and can easily be influenced by experimental conditions, and some general considerations are listed to facilitate the design of experiments. Air breathing is believed to have evolved in response to aquatic hypoxia and, probably, associated hypercapnia. The review ends by considering what realistic hypercapnia is, how hypercapnic tropical waters can become and how this might influence bimodal animals' gas exchange. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  16. Removal of virus to protozoan sized particles in point-of-use ceramic water filters.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Kowalski, Kate; Schilling, Cherylynn; Schreier, Simon; Kohler, Amanda; Scott Summers, R

    2010-03-01

    The particle removal performance of point-of-use ceramic water filters (CWFs) was characterized in the size range of 0.02-100 microm using carboxylate-coated polystyrene fluorescent microspheres, natural particles and clay. Particles were spiked into dechlorinated tap water, and three successive water batches treated in each of six different CWFs. Particle removal generally increased with increasing size. The removal of virus-sized 0.02 and 0.1 microm spheres were highly variable between the six filters, ranging from 63 to 99.6%. For the 0.5 microm spheres removal was less variable and in the range of 95.1-99.6%, while for the 1, 2, 4.5, and 10 microm spheres removal was >99.6%. Recoating four of the CWFs with colloidal silver solution improved removal of the 0.02 microm spheres, but had no significant effects on the other particle sizes. Log removals of 1.8-3.2 were found for natural turbidity and spiked kaolin clay particles; however, particles as large as 95 microm were detected in filtered water. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of particle size and curing conditions on testing mineral trioxide aggregate cement.

    PubMed

    Ha, William Nguyen; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-12-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects on curing conditions (dry versus submerged curing) and particle size on the compressive strength (CS) and flexural strength (FS) of set MTA cement. Materials and methods: Two different Portland cements were created, P1 and P2, with P1 < P2 in particle size. These were then used to create two experimental MTA products, M1 and M2, with M1 < M2 in particle size. Particle size analysis was performed according to ISO 13320. The particle size at the 90th percentile (i.e. the larger particles) was P1: 15.2 μm, P2: 29.1 μm, M1: 16.5 μm, and M2: 37.1 μm. M2 was cured exposed to air, or submerged in fluids of pH 5.0, 7.2 (PBS), or 7.5 for 1 week. CS and FS of the set cement were determined using a modified ISO 9917-1 and ISO 4049 methods, respectively. P1, P2, M1 and M2 were cured in PBS at physiological pH (7.2) and likewise tested for CS and FS. Results: Curing under dry conditions gave a significantly lower CS than when cured in PBS. There was a trend for lower FS for dry versus wet curing. However, this did not reach statistical significance. Cements with smaller particle sizes showed greater CS and FS at 1 day than those with larger particle sizes. However, this advantage was lost over the following 1-3 weeks. Conclusions : Experiments that test the properties of MTA should cure the MTA under wet conditions and at physiological pH.

  18. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately andin situusing crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormal size distribution.more » The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trends in average particle size with temperature, but the results of the number-weighted lognormal size distributions can also accurately describe the mean size and the width of the size distributions obtained from STEM. Since the PDF yields crystallite sizes, these results suggest that the grown Pt nanoparticles are monocrystalline. This work shows that refinement of the PDF of small supported monocrystalline nanoparticles can yield accurate mean particle sizes and distributions.« less

  19. Particle size distribution of hydrocyanic acid in gari, a cassava-based product.

    PubMed

    Maduagwu, E N; Fafunso, M

    1980-12-01

    A reciprocal relationship was observed between the cyanide content of gari and particle size. Hydrocyanic acid (HCN) content was positively correlated (r = 0.62) with sugar content but the correlation with starch content was poor (r = 0.33). From both the nutritional and toxicological standpoints, it would appear that larger particles size in gari is beneficial.

