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Sample records for binary aquila x-1

  1. Spectral-timing Analysis of the Lower kHz QPO in the Low-mass X-Ray Binary Aquila X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Jon S.; Cackett, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ∼30 μs between the 3.0–8.0 keV and 8.0–20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4-σ confidence, which may raise questions about the role of reverberation in the production of lags.

  2. Recurrent X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Aquila X-1 observations by the All Sky Monitor on Ariel 5 are presented. Data is compared with that obtained by rocket survey, and by the Uhuru, OSO 7, and OAO 3 satellites. The variability of brightness is discussed as a connection between dwarf novae and long term transient X ray sources.

  3. Simplified Picture of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries Based on Data from Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Asai, Kazumi

    2013-04-01

    We propose a simplified picture of low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) based on data obtained from Aql X-1 and 4U 1608- 52, which often produce outbursts. In this picture we propose at least three states and three state transitions: i.e., the states: (1) soft state, (2) hard-high state, and (3) hard-low state, and the state transitions: (i) hard-high state to soft state, (ii) soft state to hard-high state, and (iii) hard-high state to hard-low state or vice versa. Gases from the accretion disc of an NS-LMXB penetrate almost the entire magnetic field and accrete onto the neutron star in cases (1) and (2), whereas in case (3) some gases accrete around the magnetic poles in a manner resembling the behavior of an X-ray pulsar, and considerable gas is dispersed or ejected by the propeller effect. Transition (iii) occurs when the Alfvén radius is equal to the co-rotation radius. Therefore, in this case it is possible to estimate the strength of the neutron star's magnetic field by detecting transition (iii). We also discuss the no-accretion X-ray state or the recycled pulsar state, in which the Alfvén radius is larger than the light cylinder radius.

  4. Measuring a Truncated Disk in Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ashley L.; Tomsick, John A.; Miller, Jon M.; Chenevez, Jerome; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Feurst, Felix; V, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Parker, Michael L.; Stern, Daniel; Romano, Patrizia; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR and Swift observations of the neutron star Aquila X-1 during the peak of its 2014 July outburst. The spectrum is soft with strong evidence for a broad Fe K(alpha) line. Modeled with a relativistically broadened reflection model, we find that the inner disk is truncated with an inner radius of 15 +/- 3RG. The disk is likely truncated by either the boundary layer and/or a magnetic field. Associating the truncated inner disk with pressure from a magnetic field gives an upper limit of B < 5+/- 2x10(exp 8) G. Although the radius is truncated far from the stellar surface, material is still reaching the neutron star surface as evidenced by the X-ray burst present in the NuSTAR observation.

  5. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  6. Aquila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Eagle; abbrev. Aql, gen. Aquilae; area 652 sq. deg.) An equatorial constellation that lies between Sagitta and Sagittarius, and culminates at midnight in mid-July. Its origin dates back to Babylonian times and it is said to represent the eagle of Zeus in Greek mythology, which carried the thunderbolts that Zeus hurled at his enemies and which snatched up Ganymede to become cup-bearer to the g...

  7. Mass Flow in the Close Binary V342 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, C. N.; Polidan, R. S.; Welty, A.; Wade, R.; Etzel, P. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.

    1995-12-01

    Preliminary analysis of the eclipsing binary V342 Aquilae indicates it is undergoing an extremely active phase of mass flow. Three observational datasets provide complete orbital phase coverage of the 3.39 day period across a wide band; IUE spectroscopic data, photometric uvbyRI data, and optical spectroscopy data. IUE observations made in 1991, 1993 and 1995 include 88 low resolution SWP and LWP spectra spanning from 1150 to 3200 Angstroms. The uvbyRI optical photometry data (P. Etzel) were obtained simultaneously with the 1993 IUE observations. Limited KPNO 2.1 meter telescope optical data (A. Welty) covering from 3840 to 9000 Angstroms were taken in 1994. Our UV spectra show very pronounced Fe II absorption lines arising from ground and metastable levels, indicating an extensive circumstellar shell in the system. The strength of this absorption shows both an orbital and a cycle-to-cycle variability. The eclipse spectra display very strong emission from lines such as C II at 1335 Angstroms, Si IV at 1400 Angstroms, and C IV at 1550 Angstroms, with a striking similarity to the eclipse spectra of TT Hydrae. Based upon these data, we have deduced the effective temperatures, spectral types and orbital geometry of the two stars. The UV spectra show the primary is approximately a late B star and the secondary is a late G star. We also present velocity curve results from the optical data along with the resulting mass ratio estimate. Our ongoing analysis aims to understand the unusually large rate of mass flow occuring in V342 Aquilae. P.B.E. acknowledges support under NSF grant AST-9115104.

  8. NGC 300 X-1 and IC 10 X-1: a new breed of black hole binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, R.; Clark, J. S.; Kolb, U. C.

    2008-09-01

    Context: IC 10 X-1 has recently been confirmed as a black hole (BH) + Wolf-Rayet (WR) X-ray binary, and NGC 300 X-1 is thought to be. The only other known BH+WR candidate is Cygnus X-3. IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1 have similar X-ray properties, with 0.3-10 keV luminosities ~1038 erg s-1, and their X-ray lightcurves exhibit orbital periods ~30 h. Aims: We investigate similarities between IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1, as well as differences between these systems and the known Galactic BH binary systems. Methods: We have examined all four XMM-Newton observations of NGC 300 X-1, as well as the single XMM-Newton observation of IC 10 X-1. For each observation, we extracted lightcurves and spectra from the pn, MOS1 and MOS2 cameras; power density spectra were constructed from the lightcurves, and the X-ray emission spectra were modeled. Results: Each source exhibits power density spectra that are well described by a power law with index, γ, ~1. Such variability is characteristic of turbulence in wind accretion or disc-accreting X-ray binaries (XBs) in the high state. In this state, Galactic XBs with known BH primaries have soft, thermal emission; however the emission spectra of NGC 300 X-1 and IC 10 X-1 in the XMM-Newton observations are predominantly non-thermal. Furthermore, the Observation 1 spectrum of NGC 300 X-1 is strikingly similar to that of IC 10 X-1. Conclusions: The remarkable similarity between the behaviour of NGC 300 X-1 in Observation 1 and that of IC 10 X-1 lends strong evidence for NGC 300 X-1 being a BH+WR binary. Our spectral modeling rules out Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a neutron star (NS) for NGC 300 X-1, but not a disc-accreting NS+WR system, nor a NS low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is merely coincident with the WR. We favour disc accretion for both systems, but cannot exclude Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a BH. The unusual spectra of NGC 300 X-1 and IC 10 X-1 may be due to these systems existing in a persistently high state, whereas all known BH LMXBs

  9. The 1978 X-ray and optical outburst of Aquila X-1 /4U 1908+00/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, P. A.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Bowyer, S.; Clark, G. W.; Li, F. K.; Van Paradijs, J.; Remillard, R.; Holt, S. S.; Kaluzienski, L. J.; Junkkarinen, V. T.

    1980-01-01

    During the summer of 1978 the recurrent transient X-ray source, Aquila X-1, underwent its first major outburst in two years. This paper presents the results of extensive X-ray and optical observations of this event, which lasted for about two months. The peak X-ray luminosity was about 1.3 times that of the Crab and exhibited spectrum-dependent flickering on time scales of about 5 minutes. In addition, one very large flare was observed about one month after maximum that was also correlated with spectral changes. During this flare the previously identified optical counterpart brightened from V = 19 to a peak of V = 14.8, where it was distinctly blue (U - B = 0.4), and then reddened during the decay. These observations are interpreted in terms of a standard accretion disk model with particular emphasis on the similarities to Sco -1 and other dwarf X-ray systems.

  10. Magnetic Field in X-Ray Binary Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karitskaya, E. A.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Hubrig, S.; Gnedin, Yu. N.; Pogodin, M. A.; Yudin, R. V.; Agafonov, M. I.; Sharova, O. I.

    Our spectroscopic observations with FORS1 at 8.2-m VLT telescope (Paranal, Chile) lead to detection of magnetic field in the X-ray binary Cyg X-1. That is the first successful attempt of measuring magnetic field in a binary with a black hole. The value of the mean longitudinal magnetic field in optical component (O9.7 Iab supergiant) changes regularly with the orbital phase reaching its maximum of 130 G (σ≈20 G). The measurements based on Zeeman effect were carried through over all observed supergiant photosphere absorption spectral lines. Similar measurements over the emission line He II λ 4686 Å yielded a value of several hundreds Gauss of a smaller significance level. The system Doppler tomogram we build over the line profiles shows that He II λ 4686 Å originates in the outer regions of the accretion structure. The values measured correspond, in the frame of the disc accretion standard model, to a near-black-hole field of ˜ 10^8-10^9 G and may be responsible for the observed Cyg X-1 X-ray flickering. Also some consequences of such magnetic field existence in Cyg X-1 optical component photosphere were suggested.

  11. Quiescent Thermal Emission from the Neutron Star in Aquila X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, Robert E.; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F.; Pavlov, George G.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2001-10-01

    We report on the quiescent spectrum measured with Chandra ACIS-S of the transient, type I, X-ray-bursting neutron star Aql X-1, immediately following an accretion outburst. The neutron star radius, assuming a pure hydrogen atmosphere and a hard power-law spectrum, is R∞=13.4+5-4(d/5 kpc) km. Based on the historical outburst record of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor, the quiescent luminosity is consistent with that predicted by Brown, Bildsten, and Rutledge from deep crustal heating, lending support to this theory for providing a minimum quiescent luminosity of transient neutron stars. While not required by the data, the hard power-law component can account for 18%+/-8% of the 0.5-10 keV thermal flux. Short-timescale intensity variability during this observation is less than 15% rms (3 σ 0.0001-1 Hz, 0.2-8 keV). Comparison between the Chandra spectrum and three X-ray spectral observations made between 1992 October and 1996 October find all spectra consistent with a pure H atmosphere, but with temperatures ranging from 145 to 168 eV, spanning a factor of 1.87+/-0.21 in observed flux. The source of variability in the quiescent luminosity on long timescales (greater than years) remains a puzzle. If from accretion, then it remains to be explained why the quiescent accretion rate provides a luminosity so nearly equal to that from deep crustal heating.

  12. Slow and Fast Transitions in the Rising Phase of Outbursts from NS-LMXB Transients, Aquila X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Serino, Motoko; Nakahira, Satoshi; Negoro, Hitoshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed the initial rising behaviors of X-ray outbursts from two transient low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) containing a neutron-star (NS), Aquila X-1 (Aql X-1) and 4U 1608-52, which are continuously being monitored by MAXI/GSC in 2-20 keV, RXTE/ASM in 2-10 keV, and Swift/BAT in 15-50 keV. We found that the observed ten outbursts can be classified into two types based on the patterns of the relative intensity evolutions in the two energy bands below/above 15 keV. One type behaves as the 15-50 keV intensity achieves the maximum during the initial hard-state period, and drops greatly at the hard-to-soft state transition. On the other hand, the other type does as both the 2-15 keV and 15-50 keV intensities achieve the maximums after the transition. The former have the longer initial hard-state (gtrsim 9 d) than the latter (lesssim 5 d). Therefore, we named them as slow-type (S-type) and fast-type (F-type), respectively. These two types also show differences in the luminosity at the hard-to-soft state transition as well as in the average luminosity before the outburst started, where the S-type are higher than the F-type in both. These results suggest that the X-ray radiation during the pre-outburst period, which heats up the accretion disk and delays the disk transition (i.e., from a geometrically thick disk to a thin one), would determine whether the following outburst becomes S-type or F-type. The luminosity when the hard-to-soft state transition occurs is higher than ˜8 × 1036 erg s-1 in the S-type, which corresponds to 4% of the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 M⊙ NS.

  13. Timing and Spectral Studies of the Peculiar X-ray Binary Circinus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.

    2003-08-26

    Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) is an X-ray binary displaying an array of phenomena which makes it unique in our Galaxy. Despite several decades of observation, controversy surrounds even the most basic facts about this system. It is generally classified as a Neutron Star (NS) Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB),though this classification is based primarily on the observation of Type I X-ray Bursts by EXOSAT in 1985. It is believed to be in a very eccentric {approx} 16.5 day orbit, displaying periodic outbursts in the radio and other frequency bands (including optical and IR) which reinforce the notion that this is in fact the orbital period. Cir X-1 lies in the plane of the Galaxy, where optical identification of the companion is made difficult due to dust obscuration. The companion is thought to be a low mass star, though a high mass companion has not currently been ruled out. In this work, the author analyzes recent observations of Cir X-1 made with the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment, as well as archival observations of Cir X-1 made by a variety of instruments, from as early as 1969. The fast (< 1 s) timing properties of Cir X-1 are studied by performing FFT analyses of the USA data. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 1-50 Hz range are found and discussed in the context of recent correlations which question the leading models invoked for their generation. The energy dependence of the QPOs (rms increasing with energy) argues against them being generated in the disk and favors models in which the QPOs are related to a higher energy Comptonizing component. The power spectrum of Cir X-1 in its soft state is compared to that of Cygnus X-1 (Cyg X-1), the prototypical black hole candidate. Using scaling arguments the author argues that the mass of Cir X-1 could exceed significantly the canonical 1.4 M{circle_dot} mass of a neutron star, possibly partly explaining why this object appears so different to other neutron stars. The spectral evolution of Cir X-1 is

  14. The youngest known X-ray binary: Circinus X-1 and its natal supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Calvelo-Santos, D. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S.; Wijnands, R.; Van der Klis, M.

    2013-12-20

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  15. The Youngest Known X-Ray Binary: Circinus X-1 and Its Natal Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Calvelo-Santos, D. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  16. The mass of the black hole in the X-ray binary LMC X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubekerov, M. K.; Antokhina, E. A.; Gostev, N. Yu.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Shimansky, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    A dynamical estimate of the mass of the black hole in the LMC X-1 binary system is obtained in the framework of a Roche model for the optical star, based on fitting of the He I 4471 Å and He II 4200 Å absorption lines assuming LTE. The mass of the black hole derived from the radial-velocity curve for the He II 4200 Å line is m x = 10.55 M ⊙, close to the value found earlier based on a model with two point bodies [1].

  17. Understanding Black Hole X-ray Binaries: The Case of Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, Katja

    2008-01-01

    Black Hole X-ray Binaries are known to display distinct emission states that differ in their X-ray spectra, their X-ray timing properties (on times scales less than 1 s) and their radio emission. In recent years monitoring observations, specially with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), have provided us with detailed empirical modeling of the phenomenology of the different states as well as a unification scheme of the long term evolution of black holes, transient and persistent, in terms of these states. Observations of the persistent High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) Cygnus X-l have been at the forefront of learning about black hole states since its optical identification through a state transition in 1973. In this talk I will present in depth studies of several different aspects of the accretion process in this system. The main data base for these studies is an ongoing RXTE and Ryle radio telescope bi-weekly monitoring campaign that started in 1997. I will discuss high-resolution timing results, especially power spectra, which first gave rise to the Lorentzian description now widely used for black hole and neutron star binaries, and time lags, which we found to be especially well suited to identify state transitions. The evolution of spectral, timing, and radio parameters over years will be shown, including the rms-flux relation and the observation of a clearly correlated radio/x-ray flare. We also observed Cygnus X-1 with INTEGRAL, which allowed us to extend timing and spectral studies to higher energies, with XMM, which provided strong constraints on the parameters of the 6.4 keV iron fluorescence line, and with Chandra, which provided the most in depth study to date of the stellar wind in this system. Models based on the physical conditions in the accretion region are still mainly concentrated on the one or other of the observational areas but they are expanding: as an example I will review results from a jet model for the quantitative description of the

  18. Chandra and XMM monitoring of the black hole X-ray binary IC 10 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Cappallo, Rigel C.; Moro, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The massive black hole (BH)+Wolf-Rayet (WR) binary IC 10 X-1 was observed in a series of 10 Chandra and two XMM-Newton observations spanning 2003-2012, showing consistent variability around 7 × 1037 erg s-1, with a spectral hardening event in 2009. We phase connected the entire light curve by folding the photon arrival times on a series of trial periods spanning the known orbital period and its uncertainty, refining the X-ray period to P = 1.45175(1) d. The duration of minimum flux in the X-ray eclipse is ˜5 h which together with the optical radial velocity (RV) curve for the companion yields a radius for the eclipsing body of 8-10 R⊙ for the allowed range of masses. The orbital separation (a1 + a2) = 18.5-22 R⊙ then provides a limiting inclination i > 63° for total eclipses to occur. The eclipses are asymmetric (egress duration ˜0.9 h) and show energy dependence, suggestive of an accretion disc hotspot and corona. The eclipse is much (˜5×) wider than the 1.5-2 R⊙ WR star, pointing to absorption/scattering in the dense wind of the WR star. The same is true of the close analog NGC 300 X-1. RV measurements of the He II [λλ4686] line from the literature show a phase shift with respect to the X-ray ephemeris such that the velocity does not pass through zero at mid-eclipse. The X-ray eclipse leads inferior conjunction of the RV curve by ˜90°, so either the BH is being eclipsed by a trailing shock/plume, or the He II line does not directly trace the motion of the WR star and instead originates in a shadowed partially ionized region of the stellar wind.

  19. Activities of X-ray binaries accompanied by a neutron star with weak magnetic field: Cir X-1, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Asai, Kazumi

    This paper is presented on X-ray activities of X-ray binaries accompanied by a neutron star with weak magnetic field. Neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs) have been well studied so far, but there are still unknown problems concerning activities of outbursts and X-ray spectral features. We can define the soft and hard states which show different spectra created from each disk structure. These states depend on the gas accretion rate causing viscosity change in the disk, whereas we have pointed out an importance of magnetic field in NS-LMXB for X-ray activities (Matsuoka & Asai 2013). Thus, we have obtained decay features occurred by a propeller effect for Aql X-1 and 4U1608-52, and thus, we have defined the propeller effect levels of these sources (Asai et al. 2013). A companion star of Cir X-1 is a star of B5~A0 type, but it has X-ray spectral feature similar to NS-LMXB as well as it produced type I X-ray bursts. A long history over 40 years of X-ray observations has provided that Cir X-1 X-ray intensities have many varieties from continuous variable fluxes with Z-type feature of NS-LMXB to recurrent outburst fluxes with Atoll-type feature on a time scale of years. Recent MAXI observations have revealed a strange sudden decay feature in some outbursts. It is difficult to explain this decay feature by the simple picture which causes by ordinary mechanisms known in NS-LMXB such as a state transition, a propeller effect and a brink due to disk irradiation (Powell et al. 2007). Therefore, we introduced new type of instability of the accretion disk in relation to stellar wind stripping effect (Asai et al. 2014) which may be common to a system consisting of a compact star and an ordinary massive star.

  20. Masses of the components of the HDE226868/Cyg X-1 binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, Janusz

    Recent determination of the distance to HDE 226868/Cyg X-1 binary system (Reid et al., 2011) and more precise determination of the effective temperature of HDE 226868 (Caballero-Nieves et al., 2009) permit a more accurate estimate of the masses of both components. Using up to date evolutionary models, I obtain a mass range of between 25 to 35 Msun for the mass of the supergiant and between 13 to 23 Msun for the mass of the black hole. Accepting more liberal estimates of uncertainties in both the distance and the effective temperature, one may extend these ranges to 21 to 35 Msun and 10 to 23 Msun for both masses, respectively. The most likely values within these ranges are, respectively, 27Msun and 16Msun. The obtained mass of black hole agrees with the value 15 ± 1 Msun suggested by Orosz et al. (2011). However, the value suggested by them for the mass of the supergiant of 19 ± 2 Msun should not be used as such a star violates the mass-luminosity relation for the the massive core hydrogen burning stars. This consideration was not incorporated into the iterative process of Orosz et al. To resolve this violation I consider the possibility that the hydrogen content of HDE 222268 might be lowered as a result of the mass transfer and the induced fast rotation of the mass gainer. I analyzed the evolutionary effects of such situation and found that, while important, they do not invalidate the conclusions listed above. If, as a result of the rotation induced mixing, the present hydrogen content of HDE 226868 is equal about 0.6 (as suggested by some observational data), then its present mass may be somewhat lower: about 24 Msun rather than about 27 Msun.

  1. X-ray Studies of the Black Hole Binary Cygnus X-1 with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shin'ya

    2011-03-01

    In order to study X-ray properties of black hole binaries in so-called Low/Hard state, we analyzed 0.5--300 keV data of Cyg X-1, taken with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer and the Hard X-ray Detector onboard the X-ray satellite Suzaku. The data were acquired on 25 occasions from 2005 to 2009, with a total exposure of ~450 ks. The source was in the Low/Hard state throughout, and the 0.5-300 keV luminosity changed by a factor of 4, corresponding to 2-10% of the Eddington limit for a 10 Mo black hole. Among the 25 data sets, the first one was already analyzed by Makishima et al. (2008), who successfully reproduced the wide-band spectrum by a linear combination of an emission from a standard accretion disk, soft and hard Comptonization continua, and reprocessed features. Given this, we analyzed the 25 data sets for intensity-related spectral changes, on three different time scales using different analysis methods. One is the source behavior on time scales of days to months, studied via direct comparison among the 25 spectra which are averaged over individual observations. Another is spectral changes on time scales of 1-2 seconds, revealed through ``intensity-sorted spectroscopy''. The other is spectral changes on time scales down to ~0.1 seconds, conducted using ``shot analysis" technique which was originally developed by Negoro et al. (1997) with Ginga. These studies partially incorporated spectral fitting in terms of a thermal Comptonization model. We payed great attention to instrumental problems caused by the source brightness, and occasional ``dipping" episodes which affects the Cyg X-1 spectrum at low energies. The shot analysis incorporated a small fraction of XIS data that were taken in the P-sum mode with a time resolution of 7.8 msec. Through these consistent analyses of all the 25 data sets, we found that a significant soft X-ray excess develops as the source gets brighter. Comparing results from the different time scales, the soft excess was further

  2. Sco X-1 in LIGO: directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadors, Grant; Goetz, Evan; Riles, Keith

    2014-03-01

    Scorpius X-1 and similar low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems with neutron stars contain favorable conditions for the emission of continuous gravitational waves (GW). Companion star accretion is believed to recycle the neutron star, spinning it up to high rotational speeds. That accretion could also induce non-axisymmetries in the neutron star, leading to detectable GW emission. Advanced LIGO and other 2nd-generation interferometric observatories will permit searches for such gravitational waves using new algorithms, including the TwoSpect program, which was developed originally for all-sky binary searches. In this presentation we discuss an implementation of TwoSpect using fine templates in parameter space at the initial stage and optimized to search for LMXBs, such as Sco X-1, where some of the orbital parameters are known. Results from simulations will be shown.

  3. Search for Hard X-Ray Emission from Aquila X-1: High Energy Emission from Gamma-ray Radio Star 2CG 135+1/LSI 61 305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Several investigations supported by these CCRO grant were completed or are close to completion. The study of EGRET data for the unidentified source 2CG 135+01 was very fruitful. We discovered transient gamma-ray emission by combining several data obtained since 1994 through 1997. It is the first time that time variable emission is established for this enigmatic source, and clearly an interpretation in terms of an isolated radio pulsar (Geminga-like) is disfavored now. Our preferred model is a Galactic source, probably an energetic pulsar (such as PSR129-63) in a binary system producing gamma-rays because of pulsar wind/mass outflow interaction. We also accumulated may data concerning the radio source LSI 61 303, the possible counterpart of 2CG 135+01. We show that a possible anti-correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission exists. This anticorrelation is evident only in the energy range above 100 MeV, as demonstrated by the lack of it obtained from OSSE data. If confirmed, this anti-correlation would prove to be very important for the interpretation of the hundreds of unidentified gamma-ray sources currently discovered by EGRET near the Galactic plane, and would point to a new class of sources in addition to AGNs and isolated pulsars. We also completed the analysis of several time variable gamma-ray sources near the Galactic plane, with the discussion of evidence for transient emission from 2EG J1813-12 and 2EG J1828+01. We completed several investigations regarding gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including the study of the brightness distribution for different spectral/duration GRB sub-classes, an investigation of acceleration processes and their consequences for GRB afterglow emission [61, the application of the synchrotron shock model of GRBs to X-ray energies.

  4. Tuning into Scorpius X-1: adapting a continuous gravitational-wave search for a known binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadors, Grant David; Goetz, Evan; Riles, Keith

    2016-05-01

    We describe how the TwoSpect data analysis method for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) has been tuned for directed sources such as the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1). A comparison of five search algorithms generated simulations of the orbital and GW parameters of Sco X-1. Whereas that comparison focused on relative performance, here the simulations help quantify the sensitivity enhancement and parameter estimation abilities of this directed method, derived from an all-sky search for unknown sources, using doubly Fourier-transformed data. Sensitivity is shown to be enhanced when the source sky location and period are known, because we can run a fully templated search, bypassing the all-sky hierarchical stage using an incoherent harmonic sum. The GW strain and frequency, as well as the projected semi-major axis of the binary system, are recovered and uncertainty estimated, for simulated signals that are detected. Upper limits for GW strain are set for undetected signals. Applications to future GW observatory data are discussed. Robust against spin-wandering and computationally tractable despite an unknown frequency, this directed search is an important new tool for finding gravitational signals from LMXBs.

  5. Combining Fits of The Optical Photometry and X-ray Spectra of the Low Mass X-ray Binary V1408 Aquilae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sebastian; Mason, Paul A.; Robinson, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    V1408 Aquilae is a binary system with a black hole primary accreting matter from a low mass secondary. We observed the system at the McDonald Observatory and collected 126 hours of high speed optical photometry on the source. We modeled the optical light curve using the XRbinary light curve synthesis software. The best fits to the optical light curve seem to suggest that the primary is a low mass black hole, however we cannot exclude some high mass solutions. Our models slightly favor a 3 solar mass primary at an inclination of about 13 degrees. In order to further constrain these parameters, and verify their validity we compared the fits of the optical light curve to fits to the X-ray spectra of the source. Using data from the Chandra Transmission Grating Catalog and Archive and the ISIS software analysis package we modeled the spectra of the source with a multi-temperature blackbody for a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning black hole and an additional photon power law component. The fits to the optical lightcurve and X-ray spectra are in agreement, from this we conclude that the case for V1408 Aql to be at a low inclination and harbor a low mass black hole is plausible.

  6. Circinus X-1: a Laboratory for Studying the Accretion Phenomenon in Compact Binary X-Ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson-Saba, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the binary X-ray source Circinus X-1 provide samples of a range of spectral and temporal behavior whose variety is thought to reflect a broad continuum of accretion conditions in an eccentric binary system. The data support an identification of three or more X-ray spectral components, probably associated with distinct emission regions.

  7. How Massive are the Heaviest Black Holes in X-ray Binaries? Exploring IC 10 X-1 and its Kind.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Maccarone, Tom; Steiner, James F.; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Yang, Jun; Binder, Breanna A.; Cappallo, Rigel

    2016-01-01

    Black hole X-ray binaries represent a unique probe of stellar evolution and the most extreme physical conditions found in nature. The X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 occupies an important niche as a link between BH-XRBs and Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources (ULX) due to its intermediate luminosity (10^38 erg/s), and role as a central exemplar of the association of between low metallicity galaxies and maximum BH mass.The most secure and direct dynamical evidence for any BH mass comes from the radial velocity (RV) curve coupled with eclipse timing measurements. We phase-connected X-ray timing data accumulated over a decade with Chandra/XMM, with the optical RV curve, revealing a surprizing simultenaity of mid X-ray eclipse and the maximum blueshift velocity of He II emission lines. Our interpretation is that the optical emission lines originate in a shadowed sector of the WR star's stellar wind which escapes X-ray ionization by the compact object. The RV shifts are therefore a projection effect of the stellar wind, and unrelated to the system's mass function which becomes completely unknown. Chandra, XMM and NuStar datasets present a complex picture of radiative transfer through a photo-ionized wind. A search for the orbital period derivative (P-dot) by X-ray timing offers additonal insights, and we present a simulation for the feasibility of constraining P-dot via optical means.This is a substantial change to our understanding of IC 10 X-1, and with similar results reported for its "near twin" NGC 300 X-1, adds new a dimension to the facinating question of the maximum mass for stellar BHs.

  8. BVRI Photometric Study of V1695 Aquilae, an Extreme Mass Ratio, High fill-out Contact Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Caton, Daniel B.; Faulkner, Danny R.; Van Hamme, Walter V.; Gray, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    CCD, BVRI light curves of V1695 AQL were taken during the Fall 2016 season at the Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory with the 0.6-m reflector of the SARA South observatory in remote mode. It is an eclipsing binary with a period of 0.4128251d. The light curves yield a total eclipse (eclipse duration: 51 minutes) but all have amplitudes of only ~0.3 mags. The spectral type is ~G8V (~5500 K). Four times of minimum light were calculated, all primary eclipses, from our present observations:HJD I = 2457614.68359 ±0.0002, 2457634.49320 ±0.00037, 2457636.56250 ±0.00006, and 2457635.68247 ±0.00002dThe following quadratic ephemerides was determined from all available times of minimum light.JD Hel MinI = 2457636.56135±0.00131d + 0.4128407±0.000011 × E + 0.00000000097 ±0.00000000009 × E2A 14 year period study reveals a period increase in the orbital period with high confidence. Thus, the mass ratio may be tending to more extreme values as the binary coalesces. The solution is that of an Extreme Mass Ratio Binary. The mass ratio is only 0.15. Its Roche Lobe fill-out is a hefty 42%. As expected in binaries of this type, it has cool spot regions. The secondary component has a temperature of ~5800 K, which makes it a W-type W UMa Binary. More details of our results will be given.

  9. Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from binary systems: Parameter-space metrics and optimal Scorpius X-1 sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaci, Paola; Prix, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    We derive simple analytic expressions for the (coherent and semicoherent) phase metrics of continuous-wave sources in low-eccentricity binary systems for the two regimes of long and short segments compared to the orbital period. The resulting expressions correct and extend previous results found in the literature. We present results of extensive Monte Carlo studies comparing metric mismatch predictions against the measured loss of detection statistics for binary parameter offsets. The agreement is generally found to be within ˜10 %- 30 % . For an application of the metric template expressions, we estimate the optimal achievable sensitivity of an Einstein@Home directed search for Scorpius X-1, under the assumption of sufficiently small spin wandering. We find that such a search, using data from the upcoming advanced detectors, would be able to beat the torque-balance level [R. V. Wagoner, Astrophys. J. 278, 345 (1984); L. Bildsten, Astrophys. J. 501, L89 (1998).] up to a frequency of ˜500 - 600 Hz , if orbital eccentricity is well constrained, and up to a frequency of ˜160 - 200 Hz for more conservative assumptions about the uncertainty on orbital eccentricity.

  10. A holistic view of a black hole binary: bringing together spectral, timing, and polarization analysis of Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The microquasar Cygnus X-1 is a persistent high mass X-ray binary, consisting of an O-type supergiant and a stellar mass black hole, and therefore one of those systems which are often considered downscaled versions of AGN, an analogy supported in Cyg X-1 by observations of radio jets. The size and proximity of such systems allow us to observe phenomena on time-scales which are not accessible in their supermassive siblings. Cyg X-1 shows distinct X-ray states, characterized by X-ray spectral and timing properties. Radio behavior is strongly correlated with the X-ray states and a jet-break exists in the mid-IR range in the hard state. The source state is therefore essential for the interpretation of data at all wavelengths. For most observations lacking broadband X-ray coverage, however, the exact state determination proves challenging. In this work, I will present a recently developed novel approach that uses data from all sky monitors such as RXTE-ASM, MAXI, Swift-BAT, and Fermi-GBM to define states and state transitions on a timescales of a few hours over a period of more than 17 years. This approach can be used to investigate the context of high resolution observations of Cyg X-1 with Chandra and XMM, and to conduct state-resolved polarization analysis with INTEGRAL. I then combine spectral and model-independent X-ray timing analysis of over 1900 RXTE orbits over 14 years and investigate the evolution of Fourier-dependent timing parameters such as power spectra, coherence, and time lag at different photon energies over all spectral states. Results include a correlation between the shape of the power and time lag spectra in all hard and intermediate states, a photon-energy dependent increase of the fractional rms in the soft state, and a strong energy-dependency of the power spectra shapes during state transitions. The findings are crucial for constraining physical models for accretion and ejection in compact objects and for comparisons with other accreting

  11. An X-ray spectroscopic study of the SMC X-1/Sk 160 X-ray binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdowski, Patrick Stephen

    1999-11-01

    In this thesis, the properties of the circumstellar environment of the high-mass X-ray binary system SMC X- 1/Sk 160 are explored using observational data from several satellite X-ray observatories. First, we have investigated the cause of the quasiperiodic ~60 day high-state low-state X-ray flux variation, previously suggested, and now clearly evident in extensive BATSE and RXTE monitoring data. Data from short-term pointed observations with the Ginga, ROSAT, ASCA, and RXTE observatories, show that while the uneclipsed flux varies by as much as a factor of 20 between high and low states, the eclipsed flux consists of approximately the same flux of reprocessed radiation in both states. From this we conclude that the high-low cycle is due to a quasi-periodic occultation of the source, most likely by a precessing tilted accretion disk around the neutron star. Next, we investigate the composition and distribution of the wind of Sk 160, the supergiant companion of the X-ray star SMC X-1, by comparing an X-ray spectrum of the source, obtained with the ASCA observatory during an eclipse with the computed spectra of reprocessed radiation from circumstellar matter with various density distributions. We show that the metal abundance in the wind of SMC X-1 is no greater than a few tenths of solar, as has been determined for other objects in the Magellanic Clouds. We also show that the observed spectrum is not consistent with the density distributions of circumstellar matter of the spherically symmetric form derived for line-driven winds, nor the density distribution from a hydrodynamic simulation of the X-ray perturbed and line-driven wind by Blondin & Woo (1995). Essential properties of a density distribution that would yield agreement with the observed spectrum are defined. Finally, we discuss prospects for future studies of this kind based on high-resolution spectroscopy data expected from the AXAF mission. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14

  12. Doppler Tomography in 2D and 3D of the X-ray Binary Cyg X-1 for June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharova, O. I.; Agafonov, M. I.; Karitskaya, E. A.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Zharikov, S. V.; Butenko, G. Z.; Bondar, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    The 2D and 3D Doppler tomograms of X-ray binary system Cyg X-1 (V1357 Cyg) were reconstructed from spectral data for the line HeII 4686Å obtained with 2-m telescope of the Peak Terskol Observatory (Russia) and 2.1-m telescope of the Mexican National Observatory in June, 2007. Information about gas motions outside the orbital plane, using all of the three velocity components Vx, Vy, Vz, was obtained for the first time. The tomographic reconstruction was carried out for the system inclination angle of 45°. The equal resolution (50 × 50 × 50 km/s) is realized in this case, in the orbital plane (Vx, Vy) and also in the perpendicular direction Vz. The checkout tomograms were realized also for the inclination angle of 40° because of the angle uncertainty. Two versions of the result showed no qualitative discrepancy. Details of the structures revealed by the 3D Doppler tomogram were analyzed.

  13. Hercules X-1: Spectral Variability of an X-Ray Pulsar in a Stellar Binary System. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    A cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment onboard the Orbiting Solar Observatory 8 (OSO-8), observed Her x-1 continuously for approximately 8 days. Spectral-temporal correlations of the X-ray emission were obtained. The major results concern observations of: (1) iron band emission, (2) spectral hardening (increase in effective x-ray temperature) within the X-ray pulse, and (3) a transition from an X-ray low state to a high state. The spectrum obtained prior to the high state can be interpreted as reflected emission from a hot coronal gas surrounding an accretion disk, which itself shields the primary X-ray source from the line of sight during the low state. The spectral hardening within the X-ray pulse was indicative of the beaming mechanism at the neutron star surface. The hardest spectrum by pulse phase was identified with the line of sight close to the Her x-1 magnetic dipole axis, and the X-ray pencil beam become harder with decreasing angle between the line of sight and the dipole axis.

  14. On the Nature of the Variability Power Decay towards Soft Spectral States in X-Ray Binaries. Case Study in Cyg X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhinikov, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the Fourier Power Density Spectrum (PDS) observed from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard and intermediate spectral states is a broad band-limited noise, characterized by a constant below some frequency (a "break" frequency) and a power law above this frequency. It has been shown that the variability of this type can be produced by the inward diffusion of the local driving perturbations in a bounded configuration (accretion disk or corona). In the framework of this model, the perturbation diffusion time to is related to the phenomenological break frequency, while the PDS power-law slope above the "break" is determined by the viscosity distribution over the configuration. The perturbation diffusion scenario explains the decay of the power of X-ray variability observed in a number of compact sources (containing black hole and neutron star) during an evolution of theses sources from low/hard to high/soft states. We compare the model predictions with the subset of data from Cyg X-1 collected by the Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE). Our extensive analysis of the Cyg X-1 PDSs demonstrates that the observed integrated power P(sub x), decreases approximately as a square root of the characteristic frequency of the driving oscillations v(sub dr). The RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 allow us to infer P(sub dr), and t(sub o) as a function of v(sub dr). We also apply the basic parameters of observed PDSs, power-law index and low frequency quasiperiodic oscillations. to infer Reynolds (Re) number from the observations using the method developed in our previous paper. Our analysis shows that Re-number increases from values about 10 in low/hard state to that about 70 during the high/soft state. Subject headings: accretion, accretion disks-black hole physics-stars:individual (Cyg X-1) :radiation mechanisms: nonthermal-physical data and processes

  15. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ˜8 R G, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L Edd ˜ 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  16. On the Nature of the Variability Power Decay toward Soft Spectral States in X-Ray Binaries: Case Study in Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2008-05-01

    A characteristic feature of the Fourier power density spectrum (PDS) observed from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard and intermediate spectral states is a broadband-limited noise characterized by a constant below some frequency (a "break" frequency) and a power law above this frequency. It has been shown that the variability of this type can be produced by the inward diffusion of the local driving perturbations in a bounded configuration (accretion disk or corona). In the framework of this model, the perturbation diffusion time t0 is related to the phenomenological break frequency, while the PDS power-law slope above the "break" is determined by the viscosity distribution over the configuration. The perturbation diffusion scenario explains the decay of the power of X-ray variability observed in a number of compact sources (containing black holes and neutron stars) during an evolution of these sources from low/hard to high/soft states. We compare the model predictions with the subset of data from Cyg X-1 collected by the Rossi X-Ray Time Explorer (RXTE). Our extensive analysis of the Cyg X-1 PDSs demonstrates that the observed integrated power Px decreases approximately as the square root of the characteristic frequency of the driving oscillations νdr. The RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 allow us to infer Pdr and t0 as a function of νdr. Using the inferred dependences of the integrated power of the driving oscillations Pdr and t0 on νdr we demonstrate that the power predicted by the model also decays as Px,diff propto ν-0.5dr, which is similar to the observed Px behavior. We also apply the basic parameters of observed PDSs, power-law indices, and low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations to infer the Reynolds number (Re) from the observations using the method developed in our previous paper. Our analysis shows that Re increases from values of about 10 in low/hard state to about 70 during the high/soft state.

  17. On the nature of the variability power decay towards soft spectral states in X-ray binaries. Case study in Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the Fourier Power Density Spectrum (PDS) observed from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard and intermediate spectral states is a broad band-limited noise, characterized by a constant below some frequency (a ``break'' frequency) and a power law above this frequency. It has been shown that the variability of this type can be produced by the inward diffusion of the local driving perturbations in a bounded configuration (accretion disk or corona). In the framework of this model, the perturbation diffusion time t0 is related to the phenomenological break frequency, while the PDS power-law slope above the ``break'' is determined by the viscosity distribution over the configuration. The perturbation diffusion scenario explains the decay of the power of X-ray variability observed in a number of compact sources (containing black hole and neutron star) during an evolution of theses sources from low/hard to high/soft states. We compare the model predictions with the subset of data from Cyg X-1 collected by the Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE). Our extensive analysis of the Cyg X-1 PDSs demonstrates that the observed integrated power Px decreases approximately as a square root of the characteristic frequency of the driving oscillations νdr. The RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 allow us to infer Pdr and t0 as a function of νdr. Using the inferred dependences of the integrated power of the driving oscillations Pdr and t0 on νdr we demonstrate that the power predicted by the model also decays as Px,diff~νdr-0.5 that is similar to the observed Px behavior. We also apply the basic parameters of observed PDSs, power-law index and low frequency quasiperiodic oscillations, to infer Reynolds (Re) number from the observations using the method developed in our previous paper. Our analysis shows that Re-number increases from values about 10 in low/hard state to that about 70 during the high/soft state.

  18. Large-scale environments of binary AGB stars probed by Herschel. I. Morphology statistics and case studies of R Aquarii and W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Nowotny, W.; Cox, N. L. J.; Aringer, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Decin, L.; van Eck, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kornfeld, K.; Mecina, M.; Posch, Thomas; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample offers a selection of 78 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) observed with the PACS photometer on-board Herschel at 70 μm and 160 μm. For most of these objects, the dusty AGB wind is not spherically symmetric and the wind shape can be subdivided into four classes. In the present paper we concentrate on the influence of a companion on the morphology of the stellar wind. Literature was searched to find binaries in the MESS sample, which were subsequently linked to their wind-morphology class to assert that the binaries are not distributed equally among the classes. In the second part of the paper we concentrate on the circumstellar environment of the two prominent objects R Aqr and W Aql. Each shows a characteristic signature of a companion interaction with the stellar wind. For the symbiotic star R Aqr, PACS revealed two perfectly opposing arms that in part reflect the previously observed ring-shaped nebula in the optical. However, from the far-IR there is evidence that the emitting region is elliptical rather than circular. The outline of the wind of W Aql seems to follow a large Archimedean spiral formed by the orbit of the companion but also shows strong indications of an interaction with the interstellar medium. We investigated the nature of the companion of W Aql and found that the magnitude of the orbital period supports the size of the spiral outline. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Cygnus X-1 is one of the strongest x-ray sources. It is the first celestial object for which we had reasonably convincing evidence that it is a BLACK HOLE. Its x-ray properties include an ultra-soft spectrum, compared to massive x-ray binaries containing a neutron star, rapid (˜1 s) flickering, and high/low flux states with different spectral characteristics. In 1971, a RADIO SOURCE appeared at...

  20. Long-Term Properties of Accretion Discs in X-ray Binaries. 1; The Variable Third Period in SMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, P. A.; Clarkson, W. I.; Coe, M. J.; Laycock, S.; Tout, M.; Wilson, C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Long term X-ray monitoring data from the RXTE All Sky Monitor (ASM) reveal that the third (superorbital) period in SMC X-1 is not constant but varies between 40-60 days. A dynamic power spectrum analysis indicates that the third period has been present continuously throughout the five years of ASM observations. This period changed smoothly from 60 days to 45 days and then returned to its former value, on a timescale of approximately 1600 days. During the nearly 4 years of overlap between the CGRO & RXTE missions, the simultaneous BATSE hard X-ray data confirm this variation in SMC X-1. Sources of systematic error and possible artefacts are investigated and found to be incapable of reproducing the results reported here. Our disco cry of such an instability in the superorbital period of SMC X-1 is interpreted in the context of recent theoretical studies of warped, precessing accretion discs. We find that the behaviour of SMC X-1 is consistent with a radiation - driven warping model.

  1. Aquila field: Advanced contracting strategies

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Aquila oil field, in 2,800 ft of water, is in the middle of the Otranto Channel in the Mediterranean Sea, approximately 28 miles offshore southern Italy, and is subject to difficult sea and weather conditions. The many difficulties, caused mainly by water depth, requires the use of advanced technology that can be obtained only through the direct association with contractor companies. This solution safeguards the technological reliability and allows for maximum control of time and cost. The selection of a floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) system resulted from a feasibility study that indicated this solution was the only method that would provide economical exploitation of the Aquila field. The system includes flowlines and control lines. The ship, FPSO Agip Firenze, has been specially redesigned to manage the field development. Agip will provide the subsea production system, the Christmas tree, control system, and artificial lift.

  2. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in supergiant fast X-ray transient and classical supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-García, A.; Shenar, T.; Torrejón, J. M.; Oskinova, L.; Martínez-Núñez, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Rodes-Roca, J. J.; González-Galán, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Bernabeu, G.; Sander, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are two types of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. Aims: To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyze the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. As a next step, we compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. Methods: We use archival infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations, and analyze them with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. We derive the physical properties of the stars and their stellar winds, accounting for the influence of X-rays on the stellar winds. Results: We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). The distance to the sources have been revised and also agree well with the estimations already available in the literature. In IGR J17544-2619 we are able to narrow the uncertainty to d = 3.0 ± 0.2 kpc. From the stellar radius of the donor and its X-ray behavior, the eccentricity of IGR J17544-2619 is constrained to e< 0.25. The derived chemical abundances point to certain mixing during the lifetime of the donors. An important difference between the stellar winds of the

  3. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of the flaring X-ray source, Aquila A-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Charles, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the summer of 1978 the recurrent transient X-ray source, Aquila X-1, underwent its first major outburst in two years. The results of extensive observations at X-ray and optical wavelengths throughout this event, which lasted for approximately two months are presented. The peak X-ray luminosity was approximately 1.3 times that of the Crab and exhibited spectral dependent flickering on timescales approximately 5 minutes. The observations are interpreted in terms of a standard accretion disk model withparticular emphasis on the similarities to Sco X-1 and other dward X-ray systems, although the transient nature of the system remains unexplained. It was found that Aquila X-1 can be described adequately by the semi-detached Roche lobe model and yields a mass ratio of less than or approximate to 3.5.

  4. The L'Aquila trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Alessandro; Cocco, Massimo; Cultrera, Giovanna; Galadini, Fabrizio; Margheriti, Lucia; Nostro, Concetta; Pantosti, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    The first step of the trial in L'Aquila (Italy) ended with a conviction of a group of seven experts to 6 years of jail and several million euros refund for the families of the people who died during the Mw 6.3 earthquake on April 6, 2009. This verdict has a tremendous impact on the scientific community as well as on the way in which scientists deliver their expert opinions to decision makers and society. In this presentation, we describe the role of scientists in charge of releasing authoritative information concerning earthquakes and seismic hazard and the conditions that led to the verdict, in order to discuss whether this trial represented a prosecution to science, and if errors were made in communicating the risk. Documents, articles and comments about the trial are collected in the web site http://processoaquila.wordpress.com/. We will first summarize what was the knowledge about the seismic hazard of the region and the vulnerability of L'Aquila before the meeting of the National Commission for Forecasting and Predicting Great Risks (CGR) held 6 days before the main shock. The basic point of the accusation is that the CGR suggested that no strong earthquake would have occurred (which of course was never mentioned by any seismologist participating to the meeting). This message would have convinced the victims to stay at home, instead of moving out after the M3.9 and M3.5 earthquakes few hours before the mainshock. We will describe how the available scientific information was passed to the national and local authorities, and in general how the Italian scientific Institution in charge of seismic monitoring and research (INGV), the Civil Protection Department (DPC) and the CGR should interact according to the law. As far as the communication and outreach to the public, the scientific Institutions as INGV have the duty to communicate scientific information. Instead, the risk management and the definition of actions for risk reduction is in charge of Civil

  5. Power colours: simple X-ray binary variability comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, L. M.; Uttley, P.; Klein-Wolt, M.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a new method of variability classification using observations of black hole X-ray binaries. Using `power colours' - ratios of integrated power in different Fourier frequency bands - we can clearly differentiate different canonical black hole states as the objects evolve during outburst. We analyse (˜2400) Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of 12 transient low-mass black hole X-ray binaries and find that the path taken around the power colour-colour diagram as the sources evolve is highly consistent from object to object. We discuss how the consistency observed in the power colour-colour diagram between different objects allows for easy state classification based on only a few observations, and show how the power-spectral shapes can be simply classified using a single parameter, the power-spectral `hue'. To illustrate the benefits of our simple model-independent approach, we show that the persistent high-mass X-ray binary Cyg X-1 shows very similar power-spectral evolution to the transient black hole sources, with the main difference being caused by a combination of a lack of quasi-periodic oscillations and an excess of low-frequency power-law noise in the Cyg X-1 power spectra during the transitional state. We also compare the transient objects to the neutron star atoll source Aquila X-1, demonstrating that it traces a different path in the power colour-colour plot. Thus, power colours could be an effective method to classify newly discovered X-ray binaries.

  6. X-1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-1 (#46-062) in flight. The shock wave pattern in the exhaust plume is visible. The X-1 series aircraft were air-launched from a modified Boeing B-29 or a B-50 Superfortress bombers. The X-1-1 was painted a bright orange by Bell Aircraft. It was thought that the aircraft would be more visable to those doing the tracking during a flight. When NACA received the airplanes they were painted white, which was an easier color to find in the skies over Muroc Air Field in California. This particular craft was nicknamed 'Glamorous Glennis' by Chuck Yeager in honor of his wife, and is now on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all

  7. Optical Outburst of AQL X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Bailyn, C.; Garcia, M.; Rines, K.; Levine, A.; Espinoza, J.; Gonzalez, D.

    1999-05-01

    We report YALO consortium observations using the Yale 1-m telescope at CTIO and observations with the 48" telescope at the Whipple Observatory: Aql X-1 = V1333 Aql appears to be beginning a new outburst. This x-ray binary outbursts approximately once per year, and based on its recent outbursts was due to erupt.

  8. X1 Exoskeleton

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Ironman-Like Exoskeleton Could Give Astronauts, Paraplegics Improved Mobility and Strength. While NASA's X1 robotic exoskeleton can't do what you see in the movies, the latest robotic, space...

  9. A SEMI-COHERENT SEARCH FOR WEAK PULSATIONS IN AQUILA X–1

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, C.; Patruno, A.

    2015-06-20

    Non-pulsating neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries largely outnumber those that show pulsations. The lack of detectable pulses represents a big open problem for two important reasons. The first is that the structure of the accretion flow in the region closest to the neutron star is not well understood and it is therefore unclear what is the mechanism that prevents the pulse formation. The second is that the detection of pulsations would immediately reveal the spin of the neutron star. AQUILA X–1 is a special source among low mass X-ray binaries because it has showed the unique property of pulsating for only ∼150 s out of a total observing time of more than 1.5 million seconds. However, the existing upper limits on the pulsed fraction leave open two alternatives. Either AQUILA X–1 has very weak pulses which have been undetected, or it has genuinely pulsed only for a tiny amount of the observed time. Understanding which of the two scenarios is the correct one is fundamental to increase our knowledge about the pulse formation process and understand the chances we have to detect weak pulses in other low-mass X-ray binaries. In this paper we perform a semi-coherent search on the entire X-ray data available for AQUILA X–1. We find no evidence for (new) weak pulsations with the most stringent upper limits being of the order of 0.3% in the 7–25 keV energy band.

  10. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  11. V803 Aquilae: A newborn W Ursae Majoris Siamese twin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Su, Wen; Dewitt, Jason R.

    1993-12-01

    A complete photometric analysis of BVRI photometry of the physically compact, eclipsing binary V803 Aquilae is presented. Six mean epochs of minimum light were determined from observations covering three primary and three secondary eclipses. A period study covering 54 years of observation or nearly 77,000 orbital revolutions reveals three distinct eras of constant period with two major period jumps of +0.1 s and -0.3 s. The light curves shows that the primary and secondary eclipse depths are identical in V, and are nearly identical in B, R, and I, indicating that the components have nearly the same temperatures. Standard magnitudes were determined and a reddening estimate was made. A simultaneous solution of the four light curves was computed using the Wilson-Devinney synthetic light-curve code. The solution indicates that the system consists of twin approximately K4 stars in shallow contact with a fill-out of approximately 8%. A mass ratio of 1.000 was computed with a negligible temperature difference of only 6 K. Thus, based on our purely photometric solution, V803 Aql is made up of 'Siamese' (contact) twin components. Theory would indicate that the twins have just recently come into contact, and the lack of other equal-mass W Ursae Majoris systems would indicate that it is in a very transient or unusual state.

  12. V803 Aquilae: A newborn W Ursae Majoris Siamese twin?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Su, Wen; Dewitt, Jason R.

    1993-01-01

    A complete photometric analysis of BVRI photometry of the physically compact, eclipsing binary V803 Aquilae is presented. Six mean epochs of minimum light were determined from observations covering three primary and three secondary eclipses. A period study covering 54 years of observation or nearly 77,000 orbital revolutions reveals three distinct eras of constant period with two major period jumps of +0.1 s and -0.3 s. The light curves shows that the primary and secondary eclipse depths are identical in V, and are nearly identical in B, R, and I, indicating that the components have nearly the same temperatures. Standard magnitudes were determined and a reddening estimate was made. A simultaneous solution of the four light curves was computed using the Wilson-Devinney synthetic light-curve code. The solution indicates that the system consists of twin approximately K4 stars in shallow contact with a fill-out of approximately 8%. A mass ratio of 1.000 was computed with a negligible temperature difference of only 6 K. Thus, based on our purely photometric solution, V803 Aql is made up of 'Siamese' (contact) twin components. Theory would indicate that the twins have just recently come into contact, and the lack of other equal-mass W Ursae Majoris systems would indicate that it is in a very transient or unusual state.

  13. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  14. X-1A on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1A (48-1384) is photographed in July 1955 sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base, California. This view of the left side of the aircraft shows the change to the X-1A canopy from the X-1s (see photo E49-0039 under XS-1) The nose boom carries an angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip vane, along with a pitot tube for measuring static and impact pressures. The fuselage length is 35 feet 8 inches, with a wing span of 28 feet. The X-1A was created to explore stability and control characteristics at speeds in excess of Mach 2 and altitudes greater than 90,000 feet. Bell test pilot Jean 'Skip' Ziegler made six test flights in the X-1A between 14 February and 25 April 1953. Air Force test pilots Maj. Charles 'Chuck' Yeager and Maj. Arthur 'Kit' Murray made 18 flights between 21 November 1953 and 26 August 1954. NACA test pilot Joseph Walker made one successful flight on 20 July 1955. During a second flight attempt, on 8 August 1955, an explosion damaged the X-1A shortly before launch. Walker, unhurt, climbed up into the JTB-29A mothership, and the X-1A was jettisoned over the Edwards AFB bombing range.

  15. X-1A impact site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    A photo taken on 8 August 1955, showing the remains of the Bell X-1A The Bell X-1A (Serial # 48-1384) was designed for aerodynamic stability and air load research. It was delivered to Edwards Air Force Base on 7 January 1953. The aircraft made its first glide flight on 14 February with Bell test pilot Jean 'Skip' Ziegler at the controls. Ziegler also flew the first powered flight in the X-1A on 21 February. Contractor flights in the aircraft continued through April, at which time the X-1A was temporarily grounded for modifications. Flight operations were resumed on 21 November 1953 with Maj. Charles 'Chuck' Yeager at the controls. During a flight on 12 December, Yeager took the X-1A to a record-breaking speed of Mach 2.44 at an altitude of 75,000 feet. He then encountered the unpleasant phenomemon of inertia coupling. The X-1A tumbled out of control, knocking Yeager unconscious briefly before entering an inverted spin. Fortunately Yeager regained his senses and control of the aircraft 60 miles from Edwards at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Shaken, but unharmed, he brought the rocket plane in for a safe landing on Rogers Dry Lake. Next, the X-1A was used for a series of high-altitude missions piloted by Maj. Arthur 'Kit' Murray. Fourteen flights proved necessary to meet the program requirements, with only four being successful. During the test series, Murray set several unofficial world altitude records. The highest (90,440 feet) was set on 26 August 1954. Following completion of the altitude program, the aircraft was turned over to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1A underwent more modifications and was returned to flight status in July 1955. The first NACA-sponsored flight, piloted by Joseph A. Walker, took place on 20 July. The second NACA mission was to be the 25th flight of the X-1A. The flight began normally on 8 August 1955, with the X-1A shackled to the underside of a JTB-29A (45-21800) piloted by Stanley Butchart and John 'Jack' Mc

  16. X-1 aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    The first of the rocket-powered research aircraft, the X-1 (originally designated the XS-1), was a bullet-shaped airplane that was built by the Bell Aircraft Company for the US Air Force and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The mission of the X-1 was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier'. The first of the three X-1s was glide-tested at Pinecastle Field, FL, in early 1946. The first powered flight of the X-1 was made on Dec. 9, 1946, at Muroc Army Air Field (later redesignated Edwards Air Force Base) with Chalmers Goodlin, a Bell test pilot,at the controls. On Oct. 14, 1947, with USAF Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager as pilot, the aircraft flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time. Captain Yeager ignited the four-chambered XLR-11 rocket engines after being air-launched from under the bomb bay of a B-29 at 21,000 ft. The 6,000-lb thrust ethyl alcohol/liquid oxygen burning rockets, built by Reaction Motors, Inc., pushed him up to a speed of 700 mph in level flight. Captain Yeager was also the pilot when the X-1 reached its maximum speed of 957 mph. Another USAF pilot. Lt. Col. Frank Everest, Jr., was credited with taking the X-1 to its maximum altitude of 71,902 ft. Eighteen pilots in all flew the X-1s. The number three plane was destroyed in a fire before evermaking any powered flights. A single-place monoplane, the X-1 was 31 ft long, 10 ft high, and had a wingspan of 29 ft. It weighed 4,900 lb and carried 8,200 lb of fuel. It had a flush cockpit with a side entrance and no ejection seat. The following movie runs about 20 seconds, and shows several air-to-air views of X-1 Number 2 and its modified B-50 mothership. It begins with different angles of the X-1 in-flight while mated to the B-50's bomb bay, and ends showing the air-launch. The X-1 drops below the B-50, then accelerates away as the rockets ignite.

  17. L'Aquila earthquake verdict yields aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-11-01

    The 22 October verdict by a court in L'Aquila, Italy, convicting seven Italian earthquake experts of manslaughter for failing to provide an adequate seismic warning to residents prior to a damaging quake in the region continues to send shockwaves through the scientific community. A sampling of the scientific community's concern about the verdict, which is likely to be appealed, included a 25 October joint statement from U.S. National Academy of Sciences president Ralph Cicerone and U.K. Royal Society president Sir Paul Nurse that noted "the difficult task facing scientists in dealing with risk communication and uncertainty." The statement continued, "Much as society and governments would like science to provide simple, clear-cut answers to the problems that we face, it is not always possible. Scientists can, however, gather all the available evidence and offer an analysis of the evidence in light of what they do know. The sensible course is to turn to expert scientists who can provide evidence and advice to the best of their knowledge. They will sometimes be wrong, but we must not allow the desire for perfection to be the enemy of good. That is why we must protest the verdict in Italy. If it becomes a precedent in law, it could lead to a situation in which scientists will be afraid to give expert opinion for fear of prosecution or reprisal. Much government policy and many societal choices rely on good scientific advice and so we must cultivate an environment that allows scientists to contribute what they reasonably can, without being held responsible for forecasts or judgments that they cannot make with confidence."

  18. Pulse Shape Evolution, HER X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanParadijs, Johannes A.

    1998-01-01

    This study focuses on the pulse shape evolution and spectral properties of the X-ray binary Her X-1 with regard to the well known 35-day cycle of Her X-1. A follow-up set of RXTE observations has been conducted in RXTE AO-2 phase and the two observation sets are being analyzed together. We presented results of early analysis of pulse shape evolution in "Proceedings of the Fourth Compton Symposium." More advanced analysis was presented at the HEAD meeting in November, 1997 in Estes Park, Colorado. A related study of the 35-day cycle using RXTE/ASM data, which laid out the overall picture within which the more detailed PCA observations could be placed has also been conducted. The results of this study have been published in The Astrophysical Journal, vol. 510, 974. A pair of papers on the detailed pulse evolution and the spectral/color evolution are currently being prepared for publication. Some of the significant results of this study have been a confirmation of the detailed pulse profile changes at the end of the Main High state in Her X-1 first observed by GINGA, observations of the pulse evolution in several Short High states which agree with the pulse evolution pattern predicted using a disk occultation model in the PhD Thesis of Scott 1993, observation of a systematic lengthening of the eclipse egress during the Main High state of the 35-day phase and observation of a new type of extended eclipse ingress during which pulsations cease to observed during the Short High state.

