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Sample records for binary collision approximation

  1. Binary collision approximations for the memory function for density fluctuations in equilibrium atomic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Joyce E.

    Time correlation functions of density fluctuations of liquids at equilibrium can be used to relate the microscopic dynamics of a liquid to its macroscopic transport properties. Time correlation functions are especially useful since they can be generated in a variety of ways, from scattering experiments to computer simulation to analytic theory. The kinetic theory of fluctuations in equilibrium liquids is an analytic theory for calculating correlation functions using memory functions. In this work, we use a diagrammatic formulation of the kinetic theory to develop a series of binary collision approximations for the collisional part of the memory function. We define binary collisions as collisions between two distinct density fluctuations whose identities are fixed during the duration of a collsion. R approximations are for the short time part of the memory function, and build upon the work of Ranganathan and Andersen. These approximations have purely repulsive interactions between the fluctuations. The second type of approximation, RA approximations, is for the longer time part of the memory function, where the density fluctuations now interact via repulsive and attractive forces. Although RA approximations are a natural extension of R approximations, they permit two density fluctuations to become trapped in the wells of the interaction potential, leading to long-lived oscillatory behavior, which is unphysical. Therefore we consider S approximations which describe binary particles which experience the random effect of the surroundings while interacting via repulsive or repulsive and attractive interactions. For each of these approximations for the memory function we numerically solve the kinetic equation to generate correlation functions. These results are compared to molecular dynamics results for the correlation functions. Comparing the successes and failures of the different approximations, we conclude that R approximations give more accurate intermediate and

  2. Comparison of binary collision approximation and molecular dynamics for displacement cascades in GaAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2011-10-01

    The predictions of binary collision approximation (BCA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of displacement cascades in GaAs are compared. There are three issues addressed in this work. The first is the optimal choice of the effective displacement threshold to use in the BCA calculations to obtain the best agreement with MD results. Second, the spatial correlations of point defects are compared. This is related to the level of clustering that occurs for different types of radiation. Finally, the size and structure of amorphous zones seen in the MD simulations is summarized. BCA simulations are not able to predict the formation of amorphous material.

  3. Extension of Binary-Collision-Approximation-Based Simulation Applicable to Any Structured Target Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Arimichi; Saito, Seiki; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated plasma-surface interactions by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. However, such simulations have a high computation cost and are limited to simulations of materials of nanometer order. In order to overcome this limitation, a complementary model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA) can be established. We employed the BCA-based simulation code ACAT and extended it to handle any crystalline or amorphous structure. The extended code, named “AC∀T”, stores the positions of all projectile and target atoms and the velocities of recoil atoms so that it can be combined with the MD code. It also has the potential to reproduce channeling phenomena. Thus, it is expected to be useful for the evaluation of channeling effects.

  4. Determination of recombination radius in Si for binary collision approximation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2015-09-11

    Displacement damage caused by ions or neutrons in microelectronic devices can have significant effect on the performance of these devices. Therefore, it is important to predict not only the displacement damage profile, but also its magnitude precisely. Analytical methods and binary collision approximation codes working with amorphous targets use the concept of displacement energy, the energy that a lattice atom has to receive to create a permanent replacement. It was found that this “displacement energy” is direction dependent; it can range from 12 to 32 eV in silicon. Obviously, this model fails in BCA codes that work with crystalline targets, such as Marlowe. Marlowe does not use displacement energy; instead, it uses lattice binding energy only and then pairs the interstitial atoms with vacancies. Then based on the configuration of the Frenkel pairs it classifies them as close, near, or distant pairs, and considers the distant pairs the permanent replacements. Unfortunately, this separation is an ad hoc assumption, and the results do not agree with molecular dynamics calculations. After irradiation, there is a prompt recombination of interstitials and vacancies if they are nearby, within a recombination radius. In order to implement this recombination radius in Marlowe, we used the comparison of MD and Marlowe calculation in a range of ion energies in single crystal silicon target. As a result, the calculations showed that a single recombination radius of ~7.4 Å in Marlowe for a range of ion energies gives an excellent agreement with MD.

  5. Determination of recombination radius in Si for binary collision approximation codes

    DOE PAGES

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2015-09-11

    Displacement damage caused by ions or neutrons in microelectronic devices can have significant effect on the performance of these devices. Therefore, it is important to predict not only the displacement damage profile, but also its magnitude precisely. Analytical methods and binary collision approximation codes working with amorphous targets use the concept of displacement energy, the energy that a lattice atom has to receive to create a permanent replacement. It was found that this “displacement energy” is direction dependent; it can range from 12 to 32 eV in silicon. Obviously, this model fails in BCA codes that work with crystalline targets,more » such as Marlowe. Marlowe does not use displacement energy; instead, it uses lattice binding energy only and then pairs the interstitial atoms with vacancies. Then based on the configuration of the Frenkel pairs it classifies them as close, near, or distant pairs, and considers the distant pairs the permanent replacements. Unfortunately, this separation is an ad hoc assumption, and the results do not agree with molecular dynamics calculations. After irradiation, there is a prompt recombination of interstitials and vacancies if they are nearby, within a recombination radius. In order to implement this recombination radius in Marlowe, we used the comparison of MD and Marlowe calculation in a range of ion energies in single crystal silicon target. As a result, the calculations showed that a single recombination radius of ~7.4 Å in Marlowe for a range of ion energies gives an excellent agreement with MD.« less

  6. Study of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade in subcascades within the Binary Collision Approximation framework

    SciTech Connect

    Luneville, Laurence; Simone, David; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    When a material is subjected to irradiation, many primary defects are cre- ated at the atomic level by sequences of ballistic collision events to form highly disordered regions defined as displacement cascades. The long term evolution of materials under irradiation is dictated by the number and the spatial distribution of the surviving defects in the displacement cascade. The peculiar power law shape of collision cross sections is responsible for the frag- mentation of a displacement cascade into smaller subcascades. However, it remains difficult to define a subcascade. Within the fractal geometry frame- work, we demonstrate in this work that the set of atomic trajectories in a displacement cascade exhibit a fractal behavior. From this analysis, we present a new criterion to describe the fragmentation of a displacement cas- cade and to calculate the distribution and the number of defects from this fragmentation. Such an analysis provides the natural framework to estimate the number of defects created in a displacement cascade to integrate with results of MD simulations. From this defiintion of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade, this work gives some new insights to describe both the primary defects produced in a material under irradiation and then to compare different irradiations performed with different particles.

  7. Microstructure evolution of irradiated tungsten: Crystal effects in He and H implantation as modelled in the Binary Collision Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Ortiz, C. J.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Sarkar, U.; Debacker, A.

    2010-08-01

    It is important to develop an understanding of the evolution of W microstructure the conditions the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as well as the DEMOnstration Power Plan (DEMO), and modelling techniques can be very helpful. In this paper, the Binary Collision Approximation of Molecular Dynamics as implemented in the Marlowe code is used to model the slowing down of atomic helium and hydrogen on tungsten in the 1-100 keV range. The computed helium and Frenkel Pairs (FP) distributions are then used as input for the simulation of isochronal annealing experiments with an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model. Parameterisation is discussed in a companion paper to this one. To model inelastic energy losses beyond the Lindhard regime, a new module has been implemented in the Marlowe code which is presented here, along with a discussion on various parameters of the model important in the modelling of channelled trajectories. For a given total inelastic stopping cross section, large differences in low energy channelling ranges are identified depending on whether inelastic energy loss is considered to be purely continuous or to also occur during the atomic collisions. In polycrystals, the channelling probability is shown to be significant over the whole range of slowing down energies considered. Channelling together with short replacement sequences has the effect of reducing the FP production efficiency by more than a factor two in polycrystalline as compared with an hypothetical structureless tungsten. This has a crucial effect on the helium isochronal desorption spectra predicted by the OKMC simulations. Those predicted with structureless tungsten are at variance with experiment, due to the overestimation of He trapping on the radiation induced defects.

  8. Multiscale Coupling of Monte Carlo Binary-Collision-Approximation Codes with Particle-in-Cells for Plasma-Material Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Davide; Lindquist, Kyle; Ruzic, David N.

    2013-10-01

    Techniques based on Monte Carlo Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) are widely used for the evaluation of particle interactions with matter, but rarely coupled with a consistent kinetic plasma solver like a Particle-in-Cell. The TRIM code [Eckstein; Biersack and Haggmark, 1980] and its version including dynamic-composition TRIDYN [Moller and Eckstein, 1984] are two popular implementations of BCA, where single-particle projectiles interact with a target of amorphous material according to the classical Carbon-Krypton interaction potential. The effect of surface roughness can be included as well, thanks to the Fractal-TRIM method [Ruzic and Chiu, 1989]. In the present study we couple BCA codes with Particles-in-Cells. The Lagrangian treatment of particle motion usually implemented in PiC codes suggests a natural coupling of PiC's with BCA's, even if a number of caveats has to be taken into account, related to the discrete nature of computational particles, to the difference between the two approaches and most important to the multiple spatial and temporal scales involved. The break down of BCA at low energies (unless the projectiles are channeling through an oriented crystal layer [Hobler and Betz, 2001]) has been supplemented by Yamamura's semi-empirical relations.

  9. Primary damage in tungsten using the binary collision approximation, molecular dynamic simulations and the density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, A.; Sand, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Domain, C.; Olsson, P.; Berthod, E.; Becquart, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    The damage produced by primary knock-on atoms (PKA) in W has been investigated from the threshold displacement energy (TDE) where it produces one self interstitial atom-vacancy pair to larger energies, up to 100 keV, where a large molten volume is formed. The TDE has been determined in different crystal directions using the Born-Oppenheimer density functional molecular dynamics (DFT-MD). A significant difference has been observed without and with the semi-core electrons. Classical MD has been used with two different empirical potentials characterized as ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ to obtain statistics on TDEs. Cascades of larger energy have been calculated, with these potentials, using a model that accounts for electronic losses (Sand et al 2013 Europhys. Lett. 103 46003). Two other sets of cascades have been produced using the binary collision approximation (BCA): a Monte Carlo BCA using SDTrimSP (Eckstein et al 2011 SDTrimSP: Version 5.00. Report IPP 12/8) (similar to SRIM www.srim.org) and MARLOWE (RSICC Home Page. (https://rsicc.ornl.gov/codes/psr/psr1/psr-137.html) (accessed May, 2014)). The comparison of these sets of cascades gave a recombination distance equal to 12 Å which is significantly larger from the one we reported in Hou et al (2010 J. Nucl. Mater. 403 89) because, here, we used bulk cascades rather than surface cascades which produce more defects (Stoller 2002 J. Nucl. Mater. 307 935, Nordlund et al 1999 Nature 398 49). Investigations on the defect clustering aspect showed that the difference between BCA and MD cascades is considerably reduced after the annealing of the cascade debris at 473 K using our Object Kinetic Monte Carlo model, LAKIMOCA (Domain et al 2004 J. Nucl. Mater. 335 121).

  10. A diagrammatic formulation of the kinetic theory of fluctuations in equilibrium classical fluids. VI. Binary collision approximations for the memory function for self-correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce E.; Andersen, Hans C.

    2007-08-01

    We use computer simulation results for a dense Lennard-Jones fluid for a range of temperatures to test the accuracy of various binary collision approximations for the memory function for density fluctuations in liquids. The approximations tested include the moderate density approximation of the generalized Boltzmann-Enskog memory function (MGBE) of Mazenko and Yip [Statistical Mechanics. Part B. Time-Dependent Processes, edited by B. J. Berne (Plenum, New York, 1977)], the binary collision approximation (BCA) and the short time approximation (STA) of Ranganathan and Andersen [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1243 (2004); J. Phys. Chem. 109, 21437 (2005)] and various other approximations we derived by using diagrammatic methods. The tests are of two types. The first is a comparison of the correlation functions predicted by each approximate memory function with the simulation results, especially for the self-longitudinal current correlation (SLCC) function. The second is a direct comparison of each approximate memory function with a memory function numerically extracted from the correlation function data. The MGBE memory function is accurate at short times but decays to zero too slowly and gives a poor description of the correlation function at intermediate times. The BCA is exact at zero time, but it predicts a correlation function that diverges at long times. The STA gives a reasonable description of the SLCC but does not predict the correct temperature dependence of the negative dip in the function that is associated with caging at low temperatures. None of the other binary collision approximations is a systematic improvement on the STA. The extracted memory functions have a rapidly decaying short time part, much like the STA, and a much smaller, more slowly decaying part of the type predicted by a mode coupling theory. Theories that use mode coupling commonly include a binary collision term in the memory function but do not discuss in detail the nature of that term. It is

  11. Sequential binary collision ionization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Boeyen, R. W.; Watanabe, N.; Doering, J. P.; Moore, J. H.; Coplan, M. A.; Cooper, J. W.

    2004-03-01

    Fully differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of the magnesium 3s orbital have been measured in a high-momentum-transfer regime wherein the ionization mechanisms can be accurately described by simple binary collision models. Measurements where performed at incident-electron energies from 400 to 3000 eV, ejected-electron energies of 62 eV, scattering angle of 20 °, and momentum transfers of 2 to 5 a.u. In the out-of-plane geometry of the experiment the cross section is observed far off the Bethe ridge. Both first- and second-order processes can be clearly distinguished as previously observed by Murray et al [Ref. 1] and Schulz et al [Ref. 2]. Owing to the relatively large momentum of the ejected electron, the second order processes can be modeled as sequential binary collisions involving a binary elastic collision between the incident electron and ionic core and a binary knock-out collision between the incident electron and target electron. At low incident-electron energies the cross section for both first and second order processes are comparable, while at high incident energies second-order processes dominate. *Supported by NSF under grant PHY-99-87870. [1] A. J. Murray, M. B. J. Woolf, and F. H. Read J. Phys. B 25, 3021 (1992). [2] M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D. H. Madison. S. Jones and J. Ullrich, Nature 422, 48 (2003).

  12. Evaluation of interatomic potentials for noble gas atoms from rainbow scattering under axial channeling at Ag(1 1 1) surface by computer simulations based on binary collision approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    The rainbow angles corresponding to pronounced peaks in the angular distributions of scattered projectiles with small angle, attributed to rainbow scattering (RS), under axial surface channeling conditions are strongly dependent on the interatomic potentials between projectiles and target atoms. The dependence of rainbow angles on normal energy of projectile energy to the target surface that has been experimentally obtained by Schüller and Winter (SW) (2007) for RS of He, Ne and Ar atoms from a Ag(1 1 1) surface with projectile energies of 3-60 keV was evaluated by the three-dimensional computer simulations using the ACOCT code based on the binary collision approximation with interatomic pair potentials. Consequently, the ACOCT results employing the Moliere pair potential with screening length correction close to adjustable one of O'Connor and Biersack (OB) formula are almost in agreement with the experimental ones, being self-consistent with the SW's ones analyzed by computer simulations of classical trajectory calculations as RS from corrugated equipotential planes based on continuum potentials including the Moliere pair potential with screening length correction of the OB formula.

  13. Evaluation of interatomic potentials for rainbow scattering under axial channeling at KCl(0 0 1) surface by three-dimensional computer simulations based on binary collision approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2017-05-01

    The rainbow angles corresponding to prominent peaks in the angular distributions of scattered projectiles with small angle, attributed to rainbow scattering (RS), under axial surface channeling conditions are strongly influenced by the interatomic potentials between projectiles and target atoms. The dependence of rainbow angles on normal energy of projectile energy to the target surface, being experimentally obtained by Specht et al. for RS of He, N, Ne and Ar atoms under <1 0 0> and <1 1 0> axial channeling conditions at a KCl(0 0 1) surface with projectile energies of 1-60 keV, was evaluated by the three-dimensional computer simulations using the ACOCT code based on the binary collision approximation with interatomic pair potentials. Good agreement between the ACOCT results using the ZBL pair potential and the individual pair potentials calculated from Hartree-Fock (HF) wave functions and the experimental ones was found for RS of He, N and Ne atoms from the atomic rows along <1 0 0> direction. For <1 1 0> direction, the ACOCT results employing the Moliere pair potential with adjustable screening length of O'Connor-Biersack (OB) formula, the ZBL pair potential and the individual HF pair potentials except for Ar → KCl using the OB pair potential are nearly in agreement with the experimental ones.

  14. First in situ observations of binary raindrop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Rahman, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we present the first-time observations of binary raindrop collisions in rainfall events. These observations constitute a critical step in concluding a long-standing debate on the controlling physical process, binary raindrop collision versus spontaneous raindrop breakup, for the raindrop size distribution (DSD) evolution from cloud to ground level. Our raindrop collision observations were made possible by a new instrument called the High-speed Optical Disdrometer (HOD) that we recently developed for precipitation microphysics investigations. Our approximately 1 year long field campaign that covered 33 rainfall events provided 11 observations of binary raindrop collisions and outcomes but no spontaneous breakup observation. The field-observed collision rate (i.e., number of raindrop collisions within the measurement volume of the HOD per unit time) showed an increasing trend with increasing rain rate as expected from the theoretical collision rate predictions. Furthermore, the field-observed collision rates were (i) comparable (for rain rates less than approximately 50 mm/h) and (ii) significantly larger (for larger rain rates) than the theoretically predicted rates that have been used in various numerical investigations that suggest the controlling role of raindrop collisions in DSD evolution. Our observations, yet to be supplemented with observations from comprehensive field campaigns at different geographic locations and rainfall events for a definitive conclusion, support the collision-driven DSD evolution hypothesis.

  15. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  16. Solitary waves in dimer binary collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Zaid; Jayaprakash, K. R.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary wave propagation in nonlinear diatomic (dimer) chains is a very interesting topic of research in the study of nonlinear lattices. Such waves were recently found to be supported by the essentially nonlinear granular lattice and Toda lattice. An interesting aspect of this discovery is attributed to the realization of a spectrum of the mass ratio (the only system parameter governing the dynamics) that supports the propagation of such waves corresponding to the considered interaction potential. The objective of this exposition is to explore solitary wave propagation in the dimer binary collision (BC) model. Interestingly, the dimer BC model supports solitary wave propagation at a discrete spectrum of mass ratios similar to those observed in granular and Toda dimers. Further, we report a qualitative and one-to-one correspondence between the spectrum of the mass ratio corresponding to the dimer BC model and those corresponding to granular and Toda dimer chains.

  17. Planet formation in binary systems: simulating coagulation using analytically determined collision velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silsbee, Kedron; Rafikov, Roman

    2017-06-01

    The existence of planets in tight binary systems presents an interesting puzzle. It is thought that cores of giant planets form via agglomeration of planetesimals in mutual collisions. However, in tight binary systems, one would naïvely expect the collision velocities between planetesimals to be so high that even 100 km bodies would be destroyed, rather than growing in mutual collisions. In these systems, planetesimals are perturbed by gravity from the companion star, and gravity and gas drag from a massive eccentric gas disk. There is a damaging secular resonance that occurs due to the combination of disk gravity and gravity from the binary companion, however the disk gravity can also create locations of low relative eccentricity between planetesimals of different sizes that would not exist if the disk gravity were ignored. Because the gas drag acts more strongly on smaller planetesimals, orbital eccentricity and apsidal angle depend on planetesimal size. Consequently, planetesimal collision velocities depend on the sizes of the collision partners. Same-size bodies collide at low velocity because their orbits are apsidally aligned. Therefore, often in a given environment some collisions will lead to planetesimal growth, and some to erosion or destruction. This variety of collisional outcomes makes it difficult to determine whether any planetesimals can grow to large sizes. We run a multi-annulus coagulation/fragmentation simulation that also includes the effect of size-dependent radial drift of planetesimals to determine the minimum size of initial planetesimal necessary for growth to large sizes in collisions. The minimum initial size of planetesimal necessary for growth depends greatly on the disk mass, eccentricity and the degree of apsidal alignment with the binary. We find that in a wide variety of situations, it is a reasonable approximation that growth occurs as long as there are no collisions capable of completely destroying a planetesimal, but erosion by

  18. Lifetime of binary asteroids versus gravitational encounters and collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauvineau, Bertrand; Farinella, Paolo; Mignard, F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the effect on the dynamics of a binary asteroid in the case of a near encounter with a third body. The dynamics of the binary is modeled as a two-body problem perturbed by an approaching body in the following ways: near encounters and collisions with a component of the system. In each case, the typical value of the two-body energy variation is estimated, and a random walk for the cumulative effect is assumed. Results are applied to some binary asteroid candidates. The main conclusion is that the collisional disruption is the dominant effect, giving lifetimes comparable to or larger than the age of the solar system.

  19. An approximate formula for recalescence in binary eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    In alloys, solidification takes place along various paths which may be ascertained via phase diagrams; while there would be no single formula applicable to all alloys, an approximate formula for a specific solidification path would be useful in estimating the fraction of the solid formed during recalescence. A formulation is here presented of recalescence in binary eutectic alloys. This formula is applied to Ag-Cu alloys which are of interest in containerless solidification, due to their formation of supersaturated solutions.