  20. Particle size-dependent organ distribution of gold nanoparticles after intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Wim H; Hagens, Werner I; Krystek, Petra; Burger, Marina C; Sips, Adriënne J A M; Geertsma, Robert E

    2008-04-01

    A kinetic study was performed to determine the influence of particle size on the in vivo tissue distribution of spherical-shaped gold nanoparticles in the rat. Gold nanoparticles were chosen as model substances as they are used in several medical applications. In addition, the detection of the presence of gold is feasible with no background levels in the body in the normal situation. Rats were intravenously injected in the tail vein with gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 10, 50, 100 and 250 nm, respectively. After 24 h, the rats were sacrificed and blood and various organs were collected for gold determination. The presence of gold was measured quantitatively with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For all gold nanoparticle sizes the majority of the gold was demonstrated to be present in liver and spleen. A clear difference was observed between the distribution of the 10 nm particles and the larger particles. The 10 nm particles were present in various organ systems including blood, liver, spleen, kidney, testis, thymus, heart, lung and brain, whereas the larger particles were only detected in blood, liver and spleen. The results demonstrate that tissue distribution of gold nanoparticles is size-dependent with the smallest 10nm nanoparticles showing the most widespread organ distribution.

  1. Particle size related bacterial recovery in immunomagnetic separation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have demonstrated superior capture efficiencies in small molecule targets during immunomagnetic separation (IMS), but the potentials of MNPs in bacterial isolation have not been verified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of magnetic particle size o...

  2. The role of particle-size soil fractions in the adsorption of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandzhieva, Saglara; Minkina, Tatiana; Pinsky, David; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Kalinitchenko, Valeriy; Sushkova, Svetlana; Chaplygin, Viktor; Dikaev, Zaurbek; Startsev, Viktor; Bakoev, Serojdin

    2014-05-01

    Ion-exchange adsorption phenomena are important in the immobilization of heavy metals (HMs) by soils. Numerous works are devoted to the study of this problem. However, the interaction features of different particle-size soil fractions and their role in the immobilization of HMs studied insufficiently. Therefore, the assessment of the effect of the particle-size distribution on the adsorption properties of soils is a vital task. The parameters of Cu2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption by chernozems of the south of Russia and their particle-size fractions were studied. In the particle-size fractions separated from the soils, the concentrations of Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2 decreased with the decreasing particle size. The parameters of the adsorption values of k (the constant of the affinity)and Cmax.(the maximum adsorption of the HMs) characterizing the adsorption of HMs by the southern chernozem and its particle-size fractions formed the following sequence: silt > clay > entire soil. The adsorption capacity of chernozems for Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ depending on the particle-size distribution decreased in the following sequence: clay loamy ordinary chernozem clay loamy southern chernozem> loamy southern chernozem> loamy sandy southern chernozem. According to the parameters of the adsorption by the different particle-size fractions, the heavy metal cations form a sequence analogous to that obtained for the entire soils: Cu2+ ≥ Pb2+ > Zn2+. The parameters of the heavy metal adsorption by similar particle-size fractions separated from different soils decreased in the following order: clay loamy chernozem> loamy chernozem> loamy sandy chernozem. The analysis of the changes in the parameters of the Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ adsorption by the studied soils and their particle-size fractions showed that the extensive adsorption characteristic - the maximum adsorption (Cmax.) - is a less sensitive parameter characterizing the adsorption capacity of the soils than the intensive characteristic of

  3. Thermal conductivity measurements of particulate materials: 3. Natural samples and mixtures of particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presley, Marsha A.; Craddock, Robert A.