  19. Testimonies to the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) and to the L'Aquila process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenda, Pavel; Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    Lot of confusions, misinformation, false solidarity, efforts to misuse geoethics and other unethical activities in favour of the top Italian seismologists responsible for a bad and superficial evaluation of the situation 6 days prior to the earthquake - that is a general characteristics for the whole period of 5 years separating us from the horrible morning of April 6, 2009 in L'Aquila with 309 human victims. The first author of this presentation as a seismologist had unusual opportunity to visit the unfortunate city in April 2009. He got all "first-hand" information that a real scientifically based prediction did exist already for some shocks in the area on March 29 and 30, 2009. The author of the prediction Gianpaolo Giuliani was obliged to stop any public information diffused by means of internet. A new prediction was known to him on March 31 - in the day when the "Commission of Great Risks" offered a public assurance that any immediate earthquake can be practically excluded. In reality the members of the commission completely ignored such a prediction declaring it as a false alarm of "somebody" (even without using the name of Giuliani). The observations by Giuliani were of high quality from the scientific point of view. G. Giuliani predicted L'Aquila earthquake in the professional way - for the first time during many years of observations. The anomalies, which preceded L'Aquila earthquake were detected on many places in Europe in the same time. The question is, what locality would be signed as potential focal area, if G. Giuliani would know the other observations in Europe. The deformation (and other) anomalies are observable before almost all of global M8 earthquakes. Earthquakes are preceded by deformation and are predictable. The testimony of the second author is based on many unfortunate personal experiences with representatives of the INGV Rome and their supporters from India and even Australia. In July 2010, prosecutor Fabio Picuti charged the Commission

  20. Mass transfer and magnetic braking in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-02-01

    Sco X-1 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that has one of the most precisely determined set of binary parameters such as the mass accretion rate, companions mass ratio and the orbital period. For this system, as well as for a large fraction of other well-studied LMXBs, the observationally-inferred mass accretion rate is known to strongly exceed the theoretically expected mass transfer (MT) rate. We suggest that this discrepancy can be solved by applying a modified magnetic braking prescription, which accounts for increased wind mass-loss in evolved stars compared to main sequence stars. Using our MT framework based on MESA, we explore a large range of binaries at the onset of the MT. We identify the subset of binaries for which the MT tracks cross the Sco X-1 values for the mass ratio and the orbital period. We confirm that no solution can be found for which the standard magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates, while wind-boosted magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates for many progenitor binaries that evolve to the observed orbital period and mass ratio.

  1. Spectroscopic observations of the optical candidate for Cygnus X-1.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucato, R.; Kristian, J.

    1973-01-01

    The spectroscopic binary BD+34 3815 (= HDE 226868) with a period of 5.6 days, which is the brightest object in the position box for the X-ray source Cyg X-1, is studied to determine whether it meets all the requirements for being a black hole. Evidence is presented that the mass of the secondary is larger than the upper limits for white dwarfs or neutron stars, but there is no conclusive evidence that the optical binary is an X-ray source, and that the secondary is a collapsed object.

  2. Far-ultraviolet Observation Of The Aquila Rift With Fims Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Joon; Min, K.; Seon, K.; Han, W.; Lee, D.; Edelstein, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first FUV observation of the Aquila Rift region near the Galactic plane by the FIMS instrument flown aboard the STSAT-1. Various wavelength datasets are used to compare with our FUV observation. While the core of the Aquila Rift suffers heavy dust extinction, the FUV continuum emission outside the Aquila Rift is found to be proportional to the certain amount of dust. The FUV Intensity clearly correlates with the dust extinction for E(B-V) < 0.3,, while anti-correlation is seen for E(B-V) > 0.3, which is in agreement with Hurwitz (1994) and Luhman & Jaffe (1996). Our entire field of view basically consists of inside and outside of Aquila Rift. The "Aquila-East,” "Aquila-Serpens,” and "Aquila-West,” are the inside sub-regions, and the "Scutum,” "Halo,” "Ophiuchus,” and "Hercules” are the outside. The CLOUD model and the calculation of H2 fluorescent line intensities are applied to investigate the physical conditions of each inside sub-region. Based on the velocity break (l 33°) in CO emission and our result that the H2 fluorescent emission is poor in the "Aquila-East” region compared to the "Aquila-Serpens” and "Aquila-West” regions although the ``Aquila-East'' is similar to the other two inside sub-regions, we conclude the east region of Aquila is different in molecular condition or dust distribution, which may be related with the fact that the "Aquila-East” region is lack of star-forming regions. Furthermore, by calculating the line ratio of H2 fluorescent emissions, the characteristics of temperature and amount of dust can be expected for each sub-region.

  3. EVN detection of Aql X-1 in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Miller-Jones, J.; Garrett, M.; Fender, R.; Rushton, A.; Spencer, R.

    2009-11-01

    The X-ray binary Aql X-1 has been in outburst in the last few weeks (ATEL #2288, #2296, #2299, #2302, #2303). We observed the system on 2009 November 19 between 14:30-19:00 UT at 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN) using the e-VLBI technique. The participating radio telescopes were Effelsberg (1 Gbps), Medicina (896 Mbps), Onsala 25m (1 Gbps), Torun (1 Gbps), Westerbork (1 Gbps), Yebes (896 Mbps), and Cambridge (128 Mbps).

  4. Particle Injection in the Cir X-1 radio outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, J. G.; Paredes, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    A particle injection model has been applied to the radio outbursts of the X-ray binary Circinus X-1. The radio outbursts of this system have often been observed to exhibit a double peaked structure, i.e., with two apparent consecutive maxima. We show here that particle injection models can account for such observed behavior provided that a time variable particle injection rate is adopted.

  5. Shakemaps of the L'Aquila main shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faenza, L.; Lauciani, V.; Michelini, A.

    2009-12-01

    This work addresses the determination of the shakemap of the l’Aquila, M6.3 April 6, 2009, main shock. Since 2006 and as part of national projects funded by the Italian Civil Protection and by the EU SAFER project, INGV has been determining shakemaps for M3.0+ using the USGS-ShakeMap software package and a fully automatic procedure, based on manually revised location and magnitude. This work summarizes how the shakemaps of the main shocks have been obtained. Focus of the presentation is on the importance that the data and the extent of the finite fault have in the determination of faithful ground motion maps. For the L'Aquila main shock, we have found that the data alone are not sufficient to replicate the observed ground motion in parts of the strongly affected areas. In particular, since the station coverage toward the SE where the earthquake rupture propagated is scantier, prompt availability of a rupture fault model would have been important to better describe the level of strong ground motion throughout the affected area. We present an overview of the performance of the INGV real time system during the L’Aquila main shock - the first time that INGV provides real time information to Civil Protetion during a seismic crisis. Finally, we show a comparison between the intensities determined from the strong ground motion and those obtained from the macroseismic survey.

  6. Searching for Gravitational Waves from Scorpius X-1 in Advanced LIGO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanhao; LSC; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is considered to be one of the most promising continuous gravitational-wave(GW) sources for ground-based detectors. The improved sensitivity of advanced detectors and multiple improved search methods bring us closer to detecting an astrophysically feasible GW signal from Sco X-1. I will present an update on the search for GWs from Sco X-1 in data from Advanced LIGO's first observing run (O1). on behalf of The LSC and the Virgo Collaboration.

  7. The Gould’s Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS). III. The Distance to the Serpens/Aquila Molecular Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Kounkel, Marina A.; Loinard, Laurent; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Torres, Rosa M.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; Hartmann, Lee; Boden, Andrew F.; Evans, Neal J., II; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John J.; Galli, Phillip A. B.

    2017-01-01

    We report on new distances and proper motions to seven stars across the Serpens/Aquila complex. The observations were obtained as part of the Gould’s Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) project between 2013 September and 2016 April with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). One of our targets is the proto-Herbig AeBe object EC 95, which is a binary system embedded in the Serpens Core. For this system, we combined the GOBELINS observations with previous VLBA data to cover a total period of 8 years, and derive the orbital elements and an updated source distance. The individual distances to sources in the complex are fully consistent with each other, and the mean value corresponds to a distance of 436.0 ± 9.2 pc for the Serpens/W40 complex. Given this new evidence, we argue that Serpens Main, W40, and Serpens South are physically associated and form a single cloud structure.

  8. FAR-ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATION OF THE AQUILA RIFT WITH FIMS/SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.-J.; Min, K.-W.; Seon, K.-I.; Han, W.; Lee, D.-H.; Edelstein, J.

    2012-07-20

    We present the results of far ultraviolet (FUV) observations of the broad region around the Aquila Rift including the Galactic plane. As compared with various wavelength data sets, dust scattering is found to be the major origin of the diffuse FUV continuum in this region. The FUV intensity clearly correlates with the dust extinction level for E(B - V) < 0.2, while this correlation disappears for E(B - V) > 0.2 due to heavy dust extinction combined with the effect of nonuniform interstellar radiation fields. The FUV intensity also correlates well with H{alpha} intensity, implying that at least some fraction of the observed H{alpha} emission could be the dust-scattered light of H{alpha} photons originating elsewhere in the Galaxy. Most of the Aquila Rift region is seen devoid of diffuse FUV continuum due to heavy extinction while strong emission is observed in the surrounding regions. Molecular hydrogen fluorescent emission lines are clearly seen in the spectrum of 'Aquila-Serpens', while 'Aquila-East' does not show any apparent line features. CO emission intensity is also found to be higher in the 'Aquila-Serpens' region than in the 'Aquila-East' region. In this regard, we note that regions of star formation have been found in 'Aquila-Serpens' but not in 'Aquila-East'.

  9. Lessons of L'Aquila for Operational Earthquake Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    The L'Aquila earthquake of 6 Apr 2009 (magnitude 6.3) killed 309 people and left tens of thousands homeless. The mainshock was preceded by a vigorous seismic sequence that prompted informal earthquake predictions and evacuations. In an attempt to calm the population, the Italian Department of Civil Protection (DPC) convened its Commission on the Forecasting and Prevention of Major Risk (MRC) in L'Aquila on 31 March 2009 and issued statements about the hazard that were widely received as an "anti-alarm"; i.e., a deterministic prediction that there would not be a major earthquake. On October 23, 2012, a court in L'Aquila convicted the vice-director of DPC and six scientists and engineers who attended the MRC meeting on charges of criminal manslaughter, and it sentenced each to six years in prison. A few weeks after the L'Aquila disaster, the Italian government convened an International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting for Civil Protection (ICEF) with the mandate to assess the status of short-term forecasting methods and to recommend how they should be used in civil protection. The ICEF, which I chaired, issued its findings and recommendations on 2 Oct 2009 and published its final report, "Operational Earthquake Forecasting: Status of Knowledge and Guidelines for Implementation," in Aug 2011 (www.annalsofgeophysics.eu/index.php/annals/article/view/5350). As defined by the Commission, operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) involves two key activities: the continual updating of authoritative information about the future occurrence of potentially damaging earthquakes, and the officially sanctioned dissemination of this information to enhance earthquake preparedness in threatened communities. Among the main lessons of L'Aquila is the need to separate the role of science advisors, whose job is to provide objective information about natural hazards, from that of civil decision-makers who must weigh the benefits of protective actions against the costs of false alarms

  10. Chandra-HETGS Observations of LMC X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The High Mass X-ray Binary, Black Hole Candidate (BHC) system LMC X-1 is among those that has been claimed to exhibit evidence for near maximal spin. However, compared to other systems, LMC X-1 is rather unusual in that it never shows evidence for ever reaching a "stable" minimum effective area. Here we discuss a series of Chandra-High Energy Transmission Gratings observations that cover a number of different orbital phases. We find spectroscopic evidence for emission from the high mass companion's wind. Additionally, we explore whether there is orbital phase-dependent absorption by this wind, as has been previously suggested. Finally, we use Comptonization models to describe the continuum spectrum, and discuss those aspects of the fits that are driving the suggestion for maximal spin.

  11. Herschel observations of Circinus X-1 during outburst and quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Buxton, Michelle; Fost, Tyler E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: tyler.fost@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    We have used the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver instruments on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe Cir X-1 both in and out of outburst. We detected Cir X-1 during outburst at 70 μm. Unfortunately, a cold background source dominates Cir X-1 at longer wavelengths. We have assembled optical and infrared (IR) data for Cir X-1 to model its spectral energy distribution (SED) in both quiescence and outburst and find that in both states it is consistent with a heavily reddened, 10,000 K blackbody. We believe this behavior is completely consistent with previous suggestions that these outbursts are due to accretion disk events, not unlike those of dwarf novae. To explore the behavior of other low-mass X-ray binaries with reported synchrotron jets, we have extracted and/or compiled optical and near- and mid-IR data sets for five such systems to construct their SEDs. The Z-source GX 349+2 and the black hole system GRS 1915+105 have strong and variable mid-IR excesses that suggest synchrotron emission. The other Z-sources have rather weak (or no) IR excesses that can be explained as reddened blackbody spectra with the addition of either synchrotron or bremsstrahlung components.

  12. Wind dynamics in SMC X-1. 1: Hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blondin, John M.; Woo, Jonathan W.

    1995-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of the disrupted stellar wind in the high-mass X-ray binary system SMC X-1. The three dominant processes that determine the geometry of the wind in high X-ray luminosity systems such as SMC X-1 are the X-ray suppression of the stellar wind from the X-ray irradiated face of the primary star, the focusing of the radiatively driven wind in the X-ray shadow by the effects of stellar rotation, and the rapid X-ray heating of gas in the vicinity of the X-ray source, including the X-ray illuminated surface of the primary star. The resulting distribution of circumstellar gas provides a successful explanation for the asymmetric, extended eclipse transitions and the intensity of the deep eclipse X-ray emission in SMC X-1, as well as a possible explanation for the X-ray dips seen near superior conjunction of the X-ray source in Cyg X-1.

  13. Radio non-detection of Aql X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Altamirano, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Garrett, M.; Fender, R.; Rushton, A.; Spencer, R.; Maitra, D.

    2010-10-01

    The neutron star X-ray binary Aql X-1 is on the decaying phase of a major outburst that peaked at optical and X-ray bands in mid-September (ATEL #2850, #2871, #2891, #2902). We observed the object at 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in the e-VLBI mode on 2010 October 4th between 18:20-22:09 UT. The participating stations were Cambridge, Effelsberg, Jodrell Bank (MkII), Hartebeesthoek, Medicina, Onsala, Torun, Westerbork and Yebes.

  14. X-1E Engine Ground Test Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1E during a ground engine test run on the NACA High-Speed Flight Station ramp near the Rogers Dry Lake. The rocket technician is keeping the concrete cool by hosing it with water during the test. This also helps in washing away any chemicals that might spill. The test crew worked close to the aircraft during ground tests. There were four versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Supersonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on January 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On October 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager, became the first aircraft to exceed the speed of sound, reaching about

  15. Understanding the Cray X1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    2004-01-01

    This paper helps the reader understand the characteristics of the Cray X1 vector supercomputer system, and provides hints and information to enable the reader to port codes to the system. It provides a comparison between the basic performance of the X1 platform and other platforms that are available at NASA Ames Research Center. A set of codes, solving the Laplacian equation with different parallel paradigms, is used to understand some features of the X1 compiler. An example code from the NAS Parallel Benchmarks is used to demonstrate performance optimization on the X1 platform.

  16. Discovery of orbital decay in SMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.; Rappaport, S.; Boynton, P.; Deeter, J.; Nagase, F.

    1992-01-01

    The results are reported of three observations of the binary X ray pulsar SMC X-1 with the Ginga satellite. Timing analyses of the 0.71 s X ray pulsations yield Doppler delay curves which, in turn, provide the most accurate determination of the SMC X-1 orbital parameters available to date. The orbital phase of the 3.9 day orbit is determined in May 1987, Aug. 1988, and Aug. 1988 with accuracies of 11, 1, and 3.5 s, respectively. These phases are combined with two previous determinations of the orbital phase to yield the rate of change in the orbital period: P sub orb/P sub orb = (-3.34 + or - 0.023) x 10(exp -6)/yr. An interpretation of this measurement and the known decay rate for the orbit of Cen X-3 is made in the context of tidal evolution. Finally, a discussion is presented of the relation among the stellar evolution, orbital decay, and neutron star spinup time scales for the SMC X-1 system.

  17. THE MASS OF THE BLACK HOLE IN CYGNUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Orosz, Jerome A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Narayan, Ramesh; Gou, Lijun; Aufdenberg, Jason P.; Remillard, Ronald A. E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: narayan@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: aufded93@erau.edu

    2011-12-01

    Cygnus X-1 is a binary star system that is comprised of a black hole and a massive giant companion star in a tight orbit. Building on our accurate distance measurement reported in the preceding paper, we first determine the radius of the companion star, thereby constraining the scale of the binary system. To obtain a full dynamical model of the binary, we use an extensive collection of optical photometric and spectroscopic data taken from the literature. By using all of the available observational constraints, we show that the orbit is slightly eccentric (both the radial velocity and photometric data independently confirm this result) and that the companion star rotates roughly 1.4 times its pseudosynchronous value. We find a black hole mass of M = 14.8 {+-} 1.0 M{sub Sun }, a companion mass of M{sub opt} = 19.2 {+-} 1.9 M{sub Sun }, and the angle of inclination of the orbital plane to our line of sight of i = 27.1 {+-} 0.8 deg.

  18. Operational effectiveness of a Multiple Aquila Control System (MACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Flynn, J. D.; Frey, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    The operational effectiveness of a multiple aquila control system (MACS) was examined under a variety of remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) mission configurations. The set of assumptions and inputs used to form the rules under which a computerized simulation of MACS was run is given. The characteristics that are to govern MACS operations include: the battlefield environment that generates the requests for RPV missions, operating time-lines of the RPV-peculiar equipment, maintenance requirements, and vulnerability to enemy fire. The number of RPV missions and the number of operation days are discussed. Command, control, and communication data rates are estimated by determining how many messages are passed and what information is necessary in them to support ground coordination between MACS sections.

  19. AQUILA Remotely Piloted Vehicle System Technology Demonstrator (RPV-STD) Program. Volume 2. System Evolution and Engineering Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    Aquila Site Layout ..... ....... . ........ 214 69 Aquila Site Layout- Preliminary Design Review ,.,.... e215 T0 Aquila Sit yout With Truok-Mounbed GCS...anticipated * Skin roughness greater than anticipated (minimum resin to reduce weight) * Protruding wing tip fasteners required * EU antena drag higher...with fiberglass skin , was also proposed as the tial wing structure ooncept. These selections were made in consider- ation of the sucoessful history of

  20. Biological Anomalies around the 2009 L’Aquila Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Fidani, Cristiano

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Earthquakes have been seldom associated with reported non-seismic phenomena observed weeks before and after shocks. Non-seismic phenomena are characterized by radio disturbances and light emissions as well as degassing of vast areas near the epicenter with chemical alterations of shallow geospheres (aquifers, soils) and the troposphere. Many animals are sensitive to even the weakest changes in the environment, typically responding with behavioral and physiological changes. A specific questionnaire was developed to collect data on these changes around the time of the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake. Abstract The April 6, 2009 L’Aquila earthquake was the strongest seismic event to occur in Italy over the last thirty years with a magnitude of M = 6.3. Around the time of the seismic swarm many instruments were operating in Central Italy, even if not dedicated to biological effects associated with the stress field variations, including seismicity. Testimonies were collected using a specific questionnaire immediately after the main shock, including data on earthquake lights, gas leaks, human diseases, and irregular animal behavior. The questionnaire was made up of a sequence of arguments, based upon past historical earthquake observations and compiled over seven months after the main shock. Data on animal behavior, before, during and after the main shocks, were analyzed in space/time distributions with respect to the epicenter area, evidencing the specific responses of different animals. Several instances of strange animal behavior were observed which could causally support the hypotheses that they were induced by the physical presence of gas, electric charges and electromagnetic waves in atmosphere. The aim of this study was to order the biological observations and thereby allow future work to determine whether these observations were influenced by geophysical parameters. PMID:26479529

  1. Evidence of Circumstellar Matter Surrounding the Hercules X-1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, C. S.; Dotani, T.; Nagase, F.; Makino, F.; Deeter, J. E.; Min, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze data from two eclipse ingresses of Her X-1 observed with Ginga on 1989 April 30 and May 19. These observations occur, respectively, during the MAIN HIGH and SHORT HIGH states in the 35 day modulation of Her X-1 intensity. We find significant residual X-ray flux during eclipse, with a gradual decrease in flux following the occultation of the neutron star by the atmosphere of HZ Her. During the central part of the eclipse the count rate becomes nearly constant, at 0.5 mcrab in the energy range 1.7-36.8 keV. From a spec- tral analysis of the residual emission during the total eclipse of the central source in the MAIN MGH state, we determine the energy spectral index, alpha = 0.8, similar to that before eclipse. A remarkable feature of the eclipse spectrum is that it does not show a significant iron line feature in contrast to massive wind-fed pulsars, such as Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. From a timing analysis of the same eclipse data, we show that there are no pulses. These results imply that the emission comes from the scattering of continuum X-rays by material in a region considerably larger than the companion star. An extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona is insufficient to account for the count rates in mid-eclipse, when known parameters of the binary system are used. Based on the present results, we suggest that scattering occurs not only in the accretion disk corona but also in the circumstellar matter surrounding the system of Her X-1/HZ Her.

  2. Evidence of circumstellar matter surrounding the Hercules X-1 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, C. S.; Dotani, T.; Nagase, F.; Makino, F.; Deeter, J. E.; Min, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze data from two eclipse ingresses of Her X-1 observed with Ginga on 1989 April 30 and May 19. These observations occur, respectively, during the MAIN HIGH and SHORT HIGH states in the 35 day modulation of Her X-1 intensity. We find significant residual X-ray flux during eclipse, with a gradual decrease in flux following the occultation of the neutron star by the atmosphere of HZ Her. During the central part of the eclipse the count rate becomes nearly constant, at 0.5 mCrab in the energy range 1.7-36.8 keV. From a spectral analysis of the residual emission during the total eclipse of the central source in the MAIN HIGH state, we determine the energy spectral index, alpha = 0.8, similar to that before eclipse. A remarkable feature of the eclipse spectrum is that it does not show a significant iron line feature in contrast to massive wind-fed pulsars, such as Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. From a timing analysis of the same eclipse data, we show that there are no pulses. These results imply that the emission comes from the scattering of continuum X-rays by material in a region considerably larger than the companion star. An extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona may be responsible for this scattering. However, partial eclipse of an extended accretion disk corona is insufficient to account for the count rates in mid-eclipse, when known parameters of the binary system are used. Based on the present results, we suggest that scattering occurs not only in the accretion disk corona but also in the circumstellar matter surrounding the system of Her X-1/HZ Her.

  3. AR1429 Releases X1 Class Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the X1 flare, shown here in the 171 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength typically shown in the color gold. This movie runs from 10 PM ET March 4 to 3 AM March ...

  4. On the nature of SMC X-1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.-D.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.

    1997-05-01

    The 0.71 s X-ray pulsar SMC X-1 has some distinct features from other X-ray pulsars. It maintained a stable spin-up though in X-rays both low- and high-intensity states have been observed. An X-ray burst was discovered from SMC X-1, and was probably generated by an instability in the accretion flow. Using the modified magnetically threaded accretion disk theory, we have estimated the magnetic moment of SMC X-1 to be ~10^29^G.cm^3^, which is lower than those of other typical X-ray pulsars (e.g., Her X-1, Vela X-1) by an order of magnitude. Comparing SMC X-1 with the new transient X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28, from which type II bursts were recently discovered, we suggest that the nature of this type of "bursting pulsars" may be accounted for by their relatively low magnetic moments and high accretion rates, if the burst from SMC X-1 is really due to spasmodic accretion as those from GRO J1744-28. The inner edge of the accretion disk in both X-ray sources is found to lie in the transition region at which the radiation pressure becomes comparable to the gas pressure, suggesting that the bursts from both sources may be related to the Lightman-Eardley instability in the inner region of the disk. The difference between the one burst from SMC X-1 and the many bursts from GRO J1744-28 is discussed, and may originate from the different magnetic field structure in these two X-ray pulsars.

  5. Highly Structured Wind in Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Joern; Kretschmar, Peter; Torrejon, Jose Miguel; Pottschmidt, Katja; Hanke, Manfred; Santangelo, Andrea; Ferrigno, Carlo; Staubert, Ruediger

    2008-01-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of the spectral and temporal behavior of a long almost uninterrupted INTEGRAL observation of Vela X-1 in Nov/Dec 2003. In addition to an already high activity level, Vela X-1 exhibited several very intense flares with a maximum intensity of more than 5 Crab in the 20 40 keV band. Furthermore Vela X-1 exhibited several off states where the source became undetectable with ISGRI. We interpret flares and off states as being due to the strongly structured wind of the optical companion: when Vela X-1 encounters a cavity in the wind with strongly reduced density, the flux will drop, thus potentially triggering the onset of the propeller effect which inhibits further accretion, thus giving rise to the off states. The required drop in density to trigger the propeller effect in Vela X-1 is of the same order as predicted by theoretical papers for the densities in the OB star winds. The same structured wind can give rise to the giant flares when Vela X-1 encounters a dense blob in the wind. Further temporal analysis revealed that a short lived QPO with a period of 6800 sec is present. The part of the light curve during which the QPO is present is very close to the off states and just following a high intensity state, thus showing that all these phenomena are related.

  6. X-1 research aircraft landing on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    The first of the rocket-powered research aircraft, the X-1 (originally designated the XS-1), was a bullet-shaped airplane that was built by the Bell Aircraft Company for the US Air Force and the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA). The mission of the X-1 was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier'. The first of the three X-1s was glide-tested at Pinecastle Air Force Base, FL, in early 1946. The first powered flight of the X-1 was made on Dec. 9, 1946, at Edwards Air Force Base with Chalmers Goodlin, a Bell test pilot, at the controls. On Oct. 14, 1947, with USAF Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager as pilot, the aircraft flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time. Captain Yeager ignited the four-chambered XLR-11 rocket engines after being air-launched from under the bomb bay of a B-29 at 21,000 ft. The 6,000-lbthrust ethyl alcohol/liquid oxygen burning rockets, built by Reaction Motors, Inc., pushed him up to a speed of 700 mph in level flight. Captain Yeager was also the pilot when the X-1 reached its maximum speed of 957 mph. Another USAF pilot. Lt. Col. Frank Everest, Jr., was credited with taking the X-1 to its maximum altitude of 71,902 ft. Eighteen pilots in all flew the X-1s. The number three plane was destroyed in a fire before ever making any powered flights. A single-place monoplane, the X-1 was 31 ft long, 10 ft high, and had a wingspan of 29 ft. It weighed 4,900 lb and carried 8,200 lb of fuel. It had a flush cockpit with a side entrance and no ejection seat. This roughly 30-second video clip shows the X-1 landing on Rogers Dry Lakebed followed by the safety chase aircraft.

  7. X-1 launch from B-29 mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    The first of the rocket-powered research aircraft, the X-1 (originally designated the XS-1), was a bullet-shaped airplane that was built by the Bell Aircraft Company for the US Air Force and the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA). The mission of the X-1 was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier'. The first of the three X-1s was glide-tested at Pinecastle Air Force Base, FL, in early 1946. The first powered flight of the X-1 was made on Dec. 9, 1946, at Edwards Air Force Base with Chalmers Goodlin, a Bell test pilot, at the controls. On Oct. 14, 1947, with USAF Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager as pilot, the aircraft flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time. Captain Yeager ignited the four-chambered XLR-11 rocket engines after being air-launched from under the bomb bay of a B-29 at 21,000 ft. The 6,000-lb thrust ethyl alcohol/liquid oxygen burning rockets, built by Reaction Motors, Inc., pushed him up to a speed of 700 mph in level flight. Captain Yeager was also the pilot when the X-1 reached its maximum speed of 957 mph. Another USAF pilot. Lt. Col. Frank Everest, Jr., was credited with taking the X-1 to its maximum altitude of 71,902 ft. Eighteen pilots in all flew the X-1s. The number three plane was destroyed in a fire before ever making any powered flights. A single-place monoplane, the X-1 was 31 ft long, 10 ft high, and had a wingspan of 29 ft. It weighed 4,900 lb and carried 8,200 lb of fuel. It had a flush cockpit with a side entrance and no ejection seat. This roughly 30-second video clip shows the X-1 launched from a B-29, ignition of the XLR-11 rocket engine, and the succeeding flight, including a roll. At one point, the video shows observers of the flight from the ground.

  8. Shell-shocked: the interstellar medium near Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, P. H.; Heinz, S.; Richards, E.; Maccarone, T. J.; Russell, D. M.; Gallo, E.; Fender, R.; Markoff, S.; Nowak, M.

    2015-02-01

    We conduct a detailed case study of the interstellar shell near the high-mass X-ray binary, Cygnus X-1. We present new WIYN optical spectroscopic and Chandra X-ray observations of this region, which we compare with detailed MAPPINGS III shock models, to investigate the outflow powering the shell. Our analysis places improved, physically motivated constraints on the nature of the shock wave and the interstellar medium (ISM) it is plowing through. We find that the shock is travelling at less than a few hundred km s-1 through a low-density ISM (<5 cm-3). We calculate a robust, 3σ upper limit to the total, time-averaged power needed to drive the shock wave and inflate the bubble, <2 × 1038 erg s-1. We then review possible origins of the shock wave. We find that a supernova origin to the shock wave is unlikely and that the black hole jet and/or O-star wind can both be central drivers of the shock wave. We conclude that the source of the Cygnus X-1 shock wave is far from solved.

  9. FUSE observations of a full orbit of Scorpius X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Boroson, Bram; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Raymond, John E-mail: svrtilek@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-09-20

    We obtained UV spectra of X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 in the 900-1200 Å range with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer over the full 0.79 day binary orbit. The strongest emission lines are the doublet of O VI at 1032,1038 Å and the C III complex at 1175 Å. The spectrum is affected by a multitude of narrow interstellar absorption lines, both atomic and molecular. Examination of line variability and Doppler tomograms suggests emission from both the neighborhood of the donor star and the accretion disk. Models of turbulence and Doppler broadened Keplerian disk lines Doppler shifted with the orbit of the neutron star added to narrow Gaussian emission lines with undetermined Doppler shift fit the data with consistent values of disk radius, inclination, and radial line brightness profile. The Doppler shift of the narrow component with the orbit suggests an association with the donor star. We test our line models with previously analyzed near UV spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph and archival spectra obtained with the HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph.

  10. FUSE Observations of a Full Orbit of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroson, Bram; Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Raymond, John

    2014-09-01

    We obtained UV spectra of X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 in the 900-1200 Å range with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer over the full 0.79 day binary orbit. The strongest emission lines are the doublet of O VI at 1032,1038 Å and the C III complex at 1175 Å. The spectrum is affected by a multitude of narrow interstellar absorption lines, both atomic and molecular. Examination of line variability and Doppler tomograms suggests emission from both the neighborhood of the donor star and the accretion disk. Models of turbulence and Doppler broadened Keplerian disk lines Doppler shifted with the orbit of the neutron star added to narrow Gaussian emission lines with undetermined Doppler shift fit the data with consistent values of disk radius, inclination, and radial line brightness profile. The Doppler shift of the narrow component with the orbit suggests an association with the donor star. We test our line models with previously analyzed near UV spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph and archival spectra obtained with the HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph.

  11. Cray X1 Evaluation Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, J.S.

    2004-02-09

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science The Cray X1 is an attempt to incorporate the best aspects of previous Cray vector systems and massively-parallel-processing (MPP) systems into one design. Like the Cray T90, the X1 has high memory bandwidth, which is key to realizing a high percentage of theoretical peak performance. Like the Cray T3E, the X1 has a high-bandwidth, low-latency, scalable interconnect, and scalable system software. And, like the Cray SV1, the X1 leverages commodity off-the-shelf (CMOS) technology and incorporates non-traditional vector concepts, like vector caches and multi-streaming processors. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel benchmarks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation.

  12. Analysis of sub-ionospheric transmitter signal behaviours above L'Aquila region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M.; Biagi, F. P.; Sawas, S.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Parrot, M.; Stangl, G.; Galopeau, P.; Besser, B.; Prattes, G.; Voller, W.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the sub-ionospheric transmitter signals observed above L'Aquila by the electric field ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We consider the variation of the intensity level of the DFY transmitter station (Germany) during the occurrence of the L'Aquila earthquakes on April, 06th, 2009. We review the major methods based on the investigation of the ICE dynamic spectrum and the role of the time and the frequency profiles. We show that the drop of the German transmitter signal occurs nearly one week before the L'Aquila earthquakes. The origin of the decrease in the VLF transmitter intensity level is probably due to a lithospheric generation mechanism which indirectly disturbs the ionosphere. We discuss the behavior of the VLF sub-ionospheric transmitter signal and the models which might explain the origin of the transmitter signal attenuation above seismic regions.

  13. Energy and Power Spectra of Circinus X-1 in the Crisis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Xuan; Han, Wan-Qiang; Yu, Jin-Jiang; Wu, Hai-Bin; Cao, He-Fei

    2007-12-01

    Cir X-1 is a low mass X-ray binary. The color-color diagram and the hardness intensity diagram (HID) are shown by dissimilar figures in different periods. The authors use the transformation period in which the X-ray flow of Cir X-1 changes from high to low to discuss the HID by the corresponding energy spectra and timing characters, and they also compare the results in 1977. They have found new effect on the X-ray radiation with intensity changes of the source.

  14. Hercules X-1: Pulsed gamma-rays detected above 150 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Gibbs, K. G.; Gorham, P. W.; Kenny, S.; Lamb, R. C.; Liebing, D. F.; Porter, N. A.; Stenger, V. J.; Weekes, T. C.

    1985-01-01

    The 1.24 second binary pulsar Her X-1, first observed in X-rays in 1971 by UHURU has now been seen as a sporadic gamma ray source from 1 TeV up to at least 500 TeV. In addition, reprocessed optical and infrared pulses are seen from the companion star HZ Herculis. Thus measurements of the Her X-1/HZ Herculis system span 15 decades in energy, rivaling both the Crab pulsar and Cygnus X-3 in this respect for a discrete galactic source.

  15. Broad-band X-ray observations of CIR X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisack, M.; Staubert, R.; Balucinska-Church, M.; Skinner, G.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Aref'ev, V. A.; Efremov, V. V.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    1995-08-01

    We present broad-band (2-88 keV) X-ray observations of the X-ray binary Cir X-1 with the TTM and HEXE instruments on board of the Mir space station. The observations were made in January/February 1989. The spectrum is best described by a model with 3 components: a blackbody at low energies, an iron line and a Comptonized hard continuum. The spectrum is variable during our observations; when the Comptonized component becomes harder, the spectrum becomes softer below 15 keV. The high-energy spectrum resembles that of X-ray binary pulsars.

  16. K2 and MAXI observations of Sco X-1 - evidence for disc precession?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, Pasi; Ramsay, Gavin; Barclay, Thomas; Charles, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Sco X-1 is the archetypal low-mass X-ray binary and the brightest persistent extrasolar X-ray source in the sky. It was included in the K2 Campaign 2 field and was observed continuously for 71 d with 1 min time resolution. In this Letter, we report these results and underline the potential of K2 for similar observations of other accreting compact binaries. We reconfirm that Sco X-1 shows a bimodal distribution of optical `high' and `low' states and rapid transitions between them on time-scales less than 3 h (or 0.15 orbits). We also find evidence that this behaviour has a typical systemic time-scale of 4.8 d, which we interpret as a possible disc precession period in the system. Finally, we confirm the complex optical versus X-ray correlation/anticorrelation behaviour for `high' and `low' optical states, respectively.

  17. Binary Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary was the first trans-neptunian binary to be identified in 1978. Pluto-Charon is a true binary with both components orbiting a barycenter located between them. The Pluto system is also the first, and to date only, known binary with a satellite system consisting of four small satellites in near-resonant orbits around the common center of mass. Seven other Plutinos, objects in 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune, have orbital companions including 2004 KB19 reported here for the first time. Compared to the Cold Classical population, the Plutinos differ in the frequency of binaries, the relative sizes of the components, and their inclination distribution. These differences point to distinct dynamical histories and binary formation processes encountered by Plutinos.

  18. Space X1 First Entry Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    One mini-grab sample container (m-GSC) was returned aboard Space X1 because of the importance of quickly knowing first-entry conditions in this new commercial module. This sample was analyzed alongside samples of the portable clean room (PCR) used in the Space X complex at KSC. The recoveries of C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene from the GSCs averaged 130, 129, and 132 %, respectively.

  19. Origin of multi-band emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu; Lu, Jufu; Xu, Bing

    2014-06-20

    We study the origin of non-thermal emissions from the Galactic black hole X-ray binary Cygnus X-1, which is a confirmed high-mass microquasar. By analogy with the methods used in studies of active galactic nuclei, we propose a two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation model from the microquasar Cygnus X-1. In this model, the evolution equation for relativistic electrons in a conical jet are numerically solved by including escape, adiabatic, and various radiative losses. The radiative processes involved are synchrotron emission, its self-Compton scattering, and inverse Compton scatterings of an accretion disk and its surrounding stellar companion. This model also includes an electromagnetic cascade process of an anisotropic γ-γ interaction. We study the spectral properties of electron evolution and its emission spectral characteristic at different heights of the emission region located in the jet. We find that radio data from Cygnus X-1 are reproduced by the synchrotron emission, the Fermi Large Area Telescope measurements by the synchrotron emission and Comptonization of photons of the stellar companion, and the TeV band emission fluxes by the Comptonization of the stellar photons. Our results show the following. (1) The radio emission region extends from the binary system scales to the termination of the jet. (2) The GeV band emissions should originate from the distance close to the binary system scales. (3) The TeV band emissions could be inside the binary system, and these emissions could be probed by the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. (4) The MeV tail emissions, which produce a strongly linearly polarized signal, are emitted inside the binary system. The location of the emissions is very close to the inner region of the jet.

  20. The Hard X-Ray Emission from Scorpius X-1 as seen by INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, Steve; Weidenspointner, G.; Shrader, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of our hard X-ray and gamma-ray study of the LMXB Sco X-1 utilizing INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI and SPI data as well as contemporaneous RXTE PCA data. We have concentrated on investigating the high-energy spectral properties of the Sco X-1 including the nature of the high-energy spectrum and its possible correlations with the location of the source on the color-color diagram. We also present the results of a search for positron-electron annihilation line emission from Sco X-1, as it is the brightest of a bulge X-ray binary population which approximately traces the 511-keV spatial distribution inferred from SPI.

  1. 78 FR 70200 - Airworthiness Directives; AQUILA-Aviation by Excellence AG Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA-2013-0963; Directorate Identifier 2013-CE-034-AD; Amendment 39-17663; AD 2013-23-08] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; AQUILA--Aviation by Excellence AG Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request...

  2. 10 microsecond time resolution studies of Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, H. C.

    1997-06-01

    Time variability analyses have been applied to data composed of event times of X-rays emitted from the binary system Cygnus X-1 to search for unique black hole signatures. The X-ray data analyzed was collected at ten microsecond time resolution or better from two instruments, the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory (HEAO) A-1 detector and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA). HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA collected data from 1977--79 and from 1996 on with energy sensitivity from 1--25 keV and 2--60 keV, respectively. Variability characteristics predicted by various models of an accretion disk around a black hole have been searched for in the data. Drop-offs or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the Fourier power spectra are expected from some of these models. The Fourier spectral technique was applied to the HEAO A-1 and RXTE/PCA data with careful consideration given for correcting the Poisson noise floor for instrumental effects. Evidence for a drop-off may be interpreted from the faster fall off in variability at frequencies greater than the observed breaks. Both breaks occur within the range of Keplerian frequencies associated with the inner edge radii of advection-dominated accretion disks predicted for Cyg X-1. The break between 10--20 Hz is also near the sharp rollover predicted by Nowak and Wagoner`s model of accretion disk turbulence. No QPOs were observed in the data for quality factors Q > 9 with a 95% confidence level upper limit for the fractional rms amplitude at 1.2% for a 16 M⊙ black hole.

  3. Myths and realities about the recovery of L׳Aquila after the earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Diana; Blaschke, Thomas; Kienberger, Stefan; Zeil, Peter

    2014-01-01

    There is a set of myths which are linked to the recovery of L׳Aquila, such as: the L׳Aquila recovery has come to a halt, it is still in an early recovery phase, and there is economic stagnation. The objective of this paper is threefold: (a) to identify and develop a set of spatial indicators for the case of L׳Aquila, (b) to test the feasibility of a numerical assessment of these spatial indicators as a method to monitor the progress of a recovery process after an earthquake and (c) to answer the question whether the recovery process in L׳Aquila stagnates or not. We hypothesize that after an earthquake the spatial distribution of expert defined variables can constitute an index to assess the recovery process more objectively. In these articles, we aggregated several indicators of building conditions to characterize the physical dimension, and we developed building use indicators to serve as proxies for the socio-economic dimension while aiming for transferability of this approach. The methodology of this research entailed six steps: (1) fieldwork, (2) selection of a sampling area, (3) selection of the variables and indicators for the physical and socio-economic dimensions, (4) analyses of the recovery progress using spatial indicators by comparing the changes in the restricted core area as well as building use over time; (5) selection and integration of the results through expert weighting; and (6) determining hotspots of recovery in L׳Aquila. Eight categories of building conditions and twelve categories of building use were identified. Both indicators: building condition and building use are aggregated into a recovery index. The reconstruction process in the city center of L׳Aquila seems to stagnate, which is reflected by the five following variables: percentage of buildings with on-going reconstruction, partial reconstruction, reconstruction projected residential building use and transport facilities. These five factors were still at low levels within the

  4. New challenges for seismology and decision makers after L'Aquila trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, Warner

    2013-04-01

    On 22 October seven experts who attended a Major Risk Committee meeting were sentenced to six years in prison on charges of manslaughter for underestimating the risk before the devastating 6.3-magnitude earthquake that struck the hillside city of L'Aquila on 6 April 2009, which caused more than 300 deaths. The earthquake followed a sequence of seismic events that started at the beginning of the year, with the largest shock - a 4.2-magnitude earthquake - occurring on 30 March. A day later, the seven experts met in L'Aquila; the minutes of the meeting, which were released after the quake, contained three main conclusions: that earthquakes are not predictable in a deterministic sense; that the L'Aquila region has the highest seismic hazard in Italy; and that the occurrence of a large earthquake in the short term was unlikely. There is not doubt that this trial will represent an important turning point for seismologists, and more in general for scientists who serve as advisors for public safety purposes. Here, starting from the analysis of the accusations made by the prosecutor and a detailed scientific appraisal of what happened, we try to figure out how seismology can evolve in order to be more effective in protecting people, and (possibly) avoiding accusations like the ones who characterize the L'Aquila trial. In particular, we discuss (i) the principles of the Operational Earthquake Forecasting that were put forward by an international Commission on Earthquake Forecasting (ICEF) nominated after L'Aquila earthquake, (ii) the ICEF recommendations for Civil Protection, and (iii) the recent developments in this field in Italy. Finally, we also explore the interface between scientists and decision makers, in particular in the framework of making decisions in a low probability environment.

  5. ORNL Cray X1 evaluation status report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, P.K.; Alexander, R.A.; Apra, E.; Balay, S.; Bland, A.S; Colgan, J.; D'Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.; Dunigan Jr., T.H.; Fahey, M.R.; Fahey, R.A.; Geist, A.; Gordon, M.; Harrison, R.J.; Kaushik, D.; Krishnakumar, M.; Luszczek, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Nichols, J.A.; Nieplocha, J.; Oliker, L.; Packwood, T.; Pindzola, M.S.; Schulthess, T.C.; Vetter, J.S.; White III, J.B.; Windus, T.L.; Worley, P.H.; Zacharia, T.

    2004-05-01

    On August 15, 2002 the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Center for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to deploy a new scalable vector supercomputer architecture for solving important scientific problems in climate, fusion, biology, nanoscale materials and astrophysics. ''This program is one of the first steps in an initiative designed to provide U.S. scientists with the computational power that is essential to 21st century scientific leadership,'' said Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, director of the department's Office of Science. In FY03, CCS procured a 256-processor Cray X1 to evaluate the processors, memory subsystem, scalability of the architecture, software environment and to predict the expected sustained performance on key DOE applications codes. The results of the micro-benchmarks and kernel bench marks show the architecture of the Cray X1 to be exceptionally fast for most operations. The best results are shown on large problems, where it is not possible to fit the entire problem into the cache of the processors. These large problems are exactly the types of problems that are important for the DOE and ultra-scale simulation. Application performance is found to be markedly improved by this architecture: - Large-scale simulations of high-temperature superconductors run 25 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Best performance of the parallel ocean program (POP v1.4.3) is 50 percent higher than on Japan s Earth Simulator and 5 times higher than on an IBM Power4 cluster. - A fusion application, global GYRO transport, was found to be 16 times faster on the X1 than on an IBM Power3. The increased performance allowed simulations to fully resolve questions raised by a prior study. - The transport kernel in the AGILE-BOLTZTRAN astrophysics code runs 15 times faster than on an IBM Power4 cluster using the same number of processors. - Molecular dynamics simulations related to the phenomenon of

  6. Discovery of Orbital Decay in SMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.; Rappaport, S.; Deeter, J. E.; Boynton, P. E.; Nagase, F.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the results of three observations of the binary X-ray pulsar SMC X-1 with the Ginga satellite. Timing analyses of the 0.71 s X-ray pulsations yield Doppler delay curves which, in turn, enable the most accurate determination of the SMC X-1 orbital parameters available to date. Epochs of phase zero for the 3.9 day orbit were determined for 1987 May, 1988 August, and 1989 August with accuracies of 13, 0.6, and 3 s, respectively. These epochs are combined with two previous determinations of the orbital epoch to yield the rate of change in the orbital period dot-P(orb)/P(orb) = ( 3.36 +/- 0.02) x 10(exp -6) yr(exp -1). An interpretation of the orbital decay is made in the context of tidal evolution, with consideration of the influence of the increasing moment of inertia of the companion star due to its nuclear evolution. We find that, while the orbital decay is probably driven by tidal interactions, the asynchronism between the orbit and the rotation of the companion star is most likely maintained by the evolutionary expansion of the companion star (Sk 160) rather than via the Darwin instability. In this case Sk 160 is likely to be in the hydrogen shell burning phase of its evolution. Finally, a discussion is presented of the relation among the time scales for stellar evolution (less than 10(exp 7) yr), orbital decay (3 x 10(exp 5) yr), and neutron-star spin-up in the SMC X-1 system (2000 yr). In particular, we present the result of a self-consistent calculation for the histories of the spin of the neutron star and the mass transfer in this system. A plausible case can be made for the spin-up time scale being directly related to the lifetime of the luminous X-ray phase which will end in a common-envelope phase within a time of less than approx. 10(exp 4) yr.

  7. Long-term studies with the Ariel-5 asm. 1: Her X-1, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3. [periodic variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Kaluzienski, L. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve hundred days of 3-6 keV X-ray data from Her X-1, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 accumulated with the Ariel-5 all-sky monitor are interrogated. The binary periodicities of all three can be clearly observed, as can the approximately 35-d variation of Her X-1, for which we can refine the period to 34.875 plus or minus .030-d. No such longer-term periodicity less than 200-d is observed from Vela X-1. The 26.6-d low-state recurrence period for Cen X-3 previously suggested is not observed, but a 43.0-d candidate periodicity is found which may be consistent with the precession of an accretion disk in that system. The present results are illustrative of the long-term studies which can be performed on approximately 50 sources over a temporal base which will ultimately extend to at least 1800 days.

  8. X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome systems in the Neotropical Gymnotiformes electric fish of the genus Brachyhypopomus

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    Several types of sex chromosome systems have been recorded among Gymnotiformes, including male and female heterogamety, simple and multiple sex chromosomes, and different mechanisms of origin and evolution. The X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y systems identified in three species of this order are considered homoplasic for the group. In the genus Brachyhypopomus, only B. gauderio presented this type of system. Herein we describe the karyotypes of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus and B. n. sp. FLAV, which have an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system that evolved via fusion between an autosome and the Y chromosome. The morphology of the chromosomes and the meiotic pairing suggest that the sex chromosomes of B. gauderio and B. pinnicaudatus have a common origin, whereas in B . n. sp. FLAV the sex chromosome system evolved independently. However, we cannot discard the possibility of common origin followed by distinct processes of differentiation. The identification of two new karyotypes with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in Gymnotiformes makes it the most common among the karyotyped species of the group. Comparisons of these karyotypes and the evolutionary history of the taxa indicate independent origins for their sex chromosomes systems. The recurrent emergence of the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y system may represent sex chromosomes turnover events in Gymnotiformes. PMID:26273225

  9. The Lukewarm Absorber in the Microquasar Cir X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Galloway, D. K.; Brandt, W. N.

    2006-09-01

    Through many observations in the last decades the extreme and violent X-ray binary Cir X-1 has been classified as a microquasar, Z-source, X-ray burster, and accreting neutron star exhibiting ultrarelativistic jets. Since the launch of Chandra the source underwent a dramatic change from a high flux (1.5 Crab) source to a rather low persistent flux ( 30 mCrab) in the last year. Spectra from Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) taken during this transformation have revealed many details besides the large overall flux change ranging from blue-shifted absorption lines indicating high-velocity (< 2000 km/s) outflows during high flux, persistently bright lines emission throughout all phases to some form of warm absorption in the low flux phase. Newly released atomic data allows us to analyse specifically the Fe K line region with unprecedented detail for all flux phases observed so far. We also compare these new results with recently released findings of warm absorbers and outflow signatures observed in other microqasars such as GX 339+4, GRS J1655-40, and GRS1915+115.

  10. THE ORBITAL PERIOD OF SCORPIUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, Christopher T.

    2012-08-10

    The orbital period of Sco X-1 was first identified by Gottlieb et al. While this has been confirmed on multiple occasions, this work, based on nearly a century of photographic data, has remained the reference in defining the system ephemeris ever since. It was, however, called into question when Vanderlinde et al. claimed to find the one-year alias of the historical period in RXTE/All-Sky Monitor data and suggested that this was the true period rather than that of Gottlieb et al. We examine data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) spanning 2001-2009. We confirm that the period of Gottlieb et al. is in fact the correct one, at least in the optical, with the one-year alias strongly rejected by these data. We also provide a modern time of minimum light based on the ASAS data.

  11. Leon X-1, the First Chandra Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Aldcroft, Tom; Cameron, Robert A.; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Elsner, Ronald F.; Patel, Sandeep K.; ODell, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    Here we present an analysis of the first photons detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and an identification of the brightest source in the field which we named Leon X-1 to honor the momentous contributions of the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. The observation took place immediately following the opening of the last door protecting the X-ray telescope. We discuss the unusual operational conditions as the first extra-terrestrial X-ray photons reflected from the telescope onto the ACIS camera. One bright source was a p parent to the team at the control center and the small collection of photons that appeared on the monitor were sufficient to indicate that the telescope had survived the launch and was approximately in focus, even prior to any checks and subsequent adjustments.

  12. Long-term change in the cyclotron line energy in Her X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staubert, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution in the centroid energy of the Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) in the spectrum of the binary X-ray pulsar Her X-1. After the discovery in 1976 by the MPE/AIT balloon telescope HEXE, the line feature was confirmed by several other instruments, establishing the centroid energy at around 35 keV, thereby providing the first direct measure of the B-filed strength of a neutron star at a few 10^12 Gauss. Between 1991 and 1993 an upward jump by ~7 keV occurred, first noted by BATSE and soon confirmed by RXTE and Beppo/SAX. Since then a systematic effort to monitor the cyclotron line energy E_cyc with all available instruments has led to two further discoveries: 1) E_cyc correlates positively with the X-ray luminosity (this feature is now found in four more binary X-ray pulsars). 2) Over the last 20 years the (flux normalized) E_cyc in Her X-1 has decayed by ~5 keV, down to 36.5 keV in August 2015. Her X-1 is the first and so far the only source showing such a variation. We will discuss possible physical scenarios relevant for accretion mounds/columns on highly magnetized neutron stars.

  13. Understanding compact object formation and natal kicks. IV. The case of IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Ansari, Asna; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey; Glebbeek, Evert E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ansari@ldeo.columbia.edu

    2014-08-01

    The extragalactic X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has attracted attention as it is possibly the host of the most massive stellar-mass black-hole (BH) known to date. Here we consider all available observational constraints and construct its evolutionary history up to the instant just before the formation of the BH. Our analysis accounts for the simplest possible history, which includes three evolutionary phases: binary orbital dynamics at core collapse, common envelope (CE) evolution, and evolution of the BH-helium star binary progenitor of the observed system. We derive the complete set of constraints on the progenitor system at various evolutionary stages. Specifically, right before the core collapse event, we find the mass of the BH immediate progenitor to be ≳ 31 M{sub ☉} (at 95% of confidence, same hereafter). The magnitude of the natal kick imparted to the BH is constrained to be ≲ 130 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, we find that the 'enthalpy' formalism recently suggested by Ivanova and Chaichenets is able to explain the existence of IC 10 X-1 without the need to invoke unreasonably high CE efficiencies. With this physically motivated formalism, we find that the CE efficiency required to explain the system is in the range of ≅ 0.6-1.

  14. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in the Aquila molecular cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe

    One of the main scientific goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey is to elucidate the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores in molecular clouds. In the ~11 deg2 field of Aquila imaged with Herschel/PACS-SPIRE at 70-500 μm, we have identified a complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them are gravitationally-bound candidate prestellar cores. Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in the Aquila cloud and suggest an intimate connection between these filaments and the formation process of prestellar cores. Indeed, a strong correlation is found between their spatial distributions. These Herschel findings support a filamentary paradigm for the early stages of star formation, where the cores result from the gravitational fragmentation of the densest filaments.

  15. [Gene therapy of SCID-X1].

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Schambach, A; Modlich, U; Thrasher, A

    2007-12-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited disease caused by inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG), which is located on the X-chromosome. Affected boys fail to develop two major effector cell types of the immune system (T cells and NK cells) and suffer from a functional B cell defect. Although drugs such as antibiotics can offer partial protection, the boys normally die in the first year of life in the absence of a curative therapy. For a third of the children, bone marrow transplantation from a fully matched donor is available and can cure the disease without major side effects. Mismatched bone marrow transplantation, however, is complicated by severe and potentially lethal side effects. Over the past decade, scientists worldwide have developed new treatments by introducing a correct copy of the IL2RG-cDNA. Gene therapy was highly effective when applied in young children. However, in a few patients the IL2RG-gene vector has unfortunately caused leukaemia. Activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by accidental integration of the gene vector has been identified as the underlying mechanism. In future clinical trials, improved vector technology in combination with other protocol modifications may reduce the risk of this side effect.

  16. Three-dimensional Aquila Rift: magnetized H I arch anchored by molecular complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional structure of the Aquila Rift of magnetized neutral gas is investigated by analysing H I and CO line data. The projected distance on the Galactic plane of the H I arch of the Aquila Rift is r⊥ ˜ 250 pc from the Sun. The H I arch emerges at l ˜ 30°, reaches to altitudes as high as ˜500 pc above the plane at l ˜ 350°, and returns to the disc at l ˜ 270°. The extent of arch at positive latitudes is ˜1 kpc and the width is ˜100 pc. The eastern root is associated with the giant molecular cloud complex, which is the main body of the optically defined Aquila Rift. The H I and molecular masses of the Rift are estimated to be M_{H I}˜ 1.4{×} 10^5 M_{⊙} and M_H_2˜ 3{×} 10^5 M_{⊙}. Gravitational energies to lift the gases to their heights are E_{grav: H I}˜ 1.4{×} 10^{51} erg and E_{grav: H_2}˜ 0.3{×} 10^{51} erg, respectively. Magnetic field is aligned along the H I arch of the Rift, and the strength is measured to be B ˜ 10 μG using Faraday rotation measures of extragalactic radio sources. The magnetic energy is estimated to be Emag ˜ 1.2 × 1051 erg. A possible mechanism of formation of the Aquila Rift is proposed in terms of interstellar magnetic inflation by a sinusoidal Parker instability of wavelength of ˜2.5 kpc and amplitude ˜500 pc.

  17. Retrospective investigation of geomagnetic field time-series during the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masci, Fabrizio; Di Persio, Manuele

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports the analyses of ULF (Ultra-Low-Frequency) geomagnetic field observations coming from the Geomagnetic Observatory of L'Aquila during the period 2008-2009. This period includes the L'Aquila 2009 seismic sequence, where the main shock of 6 April heavily damaged the medieval centre of the town and its surrounding area, causing 308 deaths, more than 1000 injuries and about 60,000 displaced people. Recently, several publications have documented the observation of precursory signals which occurred before the 6 April earthquake (e.g. Eftaxias et al., 2009, 2010), while others do not find any pre-earthquake anomaly (e.g. Villante et al., 2010; Di Lorenzo et al., 2011). In light of this, the goal of this study is to carry out further retrospective investigations. ULF magnetic field data are investigated by means of conventional analyses of magnetic polarization ratio, improved magnetic polarization ratio, and fractal analysis. In addition, total geomagnetic field data coming from the INGV Central Italy tectonomagnetic network have also been investigated, using the simple inter-station differentiation method. Within the limits of these methods, no magnetic anomalous signal which may be reasonably characterized as a precursor of the L'Aquila earthquakes has been found.

  18. Aquila field - advanced contracting strategies for the offshore development, in 850 meter water depth

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, E.; Ciprigno, M.

    1996-12-31

    Aquila oil field is located in 850 meters of water in the middle of the Otranto Channel, in the Mediterranean Sea, at about 45 km from the shore and is subject to both difficult sea and weather conditions. The many difficulties, mainly due to the very high water depth, imposed the use of advanced technology, that could be obtained only through the direct association of contractor companies, leaders in their own field. Such a solution safeguards the technological reliability and allows the maximum control of time and cost. The selection of an FPSO (Floating, Production, Storage and Offloading) comes from a feasibility study indicating this solution as the only one, allowing the economical exploitation of the Aquila field. This paper deals with a series of technical solutions and contractual agreements with a Joint-Venture embracing two leading world contractors for developing, manufacturing and installing the FPSO {open_quotes}Agip Firenze{close_quotes}, permanently anchored at a world record 850 m water depth. The system includes flowlines and control lines. The ship, has been especially redesigned and purchased by contractors. They will use the vessel to manage the field development. Agip will provide the subsea production system: christmas tree and control system with artificial lift. The Aquila field development project aims to identify an economically viable, low risk method of producing hydrocarbons from a deep water location where previously the reserves were technologically and economically out of range.

  19. High Variability in Vela X-1: Giant Flares and Off States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Joern; Kretschmar, Peter; Torrejon, Jose Miguel; Pottschmidt, Katja; Hanke, Manfred; Santangelo, Andrea; Ferrigno, Carlo; Staubert, Ruediger

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the spectral and temporal behavior of the high mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 during a phase of high activity, with special focus on the observed giant flares and off states. Methods. INTEGRAL observed Vela X-1 in a long almost uninterrupted observation for two weeks in 2003 Nov/Dec. The data were analyzed with OSA 7.0 and FTOOLS 6.2. We derive the pulse period, light curves, spectra, hardness ratios, hardness intensity diagrams, and study the eclipse. Results. In addition to an already high activity level, Vela X-1 exhibited several very intense flares, the brightest ones reaching a maximum intensity of more than 5 Crab in the 20-40 keV band and several off states where the source is no longer detected by INTEGRAL. We determine the pulse period to be 283.5320 +/- 0.0002 s which is stable throughout the whole observation. Analyzing the eclipses resulted in an improvement of the ephemeris. Spectral analysis of the flares shows that there seem to be two types of flares: relatively brief flares which can be extremely intense, and show spectral softening, contrary to high intensity states which are longer and show no softening. Conclusions. Both flares and off states are interpreted as being due to a strongly structured wind of the optical companion. When Vela X-1 encounters a cavity with strongly reduced density, the flux will drop triggering the onset of the propeller effect which inhibits further accretion, thus giving rise to off states. The required drop of the density of the material to trigger the propeller effect in Vela X-1 is of the same order as predicted by theoretical papers on the densities in the OB star winds. The same structured wind can give rise to the giant flares when Vela X-1 encounters a dense blob in the wind.