  20. Binary black hole evolutions of approximate puncture initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre M.; Hinder, Ian; Herrmann, Frank; Vaishnav, Birjoo

    2009-07-15

    Approximate solutions to the Einstein field equations are valuable tools to investigate gravitational phenomena. An important aspect of any approximation is to investigate and quantify its regime of validity. We present a study that evaluates the effects that approximate puncture initial data, based on skeleton solutions to the Einstein constraints as proposed by [G. Faye, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schaefer, Phys. Rev. D 69, 124029 (2004).], have on numerical evolutions. Using data analysis tools, we assess the effectiveness of these constraint-violating initial data for both initial and advanced LIGO and show that the matches of waveforms from skeleton data with the corresponding waveforms from constraint-satisfying initial data are > or approx. 0.97 when the total mass of the binary is > or approx. 40M{sub {center_dot}}. In addition, we demonstrate that the differences between the skeleton and the constraint-satisfying initial data evolutions, and thus waveforms, are due to negative Hamiltonian constraint violations present in the skeleton initial data located in the vicinity of the punctures. During the evolution, the skeleton data develops both Hamiltonian and momentum constraint violations that decay with time, with the binary system relaxing to a constraint-satisfying solution with black holes of smaller mass and thus different dynamics.

  1. Approximate universal relations among tidal parameters for neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    One of largest uncertainties in nuclear physics is the relation between the pressure and density of supranuclear matter: the equation of state. Some of this uncertainty may be removed through future gravitational wave observations of neutron star binaries by extracting the tidal deformabilities (or Love numbers) of neutron stars, a novel way to probe nuclear physics in the high-density regime. Previous studies have shown that only a certain combination of the individual (quadrupolar) deformabilities of each body (the so-called chirp tidal deformability) can be measured with second-generation, gravitational wave interferometers, such as Adv. LIGO, due to correlations between the individual deformabilities. To overcome this, we search for approximately universal (i.e. approximately equation-of-state independent) relations between two combinations of the individual tidal deformabilities, such that once one of them has been measured, the other can be automatically obtained and the individual ones decoupled through these relations. We find an approximately universal relation between the symmetric and the anti-symmetric combination of the individual tidal deformabilities that is equation-of-state-insensitive to 20 % for binaries with masses less than 1.7{{M}⊙} . We show that these relations can be used to eliminate a combination of the tidal parameters from the list of model parameters, thus breaking degeneracies and improving the accuracy in parameter estimation. A simple (Fisher) study shows that the universal binary Love relations can improve the accuracy in the extraction of the symmetric combination of tidal parameters by as much as an order of magnitude, making the overall accuracy in the extraction of this parameter slightly better than that of the chirp tidal deformability. These new universal relations and the improved measurement accuracy on tidal parameters not only are important to astrophysics and nuclear physics, but also impact our ability to probe

  2. Parameter estimates in binary black hole collisions using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, M.; Gracia-Linares, M.; González, J. A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present an algorithm based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), that estimates the mass ratio in a binary black hole collision out of given gravitational wave (GW) strains. In this analysis, the ANN is trained with a sample of GW signals generated with numerical simulations. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated with GWs generated also with simulations for given mass ratios unknown to the ANN. We measure the accuracy of the algorithm in the interpolation and extrapolation regimes. We present the results for noise free signals and signals contaminated with Gaussian noise, in order to foresee the dependence of the method accuracy in terms of the signal to noise ratio.

  3. Efficient approximation of the cluster size distribution in binary condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Dennis S.; Sidin, Ryan S. R.; Hagmeijer, Rob

    2010-05-01

    We propose a computationally efficient method for the calculation of the binary cluster size distribution. This method is based on the phase path analysis algorithm, which was originally derived for single-component condensation. We extend this method by constructing the binary general dynamic equation, which introduces clusters at a point in two component n1,n2-space. The location of this source point is determined by the Gibbs free energy of formation and the impingement rates of the two constituents. The resulting model describes the binary cluster size distribution along a line in n1,n2-space. The solution of the binary general dynamic equation is compared with the solution of formally exact binary Becker-Döring equations for a typical nucleation pulse experiment. The results show good agreement for the cluster composition and size and the integral properties of the size distribution.

  4. Binary collision rates of relativistic thermal plasmas. I Theoretical framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Binary collision rates for arbitrary scattering cross sections are derived in the case of a beam of particles interacting with a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) plasma, or in the case of two MB plasmas interacting at generally different temperatures. The expressions are valid for all beam energies and plasma temperatures, from the nonrelativistic to the extreme relativistic limits. The calculated quantities include the reaction rate, the energy exchange rate, and the average rate of change of the squared transverse momentum component of a monoenergetic particle beam as a result of scatterings with particles of a MB plasma. Results are specialized to elastic scattering processes, two-temperature reaction rates, or the cold plasma limit, reproducing previous work.

  5. Binary collision rates of relativistic thermal plasmas. I Theoretical framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Binary collision rates for arbitrary scattering cross sections are derived in the case of a beam of particles interacting with a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) plasma, or in the case of two MB plasmas interacting at generally different temperatures. The expressions are valid for all beam energies and plasma temperatures, from the nonrelativistic to the extreme relativistic limits. The calculated quantities include the reaction rate, the energy exchange rate, and the average rate of change of the squared transverse momentum component of a monoenergetic particle beam as a result of scatterings with particles of a MB plasma. Results are specialized to elastic scattering processes, two-temperature reaction rates, or the cold plasma limit, reproducing previous work.

  6. Very wide binary stars as the primary source of stellar collisions in the galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2014-02-20

    We present numerical simulations modeling the orbital evolution of very wide binaries, pairs of stars separated by over ∼10{sup 3} AU. Due to perturbations from other passing stars and the Milky Way's tide, the orbits of very wide binary stars occasionally become extremely eccentric, which forces close encounters between the companion stars. We show that this process causes a stellar collision between very wide binary companion stars once every 1000-7500 yr on average in the Milky Way. One of the main uncertainties in this collision rate is the amount of energy dissipated by dynamic tides during close (but not collisional) periastron passages. This dissipation presents a dynamical barrier to stellar collisions and can instead transform very wide binaries into close or contact binaries. However, for any plausible tidal dissipation model, very wide binary stars are an unrealized, and potentially the dominant, source of stellar collisions in our Galaxy. Such collisions should occur throughout the thin disk of the Milky Way. Stellar collisions within very wide binaries should yield a small population of single, Li-depleted, rapidly rotating massive stars.

  7. Binary Collision Density in a Non-Ideal Gas as a Function of Particle Density, Collision Diameter, and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, binary collision density in a dense non-ideal gas with Lennard-Jones interactions is investigated. It is shown that the functional form of the dependence of collision density on particle density and collision diameter remains the same as that for an ideal gas. The temperature dependence of the collision density, however, has a very different form at low temperatures, where it decreases as temperature increases. But at higher temperatures the functional form becomes the same as that for an ideal gas.

  8. A Hybrid Approximation Technique for Head-on Black-Hole-Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David; Chen, Yanbei; Keppel, Drew; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    Black-hole-binary coalescence is often divided into three stages, inspiral, merger and ringdown; the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation treats the inspiral phase, black-hole perturbation (BHP) theory describes the ringdown, and the strongly nonlinear dynamics of spacetime characterize the merger. In this paper, we introduce a hybrid method that incorporates elements of PN and BHP theories, and we apply it to the head-on collision of black holes with transverse, anti-parallel spins. We compare our approximation technique with a full numerical-relativity simulation by G. Lovelace et al, and we find surprisingly good agreement between the gravitational waveforms and the radiated energy and momentum. We also apply this model to understand the flow of gravitational field momentum in the simulation, quantified by the Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor. Our results indicate that while PN and BHP theories do not capture all the strongly nonlinear physics of the merger, they do suffice to explain the outgoing gravitational radiation for head-on mergers. )

  9. Use of the Glauber approximation in atomic collisions - A progress report.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.

    1972-01-01

    Recent progress in the use of the Glauber (1970) theory for estimating atomic collision cross sections is reviewed. It appears that the Glauber approximation is reliable for electron-hydrogen elastic scattering and excitation at incident energies exceeding 30 eV. For more complicated atomic collisions, the usefulness of the Glauber approximation has not yet been significantly tested.

  10. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield - especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the "density gradient model") which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target's atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient - leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  11. Gravitational recoil from binary black hole mergers: The close-limit approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Yunes, Nicolas; Laguna, Pablo

    2006-12-15

    The coalescence of a binary black hole system is one of the main sources of gravitational waves that present and future detectors will study. Apart from the energy and angular momentum that these waves carry, for unequal-mass binaries there is also a net flux of linear momentum that implies a recoil velocity of the resulting final black hole in the opposite direction. Due to the relevance of this phenomenon in astrophysics, in particular, for galaxy merger scenarios, there have been several attempts to estimate the magnitude of this velocity. Since the main contribution to the recoil comes from the last orbit and plunge, an approximation valid at the last stage of coalescence is well motivated for this type of calculation. In this paper, we present a computation of the recoil velocity based on the close-limit approximation scheme, which gives excellent results for head-on and grazing collisions of black holes when compared to full numerical relativistic calculations. We obtain a maximum recoil velocity of {approx}57 km/s for a symmetric mass ratio {eta}=M{sub 1}M{sub 2}/(M{sub 1}+M{sub 2}){sup 2}{approx}0.19 and an initial proper separation of 4M, where M is the total Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) mass of the system. This separation is the maximum at which the close-limit approximation is expected to provide accurate results. Therefore, it cannot account for the contributions due to inspiral and initial merger. If we supplement this estimate with post-Newtonian (PN) calculations up to the innermost stable circular orbit, we obtain a lower bound for the recoil velocity, with a maximum around 80 km/s. This is a lower bound because it neglects the initial merger phase. We can however obtain a rough estimate by using PN methods or the close-limit approximation. Since both methods are known to overestimate the amount of radiation, we obtain in this way an upper bound for the recoil with maxima in the range of 214-240 km/s. We also provide nonlinear fits to these estimated

  12. Zero-degree binary encounter electrons in fast collisions of highly charged F and O ions with H 2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Sanders, J. M.; Hidmi, H.; Richard, P.

    1993-06-01

    Doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for binary encounter electrons (BEe) produced by 0.5-2 MeV/u highly-charged F and O ions in collisions with H 2 gas targets have been studied at 0° with respect to the ion beam direction. The measured DDCS of the broad binary encounter peak was well described by a simple impulse approximation (IA) treatment for bare ions, and was demonstrated to provide in situ detection efficiency of the electron spectrometer. The projectile energy dependence of the BEe production for nonbare (clothed) projectiles is found to follow a scaled IA prediction, in which a BEe enhancement is consistently exhibited for the collision energy range studied.

  13. Binary and triple collisions causing instability in the free-fall three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Hiroaki; Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2000-04-01

    Dominant factors for escape after the first triple-encounter are searched for in the three-body problem with zero initial velocities and equal masses. By a global numerical survey on the whole initial-value space, it is found that not only a triple-collision orbit but also a particular family of binary-collision orbits exist in the set of escape orbits. This observation is justified from various viewpoints. Binary-collision orbits experiencing close triple-encounter turn out to be close to isosceles orbits after the encounter and hence lead to escape. Except for a few cases, binary-collision orbits of near-isosceles slingshot also escape.

  14. Collisions of Halo Nuclei within a Dynamical Eikonal Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.; Goldstein, G.

    2005-08-19

    The dynamical eikonal approximation unifies the semiclassical time-dependent and eikonal methods. It allows calculating differential cross sections for elastic scattering and breakup in a quantal way by taking into account interference effects. Good agreement is obtained with experiment for {sup 11}Be breakup on {sup 208}Pb. Dynamical effects are weak for elastic scattering.

  15. Optimal conditions for using the binary approximation of continuously self-imaging gratings.

    PubMed

    Piponnier, Martin; Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; de Bougrenet, Jean-Louis; Primot, Jérôme

    2011-11-07

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE), that generate a propagation-invariant transverse intensity pattern, can be used for metrology and imaging application because they provide a very wide depth of focus. However, exact implementation of such DOE is not easy, so we generally code the transmittance by a binary approximation. In this paper, we will study the influence of the binary approximation of Continuously Self-Imaging Gratings (CSIG) on the propagated intensity pattern, for amplitude or phase coding. We will thus demonstrate that under specific conditions, parasitic effects due to the binarization disappear and we retrieve the theoretical non-diffracting property of CSIG's.

  16. Effect of Collision Angle on Binary Droplet Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen

    2006-11-01

    Drop pairs of water/glycerin solution were injected into silicone oil of lower density through opposing tubes at varying initial angles with the goal of controlling the eventual collision angles. Simultaneous dual-field PIV measurements were obtained in index-matched fluids to characterize coalescence and rebounding behavior. The larger field captured trajectories, and the smaller field captured the thin film region. Experiments were performed for Weber numbers [We] in the range of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80 degrees below the horizontal. Above We ˜ 10, drops coalesced, with the rebounding/coalescence boundary shifting to higher We with increasing collision angle. Also, the collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture. The rupture location moved higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. Interactions of vortex rings within drops and strong deformation associated with shallow collision angles and sufficient We encouraged coalescence. Details of these interactions will be discussed in the presentation. Supported by Petroleum Research Fund (42939-AC9) and NSF (CTS-0320327).

  17. Short collision time approximation for neutron scattering using discrete frequency distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    A completely general form for computing any scattering cross section based on the incoherent approximation without extending f(..omega..) to negative frequencies and without integrating over the complex plane is presented. A simple derivation of the short collision time approximation for discrete frequency distributions is also given. The approximation works well for large incident neutron energies when the duration of a collision is short compared with the natural periods of atomic motion. Single-differential scattering cross sections for light water as computed with the free proton and Nelkin scattering models at 561/sup 0/K, and the short collision time approximation with T/sub eff/ = 1468/sup 0/K, are shown for an incident neutron energy of 1.0 eV. 1 figure. (RWR)

  18. Research on plasma turbulence involving binary particle collisions and collective effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandri, G.

    1972-01-01

    Plasmas in which binary collisions are important are studied by means of nonadiabatic methods. Two- and three-body correlations are calculated to determine the one-particle distribution for the ionization model. The general dispersion analysis is summarized, and examples of the ionization model and of the static fluctuations are discussed.

  19. Analysis of the Conformally Flat Approximation for Binary Neutron Star Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, In-Saeng; Mathews, Grant J.; Haywood, J. Reese; Lan, N. Q.

    The spatially conformally flat approximation (CFA) is a viable method to deduce initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of binary neutron stars employing the full Einstein equations. Here we review the status of the original formulation of the CFA for the general relativistic hydrodynamic initial conditions of binary neutron stars. We illustrate the stability of the conformally flat condition on the hydrodynamics by numerically evolving ~100 quasi-circular orbits. We illustrate the use of this approximation for orbiting neutron stars in the quasi-circular orbit approximation to demonstrate the equation of state dependence of these initial conditions and how they might affect the emergent gravitational wave frequency as the stars approach the innermost stable circular orbit.

  20. Analysis of the Conformally Flat Approximation for Binary Neutron Star Initial Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Suh, In-Saeng; Mathews, Grant J.; Haywood, J. Reese; ...

    2017-01-09

    The spatially conformally flat approximation (CFA) is a viable method to deduce initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of binary neutron stars employing the full Einstein equations. Here in this paper, we analyze the viability of the CFA for the general relativistic hydrodynamic initial conditions of binary neutron stars. We illustrate the stability of the conformally flat condition on the hydrodynamics by numerically evolving ~100 quasicircular orbits. We illustrate the use of this approximation for orbiting neutron stars in the quasicircular orbit approximation to demonstrate the equation of state dependence of these initial conditions and how they might affect themore » emergent gravitational wave frequency as the stars approach the innermost stable circular orbit.« less

  1. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  2. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit heats of segregation for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent LMTO-based parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation, while the ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of a segregation model driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  3. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  4. Surface Segregation Energies of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy method. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameterization. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. The ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation for the most part, but predicted relaxations from quantum approximate calculations are used in selected cases to compute approximate relaxed ab initio segregation energies. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with other quantum approximate and ab initio theoretical work, and available experimental results.

  5. Polar pattern formation in driven filament systems requires non-binary particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2015-10-01

    From the self-organization of the cytoskeleton to the synchronous motion of bird flocks, living matter has the extraordinary ability to behave in a concerted manner. The Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particles is frequently used in silico to link a system’s meso- or macroscopic behaviour to the microscopic dynamics of its constituents. But so far such studies have relied on an assumption of simplified binary collisions owing to a lack of experimental data suggesting otherwise. We report here experimentally determined binary-collision statistics by studying a recently introduced molecular system, the high-density actomyosin motility assay. We demonstrate that the alignment induced by binary collisions is too weak to account for the observed ordering transition. The transition density for polar pattern formation decreases quadratically with filament length, indicating that multi-filament collisions drive the observed ordering phenomenon and that a gas-like picture cannot explain the transition of the system to polar order. Our findings demonstrate that the unique properties of biological active-matter systems require a description that goes well beyond that developed in the framework of kinetic theories.

  6. Lorentz invariant relative velocity and relativistic binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannoni, Mirco

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of Lorentz invariant relative velocity that is often misunderstood or unknown in high energy physics literature. The properties of the relative velocity allow to formulate the invariant flux and cross-section without recurring to nonphysical velocities or any assumption about the reference frame. Applications such as the luminosity of a collider, the use as kinematic variable, and the statistical theory of collisions in a relativistic classical gas are reviewed. It is emphasized how the hyperbolic properties of the velocity space explain the peculiarities of relativistic scattering.

  7. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. I - Rotational transitions in the sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The impact parameter method and the sudden approximation are applied to determine the total probability of inelastic rotational transitions arising from a collision of an atom and a homonuclear diatomic molecule at large impact parameters. An analytical approximation to this probability is found for conditions where the electron exchange or overlap forces dominate the scattering. An approximate upper bound to the range of impact parameters for which rotational scattering can be important is determined. In addition, an estimate of the total inelastic cross section is found at conditions for which a statistical model describes the scattering well. The results of this analysis are applied to Ar-O2 collisions and may be readily applied to other combinations of atoms and molecules.

  8. Explosions triggered by violent binary-star collisions: application to Eta Carinae and other eruptive transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses a scenario where a violent periastron collision of stars in an eccentric binary system induces an eruption or explosion seen as a brief transient source, attributed to luminous blue variables (LBVs), supernova (SN) impostors or other transients. The key ingredient is that an evolved primary increases its photospheric radius on relatively short (year to decade) time-scales, to a point where the radius is comparable to or larger than the periastron separation in an eccentric binary. In such a configuration, a violent and sudden collision would ensue, possibly leading to substantial mass ejection instead of a merger. Sudden energy deposition during the encounter could drive expansion of the optically thick envelope, causing a luminous transient source. Repeated periastral grazings in an eccentric system could quickly escalate to a catastrophic encounter. Outbursts triggered by tidal disturbances or powered by secondary accretion of the primary star's wind have been suggested previously. Instead, this paper proposes a much more violent encounter where the companion star plunges deep inside the photosphere of a bloated primary during periastron, as a result of the primary star increasing its own radius. This is motivated by the case of Eta Carinae, where such a collision must have occurred if conventional estimates of the present-day orbit are correct and where peaks in the light curve coincide with times of periastron. Stellar collisions may explain brief recurring LBV outbursts, such as SN 2000ch and SN 2009ip, and perhaps outbursts from intermediate-mass progenitor stars (i.e. collisions are not necessarily the exclusive domain of very luminous stars), but they cannot explain all non-SN transients. Finally, mass ejections induced repeatedly at periastron cause orbital evolution; this may explain the origin of eccentric Wolf-Rayet binaries such as WR 140.

  9. A local collision probability approximation for predicting momentum transfer cross sections.

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Christian

    2015-10-21

    The local collision probability approximation (LCPA) method is introduced to compute molecular momentum transfer cross sections for comparison to ion mobility experiments. The LCPA replaces the (non-local) scattering trajectory used in the trajectory method to describe the collision process by a (local) collision probability function. This momentum transfer probability is computed using the exact same analyte-buffer interaction potential as used in the trajectory method. Subsequently, the momentum transfer cross section ΩLCPA(T) is calculated in a projection-type manner (corrected for shape effects through a shape factor). Benchmark calculations on a set of 208 carbon clusters with a range of molecular size and degree of concavity demonstrate that LCPA and trajectory calculations agree closely with one another. The results discussed here indicate that the LCPA is suitable to efficiently calculate momentum transfer cross sections for use in ion mobility spectrometry in conjunction with different buffer gases.

  10. Two-dimensional time evolution of beam-plasma instability in the presence of binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Kontar, E. P.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electrons produced during solar flares are known to be responsible for generating solar type III radio bursts. The radio emission is a byproduct of Langmuir wave generation via beam-plasma interaction and nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle interaction processes. In addition to type III radio bursts, electrons traveling downwards toward the chromosphere lead to the hard X-ray emission via electron-ion collisions. Recently, the role of Langmuir waves on the X-ray-producing electrons has been identified as important, because Langmuir waves may alter the electron distribution, thereby affecting the X-ray profile. Both Coulomb collisions and wave-particle interactions lead electrons to scattering and energy exchange that necessitates considering the two-dimensional (2D) problem in velocity space. The present paper investigates the influence of binary collisions on the beam-plasma instability development in 2D in order to elucidate the nonlinear dynamics of Langmuir waves and binary collisions. The significance of the present findings in the context of solar physics is discussed.