    2006-09-01

    A line-heat source apparatus was used to measure thermal conductivities of natural fluvial and eolian particulate sediments under low pressures of a carbon dioxide atmosphere. These measurements were compared to a previous compilation of the dependence of thermal conductivity on particle size to determine a thermal conductivity-derived particle size for each sample. Actual particle-size distributions were determined via physical separation through brass sieves. Comparison of the two analyses indicates that the thermal conductivity reflects the larger particles within the samples. In each sample at least 85-95% of the particles by weight are smaller than or equal to the thermal conductivity-derived particle size. At atmospheric pressures less than about 2-3 torr, samples that contain a large amount of small particles (<=125 μm or 4 Φ) exhibit lower thermal conductivities relative to those for the larger particles within the sample. Nonetheless, 90% of the sample by weight still consists of particles that are smaller than or equal to this lower thermal conductivity-derived particle size. These results allow further refinement in the interpretation of geomorphologic processes acting on the Martian surface. High-energy fluvial environments should produce poorer-sorted and coarser-grained deposits than lower energy eolian environments. Hence these results will provide additional information that may help identify coarser-grained fluvial deposits and may help differentiate whether channel dunes are original fluvial sediments that are at most reworked by wind or whether they represent a later overprint of sediment with a separate origin.

  4. Simulation of particle size distributions in Polar Mesospheric Clouds from Microphysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Merkel, A.; Bardeen, C.; Rusch, D. W.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution of ice particles is perhaps the most important observable aspect of microphysical processes in Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) formation and evolution. A conventional technique to derive such information is from optical observation of scattering, either passive solar scattering from photometric or spectrometric techniques, or active backscattering by lidar. We present simulated size distributions from two state-of-the-art models using CARMA sectional microphysics: WACCM/CARMA, in which CARMA is interactively coupled with WACCM3 (Bardeen et al, 2009), and stand-alone CARMA forced by WACCM3 meteorology (Merkel et al, this meeting). Both models provide well-resolved size distributions of ice particles as a function of height, location and time for realistic high-latitude summertime conditions. In this paper we present calculations of the UV scattered brightness at multiple scattering angles as viewed by the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) satellite experiment. These simulations are then considered discretely-sampled “data” for the scattering phase function, which are inverted using a technique (Lumpe et al, this meeting) to retrieve particle size information. We employ a T-matrix scattering code which applies to a wide range of non-sphericity of the ice particles, using the conventional idealized prolate/oblate spheroidal shape. This end-to-end test of the relatively new scattering phase function technique provides insight into both the retrieval accuracy and the information content in passive remote sensing of PMC.

  5. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectancemore » spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.« less

  6. Infrared reflectance spectra: effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  7. Comparing particle-size distributions in modern and ancient sand-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, E. A.; Lynds, R. M.; Huzurbazar, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    Particle-size distributions yield valuable insight into processes controlling sediment supply, transport, and deposition in sedimentary systems. This is especially true in ancient deposits, where effects of changing boundary conditions and autogenic processes may be detected from deposited sediment. In order to improve interpretations in ancient deposits and constrain uncertainty associated with new methods for paleomorphodynamic reconstructions in ancient fluvial systems, we compare particle-size distributions in three active sand-bed rivers in central Nebraska (USA) to grain-size distributions from ancient sandy fluvial deposits. Within the modern rivers studied, particle-size distributions of active-layer, suspended-load, and slackwater deposits show consistent relationships despite some morphological and sediment-supply differences between the rivers. In particular, there is substantial and consistent overlap between bed-material and suspended-load distributions, and the coarsest material found in slackwater deposits is comparable to the coarse fraction of suspended-sediment samples. Proxy bed-load and slackwater-deposit samples from the Kayenta Formation (Lower Jurassic, Utah/Colorado, USA) show overlap similar to that seen in the modern rivers, suggesting that these deposits may be sampled for paleomorphodynamic reconstructions, including paleoslope estimation. We also compare grain-size distributions of channel, floodplain, and proximal-overbank deposits in the Willwood (Paleocene/Eocene, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA), Wasatch (Paleocene/Eocene, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, USA), and Ferris (Cretaceous/Paleocene, Hanna Basin, Wyoming, USA) formations. Grain-size characteristics in these deposits reflect how suspended- and bed-load sediment is distributed across the floodplain during channel avulsion events. In order to constrain uncertainty inherent in such estimates, we evaluate uncertainty associated with sample collection, preparation, analytical

  8. Particle size dependent confinement and lattice strain effects in LiFePO4.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Raza; Murugavel, Sevi