  20. Studying the Warm Layer and the Hardening Factor in Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Yangsen; Zhang, Shuangnan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Feng, Yuxin

    2002-01-01

    As the first dynamically determined black hole X-ray binary system, Cygnus X-1 has been studied extensively. However, its broadband spectrum observed with BeppoSax is still not well understood. Besides the soft excess described by the multi-color disk model (MCD), the power-law hard component and a broad excess feature above 10 keV (a disk reflection component), there is also an additional soft component around 1 keV, whose origin is not known currently. Here we propose that the additional soft component is due to the thermal Comptonization between the soft disk photons and a warm plasma cloud just above the disk, i.e., a warm layer. We use the Monte-Carlo technique to simulate this Compton scattering process and build a table model based on our simulation results. With this table model, we study the disk structure and estimate the hardening factor to the MCD component in Cygnus X-1.

  1. e-EVN radio detection of Aql X-1 in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Yang, J.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Fender, R.; Garrett, M.; Rushton, A.; Spencer, R.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron star X-ray binary Aql X-1 is currently in outburst (ATel #5114, #5117, #5129, #5136, #5148). Using the European VLBI Network (e-EVN) we observed Aql X-1 at 5 GHz in two time-slots: 2013 June 18 between 19:48 - 20:36 UT (MJD 56461.825 - 56461.858), and 2013 June 19 between 02:53 - 05:54 UT (MJD 56462.120 - 56462.246). The two datasets were combined together and then calibrated. The participating radio telescopes were: Effelsberg (Germany), Jodrell Bank Mk2 (UK), Medicina (Italy), Noto (Italy), Onsala 25m (Sweden), Torun (Poland), Yebes (Spain), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (Netherlands), Shanghai (China), Hartebeesthoek (South Africa).

  2. THE HARD X-RAY BEHAVIOR OF AQL X-1 DURING TYPE-I BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Peng; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Ji, Long; Li, Jian; Wang, Jian-Min; Torres, Diego F.; Kretschmar, Peter E-mail: szhang@ihep.ac.cn

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery of an anti-correlation between the soft and hard X-ray light curves of the X-ray binary Aql X-1 when bursting. This behavior may indicate that the corona is cooled by the soft X-ray shower fed by the type-I X-ray bursts, and that this process happens within a few seconds. Stacking the Aql X-1 light curves of type-I bursts, we find a shortage in the 40-50 keV band, delayed by 4.5 ± 1.4 s with respect to the soft X-rays. The photospheric radius expansion bursts are different in that neither a shortage nor an excess shows up in the hard X-ray light curve.

  3. On the Spin of the Black Hole in IC 10 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, James F.; Walton, Dominic J.; García, Javier A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Laycock, Silas G. T.; Middleton, Matthew J.; Barnard, Robin; Madsen, Kristin K.

    2016-02-01

    The compact X-ray source in the eclipsing X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has reigned for years as ostensibly the most massive stellar-mass black hole, with a mass estimated to be about twice that of its closest rival. However, striking results presented recently by Laycock et al. reveal that the mass estimate, based on emission-line velocities, is unreliable and that the mass of the X-ray source is essentially unconstrained. Using Chandra and NuSTAR data, we rule against a neutron-star model and conclude that IC 10 X-1 contains a black hole. The eclipse duration of IC 10 X-1 is shorter and its depth shallower at higher energies, an effect consistent with the X-ray emission being obscured during eclipse by a Compton-thick core of a dense wind. The spectrum is strongly disk-dominated, which allows us to constrain the spin of the black hole via X-ray continuum fitting. Three other wind-fed black hole systems are known; the masses and spins of their black holes are high: M˜ 10{--}15{M}⊙ and {a}*\\gt 0.8. If the mass of IC 10 X-1's black hole is comparable, then its spin is likewise high.

  4. Evidence for a Broad Relativistic Iron Line from the Neutron Star LMXB Ser X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2007-01-01

    We report on an analysis of XMM-Newton data from the neutron star low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Serpens X-1 (Ser X-1). Spectral analysis of EPIC PN data indicates that the previously known broad iron Ka emission line in this source has a significantly skewed structure with a moderately extended red wing. The asymmetric shape of the line is well described with the laor and diskline models in XSPEC, which strongly supports an inner accretion disk origin of the line. To our knowledge this is the first strong evidence for a relativistic line in a neutron star LMXB. This finding suggests that the broad lines seen in other neutron star LMXBs likely originate from the inner disk as well. Detailed study of such lines opens up a new way to probe neutron star parameters and their strong gravitational fields. The laor model describes the line from Ser X-1 somewhat better than diskline, and suggests that the inner accretion disk radius is less than 6GM/c(exp 2). This is consistent with the weak magnetic fields of LMXBs, and may point towards a high compactness and rapid spin of the neutron star. Finally, the inferred source inclination angle in the approximate range 50-60 deg is consistent with the lack of dipping from Ser X-1.

  5. Gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1: A comparison of search methods and prospects for detection with advanced detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, C.; Bulten, H. J.; Crowder, S. G.; Dergachev, V.; Galloway, D. K.; Goetz, E.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Lasky, P. D.; Meadors, G. D.; Melatos, A.; Premachandra, S.; Riles, K.; Sammut, L.; Thrane, E. H.; Whelan, J. T.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) is potentially the most luminous source of continuous gravitational-wave radiation for interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. For low-mass X-ray binaries this radiation would be sustained by active accretion of matter from its binary companion. With the Advanced Detector Era fast approaching, work is underway to develop an array of robust tools for maximizing the science and detection potential of Sco X-1. We describe the plans and progress of a project designed to compare the numerous independent search algorithms currently available. We employ a mock-data challenge in which the search pipelines are tested for their relative proficiencies in parameter estimation, computational efficiency, robustness, and most importantly, search sensitivity. The mock-data challenge data contains an ensemble of 50 Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) type signals, simulated within a frequency band of 50-1500 Hz. Simulated detector noise was generated assuming the expected best strain sensitivity of Advanced LIGO [1] and Advanced VIRGO [2] (4 ×10-24 Hz-1 /2 ). A distribution of signal amplitudes was then chosen so as to allow a useful comparison of search methodologies. A factor of 2 in strain separates the quietest detected signal, at 6.8 ×10-26 strain, from the torque-balance limit at a spin frequency of 300 Hz, although this limit could range from 1.2 ×10-25 (25 Hz) to 2.2 ×10-26 (750 Hz) depending on the unknown frequency of Sco X-1. With future improvements to the search algorithms and using advanced detector data, our expectations for probing below the theoretical torque-balance strain limit are optimistic.

  6. An upper limit on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Oegelman, H.; Kanbach, G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the X-ray binary Vela X-1 was investigated by analyzing the COS-B satellite observations, using the COS-B X-ray detector for a phase coherent analysis in the search of rotational periodicity. The rotational upper limit is compared to the X-ray, TeV, and PeV fluxes reported by Chodil et al. (1967), North et al. (1984), and Protheroe et al. (1984), respectively. It was found that, under certain conditions, the upper limit determined here is not inconsistent with the reports of TeV and PeV emission.

  7. Coordinated X-ray and optical observations of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augusteijn, T.; Karatasos, K.; Papadakis, M.; Paterakis, G.; Kikuchi, S.; Brosch, N.; Leibowitz, E.; Hertz, P.; Mitsuda, K.; Dotani, T.

    1992-01-01

    We present the results of coordinated, partly simultaneous, optical and X-ray (Ginga) observations of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. We find that the division between the optically bright and faint state, at a blue magnitude B = 12.8, corresponds to the change from the normal to the flaring branch in the X-ray color-color diagram as proposed by Priedhorsky et al. (1986). From archival Walraven data we find that in both optical states the orbital light curve is approximately sinusoidal, and have a similar amplitudes.

  8. On the formation of SMC X-1: The effect of mass and orbital angular momentum loss

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tao; Li, X.-D. E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    SMC X-1 is a high-mass X-ray binary with an orbital period of 3.9 days. The mass of the neutron star is as low as ∼1M {sub ☉}, suggesting that it was likely formed through an electron-capture supernova rather than an iron-core collapse supernova. From the present system configurations, we argue that the orbital period at the supernova was ≲ 10 days. Since the mass transfer process between the neutron star's progenitor and the companion star before the supernova should have increased the orbital period to tens of days, a mechanism with efficient orbit angular momentum loss and relatively small mass loss is required to account for its current orbital period. We have calculated the evolution of the progenitor binary systems from zero-age main sequence to the pre-supernova stage with different initial parameters and various mass and angular momentum loss mechanisms. Our results show that the outflow from the outer Lagrangian point or a circumbinary disk formed during the mass transfer phase may be qualified for this purpose. We point out that these mechanisms may be popular in binary evolution and significantly affect the formation of compact star binaries.

  9. X-1E Loaded in B-29 Mothership on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1E airplane being loaded under the mothership, Boeing B-29. The X planes had originally been lowered into a loading pit and the launch aircraft towed over the pit, where the rocket plane was hoisted by belly straps into the bomb bay. By the early 1950s a hydraulic lift had been installed on the ramp at the NACA High-Speed Flight Station to elevate the launch aircraft and then lower it over the rocket plane for mating. There were four versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Supersonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on January 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On October 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force

  10. X-1-2 with Pilots Robert Champine Herb Hoover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 and two of the NACA pilots that flew the aircraft. The one on the left is Robert Champine with the other being Herbert Hoover. The X-1-2 was also equipped with the 10-percent wing and 8 percent tail, powered with an XLR-11 rocket engine and aircraft made its first powered flight on December 9, 1946 with Chalmers 'Slick' Goodlin at the controls. As with the X-1-1 the X-1-2 continued to investigate transonic/supersonic flight regime. NACA pilot Herbert Hoover became the first civilian to fly Mach 1, March 10, 1948. X-1-2 flew until October 23, 1951, completing 74 glide and powered flights with nine different pilots, when it was retired to be rebuilt as the X-1E.

  11. Mass flow in close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The manner of mass flow in close binary systems is examined with a special view to the role of the so-called critical Roche (or Jacobian) lobe, taking into consideration relevant physical conditions such as radiation pressure that may affect the restricted three-body problem treatment. The mass does not necessarily flow from component one to component two through the L1 point to form a gaseous ring surrounding the latter. These considerations are applied to X-ray binaries with early-type optical components, such as Cyg X-1 (HDE 226868) and 3U 1700 - 37 (HD 153919). In the two bright close binary systems Beta Lyr and UW CMa, which are believed to be undergoing dynamic mass transfer, recent Copernicus observations show that the gas giving rise to the prominent ultraviolet emission lines surrounds the entire binary system rather than merely component two. Implications of these observations are also discussed.

  12. Maintenance Production Management (2R1X1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Occupational Survey Report Burke Burright Occupational Analyst 2R1X1 MAINTENANCE PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT MARCH 2001 Air Force Occupational Measurement...34DD MON YYYY") Title and Subtitle Occupational Survey Report 2R1X1 Maintenance Production Management Contract or Grant Number Program Element...AFSC AWARDING COURSE § Maintenance Production Management Apprentice (J3ABR2R1X1-003) § 6 Weeks, 1 day § 12 Semester Hours for CCAF § Sheppard AFB, TX

  13. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole in Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-01-01

    The compact primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 was the first black hole to be established via dynamical observations. We have recently determined accurate values for its mass and distance, and for the orbital inclination angle of the binary. Building on these results, which are based on our favored (asynchronous) dynamical model, we have measured the radius of the inner edge of the black hole s accretion disk by fitting its thermal continuum spectrum to a fully relativistic model of a thin accretion disk. Assuming that the spin axis of the black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum vector, we have determined that Cygnus X-1 contains a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a* > 0.95 (3(sigma)). For a less probable (synchronous) dynamical model, we find a. > 0.92 (3 ). In our analysis, we include the uncertainties in black hole mass, orbital inclination angle, and distance, and we also include the uncertainty in the calibration of the absolute flux via the Crab. These four sources of uncertainty totally dominate the error budget. The uncertainties introduced by the thin-disk model we employ are particularly small in this case given the extreme spin of the black hole and the disk s low luminosity.

  14. THE EXTREME SPIN OF THE BLACK HOLE IN CYGNUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gou Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Orosz, Jerome A.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-12-01

    The compact primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 was the first black hole to be established via dynamical observations. We have recently determined accurate values for its mass and distance, and for the orbital inclination angle of the binary. Building on these results, which are based on our favored (asynchronous) dynamical model, we have measured the radius of the inner edge of the black hole's accretion disk by fitting its thermal continuum spectrum to a fully relativistic model of a thin accretion disk. Assuming that the spin axis of the black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum vector, we have determined that Cygnus X-1 contains a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a{sub *} > 0.95 (3{sigma}). For a less probable (synchronous) dynamical model, we find a{sub *} > 0.92 (3{sigma}). In our analysis, we include the uncertainties in black hole mass, orbital inclination angle, and distance, and we also include the uncertainty in the calibration of the absolute flux via the Crab. These four sources of uncertainty totally dominate the error budget. The uncertainties introduced by the thin-disk model we employ are particularly small in this case given the extreme spin of the black hole and the disk's low luminosity.

  15. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in the Aquila molecular cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    One of the main scientific goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr)is to elucidate the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores inmolecular clouds. In the ~ 11 deg2 field of Aquila imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70 and 500microns, we have recently identified a complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them aregravitationally-bound candidate prestellar cores that will likely form stars in the future (Könyves et al. 2010and 2015, submitted - see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in the Aquila cloud andsuggest an intimate connection between these filaments and the formation process of prestellar cores.About 10%-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filaments below Av ~ 7, while as much as ~ 50%-75%of the dense gas mass above Av ~ 7-10 is in the form of filamentary structures.Furthermore, about 90% of the Herschel-identified prestellar cores are located above a background columndensity corresponding to Av ~ 7, and ~ 75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures withsupercritical masses per unit length > 16 M⊙/pc. In accordance with this, a strong correlation is foundbetween the spatial distribution of prestellar cores and the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects identified bySpitzer in the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~ 1 Myr for the formation and evolutionof both prestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in the Aquila cloud support a filamentary paradigm for the early stagesof star formation, where the cores result primarily from the gravitational fragmentation of marginallysupercritical filaments (cf. André et al. 2014, PPVI).

  16. Multi-risk assessment of L'Aquila gas distribution network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Iervolino, I.; Silvestri, F.; d'Onofrio, A.; Santo, A.; Franchin, P.; Cavalieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    This study focuses on the assessment of seismic risk for gas distribution networks. The basic function of a gas system is to deliver gas from sources to costumers and it is essentially composed of pipelines, reduction stations, and demand nodes, which are connected to end users to which the lifeline delivers gas. Because most of the components are spatially distributed and buried, seismic hazard has to account for both spatial correlation of ground motion intensity measures and effects induced by permanent ground deformation such as liquefaction and landslide, which determine localized ground failure. Different performance measures are considered in the study for the network, in terms of connectivity and flow reduction. Part of the gas distribution network operating in L'Aquila (central Italy), operated by ENEL Rete Gas spa has been chosen as case study. The whole network is distributed via a 621 km pipeline network: 234 km of pipes operating at medium pressure and the remaining 387 km with gas flowing at low pressure; it also consists of Metering/Pressure reduction stations, Reduction Groups and demand nodes. The framework presented makes use of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, both in terms of ground motion and permanent ground deformation, empirical relations to estimate pipeline response, fragility curves for the evaluation of reduction cabins vulnerability, performance indicators to characterize the functionality of the gas network. The analysis were performed through a computer code specific for risk assessment of distributed systems developed by the authors. Probabilistic hazard scenarios have been simulated for the region covering the case study considering the Paganica fault on which L'Aquila 2009 earthquake was originated as source. The strong motion has been evaluated using an European ground motion prediction equation and an associated spatial correlation model. Regarding geotechnical hazards the landslide potential of L'Aquila region, according

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of dense cores in Aquila from Herschel (Konyves+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyves, V.; Andre, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Schneider, N.; Roy, A.; Didelon, P.; Maury, A.; Shimajiri, Y.; Di, Francesco J.; Bontemps, S.; Peretto, N.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-P.; Elia, D.; Griffin, M. J.; Hill, T.; Kirk, J.; Ladjelate, B.; Marsh, K.; Martin, P. G.; Motte, F.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Pezzuto, S.; Roussel, H.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schisano, E.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Herschel Gould Belt survey (Andre et al., 2010A&A...518L.102A) observations of the Aquila cloud complex, and using the multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm getsources (Men'shchikov et al., 2012A&A...542A..81M), we identified a total of 749 dense cores, including 685 starless cores and 64 protostellar cores. The observed properties of all dense cores are given in tablea1.dat, and their derived properties are listed in tablea2.dat. (4 data files).

  18. Special Session: Lessons Learned From the L'Aquila Earthquake Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    The verdict and prison sentences, delivered on 22 October 2012, that found six Italian scientists and one government official guilty of manslaughter in connection with the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake shocked the scientific community worldwide. A late-breaking special session co-convened by John Bates, at the National Climatic Data Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Stephen Sparks, University of Bristol, was added to the Fall Meeting schedule to address this case and to discuss the complex process of assessing and communicating the risks associated with natural hazards.

  19. Short-term oscillations in avian molt intensity: Evidence from the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Lish, J.W.; Kery, M.; Redpath, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    From a year-long study of molt in the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos, we recorded 2069 contour feathers replaced in 137 d (6 May-19 September). Very few contour feathers were lost outside this period. From precise daily counts of feathers lost, and using time series analysis, we identified short-term fluctuations (i.e., 19-d subcycles) around a midsummer peak (i.e., a left-skewed normal distribution). Because these subcycles have never before been reported and because the physiological basis for many aspects of avian molt is poorly known, we offer only hypothetical explanations for the controls responsible for the subcycles. ?? Journal of Avian Biology.

  20. Short-term oscillations in avian molt intensity: evidence from the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Lish, J.W.; Kery, M.; Redpath, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    From a year-long study of molt in the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos, we recorded 2069 contour feathers replaced in 137 d (6 May-19 September). Very few contour feathers were lost outside this period. From precise daily counts of feathers lost, and using time series analysis, we identified short-term fluctuations (i.e., 19-d subcycles) around a midsummer peak (i.e., a left-skewed normal distribution). Because these subcycles have never before been reported and because the physiological basis for many aspects of avian molt is poorly known, we offer only hypothetical explanations for the controls responsible for the subcycles.

  1. Macroseismic survey of the April 6, 2009 L’Aquila earthquake (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassi, R.; Azzaro, R.; Bernardini, F.; D'Amico, S.; Ercolani, E.; Rossi, A.; Tertulliani, A.; Vecchi, M.; Galli, P.

    2009-12-01

    On April 6, 2009, at 01:33 GMT, central Italy has been hit by a strong earthquake (Ml 5.8, Mw 6.3) representing the mainshock of a seismic sequence of over 20.000 aftershocks recorded in about five months. The event, located in the inner of the Abruzzi region just a few kilometres SW of the town of L’Aquila, has produced destructions and heavy damage in a 30 km wide area and was felt in almost Italy, as far as the coasts of Slovenia, Croatia and Albania. In all, 308 people lost their lives. A macroseismic survey was carried out soon after the earthquake by the QUEST group (QUick Earthquake Survey Team) with the aim to define, for Civil Protection purposes, the damage scenario over a territory which is densely urbanised. Damage generally depended on the high vulnerability of the buildings both for problems related to the old age of the buildings - it is the case of the historical centre of l’Aquila - and to site effects, as in some quarters of the town and in the nearby villages. Rubble-stone and masonry buildings suffered heaviest damage - a lot of old small villages almost entirely collapsed - while reinforced concrete (RC) frame buildings generally experienced moderate structural damage except in particular condition. The macroseismic effects reached intensity IX-X MCS (Mercalli-Cancani-Sieberg scale) at Onna and Castelnuovo, while many others villages reached VIII-IX MCS, amongst which the historical centre of L’Aquila. This town was investigated in detail due to the striking difference of damage between the historical centre and the more recent surrounding areas. In all, more than 300 localities have been investigated (Galli and Camassi, 2009). The earthquake has also provoked effects on natural surroundings (EMERGEO WG, 2009). Two types of phenomena have been detected: (i) surface cracks mainly observed along previously mapped faults and (ii) slope instability processes, such as landslides and secondary fractures. The pattern of macroseismic effects

  2. X-Ray Variation Statistics and Wind Clumping in Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furst, Felix; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern; Hanke, Manfred; Rothschild, Richard E.; Kretschmar, Peter; Schulz, Norbert S.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Klochkov, Dmitry; Staubert, Rudiger

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the structure of the wind in the neutron star X-ray binary system Vela X-1 by analyzing its flaring behavior. Vela X-1 shows constant flaring, with some flares reaching fluxes of more than 3.0 Crab between 20-60 keV for several 100 seconds, while the average flux is around 250 mCrab. We analyzed all archival INTEGRAL data, calculating the brightness distribution in the 20-60 keV band, which, as we show, closely follows a log-normal distribution. Orbital resolved analysis shows that the structure is strongly variable, explainable by shocks and a fluctuating accretion wake. Analysis of RXTE ASM data suggests a strong orbital change of N. Accreted clump masses derived from the INTEGRAL data are on the order of 5 x 10(exp 19)-10(exp 21) g. We show that the lightcurve can be described with a model of multiplicative random numbers. In the course of the simulation we calculate the power spectral density of the system in the 20-100 keV energy band and show that it follows a red-noise power law. We suggest that a mixture of a clumpy wind, shocks, and turbulence can explain the measured mass distribution. As the recently discovered class of supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXT) seems to show the same parameters for the wind, the link between persistent HMXB like Vela X-1 and SFXT is further strengthened.

  3. Gamma rays detected from Cygnus X-1 with likely jet origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, R.; Fernández-Barral, A.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Aharonian, F.; Blanch, O.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Galindo, D.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: We probe the high-energy (>60 MeV) emission from the black hole X-ray binary system, Cygnus X-1, and investigate its origin. Methods: We analyzed 7.5 yr of data by Fermi-LAT with the latest Pass 8 software version. Results: We report the detection of a signal at 8σ statistical significance that is spatially coincident with Cygnus X-1 and has a luminosity of 5.5 × 1033 erg s-1, above 60 MeV. The signal is correlated with the hard X-ray flux: the source is observed at high energies only during the hard X-ray spectral state, when the source is known to display persistent, relativistic radio-emitting jets. The energy spectrum, extending up to 20 GeV without any sign of spectral break, is well fit by a power-law function with a photon index of 2.3 ± 0.2. There is a hint of orbital flux variability, with high-energy emission mostly coming around the superior conjunction. Conclusions: We detected GeV emission from Cygnus X-1 and probed that the emission is most likely associated with the relativistic jets. The evidence of flux orbital variability indicates the anisotropic inverse-Compton on stellar photons as the mechanism at work, thus constraining the emission region to a distance 1011-1013 cm from the black hole.

  4. Long term X-ray variability of Circinus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo

    2003-03-19

    We present an analysis of long term X-ray monitoring observations of Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) made with four different instruments: Vela 5B, Ariel V ASM, Ginga ASM, and RXTE ASM, over the course of more than 30 years. We use Lomb-Scargle periodograms to search for the {approx}16.5 day orbital period of Cir X-1 in each of these data sets and from this derive a new orbital ephemeris based solely on X-ray measurements, which we compare to the previous ephemerides obtained from radio observations. We also use the Phase Dispersion Minimization (PDM) technique, as well as FFT analysis, to verify the periods obtained from periodograms. We obtain dynamic periodograms (both Lomb-Scargle and PDM) of Cir X-1 during the RXTE era, showing the period evolution of Cir X-1, and also displaying some unexplained discrete jumps in the location of the peak power.

  5. Revisiting the dynamical case for a massive black hole in IC10 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    2015-09-01

    The relative phasing of the X-ray eclipse ephemeris and optical radial velocity (RV) curve for the X-ray binary IC10 X-1 suggests that the He [λ4686] emission line originates in a shadowed sector of the stellar wind that avoids ionization by X-rays from the compact object. The line attains maximum blueshift when the wind is directly towards us at mid X-ray eclipse, as is also seen in Cygnus X-3. If the RV curve is unrelated to stellar motion, evidence for a massive black hole (BH) evaporates because the mass function of the binary is unknown. The reported X-ray luminosity, spectrum, slow QPO and broad eclipses caused by absorption/scattering in the Wolf-Rayet (WR) wind are all consistent with either a low-stellar-mass BH or a neutron star (NS). For an NS, the centre of mass lies inside the WR envelope whose motion is then far below the observed 370 km s-1 RV amplitude, while the velocity of the compact object is as high as 600 km s-1. The resulting 0.4 per cent Doppler variation of X-ray spectral lines could be confirmed by missions in development. These arguments also apply to other putative BH binaries whose RV and eclipse curves are not yet phase-connected. Theories of BH formation and predicted rates of gravitational wave sources may need revision.

  6. First breath of the French seismic crisis committee with the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, C.; Delouis, B.; Vergnolle, M. M.; Klinger, Y.; Chiaraluce, L.; Margheriti, L.; Mariscal, A.; Péquégnat, C.; Schlagenhauf, A.; Traversa, P.

    2009-12-01

    The April 2009 L’Aquila earthquake launched the French seismic crisis committee. The mission of this committee is to gather all possible information about the earthquake and the available means for intervention (in terms of human potential and field instruments). These information are passed to the French INSU who decides of and raise fundings for a possible field experiment. The L’Aquila earthquake is the first event to be considered by the committee. French INSU was able to propose to the Italian INGV a set of 4 people and 20 seismic recorders in less than 30h. All stations were deployed over a broad area surrounding the event, in intelligence with the Italian team in 2,5 days. The seismic recorders are Taurus units associated to CMG40 sensors, belonging to SISMOB. They continuously recorded the ground movement, and more than 20,000 events. Data are freely distributed by the French national portal of seismic data Fosfore. They were mixed alltogether with the Italian data in order to perform the relocation of seismicity, and a first attempt to derive a 'noise' correlation tomography. This first attempt of an integrated post-seismic field study should provide the community with useful information in view of a future large event striking the European countries.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep NIR survey toward Aquila. I. MHOs (Zhang+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Fang, M.; Wang, H.; Sun, J.; Wang, M.; Jiang, Z.; Anathipindika, S.

    2015-11-01

    The observations were conducted in queue-scheduled observing mode between 2012 July 26 and 29 with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), covering in total an area of ~1deg2. We observed 10 fields toward the Aquila molecular cloud in the J, H, Ks, and H2 (2.122um) bands. As part of the Gould Belt Legacy program (PID: 30574), the Spitzer Space Telescope observations toward the Serpens-Aquila rift were conducted in 2007 May and September with the IRAC and MIPS cameras. The Herschel archival data used in this paper are part of the Herschel Gould Belt guaranteed time key programs for the study of star formation with the PACS and SPIRE instruments and have been published in Andre et al. (2010A&A...518L.102A), Konyves et al. (2010A&A...518L.106K), and Bontemps et al. (2010A&A...518L..85B). (2 data files).

  8. Science, Right and Communication of Risk in L'Aquila trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamura, Marco; Miozzo, Davide; Boni, Giorgio; Amato, Davide; Ferraris, Luca; Siccardi, Franco

    2013-04-01

    CIMA Research Foundation has had access to all the information of the criminal trial held in l'Aquila intended against some of the members of the Commissione Nazionale Grandi Rischi (National Commission for Forecasting and Preventing Major Risks) and some directors of the Italian Civil Protection Department. These information constitute the base of a study that has examined: - the initiation of investigations by the families of the victims; - the public prosecutor's indictment; - the testimonies; - the liaison between experts in seismology social scientists and communication; - the statement of the defence; - the first instance decision of condemnation. The study reveals the paramount importance of communication of risk as element of prevention. Taken into particular account is the method of the Judicial Authority ex-post control on the evaluations and decisions of persons with a role of decision maker within the Civil Protection system. In the judgment just published by the Court of l'Aquila, the reassuring information from scientists and operators of Civil Protection appears to be considered as a negative value.

  9. Adaptive Response of Children and Adolescents with Autism to the 2009 Earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenti, Marco; Ciprietti, Tiziana; Di Egidio, Claudia; Gabrielli, Maura; Masedu, Francesco; Tomassini, Anna Rita; Sorge, Germana

    2012-01-01

    The literature offers no descriptions of the adaptive outcomes of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) after natural disasters. Aim of this study was to evaluate the adaptive behaviour of participants with ASD followed for 1 year after their exposure to the 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy) compared with an unexposed peer group with ASD,…

  10. A Multi-Year Light Curve of Scorpius X-1 Based on CGRO BATSE Spectroscopy Detector Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, B. J.; Harrison, T. E.; Mason, P. A.; Templeton, M.; Heikkila, C. W.; Buckley, T.; Galvan, E.; Silva, A.; Harmon, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-year light curve of the low mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, is constructed based on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Spectroscopy Detector (SD) data in the nominal energy range of 10-20 keV. A detailed discussion is given of the reduction process of the BATSE/SD data. Corrections to the SD measurements are made for off-axis pointings, spectral and bandpass changes, and differences in the eight SD sensitivities. The resulting 4.4 year Sco X-1 SD light curve is characterized in terms of the time scales over which various types of emission changes occur. This light curve is then compared with Sco X-1 light curves obtained by Axiel 5, the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LADs), and the RXTE all-sky monitor (ASM). Coincident temporal coverage by the BATSE/SD and RXTE/ASM allows a direct comparison of the behavior of Sco X-1 over a range of high energies to be made. These ASM light curves are then used to discuss model constraints on the Sco X-1 system.

  11. X-1-2 on ramp during ground engine test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Ground engine test run on the Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 airplane at NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit service area. Notice the front on the lower part of the aircraft aft of the nose section. The frost forms from the mixture of the propellants (including liquid oxygen) in the internal tanks. This photograph was taken in 1947. The aircraft shown is still painted in its original saffron (orange) paint finish. This was later changed to white, which was more visible against the dark blue sky than saffron turned out to be. There were four versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on Jan. 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December

  12. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CYGNUS X-1 ABOVE 100 MeV IN THE HARD AND SOFT STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Del Monte, E.; Giusti, M.; Striani, E.; Pooley, G.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of multi-year gamma-ray observations by the AGILE satellite of the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1. In a previous investigation we focused on gamma-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 in the hard state during the period mid-2007/2009. Here we present the results of the gamma-ray monitoring of Cygnus X-1 during the period 2010/mid-2012 which includes a remarkably prolonged 'soft state' phase (2010 June-2011 May). Previous 1-10 MeV observations of Cyg X-1 in this state hinted at a possible existence of a non-thermal particle component with substantial modifications of the Comptonized emission from the inner accretion disk. Our AGILE data, averaged over the mid-2010/mid-2011 soft state of Cygnus X-1, provide a significant upper limit for gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of F{sub soft} < 20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} , excluding the existence of prominent non-thermal emission above 100 MeV during the soft state of Cygnus X-1. We discuss theoretical implications of our findings in the context of high-energy emission models of black hole accretion. We also discuss possible gamma-ray flares detected by AGILE. In addition to a previously reported episode observed by AGILE in 2009 October during the hard state, we report a weak but important candidate for enhanced emission which occurred at the end of 2010 June (2010 June 30 10:00-2010 July 2 10:00 UT) exactly coinciding with a hard-to-soft state transition and before an anomalous radio flare. An appendix summarizes all previous high-energy observations and possible detections of Cygnus X-1 above 1 MeV.

  13. Maintenance Production Management AFSC 2R1X1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    UNITED STATES AIR FORCE MAINTENANCE PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT AFSC 2R1X1 OSSN 2435 MAY 2001 OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS PROGRAM AIR FORCE OCCUPATIONAL...United States Air Force Occupational Survey Report Maintenance Production Management AFSC 2R1X1-OSSN 2435 Contract or Grant Number Program Element...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii PREFACE This report presents the results of an Air Force Occupational Survey of the Maintenance Production Management career ladder

  14. Joint XMM-Newton, Chandra, and RXTE Observations of Cyg X-1 at Phase Zero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottschmidt, Katja

    2008-01-01

    We present first results of simultaneous observations of the high mass X-ray binary Cyg X-1 for 50 ks with XMM-Newton, Chandra-HETGS and RXTE in 2008 April. The observations are centered on phase 0 of the 5.6 d orbit when pronounced dips in the X-ray emission from the black hole are known to occur. The dips are due to highly variable absorption in the accretion stream from the O-star companion to the black hole. Compared to previous high resolution spectroscopy studies of the dip and non-dip emission with Chandra, the addition of XMM-Newton data allows for a better determination of the continuum, especially through the broad iron line region (with RXTE constraining the greater than 10 keV continuum).

  15. Total Electron-Impact Ionization Cross-Sections of CFx and NFx (x = 1 - 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Tarnovsky, Vladimir; Becker, Kurt H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The discrepancy between experimental and theoretical total electron-impact ionization cross sections for a group of fluorides, CFx, and NFx, (x = 1 - 3), is attributed to the inadequacies in previous theoretical models. Cross-sections calculated using a recently developed siBED (simulation Binary-Encounter-Dipole) model that takes into account the shielding of the long-range dipole potential between the scattering electron and target are in agreement with experimentation. The present study also carefully reanalyzed the previously reported experimental data to account for the possibility of incomplete collection of fragment ions and the presence of ion-pair formation channels. For NF3, our experimental and theoretical cross-sections compare well with the total ionization cross-sections recently reported by Haaland et al. in the region below dication formation.

  16. Using Monte-Carlo Simulations to Study the Disk Structure in Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Y.; Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, X. L.; Feng, Y. X.

    2002-01-01

    As the first dynamically determined black hole X-ray binary system, Cygnus X-1 has been studied extensively. However, its broad-band spectra in hard state with BeppoSAX is still not well understood. Besides the soft excess described by the multi-color disk model (MCD), the power- law component and a broad excess feature above 10 keV (disk reflection component), there is also an additional soft component around 1 keV, whose origin is not known currently.We propose that the additional soft component is due to the thermal Comptonization process between the s oft disk photon and the warm plasma cloud just above the disk.i.e., a warm layer. We use Monte-Carlo technique t o simulate this Compton scattering process and build several table models based on our simulation results.

  17. Linear polarization from tidal distortions of the Cygnus X-1 primary component

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkarev, N.G.; Karitskaia, E.A.; Loskutov, V.M.; Sokolov, V.V.

    1986-02-01

    The variability that would be introduced into the optical linear polarization of the Cyg X-1 (V1357 Cyg) binary system due to tidal deformation or shallow partial eclipses of the primary component is calculated, allowing for the optical-depth variation of the source function and single-scattering albedo in a model stellar atmosphere with Teff = 32,900 K and log g = 3.1. Angular distributions of the intensity and polarization per unit area of the stellar surface are derived for selected wavelengths, and the wavelength dependence of the corresponding polarization variability amplitude Ap is predicted. In the optical range Ap should be less than about 0.025 percent, but in principle might be detectable at short wavelengths. The observed V-band variations in p are, however an order of magnitude stronger and cannot result from tidal distortions or partial eclipses. 24 references.

  18. X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    This photo of the X-1A includes graphs of the flight data from Maj. Charles E. Yeager's Mach 2.44 flight on December 12, 1953. (This was only a few days short of the 50th anniversary of the Wright brothers' first powered flight.) After reaching Mach 2.44, then the highest speed ever reached by a piloted aircraft, the X-1A tumbled completely out of control. The motions were so violent that Yeager cracked the plastic canopy with his helmet. He finally recovered from a inverted spin and landed on Rogers Dry Lakebed. Among the data shown are Mach number and altitude (the two top graphs). The speed and altitude changes due to the tumble are visible as jagged lines. The third graph from the bottom shows the G-forces on the airplane. During the tumble, these twice reached 8 Gs or 8 times the normal pull of gravity at sea level. (At these G forces, a 200-pound human would, in effect, weigh 1,600 pounds if a scale were placed under him in the direction of the force vector.) Producing these graphs was a slow, difficult process. The raw data from on-board instrumentation recorded on oscillograph film. Human computers then reduced the data and recorded it on data sheets, correcting for such factors as temperature and instrument errors. They used adding machines or slide rules for their calculations, pocket calculators being 20 years in the future. Three second generation Bell Aircraft Corporations X-1s were built, though four were requested. They were the X-1A (48-1384); X-1B (48-1385); X-1C (canceled and never built); X-1D (48-1386). These aircraft were similar to the X-1s, except they were five feet longer, had conventional canopies, and were powered by Reaction Motors, Inc. XLR11-RM-5 rocket engines. The RM-5, like the previous engines, had no throttle and was controlled by igniting one or more of the four thrust chambers at will. The original program outline called for the X-1A and X-1B to be used for dynamic stability and air loads investigations. The X-1D was to be used

  19. X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    This photo of the X-1A includes graphs of the flight data from Maj. Charles E. Yeager's Mach 2.44 flight on December 12, 1953. (This was only a few days short of the 50th anniversary of the Wright brothers' first powered flight.) After reaching Mach 2.44, then the highest speed ever reached by a piloted aircraft, the X-1A tumbled completely out of control. The motions were so violent that Yeager cracked the plastic canopy with his helmet. He finally recovered from a inverted spin and landed on Rogers Dry Lakebed. Among the data shown are Mach number and altitude (the two top graphs). The speed and altitude changes due to the tumble are visible as jagged lines. The third graph from the bottom shows the G-forces on the airplane. During the tumble, these twice reached 8 Gs or 8 times the normal pull of gravity at sea level. (At these G forces, a 200-pound human would, in effect, weigh 1,600 pounds if a scale were placed under him in the direction of the force vector.) Producing these graphs was a slow, difficult process. The raw data from on-board instrumentation recorded on oscillograph film. Human computers then reduced the data and recorded it on data sheets, correcting for such factors as temperature and instrument errors. They used adding machines or slide rules for their calculations, pocket calculators being 20 years in the future. Three second generation Bell Aircraft Corporations X-1s were built, though four were requested. They were the X-1A (48-1384); X-1B (48-1385); X-1C (canceled and never built); X-1D (48-1386). These aircraft were similar to the X-1s, except they were five feet longer, had conventional canopies, and were powered by Reaction Motors, Inc. XLR11-RM-5 rocket engines. The RM-5, like the previous engines, had no throttle and was controlled by igniting one or more of the four thrust chambers at will. The original program outline called for the X-1A and X-1B to be used for dynamic stability and air loads investigations. The X-1D was to be used

  20. Common Raven (Corvus corax) kleptoparasitism at a Golden Eagle (Aquila chyrsaetos) nest in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simes, Matthew; Johnson, Diego R.; Streit, Justin; Longshore, Kathleen; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.

    2017-01-01

    The Common Raven (Corvus corax) is a ubiquitous species in the Mojave Desert of southern Nevada and California. From 5 to 24 May 2014, using remote trail cameras, we observed ravens repeatedly kleptoparasitizing food resources from the nest of a pair of Golden Eagles (Aquila chyrsaetos) in the Spring Mountains of southern Nevada. The ravens fed on nine (30%) of the 30 prey items delivered to the nest during the chick rearing period. Kleptoparasitic behavior by the ravens decreased as the eagle nestling matured to seven weeks of age, suggesting a narrow temporal window in which ravens can successfully engage in kleptoparasitic behavior at eagle nests. The observation of kleptoparasitism by Common Ravens at the nest suggests potential risks to young Golden Eagles from Common Ravens.

  1. Uranium groundwater anomalies and L'Aquila earthquake, 6th April 2009 (Italy).

    PubMed

    Plastino, Wolfango; Povinec, Pavel P; De Luca, Gaetano; Doglioni, Carlo; Nisi, Stefano; Ioannucci, Luca; Balata, Marco; Laubenstein, Matthias; Bella, Francesco; Coccia, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of chemical and physical groundwater parameters has been carried out worldwide in seismogenic areas with the aim to test possible correlations between their spatial and temporal variations and strain processes. Uranium (U) groundwater anomalies were observed during the preparation phases of the recent L'Aquila earthquake of 6th April 2009 in the cataclastic rocks near the overthrust fault crossing the deep underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The results suggest that U may be used as a potential strain indicator of geodynamic processes occurring before the seismic swarm and the main earthquake shock. Moreover, this justifies the different radon patterns before and after the main shock: the radon releases during and after the earthquake are much than more during the preparatory period because the process does not include only the microfracturing induced by stress-strain activation, but also radon increases accompanying groundwater U anomalies.

  2. Annual movements of a steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis) summering in Mongolia and wintering in Tibet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Moon, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    An adult female steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis Hodgson) was captured and fitted with a satellite transmitter in June 1995 in southeastern Mongolia. In fall, it traveled southwest towards India as expected, but stopped in southeastern Tibet and wintered in a restricted zone within the breeding range of the steppe eagle. In spring, the bird returned to the same area of Mongolia where it was captured. These observations, though derived from the movements of a single bird, suggest three things that are contrary to what is generally believed about steppe eagle biology. First, not all steppe eagles move to warmer climes in winter. Second, not all steppe eagles are nomadic in winter. Finally, because our bird wintered at the periphery of the steppe eagle breeding range in Tibet, perhaps birds that breed in this same area also winter there. If so, not all steppe eagles are migratory.

  3. The 1991 V603 Aquilae campaign - Superhumps and P-dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Thomas, Gino; Skillman, David R.; Diaz, Marcos

    1993-01-01

    The results are reported of an extensive 1991 campaign to determine an accurate value of the period of the old nova V603 Aquilae, free from aliasing, in at least one season. Phase drift of +/- 0.3 cycles around the mean period is present on a time scale of about six months. The period is shown to be unstable. There is an interesting resemblance of the 0.146 day photometric signal to the 'superhumps' of dwarf novae. However, the light variations are irregular and not similar to those of dwarf novae. The relationship between observed orbital and superhump period is studied, and it is predicted that V603 Aql is the first of many noneruptive cataclysmic variables which will be recognized as showing superhumps.

  4. The 2009 L'Aquila sequence (Central Italy): fault system anatomy by aftershock distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2010-05-01

    On April 6 (01:32 UTC) 2009 a destructive MW 6.13 earthquake struck the Abruzzi region in Central Italy, causing nearly 300 deaths, 40.000 homeless people and strong damage to the cultural heritage of the L'Aquila city and its province. Two strong earthquakes hit the same area in historical times (e.g. the 1461 and 1703 events), but the main fault that drives the extension in this portion of the Apennines was unknown. Seismic data was recorded at both permanent stations of the Centralised Italian National Seismic Network managed by the INGV and 45 temporary stations installed in the epicentral area together with the LGIT of Grenoble (Fr). The resulting geometry of the dense monitoring network allows us to gain very high resolution earthquake locations that we use to investigate the geometry of the activated fault system and to report on seismicity pattern and kinematics of the whole sequence. The mainshock was preceded by a foreshock sequence that activated the main fault plane during the three months before, while the largest foreshock (MW 4.08) occurred one week before (30th of March) nucleated on a antithetic (e.g. off-fault) segment. The distribution of the aftershocks defines a complex, 50 km long, NW-trending normal fault system, with seismicity nucleating within the upper 10-12 km of the crust. There is an exception of an event (MW 5.42) nucleating a couple of kilometers deeper that the 7th of April that activates a high angle normal fault antithetic to the main system. Its role is still unclear. We reconstruct the geometry of the two major SW-dipping normal faults forming a right lateral en-echelon system. The main fault (L'Aquila fault) is activated by the 6th of April mainshock unluckily located right below the city of L'Aquila. A 50°SW-dipping plane with planar geometry about 16 km long. The related seismicity interests the entire first 12 km of the upper crust from the surface. The ground surveys carried out soon after the occurrence of the earthquake

  5. [Perceived quality of integrated home care in two health districts of L'Aquila].

    PubMed

    Di Pillo, L; Sciommeri, A; Giacco, L; Scatigna, M; Marinucci, M C; Di Orio, F

    2003-01-01

    The present research, as far as its planning and realization is concerned, aims at exploring how ADI (Integrated Home Care) offers its services in two districts of Local Health Unit 04 in L'Aquila; a service that assumes a special relevance in the frame of interventions in favour of the individuals, since it is a valid alternative to hospitalization for disabled citizens or old people having special pathologies. The information collected gives a general outline of the competences involved within ADI, and also of the significance of the results that have been reached out in terms of quality of the assistance, since a subjective measurement, based on indexes of satisfaction, has been used.

  6. Spatial structure in the diet of imperial eagles Aquila heliaca in Kazakhstan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzner, T.E.; Bragin, E.A.; Knick, S.T.; Smith, A.T.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between spatial variability in prey and food habits of eastern imperial eagles Aquila heliaca at a 90,000 ha national nature reserve in north-central Kazakhstan. Eagle diet varied greatly within the population and the spatial structure of eagle diet within the population varied according to the scale of measurement. Patterns in dietary response were inconsistent with expectations if either ontogenetic imprinting or competition determined diet choice, but they met expectations if functional response determined diet. Eagles nesting near a high-density prey resource used that resource almost exclusively. In contrast, in locations with no single high-density prey species, eagles' diet was more diverse. Our results demonstrate that spatial structuring of diet of vertebrate predators can provide important insight into the mechanisms that drive dietary decisions. ?? OIKOS.

  7. How to predict Italy L'Aquila M6.3 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guangmeng

    2016-04-01

    According to the satellite cloud anomaly appeared over eastern Italy on 21-23 April 2012, we predicted the M6.0 quake occurred in north Italy successfully. Here checked the satellite images in 2011-2013 in Italy, and 21 cloud anomalies were found. Their possible correlation with earthquakes bigger than M4.7 which located in Italy main fault systems was statistically examined by assuming various lead times. The result shows that when the leading time interval is set to 23≤ΔT≤45 days, 8 of the 10 quakes were preceded by cloud anomalies. Poisson random test shows that AAR (anomaly appearance rate) and EOR (EQ occurrence rate) is much higher than the values by chance. This study proved the relation between cloud anomaly and earthquake in Italy. With this method, we found that L'Aquila earthquake can also be predicted according to cloud anomaly.

  8. Causes of hospitalisation before and after the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake.

    PubMed

    Petrazzi, L; Striuli, R; Polidoro, L; Petrarca, M; Scipioni, R; Struglia, M; Giorgini, P; Necozione, S; Festuccia, V; Ferri, C

    2013-09-01

    On 6 April 2009, an earthquake struck L'Aquila. The San Salvatore Hospital was evacuated, and a field hospital was built. The study aimed to assess the epidemiologic impact of the earthquake through the analysis of patient population admitted to the field hospital during a 2-month period following the disaster. We retrospectively evaluated causes of hospitalisation and demographic data of patients admitted to (i) the Division of Internal Medicine and (ii) the Division of Emergency Medicine of the field hospital from 6 April, 2009 to 29 May, 2009. All data were compared with the admissions made at the same divisions of the San Salvatore Hospital during the same period of previous year. (i) Patient group (n = 102) and comparison group (n = 108). Mean patient age was higher, patients living in L'Aquila were more numerous, while mean length of stay was lower after than before the earthquake. Infectious diseases increased, while 'other' diseases decreased after the disaster both in admission and in discharge diagnoses. Gastroenterological diseases decreased with the earthquake but only in admission diagnoses. (ii) Patient group (n = 5255) and comparison group (n = 6564). Triage codes changed with the earthquake. Cardiovascular, psychiatric, gynaecological, infectious and chronic diseases increased, while pneumologic, gastroenterological, traumatic and 'other' diseases decreased after the quake. The number of hospitalised patients decreased with the tremor, while those discharged transferred to other hospitals and those who rejected hospitalisation increased. A natural disaster completely changes causes of hospitalisation in the Divisions of Internal and Emergency Medicine. These findings can be useful for the design of specific intervention programmes and for softening the detrimental effects of quakes.

  9. Short-term earthquake probabilities during the L'Aquila earthquake sequence in central Italy, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, G.; Murru, M.; Zhuang, J.; Console, R.

    2014-12-01

    We compare the forecasting performance of several statistical models, which are used to describe the occurrence process of earthquakes, in forecasting the short-term earthquake probabilities during the occurrence of the L'Aquila earthquake sequence in central Italy, 2009. These models include the Proximity to Past Earthquakes (PPE) model and different versions of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. We used the information gains corresponding to the Poisson and binomial scores to evaluate the performance of these models. It is shown that all ETAS models work better than the PPE model. However, when comparing the different types of the ETAS models, the one with the same fixed exponent coefficient α = 2.3 for both the productivity function and the scaling factor in the spatial response function, performs better in forecasting the active aftershock sequence than the other models with different exponent coefficients when the Poisson score is adopted. These latter models perform only better when a lower magnitude threshold of 2.0 and the binomial score are used. The reason is likely due to the fact that the catalog does not contain an event of magnitude similar to the L'Aquila main shock (Mw 6.3) in the training period (April 16, 2005 to March 15, 2009). In this case the a-value is under-estimated and thus also the forecasted seismicity is underestimated when the productivity function is extrapolated to high magnitudes. These results suggest that the training catalog used for estimating the model parameters should include earthquakes of similar magnitudes as the main shock when forecasting seismicity is during an aftershock sequences.

  10. Population genetics after fragmentation: the case of the endangered Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cruz, B; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J

    2004-08-01

    The highly endangered Spanish imperial eagle, Aquila adalberti, has suffered from both population decline and fragmentation during the last century. Here we describe the current genetic status of the population using an extensive sampling of its current distribution range and both mitochondrial control region sequences and nuclear microsatellite markers. Results were evaluated in comparison to those obtained for the Eastern imperial eagle, Aquila heliaca, its nearest extant relative. Mitochondrial haplotype diversity was lower in the Spanish than in the Eastern species whereas microsatellite allelic richness and expected heterozygosity did not differ. Both allelic richness and expected heterozygosity were lower in the small Parque Nacional de Doñana breeding nucleus compared to the remaining nuclei. A signal for a recent genetic bottleneck was not detected in the current Spanish imperial eagle population. We obtained low but significant pairwise FST values that were congruent with a model of isolation by distance. FST and exact tests showed differentiation among the peripheral and small Parque Nacional de Doñana population and the remaining breeding subgroups. The centrally located Montes de Toledo population did not differ from the surrounding Centro, Extremadura and Sierra Morena populations whereas the latter were significantly differentiated. On the other hand, a Bayesian approach identified two groups, Parque Nacional de Doñana and the rest of breeding nuclei. Recent migration rates into and from Parque Nacional de Doñana and the rest of breeding nuclei were detected by assignment methods and estimated as 2.4 and 5.7 individuals per generation, respectively, by a Bayesian approach. We discuss how management strategies should aim at the maintenance of current genetic variability levels and the avoidance of inbreeding depression through the connection of the different nuclei.

  11. X-ray variability patterns and radio/X-ray correlations in Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Skinner, Gerald K.; Pooley, Guy G.; Lubiński, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    We have studied the X-ray variability patterns and correlations of the radio and X-ray fluxes in all spectral states of Cyg X-1 using X-ray data from the All-Sky Monitor onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Burst And Transient Source Experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Burst Alert Telescope onboard Swift. In the hard state, the dominant spectral variability is a changing of normalization with a fixed spectral shape, while in the intermediate state, the slope changes, with a pivot point around 10 keV. In the soft state, the low-energy X-ray emission dominates the bolometric flux which is only loosely correlated with the high-energy emission. In black hole binaries in the hard state, the radio flux is generally found to depend on a power of the X-ray flux, FR∝FpX. We confirm this for Cyg X-1. Our new finding is that this correlation extends to the intermediate and soft states, provided the broad-band X-ray flux in the Comptonization part of the spectrum (excluding the blackbody component) is considered instead of a narrow-band medium-energy X-ray flux. We find an index p≃ 1.7 ± 0.1 for 15-GHz radio emission, decreasing to p≃ 1.5 ± 0.1 at 2.25 GHz. We conclude that the higher value at 15 GHz is due to the effect of free-free absorption in the wind from the companion. The intrinsic correlation index remains uncertain. However, based on a theoretical model of the wind in Cyg X-1, it may to be close to ≃1.3, which, in the framework of accretion/jet models, would imply that the accretion flow in Cyg X-1 is radiatively efficient. The correlation with the flux due to Comptonization emission indicates that the radio jet is launched by the hot electrons in the accretion flow in all spectral states of Cyg X-1. On the other hand, we are able to rule out the X-ray jet model. Finally, we find that the index of the correlation, when measured using the X-ray flux in a narrow energy band, strongly depends on the band chosen and is, in general

  12. A study of X-ray variation in LMC X-1 with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Shu; Kubota, Aya; Yamada, Shinya; Makishima, Kazuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu

    LMC X-1 is one of persistently luminous X-ray black hole binaries accompanying an O type star. It has been observed repeatedly since its discovery by a rocket mission (Mark et al. 1969). LMC X-1 was observed with Suzaku in July 2009 for 120 ksec, and was detected over a wide X-ray band of 0.5-50 keV. As Steiner et al. (2012) reported, the source was in the soft state with 10% of Eddington luminosity, and the spectrum showed a clear iron line emission. We analyzed the Suzaku light curve and found intensity-correlated variations in the spectral hardness ratio on a timescale of 10 ksec. The variation is explained by 10% changes in the Comptonised emission, possibly accompanied by those in the narrow iron line. Assuming that the variation timescale corresponds to the viscous time scale of a standard accretion disk, these components are considered to have been emitted from a region at a distance of 150 Rg from the black hole. We also found 3 mHz QPO in lower energy band. We discuss geometry of accretion flow and interpretation of the low freqency QPO.

  13. The anomalous X-ray absorption spectrum of Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T. R.; White, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    The HEAO 2 satellite's Solid State Spectrometer and Monitor Proportional Counter was used to observe one orbit of the massive X-ray binary Vela X-1. Using spectral fits to the data as a function of orbital phase, the column density and state of the material along the line of sight to the X-ray source has been inferred. The spectrum near orbital phase 0.2 compares favorably with absorption by neutral material with a column density corresponding to plausible values of stellar wind velocity law and total primary mass loss rate. Spectra at later orbital phases, which show unexpected strong absorption features near 2.0 and 2.5 keV, are interpreted as due to absorption by material with suppressed opacity below 2.0 keV. The opacity required to produce the observed features implies either the presence of an intense soft X-ray flux, or altered elemental abundances in the gas near Vela X-1.

  14. The Nature and Cause of Spectral Variability in LMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhlen, L.; Smith, D. M.; Scank, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a long-term observation campaign of the extragalactic wind-accreting black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-1, using the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The observations show that LMC X-1's accretion disk exhibits an anomalous temperature-luminosity relation. We use deep archival RXTE observations to show that large movements across the temperature-luminosity space occupied by the system can take place on time scales as short as half an hour. These changes cannot be adequately explained by perturbations that propagate from the outer disk on a viscous timescale. We propose instead that the apparent disk variations reflect rapid fluctuations within the Compton up-scattering coronal material, which occults the inner parts of the disk. The expected relationship between the observed disk luminosity and apparent disk temperature derived from the variable occultation model is quantitatively shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Two other observations support this picture: an inverse correlation between the flux in the power-law spectral component and the fitted inner disk temperature, and a near-constant total photon flux, suggesting that the inner disk is not ejected when a lower temperature is observed.

  15. Directed search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 with initial LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Turconi, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We present results of a search for continuously emitted gravitational radiation, directed at the brightest low-mass x-ray binary, Scorpius X-1. Our semicoherent analysis covers 10 days of LIGO S5 data ranging from 50-550 Hz, and performs an incoherent sum of coherent F -statistic power distributed amongst frequency-modulated orbital sidebands. All candidates not removed at the veto stage were found to be consistent with noise at a 1% false alarm rate. We present Bayesian 95% confidence upper limits on gravitational-wave strain amplitude using two different prior distributions: a standard one, with no a priori assumptions about the orientation of Scorpius X-1; and an angle-restricted one, using a prior derived from electromagnetic observations. Median strain upper limits of 1.3 ×10-24 and 8 ×10-25 are reported at 150 Hz for the standard and angle-restricted searches respectively. This proof-of-principle analysis was limited to a short observation time by unknown effects of accretion on the intrinsic spin frequency of the neutron star, but improves upon previous upper limits by factors of ˜1.4 for the standard, and 2.3 for the angle-restricted search at the sensitive region of the detector.

  16. XMM-Newton observations of CYGNUS X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Miller, Jon

    2005-01-01

    Observations of Cygnus X-1 were first attempted under this program in the spring of 2004, but were complicated by instrumental flaring problems. Successful observations were completed in the fall of 2004, and processed data were delivered to the PI in the winter and spring of 2005. Thus, focused work on this data was only possible starting in 2005. A preliminary reduction and analysis of data from the EPIC CCD cameras and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer has been made. The EPIC spectra reveal the best example of a broadened, relativistic iron emission line yet found in Cygnus X-1. The Oxygen K-shell region has been shown to be a very complex wavelength range in numerous spectra of accreting sources, but the RGS spectra reveal this region in great detail and will be important in understanding the wind from the 0-type donor star that is focused onto the black hole in Cygnus X-1.

  17. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1: Spectra and Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, J.; Dove, J.; Nowak, M.; Vaughan, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    We present preliminary results from the analysis of an R.XTE observation of Cyg X-1 in the hard state. We show that the observed X-ray spectrum can be explained with a model for an accretion disk corona (ADC), in which a hot sphere is situated inside of a cold accretion disk (similar to an advection dominated model). ADC Models with a slab-geometry do not successfully fit the data. In addition to the spectral results we present the observed temporal properties of Cyg X-1, i.e. the coherence-function and the time-lags, and discuss the constraints the. temporal properties imply for the accretion geometry in Cyg X-1.

  18. NuSTAR discovery of a luminosity dependent cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bachetti, Matteo; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William

    2014-01-10

    We present NuSTAR observations of Vela X-1, a persistent, yet highly variable, neutron star high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). Two observations were taken at similar orbital phases but separated by nearly a year. They show very different 3-79 keV flux levels as well as strong variability during each observation, covering almost one order of magnitude in flux. These observations allow, for the first time ever, investigations on kilo-second time-scales of how the centroid energies of cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) depend on flux for a persistent HMXB. We find that the line energy of the harmonic CRSF is correlated with flux, as expected in the sub-critical accretion regime. We argue that Vela X-1 has a very narrow accretion column with a radius of around 0.4 km that sustains a Coulomb interaction dominated shock at the observed luminosities of L {sub x} ∼ 3 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. Besides the prominent harmonic line at 55 keV the fundamental line around 25 keV is clearly detected. We find that the strengths of the two CRSFs are anti-correlated, which we explain by photon spawning. This anti-correlation is a possible explanation for the debate about the existence of the fundamental line. The ratio of the line energies is variable with time and deviates significantly from 2.0, also a possible consequence of photon spawning, which changes the shape of the line. During the second observation, Vela X-1 showed a short off-state in which the power-law softened and a cut-off was no longer measurable. It is likely that the source switched to a different accretion regime at these low mass accretion rates, explaining the drastic change in spectral shape.