  11. Hierarchical approximate policy iteration with binary-tree state space decomposition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Liu, Chunming; Yang, Simon X; Hu, Dewen

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, approximate policy iteration (API) has attracted increasing attention in reinforcement learning (RL), e.g., least-squares policy iteration (LSPI) and its kernelized version, the kernel-based LSPI algorithm. However, it remains difficult for API algorithms to obtain near-optimal policies for Markov decision processes (MDPs) with large or continuous state spaces. To address this problem, this paper presents a hierarchical API (HAPI) method with binary-tree state space decomposition for RL in a class of absorbing MDPs, which can be formulated as time-optimal learning control tasks. In the proposed method, after collecting samples adaptively in the state space of the original MDP, a learning-based decomposition strategy of sample sets was designed to implement the binary-tree state space decomposition process. Then, API algorithms were used on the sample subsets to approximate local optimal policies of sub-MDPs. The original MDP was decomposed into a binary-tree structure of absorbing sub-MDPs, constructed during the learning process, thus, local near-optimal policies were approximated by API algorithms with reduced complexity and higher precision. Furthermore, because of the improved quality of local policies, the combined global policy performed better than the near-optimal policy obtained by a single API algorithm in the original MDP. Three learning control problems, including path-tracking control of a real mobile robot, were studied to evaluate the performance of the HAPI method. With the same setting for basis function selection and sample collection, the proposed HAPI obtained better near-optimal policies than previous API methods such as LSPI and KLSPI.

  12. On the Validity of the Adiabatic Approximation in Compact Binary Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Ferrari, Valeria; Pannarale, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We use the post-Newtonian-Affine model to assess the validity of the adiabatic approximation in modeling tidal effects in the phase evolution of compact binary systems. We compute the dynamical evolution of the tidal tensor, which we estimate at the 2PN order, and of the quadrupole tensor, finding that their ratio, i.e. the tidal deformability, increases in the last phases of the inspiral. We derive the gravitational wave phase corrections due to this phenomenon and quantify how they affect gravitational wave detectability.

  13. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms. II - Infinite order sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1979-01-01

    The infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation is extended to rotational excitation of symmetric tops by collisions with atoms. After development of a formalism for 'primitive' or 'one-ended' tops, proper parity-adapted linear combinations describing real rotors are considered and modifications needed for asymmetric rigid rotors are noted. The generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are discussed. IOS calculations for NH3-He and H2CO-He are performed and compared with more accurate calculations, and the IOS approximation is found to provide a reasonably accurate description.

  14. Spin memory effect for compact binaries in the post-Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David A.

    2017-04-01

    The spin memory effect is a recently predicted relativistic phenomenon in asymptotically flat spacetimes that become nonradiative infinitely far in the past and future. Between these early and late times, the magnetic-parity part of the time integral of the gravitational-wave strain can undergo a nonzero change; this difference is the spin memory effect. Families of freely falling observers around an isolated source can measure this effect, in principle, and fluxes of angular momentum per unit solid angle (or changes in superspin charges) generate the effect. The spin memory effect had not been computed explicitly for astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, such as compact binaries. In this paper, we compute the spin memory in terms of a set of radiative multipole moments of the gravitational-wave strain. The result of this calculation allows us to establish the following results about the spin memory: (i) We find that the accumulation of the spin memory behaves in a qualitatively different way from that of the displacement memory effect for nonspinning, quasicircular compact binaries in the post-Newtonian approximation: the spin memory undergoes a large secular growth over the duration of the inspiral, whereas for the displacement effect this increase is small. (ii) The rate at which the spin memory grows is equivalent to a nonlinear, but nonoscillatory and nonhereditary effect in the gravitational waveform that had been previously calculated for nonspinning, quasicircular compact binaries. (iii) This rate of buildup of the spin memory could potentially be detected by future gravitational-wave detectors by carefully combining the measured waveforms from hundreds of gravitational-wave detections of compact binaries.

  15. Grazing Collision of Binary Black Holes II: From Merger Towards Ringdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2000-04-01

    One of the great challenges in gravitational physics is to simulate the collision of two black holes in order to study the resulting gravitational radiation. The Agave collaboration has successfully collided two spinning black holes in a grazing merger. The eventual goal of this work is to simulate the orbit, merger and ringdown stages of an astrophysical binary black hole system. The success of the grazing collision has proven to be strongly dependent on predicting the dynamics of the apparent horizons during the evolution. This is due to the fact that the region inside the apparent horizon containing the singularity is removed from the computational domain. Once the black holes have merged, one is left with a single black hole horizon. The spacetime is of a highly distorted black hole. We present results from simulations of the merged to ringdown stage in the life of a binary black hole collision. We show not only how crucial a role the dynamics of the apparent horizon plays in extending the lifetime of the simulation towards ringdown, but also the vital role the appropriate prescription of gauge conditions plays.

  16. Massive black hole binaries from runaway collisions: the impact of metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2016-07-01

    The runaway collision scenario is one of the most promising mechanisms to explain the formation of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in young dense star clusters. On the other hand, the massive stars that participate in the runaway collisions lose mass by stellar winds. In this paper, we discuss new N-body simulations of massive (6.5 × 104 M⊙) star clusters, in which we added upgraded recipes for stellar winds and supernova explosion at different metallicity. We follow the evolution of the principal collision product (PCP), through dynamics and stellar evolution, till it forms a stellar remnant. At solar metallicity, the mass of the final merger product spans from few solar masses up to ˜30 M⊙. At low metallicity (0.01-0.1 Z⊙) the maximum remnant mass is ˜250 M⊙, in the range of IMBHs. A large fraction (˜0.6) of the PCPs are not ejected from the parent star cluster and acquire stellar or black hole (BH) companions. Most of the long-lived binaries hosting a PCP are BH-BH binaries. We discuss the importance of this result for gravitational wave detection.

  17. On the quantum mechanical theory of collisional recombination rates, II. Beyond the strong collision approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1995-07-01

    A quantum mechanical theory of collisional recombination (within the Lindemann mechanism, A + B {leftrightarrow} AB*, AB* + M {yields} AB + M) is presented which provides a proper quantum description of the A + B collision dynamics and treats the M + AB* inelastic scattering within the impact approximation (the quantum analog of a classical master equation treatment). The most rigorous version of the theory is similar in structure to the impact theory of spectral line broadening and involves generalized (4-index) rate constants for describing M + AB* collisions. A simplified version is also presented which involves only the normal (2-index) inelastic rate constants for M + AB* scattering but which also retains a proper quantum description of the A + B dynamics.

  18. Effect of rheological approximations on slab detachment in 3D numerical simulations of continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2017-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that slab detachment results from the development of extensional stresses within the subducting slab. Subduction slowdown due to arrival of buoyant continental material at the trench is considered to cause such stress build up in the slab. Following slab detachment, slab pull partially or completely loses its strength and hot asthenosphere may flow through the slab window, which can have major consequences for continental collision. The dynamics of slab detachment has been extensively studied in 2D (i.e. analytical and numerical), but 3D models of slab detachment during continental collision remain largely unexplored. Some of the previous 3D models have investigated the role of an asymmetric margin on the propagation of slab detachment (van Hunen and Allen, 2011), the impact of slab detachment on the curvature of orogenic belts (Capitanio and Replumaz, 2013), the role of the collision rate on slab detachment depth (Li et al., 2013) or the effect of along-trench variations on slab detachment (Duretz et al., 2014). However, rheology of mantle and lithosphere is known to have a major influence on the dynamics of subduction. Here, we explore a range of different rheological approximations to understand their sensitivity on the possible scenarios. We employ the code LaMEM (Kaus et al., 2016) to perform 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear, to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow, dominated by viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, dominated by plastic breaking and inducing strong mantle flow in

  19. Extending the binary collision algorithm to non-Spitzer systems and application to laser heating and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Alex; Schumacher, Douglass

    2017-08-01

    We have generalized the binary collision algorithm to accommodate arbitrary collision rates, enabling the accurate kinetic modeling of short range particle interactions in non-Spitzer systems. With this extension, we explore the effect of different collision models on simulating how ultra-intense lasers first begin to heat a target. The effect of collisions on plasma evolution is crucial for treating particle slowing, energy transport, and thermalization. The widely used binary collision algorithm provides a fast and computationally efficient method to include the effects of collisions between charged particles in kinetic simulations without requiring the particles to be in local thermal equilibrium already. However, it is "hardwired" to use Spitzer collision rates that are appropriate for hot, relatively dilute plasmas. This restriction prevents the Nanbu collision algorithm from accurately describing the initial heating of a cold target, a key problem for the study of laser damage or the generation of the warm dense matter state. We describe our approach for modifying the Nanbu collision algorithm and demonstrate the improved accuracy for copper targets.

  20. Validity of central field approximations in molecular scattering - Low energy CO-He collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monchick, L.; Green, S.

    1975-01-01

    Close-coupled calculations have been carried out on collisions of helium and carbon monoxide interacting via a theoretical interaction potential which is believed to reproduce accurately the true interaction of this system. These are compared with an equivalent set of calculations for the spherical average of this potential. It is concluded that the latter approximation holds reasonably well for transport-property calculations but not for differential and total scattering cross sections. As a consequence, conservation of scattering-cross-section theorems that are based on this interaction potential do not hold well.

  1. Comparison of approximations in density functional theory calculations: Energetics and structure of binary oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinuma, Yoyo; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Yu; Tanaka, Isao; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2017-09-01

    High-throughput first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are a powerful tool in data-oriented materials research. The choice of approximation to the exchange-correlation functional is crucial as it strongly affects the accuracy of DFT calculations. This study compares performance of seven approximations, six of which are based on Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with and without Hubbard U and van der Waals corrections (PBE, PBE+U, PBED3, PBED3+U, PBEsol, and PBEsol+U), and the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA on the energetics and crystal structure of elementary substances and binary oxides. For the latter, only those with closed-shell electronic structures are considered, examples of which include C u2O , A g2O , MgO, ZnO, CdO, SnO, PbO, A l2O3 , G a2O3 , I n2O3 , L a2O3 , B i2O3 , Si O2 , Sn O2 , Pb O2 , Ti O2 , Zr O2 , Hf O2 , V2O5 , N b2O5 , T a2O5 , Mo O3 , and W O3 . Prototype crystal structures are selected from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) and cation substitution is used to make a set of existing and hypothetical oxides. Two indices are proposed to quantify the extent of lattice and internal coordinate relaxation during a calculation. The former is based on the second invariant and determinant of the transformation matrix of basis vectors from before relaxation to after relaxation, and the latter is derived from shifts of internal coordinates of atoms in the unit cell. PBED3, PBEsol, and SCAN reproduce experimental lattice parameters of elementary substances and oxides well with few outliers. Notably, PBEsol and SCAN predict the lattice parameters of low dimensional structures comparably well with PBED3, even though these two functionals do not explicitly treat van der Waals interactions. SCAN gives formation enthalpies and Gibbs free energies closest to experimental data, with mean errors (MEs) of 0.01 and -0.04 eV, respectively, and root

  2. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: FORMATION OF COMPACT BINARIES, MERGER/COLLISION PRODUCTS AND G2-LIKE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Snezana; Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B. E-mail: antonini@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-02-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of binaries around massive black holes (MBHs) in nuclear stellar clusters. We focus on their secular evolution due to the perturbation by the MBHs, while simplistically accounting for their collisional evolution. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbits around MBHs are strongly affected by secular processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (e.g., Kozai-Lidov cycles). During periapsis approach, dissipative processes such as tidal friction may become highly efficient, and may lead to shrinkage of a binary orbit and even to its merger. Binaries in this environment can therefore significantly change their orbital evolution due to the MBH third-body perturbative effects. Such orbital evolution may impinge on their later stellar evolution. Here we follow the secular dynamics of such binaries and its coupling to tidal evolution, as well as the stellar evolution of such binaries on longer timescales. We find that stellar binaries in the central parts of nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are highly likely to evolve into eccentric and/or short-period binaries, and become strongly interacting binaries either on the main sequence (at which point they may even merge), or through their later binary stellar evolution. The central parts of NSCs therefore catalyze the formation and evolution of strongly interacting binaries, and lead to the enhanced formation of blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and possible supernova progenitors. Induced mergers/collisions may also lead to the formation of G2-like cloud-like objects such as the one recently observed in the Galactic center.

  3. On the validity of the adiabatic approximation in compact binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pannarale, Francesco; Ferrari, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Using a semianalytical approach recently developed to model the tidal deformations of neutron stars in inspiralling compact binaries, we study the dynamical evolution of the tidal tensor, which we explicitly derive at second post-Newtonian order, and of the quadrupole tensor. Since we do not assume a priori that the quadrupole tensor is proportional to the tidal tensor, i.e., the so-called “adiabatic approximation,” our approach enables us to establish to which extent such approximation is reliable. We find that the ratio between the quadrupole and tidal tensors (i.e., the Love number) increases as the inspiral progresses, but this phenomenon only marginally affects the emitted gravitational waveform. We estimate the frequency range in which the tidal component of the gravitational signal is well described using the Stationary phase approximation at next-to-leading post-Newtonian order, comparing different contributions to the tidal phase. We also derive a semianalytical expression for the Love number, which reproduces within a few percentage points the results obtained so far by numerical integrations of the relativistic equations of stellar perturbations.

  4. Coulomb explosion and binary encounter processes in collisions between slow ions and small molecules of biological interest

    SciTech Connect

    Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.

    2008-12-08

    In this work we study the ion impact induced fragmentation of small molecules, which are relevant for radiation damage studies in biological tissues. We present double differential ion emission yields for collisions of N{sup 6+} ions with water and methane molecules at 15 and 30 keV impact energies. The angular distribution of the fragment ions shows post-collision and nucleus-nucleus binary collision effects. In the multiple capture energy range, a strong interplay is indicated between the Coulomb explosion and the binary collision mechanisms. In the energy region, where triple capture is dominant, an unexpected angular distribution was found for water fragments, which may be attributed to orientation sensitivity of some of the capture channels. Such processes are relevant for astrophysics and radiation therapy.

  5. Head-on collisions of binary white dwarf-neutron stars: Simulations in full general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2011-03-01

    We simulate head-on collisions from rest at large separation of binary white dwarf-neutron stars (WDNSs) in full general relativity. Our study serves as a prelude to our analysis of the circular binary WDNS problem. We focus on compact binaries whose total mass exceeds the maximum mass that a cold-degenerate star can support, and our goal is to determine the fate of such systems. A fully general relativistic hydrodynamic computation of a realistic WDNS head-on collision is prohibitive due to the large range of dynamical time scales and length scales involved. For this reason, we construct an equation of state (EOS) which captures the main physical features of neutron stars (NSs) while, at the same time, scales down the size of white dwarfs (WDs). We call these scaled-down WD models “pseudo-WDs (pWDs).” Using pWDs, we can study these systems via a sequence of simulations where the size of the pWD gradually increases toward the realistic case. We perform two sets of simulations; One set studies the effects of the NS mass on the final outcome, when the pWD is kept fixed. The other set studies the effect of the pWD compaction on the final outcome, when the pWD mass and the NS are kept fixed. All simulations show that after the collision, 14%-18% of the initial total rest mass escapes to infinity. All remnant masses still exceed the maximum rest mass that our cold EOS can support (1.92M⊙), but no case leads to prompt collapse to a black hole. This outcome arises because the final configurations are hot. All cases settle into spherical, quasiequilibrium configurations consisting of a cold NS core surrounded by a hot mantle, resembling Thorne-Zytkow objects. Extrapolating our results to realistic WD compactions, we predict that the likely outcome of a head-on collision of a realistic, massive WDNS system will be the formation of a quasiequilibrium Thorne-Zytkow-like object.

  6. Computational test of the infinite order sudden approximation for excitation of linear rigid rotors by collisions with atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1978-01-01

    The infinite order sudden approximation for excitation of linear rigid rotors by collisions with atom is tested by comparing integral state-to-state cross sections with accurate close coupling and coupled states results. The systems studied are HCl-Ar, HCl-He, CO-He, HCN-He, CS-H2 and OCS-H2. With the exception of diatomic hydrides (e.g., HCl) which have atypically large rotational constants the method is found to be very accurate to remarkably low collision energies. This approximation should generally be extremely useful for thermal energy collisions.

  7. Macroscopic Model for Head-On Binary Droplet Collisions in a Gaseous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie

    2016-11-01

    In this Letter, coalescence-bouncing transitions of head-on binary droplet collisions are predicted by a novel macroscopic model based entirely on fundamental laws of physics. By making use of the lubrication theory of Zhang and Law [Phys. Fluids 23, 042102 (2011)], we have modified the Navier-Stokes equations to accurately account for the rarefied nature of the interdroplet gas film. Through the disjoint pressure model, we have incorporated the intermolecular van der Waals forces. Our model does not use any adjustable (empirical) parameters. It therefore encompasses an extreme range of length scales (more than 5 orders of magnitude): from those of the external flow in excess of the droplet size (a few hundred μ m ) to the effective range of the van der Waals force around 10 nm. A state of the art moving adaptive mesh method, capable of resolving all the relevant length scales, has been employed. Our numerical simulations are able to capture the coalescence-bouncing and bouncing-coalescence transitions that are observed as the collision intensity increases. The predicted transition Weber numbers for tetradecane and water droplet collisions at different pressures show good agreement with published experimental values. Our study also sheds new light on the roles of gas density, droplet size, and mean free path in the rupture of the gas film.

  8. A force evaluation free method to N-body problems: Binary interaction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, S.

    2016-03-01

    We recently proposed the binary interaction approximation (BIA) to N-body problems, which, in principle, excludes the interparticle force evaluation if the exact solutions are known for the corresponding two-body problems such as the Coulombic and gravitational interactions. In this article, a detailed introduction to the BIA is given, including the error analysis to give the expressions for the approximation error in the total angular momentum and the total energy of the entire system. It is shown that, although the energy conservation of the BIA scheme is worse than the 4th order Hermite integrator (HMT4) for similar elapsed, or the wall-clock times, the individual errors in position and in velocity are much better than HMT4. The energy error correction scheme to the BIA is also introduced that does not deteriorate the individual errors in position and in velocity. It is suggested that the BIA scheme is applicable to the tree method, the particle-mesh (PM), and the particle-particle-particle-mesh (PPPM) schemes simply by replacing the force evaluation and the conventional time integrator with the BIA scheme.

  9. Binary-State Dynamics on Complex Networks: Pair Approximation and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, James P.

    2013-04-01

    A wide class of binary-state dynamics on networks—including, for example, the voter model, the Bass diffusion model, and threshold models—can be described in terms of transition rates (spin-flip probabilities) that depend on the number of nearest neighbors in each of the two possible states. High-accuracy approximations for the emergent dynamics of such models on uncorrelated, infinite networks are given by recently developed compartmental models or approximate master equations (AMEs). Pair approximations (PAs) and mean-field theories can be systematically derived from the AME. We show that PA and AME solutions can coincide under certain circumstances, and numerical simulations confirm that PA is highly accurate in these cases. For monotone dynamics (where transitions out of one nodal state are impossible, e.g., susceptible-infected disease spread or Bass diffusion), PA and the AME give identical results for the fraction of nodes in the infected (active) state for all time, provided that the rate of infection depends linearly on the number of infected neighbors. In the more general nonmonotone case, we derive a condition—that proves to be equivalent to a detailed balance condition on the dynamics—for PA and AME solutions to coincide in the limit t→∞. This equivalence permits bifurcation analysis, yielding explicit expressions for the critical (ferromagnetic or paramagnetic transition) point of such dynamics, that is closely analogous to the critical temperature of the Ising spin model. Finally, the AME for threshold models of propagation is shown to reduce to just two differential equations and to give excellent agreement with numerical simulations. As part of this work, the Octave or Matlab code for implementing and solving the differential-equation systems is made available for download.

  10. Born-Oppenheimer approximation for mass scaling of cold-collision properties

    SciTech Connect

    Falke, Stephan; Tiemann, Eberhard; Lisdat, Christian

    2007-07-15

    Asymptotic levels of the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} state of the two isotopomers {sup 39}K{sub 2} and {sup 39}K{sup 41}K up to the dissociation limit are investigated with a Doppler-free high resolution laser-spectroscopic experiment in a molecular beam. The observed level structure can be reproduced correctly only if a mass dependent correction term is introduced for the interaction potential. The applied relative correction in the depth of the potential is 10{sup -6}, which is in the order of magnitude expected for corrections of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A similar change in ground state potentials might lead to significant changes of mass-scaled properties describing cold collisions like the s-wave scattering length.