    2013-11-21

    We report the intrinsic electronic properties of LiFePO4 (LFP) with different particle sizes measured by broad-band impedance spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The electronic properties show typical size-dependent effects with decreasing particle size (up to 150 nm). However, at the nanoscale level, we observed an enhancement in the polaronic conductivity about an order of magnitude. We found that the origin of the enhanced electronic conductivity in LFP is due to the significant lattice strain associated with the reduction of particle size. The observed lattice strain component corresponds to the compressive part which leads to a decrease in the hopping length of the polarons. We reproduce nonlinearities in the transport properties of LFP with particle size, to capture the interplay between confinement and lattice strain, and track the effects of strain on the electron-phonon interactions. These results could explain why nano-sized LFP has a better discharge capacity and higher rate capability than the bulk counterpart. We suggest that these new correlations will bring greater insight and better understanding for the optimization of LFP as a cathode material for advanced lithium ion batteries.

  9. Particle size reduction in debris flows: Laboratory experiments compared with field data from Inyo Creek, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabnia, O.; Sklar, L. S.; Mclaughlin, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Rock particles in debris flows are reduced in size through abrasion and fracture. Wear of coarse sediments results in production of finer particles, which alter the bulk material rheology and influence flow dynamics and runout distance. Particle wear also affects the size distribution of coarse particles, transforming the initial sediment size distribution produced on hillslopes into that delivered to the fluvial channel network. A better understanding of the controls on particle wear in debris flows would aid in the inferring flow conditions from debris flow deposits, in estimating the initial size of sediments entrained in the flow, and in modeling debris flow dynamics and mapping hazards. The rate of particle size reduction with distance traveled should depend on the intensity of particle interactions with other particles and the flow boundary, and on rock resistance to wear. We seek a geomorphic transport law to predict rate of particle wear with debris flow travel distance as a function of particle size distribution, flow depth, channel slope, fluid composition and rock strength. Here we use four rotating drums to create laboratory debris flows across a range of scales. Drum diameters range from 0.2 to 4.0 m, with the largest drum able to accommodate up to 2 Mg of material, including boulders. Each drum has vanes along the boundary to prevent sliding. Initial experiments use angular clasts of durable granodiorite; later experiments will use less resistant rock types. Shear rate is varied by changing drum rotational velocity. We begin experiments with well-sorted coarse particle size distributions, which are allowed to evolve through particle wear. The fluid is initially clear water, which rapidly acquires fine-grained wear products. After each travel increment all coarse particles (mass > 0.4 g) are weighed individually. We quantify particle wear rates using statistics of size and mass distributions, and by fitting various comminution functions to the data

  10. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Lin; Sun Jihong, E-mail: jhsun@bjut.edu.cn; Li Yuzhen

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation f{sub t}=kt{sup n} was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing andmore » therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties. - Graphical abstract: Loading (A) and release profiles (B) of aspirin in N-BMMs and N-MCM-41 indicated that BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that MCM-41. Highlights: > Bimodal mesoporous silicas (BMMs) and MCM-41 modified with amino group via post-treatment procedure. > Loading and release profiles of aspirin in modified BMMs and MCM-41. > Modified BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that modified MCM-41.« less

  11. Particle sizing in rocket motor studies utilizing hologram image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, David; Powers, John

    1987-01-01

    A technique of obtaining particle size information from holograms of combustion products is described. The holograms are obtained with a pulsed ruby laser through windows in a combustion chamber. The reconstruction is done with a krypton laser with the real image being viewed through a microscope. The particle size information is measured with a Quantimet 720 image processing system which can discriminate various features and perform measurements of the portions of interest in the image. Various problems that arise in the technique are discussed, especially those that are a consequence of the speckle due to the diffuse illumination used in the recording process.