  19. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole in Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffre E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2005-01-01

    The compact primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 was the first black hole to be established via dynamical observatIOns. We have recently determined accurate values for its mass and distance, and for the orbital inclination angle of the binary. Building on these.results, which are based on our favored (asynchronous) dynamical model, we have measured the radius of the inner edge of the black hole's accretion disk by fitting its thermal continuum.spectrum to a fully relativistic model of a thin accretion disk. Assuming that the spin axis of the black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum vector, we have determined that Cygnus X-I contains a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a* > 0.95 (3(sigma)). For a less probable (synchronous) dynamIcal model, we find a* > 0.92 (3(sigma)). In our analysis, we include the uncertainties in black hole mass orbital inclination angle and distance, and we also include the uncertainty in the calibration of the absolute flux via the Crab. These four sources of uncertainty totally dominate the error budget. The uncertainties introduced by the thin-disk model we employ are particularly small in this case given the extreme spin of the black hole and the disk's low luminosity.

  20. A DETERMINATION OF THE SPIN OF THE BLACK HOLE PRIMARY IN LMC X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gou Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Liu Jifeng; Narayan, Ramesh; Steiner, James F.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Davis, Shane W.; Ebisawa, Ken

    2009-08-20

    The first extragalactic X-ray binary, LMC X-1, was discovered in 1969. In the 1980s, its compact primary was established as the fourth dynamical black hole candidate. Recently, we published accurate values for the mass of the black hole and the orbital inclination angle of the binary system. Building on these results, we have analyzed 53 X-ray spectra obtained by RXTE and, using a selected sample of 18 of these spectra, we have determined the dimensionless spin parameter of the black hole to be a{sub *} = 0.92{sup +0.05}{sub -0.07}. This result takes into account all sources of observational and model-parameter uncertainties. The standard deviation around the mean value of a{sub *} for these 18 X-ray spectra, which were obtained over a span of several years, is only {delta}a{sub *} = 0.02. When we consider our complete sample of 53 RXTE spectra, we find a somewhat higher value of the spin parameter and a larger standard deviation. Finally, we show that our results based on RXTE data are confirmed by our analyses of selected X-ray spectra obtained by the XMM-Newton, BeppoSAX, and Ginga missions.

  1. Precision ephemerides for gravitational-wave searches. I. Sco X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Duncan K.; Premachandra, Sammanani; Steeghs, Danny; Marsh, Tom; Casares, Jorge; Cornelisse, Rémon

    2014-01-20

    Rapidly rotating neutron stars are the only candidates for persistent high-frequency gravitational wave emission, for which a targeted search can be performed based on the spin period measured from electromagnetic (e.g., radio and X-ray) observations. The principal factor determining the sensitivity of such searches is the measurement precision of the physical parameters of the system. Neutron stars in X-ray binaries present additional computational demands for searches due to the uncertainty in the binary parameters. We present the results of a pilot study with the goal of improving the measurement precision of binary orbital parameters for candidate gravitational wave sources. We observed the optical counterpart of Sco X-1 in 2011 June with the William Herschel Telescope and also made use of Very Large Telescope observations in 2011 to provide an additional epoch of radial-velocity measurements to earlier measurements in 1999. From a circular orbit fit to the combined data set, we obtained an improvement of a factor of 2 in the orbital period precision and a factor of 2.5 in the epoch of inferior conjunction T {sub 0}. While the new orbital period is consistent with the previous value of Gottlieb et al., the new T {sub 0} (and the amplitude of variation of the Bowen line velocities) exhibited a significant shift, which we attribute to variations in the emission geometry with epoch. We propagate the uncertainties on these parameters through to the expected Advanced LIGO-Virgo detector network observation epochs and quantify the improvement obtained with additional optical observations.

  2. X-ray dips and orbital modulation in Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. X.; Cui, Wei

    2001-10-01

    We observed Cyg X-1 contiguously with RXTE over one 5.6-day binary orbit. Many X-ray dips were detected in the X-ray light curves, which lie mostly between orbital phases 0.8 and 1.2 (with phase 0.0 or 1.0 defined as the times of superior conjunction of the black hole), but dips were also seen at other orbital phases. We discovered that the dips fall into two distinct categories, based on their spectral properties. One (common) type exhibits additional energy-dependent attenuation of X-ray emission at the lowest energies during a dip, which is characteristic of photoelectric absorption, but the other type shows nearly energy-independent attenuation up to at least 20 keV. Moreover, the former seems to occur around superior conjunction but the latter almost at the opposite side of the binary orbit (around phase 0.6), based on limited statistics. Therefore, the first type of dips are likely caused by density enhancement in an inhomogeneous wind of the companion star, while the second type might be due to partial obstruction of an extended X-ray emitting region by an optically thick trailing tidal stream. Such a tidal stream has been shown to exist in hydrodynamic simulations of wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries. We also made an attempt to quantifying the varying amount of absorbing material along the line of sight over the orbit. The column density does seem to be higher, on average, around superior conjunction, but large uncertainties in the measurements make it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions. .

  3. Determination of the atmospheric structure of the BO star companion of SMC X-1 by analysis of Ginga observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.

    1994-01-01

    The x-ray phenomena of the binary system SMC X-1/Sk 160, observed with the Ginga and ROSAT x-ray observatories, are compared with computed phenomena derived from a three dimensional hydrodynamical model of the stellar wind perturbed by x-ray heating and ionization which is described in the accompanying paper. In the model the BOI primary star has a line-driven stellar wind in the region of the x-ray shadow and a thermal wind in the region heated by x-rays. We find general agreement between the observed and predicted x-ray spectra throughout the binary orbit cycle, including the extended, variable, and asymmetric eclipse transitions and the period of deep eclipse.

  4. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO's sixth science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadors, G. D.; Goetz, E.; Riles, K.; Creighton, T.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    Scorpius X-1 (Sco X-1) and x-ray transient XTE J1751-305 are low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) that may emit continuous gravitational waves detectable in the band of ground-based interferometric observatories. Neutron stars in LMXBs could reach a torque-balance steady-state equilibrium in which angular momentum addition from infalling matter from the binary companion is balanced by angular momentum loss, conceivably due to gravitational-wave emission. Torque balance predicts a scale for detectable gravitational-wave strain based on observed x-ray flux. This paper describes a search for Sco X-1 and XTE J1751-305 in LIGO science run 6 data using the TwoSpect algorithm, based on searching for orbital modulations in the frequency domain. While no detections are claimed, upper limits on continuous gravitational-wave emission from Sco X-1 are obtained, spanning gravitational-wave frequencies from 40 to 2040 Hz and projected semimajor axes from 0.90 to 1.98 light-seconds. These upper limits are injection validated, equal any previous set in initial LIGO data, and extend over a broader parameter range. At optimal strain sensitivity, achieved at 165 Hz, the 95% confidence level random-polarization upper limit on dimensionless strain h0 is approximately 1.8 ×10-24. The closest approach to the torque-balance limit, within a factor of 27, is also at 165 Hz. Upper limits are set in particular narrow frequency bands of interest for J1751-305. These are the first upper limits known to date on r -mode emission from this XTE source. The TwoSpect method will be used in upcoming searches of Advanced LIGO and Virgo data.

  5. Incertitude in disaster sciences and scientists' responsibilities: A case study of the L'Aquila earthquake trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketsu, Kazuki; Oki, Satoko

    2015-04-01

    What disaster sciences are expected by the society is to prevent or mitigate future natural disasters, and therefore it is necessary to foresee natural disasters. However, various constraints often make the foreseeing difficult so that there is a high incertitude in the social contribution of disaster sciences. If scientists overstep this limitation, they will be held even criminally responsible. The L'Aquila trial in Italy is such a recent example and so we have performed data collections, hearing investigations, analyses of the reasons for the initial court's judgment, etc., to explore the incertitude of disaster sciences and scientists' responsibilities. As a result, we concluded that the casualties during the L'Aquila earthquake were mainly due to a careless "safety declaration" by the vice-director of the Civil Protection Agency, where the incertitude of disaster sciences had never been considered. In addition, news media which reported only this "safety declaration" were also seriously responsible for the casualties. The accused other than the vice-director were only morally responsible, because their meeting remarks included poor risk communication in disaster sciences but those were not reported to the citizens in advance to the L'Aquila earthquake. In the presentation, we will also discuss the similarities and differences between our conclusions above and the reasons for the appeals court's judgement, which will be published in February.

  6. Sunspot 1520 Releases Strong (X1.4) Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the sun July 10-12, ending with the X1.4 class flare on July 12, 2012. It was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory in the 131 Angstrom wavelength - a wavelength that is...

  7. Preconceptual design requirements for the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; Hands, J.A.; Raglin, P.S.; Ramirez, J.J.; Goldstein, S.A.; Cereghino, S.J.; MacLeod, G.

    1998-09-01

    The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source represents the next step in providing the US Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray source for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation, Inertial Confinement Fusion, and Weapon Physics Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories` Z Accelerator provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. The X-1 plan follows a strategy based on scaling the 2 MJ x-ray output on Z via a 3-fold increase in z-pinch load current. The large volume (>5 cm{sup 3}), high temperature (>150 eV), temporally long (>10 ns) hohlraums are unique outside of underground nuclear weapon testing. Analytical scaling arguments and hydrodynamic simulations indicate that these hohlraums at temperatures of 230--300 eV will ignite thermonuclear fuel and drive the reaction to a yield of 200 to 1,000 MJ in the laboratory. X-1 will provide the high-fidelity experimental capability to certify the survivability and performance of non-nuclear weapon components in hostile radiation environments. Non-ignition sources will provide cold x-ray environments (<15 keV), and high yield fusion burn sources will provide high fidelity warm x-ray environments (15 keV--80 keV).

  8. UBV photometry of Cyg X-1 from 1996 to 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshina, I. B.; Lyuty, V.

    2004-07-01

    The preliminary results of analysis of $UBV$-photometry of the black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in primary minimum are presented. These observations were carried out with the main goal of studying in detail the variability that was detected by Lyuty in 1985 in the optical light curve of this system near orbital phase 0.00.

  9. Response of the middle atmosphere to Sco X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Barcus, J. R.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    On the night of Mar. 9, 1983 (UT) at Punta Lobos Launch Site, Peru (12.5 deg S, 76.8 deg W, magnetic dip -0.7 deg), a sequence of sounding rockets was flown to study the electrical structure of the equatorial middle atmosphere and to evaluate perturbations on this environment induced by the X-ray star Sco X-1. The rocket series was anchored by two Nike Orion payloads (31.032 and 31.033) which were launched at 0327 and 0857 UT, near Sco X-1 star-rise and after it had attained an elevation angle of 70 deg E. An enhanced flux of X-rays was observed on the second Nike Orion flight (31.033). This increase is directly attributed to Sco X-1, both from the spectral properties of the measured X-ray distribution and by spatial information acquired from a spinning X-ray detector during the upleg portion of the 31.033 flight. Simultaneously, a growth in ion conductivity and density was seen to occur in the lower mesosphere between 60 and 80 km on the second flight, specifically in the region of maximum energy deposition by the Sco X-1 X-rays. The results imply the presence of a significant number of ionized heavy constituents within the lower mesosphere, with masses possibly in the submacroscopoic range.

  10. Occupational Therapy Career Ladder AFSC 913X1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    This is a report of an occupational survey of the Occupational Therapy (AFSC 913X1) career ladder completed in March 1990. The present survey was the...first one accomplished for this career ladder and was requested by (USAFOMC) USAF Occupational Measurement Center during the Priorities Working Group meeting. Keywords: Surveys; Air Force personnel; Therapy; Careers.

  11. Longterm lightcurves of X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, William

    The X-ray Binaries (XRB) consist of a compact object and a stellar companion, which undergoes large-scale mass-loss to the compact object by virtue of the tight ( P orb usually hours-days) orbit, producing an accretion disk surrounding the compact object. The liberation of gravitational potential energy powers exotic high-energy phenomena, indeed the resulting accretion/ outflow process is among the most efficient energy-conversion machines in the universe. The Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and RXTE All Sky Monitor (ASM) have provided remarkable X-ray lightcurves above 1.3keV for the entire sky, at near-continuous coverage, for intervals of 9 and 7 years respectively (with ~3 years' overlap). With an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to previous survey instruments, these instruments have provided new insight into the high-energy behaviour of XRBs on timescales of tens to thousands of binary orbits. This thesis describes detailed examination of the long-term X-ray lightcurves of the neutron star XRB X2127+119, SMC X-1, Her X- 1, LMC X-4, Cyg X-2 and the as yet unclassified Circinus X-1, and for Cir X-1, complementary observations in the IR band. Chapters 1 & 2 introduce X-ray Binaries in general and longterm periodicities in particular. Chapter 3 introduces the longterm datasets around which this work is based, and the chosen methods of analysis of these datasets. Chapter 4 examines the burst history of the XRB X2127+119, suggesting three possible interpretations of the apparently contradictory X-ray emission from this system, including a possible confusion of two spatially distinct sources (which was later vindicated by high-resolution imaging). Chapters 5 and 6 describe the characterisation of accretion disk warping, providing observational verification of the prevailing theoretical framework for such disk-warps. Chapters 7 & 8 examine the enigmatic XRB Circinus X-1 with high-resolution IR spectroscopy (chapter 7) and the RXTE

  12. Phase-Dependent Changes in O VI and Other Stellar Wind Lines in SMC X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Massa, D. L.; Gruber, D.; Schlegel, E. M.; Hutchings, J. B.

    2004-12-01

    The accretion-powered high-mass X-ray binary SMC X-1/Sk 160 was observed for one complete orbit (3.89 days) with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) to study how the strong X-ray source modulates the stellar wind of the B0 I primary. The observations were obtained primarily on 2003 July 19-23, with additional observations on 2003 Oct 27 and 2004 Aug 23 filling some phase gaps and duplicating others. Interstellar lines of molecular hydrogen and O VI 1032 from foreground Milky Way and SMC gas were modelled and used to correct the observed stellar O VI 1032 P-Cygni line profiles. The O VI absorption shows that the wind is highly asymmetry around the orbit. The line is at maximum strength during the eclipse of the pulsar (phase 0.0), with a total column density of N(O VI) = 7E17 cm-2. The O VI line virtually disappears near phase 0.4. The terminal velocity (700 km/s) drops to near zero at phase 0.3-0.4. These results are qualitatively consistent with 3D-hydrodynamic models of the disrupted stellar wind of SMC X-1 (Blondin and Woo 1995, ApJ, 445, 889). Archival HST/STIS spectra of SMC X-1 obtained in 2000 and 2001 show that the N V 1238-42 and C IV 1548-50 stellar wind features have phase dependences similar to that seen in O VI. The line profile variations do not appear to be correlated with X-ray high or low states of the 60-day super-orbital period. Other stellar wind lines in the FUSE spectrum of SMC X-1 (S IV 1073, P V 1117, Si IV 1122, C III 1176) show much smaller orbital modulation effects than are seen in O VI. These lines are present at approximately the same strength at all phases. This work was supported in part by NASA grant NNG04GK79G to Catholic University of America for FUSE GI program D175.

  13. Geoethical implications in the L'Aquila case: scientific knowledge and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    On October 22nd 2012, three and a half years after the earthquake that destroyed the city of L'Aquila (central Italy), killing more than 300 people and wounding about 1,500, a landmark judgment for the scientific research established the condemnation of six members of the Major Risks Committee of the Italian Government and a researcher of INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia), called to provide information about the evolution of the seismic sequence. The judge held that these Geoscientists were negligent during the meeting of 31st March 2009, convened to discuss the scientific aspects of the seismic risk of this area, affected by a long seismic sequence, also in the light of repeated warnings about the imminence of a strong earthquake, on the base of measurements of radon gas by an Italian independent technician, transmitted to the population by mass-media. Without going into the legal aspects of the criminal proceedings, this judgment strikes for the hardness of the condemnation to be paid by the scientists (six years of imprisonment, perpetual disqualification from public office and legal disqualification during the execution of the penalty, compensation for victims up to several hundred thousands of Euros). Some of them are scientists known worldwide for their proven skills, professionalism and experience. In conclusion, these scientists were found guilty of having contributed to the death of many people, because they have not communicated in an appropriate manner all available information on the seismic hazard and vulnerability of the area of L'Aquila. This judgment represents a watershed in the way of looking at the social role of geoscientists in the defense against natural hazards and their responsibility towards the people. But, in what does this responsibility consist of? It consists of the commitment to conduct an updated and reliable scientific research, which provides for a detailed analysis of the epistemic uncertainty for a more

  14. The 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence (Central Italy): fault system geometry and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valoroso, L.; Amato, A.; Cattaneo, M.; Cecere, G.; Chiarabba, C.; Chiaraluce, L.; de Gori, P.; Delladio, A.; de Luca, G.; di Bona, M.; di Stefano, R.; Govoni, A.; Lucente, F. P.; Margheriti, L.; Mazza, S.; Monachesi, G.; Moretti, M.; Olivieri, M.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Selvaggi, G.; Improta, L.; Piccinini, D.; Mariscal, A.; Pequegnat, C.; Schlagenhauf, A.; Salaun, G.; Traversa, P.; Voisin, C.; Zuccarello, L.; Azzaro, R.

    2009-12-01

    On April 6 (01:32 UTC) 2009 a destructive MW 6.3 earthquake struck the Abruzzi region in Central Italy, causing nearly 300 deaths, 40.000 homeless, and strong damage to the cultural heritage of the L'Aquila city and its province. Two strong earthquakes hit the area in historical times (e.g. the 1461 and 1703 events), but the main fault that drives the extension in this portion of the Apennines was unknown. The ground surveys carried out after the earthquake find ambiguous evidence of surface faulting. We use aftershocks distribution to investigate the geometry of the activated fault system and to report on spatio-temporal seismicity pattern and kinematics of the whole seismic sequence. Seismic data were recorded at both permanent stations of the Centralized Italian National Seismic Network managed by the INGV and 45 temporary stations installed in the epicentral area. To manage such a large amount of earthquakes, we implemented a semi-automatic procedure able to identify local earthquakes and to provide consistently weighted P- and S-wave arrival times. We show that this procedure yields consistent earthquake detection and high-quality arrival times data for hundreds of events per day. The accurate location for thousands of aftershocks defines a complex, 40 km long, NW-trending normal fault system, with seismicity nucleating within the upper 12 km of the crust. We show the geometry of two major SW-dipping normal faults that form a right lateral en-echelon system. The main fault activated by the 6th of April earthquake is 20 km-long, NW-trending and about 50° SW-dipping and is located below the city of L'Aquila. To the north, we find a second fault, activated on the 9th of April by a MW 5.4 earthquake, that is about 12-km-long and shows a dip angle of about 40° with hypocenters mainly located in the 6 to 10 km depth range.

  15. SEISMIC SITE RESPONSE ESTIMATION IN THE NEAR SOURCE REGION OF THE 2009 L’AQUILA, ITALY, EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, E.; Azzara, R.; Bergamashi, F.; Bordoni, P.; Cara, F.; Cogliano, R.; Cultrera, G.; di Giulio, G.; Duval, A.; Fodarella, A.; Milana, G.; Pucillo, S.; Régnier, J.; Riccio, G.; Salichon, J.

    2009-12-01

    The 6th of April 2009, at 3:32 local time, a Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzo region (central Italy) causing more than 300 casualties. The epicenter of the earthquake was 95km NE of Rome and 10km from the center of the city of L’Aquila, the administrative capital of the Abruzzo region. This city has a population of about 70,000 and was severely damaged by the earthquake, the total cost of the buildings damage being estimated around 3 Bn €. Historical masonry buildings particularly suffered from the seismic shaking, but some reinforced concrete structures from more modern construction were also heavily damaged. To better estimate the seismic solicitation of these structures during the earthquake, we deployed temporary arrays in the near source region. Downtown L’Aquila, as well as a rural quarter composed of ancient dwelling-centers located western L’Aquila (Roio area), have been instrumented. The array set up downtown consisted of nearly 25 stations including velocimetric and accelerometric sensors. In the Roio area, 6 stations operated for almost one month. The data has been processed in order to study the spectral ratios of the horizontal component of ground motion at the soil site and at a reference site, as well as the spectral ratio of the horizontal and the vertical movement at a single recording site. Downtown L’Aquila is set on a Quaternary fluvial terrace (breccias with limestone boulders and clasts in a marly matrix), which forms the left bank of the Aterno River and slopes down in the southwest direction towards the Aterno River. The alluvial are lying on lacustrine sediments reaching their maximum thickness (about 250m) in the center of L’Aquila. After De Luca et al. (2005), these quaternary deposits seem to lead in an important amplification factor in the low frequency range (0.5-0.6 Hz). However, the level of amplification varies strongly from one point to the other in the center of the city. This new experimentation allows new and more

  16. Cygnus X-1: Dips and Low Frequency Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, Joern

    2000-01-01

    The primary science result to come out of this work is the discovery that the time lags between hard and soft variability in Cyg X-1 show dramatic spikes during the transitions between hard and soft states (and possibly during "failed transitions" to the soft state), but are remarkably similar between the main soft and hard states. This work is being continued and elaborated upon with ongoing RXTE monitoring campaigns.

  17. VLA, PHOENIX and BATSE observations of an X1 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Robert F.; Aschwanden, Marcus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    We present observations of an X1 flare detected simultaneously with the Very Large Array (VLA), the PHOENIX Digital Radio Spectrometer, and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). The VLA was used to produce snapshot maps of the impulsive burst emission in the higher corona on timescales of 1.7 seconds at both 20 and 01 cm. Our results indicate electron acceleration several minutes before the onset of the hard X-ray burst detected by BATSE. Comparisons with high spectral and spatial observations by PHOENIX reveal a variety of radio bursts at 20 cm, such as type III bursts, intermediate drift bursts, and quasi-periodic pulsations during different stages of the X1 flare. From the drift rates of these radio bursts we derive information on local density scale heights, the speed of radio exciters, and the local magnetic field. Radio emission at 90 cm shows a type IV burst moving outward with a constant velocity of 240 km/sec. The described X1 flare is unique in the sense that it appeared at the east limb (N06/E88 providing the most accurate information on the vertical structure of different flare tracers visible in radio wavelengths.

  18. VLA, PHOENIX, and BATSE observations of an X1 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Robert F.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1992-02-01

    We present observations of an X1 flare (18 Jul. 1991) detected simultaneously with the Very Large Array (VLA), the PHOENIX Digital Radio Spectrometer and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). The VLA was used to produce snapshot maps of the impulsive acceleration in the higher corona several minutes before the onset of the hard x ray burst detected by BATSE. Comparisons with high spectral and temporal observations by PHOENIX reveal a variety of radio bursts at 20 cm, such as type 3 bursts, intermediate drift bursts, and quasi-periodic pulsations during different stages of the X1 flare. From the drift rates of these radio bursts we derive information on local density scale heights, the speed of radio exciters, and the local magnetic field. Radio emission at 90 cm shows a type 4 burst moving outward with a constant velocity of 240 km/s. The described X1 flare is unique in the sense that it appeared at the east limb (N06/E88), providing the most accurate information on the vertical structure of different flare tracers visible in radio wavelengths.

  19. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of SILICON(100) 2 X 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubacek, Jerome S.

    1992-01-01

    The Si(100) 2 x 1 surface, a technologically important surface in microelectronics and silicon molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has been studied with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to attempt to clear up the controversy that surrounds previous studies of this surface. To this end, an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) STM/surface science system has been designed and constructed to study semiconductor surfaces. Clean Si(100) 2 x 1 surfaces have been prepared and imaged with the STM. Atomic resolution images probing both the filled states and empty states indicate that the surface consists of statically buckled dimer rows. With electronic device dimensions shrinking to smaller and smaller sizes, the Si-SiO_2 interface is becoming increasingly important and, although it is the most popular interface used in the microelectronics industry, little is known about the initial stages of oxidation of the Si(100) surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy has been employed to examine Si(100) 2 x 1 surfaces exposed to molecular oxygen in UHV. Ordered rows of bright and dark spots, rotated 45^circ from the silicon dimer rows, appear in the STM images, suggesting that the Si(100)-SiO_2 interface may be explained with a beta -cristobalite(100) structure rotated by 45^ circ on the Si(100) surface.

  20. RXTE Observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, J.; Nowak, M. A.; Dove, J. B.; Pottschmidt, K.; Heindl, W. A.; Begelman, M. C.; Staubert, R.

    1998-01-01

    Of all known persistent stellar-mass black hole candidates, only LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 consistently show spectra that are dominated by a soft, thermal component. We present results from long (170 ksec) Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 made in 1996 December. The spectra can be described by a multicolor disk blackbody plus an additional high-energy power-law. Even though the spectra are very soft (Gamma approximately 2.5), RXTE detected a significant signal from LMC X-3 up to energies of 50 keV, the hardest energy at which the object was ever detected. Focusing on LMC X-3, we present results from the first year of an ongoing monitoring campaign with RXTE which started in 1997 January. We show that the appearance of the object changes considerably over its approximately 200d long cycle. This variability can either be explained by periodic changes in the mass transfer rate or by a precessing accretion disk analogous to Her X-1.

  1. RXTE Observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, J.; Nowak, M. A.; Dove, J. B.; Pottschmidt, K.; Heindl, W. A.; Begelman, M. C.; Staubert, R.

    1999-01-01

    Of all known persistent stellar-mass black hole candidates, only LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 consistently show spectra that are dominated by a soft, thermal component. We present results from long (170 ksec) Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 made in 1996 December. The spectra can be described by a multicolor disk blackbody plus an additional high-energy power-law. Even though the spectra are very soft (Gamma approximately 2.5), RXTE detected a significant signal from LMC X-3 up to energies of 50 keV, the hardest energy at which the object was ever detected. Focusing on LMC X-3 , we present results from the first year of an ongoing monitoring campaign with RXTE which started in 1997 January. We show that the appearance of the object changes considerably over its approximately 200 d long cycle. This variability can either be explained by periodic changes in the mass transfer rate or by a precessing accretion disk analogous to Her X-1.

  2. The reflection component from Cygnus X-1 in the soft state measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Nowak, Michael A.; Parker, Michael; Fabian, Andy C.; Miller, Jon M.; King, Ashley L.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Forster, Karl; Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ross, Randy R.; and others

    2014-01-01

    The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late 2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ∼1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power law, and reflection components along with absorption from highly ionized material in the system. The high throughput of NuSTAR allows for a very high quality measurement of the complex iron line region as well as the rest of the reflection component. The iron line is clearly broadened and is well described by a relativistic blurring model, providing an opportunity to constrain the black hole spin. Although the spin constraint depends somewhat on which continuum model is used, we obtain a {sub *} > 0.83 for all models that provide a good description of the spectrum. However, none of our spectral fits give a disk inclination that is consistent with the most recently reported binary values for Cyg X-1. This may indicate that there is a >13° misalignment between the orbital plane and the inner accretion disk (i.e., a warped accretion disk) or that there is missing physics in the spectral models.

  3. Headache prevalence in the population of L'Aquila (Italy) after the 2009 earthquake.

    PubMed

    Guetti, Cristiana; Angeletti, Chiara; Papola, Roberta; Petrucci, Emiliano; Ursini, Maria Laura; Ciccozzi, Alessandra; Marinangeli, Franco; Paladini, Antonella; Varrassi, Giustino

    2011-04-01

    Stress induced by the events of daily life is considered a major factor in pathogenesis of primary tension-type headache. Little is known about the impact that could have a more stressful event, like a natural disaster, both in patients with chronic headache, both in people that do not had headache previously. The aim of the present study was to observe the prevalence of headache in the population following the devastating earthquake that affected the province of L'Aquila on April 6, 2009. The study population was conducted in four tent cities (Onna, Bazzano, Tempera-St. Biagio, Paganica). Sanitary access is recorded in the registers of medical triage, in the first 5 weeks, after the April 6, 2009. The prevalence of primary headache presentation was 5.53% (95% CI 4.2-7.1), secondary headache was 2.82% (95% CI 1.9-4.9). Pain intensity, assessed by Numerical Rating Scale score showed a mean value of 7±1.1 (range 4-10). The drugs most used were the NSAIDs (46%) and paracetamol (36%), for impossibility of finding causal drugs. This study shows how more stressful events not only have an important role in determining acute exacerbation of chronic headache, but probably also play a pathogenic role in the emergence of primary headache. Also underlines the lack of diagnostic guidelines or operating protocols to early identify and treat headache in the emergency settings.

  4. Surgical treatment of bumblefoot in a captive golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

    PubMed Central

    Poorbaghi, Seyedeh Leila; Javdani, Moosa; Nazifi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The golden eagle is one of the world's largest living birds. Footpad dermatitis, also known as plantar pododermatitis or bumblefoot, is a condition characterized by lesions due to contact with unhealthy "perching" conditions, such as plastic perches, sharp-cornered perches on the ventral footpad of birds. A young female golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) in Fars province of Iran was presented to veterinary clinics of Shiraz University with clinical signs of lameness. The bird was examined clinically and a variety of complementary diagnostic procedures such as blood analysis, X-ray and bacteriological culture were performed. Then a surgical method was pick out for removing of scab, pus and necrotic tissues from abscess on the plantar aspect of bird's feet and healing the skin of area. After surgery, specific bandage, systemic antibiotics and vitamins were used. Corynebacterium, a gram negative bacterium, was isolated in the pus from the abscess. After the surgical operation, swelling in the digital pad reduced, the skin of pad healed and the signs of lameness vanished. To prevent developing bumblefoot, good bedding for proper "perching" conditions is necessary. Additionally, vitamin therapy to promote a healthy integument is advised. PMID:25653750

  5. Surgical treatment of bumblefoot in a captive golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Poorbaghi, Seyedeh Leila; Javdani, Moosa; Nazifi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The golden eagle is one of the world's largest living birds. Footpad dermatitis, also known as plantar pododermatitis or bumblefoot, is a condition characterized by lesions due to contact with unhealthy "perching" conditions, such as plastic perches, sharp-cornered perches on the ventral footpad of birds. A young female golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) in Fars province of Iran was presented to veterinary clinics of Shiraz University with clinical signs of lameness. The bird was examined clinically and a variety of complementary diagnostic procedures such as blood analysis, X-ray and bacteriological culture were performed. Then a surgical method was pick out for removing of scab, pus and necrotic tissues from abscess on the plantar aspect of bird's feet and healing the skin of area. After surgery, specific bandage, systemic antibiotics and vitamins were used. Corynebacterium, a gram negative bacterium, was isolated in the pus from the abscess. After the surgical operation, swelling in the digital pad reduced, the skin of pad healed and the signs of lameness vanished. To prevent developing bumblefoot, good bedding for proper "perching" conditions is necessary. Additionally, vitamin therapy to promote a healthy integument is advised.

  6. Predators as prey at a Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos eyrie in Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Tsengeg, Pu; Whitlock, P.; Ellis, Merlin H.

    2000-01-01

    Although golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) have for decades been known to occasionally take large or dangerous quarry, the capturing of such was generally believed to be rare and/or the act of starved birds. This report provides details of an exceptional diet at a golden eagle eyrie in eastern Mongolia with unquantified notes on the occurrence of foxes at other eyries in Mongolia. Most of the prey we recorded were unusual, including 1 raven (Corvus corax), 3 demoiselle cranes (Anthropoides virgo), 1 upland buzzard (Buteo hemilasius), 3 owls, 27 foxes, and 11 Mongolian gazelles. Some numerical comparisons are of interest. Our value for gazelle calves (10 minimum count, 1997) represents 13% of 78 prey items and at least one adult was also present. Our total of only 15 hares (Lepus tolai) and 4 marmots (Marmota sibirica) compared to 27 foxes suggests not so much a preference for foxes, but rather that populations of more normal prey were probably depressed at this site. Unusual prey represented 65% of the diet at this eyrie.

  7. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L'Aquila city (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonti, Roberta; Barthel, Rainer; Formisano, Antonio; Borri, Antonio; Candela, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different "modes of damage" of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L'Aquila district is discussed.

  8. The Genome Sequence of a Widespread Apex Predator, the Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jacqueline M.; Katzner, Todd E.; Bloom, Peter H.; Ji, Yanzhu; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K.; DeWoody, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Biologists routinely use molecular markers to identify conservation units, to quantify genetic connectivity, to estimate population sizes, and to identify targets of selection. Many imperiled eagle populations require such efforts and would benefit from enhanced genomic resources. We sequenced, assembled, and annotated the first eagle genome using DNA from a male golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in western North America. We constructed genomic libraries that were sequenced using Illumina technology and assembled the high-quality data to a depth of ∼40x coverage. The genome assembly includes 2,552 scaffolds >10 Kb and 415 scaffolds >1.2 Mb. We annotated 16,571 genes that are involved in myriad biological processes, including such disparate traits as beak formation and color vision. We also identified repetitive regions spanning 92 Mb (∼6% of the assembly), including LINES, SINES, LTR-RTs and DNA transposons. The mitochondrial genome encompasses 17,332 bp and is ∼91% identical to the Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis). Finally, the data reveal that several anonymous microsatellites commonly used for population studies are embedded within protein-coding genes and thus may not have evolved in a neutral fashion. Because the genome sequence includes ∼800,000 novel polymorphisms, markers can now be chosen based on their proximity to functional genes involved in migration, carnivory, and other biological processes. PMID:24759626

  9. Rubble masonry response under cyclic actions: The experience of L’Aquila city (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Fonti, Roberta Barthel, Rainer; Formisano, Antonio; Borri, Antonio; Candela, Michele

    2015-12-31

    Several methods of analysis are available in engineering practice to study old masonry constructions. Two commonly used approaches in the field of seismic engineering are global and local analyses. Despite several years of research in this field, the various methodologies suffer from a lack of comprehensive experimental validation. This is mainly due to the difficulty in simulating the many different kinds of masonry and, accordingly, the non-linear response under horizontal actions. This issue can be addressed by examining the local response of isolated panels under monotonic and/or alternate actions. Different testing methodologies are commonly used to identify the local response of old masonry. These range from simplified pull-out tests to sophisticated in-plane monotonic tests. However, there is a lack of both knowledge and critical comparison between experimental validations and numerical simulations. This is mainly due to the difficulties in implementing irregular settings within both simplified and advanced numerical analyses. Similarly, the simulation of degradation effects within laboratory tests is difficult with respect to old masonry in-situ boundary conditions. Numerical models, particularly on rubble masonry, are commonly simplified. They are mainly based on a kinematic chain of rigid blocks able to perform different “modes of damage” of structures subjected to horizontal actions. This paper presents an innovative methodology for testing; its aim is to identify a simplified model for out-of-plane response of rubbleworks with respect to the experimental evidence. The case study of L’Aquila district is discussed.

  10. Assessment of lead exposure in Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) from spent ammunition in central Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Julia Rodriguez-Ramos; Hofle, Ursula; Mateo, Rafael; de Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Abbott, Rachel; Acevedo, Pelayo; Blanco, Juan-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) is found only in the Iberian Peninsula and is considered one of the most threatened birds of prey in Europe. Here we analyze lead concentrations in bones (n = 84), livers (n = 15), primary feathers (n = 69), secondary feathers (n = 71) and blood feathers (n = 14) of 85 individuals collected between 1997 and 2008 in central Spain. Three birds (3.6%) had bone lead concentration > 20 (mu or u)g/g and all livers were within background lead concentration. Bone lead concentrations increased with the age of the birds and were correlated with lead concentration in rachis of secondary feathers. Spatial aggregation of elevated bone lead concentration was found in some areas of Montes de Toledo. Lead concentrations in feathers were positively associated with the density of large game animals in the area where birds were found dead or injured. Discontinuous lead exposure in eagles was evidenced by differences in lead concentration in longitudinal portions of the rachis of feathers.

  11. The 2009 L'Aquila (central Italy) MW6.3 earthquake: Main shock and aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarabba, C.; Amato, A.; Anselmi, M.; Baccheschi, P.; Bianchi, I.; Cattaneo, M.; Cecere, G.; Chiaraluce, L.; Ciaccio, M. G.; De Gori, P.; De Luca, G.; Di Bona, M.; Di Stefano, R.; Faenza, L.; Govoni, A.; Improta, L.; Lucente, F. P.; Marchetti, A.; Margheriti, L.; Mele, F.; Michelini, A.; Monachesi, G.; Moretti, M.; Pastori, M.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Piccinini, D.; Roselli, P.; Seccia, D.; Valoroso, L.

    2009-09-01

    A MW 6.3 earthquake struck on April 6, 2009 the Abruzzi region (central Italy) producing vast damage in the L'Aquila town and surroundings. In this paper we present the location and geometry of the fault system as obtained by the analysis of main shock and aftershocks recorded by permanent and temporary networks. The distribution of aftershocks, 712 selected events with ML ≥ 2.3 and 20 with ML ≥ 4.0, defines a complex, 40 km long, NW trending extensional structure. The main shock fault segment extends for 15-18 km and dips at 45° to the SW, between 10 and 2 km depth. The extent of aftershocks coincides with the surface trace of the Paganica fault, a poorly known normal fault that, after the event, has been quoted to accommodate the extension of the area. We observe a migration of seismicity to the north on an echelon fault that can rupture in future large earthquakes.

  12. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  13. Nucleophosmin Interacts with PIN2/TERF1-interacting Telomerase Inhibitor 1 (PinX1) and Attenuates the PinX1 Inhibition on Telomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Derek Hang-Cheong; Ho, Sai-Tim; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Jin, Rui; Wang, Ya-Nan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Huang, Jun-Jian; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase activation and telomere maintenance are critical for cellular immortalization and transformation. PIN2/TERF1-interacting telomerase inhibitor 1 (PinX1) is a telomerase regulator and the aberrant expression of PinX1 causes telomere shortening. Identifying PinX1-interacting proteins is important for understanding telomere maintenance. We found that PinX1 directly interacts with nucleophosmin (NPM), a protein that has been shown to positively correlate with telomerase activity. We further showed that PinX1 acts as a linker in the association between NPM and hTERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Additionally, the recruitment of NPM by PinX1 to the telomerase complex could partially attenuate the PinX1-mediated inhibition on telomerase activity. Taken together, our data reveal a novel mechanism that regulates telomerase activation through the interaction between NPM, PinX1 and the telomerase complex. PMID:28255170

  14. Model-based cross-correlation search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, John T.; Sundaresan, Santosh; Zhang, Yuanhao; Peiris, Prabath

    2015-05-01

    We consider the cross-correlation search for periodic gravitational waves and its potential application to the low-mass x-ray binary Sco X-1. This method coherently combines data not only from different detectors at the same time, but also data taken at different times from the same or different detectors. By adjusting the maximum allowed time offset between a pair of data segments to be coherently combined, one can tune the method to trade off sensitivity and computing costs. In particular, the detectable signal amplitude scales as the inverse fourth root of this coherence time. The improvement in amplitude sensitivity for a search with a maximum time offset of one hour, compared with a directed stochastic background search with 0.25-Hz-wide bins, is about a factor of 5.4. We show that a search of one year of data from the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors with a coherence time of one hour would be able to detect gravitational waves from Sco X-1 at the level predicted by torque balance over a range of signal frequencies from 30 to 300 Hz; if the coherence time could be increased to ten hours, the range would be 20 to 500 Hz. In addition, we consider several technical aspects of the cross-correlation method: We quantify the effects of spectral leakage and show that nearly rectangular windows still lead to the most sensitive search. We produce an explicit parameter-space metric for the cross-correlation search, in general, and as applied to a neutron star in a circular binary system. We consider the effects of using a signal template averaged over unknown amplitude parameters: The quantity to which the search is sensitive is a given function of the intrinsic signal amplitude and the inclination of the neutron-star rotation axis to the line of sight, and the peak of the expected detection statistic is systematically offset from the true signal parameters. Finally, we describe the potential loss of signal-to-noise ratio due to unmodeled effects such as signal

  15. NuSTAR Discovery of a Possible Black Hole HMXB and Cygnus X-1 Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Hailey, Charles James; Zhang, Shuo; Mori, Kaya; Gomez, Sebastian; Hong, Jaesub; Tomsick, John

    2017-01-01

    We report on NuSTAR observations of HD96670, a single line spectroscopic binary in the Carina OB association. We selected this source as a possible BH-HMXB candidate based on its 5.53d orbital period and 0.10 Msun mass function, both similar to Cyg X-1. HD96670 is a O8.5V main sequence star, and if its secondary were a BH, and its O star evolves to a O9Ib star like that in Cyg X-1, it would be high luminosity BH-HXMB. HD96670 is detected as a soft source in RASS and in the XMM slew survey. With a 150 ksec exposure with NuSTAR, we found a best-fit power law spectrum with photon index 2.4 - 2.6 and factor of ~2 variability. The mean Lx ~ 5 x 10^32 (5 - 30 keV) is consistent with that expected for accretion from the weak wind that late-type main sequence O stars usually show for plausible assumptions for the secondary if it is a ~5Msun BH. In the poster by Gomez and Grindlay, we show the detailed photometry and spectroscopy and PHOEBE modelling which point to the secondary indeed being a 5 Msun object, either an accreting BH or possibly a B8V star for which the X-ray spectrum would be expected to not show the hard PL component. Additional X-ray observations at or near the optically determined phase of inferiour vs. superior conjunction will resolve the nature of the secondary. If it is indeed a BH, this points the way to a much larger population of low-luminosity (Weak Wind) BH-LMXBs, with longer lifetimes, than the presently explored systems which all (but one) have super-giant donors.

  16. The smooth cyclotron line in Her X-1 as seen with nuclear spectroscopic telescope array

    SciTech Connect

    Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Bellm, Eric C.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Staubert, Rüdiger; Klochkov, Dmitry; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Chenevez, Jerome; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Wilms, Jörn; William Zhang

    2013-12-10

    Her X-1, one of the brightest and best studied X-ray binaries, shows a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) near 37 keV. This makes it an ideal target for a detailed study with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), taking advantage of its excellent hard X-ray spectral resolution. We observed Her X-1 three times, coordinated with Suzaku, during one of the high flux intervals of its 35 day superorbital period. This paper focuses on the shape and evolution of the hard X-ray spectrum. The broadband spectra can be fitted with a power law with a high-energy cutoff, an iron line, and a CRSF. We find that the CRSF has a very smooth and symmetric shape in all observations and at all pulse phases. We compare the residuals of a line with a Gaussian optical-depth profile to a Lorentzian optical-depth profile and find no significant differences, strongly constraining the very smooth shape of the line. Even though the line energy changes dramatically with pulse phase, we find that its smooth shape does not. Additionally, our data show that the continuum only changes marginally between the three observations. These changes can be explained with varying amounts of Thomson scattering in the hot corona of the accretion disk. The average, luminosity-corrected CRSF energy is lower than in past observations and follows a secular decline. The excellent data quality of NuSTAR provides the best constraint on the CRSF energy to date.

  17. Constraints on the Neutron Star and Inner Accretion Flow in Serpens X-1 Using Nustar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Parker, M. L.; Fuerst, F.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Chakrabarty, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Hailey, C. J.; Natalucci, L.; Paerels, F.; Rana, V.; Stern, D. K.; Tomsick, J. A.; Zhang, Will

    2013-01-01

    We report on an observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1, made with NuSTAR. The extraordinary sensitivity afforded by NuSTAR facilitated the detection of a clear, robust, relativistic Fe K emission line from the inner disk. A relativistic profile is required over a single Gaussian line from any charge state of Fe at the 5 sigma level of confidence, and any two Gaussians of equal width at the same confidence. The Compton back-scattering "hump" peaking in the 10-20 keV band is detected for the first time in a neutron star X-ray binary. Fits with relativistically blurred disk reflection models suggest that the disk likely extends close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) or stellar surface. The best-fit blurred reflection models constrain the gravitational redshift from the stellar surface to be ZnS (is) greater than 0.16. The data are broadly compatible with the disk extending to the ISCO; in that case,ZnS(is) greater than 0.22 and RNS (is) less than12.6 km (assuming MnS = 1.4 solar mass and a = 0, where a = cJ/GM2). If the star is as large or larger than its ISCO, or if the effective reflecting disk leaks across the ISCO to the surface, the redshift constraints become measurements. We discuss our results in the context of efforts to measure fundamental properties of neutron stars, and models for accretion onto compact objects.

  18. DISCOVERY OF A 115 DAY ORBITAL PERIOD IN THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE NGC 5408 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2009-12-01

    We report the detection of a 115 day periodicity in Swift/X-Ray Telescope monitoring data from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. Our ongoing campaign samples its X-ray flux approximately twice weekly and has now achieved a temporal baseline of approx 485 days. Periodogram analysis reveals a significant periodicity with a period of 115.5 +- 4 days. The modulation is detected with a significance of 3.2 x 10{sup -4}. The fractional modulation amplitude decreases with increasing energy, ranging from 0.13 +- 0.02 above 1 keV to 0.24 +- 0.02 below 1 keV. The shape of the profile evolves as well, becoming less sharply peaked at higher energies. The periodogram analysis is consistent with a periodic process, however, continued monitoring is required to confirm the coherent nature of the modulation. Spectral analysis indicates that NGC 5408 X-1 can reach 0.3-10 keV luminosities of approx 2 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}. We suggest that, like the 62 day period of the ULX in M82 (X41.4+60), the periodicity detected in NGC 5408 X-1 represents the orbital period of the black hole binary containing the ULX. If this is true then the secondary can only be a giant or supergiant star.

  19. Discovery of a 115 Day Orbital Period in the Ultraluminous X-ray Source NGC 5408 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a 115 day periodicity in SWIFT/XRT monitoring data from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. Our o ngoing campaign samples its X-ray flux approximately twice weekly and has now achieved a temporal baseline of ti 485 days. Periodogram ana lysis reveals a significant periodicity with a period of 115.5 +/- 4 days. The modulation is detected with a significance of 3.2 x 10(exp -4) . The fractional modulation amplitude decreases with increasing e nergy, ranging from 0.13 +/- 0.02 above 1 keV to 0.24 +/- 0.02 below 1 keV. The shape of the profile evolves as well, becoming less sharply peaked at higher energies. The periodogram analysis is consistent wi th a periodic process, however, continued monitoring is required to c onfirm the coherent nature of the modulation. Spectral analysis indic ates that NGC 5408 X-1 can reach 0.3 - 10 keV luminosities of approxi mately 2 x 10 40 ergs/s . We suggest that, like the 62 day period of the ULX in M82 (X41.4-1-60), the periodicity detected in NGC 5408 X-1 represents the orbital period of the black hole binary containing the ULX. If this is true then the secondary can only be a giant or super giant star.

  20. Evidence for a 115 Day Orbital Period in the Ultraluminous X-ray Source NGC 5408 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a 115 day periodicity in SWIFT/XRT monitoring data from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. Our ongoing campaign samples its X-ray flux approximately twice weekly and has now achieved a temporal baseline of more than 500 days. Timing analysis reveals a significant periodicity with a period of 115.5 +- 4 days. The fractional modulation amplitude decreases with increasing energy, ranging from 0.13 above 1 keV to 0.24 below 1 keV. The shape of the profile evolves as well, becoming less sharply peaked at higher energies. Periodogram analysis is consistent with a periodic process, however, continued monitoring is required to confirm the coherent nature of the modulation. Spectral analysis indicates that NGC 5408 X-1 can reach 0.3 - 10 keV luminosities of 2 x 10e40 ergs/s. We suggest that, like the 62 day period of the ULX in M82 (X41.4+60), the periodicity detected in NGC 5408 X-1 represents the orbital period of the black hole binary containing the ULX. If this is true then the secondary can only be a giant or supergiant star.

  1. USING THE X-RAY DUST SCATTERING HALO OF CYGNUS X-1 TO DETERMINE DISTANCE AND DUST DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Jingen; Lee, Julia C.; Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Joern E-mail: jclee@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the X-ray dust scattering halo of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 based on two Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observations. Using 18 different dust models, including one modified by us (eponymously dubbed XLNW), we probe the interstellar medium between us and this source. A consistent description of the cloud properties along the line of sight (LOS) that describes at the same time the halo radial profile, the halo light curves, and the column density from source spectroscopy is best achieved with a small subset of these models. Combining the studies of the halo radial profile and the halo light curves, we favor a geometric distance to Cygnus X-1 of d = 1.81 {+-} 0.09 kpc. Our study also shows that there is a dense cloud, which contributes {approx}50% of the dust grains along the LOS to Cygnus X-1, located at {approx}1.6 kpc from us. The remainder of the dust along the LOS is close to the black hole binary.

  2. Gene therapy outpaces haplo for SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B

    2015-06-04

    In this issue of Blood, Touzot et al report that autologous gene therapy/hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for infants with X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (SCID-X1) lacking a matched sibling donor may have better outcomes than haploidentical (haplo) HSCT. Because gene therapy represents an autologous transplant, it obviates immune suppression before and after transplant, eliminates risks of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and, as the authors report, led to faster immunological reconstitution after transplant than did haplo transplant.

  3. X-1E Loaded in B-29 Mothership on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1E airplane being loaded under the mothership, Boeing B-29. The X-planes had originally been lowered into a loading pit and the launch aircraft towed over the pit, where the rocket plane was hoisted by belly straps into the bomb bay. By the early 1950s a hydraulic lift had been installed on the ramp at the NACA High-Speed Flight Station to elevate the launch aircraft and then lower it over the rocket plane for mating.

  4. Confidence about line features in Her X-1 spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durouchoux, P.; Boclet, D.; Rocchia, R.

    1978-01-01

    A balloon borne X-ray telescope was flown Aire-surl'Adour, France to search for pulsation of the X-ray source HER X1. The source was measured for about 3500 s relative exposure larger than 0.75 and features were detected at 57.5 plus or minus 7.5 keV and 135 plus or minus 10 keV in the spectrum. Data were reanalyzed in terms of possibility of gain shift encoder. The very strong dependence of the line features on such a shift is discussed.

  5. [Health status and access to health services by the population of L'Aquila (Abruzzo Region, Italy) six years after the earthquake].

    PubMed

    Altobelli, Emma; Vittorini, Pierpaolo; Leuter, Cinzia; Bianchini, Valeria; Angelone, Anna Maria; Aloisio, Federica; Cofini, Vincenza; Zazzara, Francesca; Di Orio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters, such as the earthquake that occurred in the province of L'Aquila in central Italy, in 2009, generally increase the demand for healthcare. A survey was conducted to assess perception of health status an d use of health services in a sample of L'Aquila's resident population, five years after the event, and in a comparison population consisting of a sample of the resident population of Avezzano, a town in the same region, not affected by the earthquake. No differences were found in perception of health status between the two populations. Both groups reported difficulties in accessing specialized healthcare and rehabilitation services.

  6. Probing the stellar wind environment of Vela X-1 with MAXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacaria, C.; Mihara, T.; Santangelo, A.; Makishima, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Morii, M.; Sugizaki, M.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Vela X-1 is one of the best-studied and most luminous accreting X-ray pulsars. The supergiant optical companion produces a strong radiatively driven stellar wind that is accreted onto the neutron star, producing highly variable X-ray emission. A complex phenomenology that is due to both gravitational and radiative effects needs to be taken into account to reproduce orbital spectral variations. Aims: We have investigated the spectral and light curve properties of the X-ray emission from Vela X-1 along the binary orbit. These studies allow constraining the stellar wind properties and its perturbations that are induced by the pulsating neutron star. Methods: We took advantage of the All Sky Monitor MAXI/GSC data to analyze Vela X-1 spectra and light curves. By studying the orbital profiles in the 4-10 and 10-20 keV energy bands, we extracted a sample of orbital light curves (~15% of the total) showing a dip around the inferior conjunction, that is, a double-peaked shape. We analyzed orbital phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra of both the double-peaked and the standard sample. Results: The dip in the double-peaked sample needs NH ~ 2 × 1024cm-2 to be explained by absorption alone, which is not observed in our analysis. We show that Thomson scattering from an extended and ionized accretion wake can contribute to the observed dip. Fit by a cutoff power-law model, the two analyzed samples show orbital modulation of the photon index that hardens by ~0.3 around the inferior conjunction, compared to earlier and later phases. This indicates a possible inadequacy of this model. In contrast, including a partial covering component at certain orbital phase bins allows a constant photon index along the orbital phases, indicating a highly inhomogeneous environment whose column density has a local peak around the inferior conjunction. We discuss our results in the framework of possible scenarios.

  7. Hard X-ray emission of Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Churazov, Eugene M.; Krivonos, Roman A.

    2014-12-01

    We study hard X-ray emission of the brightest accreting neutron star Sco X-1 with INTEGRAL observatory. Up to now INTEGRAL have collected ˜4 Ms of deadtime corrected exposure on this source. We show that hard X-ray tail in time average spectrum of Sco X-1 has a power-law shape without cutoff up to energies ˜200-300 keV. An absence of the high energy cutoff does not agree with the predictions of a model, in which the tail is formed as a result of Comptonization of soft seed photons on bulk motion of matter near the compact object. The amplitude of the tail varies with time with factor more than 10 with the faintest tail at the top of the so-called flaring branch of its colour-colour diagram. We show that the minimal amplitude of the power-law tail is recorded when the component, corresponding to the innermost part of optically thick accretion disc, disappears from the emission spectrum. Therefore, we show that the presence of the hard X-ray tail may be related with the existence of the inner part of the optically thick disc. We estimate cooling time for these energetic electrons and show that they cannot be thermal. We propose that the hard X-ray tail emission originates as a Compton upscattering of soft seed photons on electrons, which might have initial non-thermal distribution.

  8. Broad-Band Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asami, Fumi; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nagase, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed with Suzaku in the main-on state from 2005 to 2010. The 0.4- 100 keV wide-band spectra obtained in four observations showed a broad hump around 4-9 keV in addition to narrow Fe lines at 6.4 and 6.7 keV. The hump was seen in all the four observations regardless of the selection of the continuum models. Thus it is considered a stable and intrinsic spectral feature in Her X-1. The broad hump lacked a sharp structure like an absorption edge. Thus it was represented by two different spectral models: an ionized partial covering or an additional broad line at 6.5 keV. The former required a persistently existing ionized absorber, whose origin was unclear. In the latter case, the Gaussian fitting of the 6.5-keV line needs a large width of sigma = 1.0-1.5 keV and a large equivalent width of 400-900 eV. If the broad line originates from Fe fluorescence of accreting matter, its large width may be explained by the Doppler broadening in the accretion flow. However, the large equivalent width may be inconsistent with a simple accretion geometry.

  9. The Origin of the EUV Emission in Her X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Marshall, H.

    1999-01-01

    Her X-1 exhibits a strong orbital modulation of its EUV flux with a large decrease around time of eclipse of the neutron star, and a significant dip which appears at different orbital phases at different 35-day phases. We consider observations of Her X-1 in the EUVE by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), which includes data from 1995 near the end of the Short High state, and date from 1997 at the start of the Short High state. The observed EUV lightcurve has bright and faint phases. The bright phase can be explained as the low energy tail of the soft x-ray pulse. The faint phase emission has been modeled to understand its origin. We find: the x-ray heated surface of HZ Her is too cool to produce enough emission; the accretion disk does not explain the orbital modulation; however, reflection of x-rays off of HZ Her can produce the observed lightcurve with orbital eclipses. The dip can be explained by shadowing of the companion by the accretion disk. We discuss the constraints on the accretion disk geometry derived from the observed shadowing.

  10. The Origin of the EUV Emission in Her X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Marshall, H.

    1999-01-01

    Her X-1 exhibits a strong orbital modulation of its EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation) flux with a large decrease around time of eclipse of the neutron star, and a significant dip which appears at different orbital phases at different 35-day phases. We consider observations of Her X-1 in the EUVE by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), which includes data from 1995 near the end of the Short High state, and date from 1997 at the start of the Short High state. The observed EUV lightcurve has bright and faint phases. The bright phase can be explained as the low energy tail of the soft x-ray pulse. The faint phase emission has been modeled to understand its origin. We find: the x-ray heated surface of HZ Her is too cool to produce enough emission; the accretion disk does not explain the orbital modulation; however, reflection of x-rays off of HZ Her can produce the observed lightcurve with orbital eclipses. The dip can be explained by shadowing of the companion by the accretion disk. We discuss the constraints on the accretion disk geometry derived from the observed shadowing.

  11. Circinus X-1 - X-ray observations with SAS 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dower, R. G.; Bradt, H. V.; Morgan, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight observations of Cir X-1 with SAS 3, each lasting 1-6 days, have yielded a variety of new phenomena, viz., a luminous state of steady emission, rapid large-intensity dips, an extremely rapid X-ray transition, and bright flares. Through searches for periodic X-ray pulsations were carried out on data trains of duration up to 6 days; upper limits for pulsations with periods greater than 250 microsec range down to 0.3%. Aperiodic variability with characteristic times of 0.4-1.0 sec was observed but is not well characterized by a simple shot noise model. No millisecond bursts were observed during 40,000 sec in three separate observations. Spectral parameters derived before and after several X-ray transitions indicate that the transitions are not due to absorption of X-rays by intervening gas. Models previously proposed for the Cir X-1 system do not easily provide explanations for all the complex phenomena reported herein.

  12. Analyzing the X-Ray Variability of Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottschmidt, Katja; Konig, Michael

    The X-ray lightcurves of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 exhibit aperiodic variability on time scales ranging from minutes down to milliseconds. This characteristic behavior is usually explained by shot noise models. These models assume that the lightcurve is produced by superposition of randomly occuring shots and an additional white noise component. A more general approach to describe the variability as a stochastic process uses autoregressive [AR] models. Those models express a time series as a linear function of its past values plus a white noise term and provide parameters characterising the temporal correlation of the process. Since the measured X-ray lightcurve is an observation of the system dynamics, it contains observational noise. If this is not accounted for the temporal correlations will be underestimated. Therefore we have applied the Linear State Space Model technique (Koenig \\& Timmer 1996) to explicitely model the observational noise covering an intrinsic autoregressive process. We have reanalysed EXOSAT ME observations of Cygnus X-1 using both common Fourier techniques and the Linear State Space Model technique. We found that the intrinsic process can be described by an AR[1] model with a relaxation time of about 0.3 s. Reference: Koenig, M., Timmer, J. 1996, A\\&A, submitted

  13. Case A Binary Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C A; Eggleton, P P

    2001-03-28

    We undertake a comparison of observed Algol-type binaries with a library of computed Case A binary evolution tracks. The library consists of 5500 binary tracks with various values of initial primary mass M{sub 10}, mass ratio q{sub 0}, and period P{sub 0}, designed to sample the phase-space of Case A binaries in the range -0.10 {le} log M{sub 10} {le} 1.7. Each binary is evolved using a standard code with the assumption that both total mass and orbital angular momentum are conserved. This code follows the evolution of both stars until the point where contact or reverse mass transfer occurs. The resulting binary tracks show a rich variety of behavior which we sort into several subclasses of Case A and Case B. We present the results of this classification, the final mass ratio and the fraction of time spent in Roche Lobe overflow for each binary system. The conservative assumption under which we created this library is expected to hold for a broad range of binaries, where both components have spectra in the range G0 to B1 and luminosity class III - V. We gather a list of relatively well-determined observed hot Algol-type binaries meeting this criterion, as well as a list of cooler Algol-type binaries where we expect significant dynamo-driven mass loss and angular momentum loss. We fit each observed binary to our library of tracks using a {chi}{sup 2}-minimizing procedure. We find that the hot Algols display overall acceptable {chi}{sup 2}, confirming the conservative assumption, while the cool Algols show much less acceptable {chi}{sup 2} suggesting the need for more free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum loss.

  14. Spectroscopy of the Stellar Wind in the Cygnus X-1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskovicova, Ivica; Hanke, Manfred; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schultz, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray luminosity of black holes is produced through the accretion of material from their companion stars. Depending on the mass of the donor star, accretion of the material falling onto the black hole through the inner Lagrange point of the system or accretion by the strong stellar wind can occur. Cygnus X-1 is a high mass X-ray binary system, where the black hole is powered by accretion of the stellar wind of its supergiant companion star HDE226868. As the companion is close to filling its Roche lobe, the wind is not symmetric, but strongly focused towards the black hole. Chandra-HETGS observations allow for an investigation of this focused stellar wind, which is essential to understand the physics of the accretion flow. We compare observations at the distinct orbital phases of 0.0, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75. These correspond to different lines of sights towards the source, allowing us to probe the structure and the dynamics of the wind.