  11. Born-approximation and radiative corrections to pair production in photon-photon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Aspects of pair production in photon-photon collisions, which can be of great importance in a variety of astrophysical settings, are examined. In particular, the correction associated with the use of Coulomb rather than plane-wave functions to describe the outgoing e(+) e(-) is evaluated. This is important only in the energy domain near threshold where e(+) e(-) are nonrelativistic, and the effect is evaluated. Because of the extreme simplicity of the nonrelativistic Born limit, the corresponding derivation is briefly outlined using noncovariant perturbation theory. The relative magnitude of the Born correction is comparable to radiative-correction effects. These effects can be evaluated easily in the nonrelativistic limit, and an approximate calculation is outlined.

  12. Fokker action of nonspinning compact binaries at the fourth post-Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Laura; Blanchet, Luc; Bohé, Alejandro; Faye, Guillaume; Marsat, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    The Fokker action governing the motion of compact binary systems without spins is derived in harmonic coordinates at the fourth post-Newtonian approximation (4PN) of general relativity. Dimensional regularization is used for treating the local ultraviolet (UV) divergences associated with point particles, followed by a renormalization of the poles into a redefinition of the trajectories of the point masses. Effects at the 4PN order associated with wave tails propagating at infinity are included consistently at the level of the action. A finite part procedure based on analytic continuation deals with the infrared (IR) divergencies at spatial infinity, which are shown to be fully consistent with the presence of near-zone tails. Our end result at 4PN order is Lorentz invariant and has the correct self-force limit for the energy of circular orbits. However, we find that it differs from the recently published result derived within the ADM Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity [T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.064058]. More work is needed to understand this discrepancy.

  13. Binary collision theory for thermal and nonisothermal relaxation and reaction of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talkner, Peter; Pollak, Eli; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.

    1998-09-01

    Many unimolecular reactions are initiated by photoexcitation of a polyatomic molecule at room temperature from its S 0 ground state to an electronically excited S 1 state. This excitation will generally lead to a nonisothermal initial distribution of energy in the excited state. Collisions with a buffer gas at room temperature tend to reequilibrate the reacting molecule. The ensuing radiative and nonradiative decay will depend on the competition between the energy dependent unimolecular decay rate and the energy relaxation. In this paper we describe a Gaussian binary collision theory which includes all three aspects - radiative decay, nonradiative decay and relaxation. The Gaussian property is justified when the reacting species is large enough, i.e. it has a large enough number of degrees of freedom such that the equilibrium distribution of the molecule can be described by a Gaussian. Guided by experimental observation, we adapt a Gaussian transition probability, which is similar to Mel'nikov's, to describe the relaxation dynamics. An analytic solution for the Gaussian master equation is presented. We find that pressure induced decay which is faster than the initial decay rate is an experimental signature of an initial cold distribution of reactants. This signature was observed experimentally in the isomerization of trans-stilbene. Application to the decay dynamics of the trans-stilbene molecule shows that an initial temperature of 230 K for trans-stilbene in the excited S 1 state suffices for good agreement between the theoretical and experimental survival probability measured at a gas temperature of 300 K.

  14. Comparison of the two-state approximation and multistate treatments for vibration--vibration energy exchange in molecular collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.K.

    1981-09-01

    We have solved the time-dependent Schroedinger equation based on a semiclassical collision to examine deviations of the two-state approximation from multistate treatments for vibration--vibration energy exchange processes. For a specific case of 41..-->..50 in D/sub 2/+D/sub 2/, the two-state calculation of energy exchange probabilities fails at high collision energies (E> or approx. =2h..omega.., where ..omega.. is the frequency of the oscillator). A thermal average shows that the approximation leads to large deviatons above 2000 /sup 0/K.

  15. Comparison of the binary logistic and skewed logistic (Scobit) models of injury severity in motor vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The binary logistic model has been extensively used to analyze traffic collision and injury data where the outcome of interest has two categories. However, the assumption of a symmetric distribution may not be a desirable property in some cases, especially when there is a significant imbalance in the two categories of outcome. This study compares the standard binary logistic model with the skewed logistic model in two cases in which the symmetry assumption is violated in one but not the other case. The differences in the estimates, and thus the marginal effects obtained, are significant when the assumption of symmetry is violated.

  16. Energy loss of ions in a magnetized plasma: conformity between linear response and binary collision treatments.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, H B; Zwicknagel, G; Toepffer, C

    2003-02-01

    The energy loss of a heavy ion moving in a magnetized electron plasma is considered within the linear response (LR) and binary collision (BC) treatments with the purpose to look for a connection between these two models. These two complementary approaches yield close results if no magnetic field is present, but there develop discrepancies with growing magnetic field at ion velocities that are lower than, or comparable with, the thermal velocity of the electrons. We show that this is a peculiarity of the Coulomb interaction which requires cutoff procedures to account for its singularity at the origin and its infinite range. The cutoff procedures in the LR and BC treatments are different as the order of integrations in velocity and in ordinary (Fourier) spaces is reversed in both treatments. While BC involves a velocity average of Coulomb logarithms, there appear in LR Coulomb logarithms of velocity averaged cutoffs. The discrepancies between LR and BC vanish, except for small contributions of collective modes, for smoothened potentials that require no cutoffs. This is shown explicitly with the help of an improved BC in which the velocity transfer is treated up to second order in the interaction in Fourier space.

  17. The Binary Collision-Induced Second Overtone Band of Gaseous Hydrogen: Modelling and Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1999-01-01

    Collision-induced absorption (CIA) is the major source of the infrared opacity of dense planetary atmospheres which are composed of nonpolar molecules. Knowledge of CIA absorption spectra of H2-H2 pairs is important for modelling the atmospheres of planets and cold stars that are mainly composed of hydrogen. The spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. By extrapolation to zero density of the absorption coefficient measured every 10 cm(exp -1) in the spectral range from 11100 to 13800 cm(exp -1), we have determined the binary absorption coefficient. These extrapolated measurements are compared with calculations based on a model that was obtained by using simple computer codes and lineshape profiles. In view of the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, we find the agreement between results of the model and experiment to be reasonable.

  18. Laser-assisted binary rearrangement collision: e++H-->Ps+p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu-Min, Li; Zi-Fang, Zhou; Jian-Ge, Zhou; Yao-Yang, Liu

    1993-06-01

    In the first Born approximation, the laser-assisted rearrangement collision between a positron and a hydrogen atom is systematically studied. In solving the dressed wave functions, the A.p gauge is adopted. To overcome the difficulty in the reduction of the S matrix, we have developed the Feynman integration technique. The scattering amplitude is reduced to one-dimensional integrals and analytical expressions. The numerical calculation is greatly simplified, which makes it possible to compute the integral cross sections for Ps formation including multiphoton processes. Our results indicate that when the laser field is presented, the cross sections for Ps formation are remarkably enhanced. This is of great importance in improving this kind of reaction.

  19. Deriving analytic solutions for compact binary inspirals without recourse to adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2017-05-01

    We utilize the dynamical renormalization group formalism to calculate the real space trajectory of a compact binary inspiral for long times via a systematic resummation of secularly growing terms. This method generates closed form solutions without orbit averaging, and the accuracy can be systematically improved. The expansion parameter is v5ν Ω (t -t0) where t0 is the initial time, t is the time elapsed, and Ω and v are the angular orbital frequency and initial speed, respectively. ν is the binary's symmetric mass ratio. We demonstrate how to apply the renormalization group method to resum solutions beyond leading order in two ways. First, we calculate the second-order corrections of the leading radiation reaction force, which involves highly nontrivial checks of the formalism (i.e., its renormalizability). Second, we show how to systematically include post-Newtonian corrections to the radiation reaction force. By avoiding orbit averaging, we gain predictive power and eliminate ambiguities in the initial conditions. Finally, we discuss how this methodology can be used to find analytic solutions to the spin equations of motion that are valid over long times.

  20. The effect of rheological approximations on the dynamics and topography in 3D subduction-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. Moreover, they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. These differences arise for several reasons, such as different rheological properties, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergent plates. Previous 3D geodynamic models of subduction/collision processes have used various rheological approximations, making numerical results difficult to compare, since there is no clear image on the extent of these approximations on the dynamics. Here, we employ the code LaMEM to perform high-resolution long-term 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. We test the effect of rheological approximations on mantle and lithosphere dynamics in a geometrically simplified model setup that resembles a tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone. We use the "sticky-air" approach to allow for the development of topography and the dynamics of subduction and collision is entirely driven by slab-pull (i.e. "free subduction"). The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow following a viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, inducing strong mantle flow in the slab window. We also examine the stress states in the subducting and overriding plates and topography evolution in the upper plate, and we discuss the implications on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins

  1. Alternative treatment for the energy-transfer and transport cross section in dressed electron-ion binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, P. L.

    2016-10-01

    A formula for determining the electronic stopping power and the transport cross section in electron-ion binary collisions is derived from the induced density for spherically symmetric potentials using the partial-wave expansion. In contrast to the previous one found in many textbooks, the present formula converges to the Bethe and Bloch stopping-power formulas at high ion velocities and agrees rather well with experimental stopping-power data, as shown here for Al, C, and H2O targets. It can be employed in plasma physics and particularly in any application that requires electronic stopping-power values of quasifree electrons with high accuracy.

  2. Evaluation of approximate relations for Delta /Q/ using a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. [collision integral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathenson, M.; Baganoff, D.; Yen, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Data obtained from a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for shock-wave structure are used to test the accuracy of accepted approximate expressions for the two moments of the collision integral Delta (Q) for general intermolecular potentials in systems with a large translational nonequilibrium. The accuracy of the numerical scheme is established by comparison of the numerical results with exact expressions in the case of Maxwell molecules. They are then used in the case of hard-sphere molecules, which are the furthest-removed inverse power potential from the Maxwell molecule; and the accuracy of the approximate expressions in this domain is gauged. A number of approximate solutions are judged in this manner, and the general advantages of the numerical approach in itself are considered.

  3. Film model approximation for particle-diffusion-controlled binary ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, G.; Cincotti, A.; Cao, G.

    1999-01-01

    A new rate expression for particle-diffusion-controlled ion exchange, based on an equivalent pseudosteady-state film resistance model, is developed. The rate expression approximates the electric field effects on intraparticle diffusion in spherical ion-exchangers. With regard to the prediction of batch exchange and column breakthrough curves for both irreversible and reversible processes, the model captures the essential traits of the coupled diffusion phenomenon described by the Nernst-Planck equation with results of accuracy comparable to that obtained when using the linear driving force approximation for systems with constant diffusivity. Numerical results for the exchange of two counterions of equal valence are presented as application examples for different mobility ratios and selectivity coefficients.

  4. First-Order Approximation of the Ordered Binary-Symmetric Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossorier, Marc P. C.; Lin, Shu

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents different results related to the ordering of a sequence of N received symbols with respect to their reliability measure, for BPSK transmission over the AWGN channel model. First, a tight approximation of Pe (i; N), the probability that the hard decision associated with the i-th symbol of the ordered sequence is in error, is derived. Then, it is shown that despite the fact that the random variables representing the noise at positions n 1(sub 1), n(sub 2), ..., n(sub j) of the ordering are no longer independent, the events of having a hard decision decoding error at these positions remain almost independent Pe (n(sub i), n2, ..., n(sub j); N), the probability that the hard decisions associated with the symbols at positions n(sub 1), n(sub 2), ..., n(sub j), in the ordered sequence are in error, is thus well approximated from each of the Pe (n(sub i): N), for i is a member of [1, j]. Finally, based on the independence of these events, the fully connected 2(sup N) -state BSC representing the channel after ordering is simplified by N independent time-shared 2-state BSC's. This new model allows one to easily and tightly approximate the capacity of the channel after ordering.

  5. Impulse formalism for atom-molecule collisions: Inadequacy of the peaking approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. D.; Bakshi, P. M.; Sindoni, J. M.

    1989-08-01

    Expressions for differential and total cross sections for atom-diatomscattering are derived using the impulse formalism without any approximations.Results for the rotational-vibrational scattering are obtained without usingthe peaking approximation (PA). For the specific case of a hard-core potential,it is shown that, except for elastic scattering, PA results are substantiallydifferent from the true impulse results.

  6. Resonant Excitation of White Dwarf Oscillations in Compact Object Binaries: 1. The No Back Reaction Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rathore, Y.

    2004-06-14

    We consider the evolution of white dwarfs with compact object companions (specifically black holes with masses up to {approx} 10{sup 6} M{sub {circle_dot}}, neutron stars, and other white dwarfs). We suppose that the orbits are initially quite elliptical and then shrink and circularize under the action of gravitational radiation. During this evolution, the white dwarfs will pass through resonances when harmonics of the orbital frequency match the stellar oscillation eigenfrequencies. As a star passes through these resonances, the associated modes will be excited and can be driven to amplitudes that are so large that there is a back reaction on the orbit which, in turn, limits the growth of the modes. A formalism is presented for describing this dynamical interaction for a non-rotating star in the linear approximation when the orbit can be treated as non-relativistic. A semi-analytical expression is found for computing the resonant energy transfer as a function of stellar and orbital parameters for the regime where back reaction may be neglected. This is used to calculate the results of passage through a sequence of resonances for several hypothetical systems. It is found that the amplitude of the {ell} = m = 2 f-mode can be driven into the non-linear regime for appropriate initial conditions. We also discuss where the no back reaction approximation is expected to fail, and the qualitative effects of back reaction.

  7. Gravitational self-force meets the post-Newtonian approximation in extreme-mass ratio inspiral of binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Post-Newtonian analysis, numerical relativity and, now, perturbation-based gravitational self-force analysis are all being used to describe various aspects of black hole binary systems. Recent comparisons between self-force analysis, with m1m2, and post-Newtonian analysis, with v/c 1 show excellent agreement in their common domain of validity. This lends credence to the two very different regularization procedures which are invoked in these approximations. When self-force analysis is able to create gravitational waveforms from extreme mass-ratio inspiral, then unprecedented cross cultural comparisons of these three distinct approaches to understanding gravitational waves will reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each. )

  8. Simulation of binary droplet collisions with the entropic lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya V.

    2016-02-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) for multiphase flows is extended here to simulation of droplet collisions. Thermodynamically consistent, non-linearly stable ELBM together with a novel polynomial equation of state is proposed for simulation large Weber and Reynolds number collisions of two droplets. Extensive numerical investigations show that ELBM is capable of accurately capturing the dynamics and complexity of droplet collision. Different types of the collision outcomes such as coalescence, reflexive separation, and stretching separation are identified. Partition of the parameter plane is compared to the experiments and excellent agreement is observed. Moreover, the evolution of the shape of a stable lamella film is quantitatively compared with experimental results. The end pinching and the capillary-wave instability are shown to be the main mechanisms behind formation of satellite droplets for near head-on and off-center collisions with high impact parameter, respectively. It is shown that the number of satellite drops increases with increasing Weber number, as predicted by experiments. Also, it is demonstrated that the rotational motion due to angular momentum and elongation of the merged droplet play essential roles in formation of satellite droplets in off-center collisions with an intermediate impact parameter.

  9. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  10. Molecular collisions. 11: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    In a paper of this series a distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed which is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  11. Ionization collisions between two excited atoms: Application of the Glauber amplitude in the framework of the impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, T.; Nakai, Y.; Nakamura, H.

    1984-10-01

    The cross-section formula of Flannery (Phys. Rev. A 22, 2408 (1980)) in the semiquantal approximation for the processes referred to in the title is rewritten so as to make it more useful in practice. The formula is shown to be further simplified by taking an average over the azimuthal quantum number of a highly excited hydrogenic atom to be ionized. Numerical applications with use of the Glauber amplitude for the electron-atom inelastic scattering are made to the ionization collisions between two excited hydrogen atoms with simultaneous excitation and deexcitation of one of the atoms. The results are compared with those obtained by using the Born amplitude, and are analyzed in terms of the Glauber generalized oscillator strengths.

  12. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Cosmic Collisions Online - Compact Binary Mergers, Gravitational Waves and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Hans A. Bethe elucidated our understanding of the fundamental forces of Nature by exploring and explaining countless phenomena occurring in nuclear laboratories and in stars. With the dawn of gravitational wave astronomy we now can probe compact binary mergers - Nature's cosmic collision experiments - to deepen our understanding, especially where strong-field gravitation is involved. In addition to gravitational waves, some mergers are likely to generate observable electromagnetic and/or neutrino radiation, heralding a new era of multimessenger astronomy. Robust numerical algorithms now allow us to simulate these events in full general relativity on supercomputers. We will describe some recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations that show how binary black hole-neutron star and neutron star-neutron star mergers can launch jets, lending support to the idea that such mergers could be the engines that power short gamma-ray bursts. We will also show how the magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars to spinning black holes immersed in magnetized accretion disks can launch jets as well, reinforcing the belief that such ``collapsars'' are the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts. Computer-generated movies highlighting some of these simulations will be shown. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grants 1300903 and 1602536 and NASA Grant NNX13AH44G.

  13. Validity of the thin viscous sheet approximation in models of continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garthwaite, Matthew C.; Houseman, Gregory A.

    2011-02-01

    The two-dimensional thin viscous sheet approximation is widely used to describe large-scale continental deformation. It treats the lithosphere as a fluid layer in which deformation results from a balance between buoyancy forces and tectonic boundary conditions. Comparisons between two-dimensional thin sheet and full three-dimensional solutions of a simple indenter model show that appreciable differences exist, especially when the indenter half width, D, is of the same order as the thickness of the deforming layer, L (i.e., D/L ≈ 1). These differences are amplified by increasing the power law exponent of the viscous constitutive law (n) but decrease as the Argand number (Ar) is increased. The greatest differences between two-dimensional and three-dimensional solutions are found at the indenter corner, where the thin sheet consistently overestimates vertical strain rates. Differences between strain rates at the corner may be 50% or greater for small Argand numbers. Other differences arise because a lithospheric root zone is formed in the three-dimensional solutions and vertically averaged strain rate is decreased in regions close to the indenter. This effect is absent from thin sheet calculations since the thickness of the load-bearing layer is assumed constant. In general, the thin viscous sheet approximation provides a reasonably accurate estimate of long wavelength deformation for D/L as low as 1 if n is less than ˜3. However, even at large D/L the solutions may be inaccurate close to strain rate concentrations at the indenter corners where horizontal gradients of deformation are large.

  14. Non-Hertzian behavior in binary collisions of plastic balls derived from impact acoustics.

    PubMed

    Riner, Joshua; Petculescu, Andi

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents slight deviations from Hertz's impact law, inferred from acoustic signatures of polypropylene ball collisions. An impact acoustics model is used to fit the acoustic data. The model is built upon a generalized relationship between impact force (F) and deformation (xi) of the form F=kappaxi(alpha). Agreement with experiment is reached when alpha and kappa differ from Hertz's values by -6.25% and +1%, respectively. The difference is ascribable to non-idealities such as slight material inhomogeneities, impact-point asymmetry, plasticity etc. Also, the collision energy released as sound, which is usually dismissed as negligible, is derived from data fitting. The acoustic-to-incident energy ratio, dependent on impact duration, is constrained to be on the order of 100 ppm.

  15. Hydrodynamics of passing-over motion during binary droplet collision in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Yao; Zhang, Cheng-Bin; Huang, Xiang-Yong; Liu, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-10-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study is undertaken to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics of single-phase droplet collision in a shear flow. The passing-over motion of interactive droplets is observed, and the underlying hydrodynamic mechanisms are elucidated by the analysis of the motion trajectory, transient droplet deformation and detailed hydrodynamic information (e.g., pressure and flow fields). The results indicate that the hydrodynamic interaction process under shear could be divided into three stages: approaching, colliding, and separating. With the increasing confinement, the interaction time for the passing-over process is shorter and the droplet processes one higher curvature tip and more stretched profile. Furthermore, the lateral separation Δy/R 1 exhibits larger decrease in the approaching stage and the thickness of the lubrication film is decreased during the interaction. As the initial lateral separation increases, the maximum trajectory shift by the collision interaction is getting smaller. During the collision between two droplets with different sizes, the amplitude of the deformation oscillation of the larger droplet is decreased by reducing the size ratio of the smaller droplet to the bigger one. Project supported by the NSAF (Grants No. U1530260), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51306158), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130621), and the Special Program for Applied Research on Super Computation of the NSFC-Guangdong Joint Fund (the second phase).

  16. Analyzing the delta Sco Binary in Anticipation of a Disk-Star Collision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Tango et al. 2009). The goal for this project is to refine the orbit of the secondary with respect to the primary and test for the possibility of a...to the primary. The NPOI observations were compared to orbits based on parameters from Mason et al. (2009), Tango et al. (2009), and Miroshnichenko et...date has been 278 δ Sco binary 279 Table 1. The orbital elements for δ Sco. Element Mason et al. Miroshnichenko Tango et al. This Work (2009) et al

  17. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  18. Uranyl(VI) nitrate salts: modeling thermodynamic properties using the binding mean spherical approximation theory and determination of "fictive" binary data.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Bernard, Olivier; Caniffi, Barbara; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Blum, Lesser; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-02-23

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of highly concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate at 25 degrees C. A new resolution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, taking into account 1-1 and also 1-2 complex formation, is developed and used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental uranyl nitrate osmotic coefficient variation with concentration. For better consistency of the theory, binary uranyl perchlorate and chloride osmotic coefficients are also calculated. Comparison of calculated and experimental values is made. The possibility of regarding the ternary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/HNO(3)/H(2)O as a "simple" solution (in the sense of Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson) is examined from water activity and density measurements. Also, an analysis of existing uranyl nitrate binary data is proposed and compared with our obtained data. On the basis of the concept of "simple" solution, values for density and water activity for the binary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/H(2)O are proposed in a concentration range on which uranyl nitrate precipitates from measurements on concentrated solutions of the ternary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/HNO(3)/H(2)O. This new set of binary data is "fictive" in the sense that the real binary system is not stable chemically. Finally, a new, interesting predictive capability of the BIMSA theory is shown.