  12. Particle size and metals concentrations of dust from a paint manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siew Lai; Yin, Chun-Yang; Yap, Siaw Yang

    2010-02-15

    In this study, the particle size distribution and concentration of metallic elements of solvent- and water-based paint dust from bulk dust collected from dust-collecting hoppers were determined. The mean particle size diameter over a 12-week sampling period was determined using a particle size analyzer. The metals composition and concentration of the dust were determined via acid digestion technique followed by concentration analysis using inductively coupled plasma. The volume weighted mean particle diameters were found to be 0.941+/-0.016 and 8.185+/-0.201 microm for solvent- and water-based paint dust, respectively. The mean concentrations of metals in solvent-based paint dust were found to be 100+/-20.00 microg/g (arsenic), 1550+/-550.00 microg/g (copper), 15,680+/-11,780.00 microg/g (lead) and 30,460+/-10,580.00 microg/g (zinc) while the mean concentrations of metals in water-based paint dust were found to be 20.65+/-6.11 microg/g (arsenic), 9.14+/-14.65 microg/g (copper), 57.46+/-22.42 microg/g (lead) and 1660+/-1260 microg/g (zinc). Both paint dust types could be considered as hazardous since almost all of the dust particles were smaller than 10 microm. Particular emphasis on containment of solvent-based paint dust particles should be given since it was shown that they were very fine in size (<1 microm) and had high lead and zinc concentrations.

  13. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    PubMed

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles <100 nm. About half the mass of aluminum welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels.

  14. Intrinsic Size Effect in Scaffolded Porous Calcium Silicate Particles and Mechanical Behavior of Their Self-Assembled Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Hoon; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-01-10

    Scaffolded porous submicron particles with well-defined diameter, shape, and pore size have profound impacts on drug delivery, bone-tissue replacement, catalysis, sensors, photonic crystals, and self-healing materials. However, understanding the interplay between pore size, particle size, and mechanical properties of such ultrafine particles, especially at the level of individual particles and their ensemble states, is a challenge. Herein, we focus on porous calcium-silicate submicron particles with various diameters-as a model system-and perform extensive 900+ nanoindentations to completely map out their mechanical properties at three distinct structural forms from individual submicron particles to self-assembled ensembles to pressure-induced assembled arrays. Our results demonstrate a notable "intrinsic size effect" for individual porous submicron particles around ∼200-500 nm, induced by the ratio of particle characteristic diameter to pore characteristic size distribution. Increasing this ratio results in a brittle-to-ductile transition where the toughness of the submicron particles increases by 120%. This size effect becomes negligible as the porous particles form superstructures. Nevertheless, the self-assembled arrays collectively exhibit increasing elastic modulus as a function of applied forces, while pressure-induced compacted arrays exhibit no size effect. This study will impact tuning properties of individual scaffolded porous particles and can have implications on self-assembled superstructures exploiting porosity and particle size to impart new functionalities.

  15. Effect of fluorescent particle size on the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong; Vignola, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether the size of fluorescent particles affects the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF), we measured UMF and DC (direct current) signals of the fluorescence emission from four different sized fluorescent particles: (1) three carboxylate-modified fluorescent microspheres (FM) with diameters of 20 nm, 200 nm, and 1.0 µm and (2) streptavidin-conjugated Alexa Fluor 647 with a diameter of approximately 5 nm. The UMF and DC signals were simultaneously measured using a broadband lock-in amplifier and a narrowband amplifier, respectively. The ratio of the UMF strength to the DC signal strength is defined as the modulation efficiency. This modulation efficiency was then used to evaluate the effects of fluorophore size and concentration. Results show that the modulation efficiency was improved by approximately a factor of two when the size of the fluorescent particles is increased from 5 nm to 1 µm. In addition, the linear relationship between the UMF strength and ultrasound pressure (observed in our previous study) were maintained regardless of the fluorescent particle sizes.