  15. RAPID SPECTRAL CHANGES OF CYGNUS X-1 IN THE LOW/HARD STATE WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, S.; Makishima, K.; Negoro, H.; Torii, S.; Noda, H.; Mineshige, S.

    2013-04-20

    Rapid spectral changes in the hard X-ray on a timescale down to {approx}0.1 s are studied by applying a ''shot analysis'' technique to the Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1, performed on 2008 April 18 during the low/hard state. We successfully obtained the shot profiles, covering 10-200 keV with the Suzaku HXD-PIN and HXD-GSO detector. It is notable that the 100-200 keV shot profile is acquired for the first time owing to the HXD-GSO detector. The intensity changes in a time-symmetric way, though the hardness changes in a time-asymmetric way. When the shot-phase-resolved spectra are quantified with the Compton model, the Compton y-parameter and the electron temperature are found to decrease gradually through the rising phase of the shot, while the optical depth appears to increase. All the parameters return to their time-averaged values immediately within 0.1 s past the shot peak. We have not only confirmed this feature previously found in energies below {approx}60 keV, but also found that the spectral change is more prominent in energies above {approx}100 keV, implying the existence of some instant mechanism for direct entropy production. We discuss possible interpretations of the rapid spectral changes in the hard X-ray band.

  16. Modeling Late-Summer Distribution of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Western United States

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Increasing development across the western United States (USA) elevates concerns about effects on wildlife resources; the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is of special concern in this regard. Knowledge of golden eagle abundance and distribution across the western USA must be improved to help identify and conserve areas of major importance to the species. We used distance sampling and visual mark-recapture procedures to estimate golden eagle abundance from aerial line-transect surveys conducted across four Bird Conservation Regions in the western USA between 15 August and 15 September in 2006–2010, 2012, and 2013. To assess golden eagle-habitat relationships at this scale, we modeled counts of golden eagles seen during surveys in 2006–2010, adjusted for probability of detection, and used land cover and other environmental factors as predictor variables within 20-km2 sampling units randomly selected from survey transects. We found evidence of positive relationships between intensity of use by golden eagles and elevation, solar radiation, and mean wind speed, and of negative relationships with the proportion of landscape classified as forest or as developed. The model accurately predicted habitat use observed during surveys conducted in 2012 and 2013. We used the model to construct a map predicting intensity of use by golden eagles during late summer across our ~2 million-km2 study area. The map can be used to help prioritize landscapes for conservation efforts, identify areas where mitigation efforts may be most effective, and identify regions for additional research and monitoring. In addition, our map can be used to develop region-specific (e.g., state-level) density estimates based on the latest information on golden eagle abundance from a late-summer survey and aid designation of geographic management units for the species. PMID:27556735

  17. The Mitochondrial Genomes of Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus (Aves, Accipitriformes): Sequence, Structure and Phylogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Chen, Juan; Wang, Ping; Ren, Qiongqiong; Yuan, Jian; Qian, Chaoju; Hua, Xinghong; Guo, Zhichun; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jianke; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Qin; Ding, Hengwu; Bi, De; Zhang, Zongmeng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Dongsheng; Kan, Xianzhao

    2015-01-01

    The family Accipitridae is one of the largest groups of non-passerine birds, including 68 genera and 243 species globally distributed. In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial sequences of two species of accipitrid, namely Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus, and conducted a comparative mitogenome analysis across the family. The mitogenome length of A. fasciata and B. lagopus are 18,513 and 18,559 bp with an A + T content of 54.2% and 55.0%, respectively. For both the two accipitrid birds mtDNAs, obvious positive AT-skew and negative GC-skew biases were detected for all 12 PCGs encoded by the H strand, whereas the reverse was found in MT-ND6 encoded by the L strand. One extra nucleotide‘C’is present at the position 174 of MT-ND3 gene of A. fasciata, which is not observed at that of B. lagopus. Six conserved sequence boxes in the Domain II, named boxes F, E, D, C, CSBa, and CSBb, respectively, were recognized in the CRs of A. fasciata and B. lagopus. Rates and patterns of mitochondrial gene evolution within Accipitridae were also estimated. The highest dN/dS was detected for the MT-ATP8 gene (0.32493) among Accipitridae, while the lowest for the MT-CO1 gene (0.01415). Mitophylogenetic analysis supported the robust monophyly of Accipitriformes, and Cathartidae was basal to the balance of the order. Moreover, we performed phylogenetic analyses using two other data sets (two mitochondrial loci, and combined nuclear and mitochondrial loci). Our results indicate that the subfamily Aquilinae and all currently polytypic genera of this subfamily are monophyletic. These two novel mtDNA data will be useful in refining the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary processes of Accipitriformes. PMID:26295156

  18. Satellite tracking of two lesser spotted eagles Aquila pomarina, migrating from Namibia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyburg, B.-U.; Ellis, D.H.; Meyburg, C.; Mendelsohn, J.; Scheller, W.

    2001-01-01

    One immature and one subadult Lesser Spotted Eagle, Aquila pomarina, were followed by satellite telemetry from their non-breeding areas in Namibia. Both birds were fitted with transmitters (PTTs) in February 1994 and tracked, the immature for six months and two weeks, over distances of 10084 and 16773 km, respectively. During their time in Namibia both birds? movements were in response to good local rainfall. The immature eagle left Namibia at the end of February, the subadult at the end of March. They flew to their respective summer quarters in Hungary and the Ukraine, arriving there 2.5 and 1.5 months later than the breeding adults. The immature eagle took over two months longer on the homeward journey than a breeding male followed by telemetry in a previous study. On returning, the immature eagle followed the narrow flightpath through Africa used by other Lesser Spotted Eagles on their outward migration. It reached this corridor, which runs roughly between longitudes 31? and 36? East from Suez to Lake Tanganyika, veering from the shortest route in a direction east-northeast through Angola and Zambia to the southern end of Lake Tanganyika. The route taken by the subadult bird on its return migration differed markedly from that of all Lesser Spotted Eagles tracked to date, running further west through the Democratic Republic of Congo where, level with the equator, it flew over the eastern rainforest of that country. The outward migration, however, followed the same corridor and coincided in time with the migration of adults.

  19. Satellite tracking of two Lesser Spotted Eagles, Aquila pomarina, migrating from Namibia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyburg, B.-U.; Ellis, D.H.; Meyburg, C.; Mendelsohn, J.M.; Scheller, W.

    2001-01-01

    One immature and one subadult Lesser Spotted Eagle, Aquila pomarina, were followed by satellite telemetry from their nonbreeding areas in Namibia. Both birds were fitted with transmitters (PTTs) in February 1994 and tracked, the immature for six months and three weeks, the subadult for eight months and two weeks, over distances of 10 084 and 16 773 km, respectively. During their time in Namibia both birds' movements were in response to good local rainfall. The immature eagle left Namibia at the end of February, the subadult at the end of March. They flew to their respective summer quarters in Hungary and the Ukraine, arriving there 2.5 and 1.5 months later than the breeding adults. The immature eagle took over two months longer on the homeward journey than a breeding male followed by telemetry in a previous study. On returning, the immature eagle followed the narrow flightpath through Africa used by other Lesser Spotted Eagles on their outward migration. It reached this corridor, which runs roughly between longitudes 31?? and 36?? East from Suez to Lake Tanganyika, veering from the shortest route in a direction east-northeast through Angola and Zambia to the southern end of Lake Tanganyika. The route taken by the subadult bird on its return migration differed markedly from that of all Lesser Spotted Eagles tracked to date, running further west through the Democratic Republic of Congo where, level with the equator, it flew over the eastern rainforest of that country. The outward migration, however, followed the same corridor and coincided in time with the migration of adults. [A German translation of the abstract is provided on p. 40.].

  20. Automatic aeroelastic devices in the wings of a steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Anna C; Thomas, Adrian L R; Taylor, Graham K

    2007-12-01

    Here we analyse aeroelastic devices in the wings of a steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis during manoeuvres. Chaotic deflections of the upperwing coverts observed using video cameras carried by the bird (50 frames s(-1)) indicate trailing-edge separation but attached flow near the leading edge during flapping and gust response, and completely stalled flows upon landing. The underwing coverts deflect automatically along the leading edge at high angle of attack. We use high-speed digital video (500 frames s(-1)) to analyse these deflections in greater detail during perching sequences indoors and outdoors. Outdoor perching sequences usually follow a stereotyped three-phase sequence comprising a glide, pitch-up manoeuvre and deep stall. During deep stall, the spread-eagled bird has aerodynamics reminiscent of a cross-parachute. Deployment of the underwing coverts is closely phased with wing sweeping during the pitch-up manoeuvre, and is accompanied by alula protraction. Surprisingly, active alula protraction is preceded by passive peeling from its tip. Indoor flights follow a stereotyped flapping perching sequence, with deployment of the underwing coverts closely phased with alula protraction and the end of the downstroke. We propose that the underwing coverts operate as an automatic high-lift device, analogous to a Kruger flap. We suggest that the alula operates as a strake, promoting formation of a leading-edge vortex on the swept hand-wing when the arm-wing is completely stalled, and hypothesise that its active protraction is stimulated by its initial passive deflection. These aeroelastic devices appear to be used for flow control to enhance unsteady manoeuvres, and may also provide sensory feedback.

  1. A self-consistent chemically stratified atmosphere model for the roAp star 10 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvacil, N.; Shulyak, D.; Ryabchikova, T. A.; Kochukhov, O.; Akberov, A.; Weiss, W.

    2013-04-01

    Context. Chemically peculiar A-type (Ap) stars are a subgroup of the CP2 stars that exhibit anomalous overabundances of numerous elements, e.g. Fe, Cr, Sr, and rare earth elements. The pulsating subgroup of Ap stars, the roAp stars, present ideal laboratories to observe and model pulsational signatures, as well as the interplay of the pulsations with strong magnetic fields and vertical abundance gradients. Aims: Based on high-resolution spectroscopic observations and observed stellar energy distributions, we construct a self-consistent model atmosphere for the roAp star 10 Aquilae (HD 176232). It accounts for modulations of the temperature-pressure structure caused by vertical abundance gradients. We demonstrate that such an analysis can be used to determine precisely the fundamental atmospheric parameters required for pulsation modelling. Methods: Average abundances were derived for 56 species. For Mg, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Sr, Pr, and Nd, vertical stratification profiles were empirically derived using the DDAFit minimisation routine together with the magnetic spectrum synthesis codeSynthmag. Model atmospheres were computed with the LLmodels code, which accounts for the individual abundances and stratification of chemical elements. Results: For the final model atmosphere, Teff = 7550 K and log (g) = 3.8 were adopted. While Mg, Si, Co, and Cr exhibit steep abundance gradients, Ca, Fe, and Sr showed much wider abundance gradients between logτ5000 = -1.5 and 0.5. Elements Mg and Co were found to be the least stratified, while Ca and Sr showed strong depth variations in abundance of up to ≈ 6 dex. Table 4 and Figs. 10-12 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. A fluorescent approach for identifying P2X1 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ruepp, Marc-David; Brozik, James A.; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; Farndale, Richard W.; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth D.; Thompson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    There are no commercially available, small, receptor-specific P2X1 ligands. There are several synthetic derivatives of the natural agonist ATP and some structurally-complex antagonists including compounds such as PPADS, NTP-ATP, suramin and its derivatives (e.g. NF279, NF449). NF449 is the most potent and selective ligand, but potencies of many others are not particularly high and they can also act at other P2X, P2Y and non-purinergic receptors. While there is clearly scope for further work on P2X1 receptor pharmacology, screening can be difficult owing to rapid receptor desensitisation. To reduce desensitisation substitutions can be made within the N-terminus of the P2X1 receptor, but these could also affect ligand properties. An alternative is the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes that respond to membrane potential changes resulting from channel opening. Here we utilised this approach in conjunction with fragment-based drug-discovery. Using a single concentration (300 μM) we identified 46 novel leads from a library of 1443 fragments (hit rate = 3.2%). These hits were independently validated by measuring concentration-dependence with the same voltage-sensitive dye, and by visualising the competition of hits with an Alexa-647-ATP fluorophore using confocal microscopy; confocal yielded kon (1.142 × 106 M−1 s−1) and koff (0.136 s−1) for Alexa-647-ATP (Kd = 119 nM). The identified hit fragments had promising structural diversity. In summary, the measurement of functional responses using voltage-sensitive dyes was flexible and cost-effective because labelled competitors were not needed, effects were independent of a specific binding site, and both agonist and antagonist actions were probed in a single assay. The method is widely applicable and could be applied to all P2X family members, as well as other voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology

  3. The Extreme Spin of the Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Reid, Mark J.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Steiner, James F.; Narayan, Ramesh; Xiang, Jingen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkably, an astronomical black hole is completely described by the two numbers that specify its mass and its spin. Knowledge of spin is crucial for understanding how, for example, black holes produce relativistic jets. Recently, it has become possible to measure the spins of black holes by focusing on the very inner region of an accreting disk of hot gas orbiting the black hole. According to General Relativity (GR), this disk is truncated at an inner radius 1 that depends only on the mass and spin of the black hole. We measure the radius of the inner edge of this disk by fitting its continuum X-ray spectrum to a fully relativistic model. Using our measurement of this radius, we deduce that the spin of Cygnus X-1 exceeds 97% of the maximum value allowed by GR.

  4. Pion production In The Inner Disk Around Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Meirelles Filho, C.; Miyake, H.; Timoteo, V.S.; Lima, C.L

    2004-12-02

    Neutron production via 4He breakup and p(p, n{pi}+)p is considered in the innermost region of an accretion disk surrounding a Kerr Black Hole. Close to the horizon, the contribution from p(p, n{pi}+)p to the neutron production is comparable to that from the breakup. It is shown that the viscosity generated by the collisions of the accreting matter with the neutrons may drive stationary accretion, for accretion rates below a critical value. In this case, solution to the disk equations is double-valued and for both solutions protons overnumber the pairs. We suggest that these solutions may mimic the states of high and low luminosity observed in Cygnus X-1.

  5. Variation of the pulse profile of Hercules X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohashi, T.; Inoue, H.; Kawai, N.; Koyama, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mitani, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Nagase, F.; Nakagawa, M.; Kondo, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray pulsar Her X-1 was observed in an on-state during its 35th cycle of activity in May, 1983 using the gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) array of the Tenma X-ray astronomy satellite. The outstanding features observed during the declining phase of the on-state included: a sharp decrease in the main X-ray pulse amplitude; and a steady increase in the column density of cool matter. On the basis of the spectral shape of the pulses, it is suggested that the main phase was attenuated due to electron scattering of the X-ray beam in a highly ionized medium located 3 x 10 to the 8th cm from the neutron star. Near the end of the on-state, the main pulse totally disappeared and a plain sinusoidal profile was observed. The observed pulse profiles are reproduced in graphic form.

  6. Feeding the monster: Wind accretion in Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskovicova, Ivica

    2012-07-01

    Stellar wind in HMXBs is highly structured: dense clumps of low temperatures are embedded in highly ionized material. We present analysis of the focused stellar wind in the hard state of Cygnus X-1 from high-resolution Chandra-HETGS observations at four distinct orbital phases: phi~0, ~0.2, ~0.5 and ~0.75. All light curves but the one at phi~0.5 show strong absorption dips that are believed to be caused by the clumps. We compare the spectral properties between dips and persistent flux: while the H-like and He-like absorption lines reveal the highly photoionized wind, the lines of lower ionization stages visible only in the dip spectra constrain the properties of the clumps. Comparison between different orbital phases allows us to study the complex structure and dynamics of the wind.

  7. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1 Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, J. B.; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, M. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the broad-band spectrum of Cygnus X-1 from 3.0 to 200 keV, using data from a 10 ksec observation by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Although the spectrum can be well described phenomenologically by an exponentially cut-off power law (photon index Gamma = 1.45+0.01 -0.02 , e-folding energy e(sub f) = 162+9 -8 keV, plus a deviation from a power law that formally can be modeled as a thermal blackbody, with temperature kT(sub BB) = 1.2 +0.0 -0.1 keV), the inclusion of a reflection component does not improve the fit. As a physical description of this system, we apply the accretion disc corona (ADC) models. A slab-geometry ADC model is unable to describe the data. However, a spherical corona, with a total optical depth tau- = 1.6 + or - 0.1 and an average temperature kTc = 87 + or - 5 keV, surrounded by an exterior cold disc, does provide a good description of the data (X red (exp 2) = 1.55). These models deviate from the data bv up to 7% in the 5-10 keV range. However, considering how successfully the spherical corona reproduces the 10-200 keV data, such "photon-starved" coronal geometries seem very promising for explaining the accretion processes of Cygnus X-1.

  8. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1. Report 2; TIming Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilms, Joern; Dove, James B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present timing analysis for a Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observation of Cygnus X-1 in its hard/low state. This was the first RXTE observation of Cyg X-1 taken after it transited back to this state from its soft/high state. RXTE's large effective area, superior timing capabilities, and ability to obtain long, uninterrupted observations have allowed us to obtain measurements of the power spectral density (PSD), coherence function, and Fourier time lags to a decade lower in frequency and half a decade higher in frequency than typically was achieved with previous instruments. Notable aspects of our observations include a weak 0.005 Hz feature in the PSD coincident with a coherence recovery; a 'hardening' of the high-frequency PSD with increasing energy; a broad frequency range measurement of the coherence function, revealing rollovers from unity coherence at both low and high frequency; and an accurate determination of the Fourier time lags over two and a half decades in frequency. As has been noted in previous similar observations, the time delay is approximately proportional to f(exp -0.7), and at a fixed Fourier frequency the time delay of the hard X-rays compared to the softest energy channel tends to increase logarithmically with energy. Curiously, the 0.01-0.2 Hz coherence between the highest and lowest energy bands is actually slightly greater than the coherence between the second highest and lowest energy bands. We carefully describe all of the analysis techniques used in this paper, and we make comparisons of the data to general theoretical expectations. In a companion paper, we make specific comparisons to a Compton corona model that we have successfully used to describe the energy spectral data from this observation.

  9. PTSD Growth and Substance Abuse Among a College Student Community: Coping Strategies after 2009 L’aquila Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, V; Roncone, R; Giusti, L; Casacchia, M; Cifone, MG; Pollice, R

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was the assessment of coping strategies, specifically substance use and post-traumatic growth (PTG), in 411 college students two years after 2009 L’Aquila earthquake. Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) was used to assess PTG and one question about substance use (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis) was asked to verify if students had modified their use in the post-earthquake compared with the pre-earthquake period. The 77.1% of college students were exposed to L’Aquila earthquake. The PTGI mean score was 35.23, underlining low positive coping strategies among student community. About substance abuse, the 43.8% of college students reported a marked increase in alcohol use, 7.8% in cannabis and the 15.8% reported an increase in nicotine use in the post-earthquake period. Despite these data, 12.5 % of the students reported a decrease in alcohol use after the earthquake and 17.3% of the sample reported a PTG, showing positive behaviors and attitudes after the traumatic experience of the natural disaster (increase of social relationships, appreciation of new future possibilities, and development of a new deep meaning of life). Inferential analysis shows a strong negative correlation between direct earthquake exposure and PTGI total score. In post-disaster settings, a systematic framework of case identification, triage, and mental health interventions, including the improvement of positive coping strategies, like the PTG, should be integrated into emergency medicine and trauma care responses. PMID:25893001

  10. Surface displacements following the Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake: One year of continuous monitoring via Robotized Total Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manconi, Andrea; Giordan, Daniele; Allasia, Paolo; Baldo, Marco; Lollino, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of a continuous monitoring of the surface displacements following the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in the area of Paganica village, central Italy. We considered 3-dimensional displacements measured via Robotized Total Station (RTS) installed the April 24th 2009 in the area of Paganica village (ca. 5 km ENE from L'Aquila town), where a water pipeline located within the urban centre was severely damaged. The RTS ran continuously for about one year, with high sampling rates, and measured displacements at selected point targets. The revealed surface displacements are in agreement with the results of a DInSAR time series analysis relevant to satellite SAR data acquired over the same area and time period by the Italian satellite's constellation Cosmo-SkyMed. Moreover, despite the RTS monitored area was spatially limited, our analyses provide detailed feedbacks on fault processes following the L'Aquila earthquake. The aftershocks temporal evolution and the post-seismic displacements measured in the area show very similar exponential decays over time, with estimated cross-correlation coefficients values ranging from 0.86 to 0.97. The results of our time dependent modelling of the RTS measurements suggest that L'Aquila earthquake post-seismic displacements were dominated by the fault afterslip and/or fault creep, while poroelastic and viscoelastic processes had negligible effects.

  11. HZ Her/Her X-1: Study of the light curve dips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igna, Ciprian Dacian

    The HZ Her/Her X-1 X-ray binary exhibits rapid and variable X-ray absorption features. These were noticed soon after the discovery of its periodic flux variations, such as X-ray pulsations and eclipses, and were named light curve dips by Giacconi et al. 1973. Their properties were analyzed, debated and documented ever since. The largest existing set of detailed observations of Her X-1 are contained in the data archive of NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). From this entire light curve, several hundred new light curve dips were documented, based on X-ray Softness Ratio (SR), making this thesis the most extensive study of HZ Her/Her X-1's dips to date. The dips were classified into 12 different categories in order to study their statistical distribution, intensity, duration, symmetry and SR evolution. Some dips properties depend on Her X-1's 35-day X-ray cycle, which is caused by the precessing disk around the neutron star. The 35-day phase of dips was determined using Turn-On (TO) times calculated from the February 1996 - December 2009 RXTE/All Sky Monitor (ASM) light curve. 147 TOs were found by cross-correlation with X-ray cycle templates, and the 22 Burst and Transient Source Experiment TOs were confirmed. Thus this study also has the longest time period yet for the analysis of the 35-day X-ray cycle. The set of 147 TOs does not correlate with 0.2 or 0.7 orbital phases, disproving the reports over the past 30 years. The ASM-based 35-day cycle lengths range from 33.2 to 36.7 days, with an average of 34.7 +/- 0.2 days. The observed timing of dips is illustrated in the 35-day phase vs. orbital phase plot, and compared to models. The current large set of dips gives much better detail than that of Crosa & Boynton 1980. A model for dips is developed here, which takes dips to be caused by blockage of the line of sight to the neutron star by the site of the accretion stream - disk collision. An extensive investigation of the model

  12. Taming the binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, D.

    2008-07-01

    Astrometric binaries are both a gold mine and a nightmare. They are a gold mine because they are sometimes the unique source of orbital inclination for spectroscopic binaries, thus making it possible for astrophysicists to get some clues about the mass of the often invisible secondary. However, this is an ideal situation in the sense that one benefits from the additional knowledge that it is a binary for which some orbital parameters are somehow secured (e.g. the orbital period). On the other hand, binaries are a nightmare, especially when their binary nature is not established yet. Indeed, in such cases, depending on the time interval covered by the observations compared to the orbital period, either the parallax or the proper motion can be severely biased if the successive positions of the binary are modelled assuming it is a single star. With large survey campaigns sometimes monitoring some stars for the first time ever, it is therefore crucial to design robust reduction pipelines in which such troublesome objects are quickly identified and either removed or processed accordingly. Finally, even if an object is known not to be a single star, the binary model might turn out not to be the most appropriate for describing the observations. These different situations will be covered.

  13. The quasi-periodic oscillations and very low frequency noise of Scorpius X-1 as transient chaos - A dripping handrail?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas; Young, Karl; Donoho, David L.; Crutchfield, James P.; Imamura, James

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise (VLFN) characteristic of many accretion sources are different aspects of the same physical process. We analyzed a long, high time resolution EXOSAT observation of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Sco X-1. The X-ray luminosity varies stochastically on time scales from milliseconds to hours. The nature of this variability - as quantified with both power spectrum analysis and a new wavelet technique, the scalegram - agrees well with the dripping handrail accretion model, a simple dynamical system which exhibits transient chaos. In this model both the QPO and VLFN are produced by radiation from blobs with a wide size distribution, resulting from accretion and subsequent diffusion of hot gas, the density of which is limited by an unspecified instability to lie below a threshold.

  14. Quasi-Periodic Variability in NGC 5408 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa; Soria, Roberto; Uttley, Phil; Cropper, Mark

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of quasiperiodic variability in the 0.2 - 10 keV X-ray flux from the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1. The average power spectrum of all EPIC-pn data reveals a strong 20 mHz QPO with an average amplitude (rms) of 9%, and a coherence, Q identical with nu(sub 0)/sigma approximately equal to 6. In a 33 ksec time interval when the 20 mHz QPO is strongest we also find evidence for a 2nd QPO peak at 15 mHz, the first indication for a close pair of QPOs in a ULX source. Interestingly, the frequency ratio of this QPO pair is inconsistent with 3:2 at the 3 sigma level, but is consistent with a 4:3 ratio. A powerlaw noise component with slope near 1.5 is also present below 0.1 Hz with evidence for a break to a flatter slope at about 3 mHz. The source shows substantial broadband variability, with a total amplitude (rms) of about 30% in the 0.1 - 100 mHz frequency band, and there is strong energy dependence to the variability. The power spectrum of hard X-ray photons (greater than 2 keV) shows a "classic" flat-topped continuum breaking to a power law with index 1.5 - 2. Both the break and 20 mHz QPO are detected in the hard band, and the 20 mHz QPO is essentially at the break. The QPO is both strong and narrow in this band, having an amplitude (rms) of 15%, and Q approx. equal to 25. The energy spectrum is well fit by three components, a "cool" disk with kT = 0.15 keV, a steep power law with index 2.56, and a thermal plasma at kT = 0.87 keV. The disk, power law, and thermal plasma components contribute 35, 60, and 5% of the 0.3 - 10 keV flux, respectively. Both the timing and spectral properties of NGC 5408 X-1 are strikingly reminiscent of Galactic black hole systems at high inferred accretion rates, but with its characteristic frequencies (QPO and break frequencies) scaled down by a factor of 10 - 100. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of models for ULXs, and their implications for the object's mass.

  15. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1. 1; Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Vaughan, Brian A.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the broad-band spectrum of Cygnus X-1 from 3.0 to 200 keV, using data from a 10 ksec observation by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The spectrum can be well described phenomenologically by an exponentially cut-off power law with a photon index Gamma = 1.45(+0.01 -0.02) (a value considerably harder 0.02 than typically found), e-folding energy E(sub f) = 162(+9 -8) keV, plus a deviation from a power law that formally can be modeled as a thermal blackbody with temperature kT(sub bb) = 1.2(+0.0 -0.1) keV. Although the 3-30 keV portion of the spectrum can be fit with a reflected power law with Gamma = 1.81 + or - 0.01 and covering fraction f = 0.35 + or - 0.02, the quality of the fit is significantly reduced when the HEXTE data in the 30-100 keV range is included, as there is no observed hardening in the power law within this energy range. As a physical description of this system, we apply the accretion disc corona models of Dove, Wilms & Begelman (1997a) - where the temperature of the corona is determined self-consistently. A spherical corona with a total optical depth pi = 1.6 + or - 0.1 and an average temperature kT(sub c) = 87 + or - 5 keV, surrounded by an exterior cold disc, does provide a good description of the data (X(exp 2 sub red) = 1.55). These models deviate from red the data by up to 7% in the 5 - 10 keV range, and we discuss possible reasons for these discrepancies. However, considering bow successfully the spherical corona reproduces the 10 - 200 keV data, such "pboton-starved" coronal geometries seem very promising for explaining the accretion processes of Cygnus X-1.

  16. The L'Aquila process and the perils of bad communication of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Responsibilities and observance of ethical behaviour by scientists have increased more than ever with the advancement of science and of the social and economic development of a country. Nowadays, geoscientists are often charged by local and/or national and international authorities with the task of providing ways to foster economic development while protecting human life and safeguarding the environment. But besides technical and scientific expertise, in a democratic country all this requires efficient ways and various channels of scientific divulgation. Geoscientists themselves should be involved in these procedures, or at least they should be called to verify that correct communication is actually released. Unfortunately, it seems that awareness of such new and ever-increasing responsibilities is not yet being always realized at a needed level. The question is especially sensible in Italy, a country in which the hydro-geological, seismological, volcanological and coastal set-up requires careful technical and scientific treatment. Given the fragility of the natural system, the role of geoscientists should not be restricted to the delivery of scientific expertise: in fact, and perhaps more than elsewhere, problems are compounded by the need of communication based on sound science not only to governing authorities, but also to the public at large, possibly including also an array of mass media. Many international organizations have been wrongly interpreting the accusation and especially the sentence at the first stage of the L'Aquila process as a problem of impossibility to predict earthquakes. But the recently published motivation of the sentence seems to have brought to light the lack of a scrupulous overview of the situation prior to the disastrous seismic event, practically leaving the task of public information to the judgment or perception of the national agency in charge of natural hazards. It turned out that a major outcome of the process, apart from the

  17. Searches for periodic gravitational waves from unknown isolated sources and Scorpius X-1: Results from the second LIGO science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, B.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, . P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cumming, A.; Cutler, C.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Delker, T.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Ding, H.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissell, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logan, J.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; Nutzman, P.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robison, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Sazonov, A.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strand, N. E.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Takahashi, H.; Takamori, A.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tinto, M.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van Putten, M.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D.. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiley, S.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zaleski, K. D.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2007-10-01

    We carry out two searches for periodic gravitational waves using the most sensitive few hours of data from the second LIGO science run. Both searches exploit fully coherent matched filtering and cover wide areas of parameter space, an innovation over previous analyses which requires considerable algorithm development and computational power. The first search is targeted at isolated, previously unknown neutron stars, covers the entire sky in the frequency band 160 728.8 Hz, and assumes a frequency derivative of less than 4×10-10Hz/s. The second search targets the accreting neutron star in the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1 and covers the frequency bands 464 484 Hz and 604 624 Hz as well as the two relevant binary orbit parameters. Because of the high computational cost of these searches we limit the analyses to the most sensitive 10 hours and 6 hours of data, respectively. Given the limited sensitivity and duration of the analyzed data set, we do not attempt deep follow-up studies. Rather we concentrate on demonstrating the data analysis method on a real data set and present our results as upper limits over large volumes of the parameter space. In order to achieve this, we look for coincidences in parameter space between the Livingston and Hanford 4-km interferometers. For isolated neutron stars our 95% confidence level upper limits on the gravitational wave strain amplitude range from 6.6×10-23 to 1×10-21 across the frequency band; for Scorpius X-1 they range from 1.7×10-22 to 1.3×10-21 across the two 20-Hz frequency bands. The upper limits presented in this paper are the first broadband wide parameter space upper limits on periodic gravitational waves from coherent search techniques. The methods developed here lay the foundations for upcoming hierarchical searches of more sensitive data which may detect astrophysical signals.

  18. Monte Carlo Simulator to Study High Mass X-Ray Binary System

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shin; Nagase, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Sako, Masao; Kahn, Steve M.; Ishida, Manabu; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Paerels, Frederik; /Columbia U.

    2005-07-08

    We have developed a Monte Carlo simulator for astrophysical objects, which incorporate the transportation of X-ray photons in photoionized plasma. We applied the code to X-ray spectra of high mass X-ray binaries, Vela X-1 and GX 301-2, obtained with Chandra HETGS. By utilizing the simulator, we have successfully reproduced many emission lines observed from Vela X-1. The ionization structure and the matter distribution in the Vela X-1 system are deduced. For GX 301-2, we have derived the physical parameters of material surrounding the neutron star from fully resolved shape of the Compton shoulder in the iron K{alpha} line.

  19. Synchrotron and Coulomb Boiler in Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Malzac, Julien; Belmont, Renaud

    2009-05-11

    We use a new code to simulate the radiation and kinetic processes in the X-ray emitting region around accreting black holes and constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona of Cygnus X-1. In the hard state we find a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). On the other hand, our results also point toward proton temperatures that are substantially lower than typical temperatures of the ADAF models. Finally, we show that in both spectral states Comptonising plasma could be powered essentially through power-law acceleration of non-thermal electrons, which are then partly thermalised by the synchrotron and Coulomb boiler. This suggests that, contrary to current beliefs, the corona of the HSS and that of the LHS could be of very similar nature. The differences between the LHS and HSS coronal spectra would then be predominantly caused by the strong disc soft cooling emission which is present in the HSS and absent in the LHS.

  20. Hard X-ray spectrum of Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Marshall, F. E.; Levine, A. M.; Primini, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Long-term measurements of the hard X-ray spectrum from 3 keV to 8 MeV of the black-hole candidate Cygnus X-1 in its low state are reported. Observations were made from October 26 to November 18, 1977 with the A2 (Cosmic X-ray) and A4 (Hard X-ray and Low-Energy Gamma-Ray) experiments on board HEAO 1 in the spacecraft's scanning mode. The measured spectrum below 200 keV is found to agree well with previous spectra which have been fit by a model of the Compton scattering of optical or UV photons in a very hot plasma of electron temperature 32.4 keV and optical depth 3.9 or 1.6 for spherical or disk geometry, respectively. At energies above 300 keV, however, flux excess is observed which may be accounted for by a distribution of electron temperatures from 15 to about 100 keV.

  1. From Binaries to Triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freismuth, T.; Tokovinin, A.

    2002-12-01

    About 10% of all binary systems are close binaries (P<1000 days). Among those with P<10d, over 40% are known to belong to higher-multiplicity systems (triples, quadruples, etc.). Do ALL close systems have tertiary companions? For a selection of 12 nearby, and apparently "single" close binaries with solar-mass dwarf primary components from the 8-th catalogue of spectroscopic binary orbits, images in the B and R filters were taken at the CTIO 0.9m telescope and suitable tertiary candidates were be identified on color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Of the 12 SBs, four were found to have tertiary candidates: HD 67084, HD 120734, HD 93486, and VV Mon. However, none of these candidates were found to be common proper motion companions. Follow up observations using adaptive optics reveal a companion to HD 148704. Future observations are planned.

  2. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  3. Binary Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2006-05-01

    A review of observations and theories regarding binary asteroids and binary trans-Neptunian objects [collectively, binary minor planets (BMPs)] is presented. To date, these objects have been discovered using a combination of direct imaging, lightcurve analysis, and radar. They are found throughout the Solar System, and present a challenge for theorists modeling their formation in the context of Solar System evolution. The most promising models invoke rotational disruption for the smallest, shortest-lived objects (the asteroids nearest to Earth), consistent with the observed fast rotation of these bodies; impacts for the larger, longer-lived asteroids in the main belt, consistent with the range of size ratios of their components and slower rotation rates; and mutual capture for the distant, icy, trans-Neptunian objects, consistent with their large component separations and near-equal sizes. Numerical simulations have successfully reproduced key features of the binaries in the first two categories; the third remains to be investigated in detail.

  4. Binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve; Goodman, Jeremy; Mateo, Mario; Phinney, E. S.; Pryor, Carlton; Richer, Harvey B.; Verbunt, Frank; Weinberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that globular clusters contain a substantial number of binaries most of which are believed to be primordial. We discuss different successful optical search techniques, based on radial-velocity variables, photometric variables, and the positions of stars in the color-magnitude diagram. In addition, we review searches in other wavelengths, which have turned up low-mass X-ray binaries and more recently a variety of radio pulsars. On the theoretical side, we give an overview of the different physical mechanisms through which individual binaries evolve. We discuss the various simulation techniques which recently have been employed to study the effects of a primordial binary population, and the fascinating interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics which drives globular-cluster evolution.

  5. Binary technetium halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Erik Vaughan

    In this work, the synthetic and coordination chemistry as well as the physico-chemical properties of binary technetium (Tc) chlorides, bromides, and iodides were investigated. Resulting from these studies was the discovery of five new binary Tc halide phases: alpha/beta-TcCl3, alpha/beta-TcCl 2, and TcI3, and the reinvestigation of the chemistries of TcBr3 and TcX4 (X = Cl, Br). Prior to 2009, the chemistry of binary Tc halides was poorly studied and defined by only three compounds, i.e., TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. Today, ten phases are known (i.e., TcF6, TcF5, TcCl4, TcBr 4, TcBr3, TcI3, alpha/beta-TcCl3 and alpha/beta-TcCl2) making the binary halide system of Tc comparable to those of its neighboring elements. Technetium binary halides were synthesized using three methods: reactions of the elements in sealed tubes, reactions of flowing HX(g) (X = Cl, Br, and I) with Tc2(O2CCH3)4Cl2, and thermal decompositions of TcX4 (X = Cl, Br) and alpha-TcCl 3 in sealed tubes under vacuum. Binary Tc halides can be found in various dimensionalities such as molecular solids (TcF6), extended chains (TcF5, TcCl4, alpha/beta-TcCl2, TcBr 3, TcI3), infinite layers (beta-TcCl3), and bidimensional networks of clusters (alpha-TcCl3); eight structure-types with varying degrees of metal-metal interactions are now known. The coordination chemistry of Tc binary halides can resemble that of the adjacent elements: molybdenum and ruthenium (beta-TcCl3, TcBr3, TcI 3), rhenium (TcF5, alpha-TcCl3), platinum (TcCl 4, TcBr4), or can be unique (alpha-TcCl2 and beta-TcCl 2) in respect to other known transition metal binary halides. Technetium binary halides display a range of interesting physical properties that are manifested from their electronic and structural configurations. The thermochemistry of binary Tc halides is extensive. These compounds can selectively volatilize, decompose, disproportionate, or convert to other phases. Ultimately, binary Tc halides may find application in the nuclear fuel

  6. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  7. Scattering from binary optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Douglas W.

    1993-01-01

    There are a number of sources of scattering in binary optics: etch depth errors, line edge errors, quantization errors, roughness, and the binary approximation to the ideal surface. These sources of scattering can be systematic (deterministic) or random. In this paper, scattering formulas for both systematic and random errors are derived using Fourier optics. These formulas can be used to explain the results of scattering measurements and computer simulations.

  8. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  9. SAS 3 observations of Cygnus X-1 - The intensity dips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Canizares, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    In general, the dips are observed to occur near superior conjunctions of the X-ray source, but one pair of 2-minute dips occurs when the X-ray source is closer to the observer than is the supergiant companion. The dips are analyzed spectrally with the aid of seven energy channels in the range 1.2-50 keV. Essentially, there is no change in the spectral index during the dips. Reductions in the count rates are observed at energies exceeding 6 keV for some of the dips, but the dip amplitude is always significantly greater in the 1.2-3 keV band. It is believed that absorption by partially ionized gas may best explain these results, since the observations of Pravdo et al. (1980) rule out absorption by unionized material. Estimates for the intervening gas density, extent, and distance from the X-ray source are presented. Attention is also given to the problems confronting the models for the injection of gas through the line of sight, believed to be inclined by approximately 30 deg from the binary pole.

  10. The Microquasar Cyg X-1: A Short Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, M. A.; Wilms, J.; Hanke, M.; Pottschmidt, K.; Markoff, S.

    2011-01-01

    We review the spectral properties of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-I. Specifically, we discuss two recent sets of multi-satellite observations. One comprises a 0.5-500 keY spectrum, obtained with eve!)' flying X-ray satellite at that time, that is among the hardest Cyg X-I spectra observed to date. The second set is comprised of 0.5-40 keV Chandra-HETG plus RXTE-PCA spectra from a radio-quiet, spectrally soft state. We first discuss the "messy astrophysics" often neglected in the study of Cyg X-I, i.e., ionized absorption from the wind of the secondary and the foreground dust scattering halo. We then discuss components common to both state extremes: a low temperature accretion disk, and a relativistically broadened Fe line and reflection. Hard state spectral models indicate that the disk inner edge does not extend beyond > or approx.= 40 GM/sq c , and may even approach as close as approx. = 6GM/sq c. The soft state exhibits a much more prominent disk component; however, its very low normalization plausibly indicates a spinning black hole in the Cyg X-I system. Key words. accretion, accretion disks - black hole physics - X-rays:binaries

  11. Cygnus X-1: A Case for a Magnetic Accretion Disk?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Dove, J.; Wilms, J.

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), which is capable of broad spectral coverage and fast timing, as well as other instruments which are increasingly being used in multi-wavelength campaigns (via both space-based and ground-based observations), we must demand more of our theoretical models. No current model mimics all facets of a system as complex as an x-ray binary. However, a modern theory should qualitatively reproduce - or at the very least not fundamentally disagree with - all of Cygnus X-l's most basic average properties: energy spectrum (viewed within a broader framework of black hole candidate spectral behavior), power spectrum (PSD), and time delays and coherence between variability in different energy bands. Below we discuss each of these basic properties in turn, and we assess the health of one of the currently popular theories: Comptonization of photons from a cold disk. We find that the data pose substantial challenges for this theory, as well as all other in currently discussed models.

  12. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in cluster-forming clumps of the Aquila Rift complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe; Maury, Anaëlle

    2015-08-01

    One of the main goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (André et al. 2010) is to elucidate the physicalmechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores in molecular clouds. In theAquila cloud complex imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70-500 μm, we have recently identifieda complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them are gravitationally-bound prestellar cores, likelyforming stars in the future. We also detected 58 protostellar cores (Könyves et al. 2010 and 2015, subm.- see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives). This region is dominated by two (proto)clusters which arecurrently active sites of clustered star formation (SF): the filamentary Serpens South cloud and the W40HII region. The latter is powered by massive young stars, and a 2nd-generation SF can be witnessed inthe surroundings (Maury et al. 2011).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in Aquila and suggest aclose connection between them and the formation process of prestellar cores, where both structures arehighly concentrated around the protoclusters. About 10-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filamentsbelow Av~7, while ~50-75% of the dense gas mass above Av~7-10 is in filamentary structures.Furthermore, ~90% of our prestellar cores are located above a background column density correspondingto Av~7, and ~75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unitlength >16 M⊙/pc. Indeed, a strong correlation is found between the spatial distribution of prestellar coresand the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects found by Spitzerin the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~1 Myr for the formation and evolution of bothprestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in Aquila support a filamentary paradigm for the early stages of SF,where the cores result from the gravitational fragmentation

  13. Hard X-ray component in the Sco X-1 spectrum: Synchrotron emission from a nono-quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.

    Sco X-1 is a low mass X-ray binary system and is the very first X-ray source to be discovered in 1962. From the recent observation of a resolved radio jet the souce has been included in the list of galactic microquasars. The observed spectral data in the 2-20 keV energy band fits a Free-free emission from a hot plasma. Above 20 keV, a hard tail has been reported on occasions. During our continuuing balloon borne X-ray survey in the 20-200 keV region using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment, Sco X-1 was observed on two different occasions. Eventhough the total X-ray luminosity of the source different, the spectral nature of the source did not show any variation. The presence of hard X-ray flux is unmistakable. We present the spectra data in the hard X-ray band and discuss the results in terms of geometrical characteristics of the X-ray source and the observed temporal variations. It is proposed that while a core activity is similar to the micro-quasars, the absence of abrupt changes similar to GRS 1915+105, in the CGRO and RXTE data suggest a with much reduced magnitude.

  14. Confirmation via the continuum-fitting method that the spin of the black hole in Cygnus X-1 is extreme

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Lijun; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Steiner, James F.; Reid, Mark J.; Narayan, Ramesh; García, Javier; Remillard, Ronald A.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Hanke, Manfred

    2014-07-20

    In Gou et al., we reported that the black hole primary in the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 is a near-extreme Kerr black hole with a spin parameter a{sub *} > 0.95 (3σ). We confirm this result while setting a new and more stringent limit: a{sub *} > 0.983 at the 3σ (99.7%) confidence level. The earlier work, which was based on an analysis of all three useful spectra that were then available, was possibly biased by the presence in these spectra of a relatively strong Compton power-law component: the fraction of the thermal seed photons scattered into the power law was f{sub s} = 23%-31%, while the upper limit for reliable application of the continuum-fitting method is f{sub s} ≲ 25%. We have subsequently obtained six additional spectra of Cygnus X-1 suitable for the measurement of spin. Five of these spectra are of high quality with f{sub s} in the range 10%-19%, a regime where the continuum-fitting method has been shown to deliver reliable results. Individually, the six spectra give lower limits on the spin parameter that range from a{sub *} > 0.95 to a{sub *} > 0.98, allowing us to conservatively conclude that the spin of the black hole is a{sub *} > 0.983 (3σ).

  15. Spectral and temporal properties of the X-ray pulsar SMC X-1 at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, M.; Gruber, D. E.; Kendziorra, E .; Kretschmar, P.; Maisack, M.; Mony, B.; Staubert, R.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Pietsch, W.

    1993-01-01

    The binary X-ray pulsar SMC X- 1 has been observed at hard X-rays with the High Energy X-Ray Experiment (HEXE) on nine occasions between Nov. 1987 and March 1989. A thin thermal bremsstrahlung fit to the phase averaged spectrum yields a plasma temperature (14.4 +/- 1.3) keV and a luminosity above (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 10 exp 38 erg/s in the 20-80 keV band. Pulse period values have been established for three observations, confirming the remarkably stable spin-up trend of SMC X-1. In one of the three observations the pulse profile was seen to deviate from a dominant double pulsation, while at the same time the pulsed fraction was unusually large. For one observation we determined for the first time the pulsed fraction in narrow energy bands. It increases with photon energy from about 20 percent up to over 60 percent in the energy range from 20 to 80 keV.

  16. NuSTAR AND SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE HARD STATE IN CYGNUS X-1: LOCATING THE INNER ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M. L.; Lohfink, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Alston, W. N.; Kara, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Miller, J. M.; Yamaoka, K.; Nowak, M.; Grinberg, V.; Christensen, F. E.; Fürst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; King, A. L.; Stern, D.; and others

    2015-07-20

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broadband spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, instead requiring a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of García et al. to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3σ confidence level. In addition, we find that the line profile has not changed greatly in the switch from soft to hard states, and that the differences are consistent with changes in the underlying reflection spectrum rather than the relativistic blurring. We find that the blurring parameters are consistent when fitting either just the iron line or the entire broadband spectrum, which is well modeled with a Comptonized continuum plus reflection model.

  17. The Swift-BAT monitoring reveals a long-term decay of the cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; D'Aì, A.

    2016-11-01

    We study the behaviour of the cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) of the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 using the long-term hard X-ray monitoring performed by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift. High-statistics, intensity-selected spectra were built along 11 years of BAT survey. While the fundamental line is not revealed, the second harmonic of the CRSF can be clearly detected in all the spectra, at an energy varying between ˜53 and ˜58 keV, directly correlated with the luminosity. We have further investigated the evolution of the CRSF in time, by studying the intensity-selected spectra built along four 33-month time intervals along the survey. For the first time, we find in this source a secular variation in the CRSF energy: independent of the source luminosity, the CRSF second harmonic energy decreases by ˜0.36 keV yr-1 between the first and the third time intervals, corresponding to an apparent decay of the magnetic field of ˜3 × 1010 G yr-1. The intensity-cyclotron energy pattern is consistent between the third and the last time intervals. A possible interpretation for this decay could be the settling of an accreted mound that produces either a distortion of the poloidal magnetic field on the polar cap or a geometrical displacement of the line forming region. This hypothesis seems supported by the correspondence between the rate of the line shift per unit accreted mass and the mass accreted on the polar cap per unit area in Vela X-1 and Her X-1, respectively.

  18. Determination of Black Hole Mass in Cyg X-1 by Scaling of Spectral Index-QPO Frequency Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that timing and spectral properties of Galactic Black Hole (BH) X-ray binaries (XRB) are strongly correlated. In particular, it has been shown that low frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) nu(sub low) - photon index GAMMA correlation curves have a specific pattern. In a number of the sources studied the shape of the index-low frequency QPO correlations are self-similar with a position offset in the nu(sub low) - GAMMA plane determined by a BH mass M(sub BH). Specifically, Titarchuk & Fiorito (2004) gave strong theoretical and observational arguments that the QPO frequency values in this nu(sub low) - GAMMA correlation should be inversely proportional to M(sub BH). A simple translation of the correlation for a given source along frequency axis leads to the observed correlation for another source. As a result of this translation one can obtain a scaling factor which is simply a BH mass ratio for these particular sources. This property of the correlations offers a fundamentally new method for BH mass determination in XRBs. Here we use the observed QPO-index correlations observed in three BH sources: GRO J1655-40, GRS 1915+105 and Cyg X-1. The BH mass of (6.3 plus or minus 0.5) solar mass in GRO J1655-40 is obtained using optical observations. RXTE observations during the recent 2005 outburst yielded sufficient data to establish the correlation pattern during both rise and decay of the event. We use GRO J1655-40 as a standard reference source to measure the BH mass in Cyg X-1. We also revisit the GRS 1915+105 data as a further test of our scaling method. We obtain the BH mass in Cyg X-1 in the range 7.6-9.9.

  19. Energy-dependent evolution in IC10 X-1: hard evidence for an extended corona and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.; Steiner, J. F.; Prestwich, A. F.; Stevens, I. R.; Clark, J. S.; Kolb, U. C.

    2014-09-10

    We have analyzed a ∼130 ks XMM-Newton observation of the dynamically confirmed black hole + Wolf-Rayet (BH+WR) X-ray binary (XB) IC10 X-1, covering ∼1 orbital cycle. This system experiences periodic intensity dips every ∼35 hr. We find that energy-independent evolution is rejected at a >5σ level. The spectral and timing evolution of IC10 X-1 are best explained by a compact disk blackbody and an extended Comptonized component, where the thermal component is completely absorbed and the Comptonized component is partially covered during the dip. We consider three possibilities for the absorber: cold material in the outer accretion disk, as is well documented for Galactic neutron star (NS) XBs at high inclination; a stream of stellar wind that is enhanced by traveling through the L1 point; and a spherical wind. We estimated the corona radius (r {sub ADC}) for IC10 X-1 from the dip ingress to be ∼10{sup 6} km, assuming absorption from the outer disk, and found it to be consistent with the relation between r {sub ADC} and 1-30 keV luminosity observed in Galactic NS XBs that spans two orders of magnitude. For the other two scenarios, the corona would be larger. Prior BH mass (M {sub BH}) estimates range over 23-38 M {sub ☉}, depending on the inclination and WR mass. For disk absorption, the inclination, i, is likely to be ∼60-80°, with M {sub BH} ∼ 24-41 M {sub ☉}. Alternatively, the L1-enhanced wind requires i ∼ 80°, suggesting ∼24-33 M {sub ☉}. For a spherical absorber, i ∼ 40°, and M {sub BH} ∼ 50-65 M {sub ☉}.

  20. Anisotropy of partially self-absorbed jets and the jet of Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Paul, Debdutta; Osborne, Ruaraidh; Rao, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the angular dependence of the flux from partially synchrotron self-absorbed conical jets (proposed by Blandford & Königl). We consider the jet viewed from either a side or close to on axis, and in the latter case, either from the jet top or bottom. We derive analytical formulae for the flux in each of these cases, and find the exact solution for an arbitrary angle numerically. We find that the maximum of the emission occurs when the jet is viewed from top on-axis, which is contrast to a previous result, which found the maximum at some intermediate angle and null emission on-axis. We then calculate the ratio of the jet-to-counterjet emission for this model, which depends on the viewing angle and the index of power-law electrons. We apply our results to the black hole binary Cyg X-1. Given the jet-to-counterjet flux ratio of ≳ 50 found observationally and the current estimates of the inclination, we find the jet velocity to be ≳0.8c. We also point out that when the projection effect is taken into account, the radio observations imply the jet half-opening angle of ≲ 1°, a half of the value given before. When combined with the existing estimates of Γj, the jet half-opening angle is low, ≪1/Γj, and much lower than values observed in blazars, unless Γj is much higher than currently estimated.

  1. The doubling of the superorbital period of Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Pooley, Guy G.; Skinner, Gerald K.

    2011-04-01

    We study properties of the superorbital modulation of the X-ray emission of Cyg X-1. We find that it has had a stable period of ˜300 d in soft and hard X-rays and in radio since 2005 until at least 2010, which is about double the previously seen period. This new period, seen in the hard spectral state only, is detected not only in the light curves but also in soft X-ray hardness ratios and in the amplitude of the orbital modulation. On the other hand, the spectral slope in hard X-rays, ≳20 keV, averaged over superorbital bins is constant, and the soft and hard X-rays and the radio emission change in phase. This shows that the superorbital variability consists of changing the normalization of an intrinsic spectrum of a constant shape and of changes of the absorbing column density with the phase. The maximum column density is achieved at the superorbital minimum. The amplitude changes are likely to be caused by a changing viewing angle of an anisotropic emitter, most likely a precessing accretion disc. The constant shape of the intrinsic spectrum shows that this modulation is not caused by a changing accretion rate. The modulated absorbing column density shows the presence of a bulge at the disc edge, as proposed previously. We also find the change of the superorbital period from ˜150 to ˜300 d to be associated with almost unchanged average X-ray fluxes, making the period change difficult to explain in the framework of disc-irradiation models. Finally, we find no correlation of the X-ray and radio properties with the reported detections in the GeV and TeV γ-ray range.

  2. Calculations of α/γ phase boundaries in Fe-C-X1X2 systems from the central atoms model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Aaronson, H. I.; Enomoto, M.

    1995-03-01

    The α/γ phase boundaries in Fe-C-X1-X2 quaternary alloys (where X1 = Mn and X2 = Si, Ni, and Co, successively) are calculated from the Central Atoms model, as generalized to multi-component systems by Foo and Lupis. The interaction parameters are evaluated from the Wagner interaction parameters in ternary iron alloys reported in the literature or estimated from the interaction parameters in binary alloys. Two equilibrium conditions, para- and ortho-equilibrium, are utilized. In the Fe-C-Mn-Si system, a mixed state of equilibrium, in which orthoequilibrium is achieved with respect to C and Si while the other two substitutional elements (Fe and Mn) are assumed to be immobile (paraequilibrium), is also considered. The calculated phase boundaries are employed to evaluate the free energy change for the nucleation and the growth kinetics of proeutectoid ferrite in these alloys in companion articles.

  3. Solar System binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    The discovery of binaries in each of the major populations of minor bodies in the solar system is propelling a rapid growth of heretofore unattainable physical information. The availability of mass and density constraints for minor bodies opens the door to studies of internal structure, comparisons with meteorite samples, and correlations between bulk-physical and surface-spectral properties. The number of known binaries is now more than 70 and is growing rapidly. A smaller number have had the extensive followup observations needed to derive mass and albedo information, but this list is growing as well. It will soon be the case that we will know more about the physical parameters of objects in the Kuiper Belt than has been known about asteroids in the Main Belt for the last 200 years. Another important aspect of binaries is understanding the mechanisms that lead to their formation and survival. The relative sizes and separations of binaries in the different minor body populations point to more than one mechanism for forming bound pairs. Collisions appear to play a major role in the Main Belt. Rotational and/or tidal fission may be important in the Near Earth population. For the Kuiper Belt, capture in multi-body interactions may be the preferred formation mechanism. However, all of these conclusions remain tentative and limited by observational and theoretical incompleteness. Observational techniques for identifying binaries are equally varied. High angular resolution observations from space and from the ground are critical for detection of the relatively distant binaries in the Main Belt and the Kuiper Belt. Radar has been the most productive method for detection of Near Earth binaries. Lightcurve analysis is an independent technique that is capable of exploring phase space inaccessible to direct observations. Finally, spacecraft flybys have played a crucial paradigm-changing role with discoveries that unlocked this now-burgeoning field.

  4. Rupture Process of the 2009 L’Aquila, Italy, Earthquake Inferred from the Inversion of Multiple Seismological Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Koketsu, K.; Vuan, A.; Miyake, H.

    2009-12-01

    The L'Aquila, Central Italy earthquake, occurred on April 6, 2009 at 01:32:40 UTC time. This Mw 6.3 (Global CMT) event caused large damages to the city of L'Aquila and surrounding villages of the Abruzzi region. Event was followed by a significant aftershock activity that extended over the length exceeding 30 km in NW-SE direction. According to the moment tensor solution, the earthquake was generated by a normal faulting on a fault system running parallel to the axis of the Apennine mountains. The aftershock distribution (Amato et al., 2009) and the previous studies of the active faults in the area (e.g., Salvi et al., 2003) suggest that the fault activated during the mainshock is a NW-SE oriented structure dipping towards the southwest. The updated epicenter location is reported by INGV, Rome to be 2 km away from the city of L'Aquila. A detailed study of the source process of this event is essential for understanding the observed macrosesmic effects and the relation between the causative fault and the aftershock activity. We develop a rupture model for the L'Aquila event by analyzing the teleseismic waveform data of IRIS-DMC and strong motion records from the Italian Strong Motion Network (RAN). To estimate the general pattern of the source rupture area and determine the hypocentral depth, we have performed the moment tensor analysis as well as the source inversion of broadband teleseismic records using the methods developed by Kikuchi and Kanamori (1982, 1991), Kikuchi et al. (2003), and Yoshida et al. (1996). Based on the aftershock study, we assumed that the rupture occurred on the SW dipping fault plane with the dimensions of 25 km in length by 15 km in width. We also assumed strike = 148 deg and dip = 44 deg, based on the residuals of the point source analysis and the aftershock distribution. The optimal depth that maximizes the waveform fit was found to be 6 km. The total seismic moment corresponds to 3.10 x 10**18 Nm. The inverted slip model shows one main

  5. The self-built ecovillage in L'Aquila, Italy: community resilience as a grassroots response to environmental shock.

    PubMed

    Fois, Francesca; Forino, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    The paper applies the community resilience approach to the post-disaster case of Pescomaggiore, an Italian village affected by the L'Aquila earthquake in 2009. A group of residents refused to accept the housing recovery solutions proposed by the government, opting for autonomous recovery. They developed a housing project in the form of a self-built ecovillage, characterised by earthquake-proof buildings made of straw and wood. The project is a paradigmatic example of a community-based response to an external shock. It illustrates the concept of 'community resilience', which is widely explored in the scientific debate but still vaguely defined. Based on qualitative methodologies, the paper seeks to understand how the community resilience process can be enacted in alternative social practices such as ecovillages. The goal is to see under which conditions natural disasters can be considered windows of opportunity for sustainability.

  6. RUPTURE PROPAGATION AND DAMAGE DISTRIBUTION FOR THE Mw 6.3 APRIL 6, 2009 L’AQUILA EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, S.; Koper, K. D.; Herrmann, R. B.; Akinci, A.; Malagnini, L.

    2009-12-01

    We present rupture details of the Mw6.3 April 6, 2009 L’Aquila earthquake derived by back-projecting teleseismic P waves from a virtual seismic array. The technique that we use has previously been applied to large magnitude earthquakes, but here we report the first application to a moderate size earthquake, showing that it is possible to image teleseismically the finiteness of the source. We used waveforms from about 60 broadband seismic stations from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) data center. The traces were aligned and normalized by using a multi-channel cross-correlation algorithm. We evaluated the array response function and used the 4th root staking in our analysis. We found that the L’Aquila earthquake ruptured toward the east and that it had two different pulses about 4 s and 18 s after the origin time. The rupture moved with a velocity of about 2 km/s. These results are in good agreement with the results obtained using satellite data and with the ones obtained by INGV geodesists. They are also consistent with the INGV earthquake survey. The major damage was also a located east of the epicenter and the specific distribution of damage is in agreement with the energy bursts detected in this paper. The back-projection technique is potentially very fast and it is possible to obtain an image of the rupture process within 20-30 minutes of the origin time. This information can be important to governmental agencies in order to guide emergency response and rescue together with other traditional methods such us ShakeMap.