  19. Single differential electron impact ionization cross sections in the binary-encounter-Bethe approximation for the low binding energy regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Amaro, P.; Machado, J.; Santos, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    An analytical expression based on the binary-encounter-Bethe model for energy differential cross sections in the low binding energy regime is presented. Both the binary-encounter-Bethe model and its modified counterpart are extended to shells with very low binding energy by removing the constraints in the interference term of the Mott cross section, originally introduced by Kim et al. The influence of the ionic factor is also studied for such targets. All the binary-encounter-Bethe based models presented here are checked against experimental results of low binding energy targets, such as the total ionization cross sections of alkali metals. The energy differential cross sections for H and He, at several incident energies, are also compared to available experimental and theoretical values.

  20. Higher-order-in-spin interaction Hamiltonians for binary black holes from source terms of Kerr geometry in approximate ADM coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Hergt, Steven; Schaefer, Gerhard

    2008-05-15

    The Kerr metric outside the ergosphere is transformed into Arnowitt-Deser-Misner coordinates up to the orders 1/r{sup 4} and a{sup 2}, respectively, in radial coordinate r and reduced angular momentum variable a, starting from the Kerr solution in quasi-isotropic as well as harmonic coordinates. The distributional source terms for the approximate solution are calculated. To leading order in linear momenta, higher-order-in-spin interaction Hamiltonians for black hole binaries are derived.

  1. Reactive collision terms for fluid transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eccles, J. V.; Raitt, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    A modified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision method is used for the derivation of reactive collision terms to allow for complete higher-moment approximations in fluid transport theory. The general reactive collision terms for the 8-, 10- and 13-moment approximation for binary reactions are derived. Then, reactive collision terms for specific chemistry are derived with the assumptions: (1) all reactants and products have 13-moment distribution functions; (2) simple, classical assumptions provide sufficient models for reaction dynamics; and (3) the reaction rate is energy-independent. The derived specific formulas reflect two extremes in reactive collision dynamics: direct and indirect reaction mechanisms. Finally, considerations for correct use of the reactive collision terms are discussed in the context of space plasma environments.

  2. Simulating the ballistic effects of ion irradiation in the binary collision approximation: A first step toward the ion mixing framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, G.; Antoshchenkova, E.; Hayoun, M.; Lunéville, L.; Simeone, D.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding ballistic effects induced by ion beam irradiation can be a key point for controlling and predicting the microstructure of irradiated materials. Meanwhile, the ion mixing framework suggests an average description of displacement cascades may be sufficient to estimate the influence of ballistic relocations on the microstructure. In this work, the BCA code MARLOWE was chosen for its ability to account for the crystal structure of irradiated materials. A first set of simulations was performed on pure copper for energies ranging from 0.5 keV to 20 keV. These simulations were validated using molecular dynamics (MD). A second set of simulations on AgCu irradiated by 1 MeV krypton ions was then carried out using MARLOWE only, as such energy is beyond reach for molecular dynamics. MARLOWE simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, which suggests the predictive potential of the method.

  3. Comparing denominator degrees of freedom approximations for the generalized linear mixed model in analyzing binary outcome in small sample cluster-randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Redden, David T

    2015-04-23

    Small number of clusters and large variation of cluster sizes commonly exist in cluster-randomized trials (CRTs) and are often the critical factors affecting the validity and efficiency of statistical analyses. F tests are commonly used in the generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to test intervention effects in CRTs. The most challenging issue for the approximate Wald F test is the estimation of the denominator degrees of freedom (DDF). Some DDF approximation methods have been proposed, but their small sample performances in analysing binary outcomes in CRTs with few heterogeneous clusters are not well studied. The small sample performances of five DDF approximations for the F test are compared and contrasted under CRT frameworks with simulations. Specifically, we illustrate how the intraclass correlation (ICC), sample size, and the variation of cluster sizes affect the type I error and statistical power when different DDF approximation methods in GLMM are used to test intervention effect in CRTs with binary outcomes. The results are also illustrated using a real CRT dataset. Our simulation results suggest that the Between-Within method maintains the nominal type I error rates even when the total number of clusters is as low as 10 and is robust to the variation of the cluster sizes. The Residual and Containment methods have inflated type I error rates when the cluster number is small (<30) and the inflation becomes more severe with increased variation in cluster sizes. In contrast, the Satterthwaite and Kenward-Roger methods can provide tests with very conservative type I error rates when the total cluster number is small (<30) and the conservativeness becomes more severe as variation in cluster sizes increases. Our simulations also suggest that the Between-Within method is statistically more powerful than the Satterthwaite or Kenward-Roger method in analysing CRTs with heterogeneous cluster sizes, especially when the cluster number is small. We conclude that the

  4. Non-equilibrium of charged particles in swarms and plasmas—from binary collisions to plasma effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Simonović, I.; Marjanović, S.; Bošnjaković, D.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Dujko, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we show three quite different examples of low-temperature plasmas, where one can follow the connection of the elementary binary processes (occurring at the nanoscopic scale) to the macroscopic discharge behavior and to its application. The first example is on the nature of the higher-order transport coefficient (second-order diffusion or skewness); how it may be used to improve the modelling of plasmas and also on how it may be used to discern details of the relevant cross sections. A prerequisite for such modeling and use of transport data is that the hydrodynamic approximation is applicable. In the second example, we show the actual development of avalanches in a resistive plate chamber particle detector by conducting kinetic modelling (although it may also be achieved by using swarm data). The current and deposited charge waveforms may be predicted accurately showing temporal resolution, which allows us to optimize detectors by adjusting the gas mixture composition and external fields. Here kinetic modeling is necessary to establish high accuracy and the details of the physics that supports fluid models that allows us to follow the transition to streamers. Finally, we show an example of positron traps filled with gas that, for all practical purposes, are a weakly ionized gas akin to swarms, and may be modelled in that fashion. However, low pressures dictate the need to apply full kinetic modelling and use the energy distribution function to explain the kinetics of the system. In this way, it is possible to confirm a well established phenomenology, but in a manner that allows precise quantitative comparisons and description, and thus open doors to a possible optimization.

  5. Experimental determination of water activity for binary aqueous cerium(III) ionic solutions: application to an assessment of the predictive capability of the binding mean spherical approximation model.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2005-12-08

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide salt solutions at high concentration. The predictive capability of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory to describe the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes is assessed in the case of aqueous solutions of lanthanide(III) nitrate and chloride salts. Osmotic coefficients of cerium(III) nitrate and chloride were calculated from other lanthanide(III) salts properties. In parallel, concentrated binary solutions of cerium nitrate were prepared in order to measure experimentally its water activity and density as a function of concentration, at 25 degrees C. Water activities of several binary solutions of cerium chloride were also measured to check existing data on this salt. Then, the properties of cerium chloride and cerium nitrate solutions were compared within the BIMSA model. Osmotic coefficient values for promethium nitrate and promethium chloride given by this theory are proposed. Finally, water activity measurements were made to examine the fact that the ternary system Ce(NO3)3/HNO3/H2O and the quaternary system Ce(NO3)3/HNO3/N2H5NO3/H2O may be regarded as "simple solutions" (in the sense of Zdanovskii and Mikulin).

  6. A 8.9-ENOB 2.5-εW 150-KS/s non-binary redundant successive approximation ADC in 0.18-microm CMOS for bio-implanted devices.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok Lim; Lee, Andreas Astuti; Yuan, Xiaojun; Krishna, Kotlanka R; Je, Minkyu

    2010-01-01

    A successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) with a split-capacitor switching scheme implementing the generalized non-binary redundant SAR algorithm and an energy efficient level shifter is proposed for bio-implanted applications. The generalized non-binary redundant SAR algorithm removes the radix constraint in conventional non-binary redundant SAR algorithm, and the energy efficient level shifter allows optimal power supplies to be chosen independently for the analog and digital blocks. A FOM of 34.7fJ/step has been achieved.

  7. The Wind-Wind Collision Region of the Wolf-Rayet Binary V444 Cygni: How Much Optical Line Emission Does It Produce?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Aaron; Auer, Lawrence H.; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Cardona, Octavio

    2001-12-01

    We model the emission-line profile variations that are expected to be produced by physical and wind eclipses in the Wolf-Rayet (W-R+O) binary system V444 Cyg. A comparison of the theoretical profiles with the He II 4686 Å line observed in V444 Cyg allows us to isolate the effects that are likely to be due to the wind-wind collision region in this particular line. We estimate that the wind-wind collision region contributes no more than ~12% of the equivalent width of the emission line, with smaller values during elongations, when part of the shock cone is being eclipsed by the O star. The upper limit implies a maximum contribution from the wind-wind collision region of ~1×1035 ergs s-1 to the total luminosity of He II 4686 Å line. Using the analytical solution of Cantó et al., we find that the bulk of this emission arises along the shock cone walls where the flow velocity is ~800 km s-1, at a distance of ~8 Rsolar from the O star's surface, and at θ=65°-75° from the line joining the centers of the two stars, with origin in the O star. The derived surface density of this region is σ=0.22 g cm-2, which, together with the He II 4686 Å luminosity, indicates that the thickness of the shock lies in the range 2-10×1010 cm and the total density is 1-6×1012 cm-3.

  8. Constraining the minute amount of audible energy radiated from binary collisions of light plastic spheres in conditions of incomplete angular coverage of the measured pressure.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, Andi; Riner, Joshua

    2010-10-01

    Usually, the energy released as air-coupled sound following a collision is dismissed as negligible. The goal of this Letter is to quantify the value of this small but measurable quantity, since it can be useful to impact studies. Measurements of sound radiation from binary collisions of polypropylene balls were performed in order to constrain the fraction of incident energy radiated as sound in air. In the experiments, one ball is released from rest, directly above a stationary target ball. The transient acoustic waveforms are detected by a microphone rotated about the impact point at a radius of 10 cm. The sound pressure was measured as a function of the polar angle θ (the azimuthal symmetry of the problem was verified by rotating the microphone in the horizontal plane). The angular pattern has two main lobes that are asymmetric with respect to the impact plane. This asymmetry is ascribable to interference and/or scattering effects. Gaps in the acoustic measurements at the "poles" (i.e., around 0° and 180°) pose a challenge similar to that of extrapolating the cosmic microwave background in the galactic "cut." The data was continued in the gaps by polynomial interpolation rather than least-squares fitting, a choice dictated by the accuracy of the reconstructed pattern. The acoustic energy radiated during the impact, estimated by multiplying the collision time by the sound intensity integrated over a spherical surface centered at the impact point, is calculated as four orders of magnitude smaller than the incident energy (0.23 μJ versus 1.6 mJ).

  9. Binary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Keegan; Nakajima, Miki; Stevenson, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Can a bound pair of similar mass terrestrial planets exist? We are interested here in bodies with a mass ratio of ~ 3:1 or less (so Pluto/Charon or Earth/Moon do not qualify) and we do not regard the absence of any such discoveries in the Kepler data set to be significant since the tidal decay and merger of a close binary is prohibitively fast well inside of 1AU. SPH simulations of equal mass “Earths” were carried out to seek an answer to this question, assuming encounters that were only slightly more energetic than parabolic (zero energy). We were interested in whether the collision or near collision of two similar mass bodies would lead to a binary in which the two bodies remain largely intact, effectively a tidal capture hypothesis though with the tidal distortion being very large. Necessarily, the angular momentum of such an encounter will lead to bodies separated by only a few planetary radii if capture occurs. Consistent with previous work, mostly by Canup, we find that most impacts are disruptive, leading to a dominant mass body surrounded by a disk from which a secondary forms whose mass is small compared to the primary, hence not a binary planet by our adopted definition. However, larger impact parameter “kissing” collisions were found to produce binaries because the dissipation upon first encounter was sufficient to provide a bound orbit that was then rung down by tides to an end state where the planets are only a few planetary radii apart. The long computational times for these simulation make it difficult to fully map the phase space of encounters for which this outcome is likely but the indications are that the probability is not vanishingly small and since planetary encounters are a plausible part of planet formation, we expect binary planets to exist and be a non-negligible fraction of the larger orbital radius exoplanets awaiting discovery.

  10. The Wind-Wind Collision Region of the Wolf-Rayet Binary V444 Cyg: How much optical line emission does it produce ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, A.; Auer, L. H.; Koenigsberger, G.; Cardona, O.

    2001-12-01

    We model the emission line profile variations that are expected to be produced by physical and wind eclipses in the Wolf-Rayet (WR+O) binary system V444 Cyg. A comparison of the theoretical profiles with the He II 4686 Å line observed in V444 Cyg allows us to isolate the effects that are likely to be due to the wind-wind collision region, in this particular line. We estimate that the WWC region contributes no more than ~ 12% of the equivalent width of the emission line, with smaller values during elongations, when part of the shock cone is being eclipsed by the O-star. The upper limit implies a maximum contribution from the wind-wind collision region of ~ 1.*E35 ergs s-1 to the total luminosity of He II 4686 Å line. Using the analytical solution of Cantó et al. (1996), we find that the bulk of this emission seems to be arising along the shock cone walls where the flow velocity is ~ 800 km s-1, at a distance of ~ 8 {Rsun }\\> from the O-star's surface, and at Θ =60-70o from the line joining the centers of the two stars, with origin in the O-star. The derived surface density of this region is σ =0.22 gr cm-2, which together with the He II 4686 Å luminosity, indicates that the thickness of the shock lies in the range 2-10 x 1010 cm and the total density is 1-6 x 1012 cm-3.

  11. Heavy ion collisions with A = 10/sup 57/: Aspects of nuclear stability and the nuclear equation of state in coalescing neutron-star binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Evans, C.R.; Detweiler, S.L.

    1987-12-01

    The dynamics of the final stages of the coalescence of two neturon stars (such as the binary pulsar PSR 1913+16) is an unsolved problem in astrophysics. Such systems are probably efficient generators of gravitational radiation, and may be significant contributors to heavy-element nucleosynthesis. The input physics for the study of such systems is similar to that required for the strudy of heavy-ion collision hydrodynamics; e.g., a finite temperature nuclear equation of state, properties of nuclei away from stability, etc. We discuss the development of a relativistic hydrodynamics code in three spatial dimensions for the purpose of studying such neutron-star systems. The properties of the mass-radius relation (determined by the nuclear equation of state) may lead to a proposed mechanism by which hot, highly neutronized matter is ejected from the coalescing stars. This material is photodisintegrated into a free (mostly) neutron gas which may subsequently experience rapid-neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Coulomb collision model for use in nonthermal plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chap, Andrew M.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2017-06-01

    In kinetic simulations of non-Maxwellian plasmas, the calculation of particle scattering due to Coulomb collisions has no simple approximation. In such simulations, the number of collision interactions a particle experiences in a single time step is typically too large for direct calculation. In this work, the cumulative effect of a series of binary collisions is calculated numerically in a stochastic manner, and heuristic trends are produced as functions of the local plasma parameters. The result is a collision model suitable for implementation into a kinetic plasma simulation. The presence of low-probability, high-angle scattering due to close collision encounters is defined and described, and this effect is demonstrated in a test problem simulation of weakly collisional counterstreaming ion beams.

  13. Ice particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  14. Collision-Induced Absorption Spectra of Binary Mixtures of Molecular Hydrogen with Molecular Deuterium and Argon and of Pure Hydrogen, D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chang-Tsang William

    In the present research project a systematic study of the collision-induced infrared absorption (CIA) spectra of the binary mixtures of H_2 - D_2 in the region of the double fundamental vibrations of H_2 and D_2, and H_2 - Ar in the fundamental band of H_2, and of pure HD in its fundamental and first overtone regions was undertaken. The experiments were carried out with a 2.0 m high-pressure low-temperature transmission-type absorption cell at 77, 201 and 296 K at total gas densities up to 550 amagat. Infrared prism and grating spectrometers equipped with a microprocessor -controlled stepping motor were used to record the spectra. All the experimental results obtained represent first-time observations in collision-induced absorption. Collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of the double transitions of H_2(v=1>=ts 0) and D_2(v=1>=ts 0) have been observed at 77 and 201 K in the spectral region 7000-8000 cm^{-1} for total gas densities up to 550 amagat with a partial gas density ratio of 1:1 of H_2 and D_2. The observed spectra are interpreted in terms of the transitions, Q_1(J) of H_2+Q_1(J) of D _2, Q_1(J) of H_2+S _1(J) of D_2, S_1(J) of H_2 + Q_1(J) of D_2, and S_1(J) of H_2 + S_1(J) of D_2 for J = 0 and 1 for H _2 and J = 0, 1, and 2 for D_2. Analysis of the experimental absorption profiles was carried out using appropriate lineshape functions. The absorption coefficients, lineshape parameters, etc., are obtained from the analysis. Collision-induced enhancement absorption spectra of the fundamental band of H_2 in H_2 - Ar mixtures were recorded at room temperature for a base density of 72 amagat of H_2 for several partial densities of Ar up to 440 amagat. Hexadecapole-induced U transitions, U_1(1), U_1(2), Q_1(0)+U _0(1), and Q_1(1) + U_0(1) have been identified in the spectral region 5400 -6200 cm^{-1}. A "cage" model has been proposed to account for the double transitions of H_2 - H_2 in the H _2 - Ar enhancement spectra. From the analysis of the

  15. Origin of orbits of secondaries in the discovered trans-Neptunian binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The dependences of inclinations of orbits of secondaries in the discovered trans-Neptunian binaries on the distance between the primary and the secondary, on the eccentricity of orbits of the secondary around the primary, on the ratio of diameters of the secondary and the primary, and on the elements of heliocentric orbits of these binaries are studied. These dependences are interpreted using the model of formation of a satellite system in a collision of two rarefied condensations composed of dust and/or objects less than 1 m in diameter. It is assumed in this model that a satellite system forms in the process of compression of a condensation produced in such a collision. The model of formation of a satellite system in a collision of two condensations agrees with the results of observations: according to observational data, approximately 40% of trans-Neptunian binaries have a negative angular momentum relative to their centers of mass.

  16. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore » can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  17. Approximation method for the kinetic Boltzmann equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhov, Y. M.

    1972-01-01

    The further development of a method for approximating the Boltzmann equation is considered and a case of pseudo-Maxwellian molecules is treated in detail. A method of approximating the collision frequency is discussed along with a method for approximating the moments of the Boltzmann collision integral. Since the return collisions integral and the collision frequency are expressed through the distribution function moments, use of the proposed methods make it possible to reduce the Boltzmann equation to a series of approximating equations.

  18. Relativistic Many-Body Approach to Calculating Radiation and Autoionization Probabilities, Electron Collision Strengths For Multicharged Ions in a Plasma: Debae Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Alexander; Loboda, Andrey; Nikola, Ludmila

    2011-10-01

    We present the uniform energy approach, formally based on the gauge-invariant relativistic many-body perturbation theory for the calculation of the radiative and autoionization probabilities, electron collision strengths and rate coefficients in a multicharged ions (in a collisionally pumped plasma). An account for the plasma medium influence is carried out within a Debae shielding approach. The aim is to study, in a uniform manner, elementary processes responsible for emission-line formation in a plasma. The energy shift due to the collision is arisen at first in the second PT order in the form of integral on the scattered electron energy. The cross-section is linked with imaginary part of the scattering energy shift. The electron collision excitation cross-sections and rate coefficients for some plasma Ne-, Ar-like multicharged ions are calculated within relativistic energy approach. We present the results of calculation the autoionization resonances energies and widths in heavy He-like multicharged ions and rare-earth atoms of Gd and Tm. To test the results of calculations we compare the obtained data for some Ne-like ions with other authors' calculations and available experimental data for a wide range of plasma conditions.

  19. Calculation of H2O Far-Wing Absorption within the Single-Perturber Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    APPROXIMATION .. .. ...... 3 3.0 REDUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL FORM .. .. ................. 17 4.C CALCULATION OF MATRIX ELEMENTS. .. .................. 25 5.-0... computing the absorption due to a single pair consisting of one radiator and perturber, and then multiplying by the total number of pairs." It should be...noted that this is distinct from the binary collision ap- proximation which assumes the absorption can be computed by calculating the absorption

  20. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Electron Capture Cross-Sections in Ion-Ion Collisions at Approximately to MeV/amu: Application to ENA Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discovery by STEREO A/B of energetic neutral hydrogen is spurring an interest and need for reliable estimates of electron capture cross sections at few MeVs per nucleon as well as for multi-electron ions. Required accuracy in such estimates necessitates detailed and involved quantum-mechanical calculations or expensive numerical simulations. For ENA modeling and similar purposes, a semi-classical approach offers a middle-ground approach. Kuang's semiclassical formalism to calculate electron-capture cross sections for single and multi-electron ions is an elegant and efficient method, but has so far been applied to limited and specific laboratory measurements and at somewhat lower energies. Our goals are to test and extend Kuang s method to all ion-atom and ion-ion collisions relevant to ENA modeling, including multi-electron ions and for K-shell to K-shell transitions.