  16. Effect of fluorescent particle size on the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong; Vignola, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether the size of fluorescent particles affects the modulation efficiency of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF), we measured UMF and DC (direct current) signals of the fluorescence emission from four different sized fluorescent particles: (1) three carboxylate-modified fluorescent microspheres (FM) with diameters of 20 nm, 200 nm, and 1.0 µm and (2) streptavidin-conjugated Alexa Fluor 647 with a diameter of approximately 5 nm. The UMF and DC signals were simultaneously measured using a broadband lock-in amplifier and a narrowband amplifier, respectively. The ratio of the UMF strength to the DC signal strength is defined as the modulation efficiency. This modulation efficiency was then used to evaluate the effects of fluorophore size and concentration. Results show that the modulation efficiency was improved by approximately a factor of two when the size of the fluorescent particles is increased from 5 nm to 1 µm. In addition, the linear relationship between the UMF strength and ultrasound pressure (observed in our previous study) were maintained regardless of the fluorescent particle sizes. PMID:24179476

  17. Effective Particle Size From Molecular Dynamics Simulations in Fluids

    DOE PAGES

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul Michael Jr.; Rasmussen, Kim Orskov; ...

    2017-12-08

    Here, we report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. Thismore » procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks–Chandler–Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ~0.75σ, where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective “hydrodynamic” radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ, but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.« less

  18. Effective particle size from molecular dynamics simulations in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul M.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Redondo, Antonio; Vorobieff, Peter; Kober, Edward M.

    2018-04-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. This procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ˜ 0.75σ , where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective "hydrodynamic" radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ , but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.

  19. Effective Particle Size From Molecular Dynamics Simulations in Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul Michael Jr.; Rasmussen, Kim Orskov

    Here, we report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. Thismore » procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks–Chandler–Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ~0.75σ, where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective “hydrodynamic” radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ, but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.« less

  20. Effective particle size from molecular dynamics simulations in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul M.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Redondo, Antonio; Vorobieff, Peter; Kober, Edward M.

    2017-12-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. This procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ˜ 0.75σ , where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective "hydrodynamic" radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ , but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.

  1. Impact of agglomeration state of nano- and submicron sized gold particles on pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle (NP) toxicity testing comes with many challenges. Characterization of the test substance is of crucial importance and in the case of NPs, agglomeration/aggregation state in physiological media needs to be considered. In this study, we have addressed the effect of agglomerated versus single particle suspensions of nano- and submicron sized gold on the inflammatory response in the lung. Rats were exposed to a single dose of 1.6 mg/kg body weight (bw) of spherical gold particles with geometric diameters of 50 nm or 250 nm diluted either by ultrapure water or by adding phosphate buffered saline (PBS). A single dose of 1.6 mg/kg bw DQ12 quartz was used as a positive control for pulmonary inflammation. Extensive characterization of the particle suspensions has been performed by determining the zetapotential, pH, gold concentration and particle size distribution. Primary particle size and particle purity has been verified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Pulmonary inflammation (total cell number, differential cell count and pro-inflammatory cytokines), cell damage (total protein and albumin) and cytotoxicity (alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase) were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and acute systemic effects in blood (total cell number, differential cell counts, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein) 3 and 24 hours post exposure. Uptake of gold particles in alveolar macrophages has been determined by TEM. Results Particles diluted in ultrapure water are well dispersed, while agglomerates are formed when diluting in PBS. The particle size of the 50 nm particles was confirmed, while the 250 nm particles appear to be 200 nm using tracking analysis and 210 nm using TEM. No major differences in pulmonary and systemic toxicity markers were observed after instillation of agglomerated versus single gold particles of different sizes. Both agglomerated as well as single nanoparticles were taken up by