  7. S.S. Annunziata Church (L'Aquila, Italy) unveiled by non- and micro-destructive testing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, Stefano; Cheilakou, Eleni; Theodorakeas, Panagiotis; Paoletti, Domenica; Koui, Maria

    2017-03-01

    The present research work explores the potential of an integrated inspection methodology, combining Non-destructive testing and micro-destructive analytical techniques, for both the structural assessment of the S.S. Annunziata Church located in Roio Colle (L'Aquila, Italy) and the characterization of its wall paintings' pigments. The study started by applying passive thermal imaging for the structural monitoring of the church before and after the application of a consolidation treatment, while active thermal imaging was further used for assessing this consolidation procedure. After the earthquake of 2009, which seriously damaged the city of L'Aquila and its surroundings, part of the internal plaster fell off revealing the presence of an ancient mural painting that was subsequently investigated by means of a combined analytical approach involving portable VIS-NIR fiber optics diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) and laboratory methods, such as environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The results obtained from the thermographic analysis provided information concerning the two different constrictive phases of the Church, enabled the assessment of the consolidation treatment, and contributed to the detection of localized problems mainly related to the rising damp phenomenon and to biological attack. In addition, the results obtained from the combined analytical approach allowed the identification of the wall painting pigments (red and yellow ochre, green earth, and smalt) and provided information on the binding media and the painting technique possibly applied by the artist. From the results of the present study, it is possible to conclude that the joint use of the above stated methods into an integrated methodology can produce the complete set of useful information required for the planning of the Church's restoration

  8. Radio observations of comet C/2012 X1 LINEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, A.; Howell, E.

    2014-07-01

    We obtained radio OH spectra of comet C/2012 X1 LINEAR between 03 November 2013 and 13 January 2014 with the 305-m Gordon Telescope at Arecibo Observatory. Spectra at 1667 and 1665 MHz (18-cm wavelength) were obtained with an on-sky beam size of 2.9' and spectral resolution of 0.1 km s^{-1}, on most occasions mapping 7 positions of the OH coma within 4' of the nucleus. The observation range spans heliocentric distances from 2.2 au down to 1.7 au pre-perihelion, and geocentric distances ranging from 2.8-2.2 au, yielding a resolution of 300-400,000 km at the comet. Radio OH spectra are seen via a λ-doublet, with the excitation of the lines depending on the heliocentric velocity of the comet, changing the relative velocity of the cometary gas with respect to the UV spectrum of the Sun. We interpret the spectra via a vectorial Monte Carlo model, taking into account the OH inversion predictions of Despois et al. [1] as well as Schleicher & A'Hearn [2]. In highly productive comets, larger coma densities thermalize the line excitation, reducing the observed line strength near the nucleus. We treat this collisional quenching following that outlined by Schloerb [3] and Gérard [4]. Mapping observations can directly constrain the radius within which quenching is active, and thus yield a more accurate estimate of the gas production rate. Radio observations at high spectral resolution place excellent constraints on the gas outflow velocity in cometary comae. Best-fit models for these observations, processed based on spectra binned to a resolution of 0.34 km s^{-1}, yield gas outflow velocity of 0.78 ± 0.03 km s^{-1}, typical for comets outside 1 au heliocentric distance, and consistent with those of Tseng et al. [5]. Gas production rates differ by 20-30 percent for the two inversion models, but range between 2 × 10^{28} and 4 × 10^{28} mol s^{-1}, also similar to other comets observed at these heliocentric distances. We will present spectral line maps for these

  9. Pulsations in the atmosphere of the rapidly oscillating Ap star 10Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, M.; Kochukhov, O.; Ryabchikova, T.; Huber, D.; Leone, F.; Bagnulo, S.; Weiss, W. W.

    2008-09-01

    The rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star 10Aquilae (10Aql) shows one of the lowest photometric pulsation amplitudes and is characterized by an unusual spectroscopic pulsational behaviour compared to other roAp stars. In summer 2006 this star became target of an intense observing campaign, that combined ground-based spectroscopy with space photometry obtained with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations Stars) satellite. More than 1000 spectra were taken during seven nights over a time-span of 21d with high-resolution spectrographs at the 8-m European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) and 3.6-m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) giving access to radial velocity variations of about 150 lines from different chemical species. A comparison of pulsation signatures in lines formed at different atmospheric heights allowed us to resolve the vertical structure of individual pulsation modes in 10Aql which is the first time for a multiperiodic roAp star. Taking advantage of the clear oscillation patterns seen in a number of rare earth ions and using the contemporaneous MOST photometry to resolve aliasing in the radial velocity measurements, we improve also the determination of pulsation frequencies. The inferred propagation of pulsation waves in 10Aql is qualitatively similar to other roAp stars: pulsation amplitudes become measurable in the layers where Y and Eu are concentrated, increase in layers where the Hα core is formed, reach a maximum of 200-300ms-1 in the layers probed by Ce, Sm, Dy lines and then decrease to 20-50ms-1 in the layers where NdIII and PrIII lines are formed. A unique pulsation feature of 10Aql is a second pulsation maximum indicated by TbIII lines which form in the uppermost atmospheric layers and oscillate with amplitudes of up to 350ms-1. The dramatic decline of pulsations in the atmospheric layers probed by the strong PrIII and NdIII lines accounts for the apparent peculiarity of 10Aql when compared to other roAp stars. The phase

  10. Multi-scale electromagnetic imaging of the Monte Aquila Fault (Agri Valley, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Sabatino; Romano, Gerardo; Balasco, Marianna; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Siniscalchi, Agata

    2010-05-01

    The Agri Valley is a NW-SE trending intermontane basin formed during the Quaternary times along the axial zone of the Southern Apennines thrust belt chain. This basin is about 30 Km long and 12 Km wide and is filled by Quaternary continental deposits, which cover down-thrown pre-Quaternary rocks of the Apennines chain. The Agri Valley was hit by the M 7.0, 1857 Basilicata earthquake (Branno et al., 1985), whose macroseismic field covered a wide sector of the Southern Apennines chain. The latest indications of Late Quaternary faulting processes in Agri Valley were reported in Maschio et al., (2005), which documented a unknown NE-dipping normal fault thanks to the finding of small-scale morphological features of recent tectonic activity. The identified structure was termed Monte Aquila Fault (MAF) and corresponds to the southern strand of the NW-SE trending Monti della Maddalena Fault System (Maschio et al., 2005; Burrato and Valensise, 2007). The NE-dipping MAF consists of a main northern segment, about 10 Km long, and two smaller segments with cumulate length of ~10 Km, thus bringing the total length to ~20 Km. The three segments are arranged in a right-stepping en-echelon pattern and are characterized by subtle geomorphic features. In order to provide more detailed and accurate information about the MAF, a strategy based on the application of complementary investigation tools was employed. In particular, multi-scale electromagnetic investigation, including Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Magnetotelluric (MT) methods, was used to image the MAF from near-surface to several hundred metres depth. Large-scale MT investigation proved to be useful in detecting the MAF location down to several hundred meters depth, but it didn't show any shallow evidence about MAF. Conversely, ERT and GPR surveys evidenced signatures of normal-faulting activity at shallow depth (e.g., back-tilting of the bedrock, colluvial wedges, etc.). In

  11. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2008-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5 M⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44) orbit around an unevolved companion.

  12. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  13. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  14. Critical lines for a generalized three state binary gas-liquid lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Paul H. E.; Keskin, Mustafa; Pegg, Ian L.

    1988-02-01

    The critical properties of several compressible binary gas-liquid models are described: the three state lattice gas, the Tompa model for polymer solutions, the van der Waals equation for binary mixtures, and an intermediate model. The critical lines are expressed as functions of x1 and x2, the density of type 1 molecules and the density of type 2 molecules, instead of using the pressure and temperature; representative figures are given for each of the models. The general conditions for criticality, stability, and tricriticality are given as functions of x1 and x2 through the intermediary of the spinodal temperature function T(x1,x2). A closed form solution is given for the Berthelot case (geometrical-mean combining rule). All the models exhibit a characteristic intersection of two critical lines, and the behavior near this point is investigated. In the van der Waals case we confirm the coordinates given by van Laar.

  15. Identification list of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov,, O.; Karchevsky,, A.; Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.

    The Identification List of Binaries (ILB) is a star catalogue constructed to facilitate cross-referencing between different catalogues of binary stars. As of 2015, it comprises designations for approximately 120,000 double/multiple systems. ILB contains star coordinates and cross-references to the Bayer/Flemsteed, DM (BD/CD/CPD), HD, HIP, ADS, WDS, CCDM, TDSC, GCVS, SBC9, IGR (and some other X-ray catalogues), PSR designations, as well as identifications in the recently developed BSDB system. ILB eventually became a part of the BDB stellar database.

  16. On Filtered Binary Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    BINARY PROCESSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) R.F. Pawula and S.O. Rice 13s. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED.!14 DATE OF REPORT MY,, o.. Day) 15. PAGE COUNT...APR EDITION OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE eO R.TR. 85-0055 On Filtered Binary Processes R . F. Pawula ...is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for governmental purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation ",."/ hereon. R. F. Pawula is with

  17. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2005-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1700. There are now 80 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 103 pulsars in 24 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights have been the discovery of the first ever double pulsar system and a recent flurry of discoveries in globular clusters, in particular Terzan 5.

  18. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    We present preliminary results of our implementation of a novel electrophoresis separation technique: Binary Oscillatory Cross flow Electrophoresis (BOCE). The technique utilizes the interaction of two driving forces, an oscillatory electric field and an oscillatory shear flow, to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged species. Analytical and numerical studies have indicated that this technique is capable of separating proteins with electrophoretic mobilities differing by less than 10%. With an experimental device containing a separation chamber 20 cm long, 5 cm wide, and 1 mm thick, an order of magnitude increase in throughput over commercially available electrophoresis devices is theoretically possible.

  19. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    One ingredient in an empirical birthrate estimate for pulsar binaries is the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. The current estimates for pulsar binary birthrates are based on an average value of beaming fractions for only two pulsars, i.e., PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. In this paper, we revisit the observed pulsar binaries to examine the sensitivity of birthrate predictions to different assumptions regarding opening angle and alignment. Based on empirical estimates for the relative likelihood of different beam half-opening angles and misalignment angles between the pulsar rotation and magnetic axes, we calculate an effective beaming correction factor, f{sub b,eff}, whose reciprocal is equivalent to the average fraction of all randomly selected pulsars that point toward us. For those pulsars without any direct beam geometry constraints, we find that f{sub b,eff} is likely to be smaller than 6, a canonically adopted value when calculating birthrates of Galactic pulsar binaries. We calculate f{sub b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. As in previous estimates of the posterior probability density function P(R) for pulsar binary birthrates R, PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545 still significantly contribute to, if not dominate, the Galactic birthrate of tight pulsar-neutron star (NS) and pulsar-white dwarf (WD) binaries, respectively. Our median posterior present-day birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries given a preferred pulsar population model and beaming geometry are 89 Myr{sup -1}, 0.5 Myr{sup -1}, and 34 Myr{sup -1}, respectively. For long-lived PSR-NS binaries, these estimates include a weak (x1.6) correction for slowly decaying star formation in the galactic disk. For pulsars

  20. Binary coding for hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chang, Chein-I.; Chang, Chein-Chi; Lin, Chinsu

    2004-10-01

    Binary coding is one of simplest ways to characterize spectral features. One commonly used method is a binary coding-based image software system, called Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for remotely sensed imagery developed by Mazer et al. For a given spectral signature, the SPAM calculates its spectral mean and inter-band spectral difference and uses them as thresholds to generate a binary code word for this particular spectral signature. Such coding scheme is generally effective and also very simple to implement. This paper revisits the SPAM and further develops three new SPAM-based binary coding methods, called equal probability partition (EPP) binary coding, halfway partition (HP) binary coding and median partition (MP) binary coding. These three binary coding methods along with the SPAM well be evaluated for spectral discrimination and identification. In doing so, a new criterion, called a posteriori discrimination probability (APDP) is also introduced for performance measure.

  1. Eclipsing Binary Update, No. 2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    Contents: 1. Wrong again! The elusive period of DHK 41. 2. Stars observed and not observed. 3. Eclipsing binary chart information. 4. Eclipsing binary news and notes. 5. A note on SS Arietis. 6. Featured star: TX Ursae Majoris.

  2. Binary stars - Formation by fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of binary star formation by capture, separate nuclei, fission and fragmentation are compared, assessing the success of theoretical attempts to explain the observed properties of main-sequence binary stars. The theory of formation by fragmentation is examined, discussing the prospects for checking the theory against observations of binary premain-sequence stars. It is concluded that formation by fragmentation is successful at explaining many of the key properties of main-sequence binary stars.

  3. Sco X-1 - A galactic radio source with an extragalactic radio morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geldzahler, B. J.; Corey, B. E.; Fomalont, E. B.; Hilldrup, K.

    1981-01-01

    VLA observations of radio emissions at 1465 and 4885 MHz, of Sco X-1 confirm the existence of a colinear triple structure. Evidence that the three components of Sco X-1 are physically associated is presented, including the morphology, spectrum, variability, volume emissivity and magnetic field strength. The possibility of a physical phenomenon occurring in Sco X-1 similar to that occurring in extragalactic radio sources is discussed, and two galactic sources are found having extended emission similar to that in extragalactic objects. The extended structure of Sco X-1 is also observed to be similar to that of the hot spots in luminous extragalactic sources, and a radio source 20 arcmin from Sco X-1 is found to lie nearly along the radio axis formed by the components of Sco X-1.

  4. PinX1 inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Mei, Peng-Jin; Chen, Yan-Su; Du, Ying; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-03-01

    PinX1 induces apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation in some cancer cells, and the expression of PinX1 is frequently decreased in some cancer and negatively associated with metastasis and prognosis. However, the precise roles of PinX1 in gliomas have not been studied. In this study, we found that PinX1 obviously reduced the gliomas cell proliferation through regulating the expressions of cell cycle-relative molecules to arrest cell at G1 phase and down-regulating the expression of component telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT in human), which is the hardcore of telomerase. Moreover, PinX1 could suppress the abilities of gliomas cell wound healing, migration and invasion via suppressing MMP-2 expression and increasing TIMP-2 expression. In conclusion, our results suggested that PinX1 may be a potential suppressive gene in the progression of gliomas.

  5. Orbits For Sixteen Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Z.; Novakovic, B.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper orbits for 13 binaries are recalculated and presented. The reason is that recent observations show higher residuals than the corresponding ephemerides calculated by using the orbital elements given in the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars. The binaries studied were: WDS 00182+7257 = A 803, WDS 00335+4006 = HO 3, WDS 00583+2124 = BU 302, WDS 01011+6022 = A 926, WDS 01014+1155 = BU 867, WDS 01112+4113 = A 655, WDS 01361-2954 + HJ 3447, WDS 02333+5219 = STT 42 AB, WDS 04362+0814 = A 1840 AB, WDS 08017-0836 = A 1580, WDS 08277-0425 = A 550, WDS 17471+1742 = STF 2215 and WDS 18025+4414 = BU 1127 Aa-B. In addition, for three binaries - WDS 01532+1526 = BU 260, WDS 02563+7253 =STF 312 AB and WDS 05003+3924 = STT 92 AB - the orbital elements are calculated for the first time. In this paper the authors present not only the orbital elements, but the masses, dynamical parallaxes, absolute magnitudes and ephemerides for the next five years, as well.

  6. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  7. Implementation of the frequency-modulated sideband search method for gravitational waves from low mass x-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammut, L.; Messenger, C.; Melatos, A.; Owen, B. J.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the practical implementation of the sideband search, a search for periodic gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems. The orbital motion of the source in its binary system causes frequency modulation in the combination of matched filters known as the F-statistic. The sideband search is based on the incoherent summation of these frequency-modulated F-statistic sidebands. It provides a new detection statistic for sources in binary systems, called the C-statistic. The search is well suited to low-mass x-ray binaries, the brightest of which, called Sco X-1, is an ideal target candidate. For sources like Sco X-1, with well-constrained orbital parameters, a slight variation on the search is possible. The extra orbital information can be used to approximately demodulate the data from the binary orbital motion in the coherent stage, before incoherently summing the now reduced number of sidebands. We investigate this approach and show that it improves the sensitivity of the standard Sco X-1 directed sideband search. Prior information on the neutron star inclination and gravitational wave polarization can also be used to improve upper limit sensitivity. We estimate the sensitivity of a Sco X-1 directed sideband search on ten days of LIGO data and show that it can beat previous upper limits in current LIGO data, with a possibility of constraining theoretical upper limits using future advanced instruments.

  8. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Fuerst, F.; Madsen, K. K.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.; Miller, J. M.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Webb, N.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Fabian, A. C.; Parker, M. L.; Hailey, C. J.; Ptak, A.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-09-20

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X-ray coverage of this remarkable source up to ∼30 keV. Broadband observations were undertaken at two epochs, between which Holmberg IX X-1 exhibited both flux and strong spectral variability, increasing in luminosity from L {sub X} = (1.90 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} to L {sub X} = (3.35 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}. Neither epoch exhibits a spectrum consistent with emission from the standard low/hard accretion state seen in Galactic black hole binaries, which would have been expected if Holmberg IX X-1 harbors a truly massive black hole accreting at substantially sub-Eddington accretion rates. The NuSTAR data confirm that the curvature observed previously in the 3-10 keV bandpass does represent a true spectral cutoff. During each epoch, the spectrum appears to be dominated by two optically thick thermal components, likely associated with an accretion disk. The spectrum also shows some evidence for a nonthermal tail at the highest energies, which may further support this scenario. The available data allow for either of the two thermal components to dominate the spectral evolution, although both scenarios require highly nonstandard behavior for thermal accretion disk emission.

  9. Clinical translation of TALENS: Treating SCID-X1 by gene editing in iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2015-04-02

    Mutations causing X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) reduce immune cell populations and function and may be amenable to targeted gene correction strategies. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Menon et al. (2015) correct SCID-X1-related blood differentiation defects by TALEN-mediated genome editing in patient-derived iPSCs, suggesting a possible strategy for autologous cell therapy of SCID-X1.

  10. Astrometric Binaries: White Dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliversen, Nancy A.

    We propose to observe a selection of astrometric or spectroscopicastrometric binaries nearer than about 20 pc with unseen low mass companions. Systems of this type are important for determining the luminosity function of low mass stars (white dwarfs and very late main sequence M stars), and their contribution to the total mass of the galaxy. Systems of this type are also important because the low mass, invisible companions are potential candidates in the search for planets. Our target list is selected primarily from the list of 31 astrometric binaries near the sun by Lippincott (1978, Space Sci. Rev., 22, 153), with additional candidates from recent observations by Kamper. The elimination of stars with previous IUE observations, red companions resolved by infrared speckle interferometry, or primaries later than M1 (because if white dwarf companions are present they should have been detected in the visible region) reduces the list to 5 targets which need further information. IUE SWP low dispersion observations of these targets will show clearly whether the remaining unseen companions are white dwarfs, thus eliminating very cool main sequence stars or planets. This is also important in providing complete statistical information about the nearest stars. The discovery of a white dwarf in such a nearby system would provide important additional information about the masses of white dwarfs. Recent results by Greenstein (1986, A. J., 92, 859) from binary systems containing white dwarfs imply that 80% of such systems are as yet undetected. The preference of binaries for companions of approximately equal mass makes the Lippincott-Kamper list of A through K primaries with unseen companions a good one to use to search for white dwarfs. The mass and light dominance of the current primary over the white dwarf in the visible makes ultraviolet observations essential to obtain an accurate census of white dwarf binaries.

  11. Learning to assign binary weights to binary descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoudi; Wei, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-10-01

    Constructing robust binary local feature descriptors are receiving increasing interest due to their binary nature, which can enable fast processing while requiring significantly less memory than their floating-point competitors. To bridge the performance gap between the binary and floating-point descriptors without increasing the computational cost of computing and matching, optimal binary weights are learning to assign to binary descriptor for considering each bit might contribute differently to the distinctiveness and robustness. Technically, a large-scale regularized optimization method is applied to learn float weights for each bit of the binary descriptor. Furthermore, binary approximation for the float weights is performed by utilizing an efficient alternatively greedy strategy, which can significantly improve the discriminative power while preserve fast matching advantage. Extensive experimental results on two challenging datasets (Brown dataset and Oxford dataset) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. Mixed-Up Sex Chromosomes: Identification of Sex Chromosomes in the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y System of the Legless Lizards of the Genus Lialis (Squamata: Gekkota: Pygopodidae).

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Geckos in general show extensive variability in sex determining systems, but only male heterogamety has been demonstrated in the members of their legless family Pygopodidae. In the pioneering study published more than 45 years ago, multiple sex chromosomes of the type X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y were described in Burton's legless lizard (Lialisburtonis) based on conventional cytogenetic techniques. We conducted cytogenetic analyses including comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with selected cytogenetic markers in this species and the previously cytogenetically unstudied Papua snake lizard (Lialis jicari) to better understand the nature of these sex chromosomes and their differentiation. Both species possess male heterogamety with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system; however, the Y and one of the X chromosomes are not small chromosomes as previously reported in L. burtonis, but the largest macrochromosomal pair in the karyotype. The Y chromosomes in both species have large heterochromatic blocks with extensive accumulations of GATA and AC microsatellite motifs. FISH with telomeric probe revealed an exclusively terminal position of telomeric sequences in L. jicari (2n = 42 chromosomes in females), but extensive interstitial signals, potentially remnants of chromosomal fusions, in L.burtonis (2n = 34 in females). Our study shows that even largely differentiated and heteromorphic sex chromosomes might be misidentified by conventional cytogenetic analyses and that the application of more sensitive cytogenetic techniques for the identification of sex chromosomes is beneficial even in the classical examples of multiple sex chromosomes.

  13. Analysis of optical spectra of V1357 Cyg≡Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanskii, V. V.; Karitskaya, E. A.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lyuty, V. M.; Shimanskaya, N. N.

    2012-10-01

    Optical spectra and light curves of the massive X-ray binary V1357 Cyg are analyzed. The calculations were based on models of irradiated plane-parallel stellar atmospheres, taking into account reflection of the X-ray radiation, asphericity of the stellar surface, and deviations from LTE for several ions. Comparison of observed spectra obtained in 2004-2005 at the Bohyunsan Observatory (South Korea) revealed variations of the depths of HI lines by up to 18% and of HeI and heavy elements lines by up to 10%. These variations are not related to the orbital motion of the star, and are probably due to variations of the stellar wind intensity. Perturbations of the thermal structure of the atmosphere due to irradiation in various states of Cyg X-1 (including outburst) do not lead to the formation of a hot photosphere with an electron temperature exceeding the effective temperature. As a result, variations of the profiles of optical lines of HI, HeI, and heavy elements due to the orbital motion of the star and variations of the irradiating X-ray flux do not exceed 1% of the residual intensities. Allowing for deviations from LTE enhances the HI and HeI lines by factors of two to three and the MgII lines by a factor of nine, and is therefore required for a fully adequate analysis of the observational data. Analysis of the HI, HeI, and HeII lines profiles yielded the following set of parameters for theOstar at the observing epoch: T eff = 30 500±500 K, log g = 3.31 ±0.05, [He/H] = 0.42 ± 0.05. The observed HeI line profiles have emission components that are formed in the stellar wind and increase with the line intensity. The abundances of 11 elements in the atmospheres of V1357 Cyg and α Cam, which has a similar spectral type and luminosity class, are derived. The chemical composition of V1357 Cyg is characterized by a strong excess of helium, nitrogen, neon, and silicon, which is related to the binarity of the system.

  14. Lessons from the conviction of the L'Aquila seven: The standard probabilistic earthquake hazard and risk assessment is ineffective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, Max

    2013-04-01

    An earthquake of M6.3 killed 309 people in L'Aquila, Italy, on 6 April 2011. Subsequently, a judge in L'Aquila convicted seven who had participated in an emergency meeting on March 30, assessing the probability of a major event to follow the ongoing earthquake swarm. The sentence was six years in prison, a combine fine of 2 million Euros, loss of job, loss of retirement rent, and lawyer's costs. The judge followed the prosecution's accusation that the review by the Commission of Great Risks had conveyed a false sense of security to the population, which consequently did not take their usual precautionary measures before the deadly earthquake. He did not consider the facts that (1) one of the convicted was not a member of the commission and had merrily obeyed orders to bring the latest seismological facts to the discussion, (2) another was an engineer who was not required to have any expertise regarding the probability of earthquakes, (3) and two others were seismologists not invited to speak to the public at a TV interview and a press conference. This exaggerated judgment was the consequence of an uproar in the population, who felt misinformed and even mislead. Faced with a population worried by an earthquake swarm, the head of the Italian Civil Defense is on record ordering that the population be calmed, and the vice head executed this order in a TV interview one hour before the meeting of the Commission by stating "the scientific community continues to tell me that the situation is favorable and that there is a discharge of energy." The first lesson to be learned is that communications to the public about earthquake hazard and risk must not be left in the hands of someone who has gross misunderstandings about seismology. They must be carefully prepared by experts. The more significant lesson is that the approach to calm the population and the standard probabilistic hazard and risk assessment, as practiced by GSHAP, are misleading. The later has been criticized as

  15. Risk Communication on Earthquake Prediction Studies -"No L'Aquila quake risk" experts probed in Italy in June 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, S.; Koketsu, K.; Kuwabara, E.; Tomari, J.

    2010-12-01

    For the previous 6 months from the L'Aquila earthquake which occurred on 6th April 2009, the seismicity in that region had been active. Having become even more active and reached to magnitude 4 earthquake on 30th March, the government held Major Risks Committee which is a part of the Civil Protection Department and is tasked with forecasting possible risks by collating and analyzing data from a variety of sources and making preventative recommendations. At the press conference immediately after the committee, they reported that "The scientific community tells us there is no danger, because there is an ongoing discharge of energy. The situation looks favorable." 6 days later, a magunitude 6.3 earthquake attacked L'Aquila and killed 308 people. On 3rd June next year, the prosecutors opened the investigation after complaints of the victims that far more people would have fled their homes that night if there had been no reassurances of the Major Risks Committee the previous week. This issue becomes widely known to the seismological society especially after an email titled "Letter of Support for Italian Earthquake Scientists" from seismologists at the National Geophysics and Volcanology Institute (INGV) sent worldwide. It says that the L'Aquila Prosecutors office indicted of manslaughter the members of the Major Risks Committee and that the charges are for failing to provide a short term alarm to the population before the earthquake struck. It is true that there is no generalized method to predict earthquakes but failing the short term alarm is not the reason for the investigation of the scientists. The chief prosecutor stated that "the committee could have provided the people with better advice", and "it wasn't the case that they did not receive any warnings, because there had been tremors". The email also requests sign-on support for the open letter to the president of Italy from Earth sciences colleagues from all over the world and collected more than 5000 signatures

  16. Evidence of strong Quaternary earthquakes in the epicentral areaof the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila seismic event from sediment paleofluidization and overconsolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storti, F.; Balsamo, F.; Aldega, L.; Corrado, S.; Di Paolo, L.; Mastalertz, M.; Tallini, M.

    2012-04-01

    The strong seismological potential of the Central Apennines, including the L'Aquila basin, is documented in the historical heritage of the past two millenia and by paleoseismological data. Despite the main active fault system network of Central Italy is well described and mapped, the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila event showed that Mw> 6.0 earthquakes can occur on fault zones characterized by subtlemorphotectonic evidence, like the Paganica Fault, whose seismic hazard potential may thus be overlooked. An additional source of uncertainty is provided by the evidence that in the L'Aquila region many active extensional fault systems developed by negative inversion of pre-existing contractional deformation structures. The resulting complex along-strike segmentation and overlap patterns are thus governed by the interplay between the modern extensional stress field and the structural inheritance and reduce the effectiveness of predictive scaling laws, which do not typically account for fault attributes produced by polyphased tectonics. This is particularly true in the L'Aquila region, where seismic activation of the northwestern half of the basin-boundary fault system has been proposed for the 1703 Mw ~ 7.0 earthquake, whereas only the central segment was activated in 1461 and 2009, producing earthquakes with Mw ~ 6.0 - 6.3. The reasons for this dual behaviour are still unclear despite many structural and paleoseismological studies. Indirect evidence for paleoearthquake magnitude from ground shaking effects, like paleo-fluidization structures, can provide very useful complementary information on maximum expected earthquake intensities along active fault systems.In this work wedescribe in detail large paleo-fluidization-induced features associated with a previously unmapped extensional fault zone cutting through Quaternary strata. These sediments, including lacustrine lignites and mudstones, show a somehow enigmatic overconsolidation that we quantitatively describe, as well as

  17. NEA rotations and binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, A. W.; Warner, B. D.

    2007-05-01

    Of nearly 3900 near-Earth asteroids known in June 2006, 325 have got estimated rotation periods. NEAs with sizes down to 10 meters have been sampled. Observed spin distribution shows a major changing point around D=200 m. Larger NEAs show a barrier against spin rates >11 d-1 (period P~2.2 h) that shifts to slower rates with increasing equatorial elongation. The spin barrier is interpreted as a critical spin rate for bodies held together by self-gravitation only, suggesting that NEAs larger than 200 m are mostly strenghtless bodies (i.e., with zero tensile strength), so called `rubble piles'. The barrier disappears at D<200 m where most objects rotate too fast to be held together by self-gravitation only, so a non-zero cohesion is implied in the smaller NEAs. The distribution of NEA spin rates in the `rubble pile' range (D>0.2 km) is non-Maxwellian, suggesting that other mechanisms than just collisions worked there. There is a pile up in front of the barrier (P of 2-3 h). It may be related to a spin up mechanism crowding asteroids to the barrier. An excess of slow rotators is seen at P>30 h. The spin-down mechanism has no clear lower limit on spin rate; periods as long as tens of days occur. Most NEAs appear to be in basic spin states with rotation around the principal axis. Excited rotations are present among and actually dominate in slow rotators with damping timescales >4.5 byr. A few tumblers observed among fast rotating coherent objects consistently appear to be more rigid or younger than the larger, rubble-pile tumblers. An abundant population of binary systems among NEAs has been found. The fraction of binaries among NEAs larger than 0.3 km has been estimated to be 15 +/-4%. Primaries of the binary systems concentrate at fast spin rates (periods 2-3 h) and low amplitudes, i.e., they lie just below the spin barrier. The total angular momentum content in the binary systems suggests that they formed at the critical spin rate, and that little or no angular

  18. Is the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila earthquake a confirmation of the "seismic landscape" concept?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumetti, Anna Maria; Comerci, Valerio; Guerrieri, Luca; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Serva, Leonello; Vittori, Eutizio

    2010-05-01

    In the Central Apennines, active extensional tectonics is accommodated by a dense array of normal faults. Major tectonic elements are typically located at the foot of fault escarpments, tens of kilometres long and some hundreds of meters high. Subordinate faults within major blocks produce additional topographic irregularities (i.e., minor graben and fault scarps; Blumetti et al. 1993; Serva et al. 2002; Blumetti and Guerrieri, 2007). During moderate to strong earthquakes (M>6) one or several or all these faults can be rejuvenated up to the surface, and should be therefore regarded as capable faults. Thus, their total throw is the result of several surface faulting events over the last few hundreds of thousands of years. This is true for landscapes that have a "typical" earthquake magnitude (i.e., the earthquake magnitude that better "characterizes" the local landscape; Serva et al. 2002; Michetti et al. 2005) of either 6 or 7. According to this model in the L'Aquila region the seismic landscape is the result of repeated magnitude 7 events. In other words, the maximum magnitude to be expected is around 7, but clearly smaller events can also occur, like in the April 6, 2009 case. The L'Aquila region is well known for being characterized by a high seismic hazard. In particular, two events with Intensity X MCS occurred on November 26, 1461 and February 2, 1703. The latter was the third major seismic event of a seismic sequence that in two weeks shifted from Norcia (January 14) to L'Aquila (February 2). Two other destructive earthquakes hit the same area in 1349, IX-X MCS, and in 1762, IX MCS. Concerning the February 2, 1703, event, a good dataset of geological effects was provided by contemporary reports (e.g. Uria de Llanos, 1703): about 20 km of surface faulting along the Pizzoli fault, with offsets up to about half a meter and impressive secondary effects such as a river diversion, huge deep-seated gravitational movements and liquefaction phenomena involving the

  19. Deep electrical resistivity tomography along the tectonically active Middle Aterno Valley (2009 L'Aquila earthquake area, central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; Villani, Fabio; Ricci, Tullio; Delcher, Eric; Finizola, Anthony; Sapia, Vincenzo; De Martini, Paolo Marco; Pantosti, Daniela; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Brothelande, Elodie; Gusset, Rachel; Mezon, Cécile; Orefice, Simone; Peltier, Aline; Poret, Matthieu; Torres, Liliana; Suski, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    Three 2-D Deep Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) transects, up to 6.36 km long, were obtained across the Paganica-San Demetrio Basin, bounded by the 2009 L'Aquila Mw 6.1 normal-faulting earthquake causative fault (central Italy). The investigations allowed defining for the first time the shallow subsurface basin structure. The resistivity images, and their geological interpretation, show a dissected Mesozoic-Tertiary substratum buried under continental infill of mainly Quaternary age due to the long-term activity of the Paganica-San Demetrio normal faults system (PSDFS), ruling the most recent deformational phase. Our results indicate that the basin bottom deepens up to 600 m moving to the south, with the continental infill largely exceeding the known thickness of the Quaternary sequence. The causes of this increasing thickness can be: (1) the onset of the continental deposition in the southern sector took place before the Quaternary, (2) there was an early stage of the basin development driven by different fault systems that produced a depocentre in the southern sector not related to the present-day basin shape, or (3) the fault system slip rate in the southern sector was faster than in the northern sector. We were able to gain sights into the long-term PSDFS behaviour and evolution, by comparing throw rates at different timescales and discriminating the splays that lead deformation. Some fault splays exhibit large cumulative throws (>300 m) in coincidence with large displacement of the continental deposits sequence (>100 m), thus testifying a general persistence in time of their activity as leading splays of the fault system. We evaluate the long-term (3-2.5 Myr) cumulative and Quaternary throw rates of most of the leading splays to be 0.08-0.17 mm yr-1, indicating a substantial stability of the faults activity. Among them, an individual leading fault splay extends from Paganica to San Demetrio ne' Vestini as a result of a post-Early Pleistocene linkage of

  20. Crustal Anisotropy Beneath The Central Apennines (Italy) as revealed by the 2009 L'Aquila Seismic Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccheschi, P.; Pastori, M.; Margheriti, L.; Piccinini, D.

    2014-12-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of the crustal anisotropic parameters, fast polarization direction (φ) and delay time (δt), of hundreds of earthquakes recorded during the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence, which occurred in the Central Apennines Neogene fold-and-thrust-belt. We benefit from the dense coverage of seismic stations operating in the area and from a catalogue of several accurate earthquakes locations to describe in detail the geometry of the anisotropic volume around the major active faults, providing new insights on the anisotropic structure beneath the L'Aquila area and surrounding region. The results show strong spatial variations in the φ and δt values, revealing the presence of anisotropic complexity in the area. At most of the stations φ are mainly oriented NW-SE (~N141°). This trend well matches both the strike of the nearby major active normal faults and the regional maximum horizontal compressive stress (sHmax). This is also in agreement with the main stress indicators, such as focal mechanisms and borehole breakouts. δt at single stations vary between 0.024-0.26 s, with average value of ~0.07s. Similar results could be explained by the presence of stress aligned microcracks or stress-opened fluid-filled cracks and fractures within the crustal layers, as suggested by the EDA model. Moreover, the sharp coherence between φ and the strike of major faults does not allow us to completely rule out the contribution from the structural anisotropy. Measurements obtained at the stations in the southeastern side of the study area show different anisotropic parameters. In this region φ do not appear parallel with either the strike of the local mapped faults or the sHmax direction, becoming oriented predominantly NE-SW. These stations also report the highest value of δt (up to 0.09 s). This results could be explained by the presence of a highly fractured and over-pressurized rock volumes, which causes the 90°-flips in φ and an increase in

  1. CONSTRAINTS ON THE NEUTRON STAR AND INNER ACCRETION FLOW IN SERPENS X-1 USING NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Rana, V.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Tomsick, J. A.; Chakrabarty, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Paerels, F.; Natalucci, L.; Stern, D. K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-12-10

    We report on an observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1, made with NuSTAR. The extraordinary sensitivity afforded by NuSTAR facilitated the detection of a clear, robust, relativistic Fe K emission line from the inner disk. A relativistic profile is required over a single Gaussian line from any charge state of Fe at the 5σ level of confidence, and any two Gaussians of equal width at the same confidence. The Compton back-scattering ''hump'' peaking in the 10-20 keV band is detected for the first time in a neutron star X-ray binary. Fits with relativistically blurred disk reflection models suggest that the disk likely extends close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) or stellar surface. The best-fit blurred reflection models constrain the gravitational redshift from the stellar surface to be z {sub NS} ≥ 0.16. The data are broadly compatible with the disk extending to the ISCO; in that case, z {sub NS} ≥ 0.22 and R {sub NS} ≤ 12.6 km (assuming M {sub NS} = 1.4 M {sub ☉} and a = 0, where a = cJ/GM {sup 2}). If the star is as large or larger than its ISCO, or if the effective reflecting disk leaks across the ISCO to the surface, the redshift constraints become measurements. We discuss our results in the context of efforts to measure fundamental properties of neutron stars, and models for accretion onto compact objects.

  2. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE HOLMBERG IX X-1 AND ITS STELLAR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Grise, F.; Kaaret, P.; Pakull, M. W.; Motch, C.

    2011-06-10

    Holmberg IX X-1 is an archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). Here we study the properties of the optical counterpart and of its stellar environment using optical data from SUBARU/Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph, GEMINI/GMOS-N and Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys, as well as simultaneous Chandra X-ray data. The V {approx} 22.6 spectroscopically identified optical counterpart is part of a loose cluster with an age {approx}< 20 Myr. Consequently, the mass upper limit on individual stars in the association is about 20 M{sub sun}. The counterpart is more luminous than the other stars of the association, suggesting a non-negligible optical contribution from the accretion disk. An observed UV excess also points to non-stellar light similar to X-ray active low-mass X-ray binaries. A broad He II {lambda}4686 emission line identified in the optical spectrum of the ULX further suggests optical light from X-ray reprocessing in the accretion disk. Using stellar evolutionary tracks, we have constrained the mass of the counterpart to be {approx}> 10 M{sub sun}, even if the accretion disk contributes significantly to the optical luminosity. Comparison of the photometric properties of the counterpart with binary models show that the donor may be more massive, {approx}> 25 M{sub sun}, with the ULX system likely undergoing case AB mass transfer. Finally, the counterpart exhibits photometric variability of 0.14 mag between two HST observations separated by 50 days which could be due to ellipsoidal variations and/or disk reprocessing of variable X-ray emission.

  3. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  4. X-1-2 on ramp with pilots Robert Champine and Herb Hoover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 and two of the NACA pilots that flew the aircraft. The one on the viewer's left is Robert Champine with the other being Herbert Hoover. Champine made a total of 13 flights in the X-1, plus 9 in the D-558-1 and 12 in the D-558-2. Hoover made 14 flights in the X-1. On March 10, 1948, he reached Mach 1.065, becoming the first NACA pilot to fly faster than the speed of sound. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on Jan. 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On Oct. 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager, became the first aircraft

  5. Processing Of Binary Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H. S.

    1985-07-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the area of digital processing of binary images in the context of document processing is presented here. The topics covered include input scan, adaptive thresholding, halftoning, scaling and resolution conversion, data compression, character recognition, electronic mail, digital typography, and output scan. Emphasis has been placed on illustrating the basic principles rather than descriptions of a particular system. Recent technology advances and research in this field are also mentioned.

  6. Binary image classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Carl N.

    1987-01-01

    Motivated by the LANDSAT problem of estimating the probability of crop or geological types based on multi-channel satellite imagery data, Morris and Kostal (1983), Hill, Hinkley, Kostal, and Morris (1984), and Morris, Hinkley, and Johnston (1985) developed an empirical Bayes approach to this problem. Here, researchers return to those developments, making certain improvements and extensions, but restricting attention to the binary case of only two attributes.

  7. Double Eclipsing Binary Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, P.; Pejcha, O.

    2012-06-01

    The parameters of the mutual orbit of eclipsing binaries that are physically connected can be obtained by precision timing of minima over time through light travel time effect, apsidal motion or orbital precession. This, however, requires joint analysis of data from different sources obtained through various techniques and with insufficiently quantified uncertainties. In particular, photometric uncertainties are often underestimated, which yields too small uncertainties in minima timings if determined through analysis of a χ2 surface. The task is even more difficult for double eclipsing binaries, especially those with periods close to a resonance such as CzeV344, where minima get often blended with each other. This code solves the double binary parameters simultaneously and then uses these parameters to determine minima timings (or more specifically O-C values) for individual datasets. In both cases, the uncertainties (or more precisely confidence intervals) are determined through bootstrap resampling of the original data. This procedure to a large extent alleviates the common problem with underestimated photometric uncertainties and provides a check on possible degeneracies in the parameters and the stability of the results. While there are shortcomings to this method as well when compared to Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, the ease of the implementation of bootstrapping is a significant advantage.

  8. Long-Term X-Ray Variability of Circinus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Tournear, D. M.; Bloom, E. D.; Focke, W. B.; Reilly, K. T.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analysis of long term X-ray monitoring observations of Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) made with four different instruments: Vela 5B, Ariel V ASM, Ginga ASM, and RXTE ASM, over the course of more than 30 years. We use Lomb-Scargle periodograms to search for the approx. 16.5 day orbital period of Cir X-1 in each of these data sets and from this derive a new orbital ephemeris based solely on X-ray measurements, which we compare to the previous ephemerides obtained from radio observations. We also use the Phase Dispersion Minimization (PDM) technique, as well as FFT analysis, to verify the periods obtained from periodograms. We obtain dynamic periodograms (both Lomb-Scargle and PDM) of Cir X-1 during the RXTE era, showing the period evolution of Cir X-1, and also displaying some unexplained discrete jumps in the location of the peak power.

  9. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  10. Binary-Signal Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2011-01-01

    Binary communication through long cables, opto-isolators, isolating transformers, or repeaters can become distorted in characteristic ways. The usual solution is to slow the communication rate, change to a different method, or improve the communication media. It would help if the characteristic distortions could be accommodated at the receiving end to ease the communication problem. The distortions come from loss of the high-frequency content, which adds slopes to the transitions from ones to zeroes and zeroes to ones. This weakens the definition of the ones and zeroes in the time domain. The other major distortion is the reduction of low frequency, which causes the voltage that defines the ones or zeroes to drift out of recognizable range. This development describes a method for recovering a binary data stream from a signal that has been subjected to a loss of both higher-frequency content and low-frequency content that is essential to define the difference between ones and zeroes. The method makes use of the frequency structure of the waveform created by the data stream, and then enhances the characteristics related to the data to reconstruct the binary switching pattern. A major issue is simplicity. The approach taken here is to take the first derivative of the signal and then feed it to a hysteresis switch. This is equivalent in practice to using a non-resonant band pass filter feeding a Schmitt trigger. Obviously, the derivative signal needs to be offset to halfway between the thresholds of the hysteresis switch, and amplified so that the derivatives reliably exceed the thresholds. A transition from a zero to a one is the most substantial, fastest plus movement of voltage, and therefore will create the largest plus first derivative pulse. Since the quiet state of the derivative is sitting between the hysteresis thresholds, the plus pulse exceeds the plus threshold, switching the hysteresis switch plus, which re-establishes the data zero to one transition

  11. Further Comment on “AGU Statement: Investigation of Scientists and Officials in L'Aquila, Italy, Is Unfounded”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobran, Flavio

    2010-10-01

    The AGU statement on the investigation of Italian scientists and officials in regard to the L'Aquila earthquake (Eos, 91(28), 248, 13 July 2010) appears to be a noble attempt to protect not only these individuals but also those AGU members who are involved in similar hazard and risk assessments. But in the long run this statement not only damages AGU by misleading its membership as to the responsibilities of the indicted individuals but also sends the wrong message to the Italian scientific communities about their social responsibilities. The AGU statement assumes that the indicted individuals are innocent because it is not possible for scientists to predict earthquakes, but it neglects to explain what their scientific responsibilities are and why these individuals may be also guilty of failing to properly exercise their social responsibility. If one accepts public funds, has the responsibility of deciding how to manage those funds, and is playing the double role of a scientist and a politician, one is also responsible for both the scientific and social consequences of one's actions. Because some of the indicted individuals are also responsible for drafting and promoting the unreliable Vesuvius Evacuation Plan (http://www.westnet.com/˜dobran), they should also be accountable for the consequences in the Vesuvius area.

  12. Gravity-driven postseismic deformation following the Mw 6.3 2009 L'Aquila (Italy) earthquake.

    PubMed

    Albano, Matteo; Barba, Salvatore; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Malvarosa, Fabio; Costantini, Mario; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-11-10

    The present work focuses on the postseismic deformation observed in the region of L'Aquila (central Italy) following the Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred on April 6, 2009. A new, 16-month-long dataset of COSMO-SkyMed SAR images was analysed using the Persistent Scatterer Pairs interferometric technique. The analysis revealed the existence of postseismic ground subsidence in the mountainous rocky area of Mt Ocre ridge, contiguous to the sedimentary plain that experienced coseismic subsidence. The postseismic subsidence was characterized by displacements of 10 to 35 mm along the SAR line of sight. In the Mt Ocre ridge, widespread morphological elements associated with gravitational spreading have been previously mapped. We tested the hypothesis that the postseismic subsidence of the Mt Ocre ridge compensates the loss of equilibrium induced by the nearby coseismic subsidence. Therefore, we simulated the coseismic and postseismic displacement fields via the finite element method. We included the gravitational load and fault slip and accounted for the geometrical and rheological characteristics of the area. We found that the elastoplastic behaviour of the material under gravitational loading best explains the observed postseismic displacement. These findings emphasize the role of gravity in the postseismic processes at the fault scale.

  13. From Colfiorito to L'Aquila Earthquake: learning from the past to communicating the risk of the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, T.; Crescimbene, M.; La Longa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Italy is a country at risk of impending earthquake in the near future. Very probably, as it has already happened in the 13 years between the last two important seismic events (Colfiorito 1997- L'Aquila 2009), there won't be enough time to solve all the problems connected to seismic risk: first of all the corruption related to politics concerning buildings; the lack of the money necessary to strengthen the already existing ones, historical centres, monuments and the masterpieces of Art; the difficult relations of the Institutions with the traditional media (newspapers, radio and TV) and, at the same time, the new media (web); the difficulties for scientists to reach important results in the immediate future due to the lack of funding and, last but not least, to the conflicting relationships inside the scientific community itself. In this scenario, communication and education play a crucial role in minimizing the risk of the population. In the present work we reconsider the past with the intent of starting to trace a path for a future strategy of risk communication where everybody involved, included the population, should do his best in order to face the next emergency.

  14. THE BLAST VIEW OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION IN AQUILA (l = 45{sup 0}, b = 0{sup 0})

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    We have carried out the first general submillimeter analysis of the field toward GRSMC 45.46+0.05, a massive star-forming region in Aquila. The deconvolved 6 deg{sup 2} (3{sup 0} x 2{sup 0}) maps provided by BLAST in 2005 at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m were used to perform a preliminary characterization of the clump population previously investigated in the infrared, radio, and molecular maps. Interferometric CORNISH data at 4.8 GHz have also been used to characterize the Ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIRs) within the main clumps. By means of the BLAST maps, we have produced an initial census of the submillimeter structures that will be observed by Herschel, several of which are known Infrared Dark Clouds. Our spectral energy distributions of the main clumps in the field, located at {approx}7 kpc, reveal an active population with temperatures of T{approx} 35-40 K and masses of {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun} for a dust emissivity index {beta} = 1.5. The clump evolutionary stages range from evolved sources, with extended H II regions and prominent IR stellar population, to massive young stellar objects, prior to the formation of an UCHIIR. The CORNISH data have revealed the details of the stellar content and structure of the UCHIIRs. In most cases, the ionizing stars corresponding to the brightest radio detections are capable of accounting for the clump bolometric luminosity, in most cases powered by embedded OB stellar clusters.

  15. Genetic structure and viability selection in the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a vagile raptor with a Holarctic distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jacqueline M.; Katzner, Todd E.; Roemer, Gary; Cain, James W.; Millsap, Brian; McIntyre, Carol; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Fernandez, Nadia B.; Wheeler, Maria; Bulut, Zafer; Bloom, Peter; DeWoody, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers can reveal interesting aspects of organismal ecology and evolution, especially when surveyed in rare or elusive species. Herein, we provide a preliminary assessment of golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) population structure in North America using novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These SNPs included one molecular sexing marker, two mitochondrial markers, 85 putatively neutral markers that were derived from noncoding regions within large intergenic intervals, and 74 putatively nonneutral markers found in or very near protein-coding genes. We genotyped 523 eagle samples at these 162 SNPs and quantified genotyping error rates and variability at each marker. Our samples corresponded to 344 individual golden eagles as assessed by unique multilocus genotypes. Observed heterozygosity of known adults was significantly higher than of chicks, as was the number of heterozygous loci, indicating that mean zygosity measured across all 159 autosomal markers was an indicator of fitness as it is associated with eagle survival to adulthood. Finally, we used chick samples of known provenance to test for population differentiation across portions of North America and found pronounced structure among geographic sampling sites. These data indicate that cryptic genetic population structure is likely widespread in the golden eagle gene pool, and that extensive field sampling and genotyping will be required to more clearly delineate management units within North America and elsewhere.

  16. Wing tucks are a response to atmospheric turbulence in the soaring flight of the steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kate V.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.; Taylor, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent atmospheric conditions represent a challenge to stable flight in soaring birds, which are often seen to drop their wings in a transient motion that we call a tuck. Here, we investigate the mechanics, occurrence and causation of wing tucking in a captive steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis, using ground-based video and onboard inertial instrumentation. Statistical analysis of 2594 tucks, identified automatically from 45 flights, reveals that wing tucks occur more frequently under conditions of higher atmospheric turbulence. Furthermore, wing tucks are usually preceded by transient increases in airspeed, load factor and pitch rate, consistent with the bird encountering a headwind gust. The tuck itself immediately follows a rapid drop in angle of attack, caused by a downdraft or nose-down pitch motion, which produces a rapid drop in load factor. Positive aerodynamic loading acts to elevate the wings, and the resulting aerodynamic moment must therefore be balanced in soaring by an opposing musculoskeletal moment. Wing tucking presumably occurs when the reduction in the aerodynamic moment caused by a drop in load factor is not met by an equivalent reduction in the applied musculoskeletal moment. We conclude that wing tucks represent a gust response precipitated by a transient drop in aerodynamic loading. PMID:25320064

  17. Gravity-driven postseismic deformation following the Mw 6.3 2009 L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Matteo; Barba, Salvatore; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Malvarosa, Fabio; Costantini, Mario; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on the postseismic deformation observed in the region of L’Aquila (central Italy) following the Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred on April 6, 2009. A new, 16-month-long dataset of COSMO-SkyMed SAR images was analysed using the Persistent Scatterer Pairs interferometric technique. The analysis revealed the existence of postseismic ground subsidence in the mountainous rocky area of Mt Ocre ridge, contiguous to the sedimentary plain that experienced coseismic subsidence. The postseismic subsidence was characterized by displacements of 10 to 35 mm along the SAR line of sight. In the Mt Ocre ridge, widespread morphological elements associated with gravitational spreading have been previously mapped. We tested the hypothesis that the postseismic subsidence of the Mt Ocre ridge compensates the loss of equilibrium induced by the nearby coseismic subsidence. Therefore, we simulated the coseismic and postseismic displacement fields via the finite element method. We included the gravitational load and fault slip and accounted for the geometrical and rheological characteristics of the area. We found that the elastoplastic behaviour of the material under gravitational loading best explains the observed postseismic displacement. These findings emphasize the role of gravity in the postseismic processes at the fault scale. PMID:26553120

  18. Biotelemetry data for golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in coastal southern California, November 2014–February 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Madden, Melanie C.; Sebes, Jeremy B.; Bloom, Peter H.; Katzner, Todd E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-04-21

    The status of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in coastal southern California is unclear. To address this knowledge gap, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with local, State, and other Federal agencies began a multi-year survey and tracking program of golden eagles to address questions regarding habitat use, movement behavior, nest occupancy, genetic population structure, and human impacts on eagles. Golden eagle trapping and tracking efforts began in October 2014 and continued until early March 2015. During the first trapping season that focused on San Diego County, we captured 13 golden eagles (8 females and 5 males). During the second trapping season that began in November 2015, we focused on trapping sites in San Diego, Orange, and western Riverside Counties. By February 23, 2016, we captured an additional 14 golden eagles (7 females and 7 males). In this report, biotelemetry data were collected between November 22, 2014, and February 23, 2016. The location data for eagles ranged as far north as San Luis Obispo, California, and as far south as La Paz, Baja California, Mexico.

  19. Estimation of occupancy, breeding success, and predicted abundance of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Diablo Range, California, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, J. David; Kolar, Patrick S.; Fuller, Mark R.; Hunt, W. Grainger; Hunt, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    We used a multistate occupancy sampling design to estimate occupancy, breeding success, and abundance of territorial pairs of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Diablo Range, California, in 2014. This method uses the spatial pattern of detections and non-detections over repeated visits to survey sites to estimate probabilities of occupancy and successful reproduction while accounting for imperfect detection of golden eagles and their young during surveys. The estimated probability of detecting territorial pairs of golden eagles and their young was less than 1 and varied with time of the breeding season, as did the probability of correctly classifying a pair’s breeding status. Imperfect detection and breeding classification led to a sizeable difference between the uncorrected, naïve estimate of the proportion of occupied sites where successful reproduction was observed (0.20) and the model-based estimate (0.30). The analysis further indicated a relatively high overall probability of landscape occupancy by pairs of golden eagles (0.67, standard error = 0.06), but that areas with the greatest occupancy and reproductive potential were patchily distributed. We documented a total of 138 territorial pairs of golden eagles during surveys completed in the 2014 breeding season, which represented about one-half of the 280 pairs we estimated to occur in the broader 5,169-square kilometer region sampled. The study results emphasize the importance of accounting for imperfect detection and spatial heterogeneity in studies of site occupancy, breeding success, and abundance of golden eagles.

  20. Time-repeated (pseudo-4D) seismic tomography: The example of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarabba, C.; De Gori, P.; Di Stefano, R.; Chiaraluce, L.; Valoroso, L.

    2012-04-01

    Normal faulting earthquakes in Italy often show the occurrence of multiple large shocks and seismicity jumps on adjacent fault segments, probably driven by fluid pressure diffusion along the fault system. Sharp changes of Vp/Vs and seismic anisotropy are revealed by foreshocks of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake and ascribed to a precursory fluid pressure variation in the volume hosting the main rupture. In this study, we subdivided the 3-months long sequence of aftershocks recorded by a dense temporary seismic network into three epochs that have a similar amount of data and sampling of the crustal volume around the fault. For each of the three epochs, tomographic models are computed independently obtaining similarly well resolved Vp and Vp/Vs images. We find that time-repeated seismic tomography (4D) resolves changes of Vp and Vp/Vs during the aftershocks sequence, revealing post-faulting fluid flow from the normal fault to the surrounding volume. Two transient Vp/Vs anomalies are observed, suggesting an upward migration of fluid pressure in the fault hanging-wall and on an adjacent fault located a few kilometers to the north. These transient anomalies suggest that localized build-up of fluid pressure drove the seismicity migration on adjacent segments, large aftershocks and post-seismic slip on a compliant portion of the fault.

  1. Visual binary stars: data to investigate formation of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva,, D.; Malkov,, O.; Yungelson, L.; Chulkov, D.

    Statistics of orbital parameters of binary stars as well as statistics of their physical characteristics bear traces of star formation history. However, statistical investigations of binaries are complicated by incomplete or missing observational data and by a number of observational selection effects. Visual binaries are the most common type of observed binary stars, with the number of pairs exceeding 130 000. The most complete list of presently known visual binary stars was compiled by cross-matching objects and combining data of the three largest catalogues of visual binaries. This list was supplemented by the data on parallaxes, multicolor photometry, and spectral characteristics taken from other catalogues. This allowed us to compensate partly for the lack of observational data for these objects. The combined data allowed us to check the validity of observational values and to investigate statistics of the orbital and physical parameters of visual binaries. Corrections for incompleteness of observational data are discussed. The datasets obtained, together with modern distributions of binary parameters, will be used to reconstruct the initial distributions and parameters of the function of star formation for binary systems.

  2. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-08-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  3. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  4. Modeling the Oxygen K Absorption in the Interstellar Medium: An XMM-Newton View of Sco X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Ramirez, J. M.; Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the absorption structure of the oxygen in the interstellar medium by analyzing XMM-Newton observations of the low mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. We use simple models based on the O I atomic cross section from different sources to fit the data and evaluate the impact of the atomic data in the interpretation of astrophysical observations. We show that relatively small differences in the atomic calculations can yield spurious results. We also show that the most complete and accurate set of atomic cross sections successfully reproduce the observed data in the 21 - 24.5 Angstrom wavelength region of the spectrum. Our fits indicate that the absorption is mainly due to neutral gas with an ionization parameter of Epsilon = 10(exp -4) erg/sq cm, and an oxygen column density of N(sub O) approx. = 8-10 x 10(exp 17)/sq cm. Our models are able to reproduce both the K edge and the K(alpha) absorption line from O I, which are the two main features in this region. We find no conclusive evidence for absorption by other than atomic oxygen.

  5. A return to strong radio flaring by Circinus X-1 observed with the Karoo Array Telescope test array KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. P.; Fender, R. P.; Nicolson, G. D.; Ratcliffe, S.; Linares, M.; Horrell, J.; Richter, L.; Schurch, M. P. E.; Coriat, M.; Woudt, P.; Jonas, J.; Booth, R.; Fanaroff, B.

    2013-08-01

    Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ˜17-d time-scale. A longer term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to a historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994-2006. Here, we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT (Karoo Array Telescope) test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array, demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 2011 December 13 to 2012 January 16 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from MAXI. We discuss whether the overall modulation and recent dramatic brightening is likely to be due to an increase in the power of the jet due to changes in accretion rate or changing Doppler boosting associated with a varying angle to the line of sight.

  6. High-resolution soft X-ray spectra of Scorpius X-1 - The structure of circumsource accreting material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, S. M.; Seward, F. D.; Chlebowski, T.

    1984-01-01

    Four observations of Scorpius X-1 with the Objective Grating Spectrometer of the Einstein Observatory have provided high-resolution spectra (lambda/Delta lambda = approximately 20-50) in the wavelength range 7-46 A. The spectra reveal the presence of absorption structure due to oxygen, nitrogen, and iron, and variable emission structure associated with ionized iron and nitrogen. The strengths of these features suggest that the N/O abundance ratio in the absorbing and line emitting gas is anomalously high, which might indicate that these spectral components are associated with processed material, probably accreting matter transferred from the surface of an evolved companion. Constraints on the inclination of the system, however, imply that this cool, dense, accreting material must be well out of the plane of the binary system. Possible models for the origin and nature of this circumsource medium are discussed. An extensive discussion of the calibration of the Objective Grating Spectrometer and of the analysis of spectra acquired by that instrument is also provided.

  7. The nature of ULX source M101 X-1: optically thick outflow from a stellar mass black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-02-01

    The nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has long been plagued by an ambiguity about whether the central compact objects are intermediate-mass (IMBH, ≳103 M⊙) or stellar-mass (a few tens M⊙) black holes (BHs). The high-luminosity (≃1039 erg s-1) and supersoft spectrum (T ≃ 0.1 keV) during the high state of the ULX source X-1 in the galaxy M101 suggest a large emission radius (≳109 cm), consistent with being an IMBH accreting at a sub-Eddington rate. However, recent kinematic measurement of the binary orbit of this source and identification of the secondary as a Wolf-Rayet star suggest a stellar-mass BH primary with a super-Eddington accretion. If that is the case, a hot, optically thick outflow from the BH can account for the large emission radius and the soft spectrum. By considering the interplay of photons' absorption and scattering opacities, we determine the radius and mass density of the emission region of the outflow and constrain the outflow mass-loss rate. The analysis presented here can be potentially applied to other ULXs with thermally dominated spectra, and to other super-Eddington accreting sources.

  8. Ultraviolet spectra of HZ Herculis/Hercules X-1 from HST: Hot gas during total eclipse of the neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Scott F.; Wachter, Stefanie; Margon, Bruce; Downes, Ronald A.; Blair, William P.; Halpern, Jules P.