  1. Comparison of cross sections from the quasi-classical trajectory method and the j(z)-conserving centrifugal sudden approximation with accurate quantum results for an atom-rigid nonlinear polyatomic collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a series of calculations of state-to-state integral cross sections for collisions between O and nonvibrating H2O in the gas phase on a model nonreactive potential energy surface. The dynamical methods used include converged quantum mechanical scattering calculations, the j(z) conserving centrifugal sudden (j(z)-CCS) approximation, and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. We consider three total energies 0.001, 0.002, and 0.005 E(h) and the nine initial states with rotational angular momentum less than or equal to 2 (h/2 pi). The j(z)-CCS approximation gives good results, while the QCT method can be quite unreliable for transitions to specific rotational sublevels. However, the QCT cross sections summed over final sublevels and averaged over initial sublevels are in better agreement with the quantum results.

  2. Discovery of Nearly Coherent Oscillations with a Frequency of approximately 567 Hz During Type I X-ray Bursts of the X-ray Transient and Eclipsing Binary X1658-298

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Strohmayer, Tod; Franco, Lucia M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of nearly coherent oscillations with a frequency of approximately 567 Hz during type I X-ray bursts from the X-ray transient and eclipsing binary X1658-298. If these oscillations are directly related to the neutron star rotation, then the spin period of the neutron star in X1658-298 is approximately 1.8 ms. The oscillations can be present during the rise or decay phase of the bursts. Oscillations during the decay phase of the bursts show an increase in frequency of approximately 0.5-1 Hz. However, in one particular burst the oscillations reappear at the end of the decay phase at about 571.5 Hz. This represents an increase in oscillation frequency of about 5 Hz, which is the largest frequency change seen so far in a burst oscillation. It is unclear if such a large change can be accommodated by present models used to explain the frequency evolution of the oscillations. The oscillations at 571.5 Hz are unusually soft compared to the oscillations found at 567 Hz. We also observed several bursts during which the oscillations are detected at much lower significance or not at all. Most of these bursts happen during periods of X-ray dipping behavior, suggesting that the X-ray dipping might decrease the amplitude of the oscillations (although several complications exist with this simple picture). We discuss our discovery in the framework of the neutron star spin interpretation.

  3. Part I: Microscopic description of liquid He II. Part II: Uniformly approximated WKB method as used for the calculation of phase shifts in heavy-ion collision problems

    SciTech Connect

    Suebka, P.

    1984-01-01

    In Part I, the excitation spectrum of liquid He II is obtained using the two-body potential consists of a hardcore potential plus an outside attractive potential. The sum of two gaussian potential of Khanna and Das which is similar to the Lennard-Jones potential is chosen as the attractive potential. The t-matrix method due to Brueckner and Sawada is adopted with modifications to replace the interaction potential. The spectrum gives the phonon branch and the roton dip which resemble the excitation spectrum for liquid He II. The temperature dependence of the excitation spectrum enters into calculation through the zero-momentum state occupation number. A better approximation of thermodynamic functions is obtained by extending Landau's theory to the situation where the excitation is a function of temperature as well as of momentum. Our thermodynamic calculations also bear qualitative agreement with measurements on He II as expected.

  4. Time-dependent pair distribution in the mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boley, C. D.; Tenti, G.

    1980-05-01

    The time-dependent pair-distribution function, which plays a central role in the description of nuclear magnetic relaxation and collision-induced absorption in classical fluids, is evaluated in a mean-field approximation proposed earlier. In this scheme the binary dynamics of the colliding pair is treated without approximation, and the interaction with the background fluid is taken into account via a renormalization of the pair potential. The result is expressed in terms of orbits having specified end points and specified elapsed times.

  5. A Search for Collision Orbits in the Free-Fall Three-Body Problem. I. Numerical Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Kiyotaka; Umehara, Hiroaki; Abe, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    A numerical procedure is devised to find binary collision orbits in the free-fall three-body problem. Applying this procedure, families of binary collision orbits are found and a sequence of triple collision orbits are positioned. A property of sets of binary collision orbits which is convenient to search triple collision orbits is found. Important numerical results are formulated and summarized in the final section.

  6. Application of Time Dependent Probabilistic Collision State Checkers in Highly Dynamic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Piñeiro, José D.

    2015-01-01

    When computing the trajectory of an autonomous vehicle, inevitable collision states must be avoided at all costs, so no harm comes to the device or pedestrians around it. In dynamic environments, considering collisions as binary events is risky and inefficient, as the future position of moving obstacles is unknown. We introduce a time-dependent probabilistic collision state checker system, which traces a safe route with a minimum collision probability for a robot. We apply a sequential Bayesian model to calculate approximate predictions of the movement patterns of the obstacles, and define a time-dependent variation of the Dijkstra algorithm to compute statistically safe trajectories through a crowded area. We prove the efficiency of our methods through experimentation, using a self-guided robotic device. PMID:25799557

  7. Application of time dependent probabilistic collision state checkers in highly dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Piñeiro, José D

    2015-01-01

    When computing the trajectory of an autonomous vehicle, inevitable collision states must be avoided at all costs, so no harm comes to the device or pedestrians around it. In dynamic environments, considering collisions as binary events is risky and inefficient, as the future position of moving obstacles is unknown. We introduce a time-dependent probabilistic collision state checker system, which traces a safe route with a minimum collision probability for a robot. We apply a sequential Bayesian model to calculate approximate predictions of the movement patterns of the obstacles, and define a time-dependent variation of the Dijkstra algorithm to compute statistically safe trajectories through a crowded area. We prove the efficiency of our methods through experimentation, using a self-guided robotic device.

  8. OBSERVED BINARY FRACTION SETS LIMITS ON THE EXTENT OF COLLISIONAL GRINDING IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Bottke, William F.; Levison, Harold F.; Noll, Keith

    2011-05-15

    The size distribution in the cold classical Kuiper Belt (KB) can be approximated by two idealized power laws: one with steep slope for radii R > R* and one with shallow slope for R < R*, where R* {approx} 25-50 km. Previous works suggested that the size frequency distribution (SFD) rollover at R* can be the result of extensive collisional grinding in the KB that led to the catastrophic disruption of most bodies with R < R*. Here, we use a new code to test the effect of collisions in the KB. We find that the observed rollover could indeed be explained by collisional grinding provided that the initial mass in large bodies was much larger than the one in the present KB and was dynamically depleted. In addition to the size distribution changes, our code also tracks the effects of collisions on binary systems. We find that it is generally easier to dissolve wide binary systems, such as the ones existing in the cold KB today, than to catastrophically disrupt objects with R {approx} R*. Thus, the binary survival sets important limits on the extent of collisional grinding in the KB. We find that the extensive collisional grinding required to produce the SFD rollover at R* would imply a strong gradient of the binary fraction with R and separation, because it is generally easier to dissolve binaries with small components and/or those with wide orbits. The expected binary fraction for R {approx}< R* is {approx}<0.1. The present observational data do not show such a gradient. Instead, they suggest a large binary fraction of {approx}0.4 for R = 30-40 km. This may indicate that the rollover was not produced by disruptive collisions, but is instead a fossil remnant of the KB object formation process.

  9. Scattering from binary optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Douglas W.

    1993-01-01

    There are a number of sources of scattering in binary optics: etch depth errors, line edge errors, quantization errors, roughness, and the binary approximation to the ideal surface. These sources of scattering can be systematic (deterministic) or random. In this paper, scattering formulas for both systematic and random errors are derived using Fourier optics. These formulas can be used to explain the results of scattering measurements and computer simulations.

  10. Triple interactions involving close binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of a circularized tidal binary system with a third star is studied statistically through the results of about 70,000 numerical scattering experiments. The stars involved are taken to be identical polytropes, with radii equal to one-third of the initial binary separation. The effects of nonzero stellar radii are included by calculating an approximation to the energy dissipated by tidal interactions and estimating the energy lost through physical collisions. These are then used to modify the interaction cross sections obtained in the point-mass approximation. It is found that, for a wide range of assumptions about the details of the triple interactions and the stars' structure, the net rate at which tidal binaries heat the stellar system is substantially reduced (by as much as a factor of 20) below that obtained when the binaries are treated simply as point masses. The most likely outcome of a triple encounter is the coalescence of two, or all three, of the stars involved.

  11. Learning to assign binary weights to binary descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoudi; Wei, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-10-01

    Constructing robust binary local feature descriptors are receiving increasing interest due to their binary nature, which can enable fast processing while requiring significantly less memory than their floating-point competitors. To bridge the performance gap between the binary and floating-point descriptors without increasing the computational cost of computing and matching, optimal binary weights are learning to assign to binary descriptor for considering each bit might contribute differently to the distinctiveness and robustness. Technically, a large-scale regularized optimization method is applied to learn float weights for each bit of the binary descriptor. Furthermore, binary approximation for the float weights is performed by utilizing an efficient alternatively greedy strategy, which can significantly improve the discriminative power while preserve fast matching advantage. Extensive experimental results on two challenging datasets (Brown dataset and Oxford dataset) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. Solar System binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    The discovery of binaries in each of the major populations of minor bodies in the solar system is propelling a rapid growth of heretofore unattainable physical information. The availability of mass and density constraints for minor bodies opens the door to studies of internal structure, comparisons with meteorite samples, and correlations between bulk-physical and surface-spectral properties. The number of known binaries is now more than 70 and is growing rapidly. A smaller number have had the extensive followup observations needed to derive mass and albedo information, but this list is growing as well. It will soon be the case that we will know more about the physical parameters of objects in the Kuiper Belt than has been known about asteroids in the Main Belt for the last 200 years. Another important aspect of binaries is understanding the mechanisms that lead to their formation and survival. The relative sizes and separations of binaries in the different minor body populations point to more than one mechanism for forming bound pairs. Collisions appear to play a major role in the Main Belt. Rotational and/or tidal fission may be important in the Near Earth population. For the Kuiper Belt, capture in multi-body interactions may be the preferred formation mechanism. However, all of these conclusions remain tentative and limited by observational and theoretical incompleteness. Observational techniques for identifying binaries are equally varied. High angular resolution observations from space and from the ground are critical for detection of the relatively distant binaries in the Main Belt and the Kuiper Belt. Radar has been the most productive method for detection of Near Earth binaries. Lightcurve analysis is an independent technique that is capable of exploring phase space inaccessible to direct observations. Finally, spacecraft flybys have played a crucial paradigm-changing role with discoveries that unlocked this now-burgeoning field.

  13. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Rosin, M. S.; Ricketson, L. F.; Dimits, A. M.; ...

    2014-05-29

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε , the computational cost of the method is O(ε–2) or (ε–2(lnε)2), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε–3) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods.more » We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10–5. Lastly, we discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.« less

  14. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosin, M. S.; Ricketson, L. F.; Dimits, A. M.; Caflisch, R. E.; Cohen, B. I.

    2014-05-29

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε , the computational cost of the method is O(ε–2) or (ε–2(lnε)2), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε–3) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods. We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10–5. Lastly, we discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.

  15. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosin, M.S.; Ricketson, L.F.; Dimits, A.M.; Caflisch, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε, the computational cost of the method is O(ε{sup −2}) or O(ε{sup −2}(lnε){sup 2}), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε{sup −3}) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods. We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10{sup −5}. We discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.

  16. Open Charm Yields in d+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumda, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2005-01-07

    Mid-rapidity open charm spectra from direct reconstruction of D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) {yields} K{sup {-+}} {pi}{sup {+-}} in d+Au collisions and indirect electron/positron measurements via charm semileptonic decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are reported. The D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) spectrum covers a transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range of 0.1 < p{sub T} < 3 GeV/c whereas the electron spectra cover a range of 1 < p{sub T} < 4 GeV/c. The electron spectra show approximate binary collision scaling between p+p and d+Au collisions. From these two independent analyses, the differential cross section per nucleon-nucleon binary interaction at mid-rapidity for open charm production from d+Au collisions at RHIC is d{sigma}{sub c{bar c}}{sup NN}/dy = 0.30 {+-} 0.04 (stat.) {+-} 0.09(syst.) mb. The results are compared to theoretical calculations. Implications for charmonium results in A+A collisions are discussed.

  17. Wounded quarks in A +A , p +A , and p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BoŻek, Piotr; Broniowski, Wojciech; Rybczyński, Maciej

    2016-07-01

    We explore predictions of the wounded-quark model for particle production and properties of the initial state formed in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The approach is applied uniformly to A +A collisions in a wide collision energy range, as well as for p +A and p +p collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We find that generically the predictions from wounded quarks for such features as eccentricities or initial sizes are close (within 15%) to predictions of the wounded nucleon model with an amended binary component. A larger difference is found for the size in p +Pb system, where the wounded-quark model yields a smaller (more compact) initial fireball than the standard wounded-nucleon model. The inclusion of subnucleonic degrees of freedom allows us to analyze p +p collisions in an analogous way, with predictions that can be used in further collective evolution. The approximate linear dependence of particle production in A +A collisions on the number of wounded quarks, as found in previous studies, makes the approach based on wounded quarks natural. Importantly, at the LHC energies we find approximate uniformity in particle production from wounded quarks, where at a given collision energy per nucleon pair similar production of initial entropy per source is needed to explain the particle production from p +p collisions up to A +A collisions. We also discuss the sensitivity of the wounded-quark model predictions to distribution of quarks in nucleons, distribution of nucleons in nuclei, and the quark-quark inelasticity profile in the impact parameter. In our procedure, the quark-quark inelasticity profile is chosen in such a way that the experiment-based parametrization of the proton-proton inelasticity profile is properly reproduced. The parameters of the overlaid multiplicity distribution are fixed from p +p and p +Pb data.

  18. Binary Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary was the first trans-neptunian binary to be identified in 1978. Pluto-Charon is a true binary with both components orbiting a barycenter located between them. The Pluto system is also the first, and to date only, known binary with a satellite system consisting of four small satellites in near-resonant orbits around the common center of mass. Seven other Plutinos, objects in 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune, have orbital companions including 2004 KB19 reported here for the first time. Compared to the Cold Classical population, the Plutinos differ in the frequency of binaries, the relative sizes of the components, and their inclination distribution. These differences point to distinct dynamical histories and binary formation processes encountered by Plutinos.

  19. Mesoscopic model for binary fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, C.; Tucci, K.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco-Guillén, E. E.; Morales, M.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a model for studying binary fluids based on the mesoscopic molecular simulation technique known as multiparticle collision, where the space and state variables are continuous, and time is discrete. We include a repulsion rule to simulate segregation processes that does not require calculation of the interaction forces between particles, so binary fluids can be described on a mesoscopic scale. The model is conceptually simple and computationally efficient; it maintains Galilean invariance and conserves the mass and energy in the system at the micro- and macro-scale, whereas momentum is conserved globally. For a wide range of temperatures and densities, the model yields results in good agreement with the known properties of binary fluids, such as the density profile, interface width, phase separation, and phase growth. We also apply the model to the study of binary fluids in crowded environments with consistent results.

  20. Temperature-Induced Coalescence of Colliding Binary Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Nan; Huang, Bin; Dong, Lining; Quan, Xiaojun; Hong, Fangjun; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-03-01

    This report investigates the impact of droplet temperature on the head-on collision of binary droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Understanding droplet collision is critical to many fundamental processes and industrial applications. There are many factors, including collision speed, collision angle, and droplet composition, that influence the outcome of the collision between binary droplets. This work provides the first experimental study of the influence of droplet temperature on the collision of binary droplets. As the droplet temperature increases, the possibility increases for the two droplets to coalesce after collision. The findings in this study can be extended to collision of droplets under other conditions where control of the droplet temperature is feasible. Such findings will also be beneficial to applications that involve droplet collision, such as in ink-jet printing, steam turbines, engine ignition, and spraying cooling.

  1. Temperature-induced coalescence of colliding binary droplets on superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nan; Huang, Bin; Dong, Lining; Quan, Xiaojun; Hong, Fangjun; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-03-07

    This report investigates the impact of droplet temperature on the head-on collision of binary droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Understanding droplet collision is critical to many fundamental processes and industrial applications. There are many factors, including collision speed, collision angle, and droplet composition, that influence the outcome of the collision between binary droplets. This work provides the first experimental study of the influence of droplet temperature on the collision of binary droplets. As the droplet temperature increases, the possibility increases for the two droplets to coalesce after collision. The findings in this study can be extended to collision of droplets under other conditions where control of the droplet temperature is feasible. Such findings will also be beneficial to applications that involve droplet collision, such as in ink-jet printing, steam turbines, engine ignition, and spraying cooling.

  2. Temperature-Induced Coalescence of Colliding Binary Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nan; Huang, Bin; Dong, Lining; Quan, Xiaojun; Hong, Fangjun; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates the impact of droplet temperature on the head-on collision of binary droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Understanding droplet collision is critical to many fundamental processes and industrial applications. There are many factors, including collision speed, collision angle, and droplet composition, that influence the outcome of the collision between binary droplets. This work provides the first experimental study of the influence of droplet temperature on the collision of binary droplets. As the droplet temperature increases, the possibility increases for the two droplets to coalesce after collision. The findings in this study can be extended to collision of droplets under other conditions where control of the droplet temperature is feasible. Such findings will also be beneficial to applications that involve droplet collision, such as in ink-jet printing, steam turbines, engine ignition, and spraying cooling. PMID:24603362

  3. Bubble collisions in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikos, S. T. C.; Wu, Z. C.

    The collision of two bubbles of true vacuum in a background of false vacuum is considered in the context of General Relativity. It is found that in the thin wall approximation, the problem can be solved exactly. The region to the future of the collision is described by the pseudo-Schwarzschild de Sitter metric. The parameters in this metric are found by solving the junction conditions at each collision.

  4. Identification list of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov,, O.; Karchevsky,, A.; Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.

    The Identification List of Binaries (ILB) is a star catalogue constructed to facilitate cross-referencing between different catalogues of binary stars. As of 2015, it comprises designations for approximately 120,000 double/multiple systems. ILB contains star coordinates and cross-references to the Bayer/Flemsteed, DM (BD/CD/CPD), HD, HIP, ADS, WDS, CCDM, TDSC, GCVS, SBC9, IGR (and some other X-ray catalogues), PSR designations, as well as identifications in the recently developed BSDB system. ILB eventually became a part of the BDB stellar database.

  5. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles method can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.

  6. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  7. Kinetic Models with Randomly Perturbed Binary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetti, Federico; Ladelli, Lucia; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a class of Kac-like kinetic equations on the real line, with general random collisional rules which, in some special cases, identify models for granular gases with a background heat bath (Carrillo et al. in Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 24(1):59-81, 2009), and models for wealth redistribution in an agent-based market (Bisi et al. in Commun. Math. Sci. 7:901-916, 2009). Conditions on these collisional rules which guarantee both the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium profiles and their main properties are found. The characterization of these stationary states is of independent interest, since we show that they are stationary solutions of different evolution problems, both in the kinetic theory of rarefied gases (Cercignani et al. in J. Stat. Phys. 105:337-352, 2001; Villani in J. Stat. Phys. 124:781-822, 2006) and in the econophysical context (Bisi et al. in Commun. Math. Sci. 7:901-916, 2009).

  8. How do binary clusters form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Becky; Goodwin, Simon P.; Griffiths, D. W.; Parker, Richard. J.

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 10 per cent of star clusters are found in pairs, known as binary clusters. We propose a mechanism for binary cluster formation; we use N-body simulations to show that velocity substructure in a single (even fairly smooth) region can cause binary clusters to form. This process is highly stochastic and it is not obvious from a region's initial conditions whether a binary will form and, if it does, which stars will end up in which cluster. We find the probability that a region will divide is mainly determined by its virial ratio, and a virial ratio above 'equilibrium' is generally necessary for binary formation. We also find that the mass ratio of the two clusters is strongly influenced by the initial degree of spatial substructure in the region.

  9. Exchange effects and collision mechanisms in (e, 2e) processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang-jin, Chen; Zhi-xiang, Ni; Qi-cun, Shi; Ke-zun, Xu

    1998-07-01

    In this work the triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium at an incident energy of 64.6 eV is considered in the coplanar symmetric energy-sharing and fixed relative angles of the two out-going electrons kinematics. A new collision process called triple-binary collision is identified. It has been shown that the ordinary double-binary collision process is excluded from the collision kinematics considered here. It has also been shown how the exchange effects symmetrically contribute to the peaks in the cross sections.