  2. The influence of particle size and curing conditions on testing mineral trioxide aggregate cement

    PubMed Central

    Ha, William Nguyen; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To assess the effects on curing conditions (dry versus submerged curing) and particle size on the compressive strength (CS) and flexural strength (FS) of set MTA cement. Materials and methods: Two different Portland cements were created, P1 and P2, with P1 < P2 in particle size. These were then used to create two experimental MTA products, M1 and M2, with M1 < M2 in particle size. Particle size analysis was performed according to ISO 13320. The particle size at the 90th percentile (i.e. the larger particles) was P1: 15.2 μm, P2: 29.1 μm, M1: 16.5 μm, and M2: 37.1 μm. M2 was cured exposed to air, or submerged in fluids of pH 5.0, 7.2 (PBS), or 7.5 for 1 week. CS and FS of the set cement were determined using a modified ISO 9917-1 and ISO 4049 methods, respectively. P1, P2, M1 and M2 were cured in PBS at physiological pH (7.2) and likewise tested for CS and FS. Results: Curing under dry conditions gave a significantly lower CS than when cured in PBS. There was a trend for lower FS for dry versus wet curing. However, this did not reach statistical significance. Cements with smaller particle sizes showed greater CS and FS at 1 day than those with larger particle sizes. However, this advantage was lost over the following 1–3 weeks. Conclusions: Experiments that test the properties of MTA should cure the MTA under wet conditions and at physiological pH. PMID:28642923

  3. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron) aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Monahan, C.; Greaney, R.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland) offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time), open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time), background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time) and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time) aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation), albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE) Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%), this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  4. Particle size distribution of rice flour affecting the starch enzymatic hydrolysis and hydration properties.

    PubMed

    de la Hera, Esther; Gomez, Manuel; Rosell, Cristina M

    2013-10-15

    Rice flour is becoming very attractive as raw material, but there is lack of information about the influence of particle size on its functional properties and starch digestibility. This study evaluates the degree of dependence of the rice flour functional properties, mainly derived from starch behavior, with the particle size distribution. Hydration properties of flours and gels and starch enzymatic hydrolysis of individual fractions were assessed. Particle size heterogeneity on rice flour significantly affected functional properties and starch features, at room temperature and also after gelatinization; and the extent of that effect was grain type dependent. Particle size heterogeneity on rice flour induces different pattern in starch enzymatic hydrolysis, with the long grain having slower hydrolysis as indicated the rate constant (k). No correlation between starch digestibility and hydration properties or the protein content was observed. It seems that in intact granules interactions with other grain components must be taken into account. Overall, particle size fractionation of rice flour might be advisable for selecting specific physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Impact of varying analytical methodologies on grain particle size determination.

    PubMed

    Kalivoda, J R; Jones, C K; Stark, C R

    2017-01-01

    The determination of particle size is an important quality control measurement for feed manufacturers, nutritionists, and producers. The current approved method for determining the geometric mean diameter by weight (d) and geometric standard deviation (S) of grains is standard ANSI/ASAE S319.4. This method controls many variables, including the suggested quantity of initial material and the type, number, and size of sieves. However, the method allows for variations in sieving time, sieve agitators, and the use of a dispersion agent. The objective of this experiment was to determine which method of particle size analysis best estimated the particle size of various cereal grain types. Eighteen samples of either corn, sorghum, or wheat were ground and analyzed using different variations of the approved method. Treatments were arranged in a 5 × 3 factorial arrangement with 5 sieving methods: 1) 10-min sieving time with sieve agitators and no dispersion agent, 2) 10-min sieving time with sieve agitators and dispersion agent, 3) 15-min sieving time with no sieve agitators or dispersion agent, 4) 15-min sieving time with sieve agitators and no dispersion agent, and 5) 15-min sieving time with sieve agitators and dispersion agent conducted in 3 grain types (ground corn, sorghum, and wheat) with 4 replicates per treatment. The analytical method that resulted in the lowest d and greatest S was considered desirable because it was presumably representative of increased movement of particles to their appropriate sieve. Analytical method affected d and S ( ≤ 0.05) measured by both standards. Inclusion of sieve agitators and dispersion agent in the sieve stack resulted in the lowest d, regardless of sieving time. Inclusion of dispersion agent reduced d ( ≤ 0.05) by 32 and 36 µm when shaken for 10 and 15 min, respectively, compared to the same sample analyzed without dispersion agent. The addition of the dispersion agent also increased S. The dispersion agent increased the

  6. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    DOE PAGES

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately and in situ using crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormalmore » size distribution. The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trend