    1994-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) aboard Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has been used in the UV to observe the prototypical X-ray pulsar Her X-1 and its companion HZ Her. Optical spectra were also obtained contemporaneously at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 2.1 m. The FOS spectra encompass the 1150-3300 A range near binary orbital phases 0.5 (X-ray maximum) and at 0.0 (mid-X-ray eclipse). The maximum light spectra show strong, narrow C III, N V, O V, Si IV + O IV), N IV), C IV, He II, and N IV emission lines, extending previous IUE results; the O III lambda 3133 Bowen resonance line is also prominent, confirming that the Bowen mechanism is the source of the strong lambda lambda 4640, 4650 emission complex, also seen at maximum light. Most remarkable, however, are the minimum light spectra, where the object is too faint for reasonable observations from IUE. Despite the total eclipse of the X-ray-emitting neutron star, our spectra show strong emission at N V lambda 1240, S IV + O IV) whose emission dominates the UV light at phase 0.0 might be associated with the 'accretion disk corona,' it is more likely the source is somewhat less hot (but extended) gas above and around the disk, or perhaps circumstellar material such as a stellar wind.

  9. MODELING THE OXYGEN K ABSORPTION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: AN XMM-NEWTON VIEW OF Sco X-1

    SciTech Connect

    GarcIa, J.; Bautista, M. A.; RamIrez, J. M.; Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Mendoza, C.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P. E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu E-mail: michael.c.witthoeft@nasa.gov E-mail: claudio@ivic.gob.v E-mail: quinet@umh.ac.be

    2011-04-10

    We investigate the X-ray absorption structure of oxygen in the interstellar medium by analyzing XMM - Newton observations of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1. Simple models based on the O I atomic photoabsorption cross section from different sources are used to fit the data and evaluate the impact of the atomic data on the interpretation of the observations. We show that relatively small differences in the atomic calculations can yield spurious results, and that the most complete and accurate set of atomic cross sections successfully reproduce the observed data in the 21.0-24.5 A wavelength region of the spectrum. Our fits indicate that the absorption is mainly due to neutral gas with an ionization parameter of {xi} = 10{sup -4} erg cm s{sup -1} and an oxygen column density of N{sub O} {approx} (8-10) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The models are able to reproduce both the K edge and the K{alpha} absorption line from O I which are the two main features in this region. We find no conclusive evidence for absorption by anything other than atomic oxygen.

  10. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  11. A new multiple sex chromosome system X1X1X2X2/X1Y1X2Y2 in Siluriformes: cytogenetic characterization of Bunocephalus coracoideus (Aspredinidae).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Milena; Garcia, Caroline; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; de Jesus, Isac Silva; Feldberg, Eliana

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed one Bunocephalus coracoideus population from the Negro River basin using cytogenetic techniques. The results showed a diploid number of 42 chromosomes in both sexes, with the karyotypic formula 4m + 14sm + 24a and fundamental number (FN) = 60 for females and the formula 5m + 14sm + 23a and FN = 61 for males, constituting an X1X1X2X2/X1Y1X2Y2 multiple sex chromosome system. The constitutive heterochromatin is distributed in the pericentromeric regions of most of the chromosomes, except for the sex chromosomes, of which the X1, X2, and Y1 chromosomes were euchromatic and the Y2 chromosome was partially heterochromatic. 18S rDNA mapping confirmed the presence of nucleolar organizer regions on the short arms of the fifth chromosomal pair for both sexes. The 5S rDNA is present in the terminal regions of the short arms on the 2nd, 10th, and 12th pairs and on the X2 chromosome of both sexes; however, we observed variations in the presence of these ribosomal cistrons on the Y1 chromosome, on which the cistrons are pericentromeric, and on the Y2 chromosome, on which these cistrons are present in the terminal portions of the short and long arms. Telomeric sequences are located in the terminal regions of all of the chromosomes, particularly conspicuous blocks on the 10th and 12th pairs and internal telomeric sequences in the centromeric regions of the 1st, 6th, and 9th pairs for both sexes. This work describes an new sex chromosomes system for the Siluriformes and increases our genetic knowledge of the Aspredinidae family.

  12. BINARY STORAGE ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-06-10

    A binary storage device is described comprising a toggle provided with associsted improved driver circuits adapted to produce reliable action of the toggle during clearing of the toggle to one of its two states. or transferring information into and out of the toggle. The invention resides in the development of a self-regulating driver circuit to minimize the fluctuation of the driving voltages for the toggle. The disclosed driver circuit produces two pulses in response to an input pulse: a first or ''clear'' pulse beginning nt substantially the same time but endlrg slightly sooner than the second or ''transfer'' output pulse.

  13. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  14. Chromosomal distribution of two multigene families and the unusual occurrence of an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in the dolphinfish (Coryphaenidae): an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Soares, R X; Bertollo, L A C; Cioffi, M B; Costa, G W W F; F Molina, W

    2014-04-03

    Dolphinfishes (Coryphaenidae) are pelagic predators distributed throughout all tropical and subtropical oceans and are very important for commercial, traditional, and sport fishing. This small family contains the Coryphaena hippurus and Coryphaena equiselis species whose chromosomal aspects remain unknown, despite recent advances in cytogenetic data assimilation for Perciformes. In this study, both species were cytogenetically analyzed using different staining techniques (C-, Ag-, and CMA3 banding) and fluorescence in situ hybridization, to detect 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA. C. hippurus females exhibit 2n = 48 chromosomes, with 2m+4sm+42a (NF = 54). In C. equiselis, where both sexes could be analyzed, females displayed 2n = 48 chromosomes (2m+6sm+40a) and males exhibited 2n = 47 chromosomes (3m+6sm+38a) (NF = 56), indicating the presence of X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y multiple sex chromosomes. Sex-chromosome systems are rare in Perciformes, with this study demonstrating the first occurrence in a marine pelagic species. It remains unknown as to whether this system extends to other populations; however, these data are important with respect to evolutionary, phylogenetic, and speciation issues, as well as for elucidating the genesis of this unique sex system.

  15. Ground motions recorded in Rome during the April 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence: site response and comparison with ground‐motion predictions based on a global dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caserta, Arrigo; Boore, David; Rovelli, Antonio; Govoni, Aladino; Marra, Fabrizio; Monica, Gieseppe Della; Boschi, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    The mainshock and moderate‐magnitude aftershocks of the 6 April 2009 M 6.3 L’Aquila seismic sequence, about 90 km northeast of Rome, provided the first earthquake ground‐motion recordings in the urban area of Rome. Before those recordings were obtained, the assessments of the seismic hazard in Rome were based on intensity observations and theoretical considerations. The L’Aquila recordings offer an unprecedented opportunity to calibrate the city response to central Apennine earthquakes—earthquakes that have been responsible for the largest damage to Rome in historical times. Using the data recorded in Rome in April 2009, we show that (1) published theoretical predictions of a 1 s resonance in the Tiber valley are confirmed by observations showing a significant amplitude increase in response spectra at that period, (2) the empirical soil‐transfer functions inferred from spectral ratios are satisfactorily fit through 1D models using the available geological, geophysical, and laboratory data, but local variability can be large for individual events, (3) response spectra for the motions recorded in Rome from the L’Aquila earthquakes are significantly amplified in the radial component at periods near 1 s, even at a firm site on volcanic rocks, and (4) short‐period response spectra are smaller than expected when compared to ground‐motion predictions from equations based on a global dataset, whereas the observed response spectra are higher than expected for periods near 1 s.

  16. Pediatric Epidemic of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Area of L’Aquila, Italy, Four Years after a Catastrophic Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Giovanni; Bottone, Gabriella; Maiorani, Daniela; Trombatore, Fabiana; Falasca, Silvana; Bruno, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background: A Salmonella enterica epidemic occurred in children of the area of L’Aquila (Central Italy, Abruzzo region) between June 2013 and October 2014, four years after the catastrophic earthquake of 6 April 2009. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory children. Routine investigations for Salmonella infection were carried out on numerous alimentary matrices of animal origin and sampling sources for drinking water of the L’Aquila district, including pickup points of the two main aqueducts. Results: Salmonella infection occurred in 155 children (83 females: 53%), aged 1 to 15 years (mean 2.10). Of these, 44 children (28.4%) were hospitalized because of severe dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and fever resistant to oral antipyretic and antibiotic drugs. Three children (1.9%) were reinfected within four months after primary infection by the same Salmonella strain. Four children (2.6%), aged one to two years, were coinfected by rotavirus. A seven-year old child had a concomitant right hip joint arthritis. The isolated strains, as confirmed in about the half of cases or probable/possible in the remaining ones, were identified as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium [4,5:i:-], monophasic variant. Aterno river, bordering the L’Aquila district, was recognized as the main responsible source for the contamination of local crops and vegetables derived from polluted crops. Conclusions: The high rate of hospitalized children underlines the emergence of a highly pathogenic S. enterica strain probably subsequent to the contamination of the spring water sources after geological changes occurred during the catastrophic earthquake. PMID:27164121

  17. Hydrothermal anomalies before the 2009 Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy referring to the geospheres coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Shuo; Qin, Kai; De Santis, Angelo; Liu, Shanjun

    2016-04-01

    A large number of precursory anomalies of the 2009 L'Aquila EQ were reported after the shocking, including thermal properties, electric and magnetic fields, gas emissions and seismicity. Previous studies on the seismic b-value are also insufficient, which is possibly a proxy of crust stress conditions and could therewith act as a crude stress-meter wherever seismicity is observed in lithosphere. Nevertheless, the reported anomalies have not been so far synergically analyzed to interpret or prove the potential coupling process among different geospheres. In this paper, the spatio-temporal evolution of several hydrothermal parameters related to the coversphere and atmosphere, including soil moisture, soil temperature, near-surface air temperature, and precipitable water, was comprehensively investigated. Air temperature and atmospheric aerosol were also statistically analyzed in time series with ground observations. An abnormal enhancement of aerosol occurred on March 30, 2009 and thus proved quasi-synchronous anomalies among the hydrothermal parameters from March 29 to 31 in particular places geo-related to tectonic thrusts and local topography. In additional, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization analysis of b-value revealed that regional stress accumulated to a high level, particularly in the L'Aquila basin and around regional large thrusts. This links logically and spatially the multiple observations on coversphere and atmosphere with that on lithosphere. Finally, the coupling effects of geospheres were discussed, and a conceptual LCA coupling mode was proposed to interpret the possible mechanisms of the multiple quasi-synchronous anomalies preceding the L'Aquila EQ. Results indicate that CO2-rich fluids in deep crust might have played a significant role in the local LCA coupling process.

  18. Fault Geometry and Active Stress from Earthquakes and Field Geology Data Analysis: The Colfiorito 1997 and L'Aquila 2009 Cases (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, F.; Lavecchia, G.; de Nardis, R.; Brozzetti, F.

    2015-05-01

    The fault segmentation pattern and the regional stress tensor acting since the Early Quaternary in the intra-Apennine area of central Italy was constrained by integrating two large geological and seismological fault-slip data sets collected for the areas struck by the two most energetic seismic sequences of the last 15 years (Colfiorito 1997, M w 6.0 and L'Aquila 2009, M w 6.1). The integrated analysis of the earthquake fault association and the reconstruction of the 3D shape of the seismogenic sources were exploited to identify homogeneous seismogenic volumes associated with subsets of geological and focal mechanism data. The independent analysis of geological and seismological data allowed us to observe and highlight similarities between the attitude of the long-term (e.g., Quaternary) and the instantaneous present-day (seismogenic) extensional deformations and to reveal their substantial coaxiality. Coherently, with the results from the kinematic analysis, the stress field inversion also noted a prevailing tensional seismotectonic regime associated with a subhorizontal, NE-SW, minimum stress axis. A minor, very local, and shallow (<5 km) strike-slip component of the stress field was observed in the Colfiorito sector, where an inherited N-S oriented right-lateral fault was reactivated with sinistral kinematics. Instead, an almost total absence of strike-slip solutions was observed in the L'Aquila area. These results do not agree with those indicating Quaternary regional strike-slip regimes or wide areas characterized by strike-slip deformation during the Colfiorito and L'Aquila seismic sequences.

  19. Fault Geometry and Active Stress from Earthquakes and Field Geology Data Analysis: The Colfiorito 1997 and L'Aquila 2009 Cases (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, F.; Lavecchia, G.; de Nardis, R.; Brozzetti, F.

    2014-09-01

    The fault segmentation pattern and the regional stress tensor acting since the Early Quaternary in the intra-Apennine area of central Italy was constrained by integrating two large geological and seismological fault-slip data sets collected for the areas struck by the two most energetic seismic sequences of the last 15 years (Colfiorito 1997, M w 6.0 and L'Aquila 2009, M w 6.1). The integrated analysis of the earthquake fault association and the reconstruction of the 3D shape of the seismogenic sources were exploited to identify homogeneous seismogenic volumes associated with subsets of geological and focal mechanism data. The independent analysis of geological and seismological data allowed us to observe and highlight similarities between the attitude of the long-term (e.g., Quaternary) and the instantaneous present-day (seismogenic) extensional deformations and to reveal their substantial coaxiality. Coherently, with the results from the kinematic analysis, the stress field inversion also noted a prevailing tensional seismotectonic regime associated with a subhorizontal, NE-SW, minimum stress axis. A minor, very local, and shallow (<5 km) strike-slip component of the stress field was observed in the Colfiorito sector, where an inherited N-S oriented right-lateral fault was reactivated with sinistral kinematics. Instead, an almost total absence of strike-slip solutions was observed in the L'Aquila area. These results do not agree with those indicating Quaternary regional strike-slip regimes or wide areas characterized by strike-slip deformation during the Colfiorito and L'Aquila seismic sequences.

  20. The anatomy of the 2009 L'Aquila normal fault system (central Italy) imaged by high resolution foreshock and aftershock locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, L.; Valoroso, L.; Piccinini, D.; di Stefano, R.; de Gori, P.

    2011-12-01

    On 6 April (01:32 UTC) 2009 a MW 6.1 normal faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in central Italy. We study the geometry of fault segments using high resolution foreshock and aftershock locations. Two main SW dipping segments, the L'Aquila and Campotosto faults, forming an en echelon system 40 km long (NW trending). The 16 km long L'Aquila fault shows a planar geometry with constant dip (˜48°) through the entire upper crust down to 10 km depth. The Campotosto fault activated by three events with 5.0 ≤ MW ≤ 5.2 shows a striking listric geometry, composed by planar segments with different dips along depth rather than a smoothly curving single fault surface. The investigation of the spatiotemporal evolution of foreshock activity within the crustal volume where the subsequent L'Aquila main shock nucleated allows us to image the progressive activation of the main fault plane. From the beginning of 2009 the foreshocks activated the deepest portion of the fault until a week before the main shock, when the largest foreshock (MW 4.0) triggered a minor antithetic segment. Seismicity jumped back to the main plane a few hours before the main shock. Secondary synthetic and antithetic fault segments are present both on the hanging and footwall of the system. The stress tensor obtained by inverting focal mechanisms of the largest events reveals a NE trending extension and the majority of the aftershocks are kinematically consistent. Deviations from the dominant extensional strain pattern are observed for those earthquakes activating minor structures.

  1. Multiple Views of X1.4 Solar Flare on July 12, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the July 12, 2012 X1.4 class solar flare in a variety of wavelength; 131- Teal colored, 335 - blue colored, 171 - yellow colored and finally a combined wavelength view. All video w...

  2. X1.6 Class Solar Flare on Sept. 10, 2014

    NASA Video Gallery

    An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun on Sept. 10, 2014. These images were captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. It first shows the flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelengt...

  3. [The hazards of reconstruction: anthropology of dwelling and social health risk in the L'Aquila (Central Italy) post-earthquake].

    PubMed

    Ciccozzi, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Even starting from the purpose of restoring the damage caused by a natural disaster, the post-earthquake reconstructions imply the risk of triggering a set of social disasters that may affect the public health sphere. In the case of the L'Aquila earthquake this risk seems to emerge within the urban planning on two levels of dwelling: at a landscape level, where there has been a change in the shape of the city towards a sprawling-sprinkling process; at an architectural level, on the problematic relationship between the politics and the poetics of cultural heritage protection and the goal to get restoration works capable to ensure the citizens seismic safety.

  4. Observation of the X-ray source Sco X-1 from Skylab. [radiant flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt to observe the discrete X-ray source Sco X-1 on 20 September 1973 between 0856 and 0920 UT is reported. Data obtained with the ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer, in particular the flux observed with the 1.71 to 4.96 KeV counter, is analyzed. No photographic image of the source was obtained because Sco X-1 was outside the field of view of the X-ray telescope.

  5. PinX1: structure, regulation and its functions in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ping-Fu; Chen, Yan-Su; Song, Wen-Bo; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2016-01-01

    PIN2/TRF1-interacting telomerase inhibitor 1 (PinX1) is a novel cloned gene located at human chromosome 8p23, playing a vital role in maintaining telomeres length and chromosome stability. It has been demonstrated to be involved in tumor genesis and progression in most malignancies. However, some researches showed opposing molecular status of PinX1 gene and its expression patterns in several other types of tumors. The pathogenic mechanism of PinX1 expression in human malignancy is not yet clear. Moreover, emerging evidence suggest that PinX1 (especially its TID domain) might be a potential new target cancer treatment. Therefore, PinX1 may be a new potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for human cancers, and may play different roles in different human cancers. The functions and the mechanisms of PinX1 in various human cancers remain unclear, suggesting the necessity of further extensive works of its role in tumor genesis and progression. PMID:27556185

  6. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Benacquista, Matthew J; Downing, Jonathan M B

    2013-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10(4)-10(6) stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  7. Multilevel Models for Binary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The methods and models for categorical data analysis cover considerable ground, ranging from regression-type models for binary and binomial data, count data, to ordered and unordered polytomous variables, as well as regression models that mix qualitative and continuous data. This article focuses on methods for binary or binomial data, which are…

  8. A census of dense cores in the Aquila cloud complex: SPIRE/PACS observations from the Herschel Gould Belt survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, V.; André, Ph.; Men'shchikov, A.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Schneider, N.; Roy, A.; Didelon, P.; Maury, A.; Shimajiri, Y.; Di Francesco, J.; Bontemps, S.; Peretto, N.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Elia, D.; Griffin, M. J.; Hill, T.; Kirk, J.; Ladjelate, B.; Marsh, K.; Martin, P. G.; Motte, F.; Nguyên Luong, Q.; Pezzuto, S.; Roussel, H.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Schisano, E.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present and discuss the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS) observations in an 11 deg2 area of the Aquila molecular cloud complex at d 260 pc, imaged with the SPIRE and PACS photometric cameras in parallel mode from 70 μm to 500 μm. Using the multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm getsources, we identify a complete sample of starless dense cores and embedded (Class 0-I) protostars in this region, and analyze their global properties and spatial distributions. We find a total of 651 starless cores, 60% ± 10% of which are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, and they will likely form stars inthe future. We also detect 58 protostellar cores. The core mass function (CMF) derived for the large population of prestellar cores is very similar in shape to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), confirming earlier findings on a much stronger statistical basis and supporting the view that there is a close physical link between the stellar IMF and the prestellar CMF. The global shift in mass scale observed between the CMF and the IMF is consistent with a typical star formation efficiency of 40% at the level of an individual core. By comparing the numbers of starless cores in various density bins to the number of young stellar objects (YSOs), we estimate that the lifetime of prestellar cores is 1 Myr, which is typically 4 times longer than the core free-fall time, and that it decreases with average core density. We find a strong correlation between the spatial distribution of prestellar cores and the densest filaments observed in the Aquila complex. About 90% of the Herschel-identified prestellar cores are located above a background column density corresponding to AV 7, and 75% of them lie within filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unit length ≳16 M⊙/pc. These findings support a picture wherein the cores making up the peak of the CMF (and probably responsible for the base of the IMF) result primarily from the

  9. The preparatory phase of the April 6th 2009, Mw 6.3, L’Aquila earthquake: Seismological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucente, F. P.; de Gori, P.; Margheriti, L.; Piccinini, D.; Dibona, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Piana Agostinetti, N.

    2009-12-01

    Few decades ago, the dilatancy-diffusion hypothesis held great promise as a physical basis for developing earthquakes prediction techniques, but the potential never become reality, as the result of too few observations consistent with the theory. One of the main problems has been the lack of detailed monitoring records of small earthquakes swarms spatio-temporally close to the incoming major earthquakes. In fact, the recognition of dilatancy-related effects requires the use of very dense network of three-component seismographs, which, in turn, implies the a-priori knowledge of major earthquakes location, i.e., actually a paradox. The deterministic prediction of earthquakes remains a long time, hard task to accomplish. Nevertheless, for seismologists, the understanding of the processes that preside over the earthquakes nucleation and the mechanics of faulting represents a big step toward the ability to predict earthquakes. Here we describe a set of seismological observations done on the foreshock sequence that preceded the April 6th 2009, Mw 6.3, L’Aquila earthquake. In this occasion, the dense configuration of the seismic network in the area gave us the unique opportunity for a detailed reconstruction of the preparatory phase of the main shock. We show that measurable precursory effects, as changes of the seismic waves velocity and of the anisotropic parameters in the crust, occurred before the main shock. From our observations we infer that fluids play a key role in the fault failure process, and, most significantly, that the elastic properties of the rock volume surrounding the main shock nucleation area undergo a dramatic change about a week before the main shock occurrence.

  10. Long-term blood pressure changes induced by the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: assessment by 24 h ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Petrarca, Marco; Petrazzi, Luisa; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Properzi, Giuliana; Desideri, Giovambattista; Omboni, Stefano; Parati, Gianfranco; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    An increased rate of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events has been described during and immediately after earthquakes. In this regard, few data are available on long-term blood pressure control in hypertensive outpatients after an earthquake. We evaluated the long-term effects of the April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake on blood pressure levels, as detected by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Before/after (mean±s.d. 6.9±4.5/14.2±5.1 months, respectively) the earthquake, the available 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data for the same patients were extracted from our database. Quake-related daily life discomforts were evaluated through interviews. We enrolled 47 patients (25 female, age 52±14 years), divided into three groups according to antihypertensive therapy changes after versus before the earthquake: unchanged therapy (n=24), increased therapy (n=17) and reduced therapy (n=6). Compared with before the quake, in the unchanged therapy group marked increases in 24 h (P=0.004), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.02) systolic blood pressure were observed after the quake. Corresponding changes in 24 h (P=0.005), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.009) diastolic blood pressure were observed. Daily life discomforts were reported more frequently in the unchanged therapy and increased therapy groups than the reduced therapy group (P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). In conclusion, this study shows that patients with unchanged therapy display marked blood pressure increments up to more than 1 year after an earthquake, as well as long-term quake-related discomfort. Our data suggest that particular attention to blood pressure levels and adequate therapy modifications should be considered after an earthquake, not only early after the event but also months later.

  11. Source parameters of small and moderate earthquakes in the area of the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake sequence (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Sebastiano; Orecchio, Barbara; Presti, Debora; Neri, Giancarlo; Wu, Wen-Nan; Sandu, Ilie; Zhu, Lupei; Herrmann, Robert B.

    The main goal of this study is to provide moment tensor solutions for small and moderate earthquakes of the 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence (central Italy). The analysis was performed by using data coming from the permanent Italian seismic network run by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and the “Cut And Paste” (CAP) method based on broadband waveform inversion. Focal mechanisms, source depths and moment magnitudes are determined through a grid search technique. By allowing time shifts between synthetics and observed data the CAP method reduces dependence of the solution on the assumed velocity model and on earthquake location. We computed seismic moment tensors for 312 earthquakes having local magnitude in the range between 2.7 and 5.9. The CAP method has made possible to considerably expand the database of focal mechanisms from waveform analysis in the lowest magnitude range (i.e. in the neighborhood of magnitude 3) without overlooking the reliability of results. The obtained focal mechanisms generally show NW-SE striking focal planes in agreement with mapped faults in the region. Comparisons with the already published solutions and with seismological and geological information available allowed us to proper interpret the moment tensor solutions in the frame of the seismic sequence evolution and also to furnish additional information about less energetic seismic phases. Focal data were inverted to obtain the seismogenic stress in the study area. Results are compatible with the major tectonic domain. We also obtained a relation between moment and local magnitude suitable for the area and for the available magnitude range.

  12. The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake sequence: technical and scientific activities during the emergency and post-emergency phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    The Central Apennines of Italy is an area characterized by significant seismic activity. In this area, individual earthquakes and prolonged seismic sequences produce a variety of ground effects, including landslides. The L'Aquila area, in the Abruzzo Region, was affected by an earthquake sequence that started on December 2008, and continued for several months. The main shock occurred on April 6, 2009, with local magnitude m = 6.3, and was followed by two separate earthquakes on April 7 and April 9, each with a local magnitude m > 5.0. The main shocks caused 308 fatalities, injured more than 1500 people, and left in excess of 65,000 people homeless. Damage to the cultural heritage was also severe, with tens of churches and historical buildings severely damaged or destroyed. The main shocks and some of the most severe aftershocks triggered landslides, chiefly rock falls and minor rock slides that caused damage to towns, individual houses, and the transportation network. Beginning in the immediate aftermath of the event, and continuing during the emergency and post-emergency phases, we assisted the Italian national Department for Civil Protection in the evaluation of local landslide and hydrological risk conditions. Technical and scientific activities focused on: (i) mapping the location, type, and severity of the main ground effects produced by the earthquake shaking, (ii) evaluating and selecting sites for potential new settlements and individual buildings, including a preliminary assessment of the local geomorphological and hydrological conditions; (iii) evaluating rock fall hazard at individual sites, (iv) monitoring slope and ground deformations, and (v) designing and implementing a prototype system for the forecast of the possible occurrence of rainfall-induced landslides. To execute these activates, we exploited a wide range of methods, techniques, and technologies, and we performed repeated field surveys, the interpretation of ground and aerial photographs

  13. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  14. BINARY ASTROMETRIC MICROLENSING WITH GAIA

    SciTech Connect

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2015-04-15

    We investigate whether or not Gaia can specify the binary fractions of massive stellar populations in the Galactic disk through astrometric microlensing. Furthermore, we study whether or not some information about their mass distributions can be inferred via this method. In this regard, we simulate the binary astrometric microlensing events due to massive stellar populations according to the Gaia observing strategy by considering (i) stellar-mass black holes, (ii) neutron stars, (iii) white dwarfs, and (iv) main-sequence stars as microlenses. The Gaia efficiency for detecting the binary signatures in binary astrometric microlensing events is ∼10%–20%. By calculating the optical depth due to the mentioned stellar populations, the numbers of the binary astrometric microlensing events being observed with Gaia with detectable binary signatures, for the binary fraction of about 0.1, are estimated to be 6, 11, 77, and 1316, respectively. Consequently, Gaia can potentially specify the binary fractions of these massive stellar populations. However, the binary fraction of black holes measured with this method has a large uncertainty owing to a low number of the estimated events. Knowing the binary fractions in massive stellar populations helps with studying the gravitational waves. Moreover, we investigate the number of massive microlenses for which Gaia specifies masses through astrometric microlensing of single lenses toward the Galactic bulge. The resulting efficiencies of measuring the mass of mentioned populations are 9.8%, 2.9%, 1.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. The numbers of their astrometric microlensing events being observed in the Gaia era in which the lens mass can be inferred with the relative error less than 0.5 toward the Galactic bulge are estimated as 45, 34, 76, and 786, respectively. Hence, Gaia potentially gives us some information about the mass distribution of these massive stellar populations.

  15. X-1-3 being mated to EB-50A Superfortress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    The third X-1 (46-064), known as 'Queenie,' is mated to the EB-50A (46-006) at Edwards AFB, California. Following a captive flight on 9 November 1951, both aircraft were destroyed by fire during defueling. This particular X-1 only flew twice, the first flight occurring on 20 July 1951. Bell pilot Joseph Cannon was the pilot on both flights, although the second flight was only a captive flight. Cannon was injured in the fire. The first of the rocket-powered research aircraft, the X-1 (originally designated the XS-1), was a bullet-shaped airplane that was built by the Bell Aircraft Company for the US Air Force and the NACA. The mission of the X-1 was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' The first of the three X-1's was glide-tested at Pinecastle Army Airfield, FL, in early 1946. The first powered flight of the X-1 was made on Dec. 9, 1946, at Edwards Air Force Base with Chalmers Goodlin, a Bell test pilot, at the controls. On Oct. 14, 1947, with USAF Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager as pilot, the aircraft flew faster than the speed of sound for the first time. Captain Yeager ignited the four-chambered XLR-11 rocket engines after the B-29 air-launched it from under the bomb bay of a B-29 at 21,000 feet. The 6,000-pound thrust ethyl alcohol/liquid oxygen burning rockets, built by Reaction Motors, Inc., pushed the aircraft up to a speed of 700 miles per hour in level flight. Captain Yeager was also the pilot when the X-1 reached its maximum speed, 957 miles per hour. Another USAF pilot. Lt. Col. Frank Everest, Jr., was credited with taking the X-1 to its maximum altitude of 71,902 feet. Eighteen pilots in all flew the X-1s. The number three plane was destroyed in a fire before ever making any powered flights. A single-place monoplane, the X-1 was 30 feet, 11 inches long; 10 feet, 10 inches high; and had a wingspan of 29 feet. It weighed 6,784 pounds and carried 6

  16. Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy of the A' 1Pi-X1Sigma+ and A1Pi-X1Sigma+ Systems of IrN.

    PubMed

    Ram; Bernath

    1999-02-01

    The emission spectrum of IrN has been investigated in the 10 000-20 000 cm-1 region at 0.02 cm-1 resolution using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The bands were excited in an Ir hollow cathode lamp operated with a mixture of 2 Torr of Ne and a trace of N2. Numerous bands have been classified into two transitions labeled as A1Pi-X1Sigma+ and A' 1Pi-X1Sigma+ by analogy with the isoelectronic PtC molecule. Ten bands involving vibrational levels up to Kv = 4 in the ground and excited states have been identified in the A1Pi-X1Sigma+ transition. This electronic transition has been previously observed by [A. J. Marr, M. E. Flores, and T. C. Steimle, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 8183-8196 (1996)]. To lower wavenumbers, five additional bands with R heads near 12 021, 12 816, 13 135, 14 136, and 15 125 cm-1 have been assigned as the 0-1, 3-3, 0-0, 1-0, and 2-0 bands, respectively, of the new A' 1Pi-X1Sigma+ transition. A rotational analysis of these bands has been carried out and equilibrium constants for the ground and excited states have been extracted. The Kv = 2 and 3 vibrational levels of the A' 1Pi state interact with the Kv = 0 and 1 levels of the A1Pi state and cause global perturbations in the bands. The ground state equilibrium constants for 193IrN are: omegae = 1126.176360(61) cm-1, omegaexe = 6.289697(32) cm-1, Be = 0.5001033(20) cm-1, alphae = 0.0032006(20) cm-1, and re = 1.6068276(32) Å. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Evolution of Small Binary Asteroids with the Binary YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Small, Near-Earth binaries are believed to be created following the fission of an asteroid spun up by the YORP effect. It is then believed that the YORP effect acting on the secondary (Binary YORP) increases or decreases the binary mutual distance on 10^5 yr timescales. How long this mechanism can apply is not yet fully understood. We investigate the binary orbital and rotational dynamics by using non-averaged, direct numerical simulations, taking into account the relative motion of two ellipsoids (primary and secondary) and the solar perturbation. We add the YORP force and torque on the orbital and rotational motion of the secondary. As a check of our code we obtain a ~ 7.2 cm/yr drift in semi-major axis for 1999 KW4 beta, consistent with the values obtained with former analytical studies. The synchronous rotation of the secondary is required for the Binary YORP to be effective. We investigate the synchronous lock of the secondary in function of different parameters ; mutual distance, shape of the secondary, and heliocentric orbit. For example we show that the secondary of 1999 KW4 can be synchronous only up to 7 Rp (primary radius), where the resonance becomes completely chaotic even for very small eccentricities. We use Gaussian Random Spheres to obtain various secondary shapes, and check the evolution of the binaries with the Binary YORP effect.

  18. Expression and purification of orphan cytochrome P450 4X1 and oxidation of anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Katarina; Dostalek, Miroslav; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4X1 is one of the so-called “orphan” P450s without assigned biological function. Codon-optimized P450 4X1 and a number of N-terminal modified sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli. Native P450 4X1 showed a characteristic P450 spectrum but low expression in E. coli DH5α cells (<100 nmol P450/L). The highest level of expression (300-450 nmol P450/L culture) was achieved with a bicistronic P450 4X1 construct (N-terminal MAKKTSSKGKL, change of E2A, amino acids 3-44 truncated). Anandamide (arachidonoyl ethanolamide) has emerged as an important signaling molecule in the neurovascular cascade. Recombinant P450 4X1 protein, co-expressed with human NADPH-P450 reductase in E. coli, was found to convert the natural endocannabinoid anandamide to a single monooxygenated product, 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic (EET) ethanolamide. A stable anandamide analog (CD-25) was also converted to a monooxygenated product. Arachidonic acid was oxidized more slowly to 14,15- and 8,9-EETs but only in the presence of cytochrome b5. Other fatty acids were investigated as putative substrates but showed only little or minor oxidation. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated extrahepatic mRNA expression, including several human brain structures (cerebellum, amygdala, and basal ganglia), in addition to expression in human heart, liver, prostate, and breast. The highest mRNA expression levels were detected in amygdala and skin. The ability of P450 4X1 to generate anandamide derivatives and the mRNA distribution pattern suggest a potential role for P450 4X1 in anandamide signaling in the brain. PMID:18549450

  19. Integrated Technologies for Surveying Artefacts Damaged by Earthquakes. Application of All-In LIDAR Techniques in the City of L'AQUILA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clini, P.; Quattrini, R.; Fiori, F.; Nespeca, R.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate how, in post-earthquake intervention scenarios, the latest "all-in-one" laser technologies employed beyond their usual applications and integrated in more traditional survey methods, can define a comprehensive and original approach method in response to surveying issues, safety of the artefacts, speed and low cost of surveys, quality of data and of the models provided for damage assessments and any required action. The case study of L'Aquila is therefore significant. The red area has essentially two types of buildings: monuments and historical buildings characterised by compact urban centres. Here we document the convent of the Blessed Antonia and the Antenucci Block, as case studies and synthesis of the two types and ideal laboratories to test the chosen method. In the first case, we document the project on a building that is yet to be secured and that therefore presents delicate issues in terms of survey speed and completeness, also in relation to the precious decorations that it holds. In the other case, we document the survey of the typical block in Aquila, already secured which, given the size and complexity, requires an integrated approach, more complex and more time-consuming of methods of analysis.

  20. Remote Sensing of Urban Microclimate Change in L’Aquila City (Italy) after Post-Earthquake Depopulation in an Open Source GIS Environment

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchi, Valerio; Zottele, Fabio; Dominici, Donatella

    2017-01-01

    This work reports a first attempt to use Landsat satellite imagery to identify possible urban microclimate changes in a city center after a seismic event that affected L’Aquila City (Abruzzo Region, Italy), on 6 April 2009. After the main seismic event, the collapse of part of the buildings, and the damaging of most of them, with the consequence of an almost total depopulation of the historic city center, may have caused alterations to the microclimate. This work develops an inexpensive work flow—using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) scenes—to construct the evolution of urban land use after the catastrophic main seismic event that hit L’Aquila. We hypothesized, that, possibly, before the event, the temperature was higher in the city center due to the presence of inhabitants (and thus home heating); while the opposite case occurred in the surrounding areas, where new settlements of inhabitants grew over a period of a few months. We decided not to look to independent meteorological data in order to avoid being biased in their investigations; thus, only the smallest dataset of Landsat ETM+ scenes were considered as input data in order to describe the thermal evolution of the land surface after the earthquake. We managed to use the Landsat archive images to provide thermal change indications, useful for understanding the urban changes induced by catastrophic events, setting up an easy to implement, robust, reproducible, and fast procedure. PMID:28218724

  1. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  2. A LIKELY MICRO-QUASAR IN THE SHADOW OF M82 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-jie; Liu, Jifeng; Liu, Jiren E-mail: jfliu@nao.cas.cn

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-luminous X-ray source M82 X-1 is one of the most promising intermediate mass black hole candidates in the local universe based on its high X-ray luminosities (10{sup 40}–10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1}) and quasi-periodic oscillations, and is possibly associated with a radio flare source. In this work, applying the sub-pixel technique to the 120 ks Chandra observation (ID: 10543) of M82 X-1, we split M82 X-1 into two sources separated by 1.″1. The secondary source is not detected in other M82 observations. The radio flare source is not found to associate with M82 X-1, but is instead associated with the nearby transient source S1 with an outburst luminosity of ∼10{sup 39} erg s{sup −1}. With X-ray outburst and radio flare activities analogous to the recently discovered micro-quasar in M31, S1 is likely to be a micro-quasar hidden in the shadow of M82 X-1.

  3. Two P2X1 receptor transcripts able to form functional channels are present in most human monocytes.

    PubMed

    López-López, Cintya; Jaramillo-Polanco, Josue; Portales-Pérez, Diana P; Gómez-Coronado, Karen S; Rodríguez-Meléndez, Jessica G; Cortés-García, Juan D; Espinosa-Luna, Rosa; Montaño, Luis M; Barajas-López, Carlos

    2016-12-15

    To characterize the presence and general properties of P2X1 receptors in single human monocytes we used RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and the patch-clamp and the two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. Most human monocytes expressed the canonical P2X1 (90%) and its splicing variant P2X1del (88%) mRNAs. P2X1 receptor immunoreactivity was also observed in 70% of these cells. Currents mediated by P2X1 (EC50=1.9±0.8µm) and P2X1del (EC50 >1000µm) channels, expressed in Xenopus leavis oocytes, have different ATP sensitivity and kinetics. Both currents mediated by P2X1 and P2X1del channels kept increasing during the continuous presence of high ATP concentrations. Currents mediated by the native P2X1 receptors in human monocytes showed an EC50=6.3±0.2µm. Currents have kinetics that resemble those observed for P2X1 and P2X1del receptors in oocytes. Our study is the first to demonstrate the expression of P2X1 transcript and its splicing variant P2X1del in most human monocytes. We also, for the first time, described functional homomeric P2X1del channels and demonstrated that currents mediated by P2X1 or P2X1del receptors, during heterologous expression, increased in amplitude when activated with high ATP concentrations in a similar fashion to those channels that increase their conductance under similar conditions, such as P2X7, P2X2, and P2X4 channels.

  4. Modified evolution of stellar binaries from supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Yi-Han; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of main-sequence binaries resided in the galactic centre is influenced a lot by the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Due to this perturbation, the stars in a dense environment are likely to experience mergers or collisions through secular or non-secular interactions. In this work, we study the dynamics of the stellar binaries at galactic centre, perturbed by another distant SMBH. Geometrically, such a four-body system is supposed to be decomposed into the inner triple (SMBH-star-star) and the outer triple (SMBH-stellar binary-SMBH). We survey the parameter space and determine the criteria analytically for the stellar mergers and the tidal disruption events (TDEs). For a relative distant and equal masses SMBH binary, the stars have more opportunities to merge as a result from the Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations in the inner triple. With a sample of tight stellar binaries, our numerical experiments reveal that a significant fraction of the binaries, ∼70 per cent, experience merger eventually. Whereas the majority of the stellar TDEs are likely to occur at a close periapses to the SMBH, induced by the outer Kozai effect. The tidal disruptions are found numerically as many as ∼10 per cent for a close SMBH binary that is enhanced significantly than the one without the external SMBH. These effects require the outer perturber to have an inclined orbit (≥40°) relatively to the inner orbital plane and may lead to a burst of the extremely astronomical events associated with the detection of the SMBH binary.

  5. Magnetic properties of the iron sublattice in the YFe12-xMx compounds (M = Ti, Mo or V; x = 1-3.5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnard, O.; Pop, V.

    2009-10-01

    The magnetic properties of the YFe12-xMx compounds (M = Ti, Mo or V; x = 1-3.5) have been determined in the ordered ferromagnetic state as well as in the paramagnetic state. The iron magnetic moment has been determined from 4 K up to the Curie temperature whereas the analysis of the paramagnetic region has led to the determination of the effective iron magnetic moment. The number of spins has been calculated below and above the Curie temperature in order to discuss the degree of itinerancy of the Fe magnetic behavior in the YFe12-xMx compounds. All the YFe12-xMx compounds (M = Ti, Mo or V; x = 1-3.5) have very similar crystalline properties: they crystallize in the same crystal structure and all the M elements used here are known to substitute for iron on the same crystal site. In contrast, they exhibit a wide range of magnetic behavior; the Curie temperature varies from 63 to 539 K and the mean magnetic moment per iron atom is also very dependent upon the M element used and its concentration. Furthermore the degree of itinerancy of the iron is not preserved along YFe12-xMx compounds but is found to depend significantly upon the nature of the substituting element M and its concentration. The results are discussed and compared to earlier published results obtained on binary R-Fe and ternary R-Fe-B compounds.

  6. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Electrophoresis has long been recognized as an effective analytic technique for the separation of proteins and other charged species, however attempts at scaling up to accommodate commercial volumes have met with limited success. In this report we describe a novel electrophoretic separation technique - Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis (BOCE). Numerical simulations indicate that the technique has the potential for preparative scale throughputs with high resolution, while simultaneously avoiding many problems common to conventional electrophoresis. The technique utilizes the interaction of an oscillatory electric field and a transverse oscillatory shear flow to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged protein species. An oscillatory electric field is applied across the narrow gap of a rectangular channel inducing a periodic motion of charged protein species. The amplitude of this motion depends on the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility, alpha = E(sub o)mu/(omega)d, where E(sub o) is the amplitude of the electric field oscillations, mu is the dimensional mobility, omega is the angular frequency of oscillation and d is the channel gap width. An oscillatory shear flow is induced along the length of the channel resulting in the separation of species with different mobilities. We present a model that predicts the oscillatory behavior of charged species and allows estimation of both the magnitude of the induced convective velocity and the effective diffusivity as a function of a in infinitely long channels. Numerical results indicate that in addition to the mobility dependence, the steady state behavior of solute species may be strongly affected by oscillating fluid into and out of the active electric field region at the ends of the cell. The effect is most pronounced using time dependent shear flows of the same frequency (cos((omega)t)) flow mode) as the electric field oscillations. Under such conditions, experiments indicate that

  7. Stability of binaries. Part II: Rubble-pile binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2016-10-01

    We consider the stability of the binary asteroids whose members are granular aggregates held together by self-gravity alone. A binary is said to be stable whenever both its members are orbitally and structurally stable to both orbital and structural perturbations. To this end, we extend the stability analysis of Sharma (Sharma [2015] Icarus, 258, 438-453), that is applicable to binaries with rigid members, to the case of binary systems with rubble members. We employ volume averaging (Sharma et al. [2009] Icarus, 200, 304-322), which was inspired by past work on elastic/fluid, rotating and gravitating ellipsoids. This technique has shown promise when applied to rubble-pile ellipsoids, but requires further work to settle some of its underlying assumptions. The stability test is finally applied to some suspected binary systems, viz., 216 Kleopatra, 624 Hektor and 90 Antiope. We also see that equilibrated binaries that are close to mobilizing their maximum friction can sustain only a narrow range of shapes and, generally, congruent shapes are preferred.

  8. Binary star database: binaries discovered in non-optical bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Oleg Yu.; Tessema, Solomon B.; Kniazev, Alexei Yu.

    The Binary star Database (BDB) is the world's principal database of binary and multiple systems of all observational types. In particular, it should contain data on binaries discovered in non-optical bands, X-ray binaries (XRBs) and radio pulsars in binaries. The goal of the present study was to compile complete lists of such objects. Due to the lack of a unified identification system for XRBs, we had to select them from five principal catalogues of X-ray sources. After cross-identification and positional cross-matching, a general catalogue of 373 XRBs was constructed for the first time. It contains coordinates, indication of photometric and spectroscopic binarity, and extensive cross-identification. In the preparation of the catalogue, a number of XRB classification disagreements were resolved, some catalogued identifiers and coordinates were corrected, and duplicated entries in the original catalogues were found. We have also compiled a general list of 239 radio pulsars in binary systems. The list is supplied with indication of photometric, spectroscopic or X-ray binarity, and with cross-identification data.

  9. How to Determine The Precession of the Inner Accretion Disk in Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D F; Romero, G E; Barcons, X; Lu, Y

    2005-01-05

    We show that changes in the orientation of the inner accretion disk of Cygnus X-1 affect the shape of the broad Fe K{alpha} emission line emitted from this object, in such a way that eV-level spectral resolution observations (such as those that will be carried out by the ASTRO-E2 satellite) can be used to analyze the dynamics of the disk. We here present a new diagnosis tool, supported by numerical simulations, by which short observations of Cygnus X-1, separated in time, can determine whether its accretion disk actually processes, and if so, determine its period and precession angle. Knowing the precession parameters of Cygnus X-1 would result in a clarification of the origin of such precession, distinguishing between tidal and spin-spin coupling. This approach could also be used for similar studies in other microquasar systems.

  10. Systems analysis and engineering of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; Hands, J.A.; Raglin, P.S.; Ramirez, J.J.

    1998-10-01

    The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source, which will produce {approximately} 16 MJ in x-rays, represents the next step in providing US Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray sources needed for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation (RES), Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), and Weapon Physics (WP) Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories` Z Accelerator in 1997 provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. This paper will introduce the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source Facility Project, describe the systems analysis and engineering approach being used, and identify critical technology areas being researched.

  11. Scaling of the F_2 structure function in nuclei and quark distributions at x>1

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, N; Arrington, J; Gaskell, D; Daniel, A; Seely, J; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Boillat, B; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M.H.S.; Christy, M E; Chudakov, E; Clasie, B; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Dutta, D; Ent, R; El Fassi, L; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Garrow, K; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lindgren, R; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Okayasu, Y; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W F; Wasko, C; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Wright, J; Zheng, X

    2010-11-01

    We present new data on electron scattering from a range of nuclei taken in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. For heavy nuclei, we observe a rapid falloff in the cross section for $x>1$, which is sensitive to short range contributions to the nuclear wave-function, and in deep inelastic scattering corresponds to probing extremely high momentum quarks. This result agrees with higher energy muon scattering measurements, but is in sharp contrast to neutrino scattering measurements which suggested a dramatic enhancement in the distribution of the `super-fast' quarks probed at x>1. The falloff at x>1 is noticeably stronger in ^2H and ^3He, but nearly identical for all heavier nuclei.

  12. Binary black hole spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeck, Chris; Sengupta, Anand S.

    2007-03-01

    We study parameter estimation with post-Newtonian (PN) gravitational waveforms for the quasi-circular, adiabatic inspiral of spinning binary compact objects. In particular, the performance of amplitude-corrected waveforms is compared with that of the more commonly used restricted waveforms, in Advanced LIGO and EGO. With restricted waveforms, the properties of the source can only be extracted from the phasing. In the case of amplitude-corrected waveforms, the spectrum encodes a wealth of additional information, which leads to dramatic improvements in parameter estimation. At distances of ~100 Mpc, the full PN waveforms allow for high-accuracy parameter extraction for total mass up to several hundred solar masses, while with the restricted ones the errors are steep functions of mass, and accurate parameter estimation is only possible for relatively light stellar mass binaries. At the low-mass end, the inclusion of amplitude corrections reduces the error on the time of coalescence by an order of magnitude in Advanced LIGO and a factor of 5 in EGO compared to the restricted waveforms; at higher masses these differences are much larger. The individual component masses, which are very poorly determined with restricted waveforms, become measurable with high accuracy if amplitude-corrected waveforms are used, with errors as low as a few per cent in Advanced LIGO and a few tenths of a per cent in EGO. The usual spin orbit parameter β is also poorly determined with restricted waveforms (except for low-mass systems in EGO), but the full waveforms give errors that are small compared to the largest possible value consistent with the Kerr bound. This suggests a way of finding out if one or both of the component objects violate this bound. On the other hand, we find that the spin spin parameter σ remains poorly determined even when the full waveform is used. Generally, all errors have but a weak dependence on the magnitudes and orientations of the spins. We also briefly

  13. Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of the Focused Wind In the Cygnus X-1 System I. The Non-Dip Spectrum in the Low/Hard State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanke, Manfred; Wilms, Jorn; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schultz, Norbert S.; Lee, Julia C.

    2008-01-01

    We present analyses of a 50 ks observation of the supergiant X-ray binary system CygnusX-1/HDE226868 taken with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS). CygX-1 was in its spectrally hard state and the observation was performed during superior conjunction of the black hole, allowing for the spectroscopic analysis of the accreted stellar wind along the line of sight. A significant part of the observation covers X-ray dips as commonly observed for CygX-1 at this orbital phase, however, here we only analyze the high count rate non-dip spectrum. The full 0.5-10 keV continuum can be described by a single model consisting of a disk, a narrow and a relativistically broadened Fe K line, and a power law component, which is consistent with simultaneous RXTE broad band data. We detect absorption edges from overabundant neutral O, Ne and Fe, and absorption line series from highly ionized ions and infer column densities and Doppler shifts. With emission lines of He-like Mg XI, we detect two plasma components with velocities and densities consistent with the base of the spherical wind and a focused wind. A simple simulation of the photoionization zone suggests that large parts of the spherical wind outside of the focused stream are completely ionized, which is consistent with the low velocities (<200 km/s) observed in the absorption lines, as the position of absorbers in a spherical wind at low projected velocity is well constrained. Our observations provide input for models that couple the wind activity of HDE 226868 to the properties of the accretion flow onto the black hole.

  14. HIGHLY IONIZED Fe-K ABSORPTION LINE FROM CYGNUS X-1 IN THE HIGH/SOFT STATE OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Makishima, K.; Torii, S.; Noda, H.; Mineshige, S.; Ueda, Y.; Kubota, A.; Gandhi, P.; Done, C.

    2013-04-20

    We present observations of a transient He-like Fe K{alpha} absorption line in Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 on 2011 October 5 near superior conjunction during the high/soft state, which enable us to map the full evolution from the start to the end of the episodic accretion phenomena or dips for the first time. We model the X-ray spectra during the event and trace their evolution. The absorption line is rather weak in the first half of the observation, but instantly deepens for {approx}10 ks, and weakens thereafter. The overall change in equivalent width is a factor of {approx}3, peaking at an orbital phase of {approx}0.08. This is evidence that the companion stellar wind feeding the black hole is clumpy. By analyzing the line with a Voigt profile, it is found to be consistent with a slightly redshifted Fe XXV transition, or possibly a mixture of several species less ionized than Fe XXV. The data may be explained by a clump located at a distance of {approx}10{sup 10-12} cm with a density of {approx}10{sup (-13)-(-11)} g cm{sup -3}, which accretes onto and/or transits the line of sight to the black hole, causing an instant decrease in the observed degree of ionization and/or an increase in density of the accreting matter. Continued monitoring for individual events with future X-ray calorimeter missions such as ASTRO-H and AXSIO will allow us to map out the accretion environment in detail and how it changes between the various accretion states.

  15. Kepler K2 observations of Sco X-1: orbital modulations and correlations with Fermi GBM and MAXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Baum, Zachary A.; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; Cherry, Michael L.; Scaringi, Simone

    2016-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1 using Kepler K2 optical data and Fermi GBM and MAXI X-ray data. We recover a clear sinusoidal orbital modulation from the Kepler data. Optical fluxes are distributed bimodally around the mean orbital light curve, with both high and low states showing the same modulation. The high state is broadly consistent with the flaring branch of the Z-diagram and the low state with the normal branch. We see both rapid optical flares and slower dips in the high state, and slow brightenings in the low state. High-state flares exhibit a narrow range of amplitudes with a striking cut-off at a maximum amplitude. Optical fluxes correlate with X-ray fluxes in the high state, but in the low state they are anti-correlated. These patterns can be seen clearly in both flux-flux diagrams and cross-correlation functions and are consistent between MAXI and GBM. The high-state correlation arises promptly with at most a few minutes lag. We attribute this to thermal reprocessing of X-ray flares. The low-state anti-correlation is broader, consistent with optical lags of between zero and 30 min, and strongest with respect to high-energy X-rays. We suggest that the decreases in optical flux in the low state may reflect decreasing efficiency of disc irradiation, caused by changes in the illumination geometry. These changes could reflect the vertical extent or covering factor of obscuration or the optical depth of scattering material.

  16. P2X1 receptor blockade inhibits whole kidney autoregulation of renal blood flow in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, David A.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro experiments demonstrate that P2X1 receptor activation is important for normal afferent arteriolar autoregulatory behavior, but direct in vivo evidence for this relationship occurring in the whole kidney is unavailable. Experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that P2X1 receptors are important for autoregulation of whole kidney blood flow. Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats before and during P2 receptor blockade with PPADS, P2X1 receptor blockade with IP5I, or A1 receptor blockade with DPCPX. Both P2X1 and A1 receptor stimulation with α,β-methylene ATP and CPA, respectively, caused dose-dependent decreases in RBF. Administration of either PPADS or IP5I significantly blocked P2X1 receptor stimulation. Likewise, administration of DPCPX significantly blocked A1 receptor activation to CPA. Autoregulatory behavior was assessed by measuring RBF responses to reductions in renal perfusion pressure. In vehicle-infused rats, as pressure was decreased from 120 to 100 mmHg, there was no decrease in RBF. However, in either PPADS- or IP5I-infused rats, each decrease in pressure resulted in a significant decrease in RBF, demonstrating loss of autoregulatory ability. In DPCPX-infused rats, reductions in pressure did not cause significant reductions in RBF over the pressure range of 100–120 mmHg, but the autoregulatory curve tended to be steeper than vehicle-infused rats over the range of 80–100 mmHg, suggesting that A1 receptors may influence RBF at lower pressures. These findings are consistent with in vitro data from afferent arterioles and support the hypothesis that P2X1 receptor activation is important for whole kidney autoregulation in vivo. PMID:20335318

  17. Long-term X-ray studies of Sco X-1. [emission spectra of constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Kaluzienski, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    No modulation of the 3-6 keV X-ray intensity of Sco X-1 at a level of excess of 1% was observed at the optical period of .787313d. Evidence is found for shot-noise character in a large fraction of the X-ray emission. Almost all of the Sco X-1 emission can be synthesized in terms of approximately 200 shots per day, each with a duration of approximately 1/3 day. A pinhole camera was used to obtain data and the data were statistically analyzed.

  18. Weather, AFSCs 1W0X1/A and 15WX/A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Specialty Jobs 8 Group Descriptions 10 Comparison of Current Jobs to Previous Survey Findings 22 Job Satisfaction 24 Summary 24 AFSC 1W0X1/A...ANALYSES 27 AFSC 1W0X1/A ANALYSIS OF DAFSC GROUPS 29 Skill-Level Descriptions 29 Active Duty Versus Air National Guard Comparisons 48 Summary 48...SATISFACTION ANALYSIS 70 AFSC 15WX/A ANALYSES 77 AFSC 15WX/A ANALYSIS OF DAFSC GROUPS 79 DAFSC Descriptions 79 Active Duty, Air National Guard, and

  19. Separation in 5 Msun Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy R.; Bond, H. E.; Schaefer, G.; Mason, B. D.; Karovska, M.; Tingle, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cepheids (5 Msun stars) provide an excellent sample for determining the binary properties of fairly massive stars. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of Cepheids brighter than 8th magnitude resulted in a list of ALL companions more massive than 2.0 Msun uniformly sensitive to all separations. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has resolved three of these binaries (Eta Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen). Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations for a sample of 18 Cepheids, and also a distribution of mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the 5 Msun binaries prefer shorter periods than 1 Msun stars, reflecting differences in star formation processes.

  20. CHAOTIC ZONES AROUND GRAVITATING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2015-01-20

    The extent of the continuous zone of chaotic orbits of a small-mass tertiary around a system of two gravitationally bound primaries of comparable masses (a binary star, a binary black hole, a binary asteroid, etc.) is estimated analytically, as a function of the tertiary's orbital eccentricity. The separatrix map theory is used to demonstrate that the central continuous chaos zone emerges (above a threshold in the primaries' mass ratio) due to overlapping of the orbital resonances corresponding to the integer ratios p:1 between the tertiary and the central binary periods. In this zone, the unlimited chaotic orbital diffusion of the tertiary takes place, up to its ejection from the system. The primaries' mass ratio, above which such a chaotic zone is universally present at all initial eccentricities of the tertiary, is estimated. The diversity of the observed orbital configurations of biplanetary and circumbinary exosystems is shown to be in accord with the existence of the primaries' mass parameter threshold.

  1. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    PubMed

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'.

  2. An adaptable binary entropy coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel entropy coding technique which is based on recursive interleaving of variable-to-variable length binary source codes. We discuss code design and performance estimation methods, as well as practical encoding and decoding algorithms.

  3. A collision risk model to predict avian fatalities at wind facilities: an example using golden eagles, Aquila chrysaetos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    New, Leslie; Bjerre, Emily; Millsap, Brian A.; Otto, Mark C.; Runge, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81)). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1) in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4); 80th quantile, 6

  4. THE CHANGE OF THE ORBITAL PERIODS ACROSS ERUPTIONS AND THE EJECTED MASS FOR RECURRENT NOVAE CI AQUILAE AND U SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2011-12-01

    I report on the cumulative results from a program started 24 years ago designed to measure the orbital period change of recurrent novae (RNe) across an eruption. The goal is to use the orbital period change to measure the mass ejected during each eruption as the key part of trying to measure whether the RNe white dwarfs are gaining or losing mass over an entire eruption cycle, and hence whether they can be progenitors for Type Ia supernovae. This program has now been completed for two eclipsing RNe: CI Aquilae (CI Aql) across its eruption in 2000 and U Scorpii (U Sco) across its eruption in 1999. For CI Aql, I present 78 eclipse times from 1991 to 2009 (including four during the tail of the 2000 eruption) plus two eclipses from 1926 and 1935. For U Sco, I present 67 eclipse times, including 46 times during quiescence from 1989 to 2009, plus 21 eclipse times in the tails of the 1945, 1999, and 2010 eruptions. The eclipse times during the tails of eruptions are systematically and substantially shifted with respect to the ephemerides from the eclipses in quiescence, with this being caused by shifts of the center of light during the eruption. These eclipse times are plotted on an O - C diagram and fitted to models with a steady period change ( P-dot ) between eruptions (caused by, for example, conservative mass transfer) plus an abrupt period change ({Delta}P) at the time of eruption. The primary uncertainty arises from the correlation between {Delta}P with P-dot , such that a more negative P-dot makes for a more positive {Delta}P. For CI Aql, the best fit is {Delta}P = -3.7{sup +9.2}{sub -7.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. For U Sco, the best fit is {Delta}P = (+ 43 {+-} 69) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days. These period changes can directly give a dynamical measure of the mass ejected (M{sub ejecta}) during each eruption with negligible sensitivity to the stellar masses and no uncertainty from distances. For CI Aql, the 1{sigma} upper limit is M{sub ejecta} < 10

  5. A Collision Risk Model to Predict Avian Fatalities at Wind Facilities: An Example Using Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos

    PubMed Central

    New, Leslie; Bjerre, Emily; Millsap, Brian; Otto, Mark C.; Runge, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81)). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1) in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4); 80th quantile, 6

  6. A Collision Risk Model to Predict Avian Fatalities at Wind Facilities: An Example Using Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos.

    PubMed

    New, Leslie; Bjerre, Emily; Millsap, Brian; Otto, Mark C; Runge, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81)). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1) in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4); 80th quantile, 6

  7. Influence of contamination by organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls on the breeding of the spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti).