  10. Modified evolution of stellar binaries from supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Yi-Han; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of main-sequence binaries resided in the galactic centre is influenced a lot by the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Due to this perturbation, the stars in a dense environment are likely to experience mergers or collisions through secular or non-secular interactions. In this work, we study the dynamics of the stellar binaries at galactic centre, perturbed by another distant SMBH. Geometrically, such a four-body system is supposed to be decomposed into the inner triple (SMBH-star-star) and the outer triple (SMBH-stellar binary-SMBH). We survey the parameter space and determine the criteria analytically for the stellar mergers and the tidal disruption events (TDEs). For a relative distant and equal masses SMBH binary, the stars have more opportunities to merge as a result from the Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations in the inner triple. With a sample of tight stellar binaries, our numerical experiments reveal that a significant fraction of the binaries, ˜70 per cent, experience merger eventually. Whereas the majority of the stellar TDEs are likely to occur at a close periapses to the SMBH, induced by the outer Kozai effect. The tidal disruptions are found numerically as many as ˜10 per cent for a close SMBH binary that is enhanced significantly than the one without the external SMBH. These effects require the outer perturber to have an inclined orbit (≥40°) relatively to the inner orbital plane and may lead to a burst of the extremely astronomical events associated with the detection of the SMBH binary.

  11. Approximation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Andreas S.; Shmoys, David B.; Williamson, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing global competition, rapidly changing markets, and greater consumer awareness have altered the way in which corporations do business. To become more efficient, many industries have sought to model some operational aspects by gigantic optimization problems. It is not atypical to encounter models that capture 106 separate “yes” or “no” decisions to be made. Although one could, in principle, try all 2106 possible solutions to find the optimal one, such a method would be impractically slow. Unfortunately, for most of these models, no algorithms are known that find optimal solutions with reasonable computation times. Typically, industry must rely on solutions of unguaranteed quality that are constructed in an ad hoc manner. Fortunately, for some of these models there are good approximation algorithms: algorithms that produce solutions quickly that are provably close to optimal. Over the past 6 years, there has been a sequence of major breakthroughs in our understanding of the design of approximation algorithms and of limits to obtaining such performance guarantees; this area has been one of the most flourishing areas of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. PMID:9370525

  12. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  13. NEA rotations and binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, A. W.; Warner, B. D.

    2007-05-01

    Of nearly 3900 near-Earth asteroids known in June 2006, 325 have got estimated rotation periods. NEAs with sizes down to 10 meters have been sampled. Observed spin distribution shows a major changing point around D=200 m. Larger NEAs show a barrier against spin rates >11 d-1 (period P~2.2 h) that shifts to slower rates with increasing equatorial elongation. The spin barrier is interpreted as a critical spin rate for bodies held together by self-gravitation only, suggesting that NEAs larger than 200 m are mostly strenghtless bodies (i.e., with zero tensile strength), so called `rubble piles'. The barrier disappears at D<200 m where most objects rotate too fast to be held together by self-gravitation only, so a non-zero cohesion is implied in the smaller NEAs. The distribution of NEA spin rates in the `rubble pile' range (D>0.2 km) is non-Maxwellian, suggesting that other mechanisms than just collisions worked there. There is a pile up in front of the barrier (P of 2-3 h). It may be related to a spin up mechanism crowding asteroids to the barrier. An excess of slow rotators is seen at P>30 h. The spin-down mechanism has no clear lower limit on spin rate; periods as long as tens of days occur. Most NEAs appear to be in basic spin states with rotation around the principal axis. Excited rotations are present among and actually dominate in slow rotators with damping timescales >4.5 byr. A few tumblers observed among fast rotating coherent objects consistently appear to be more rigid or younger than the larger, rubble-pile tumblers. An abundant population of binary systems among NEAs has been found. The fraction of binaries among NEAs larger than 0.3 km has been estimated to be 15 +/-4%. Primaries of the binary systems concentrate at fast spin rates (periods 2-3 h) and low amplitudes, i.e., they lie just below the spin barrier. The total angular momentum content in the binary systems suggests that they formed at the critical spin rate, and that little or no angular

  14. Modeling defect production in high energy collision cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1993-12-01

    A multi-model approach roach (MMA) to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis of the MMA is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, similar to the information obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations.

  15. Asteroid Systems: Binaries, Triples, and Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.-L.; Pravec, P.; Taylor, P.; Carry, B.; Jacobson, S.

    In the past decade, the number of known binary near-Earth asteroids has more than quadrupled and the number of known large main-belt asteroids with satellites has doubled. Half a dozen triple asteroids have been discovered, and the previously unrecognized populations of asteroid pairs and small main-belt binaries have been identified. The current observational evidence confirms that small (≲20 km) binaries form by rotational fission and establishes that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect powers the spin-up process. A unifying paradigm based on rotational fission and post-fission dynamics can explain the formation of small binaries, triples, and pairs. Large (>~20 km) binaries with small satellites are most likely created during large collisions.

  16. Bethe binary-encounter peaks in the double-differential cross sections for high-energy electron-impact ionization of H2 and He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-11-01

    We study the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region in the ejected-electron double-differential emission spectrum of H2 and He targets in collisions with 8-keV electrons. We compare the absolute cross sections for these isoelectronic systems at high emission energies. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of a state-of-the-art theoretical model based on a two-effective-center approximation. In the case of the H2 molecule the binary peak in the double-differential cross sections (DDCS) is enhanced due to the two-center Young-type interference. The observed undulation in the DDCS ratio is explained in terms of the combined contributions of the Compton profile mismatch and the interference effect. The influence of the interference effect is thus observed for higher-energy electrons compared to most of the earlier studies which focused on low-energy electrons produced in soft collisions.

  17. Bethe binary-encounter peaks in the double-differential cross sections for high-energy electron-impact ionization of H{sub 2} and He

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Tribedi, L. C.; Stia, C. R.; Fojon, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.

    2010-11-15

    We study the Bethe binary-encounter (BE) region in the ejected-electron double-differential emission spectrum of H{sub 2} and He targets in collisions with 8-keV electrons. We compare the absolute cross sections for these isoelectronic systems at high emission energies. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of a state-of-the-art theoretical model based on a two-effective-center approximation. In the case of the H{sub 2} molecule the binary peak in the double-differential cross sections (DDCS) is enhanced due to the two-center Young-type interference. The observed undulation in the DDCS ratio is explained in terms of the combined contributions of the Compton profile mismatch and the interference effect. The influence of the interference effect is thus observed for higher-energy electrons compared to most of the earlier studies which focused on low-energy electrons produced in soft collisions.

  18. First known Terrestrial Impact of a Binary Asteroid from a Main Belt Breakup Event

    PubMed Central

    Ormö, Jens; Sturkell, Erik; Alwmark, Carl; Melosh, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 470 million years ago one of the largest cosmic catastrophes occurred in our solar system since the accretion of the planets. A 200-km large asteroid was disrupted by a collision in the Main Asteroid Belt, which spawned fragments into Earth crossing orbits. This had tremendous consequences for the meteorite production and cratering rate during several millions of years following the event. The 7.5-km wide Lockne crater, central Sweden, is known to be a member of this family. We here provide evidence that Lockne and its nearby companion, the 0.7-km diameter, contemporaneous, Målingen crater, formed by the impact of a binary, presumably ‘rubble pile’ asteroid. This newly discovered crater doublet provides a unique reference for impacts by combined, and poorly consolidated projectiles, as well as for the development of binary asteroids. PMID:25340551

  19. First known terrestrial impact of a binary asteroid from a main belt breakup event.

    PubMed

    Ormö, Jens; Sturkell, Erik; Alwmark, Carl; Melosh, Jay

    2014-10-23

    Approximately 470 million years ago one of the largest cosmic catastrophes occurred in our solar system since the accretion of the planets. A 200-km large asteroid was disrupted by a collision in the Main Asteroid Belt, which spawned fragments into Earth crossing orbits. This had tremendous consequences for the meteorite production and cratering rate during several millions of years following the event. The 7.5-km wide Lockne crater, central Sweden, is known to be a member of this family. We here provide evidence that Lockne and its nearby companion, the 0.7-km diameter, contemporaneous, Målingen crater, formed by the impact of a binary, presumably 'rubble pile' asteroid. This newly discovered crater doublet provides a unique reference for impacts by combined, and poorly consolidated projectiles, as well as for the development of binary asteroids.

  20. A Monte Carlo model for determination of binary diffusion coefficients in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Panarese, A.; Bruno, D.; Colonna, G.; Diomede, P.; Laricchiuta, A.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2011-06-20

    A Monte Carlo method has been developed for the calculation of binary diffusion coefficients in gas mixtures. The method is based on the stochastic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation obtained for the transport of one component in a thermal bath of the second one. Anisotropic scattering is included by calculating the classical deflection angle in binary collisions under isotropic potential. Model results are compared to accurate solutions of the Chapman-Enskog equation in the first and higher orders. We have selected two different cases, H{sub 2} in H{sub 2} and O in O{sub 2}, assuming rigid spheres or using a model phenomenological potential. Diffusion coefficients, calculated in the proposed approach, are found in close agreement with Chapman-Enskog results in all the cases considered, the deviations being reduced using higher order approximations.

  1. Analyzing cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbetti, Roberto; Kleban, Matthew E-mail: mk161@nyu.edu

    2012-05-01

    We develop a set of controlled, analytic approximations to study the effects of bubble collisions on cosmology. We expand the initial perturbation to the inflaton field caused by the collision in a general power series, and determine its time evolution during inflation in terms of the coefficients in the expansion. In models where the observer's bubble undergoes sufficient slow-roll inflation to solve the flatness problem, in the thin wall limit only one coefficient in the expansion is relevant to observational cosmology, allowing nearly model-independent predictions. We discuss two approaches to determining the initial perturbation to the inflaton and the implications for the sign of the effect (a hot or cold spot on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature map). Lastly, we analyze the effects of collisions with thick-wall bubbles, i.e. away from the thin-wall limit.

  2. DSMC simulation of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2016-11-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra (RBS) in dilute gas mixtures have been simulated by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). Different noble gas binary mixtures have been considered and the spectra have been simulated adopting the hard sphere collision model. It is suggested that DSMC simulations can be used in the interpretation of light scattering experiments in place of approximate kinetic models. Actually, the former have a firmer physical ground and can be readily extended to treat gas mixtures of arbitrary complexity. The results obtained confirm the capability of DSMC to predict experimental spectra and clears the way towards the simulation of polyatomic gas mixtures of interest for actual application (notably, air) where tractable kinetic model equations are still lacking.

  3. Total Born approximation cross sections for single electron loss by atoms and ions colliding with atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The first born approximation (FBA) is applied to the calculation of single electron loss cross sections for various ions and atoms containing from one to seven electrons. Screened hydrogenic wave functions were used for the states of the electron ejected from the projectile, and Hartree-Fock elastic and incoherent scattering factors were used to describe the target. The effect of the target atom on the scaling of projectile ionization cross sections with respect to the projectile nuclear charge was explored in the case of hydrogen-like ions. Scaling of the cross section with respect to the target nuclear charge for electron loss by Fe (+25) in collision with neutral atoms ranging from H to Fe is also examined. These results were compared to those of the binary encounter approximation and to the FBA for the case of ionization by completely stripped target ions.

  4. NEAs' Binaries and Planetary Close Encounters -Stability and Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Rosana; Winter, O.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the present work we considered the effects of close encounters, suffered by hypothetical NEAs binaries, with Earth, Mercury and Venus, in order to determine the stability of their satellites as a function of the encounter conditions. In addition, knowing the conditions that leads to the loss (by ejection or collisions) of the most internal satellites, we are able to estimate the frequency of such encounters, and thus, determine the expected lifetime of the NEAs binaries. The methodology consisted on numerically simulate a system composed by the Sun, the planets of the Solar System, and a sample of 2100 NEAs, for a period of 10 Myr (predict NEAs' lifetime). All close encounters with the planets closer than 100 planet's radius were registered. The next step consisted on simulate a representative sample of those registered close encounters, through numerical integration, considering the planet, the asteroid that perform the close encounter, and a cloud of satellites around the asteroid. The largest radial distance for which all the satellites survive (no collision or ejection) was defined as the critical radius - Rc, given as a function of the encounter parameters (relative velocity and impact parameter). For the Earth, we found that the close encounters with impact parameter and relative velocity capable to remove the most internal satellites of the NEAs (Rc < 5 km), are very frequent. We found that 93% of the asteroids of the group Atens suffer an encounter within this limit in 10 Myrs, and that 50% of these encounters happen in approximately 330.000 years. For the Apollos we found that 60% of the asteroids suffer such encounters, and that 50% of then happen in approximately 700.000 years. Such results indicate that, in fact, the lifetime of the binaries is strongly influencied by the planetary close encounters, proving to be significantly shorter than the predicted lifetime of the NEAs. The contribution of the planets Mercury

  5. Binary Love relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2016-07-01

    When in a tight binary, the mutual tidal deformations of neutron stars get imprinted onto observables, encoding information about their internal structure at supranuclear densities and gravity in the extreme-gravity regime. Gravitational wave (GW) observations of their late binary inspiral may serve as a tool to extract the individual tidal deformabilities, but this is made difficult by degeneracies between them in the GW model. We here resolve this problem by discovering approximately equation-of-state (EoS)-insensitive relations between dimensionless combinations of the individual tidal deformabilities. We show that these relations break degeneracies in the GW model, allowing for the accurate extraction of both deformabilities. Such measurements can be used to better differentiate between EoS models, and improve tests of general relativity and cosmology.

  6. Astrometric Binaries: White Dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliversen, Nancy A.

    We propose to observe a selection of astrometric or spectroscopicastrometric binaries nearer than about 20 pc with unseen low mass companions. Systems of this type are important for determining the luminosity function of low mass stars (white dwarfs and very late main sequence M stars), and their contribution to the total mass of the galaxy. Systems of this type are also important because the low mass, invisible companions are potential candidates in the search for planets. Our target list is selected primarily from the list of 31 astrometric binaries near the sun by Lippincott (1978, Space Sci. Rev., 22, 153), with additional candidates from recent observations by Kamper. The elimination of stars with previous IUE observations, red companions resolved by infrared speckle interferometry, or primaries later than M1 (because if white dwarf companions are present they should have been detected in the visible region) reduces the list to 5 targets which need further information. IUE SWP low dispersion observations of these targets will show clearly whether the remaining unseen companions are white dwarfs, thus eliminating very cool main sequence stars or planets. This is also important in providing complete statistical information about the nearest stars. The discovery of a white dwarf in such a nearby system would provide important additional information about the masses of white dwarfs. Recent results by Greenstein (1986, A. J., 92, 859) from binary systems containing white dwarfs imply that 80% of such systems are as yet undetected. The preference of binaries for companions of approximately equal mass makes the Lippincott-Kamper list of A through K primaries with unseen companions a good one to use to search for white dwarfs. The mass and light dominance of the current primary over the white dwarf in the visible makes ultraviolet observations essential to obtain an accurate census of white dwarf binaries.

  7. Binary Formation in Planetesimal Disks. I. Equal Mass Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominami, Junko D.; Makino, Junichiro; Daisaka, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    As of April 2010, 48 TNO (trans-Neptunian Object) binaries have been found. This is about 6% of known TNOs. However, in previous theoretical studies of planetary formation in the TNO region, the effect of binary formation has been neglected. TNO binaries can be formed through a variety of mechanisms, such as a three-body process, dynamical friction on two massive bodies, inelastic collisions between two bodies etc. Most of these mechanisms become more effective as the distance from the Sun increases. In this paper, we describe our study on three-body process using direct N-body simulations. We found that chaos-assisted-capture (CAC) is the dominant channel of binary formation. We systematically changed the distance from the Sun, the number density of planetesimals, and the radius of the planetesimals and studied the effect of the binaries on the collision rate of planetesimals. In the TNO region, binaries are involved in 1/3-1/2 of collisions, and the collision rate increases by a factor of a few compared to the theoretical estimate for direct two-body collisions. Thus, it is possible that the binaries significantly enhance the collision rate and reduce the growth timescale. In the terrestrial planet region, binaries are less important, because the ratio between the Hill radius and the physical size of the planetesimals is relatively small. Although the time scale of our simulations is short, they clearly demonstrated that the accretion process in the TNO region is quite different from that in the terrestrial planet region.

  8. Collisions of noble gases with supercooled sulfuric acid-water solutions.

    PubMed

    Behr, Peter; Scharfenort, Ulrich; Zellner, Reinhard

    2009-09-07

    The collisions of hyperthermal noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) with supercooled binary sulfuric acid-water mixtures (57-77 wt%) were explored in the temperature range between 210 and 240 K. The experiments were performed by directing a molecular beam of the respective gases onto a continuously renewed liquid surface and monitoring the velocity of the scattered molecules by mass spectrometry. Depending on the initial translational energies and molecular masses, we observe both inelastic scattering from the surface as well as thermalization followed by subsequent desorption. The experiments indicate that the repulsive momentum transfer in the inelastic scattering channel increases with increasing mass of the impinging gas, while it is only weakly affected by the initial velocities. The final energy of the thermally desorbing atoms can always be approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution equal to the liquid bulk phase temperature. The influence of the binary composition of the liquid phase is only noticeable in the case of Ne, whilst this dependence diminishes for gases with molecular masses >or=40 amu. The probability of thermalisation relative to inelastic scattering increases with the bulk phase temperature, independent of the molecular masses of the colliding gas. In contrast, the fractional energy transfer during collision does not increase with temperature, except for Neon. These results can be interpreted in the model framework of hard-sphere collisions of noble gases with the surface, during which water and sulfuric acid molecules interact independently with the impinging gas.

  9. Kinetic theory of binary particles with unequal mean velocities and non-equipartition energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanpei; Mei, Yifeng; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The hydrodynamic conservation equations and constitutive relations for a binary granular mixture composed of smooth, nearly elastic spheres with non-equipartition energies and different mean velocities are derived. This research is aimed to build three-dimensional kinetic theory to characterize the behaviors of two species of particles suffering different forces. The standard Enskog method is employed assuming a Maxwell velocity distribution for each species of particles. The collision components of the stress tensor and the other parameters are calculated from the zeroth- and first-order approximation. Our results demonstrate that three factors, namely the differences between two granular masses, temperatures and mean velocities all play important roles in the stress-strain relation of the binary mixture, indicating that the assumption of energy equipartition and the same mean velocity may not be acceptable. The collision frequency and the solid viscosity increase monotonously with each granular temperature. The zeroth-order approximation to the energy dissipation varies greatly with the mean velocities of both species of spheres, reaching its peak value at the maximum of their relative velocity.

  10. Runaway stars from young star clusters containing initial binaries. I. Equal-mass, equal-energy binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Duncan, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    The production of runaway stars by the dynamical-ejection mechanism in an open star cluster containing 50 percent binaries of equal mass and energy is investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations using the NBODY5 code of Aarseth (1985). The construction of the models is outlined, and the results are presented graphically and characterized in detail. It is shown that binary-binary collisions capable of producing runaways can occur (via formation and disruption, with some stellar collisions, of hierarchical double binaries) in clusters of relatively low density (e.g., pc-sized clusters of O or B stars). The frequency of binaries in the runaway population is found to vary between 0 and 50 percent, with the majority of runaways being unevolved early-type stars. 38 references.

  11. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, Sakir

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  12. Quick matching of binary images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Adnan A. Y.

    2015-09-01

    Matching images is a fundamental problem in image processing. The most common technique used to compare binary images is to calculate the correlation between two images or simply to subtract them. Both of these methods -as well as other matching methods- require some type of similarity operation to be applied to the whole image, and hence they are image size dependent. This implies that as image size increases, more processing time is required. However, with image sizes already exceeding 20 mega-pixels and standard image sizes doubling approximately every five years, the need to find a size invariant image matching method is becoming crucial. In this paper, we present a quick way to compare and match binary images based on the Probabilistic Matching Model (PMM). We present two simple image size invariant methods based on PMM: one for fast detection of dissimilar binary images and another for matching binary images. For detecting dissimilar binary images we introduce the Dissimilar Detection via Mapping method (DDM). We compare DDM to other popular matching methods used in the image processing arena and show that DDM is magnitudes faster than any other method. For binary image matching, we use DDM as a preprocessor for other popular methods to speed up their matching speed. In particular, we use DDM with cross correlation to speed it up. Test results are presented for real images varying in size from 16 kilo-pixel images to 10 mega-pixel images to show the method's size invariance.

  13. The Lockne - Målingen doublet impacts, the result of a binary asteroid from the 470 Ma Main Asteroid Belt event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturkell, E. C.; Ormo, J.; Alwmark, C.; Melosh, H., IV

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 470 million years ago one of the largest cosmic catastrophes occurred in our solar system since the accretion of the planets. A 200-km large asteroid was disrupted by a collision in the Main Asteroid Belt (MAB), which spawned fragments into Earth crossing orbits. This had tremendous consequences for the meteorite production and cratering rate during several millions of years following the event. The 7.5-km wide Lockne crater, central Sweden, is known to be a member of this family. The 600 m large Lockne asteroid was a binary and had a companion in space by a smaller 150 m satellite. The recent discovery of the nearby, 0.7-km diameter, synchronous Målingen crater suggests it to form a doublet impact structure together with the larger Lockne crater, and as we will show here, most likely by a binary, 'rubble pile' asteroid. Despite observational evidence that about 16% of the Near Earth Asteroids (NEA's) are binary, only a handful of the approximately 188 known craters on Earth have been suggested as potential doublets. The stratigraphic and geographic relationship with Lockne suggests the Lockne and Målingen craters to be the first described doublet impact structure by a binary asteroid into a marine-target setting. In addition, the precise dating of the Lockne-Målingen impact in relation to the MAB breakup event provides a hands-on reference for studies of the formation of binaries from asteroid breakup events.