    PubMed

    Hernández, Mauro; González, Luis M; Oria, Javier; Sánchez, Roberto; Arroyo, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated temporal and regional trends of organochlorine (OC) pesticide (including polychlorinated biphenyl [PCB]) levels in eggs of the Spanish Imperial Eagle (Aquila adalberti) collected in Spain between 1972 and 2003. Levels of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and PCBs varied significantly (p = 0.022) among regions (central, western, and Doñana), being higher in Doñana than in the central and western populations (DDE: 1.64 +/- 5.56, 0.816 +/- 1.70, and 1.1 +/- 2.66 microg/g, respectively; PCBs: 1.189 +/- 5.0, 0.517 +/- 1.55, and 0.578 +/- 1.75 microg/g, respectively). Levels of DDE decreased with time, but a significant interaction was observed between region and time. In Doñana, egg volume and breadth as well as Ratcliffe Index were significantly lower after DDT use (p = 0.0018) than during the pre-DDT period (p = 0.0018); eggs were significantly smaller overall than in the other two regions (p = 0.04) and were smaller when DDE levels increased, even when controlling for regional differences (p = 0.04). Productivity in Doñana was significantly lower than in the other regions (p < 0.001). Clutch size in Doñana varied according to DDE concentrations (p = 0.01), with the highest DDE concentrations found in clutches consisting of one egg. When considering eggs with DDE levels greater than 3.5 microg/g, a significant effect of DDE on fertility was found (p = 0.03). Clutches with DDE levels greater than 4.0 microg/g had a higher probability of hatching failure (p = 0.07) and produced fewer fledglings (p = 0.03). If we consider 3.5 microg/g as the lowest-observable-adverse-effect level, the proportion of sampled clutches that exceeded that level in Doñana (29%) was significantly higher than in other regions (p < 0.001). These eggs showed a mean percentage of thinning of 16.72%. Contamination by OCs, mainly DDE, could explain, at least in part, the low productivity of the Spanish Imperial Eagles in Doñana.

  8. Astrophysically useful radiative transition parameters for the e 1Π- X 1Σ+ and 1Σ+- X 1Σ+ systems of zirconium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugavel, R.; Sriramachandran, P.

    2011-04-01

    The zirconium oxide (ZrO) is well known for its astrophysical importance. The radiative transition parameters that include Franck-Condon (FC) factor, r-centroid, electronic transition moments, Einstein coefficient, band oscillator strengths, radiative life time and effective vibrational temperature have been estimated for e 1Π- X 1Σ+ and 1Σ+- X 1Σ+ band systems of 90ZrO molecule for the experimentally known vibrational levels using RKR potential energy curves. A reliable numerical integration method has been used to solve the radial Schrödinger equation for the vibrational wave functions of upper and lower electronic states based on the latest available spectroscopic data and known wavelengths. The estimated radiative transition parameters are tabulated. The effective vibrational temperatures of these band systems of 90ZrO molecule are found to be below 4200 K. Hence, the radiative transition parameters help us to ascertain the presence of 90ZrO molecule in the interstellar medium, S stars and sunspots.

  9. The Hard X-ray Emission from Scorpius X-1 as Seen by INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Shrader, C. R.; Weidenspointner, G.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our hard X-ray and gamma-ray study of the LMXB Sco X-1 utilizing INTEGRAL data as well as contemporaneous RXTE PCA data. We have concentrated on investigating the hard X-ray spectral properties of Sco X-1 including the nature of the high-energy, nonthermal component of the spectrum and its possible correlations with the location of the source on the X-ray color-color diagram. We find that Sco X-1 has two distinct spectral when the 20-40 keV count rate is greater than 140 counts/second. One state is a hard state which exhibits a significant high-energy, powerlaw tail to the lower energy thermal spectrum. The other state shows no evidence for a powerlaw tail whatsoever. We found suggestive evidence for a correlation of these hard and soft high-energy states with the position of Sco X-1 on the low-energy X-ray color-color diagram.

  10. A search for an X-ray scattering halo around Scorpius X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Cash, Webster; Green, James

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment to detect the presence of X-ray scattering by interstellar dust grains in the form of a halo around Sco X-1. We utilize te principle that X-ray scattering off an optical is reduced by 1/sin theta for reflections out of the plane of incidence, thus reducing instrumental scattering off our moderate quality (1 arcminute) X-ray optic. We find an upper limit X-ray flux from Sco X-1 in the form of a halo at a mean energy of 0.69 keV of 7.6% of the point source flux at the 1 sigma confidence level. From this we derive an upper limit of E(B-V) = 0.12 towards Sco X-1. This is about half the value (E(B-V) approximately 0.3) derived toward Sco X-1 using the 2200 A interstellar absorption feature, indicating probable circumstellar origin to the 2200 A feature.

  11. Sasakian quiver gauge theory on the Aloff-Wallach space X1,1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geipel, Jakob C.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the SU (3)-equivariant dimensional reduction of gauge theories on spaces of the form Md ×X1,1 with d-dimensional Riemannian manifold Md and the Aloff-Wallach space X1,1 = SU (3) / U (1) endowed with its Sasaki-Einstein structure. The condition of SU (3)-equivariance of vector bundles, which has already occurred in the studies of Spin (7)-instantons on cones over Aloff-Wallach spaces, is interpreted in terms of quiver diagrams, and we construct the corresponding quiver bundles, using (parts of) the weight diagram of SU (3). We consider three examples thereof explicitly and then compare the results with the quiver gauge theory on Q3 = SU (3) / (U (1) × U (1)), the leaf space underlying the Sasaki-Einstein manifold X1,1. Moreover, we study instanton solutions on the metric cone C (X1,1) by evaluating the Hermitian Yang-Mills equation. We briefly discuss some features of the moduli space thereof, following the main ideas of a treatment of Hermitian Yang-Mills instantons on cones over generic Sasaki-Einstein manifolds in the literature.

  12. Development of a 1K x 1K GaAs QWIP Far IR Imaging Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Choi, K.; Goldberg, A.; La, A.; Gunapala, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the on-going evolution of GaAs Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs) we have developed a 1,024 x 1,024 (1K x1K), 8.4-9 microns infrared focal plane array (FPA). This 1 megapixel detector array is a hybrid using the Rockwell TCM 8050 silicon readout integrated circuit (ROIC) bump bonded to a GaAs QWIP array fabricated jointly by engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). The finished hybrid is thinned at the Jet Propulsion Lab. Prior to this development the largest format array was a 512 x 640 FPA. We have integrated the 1K x 1K array into an imaging camera system and performed tests over the 40K-90K temperature range achieving BLIP performance at an operating temperature of 76K (f/2 camera system). The GaAs array is relatively easy to fabricate once the superlattice structure of the quantum wells has been defined and grown. The overall arrays costs are currently dominated by the costs associated with the silicon readout since the GaAs array fabrication is based on high yield, well-established GaAs processing capabilities. In this paper we will present the first results of our 1K x 1K QWIP array development including fabrication methodology, test data and our imaging results.

  13. SDO Captures X1.4 Solar Flare on July 12, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the sun July 11-12, ending with the X1.4 class flare on July 12, 2012. It was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory in the 304 Angstrom wavelength - a wavelength coloriz...

  14. Complete genome sequence of a novel chlorpyrifos degrading bacterium, Cupriavidus nantongensis X1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Fei; Zhou, Yan-Long; Wang, Dao-Sheng; Sun, Le-Ni; Tang, Xin-Yun; Hua, Ri-Mao

    2016-06-10

    Cupriavidus nantongensis X1 is a chlorpyrifos degrading bacterium, which was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. It is the first time to report the complete genome sequence of C. nantongensis species, which has been reported as a novel species of Cupriavidus genus. It could provide further pathway information in chlorpyrifos degradation.

  15. Circinus X-1 revisited: Fast-timing properties in relation to spectral state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oosterbroek, T.; Van Der Klis, M.; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray spectral and fast-timing variations of Cir X-1 by performing a homogenous analysis of all EXOSAT ME data on this source using X-ray hardness-intensity diagrams (HIDs), color-color diagrams (CDs), and power spectra. Cir X-1 exhibits a wide range of power spectral shapes and a large variety in X-ray spectral shapes. At different epochs the power spectra variously resemble those of an atoll source, a Z source, a black-hole candidate, or are unlike any of these. At some epochs one-dimensional connected-branch patterns are seen in HID and CD, and at other times more complex structures are found. We interpret the complex behavior of Cir X-1 in terms of a model where accretion rate, orbital phase and epoch are the main determinants of the source behavior, and where the unique properties of the source are due to two special circumstances: (1) the source is the only known atoll source (accreting neutron star with a very low magnetic field) that can reach the Eddington critical accretion rate, and (2) it has a unique, highly eccentric and probably precessing orbit. Property (1) makes Cir X-1 a very important source for our understanding of the similarities in the observable properties of neutron stars and black holes as it allows to separate out black hole signatures from properties that are merely due to the presence of accretion compact with a low magnetic field.

  16. The Hard X-Ray Emission from Scorpius X-1 Seen by INTEGRAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, Steve; Shrader, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our hard X-ray and gamma-ray study of the LMXB Sco X-1 utilizing INTEGRAL data as well as contemporaneous RXTE PCA data. We have investigated the hard X-ray spectral properties of Sco X-1 including the nature of the high-energy, nonthermal component and its possible correlations with the location of the source on the soft X-ray color-color diagram. We find that Sco X-1 follows two distinct spectral tracks when the 20-40 keV count rate is greater than 130 counts/second. One state is a hard state which exhibits a significant high-energy, powerlaw tail to the lower energy thermal spectrum. The other state shows a much less significant high-energy component. We found suggestive evidence for a correlation of these hard and soft high-energy states with the position of Sco X-1 on the low-energy X-ray color-color diagram. We have searched for similar behavior in 2 other Z sources: GX 17+2 and GX 5-1 with negative results.

  17. Slope instability mapping around L'Aquila (Abruzzo, Italy) with Persistent Scatterers Interferometry from ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righini, Gaia; Del Conte, Sara; Cigna, Francesca; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) was used in natural hazards investigations with significant results and it is considered a helpful tool in ground deformations detection and mapping (Berardino et. al., 2003; Colesanti et al., 2003; Colesanti & Wasowski, 2006; Hilley et al., 2004). In this work results of PSI processing were interpreted after the main seismic shock that affected the Abruzzo region (Central Italy) on 6th of April 2009, in order to carry out a slope instability mapping according to the requirement of National Department of Civil Protection and in the framework of the Landslides thematic services of the EU FP7 project ‘SAFER' (Services and Applications For Emergency Response - Grant Agreement n° 218802). The area of interest was chosen in almost 460 km2 around L'Aquila according the highest probability of reactivations of landslides which depends on the local geological conditions, on the epicenter location and on other seismic parameters (Keefer, 1984). The radar images datasets were collected in order to provide estimates of the mean yearly velocity referred to two distinct time intervals: historic ERS (1992-2000) and recent ENVISAT (2002-2009), RADARSAT (2003-2009); the ERS and RADARSAT images were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa (TRE) using PS-InSAR(TM) technique, while the ENVISAT images were processed by e-GEOS using PSP-DIFSAR technique. A pre-existing landslide inventory map was updated through the integration of conventional photo interpretation and the radar-interpretation chain, as defined by Farina et al. (2008) and reported in literature (Farina et al. 2006, Meisina et al. 2007, Pancioli et al., 2008; Righini et al., 2008, Casagli et al., 2008, Herrera et al., 2009). The data were analyzed and interpreted in Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. Main updates of the pre-existing landslides are focusing on the identification of new landslides, modification of boundaries through the spatial

  18. Evidence of Quaternary rock avalanches in the central Apennines: new data and interpretation of the huge clastic deposit of the L'Aquila basin (central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Carlo; Scarascia Mugnozza, Gabriele; Tallini, Marco; Della Seta, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Active extensional tectonics and widespread seismicity affect the axial zone of the central Apennines (Italy) and led to the formation of several plio-quaternary intermontane basins, whose morpho-evolution was controlled by the coupling of tectonic and climatic inputs. Common features of the Apennines intermontane basins as well as their general morpho-evolution are known. Nonetheless, the complex interaction among regional uplift, local fault displacements and morpho-climatic factors caused differences in the denudational processes of the single intermontane basins. Such a dynamic response left precious records in the landscape, which in some cases testify for the occurrence of huge, catastrophic rock slope failures. Several Quaternary rock avalanches have been identified in central Apennines, which are often associated with Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DSGSD) and thus strictly related to the geological-structural setting as well as to the Quaternary morpho-structural evolution of the mountain chain. The L'Aquila basin is one of the intermontane tectonic depression aligned along the Middle Aterno River Valley and was the scene of strong historical earthquakes, among which the last destructive event occurred on April 6, 2009 (Mw 6.3). We present here the evidence that the huge clastic deposit on which the city of L'Aquila was built up is the body of a rock avalanche detached from the southern slope of the Gran Sasso Range. The clastic deposit elongates for 13 km to the SW, from the Assergi Plain to L'Aquila and is characterized by typical morphological features such as hummocky topography, compressional ridges and run-up on the opposite slope. Sedimentological characters of the deposit and grain size analyses on the matrix let us confirm the genetic interpretation, while borehole data and significant cross sections allowed us reconstructing the 3D shape and volume of the clastic body. Finally, morphometric analyses of the Gran Sasso Range southern

  19. A methodological non destructive approach for the conservation or structural repair of the Medioeval stone pillars of the Basilica of Santa Maria di Collemaggio in L'Aquila.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Quaresima; Elena, Antonacci; Felice, Fusco; Antonio, Filippone; Lorenzo, Fanale; Galeota, Dante

    2015-04-01

    The Medioeval Basilica of Santa Maria of Collemaggio in L'Aquila (XII century) due to the history and the election of Pope Celestino V, the Celestine Pardon, as well as to the artistic features, has a great religious and historic relevance. The whole Basilica was severely damaged during the earthquake of April 2009 and in particular the transetto zone with the cupola collapsed and ruined completely. By means of the project "Starting Afresh with Collemaggio" the Italian company Eni signs a memorandum of understanding with the city of L'Aquila for the restoration of the monument and of Collemaggio site. For this reason a wide and complex multidisciplinary diagnostic campaign was carried out in order to prepare the final design. A specific aspect concerned the diagnosis of the fourteen octagonal pillars of the central nave in terms of state of conservation and structural behavior. Each pillar consists, more or less, in forty big squared blocks of different local carbonatic stones. The diagnosis was preliminary executed by means of visual checks and mapping of the materials and of the structural damages. Subsequently non destructrutive ultrasonic and endoscopic techniques was carried out. The ultrasonic data were elaborated in order to obtain distribution maps of the velocity in the plane sections. To understanding the compressive strength of the stones and the resistance of the pillars, according to structural instances, destructive, compressive tests, and non destructive, ultrasonic and sclerometric measures, were performed of carbonatic blocks quarried in the sourroundings of L'Aquila. The compressive destructive results, inclusive of ultrasonic and sclerometric results, were compared with those non destructive obtained on the stone blocks of the pillars. The results allow to establish that three typologies of carbonatic stone were used. In many cases the surface of the stone, due to previously heartquake, was replaced with thick pieces of different stones

  20. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  1. Foreshocks and short-term hazard assessment of large earthquakes using complex networks: the case of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalaki, Eleni; Spiliotis, Konstantinos; Siettos, Constantinos; Minadakis, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.

    2016-08-01

    The monitoring of statistical network properties could be useful for the short-term hazard assessment of the occurrence of mainshocks in the presence of foreshocks. Using successive connections between events acquired from the earthquake catalog of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) for the case of the L'Aquila (Italy) mainshock (Mw = 6.3) of 6 April 2009, we provide evidence that network measures, both global (average clustering coefficient, small-world index) and local (betweenness centrality) ones, could potentially be exploited for forecasting purposes both in time and space. Our results reveal statistically significant increases in the topological measures and a nucleation of the betweenness centrality around the location of the epicenter about 2 months before the mainshock. The results of the analysis are robust even when considering either large or off-centered the main event space windows.

  2. Source Complexity of the 2009 L'Aquila, Italy, earthquake retrieved from the joint inversion of strong motion, GPS and DInSAR data - Evidence for a Reological Control on Rupture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirella, Antonella; Piatanesi, Alessio; Tinti, Elisa; Chini, Marco; Cocco, Massimo

    2010-05-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.3) occurred in the Central Apennines (Italy) on April 6th at the 01:32 UTC and caused nearly 300 casualties and heavy damages in the L'Aquila town and in several villages nearby. The main shock ruptured a normal fault striking along the Apennine axis and dipping at nearly 50° to the SW. The identification of the fault geometry of the L'Aquila main shock relies on the aftershock pattern, the interferometric data, the GPS displacements as well as the induced surface breakages. The earthquake provided an unprecedented data set of seismograms and geodetic data for a moderate-magnitude normal faulting event. In this study, we investigate the source process of the L'Aquila main shock by using a nonlinear joint inversion of strong motion, GPS and DInSAR data. The imaged rupture history is heterogeneous and characterized by rupture acceleration and directivity effects, which are stable features of the inverted models. The inferred slip distribution is characterized by two main asperities; a small shallow slip patch located up-dip the hypocenter and a large and deeper patch located southeastward. The rupture velocity is larger in the up-dip than in the along-strike direction. This difference can be partially accounted by the local crustal structure, which is characterized by a high body-wave velocity layer above the hypocenter (9.46 km) and lower velocities below. The latter velocity seems to have affected the along strike propagation, since the largest slip patch is located at depths between 9 and 14 km. The imaged slip distribution correlates well with the on-fault aftershock pattern as well as with mapped surface breakages. The rupture history is also consistent with the large PGA values recorded at L'Aquila that is located right above the hypocenter. Our results show that the L'Aquila earthquake featured a very complex rupture history, with strong spatial and temporal heterogeneities suggesting a strong reological control of the

  3. Gravity driven and tectonic post-seismic deformation of the April 6 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake detected by Cosmo-SkyMed DInSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Albano, M.; Bignami, C.; Malvarosa, F.; Costantini, M.; Saroli, M.; Barba, S.; Falco, S.; Stramondo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The present work focuses on the analysis of post-seismic surface deformation detected in the area of L'Aquila, Central Italy, after the strong earthquake that hit the city and the surrounding villages on April 6th, 2009. The analysis has been carried out thanks to a new dataset of SAR COSMO-SkyMed images covering a time span of 480 days after the mainshock, with the adoption of the Persistent Scatterer Pairs (PSP) approach. This method allows the estimation of surface deformations by exploiting the SAR images at full resolution. In the investigated area two patterns of subsidence have been identified reaching a maximum value of 45 mm in the northeast area of the L'Aquila town. Here the subsidence is mainly ascribable to the post seismic slip release of the Paganica fault and it does not coincide with the maximum measured coseismic subsidence. The time series of the ground deformations also reveal that a large amount of deformation is released in the first three months after the main shock. The second pattern of deformation is centered on the Mt. Ocre ridge, where a detailed photogeological analysis allowed us to identify widespread evidence of morphological elements associated with Deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DGSD). In particular geomorphologic analyses show evidences of lateral spread DGSD-type features, characterized by the tectonic superimposition of carbonatic sequences and transitional pelagic deposits. In this sector, the observed deformation is ascribable not only to the afterslip of the Paganica fault, but also to a gravitative cause. In order to confirm or reject such hypothesis a 2D numerical finite element models considering two cross sections over the Mt. Ocre ridge has been performed. The coseismic and postseimic deformations have been simulated numerically, considering an elastic-perfectly plastic rheology for the constituent rocks. First results show that most of the postseismic deformation is ascribable to the plastic deformation

  4. Experience with parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm that can be used for partitioning graphs embedded in 2- or 3-dimensional space. It partitions explicitly on the basis of nodes + (lambda)x(edges cut), where lambda is the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. The new algorithm is faster than the original binary dissection algorithm and attempts to obtain better partitions than the older algorithm, which only takes nodes into account. The performance of parametric dissection with plain binary dissection on 3 large unstructured 3-d meshes obtained from computational fluid dynamics and on 2 random graphs were compared. It was showm that the new algorithm can usually yield partitions that are substantially superior, but that its performance is heavily dependent on the input data.

  5. Co-metabolic degradation of dimethoate by Raoultella sp. X1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yili; Zeng, Fuhua; Qiu, Guanzhou; Lu, Xiangyang; Liu, Xueduan; Gao, Haichun

    2009-06-01

    A bacterium Raoultella sp. X1, based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence, was isolated. Characteristics regarding the bacterial morphology, physiology, and genetics were investigated with an electron microscopy and conventional microbiological techniques. Although the isolate grew and degraded dimethoate poorly when the chemical was used as a sole carbon and energy source, it was able to remove up to 75% of dimethoate via co-metabolism. With a response surface methodology, we optimized carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations of the media for dimethoate degradation. Raoultella sp. X1 has a potential to be a useful organism for dimethoate degradation and a model strain for studying this biological process at the molecular level.

  6. Laboratory Detection of IZnCH_{3} (X^{1}A_{1}) : Further Evidence for Zinc Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchino, Matthew P.; Young, Justin P.; Sheridan, Phil M.; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave direct absorption techniques were used to record the pure rotational spectrum of IZnCH_{3} (X^{1}A_{1}). This species was produced by the reaction of zinc vapor with ICH_{3} in the presence of a DC discharge. Rotational transitions ranging from J = 109 {→} 108 to J = 122 {→} 121 were recorded for I^{64}ZnCH_{3} and I^{66}ZnCH_{3} in the frequency range of 250{-290} GHz. The Ka = 0{-4} components were measured for each transition, with the K-ladder structure and nuclear spin statistics indicative of a symmetric top. As with HZnCH_{3} (X^{1}A_{1}), the detection of IZnCH_{3} provides further evidence for a zinc insertion process.

  7. In silico analysis of protein Lys-N&#x1D700;-acetylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. Shyama Prasad; Thelen, Jay J.; Miernyk, Ján A.

    2014-01-01

    Among post-translational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N&#x1D700;-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. The study of Lys-acetylation of plant proteins has lagged behind studies of mammalian and microbial cells; 1000s of acetylation sites have been identified in mammalian proteins compared with only hundreds of sites in plant proteins. While most previous emphasis was focused on post-translational modifications of histones, more recent studies have addressed metabolic regulation. Being directly coupled with cellular CoA/acetyl-CoA and NAD/NADH, reversible Lys-N&#x1D700;-acetylation has the potential to control, or contribute to control, of primary metabolism, signaling, and growth and development. PMID:25136347

  8. TWO CANDIDATE OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF M82 X-1 FROM HST OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Bai, Yu; Guo, Jincheng E-mail: songw@bao.ac.cn

    2015-10-20

    Optical counterparts can provide significant constraints on the physical nature of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). In this Letter, we identify six point sources in the error circle of a ULX in M82, namely M82 X-1, by registering Chandra positions onto Hubble Space Telescope images. Two objects are considered as optical counterpart candidates of M82 X-1, which show F658N flux excess compared to the optical continuum that may suggest the existence of an accretion disk. The spectral energy distributions of the two candidates match well with the spectra for supergiants, with stellar types as F5-G0 and B5-G0, respectively. Deep spatially resolved spectroscopic follow-up and detailed studies are needed to identify the true companion and confirm the properties of this BH system.

  9. Observations of rapid X-ray flaring from Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Oda, M.

    1977-01-01

    SAS-3 observations of Cyg X-1 in October 1976 show the source to be in a highly active state exhibiting rapid continual flaring on time scales of 1 to 10 s. The flares exhibit temporal structure and variable spectra, but their mean spectrum is similar to that of the source as a whole. The characteristic time scales of the source are 2 to 4 times longer than those previously observed. It is suggested that this active phase of Cyg X-1 signals a modified accretion-disk structure. The flares may result from correlated bunches of the same 'shots ' which are thought to explain the rest of the short-time-scale variability of the source. While the flares superficially resemble X-ray bursts, they are distinct in several respects.

  10. A performance evaluation of the Cray X1 for scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Borrill, Julian; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Djomehri, Jahed; Shan, Hongzhang; Skinner, David

    2004-05-02

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-end capability and capacity computers primarily because of their generality, scalability, and cost effectiveness. However, the recent development of massively parallel vector systems is having a significant effect on the supercomputing landscape. In this paper, we compare the performance of the recently-released Cray X1 vector system with that of the cacheless NEC SX-6 vector machine, and the superscalar cache-based IBM Power3 and Power4 architectures for scientific applications. Overall results demonstrate that the X1 is quite promising, but performance improvements are expected as the hardware, systems software, and numerical libraries mature. Code reengineering to effectively utilize the complex architecture may also lead to significant efficiency enhancements.

  11. Bimodal quasi-oscillatory and spectral behavior in Scorpius X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W.; Hasinger, G.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Middleditch, J.; Parmar, A.

    1986-01-01

    Exosat observations of Sco X-1 obtained using the Xe and/or Ar detectors for a total of about 80,000 s during four runs on August 24-27, 1985 are reported and analyzed. Two modes of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) corresponding to the quiescent and active states of Sco X-1 and to two modes of spectral behavior are identified and characterized, confirming the findings of Priedhorsky (1985) and Middleditch and Priedhorsky (1986). In the quiescent state, the QPO frequency is about 6 Hz and is anticorrelated with intensity, and the spectral hardness ratio (14-21 vs 2-7 keV) varies steeply with intensity; in the active state, QPO frequency is correlated with intensity and varies from 10 to 20 Hz, and the spectral-hardness-ratio/intensity curve is flatter. Previous observations of bimodal behavior in other bands are summarized, and theoretical models proposed to explain them are discussed.

  12. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 1: Iron line fluorescence from a subrelativistic shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 was observed in the energy range 2-24 keV from August 29 to September 3, 1975. A broad iron line feature is observed in the normal high state spectrum. The line equivalent width is given along with its full-width-half-maximum energy. Iron line fluorescence from an opaque, cool shell of material at the Alfven surface provides the necessary luminosity in this feature. The line energy width can be due to Doppler broadening if the shell is forced to corotate with the pulsar at a radius 800 million cm. Implications of this model regarding physical conditions near Her X-1 are discussed.

  13. A Performance Evaluation of the Cray X1 for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Borrill, Julian; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Djomehri, M. Jahed; Shan, Hongzhang; Skinner, David

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-end capability and capacity computers because of their generality, scalability, and cost effectiveness. However, the recent development of massively parallel vector systems is having a significant effect on the supercomputing landscape. In this paper, we compare the performance of the recently-released Cray X1 vector system with that of the cacheless NEC SX-6 vector machine, and the superscalar cache-based IBM Power3 and Power4 architectures for scientific applications. Overall results demonstrate that the X1 is quite promising, but performance improvements are expected as the hardware, systems software, and numerical libraries mature. Code reengineering to effectively utilize the complex architecture may also lead to significant efficiency enhancements.

  14. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. I - Iron line fluorescence from a subrelativistic shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Her X-1 was observed in the energy range from 2 to 24 keV from August 29 to September 3, 1975. Emission features are observed near the K-alpha iron-line energy which exhibit both broadening and a double line structure. The total luminosity in these features is about 4 by 10 to the 35th power ergs/s. Iron line fluorescence from an opaque cool (not exceeding 1 million K) shell of material at the Alfven surface provides the necessary luminosity in this feature. The double line structure and the line energy width can be due to Doppler shifts if the shell is forced to corotate with the pulsar at a radius of at least 800 million cm. Implications of this model regarding physical conditions near Her X-1 are discussed.

  15. An Analysis of Coupling between the x1 and x12 Interferometers for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Brittany

    2017-01-01

    Due to tolerances in the manufacturing process, noise from the jittering of the spacecraft housing LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is appearing in the differential measurement between its two test masses (TM's). This phenomenon manifests as a small but measurable coupling between the readouts of LPF's two heterodyne interferometers, x1 and x12. In this study, two LISA Pathfinder experiments are analyzed using three methods in an effort to characterize and quantify the coupling as well as to potentially identify its source. The main question considered is this: does the coupling change with the absolute displacement between the TM's? As a result of this work, reliable values for coupling between LPF's x1 and x12 interferometers are found, and they are seen to depend on the absolute displacement between the test masses to some degree. Completed at the Albert Einstein Institute for Gravitational Physics under the International REU program from the University of Florida.

  16. HEAO 1 observations of the long-term variability of Hercules X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorecki, A.; Levine, A.; Bautz, M.; Lang, F.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Rothschild, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Observations are reported of Hercules X-1 in the energy range 13-180 keV which covered two complete 35d cycles of high and low states of the X-ray intensity during 1978. Three high ON states and two low ON states were observed. Features resembling absorption dips were observed in the two high ON states and one low ON state in which good quality data were available. The results are interpreted in the context of precessing tilted accretion disk-periodic mass transfer models. Since the line of sight to Her X-1 lies nearer the plane of the disk rim during low ON states than during high ON states, the observed X-ray intensity during low ON states may be more susceptible to changes in the disk structure.

  17. BLACK HOLE POWERED NEBULAE AND A CASE STUDY OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IC 342 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, David; Corbel, Stephane; Paragi, Zsolt; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Tudose, Valeriu; Feng Hua

    2012-04-10

    We present new radio, optical, and X-ray observations of three ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that are associated with large-scale nebulae. We report the discovery of a radio nebula associated with the ULX IC 342 X-1 using the Very Large Array (VLA). Complementary VLA observations of the nebula around Holmberg II X-1, and high-frequency Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Telescope spectroscopic observations of NGC 5408 X-1 are also presented. We study the morphology, ionization processes, and the energetics of the optical/radio nebulae of IC 342 X-1, Holmberg II X-1, and NGC 5408 X-1. The energetics of the optical nebula of IC 342 X-1 is discussed in the framework of standard bubble theory. The total energy content of the optical nebula is 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg. The minimum energy needed to supply the associated radio nebula is 9.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg. In addition, we detected an unresolved radio source at the location of IC 342 X-1 at the VLA scales. However, our Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations using the European VLBI Network likely rule out the presence of any compact radio source at milliarcsecond (mas) scales. Using a simultaneous Swift X-ray Telescope measurement, we estimate an upper limit on the mass of the black hole in IC 342 X-1 using the 'fundamental plane' of accreting black holes and obtain M{sub BH} {<=} (1.0 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. Arguing that the nebula of IC 342 X-1 is possibly inflated by a jet, we estimate accretion rates and efficiencies for the jet of IC 342 X-1 and compare with sources like S26, SS433, and IC 10 X-1.

  18. Protocols for quantum binary voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Sharma, Rishi Dutt; Pathak, Anirban

    Two new protocols for quantum binary voting are proposed. One of the proposed protocols is designed using a standard scheme for controlled deterministic secure quantum communication (CDSQC), and the other one is designed using the idea of quantum cryptographic switch, which uses a technique known as permutation of particles. A few possible alternative approaches to accomplish the same task (quantum binary voting) have also been discussed. Security of the proposed protocols is analyzed. Further, the efficiencies of the proposed protocols are computed, and are compared with that of the existing protocols. The comparison has established that the proposed protocols are more efficient than the existing protocols.

  19. SAS-3 observations of an X-ray flare from Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Bradt, H.; Buff, J.; Laufer, B.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the SAS-3 observation of an X-ray flare from Cygnus X-1. The 1.5 to 6 keV intensity rose by a factor of four and exhibited variability on several time scales from seconds to hours. The 6 to 15 keV intensity showed less activity. The event is similar to that observed by ANS and Ariel 5, but lasted less than two weeks.

  20. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 2: Intrinsic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 was observed in the energy range 2-24 keV with sufficient temporal resolution to allow detailed study of spectral correlations with the 1.24 sec pulse phase. A region of spectral hardening which extends over approximately the 1/10 pulse phase may be associated with the underlying beam. The pulse shape stability and its asymmetry relative to this intrinsic beam are discussed.

  1. Small Arms and Gunsmith Career Ladders, AFSCs 753X0 and 753X1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    schools , Field Training Detachments (FTD), Mobile Training Teams (MTT), formal OTT, or any other organized training method. Training emphasis ratings...ANALYSIS OF TRAINING DOCUMENTS Technical school personnel at the Air Force Military Training Center, Lackland AFB matched survey tasks to related...areas of the 753X0 Specialty Training Standard (STS) dated October 1979. School personnel also matched tasks to the 753X1 Job Proficiency Guide (JPG

  2. Mental Effort in Binary Categorization Aided by Binary Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Parmet, Yisrael

    2013-01-01

    Binary cueing systems assist in many tasks, often alerting people about potential hazards (such as alarms and alerts). We investigate whether cues, besides possibly improving decision accuracy, also affect the effort users invest in tasks and whether the required effort in tasks affects the responses to cues. We developed a novel experimental tool…

  3. SCO X-1: Origin of the radio and hard X-ray emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Cheng, C. C.; Tsuruta, S.

    1973-01-01

    The consequences of models for the central radio source and the hard X-ray ( 30 keV) emitting region in Sco X-1 are examined. It was found that the radio emission could result from noncoherent synchrotron radiation and that the X-rays may be produced by bremsstrahlung. It is shown that both mechanisms require a mass outflow from Sco X-1. The radio source is located at r approximately 3x10 to the 12th power cm from the center of the star, and its linear dimensions do not exceed 3x10 to the 13th power cm. The magnetic field in the radio source is on the order of 1 gauss. If the hard X-rays are produced by thermal bremsstrahlung, their source is located at 10 to the 9th power approximately r approximately 5x10 to the 9th power cm, the temperature is 2x10 to the 9th power K, and the emission measure is 2x10 to the 56th power/cu cm. This hot plasma loses energy inward by conduction and outward by supersonic expansion. The rates of energy loss for both processes are about 10 to the 36th power erg/s, comparable to the total luminosity of Sco X-1.

  4. Optimizing performance of superscalar codes for a single Cray X1MSP processor

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Oliker, Leonid

    2004-06-08

    The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for full-scale complex scientific applications on conventional supercomputers is a major concern in high performance computing. The recently-released vector-based Cray X1 offers to bridge this gap for many demanding scientific applications. However, this unique architecture contains both data caches and multi-streaming processing units, and the optimal programming methodology is still under investigation. In this paper we investigate Cray X1 code optimization for a suite of computational kernels originally designed for superscalar processors. For our study, we select four applications from the SPLASH2 application suite (1-D FFT,Radix, Ocean, and Nbody), two kernels from the NAS benchmark suite (3-DFFT and CG), and a matrix-matrix multiplication kernel. Results show that for many cases, the addition of vectorization compiler directives results faster runtimes. However, to achieve a significant performance improvement via increased vector length, it is often necessary to restructure the program at the source level sometimes leading to algorithmic level transformations. Additionally, memory bank conflicts may result in substantial performance losses. These conflicts can often be exacerbated when optimizing code for increased vector lengths, and must be explicitly minimized. Finally, we investigate the relationship of the X1 data caches on overall performance.

  5. Intravenous injection of a foamy virus vector to correct canine SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Burtner, Christopher R; Beard, Brian C; Kennedy, Douglas R; Wohlfahrt, Martin E; Adair, Jennifer E; Trobridge, Grant D; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Torgerson, Troy R; Rawlings, David J; Felsburg, Peter J; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-05

    Current approaches to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy involve the collection and ex vivo manipulation of HSCs, a process associated with loss of stem cell multipotency and engraftment potential. An alternative approach for correcting blood-related diseases is the direct intravenous administration of viral vectors, so-called in vivo gene therapy. In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of in vivo gene therapy using a foamy virus vector for the correction of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1). In newborn SCID-X1 dogs, injection of a foamy virus vector expressing the human IL2RG gene resulted in an expansion of lymphocytes expressing the common γ chain and the development of CD3(+) T lymphocytes. CD3(+) cells expressed CD4 and CD8 coreceptors, underwent antigen receptor gene rearrangement, and demonstrated functional maturity in response to T-cell mitogens. Retroviral integration site analysis in 4 animals revealed a polyclonal pattern of integration in all dogs with evidence for dominant clones. These results demonstrate that a foamy virus vector can be administered with therapeutic benefit in the SCID-X1 dog, a clinically relevant preclinical model for in vivo gene therapy.

  6. BINARY YORP EFFECT AND EVOLUTION OF BINARY ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re'em

    2011-02-15

    The rotation states of kilometer-sized near-Earth asteroids are known to be affected by the Yarkevsky O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. In a related effect, binary YORP (BYORP), the orbital properties of a binary asteroid evolve under a radiation effect mostly acting on a tidally locked secondary. The BYORP effect can alter the orbital elements over {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} years for a D{sub p} = 2 km primary with a D{sub s} = 0.4 km secondary at 1 AU. It can either separate the binary components or cause them to collide. In this paper, we devise a simple approach to calculate the YORP effect on asteroids and the BYORP effect on binaries including J{sub 2} effects due to primary oblateness and the Sun. We apply this to asteroids with known shapes as well as a set of randomly generated bodies with various degrees of smoothness. We find a strong correlation between the strengths of an asteroid's YORP and BYORP effects. Therefore, statistical knowledge of one could be used to estimate the effect of the other. We show that the action of BYORP preferentially shrinks rather than expands the binary orbit and that YORP preferentially slows down asteroids. This conclusion holds for the two extremes of thermal conductivities studied in this work and the assumption that the asteroid reaches a stable point, but may break down for moderate thermal conductivity. The YORP and BYORP effects are shown to be smaller than could be naively expected due to near cancellation of the effects at small scales. Taking this near cancellation into account, a simple order-of-magnitude estimate of the YORP and BYORP effects as a function of the sizes and smoothness of the bodies is calculated. Finally, we provide a simple proof showing that there is no secular effect due to absorption of radiation in BYORP.

  7. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARIES WITH STELLAR COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, D. R.; Matson, R. A.; Guo, Z.; Lester, K. V.; Orosz, J. A.; Peters, G. J. E-mail: rmatson@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: lester@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: gjpeters@mucen.usc.edu

    2015-12-15

    Many short-period binary stars have distant orbiting companions that have played a role in driving the binary components into close separation. Indirect detection of a tertiary star is possible by measuring apparent changes in eclipse times of eclipsing binaries as the binary orbits the common center of mass. Here we present an analysis of the eclipse timings of 41 eclipsing binaries observed throughout the NASA Kepler mission of long duration and precise photometry. This subset of binaries is characterized by relatively deep and frequent eclipses of both stellar components. We present preliminary orbital elements for seven probable triple stars among this sample, and we discuss apparent period changes in seven additional eclipsing binaries that may be related to motion about a tertiary in a long period orbit. The results will be used in ongoing investigations of the spectra and light curves of these binaries for further evidence of the presence of third stars.

  8. Polarized Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurent, P.; Rodriquez, J.; Wilms, J.; Bel, M. Cadolle; Pottschmidt, K.; Grinberg, V.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their inherently high flux allowing the detection of clear signals, black hole X-ray binaries are interesting candidates for polarization studies, even if no polarization signals have been observed from them before. Such measurements would provide further detailed insight into these sources' emission mechanisms. We measured the polarization of the gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-I with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope. Spectral modeling ofthe data reveals two emission mechanisms: The 250-400 keY data are consistent with emission dominated by Compton scattering on thermal electrons and are weakly polarized. The second spectral component seen in the 400keV-2MeV band is by contrast strongly polarized, revealing that the MeV emission is probably related to the jet first detected in the radio band.

  9. Low state hard x-ray observation of Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.; Manchanda, R. K.; Polcaro, V. F.; Ubertini, P.; Staubert, R.; Kendziorra, E.

    1991-08-01

    We report a ``super-low'' state observation of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 in the energy range 15-120 keV. The data were obtained with the ``POKER'' experiment, designed to perform high sensitivity observations of cosmic sources in the hard X-Ray range (15-120 keV). The telescope consisted of an array of three high pressure Xenon Multiwire Proportional Counters (MWPC) with a total sensitive area of 7,500 cm2. The detectors were filled at a pressure of 2.6 bar with a mixture of Xe/Argon/Isobutane to provide an efficiency greater than 20% for photon energies from 15 keV to 110 keV. The MWPC spectral resolution was 13% at 60 keV. The fields of view of the three MWPCs were coaligned and limited by means of hexagonal copper collimators with an aperture of 5.0 degree FWHM. In order to provide imaging capability to the telescope one of the MWPC was equipped with two co-rotating Rotation Modulation Collimators, developed at AIT, and modulating a geometrical area of 1,600 cm2 of the detector. The telescope was launched from the Milo Base, Sicily (Italy), on 1985 August 5, and scanning and pointed observations were carried out on the Crab Nebula, A0535+26, MCG 8-11-11, NGC 4151, Cygnus X-1 and Her X-1. The Cygnus X-1 and Crab photon spectra are well described by single power laws, with photon indeces of α=1.87 and α=2.17 and intensities of 2.57×10-3 and 2.32×10-3 ph cm-2 s-1 keV-1 at 50 keV, respectively. The low hard X-ray emission from Cyg X-1 confirms that during the POKER observation the source was in a ``low'' state as also supported by EXOSAT data collected at lower energies on August 12.

  10. Evidence for an Intermediate Mass Black Hole in NGC 5408 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of correlated spectral and timing behavior in the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. An approx. 100 ksec pointing with XMM/Newton obtained in January, 2008 reveals a strong 10 mHz QPO in the > 1 keV flux, as well as flat-topped, band limited noise breaking to a power law. The energy spectrum is again dominated by two components, a 0.16 keV thermal disk and a power-law with an index of approx. 2.5. These new measurements, combined with results from our previous January 2006 pointing in which we first detected QPOs, show for the first time in a ULX a pattern of spectral and temporal correlations strongly analogous to that seen in Galactic black hole sources, but at much higher X-ray luminosity and longer characteristic time-scales. We find that the QPO frequency is proportional to the inferred disk flux, while the QPO and broad-band noise amplitude (root mean squared, rms) are inversely proportional to the disk flux. Assuming that QPO frequency scales inversely with black hole mass at a given power-law spectral index we derive mass estimates using the observed QPO frequency - spectral index relations from five stellar-mass black hole systems with dynamical mass constraints. The results from all sources are consistent with a mass range for NGC 5408 X-1 from 1000 - 9000 Stellar mass. We argue that these are conservative limits, and a more likely range is from 2000 - 5000 Stellar mass. Moreover, the recent relation from Gierlinski et al. that relates black hole mass to the strength of variability at high frequencies (above the break in the power spectrum), and the variability plane results of McHardy et al. and Koerding et al., are also suggestive of such a. high mass for NGC 5408 X-1. Importantly, none of the above estimates appears consistent with a black hole mass less than approx. 1000 Stellar mass for NGC 5408 X-1. We argue that these new findings strongly support the conclusion that NGC 5408 X-1 harbors an

  11. Sequential binary collision ionization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Boeyen, R. W.; Watanabe, N.; Doering, J. P.; Moore, J. H.; Coplan, M. A.; Cooper, J. W.

    2004-03-01

    Fully differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of the magnesium 3s orbital have been measured in a high-momentum-transfer regime wherein the ionization mechanisms can be accurately described by simple binary collision models. Measurements where performed at incident-electron energies from 400 to 3000 eV, ejected-electron energies of 62 eV, scattering angle of 20 °, and momentum transfers of 2 to 5 a.u. In the out-of-plane geometry of the experiment the cross section is observed far off the Bethe ridge. Both first- and second-order processes can be clearly distinguished as previously observed by Murray et al [Ref. 1] and Schulz et al [Ref. 2]. Owing to the relatively large momentum of the ejected electron, the second order processes can be modeled as sequential binary collisions involving a binary elastic collision between the incident electron and ionic core and a binary knock-out collision between the incident electron and target electron. At low incident-electron energies the cross section for both first and second order processes are comparable, while at high incident energies second-order processes dominate. *Supported by NSF under grant PHY-99-87870. [1] A. J. Murray, M. B. J. Woolf, and F. H. Read J. Phys. B 25, 3021 (1992). [2] M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D. H. Madison. S. Jones and J. Ullrich, Nature 422, 48 (2003).

  12. Generating Constant Weight Binary Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of bounds for A(n, d, w), the maximum possible number of binary vectors of length n, weight w, and pairwise Hamming distance no less than d, is a classic problem in coding theory. Such sets of vectors have many applications. A description is given of how the problem can be used in a first-year undergraduate computational…

  13. Binary logic is rich enough

    SciTech Connect

    Zapatrin, R.R.

    1992-02-01

    Given a finite ortholattice L, the *-semigroup is explicitly built whose annihilator ortholattice is isomorphic to L. Thus, it is shown that any finite quantum logic is the additive part of a binary logic. Some areas of possible applications are outlined. 7 refs.

  14. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  15. Coevolution of binaries and circumbinary gaseous discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David P.; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by Kepler raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc which drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for 104 binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentric binaries which strongly couple to the disc develop an m = 1 spiral wave launched from the 1:3 eccentric outer Lindblad resonance which corresponds to an alignment of gas particle longitude of periastrons. All systems display binary semimajor axis decay due to dissipation from the viscous disc.

  16. Searches for millisecond pulsations in low-mass X-ray binaries, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, B. A.; Van Der Klis, M.; Wood, K. S.; Norris, J. P.; Hertz, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Paradijs, J. Van; Lewin, W. H. G.; Mitsuda, K.; Penninx, W.

    1994-01-01

    Coherent millisecond X-ray pulsations are expected from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but remain undetected. Using the single-parameter Quadratic Coherence Recovery Technique (QCRT) to correct for unknown binary orbit motion, we have performed Fourier transform searches for coherent oscillations in all long, continuous segments of data obtained at 1 ms time resolution during Ginga observations of LMXB. We have searched the six known Z sources (GX 5-1, Cyg X-2, Sco X-1, GX 17+2, GX 340+0, and GX 349+2), seven of the 14 known atoll sources (GX 3+1. GX 9+1, GX 9+9, 1728-33. 1820-30, 1636-53 and 1608-52), the 'peculiar' source Cir X-1, and the high-mass binary Cyg X-3. We find no evidence for coherent pulsations in any of these sources, with 99% confidence limits on the pulsed fraction between 0.3% and 5.0% at frequencies below the Nyquist frequency of 512 Hz. A key assumption made in determining upper limits in previous searches is shown to be incorrect. We provide a recipe for correctly setting upper limits and detection thresholds. Finally we discuss and apply two strategies to improve sensitivity by utilizing multiple, independent, continuous segments of data with comparable count rates.

  17. MACHO 96-LMC-2: Lensing of a Binary Source in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Constraints on the Lensing Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.; Nelson, C. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Popowski, P.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Tomaney, A. B.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D.

    2001-05-01

    We present photometry and analysis of the microlensing alert MACHO 96-LMC-2 (event LMC-14 in an earlier paper). This event was initially detected by the MACHO Alert System and subsequently monitored by the Global Microlensing Alert Network (GMAN). The ~3% photometry provided by the GMAN follow-up effort reveals a periodic modulation in the light curve. We attribute this to binarity of the lensed source. Microlensing fits to a rotating binary source magnified by a single lens converge on two minima, separated by Δχ2~1. The most significant fit X1 predicts a primary which contributes ~100% of the light, a dark secondary, and an orbital period (T) of ~9.2 days. The second fit X2 yields a binary source with two stars of roughly equal mass and luminosity and T=21.2 days. Observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)18 resolve stellar neighbors which contribute to the MACHO object's baseline brightness. The actual lensed object appears to lie on the upper LMC main sequence. We estimate the mass of the primary component of the binary system, M~2 Msolar. This helps to determine the physical size of the orbiting system and allows a measurement of the lens proper motion. For the preferred model X1, we explore the range of dark companions by assuming 0.1 Msolar and 1.4 Msolar objects in models X1a and X1b, respectively. We find lens velocities projected to the LMC in these models of vX1a=18.3+/-3.1 km s-1 and vX1b=188+/-32 km s-1. In both these cases, a likelihood analysis suggests an LMC lens is preferred over a Galactic halo lens, although only marginally so in model X1b. We also find vX2=39.6+/-6.1 km s-1, where the likelihood for the lens location is strongly dominated by the LMC disk. In all cases, the lens mass is consistent with that of an M dwarf. Additional spectra of the lensed source system are necessary to further constrain and/or refine the derived properties of the lensing object. The LMC self-lensing rate contributed by 96-LMC-2 is consistent with

  18. Discovery of a 7 mHz X-Ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Most Massive Stellar-Mass Black Hole IC 10 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an approx.. = 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33 sigma confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q is identical with nu/delta nu, of approx. = 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of approx. = -2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies approx. > 0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the "heartbeat" mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz "dipper QPOs" of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  19. DISCOVERY OF A 7 mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: richard@astro.umd.edu

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an Almost-Equal-To 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33{sigma} confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q {identical_to} {nu}/{Delta}{nu}, of Almost-Equal-To 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of Almost-Equal-To - 2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies {approx}>0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the 'heartbeat' mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz 'dipper QPOs' of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  20. Can the 62 Day X-ray Period of ULX M82 X-1 Be Due to a Precessing Accretion Disk?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed all the archival RXTE/PCA monitoring observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 in order to study the properties of its previously discovered 62 day X-ray period (Kaaret & Feng 2007). Based on the high coherence of the modulation it has been argued that the observed period is the orbital period of the binary. Utilizing a much longer data set than in previous studies we find: (1) The phase-resolved X-ray (3-15 keV) energy spectra - modeled with a thermal accretion disk and a power-law corona - suggest that the accretion disk's contribution to the total flux is responsible for the overall periodic modulation while the power-law flux remains approximately constant with phase. (2) Suggestive evidence for a sudden phase shift-of approximately 0.3 in phase (20 days)-between the first and the second halves of the light curve separated by roughly 1000 days. If confirmed, the implied timescale to change the period is approx. = 10 yrs, which is exceptionally fast for an orbital phenomenon. These independent pieces of evidence are consistent with the 62 day period being due to a precessing accretion disk, similar to the so-called super-orbital periods observed in systems like Her X-1, LMC X-4, and SS433. However, the timing evidence for a change in the period needs to be confirmed with additional observations. This should be possible with further monitoring of M82 with instruments such as the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board Swift.

  1. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray Quasi-periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-Ray Source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-07-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (~0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs—in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  2. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  3. ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-07-10

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  4. Language Learning Actions in Two 1x1 Secondary Schools in Catalonia: The Case of Online Language Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Boris Vázquez; Cassany, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies and describes current attitudes towards classroom digitization and digital language learning practices under the umbrella of EduCAT 1x1, the One-Laptop-Per-Child (OLPC or 1x1) initiative in place in Catalonia. We thoroughly analyze practices worked out by six language teachers and twelve Compulsory Secondary Education (CSE)…

  5. WAS COMET C/1945 X1 (DU TOIT) A DWARF, SOHO-LIKE KREUTZ SUNGRAZER?

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer E-mail: R.Kracht@t-online.de

    2015-12-10

    The goal of this investigation is to reinterpret and upgrade the astrometric and other data on comet C/1945 X1, the least prominent among the Kreutz system sungrazers discovered from the ground in the twentieth century. The central issue is to appraise the pros and cons of a possibility that this object is—despite its brightness reported at discovery—a dwarf Kreutz sungrazer. We confirm Marsden’s conclusion that C/1945 X1 has a common parent with C/1882 R1 and C/1965 S1, in line with the Sekanina and Chodas scenario of their origin in the framework of the Kreutz system’s evolution. We integrate the orbit of C/1882 R1 back to the early twelfth century and then forward to around 1945 to determine the nominal direction of the line of apsides and perform a Fourier analysis to get insight into effects of the indirect planetary perturbations. To better understand the nature of C/1945 X1, its orbital motion, fate, and role in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system, as well as to attempt detecting the comet’s possible terminal outburst shortly after perihelion and answer the question in the title of this investigation, we closely examined the relevant Boyden Observatory logbooks and identified both the photographs with the comet’s known images and nearly 20 additional patrol plates, taken both before and after perihelion, on which the comet or traces of its debris will be searched for, once the process of their digitization, currently conducted as part of the Harvard College Observatory’s DASCH Project, has been completed and the scanned copies made available to the scientific community.

  6. Was Comet C/1945 X1 (DU Toit) a Dwarf, SOHO-like Kreutz Sungrazer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this investigation is to reinterpret and upgrade the astrometric and other data on comet C/1945 X1, the least prominent among the Kreutz system sungrazers discovered from the ground in the twentieth century. The central issue is to appraise the pros and cons of a possibility that this object is—despite its brightness reported at discovery—a dwarf Kreutz sungrazer. We confirm Marsden’s conclusion that C/1945 X1 has a common parent with C/1882 R1 and C/1965 S1, in line with the Sekanina & Chodas scenario of their origin in the framework of the Kreutz system’s evolution. We integrate the orbit of C/1882 R1 back to the early twelfth century and then forward to around 1945 to determine the nominal direction of the line of apsides and perform a Fourier analysis to get insight into effects of the indirect planetary perturbations. To better understand the nature of C/1945 X1, its orbital motion, fate, and role in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system, as well as to attempt detecting the comet’s possible terminal outburst shortly after perihelion and answer the question in the title of this investigation, we closely examined the relevant Boyden Observatory logbooks and identified both the photographs with the comet’s known images and nearly 20 additional patrol plates, taken both before and after perihelion, on which the comet or traces of its debris will be searched for, once the process of their digitization, currently conducted as part of the Harvard College Observatory’s DASCH Project, has been completed and the scanned copies made available to the scientific community.

  7. (1) (1)A' ← X (1)A' Electronic Transition of Protonated Coronene at 15 K.

    PubMed

    Rice, C A; Hardy, F-X; Gause, O; Maier, J P

    2014-03-20

    The electronic spectrum of protonated coronene in the gas phase was measured at vibrational and rotational temperatures of ∼15 K in a 22-pole ion trap. The (1) (1)A' ← X (1)A' electronic transition of this larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cation has an origin band maximum at 14 383.8 ± 0.2 cm(-1) and shows distinct vibrational structure in the (1) (1)A' state. Neither the origin nor the strongest absorptions to the blue coincide with known diffuse interstellar bands, implying that protonated coronene is not a carrier.

  8. Results of X-ray and optical monitoring of Scorpius X-1 in 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mook, D. E.; Messina, R. J.; Hiltner, W. A.; Belian, R.; Conner, J.; Evans, W. D.; Strong, I.; Blanco, V. M.; Hesser, J. E.; Kunkel, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Scorpius X-1 was monitored at optical and X-ray wavelengths from 1970 April 26 to 1970 May 20. The optical observations were made at six observatories around the world, and the X-ray observations were made by the Vela satellites. There was a tendency for the object to show greater variability in X-ray emission when the object was optically bright. The intensity histograms for both the optical and X-ray observations are discussed, as well as periodic variations in the optical intensity.

  9. Results of X-ray and optical monitoring of SCO X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mook, D. E.; Messina, R. J.; Hiltner, W. A.; Belian, R.; Conner, J.; Evans, W. D.; Strong, I.; Blanco, V.; Hesser, J.; Kunkel, W.

    1974-01-01

    Sco X-1 was monitored at optical and X-ray wavelengths from 1970 April 26 to 1970 May 21. The optical observations were made at six observatories around the world and the X-ray observations were made by the Vela satellites. There was a tendency for the object to show greater variability in X-ray when the object is optically bright. A discussion of the intensity histograms is presented for both the optical and X-ray observations. No evidence for optical or X-ray periodicity was detected.

  10. X-ray and UV spectroscopy of Cygnus X-1 = HDE226868

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; White, N. E.; Kondo, Y.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Mccluskey, B. G.

    1980-01-01

    Observations are presented of Cygnus X-1 with the solid-state spectrometer on the Einstein Observatory. The X-ray spectra of two intensity dips viewed near superior conjunction did not exhibit increased photoelectric absorption. Rather the data support a model in which an increase in the electron scattering optical depth modifies both the observed spectrum and the intensity. The characteristic temperature of the intervening material is greater than 5 x 10 to the 7th power K. These measurements were in part simultaneous with observations by IUE. The ultra violet spectrum and intensity remained relatively constant during an X-ray intensity dip.

  11. On the physical reality of the millisecond bursts in Cygnus X-1 - Bursts and shot noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The method of data analysis used to interpret the millisecond temporal structure of Cyg X-1 is discussed. In particular, the effects produced by the shot-noise variability of this source, which occurs on time scales of about 0.5 s, are examined. Taking into account the recent discovery that only about 30% of the flux may be in the shots, it is found that spurious 'millisecond bursts' will be detected. A comparison of the properties of these bursts with currently published experimental data is performed.

  12. Research pilot John Griffith leaning out of the hatch on the X-1 #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    In this photo, NACA research pilot John Griffith is leaning out the hatch of the X-1 #2. Surrounding him (left to right) are Dick Payne, Eddie Edwards, and maintenance chief Clyde Bailey. John Griffith became a research pilot at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics's Muroc Flight Test Unit in August of 1949, shortly before the NACA unit became the High-Speed Flight Research Station (now, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California). He flew the early experimental airplanes-the X-1, X-4, and D-558-1 and -2-flying the X-1 nine times, the X-4 three times, the D-558-1 fifteen times, and the D-558-2 nine times. He reached his top speed in the X-1 on 26 May 1950 when he achieved a speed of Mach 1.20. He was the first NACA pilot to fly the X-4. He left the NACA in 1950 to fly for Chance Vought in the F7U Cutlass. He then flew for United Airlines and for Westinghouse, where he became the Chief Engineering Test Pilot. He went on to work for the Federal Aviation Administration, assisting in the development of a supersonic transport before funding for that project ended. He then returned to United Airlines and worked as a flight instructor. John grew up in Homewood, Illinois, and attended Thornton Township Junior College in Harvey, Illinois, where he graduated as valedictorian in pre-engineering. He entered the Army Air Corps in November 1941, serving in the South Pacific during the Second World War that started soon after he joined. In 1942 and 1943 he flew 189 missions in the P-40 in New Guinea and was awarded two Distinguished Flying Crosses and four air medals. In October 1946, he left the service and studied aeronautical engineering at Purdue University, graduating with honors. He then joined the NACA at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio (today's Glenn Research Center), where he participated in ramjet testing and icing research until moving to Muroc. Following his distinguished career, he retired to Penn Valley

  13. Echo Tomography of Hercules X-1: Mapping the Accretion Disc with RXTE and HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S.

    2000-01-01

    A paper based on the RXTE results contents the following and are ready for submission to ApJ: "Possible Detection of Companion Star Reflection from Hercules X-1 with RXTE". A paper combining July 1998 and July 1999 observations (including the RXTE results for both years) is nearly ready for submission to ApJ: The July 1998 and July 1999 Multiwavelength Campaigns on Hercules X-I/HZ Herculis. The July 1999 observations took place during an anomalous X-ray low state and the RXTE and EUVE data are consistent with X_ray reflected from the surface of the companion star.

  14. Millisecond temporal structure in Cyg X-1. [including X ray variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the X-ray variability of Cyg X-1 on time scales down to a millisecond. Several bursts of millisecond duration are observed. The duty cycle for bursting is estimated to be approximately greater than. 0002 averaged over the entire 49. second exposure, although the maximum burst activity is associated with a region of enhanced emission lasting about 1/3 second. Such bursts may be associated with turbulence in disk accretion at the innermost orbits for a black hole.

  15. A Preliminary Analysis of a New Chandra Observation (ObsID 6148) of Cir X-1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaria, R.; D'Aí, A.; di Salvo, T.; Lavagetto, G.; Burderi, L.; Robba, N. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the preliminary spectral analysis of a 25 ks long Chandra observation of the peculiar source Cir X-1 near the periastron passage. We estimate more precise coordinates of the source compatible with the optical and radio counterpart coordinates. We detect emission lines associated to Mg XII, Si XIII, Si XIV, S XV, S XVI Ar XVII, Ar XVIII, Ca XIX, Ca XX, Fe XXV, Fe XXVI showing a redshift of 470 km s-1. The more intense emission features at 6.6 keV show a double-peaked shape that can be modelled with two or three Gaussian lines.

  16. ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) Liftoff Acoustic Environments: Prediction vs. Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Kenny, Jeremy; Murphy, John

    2009-01-01

    The ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) provided an opportunity to measure liftoff acoustic noise data. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers were interested in the ALV-X1 launch because the First Stage motor and launch pad conditions, including a relativity short deflector ducting, provide a potential analogue to future A