  14. Identified baryon and meson distributions at large transverse momenta from Au + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Subba, N L; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-10-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of pi+/-, p, and p up to 12 GeV/c at midrapidity in centrality selected Au + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV are presented. In central Au + Au collisions, both pi +/- and p(p) show significant suppression with respect to binary scaling at pT approximately >4 GeV/c. Protons and antiprotons are less suppressed than pi+/-, in the range 1.5 approximately < pT approximately < 6 GeV/c. The pi-/pi+ and p/p ratios show at most a weak pT dependence and no significant centrality dependence. The p/pi ratios in central Au + Au collisions approach the values in p + p and d + Au collisions at pT approximately >5 GeV/c. The results at high pT indicate that the partonic sources of pi+/-, p, and p have similar energy loss when traversing the nuclear medium.

  15. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms^{-1}. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kn_{gas}=1.972), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Kn_{liquid}=0.01 for D=36nm) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm

  16. The Binary Mass Transfer Origin of the Red Blue Straggler Sequence in M30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Y.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lu, P.; Deng, L.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Beccari, G.

    2015-03-01

    Two separated sequences of blue straggler stars (BSSs) have been revealed by Ferraro et al. in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the Milky Way globular cluster M30. Their presence has been suggested to be related to the two BSS formation channels (namely, collisions and mass transfer in close binaries) operating within the same stellar system. The blue sequence was indeed found to be well reproduced by collisional BSS models. In contrast, no specific models for mass-transfer BSSs were available for an old stellar system like M30. Here we present binary evolution models, including case-B mass transfer and binary merging, specifically calculated for this cluster. We discuss in detail the evolutionary track of a 0.9 + 0.5 M ⊙ binary, which spends approximately 4 Gyr in the BSS region of the CMD of a 13 Gyr old cluster. We also run Monte Carlo simulations to study the distribution of mass-transfer BSSs in the CMD and to compare it with the observational data. Our results show that (1) the color and magnitude distribution of synthetic mass-transfer BSSs defines a strip in the CMD that nicely matches the observed red-BSS sequence, thus providing strong support to the mass-transfer origin for these stars; (2) the CMD distribution of synthetic BSSs never attains the observed location of the blue-BSS sequence, thus reinforcing the hypothesis that the latter formed through a different channel (likely collisions); (3) most (~60%) of the synthetic BSSs are produced by mass-transfer models, while the remaining <40% requires the contribution from merger models.

  17. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  18. Aligned breakup of heavy nuclear systems as a new type of deep inelastic collisions at small impact parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczynski, J.; Swiderski, L.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; La Guidara, E.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Auditore, L.

    2010-06-15

    An interesting process of violent reseparation of a heavy nuclear system into three or four fragments of comparable size was recently observed in {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au collisions at 15 MeV/nucleon. Combined analysis of the binary deep inelastic events and the ternary and quaternary breakup events demonstrates that the newly observed ternary and quaternary reactions belong to the same wide class of deep inelastic collisions as the conventional (binary) damped reactions. It is shown that the ternary and quaternary breakup reactions occur at extremely inelastic collisions corresponding to small impact parameters, while more peripheral collisions lead to well-known binary deep inelastic reactions.

  19. Galaxy collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, C.

    Theories of how galaxies, the fundamental constituents of large-scale structure, form and evolve have undergone a dramatic paradigm shift in the last few decades. Earlier views were of rapid, early collapse and formation of basic structures, followed by slow evolution of the stellar populations and steady buildup of the chemical elements. Current theories emphasize hierarchical buildup via recurrent collisions and mergers, separated by long periods of relaxation and secular restructuring. Thus, collisions between galaxies are now seen as a primary process in their evolution. This article begins with a brief history of how this once peripheral subject found its way to center stage. The author then tours parts of the vast array of collisional forms that have been discovered to date. Many examples are provided to illustrate how detailed numerical models and multiwaveband observations have allowed the general chronological sequence of collisional morphologies to be deciphered, and how these forms are produced by the processes of tidal kinematics, hypersonic gas dynamics, collective dynamical friction and violent relaxation. Galaxy collisions may trigger the formation of a large fraction of all the stars ever formed, and play a key role in fueling active galactic nuclei. Current understanding of the processes involved is reviewed. The last decade has seen exciting new discoveries about how collisions are orchestrated by their environment, how collisional processes depend on environment, and how these environments depend on redshift or cosmological time. These discoveries and prospects for the future are summarized in the final sections.

  20. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  1. STAR HOPPERS: PLANET INSTABILITY AND CAPTURE IN EVOLVING BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2012-07-01

    Many planets are observed in stellar binary systems, and their frequency may be comparable to that of planetary systems around single stars. Binary stellar evolution in such systems influences the dynamical evolution of the resident planets. Here, we study the evolution of a single planet orbiting one star in an evolving binary system. We find that stellar evolution can trigger dynamical instabilities that drive planets into chaotic orbits. This instability leads to planet-star collisions, exchange of the planet between the binary stars ('star hoppers'), and ejection of the planet from the system. The means by which planets can be recaptured is similar to the pull-down capture mechanism for irregular solar system satellites. Because planets often suffer close encounters with the primary on the asymptotic giant branch, captures during a collision with the stellar envelope are also possible for more massive planets. Such capture could populate the habitable zone around white dwarfs.

  2. Quickly Approximating the Distance Between Two Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David

    2009-01-01

    A method of quickly approximating the distance between two objects (one smaller, regarded as a point; the other larger and complexly shaped) has been devised for use in computationally simulating motions of the objects for the purpose of planning the motions to prevent collisions.

  3. Newton's cradle versus nonbinary collisions.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Ken

    2010-03-26

    Newton's cradle is a classical example of a one-dimensional impact problem. In the early 1980s the naive perception of its behavior was corrected: For example, the impact of a particle does not exactly cause the release of the farthest particle of the target particle train, if the target particles have been just in contact with their own neighbors. It is also known that the naive picture would be correct if the whole process consisted of purely binary collisions. Our systematic study of particle systems with truncated power-law repulsive force shows that the quasibinary collision is recovered in the limit of hard core repulsion, or a very large exponent. In contrast, a discontinuous steplike repulsive force mimicking a hard contact, or a very small exponent, leads to a completely different process: the impacting cluster and the targeted cluster act, respectively, as if they were nondeformable blocks.

  4. Widths and Shifts of Isolated Lines of Neutral and Ionized Atoms Perturbed by Collisions With Electrons and Ions: An Outline of the Semiclassical Perturbation (SCP) Method and of the Approximations Used for the Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie; Dimitrijević, Milan; Nessib, Nabil

    2014-06-01

    "Stark broadening" theory and calculations have been extensively developed for about 50 years. The theory can now be considered as mature for many applications, especially for accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling, in astrophysics, laboratory plasma physics and technological plasmas, as well. This requires the knowledge of numerous collisional line profiles. In order to meet these needs, the "SCP" (semiclassical perturbation) method and numerical code were created and developed. The SCP code is now extensively used for the needs of spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling, and the results of the published calculations are displayed in the STARK-B database. The aim of the present paper is to introduce the main approximations leading to the impact of semiclassical perturbation method and to give formulae entering the numerical SCP code, in order to understand the validity conditions of the method and of the results; and also to understand some regularities and systematic trends. This would also allow one to compare the method and its results to those of other methods and codes.

  5. Electron excitation after plasmon decay in proton-aluminum collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bocan, G.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2003-03-01

    When a projectile travels inside a metal, it interacts with the electron gas, producing both binary and collective excitations (plasmons). Within the nearly-free-electron-gas scheme, Roesler and co-workers showed that plasmons decay in first order and a conduction electron is emitted (interband transition). Working within the frame of atomic collisions, we develop a simple model to describe this decay. The first-order Born expansion is used to approximate the electron wave functions. The influence of the lattice potential on the excited electron is considered in the calculations in order to balance the momentum-conservation equation. It gives contributions associated with sites of the reciprocal lattice. The potential expansion coefficients are obtained following Animalu and co-workers [Philos. Mag. 9, 451 (1964)]. First- and second-differential spectra (in energy and angle) are analyzed discriminating contributions due to different lattice momenta. In all cases, contributions due to binary excitations of the valence electrons and inner-shell ionization are presented to establish a comparison.

  6. The Binary Temperature-Composition Phase Diagram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Philip C.; Reeves, James H.; Messina, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The equations for the liquid and gas lines in the binary temperature-composition phase diagram are derived by approximating that delta(H)[subscript vap] of the two liquids are equal. It is shown that within this approximation, the resulting equations are not too difficult to present in an undergraduate physical chemistry lecture.

  7. Convoy electron production in heavy-ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.; Breinig, M.; Brandt, W.; Laubert, R.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of the sharp v vector/sub e/ approx. = v vector cusps observed in the velocity spectrum of convoy electrons (v vector/sub e/) ejected in heavy ion-solid collisions in the ion velocity range (v vector) 6 to 18 au are compared to the properties of analogous cusps observed in binary electron capture to the continuum (ECC) and electron loss to the continuum (ELC) collisions in gases. Apart from a skew toward v vector/sub e/ > v vector, the v-independent convoy distributions observed are very similar to those for ELC and the cusp widths are the same in both cases. While the shape of convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, v, and of target material, yields in polycrystalline targets (C, Al, Ag, Au) exhibit a strong dependence on Z and v. Coincidence experiments in which convoy electrons are allocated according to emergent ion charge-state q/sub e/ show a surprising independence of q/sub e/, mirroring the unweighted statistical emergent charge-state fraction. Coincidence experiments of O/sup 6 +/ /sup 7 +/ /sup 8 +/ ions traversing < 110 > and < 100 > channels in Au show a strong yield suppression and a dependence of yield on the channel chosen. Interpretation of these observations, comparisons to convoy production studies using protons, and a discussion of remaining puzzles is given. The history of ECC, ELC, and wake-riding models of convoy electron production is also reviewed.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1999-06-01

    Coalescing compact binaries with neutron star or black hole components provide the most promising sources of gravitational radiation for detection by the LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/TAMA laser interferometers now under construction. This fact has motivated several different theoretical studies of the inspiral and hydrodynamic merging of compact binaries. Analytic analyses of the inspiral waveforms have been performed in the post-Newtonian approximation. Analytic and numerical treatments of the coalescence waveforms from binary neutron stars have been performed using Newtonian hydrodynamics and the quadrupole radiation approximation. Numerical simulations of coalescing black hole and neutron star binaries are also underway in full general relativity. Recent results from each of these approaches will be described and their virtues and limitations summarized.

  9. A binary star fraction of 76 per cent and unusual orbit parameters for the blue stragglers of NGC 188.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Robert D; Geller, Aaron M

    2009-12-24

    Blue straggler stars lie on or near the main sequences of star clusters (all members of which formed around the same time), but typically are more luminous than the turn-off stars and therefore long ago should have evolved off the main sequence to become giants and white dwarfs. They are thought to derive from normal main-sequence stars that have undergone a recent increase in mass. Statistical evidence indicates that in globular star clusters the blue stragglers probably form from binary stars. The specific formation processes, such as mass transfer, mergers or stellar collisions during dynamical encounters of binary stars, remain unresolved. Here we report that 16 of the 21 blue stragglers (76 per cent) in the old (7-Gyr; ref. 2) open cluster NGC 188 are currently in binary systems, a frequency three times that found among normal solar-type main-sequence stars. These blue straggler binaries have a remarkable period-eccentricity distribution, with all but three having orbital periods of approximately 1,000 days. Moreover, these stars are rotating faster than normal main-sequence stars of the same surface temperatures. These data show that most, and possibly all, blue stragglers derive from multiple-star systems, and indicate that the several formation processes operate simultaneously. We suggest that rapid rotation of blue stragglers may place upper limits on their ages.

  10. Approximate formula for recalescence in binary eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    Supercooling of a liquid prior to the nucleation of a solid and the subsequent rapid growth are necessary conditions for producing novel microstructures including metastable phases which are not formed by conventional solidification processes. Since containerless techniques, such as levitation and free fall of a sample, are capable of achieving a significant supercooling level of liquids, they are under consideration as possible techniques for material processing on earth and in space.

  11. An approximate formula for recalescence in binary eutectic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E.H. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    Supercooling of a liquid prior to the nucleation of a solid and the subsequent rapid growth are necessary conditions for producing novel microstructures including metastable phases which are not formed by conventional solidification processes. Since containerless techniques, such as levitation and free fall of a sample, are capable of achieving a significant supercooling level of liquids, they are under consideration as possible techniques for material processing on earth and in space. It is known, however, that the supercooling level rapidly diminishes as solidification proceeds because the heat released on the phase transformation is mainly absorbed by the supercooled liquid. This self-heating process termed recalescence is a result of insufficient heat dissipation by radiation or convection in container less solidification. As a consequence, the rapid growth of the solid comes to a halt and the rest of the solidification is controlled by the heat dissipation rate to the surroundings. The extent of the solid formed during recalescence is proportional to the initial supercooling level. It is of interest to estimate the fraction of the solid from the thermodynamic information of the material.

  12. Approximate formula for recalescence in binary eutectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    Supercooling of a liquid prior to the nucleation of a solid and the subsequent rapid growth are necessary conditions for producing novel microstructures including metastable phases which are not formed by conventional solidification processes. Since containerless techniques, such as levitation and free fall of a sample, are capable of achieving a significant supercooling level of liquids, they are under consideration as possible techniques for material processing on earth and in space.

  13. Discovery of a young planetary-mass binary.

    PubMed

    Jayawardhana, Ray; Ivanov, Valentin D

    2006-09-01

    We have identified a companion to the young planetary-mass brown dwarf Oph 162225-240515. This pair forms a resolved binary consisting of two objects with masses comparable to those of extrasolar giant planets. Several lines of evidence confirm the coevality and youth of the two objects, suggesting that they form a physical binary. Models yield masses of approximately 14 and approximately 7 times the mass of Jupiter for the primary and the secondary object, respectively, at an age of approximately 1 million years. A wide ( approximately 240-astronomical unit) binary in the ultra-low-mass regime poses a challenge to some popular models of brown dwarf formation.

  14. Total Born-approximation cross sections for single-electron loss by atoms and ions colliding with atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The first Born approximation (FBA) is applied to the calculation of single-electron-loss cross sections for various ions and atoms containing from one to seven electrons. Screened hydrogenic wave functions are used for the states of the electron ejected from the projectile, and Hartree-Fock elastic and incoherent scattering factors are used to describe the target. The effect of the target atom on the scaling of projectile ionization cross sections with respect to the projectile nuclear charge is explored in the case of hydrogenlike ions. Also examined is the scaling of the cross section with respect to the target nuclear charge for electron loss by Fe(25+) in collision with neutral atoms ranging from H to Fe. These results are compared with those of the binary-encounter approximation (BEA) and with the FBA for the case of ionization by completely stripped target ions. Electron-loss cross sections are also calculated for the ions O(i+) (i = 3-7) and N(i+) (i = 0-6) in collision with He targets in the energy range of approximately 0.1 to 100 MeV/nucleon. These results are found to be in excellent agreement with the available data near the peak of the ionization cross section.

  15. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  16. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  17. DPI: Symplectic mapping for binary star systems for the Mercury software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrini, D.

    2015-04-01

    DPI is a FORTRAN77 library that supplies the symplectic mapping method for binary star systems for the Mercury N-Body software package (ascl:1201.008). The binary symplectic mapping is implemented as a hybrid symplectic method that allows close encounters and collisions between massive bodies and is therefore suitable for planetary accretion simulations.

  18. Configuration-specific kinetic theory applied to an ideal binary gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Floyd L

    2006-10-05

    This paper is the second in a two-part series dealing with the configuration-specific analyses for molecular collision events of hard, spherical molecules at thermal equilibrium. The first paper analyzed a single-component system, and the reader is referred to it for the fundamental concepts. In this paper, the expressions for the configuration-specific collision frequencies and the average line-of-centers collision angles and speeds are derived for an ideal binary gas mixture. The analyses show that the average line-of-centers quantities are all dependent upon the ratio of the masses of the two components, but not upon molecular size. Of course, the configuration-specific collision frequencies do depend on molecular size. The expression for the overall binary collision frequency is a simple sum of the configuration-specific collision frequencies and is identical to the conventional expression.

  19. Puck collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  20. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  1. Interpolation and Approximation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaijser, Sten

    1991-01-01

    Introduced are the basic ideas of interpolation and approximation theory through a combination of theory and exercises written for extramural education at the university level. Topics treated are spline methods, Lagrange interpolation, trigonometric approximation, Fourier series, and polynomial approximation. (MDH)

  2. EVOLUTION OF A RING AROUND THE PLUTO–CHARON BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-08-10

    We consider the formation of satellites around the Pluto–Charon binary. An early collision between the two partners likely produced the binary and a narrow ring of debris, out of which arose the moons Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra. How the satellites emerged from the compact ring is uncertain. Here we show that a particle ring spreads from physical collisions and collective gravitational scattering, similar to migration. Around a binary, these processes take place in the reference frames of “most circular” orbits, akin to circular ones in a Keplerian potential. Ring particles damp to these orbits and avoid destructive collisions. Damping and diffusion also help particles survive dynamical instabilities driven by resonances with the binary. In some situations, particles become trapped near resonances that sweep outward with the tidal evolution of the Pluto–Charon binary. With simple models and numerical experiments, we show how the Pluto–Charon impact ring may have expanded into a broad disk, out of which grew the circumbinary moons. In some scenarios, the ring can spread well beyond the orbit of Hydra, the most distant moon, to form a handful of smaller satellites. If these small moons exist, New Horizons will find them.

  3. Evolution of a Ring around the Pluto-Charon Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2015-08-01

    We consider the formation of satellites around the Pluto-Charon binary. An early collision between the two partners likely produced the binary and a narrow ring of debris, out of which arose the moons Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra. How the satellites emerged from the compact ring is uncertain. Here we show that a particle ring spreads from physical collisions and collective gravitational scattering, similar to migration. Around a binary, these processes take place in the reference frames of “most circular” orbits, akin to circular ones in a Keplerian potential. Ring particles damp to these orbits and avoid destructive collisions. Damping and diffusion also help particles survive dynamical instabilities driven by resonances with the binary. In some situations, particles become trapped near resonances that sweep outward with the tidal evolution of the Pluto-Charon binary. With simple models and numerical experiments, we show how the Pluto-Charon impact ring may have expanded into a broad disk, out of which grew the circumbinary moons. In some scenarios, the ring can spread well beyond the orbit of Hydra, the most distant moon, to form a handful of smaller satellites. If these small moons exist, New Horizons will find them.

  4. Birth of Massive Black Hole Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Colpi, M.; Dotti, M.; Mayer, L.; Kazantzidis, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-19

    If massive black holes (BHs) are ubiquitous in galaxies and galaxies experience multiple mergers during their cosmic assembly, then BH binaries should be common albeit temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observationally, the paucity of active BH pairs points toward binary lifetimes far shorter than the Hubble time, indicating rapid inspiral of the BHs down to the domain where gravitational waves lead to their coalescence. Here, we review a series of studies on the dynamics of massive BHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers that underscore the vital role played by a cool, gaseous component in promoting the rapid formation of the BH binary. The BH binary is found to reside at the center of a massive self-gravitating nuclear disc resulting from the collision of the two gaseous discs present in the mother galaxies. Hardening by gravitational torques against gas in this grand disc is found to continue down to sub-parsec scales. The eccentricity decreases with time to zero and when the binary is circular, accretion sets in around the two BHs. When this occurs, each BH is endowed with it own small-size ({approx}< 0.01 pc) accretion disc comprising a few percent of the BH mass. Double AGN activity is expected to occur on an estimated timescale of {approx}< 1 Myr. The double nuclear point-like sources that may appear have typical separation of {approx}< 10 pc, and are likely to be embedded in the still ongoing starburst. We note that a potential threat of binary stalling, in a gaseous environment, may come from radiation and/or mechanical energy injections by the BHs. Only short-lived or sub-Eddington accretion episodes can guarantee the persistence of a dense cool gas structure around the binary necessary for continuing BH inspiral.

  5. Centrality dependence of particle production in p - Pb collisions at s NN = 5.02 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2015-06-08

    We report measurements of the primary charged-particle pseudorapidity density and transverse momentum distributions in p-Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV and investigate their correlation with experimental observables sensitive to the centrality of the collision. Centrality classes are defined by using different event-activity estimators, i.e., charged-particle multiplicities measured in three different pseudorapidity regions as well as the energy measured at beam rapidity (zero degree). The procedures to determine the centrality, quantified by the number of participants (Npart) or the number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions (Ncoll) are described. We show that, in contrast to Pb-Pb collisions, in p-Pb collisions large multiplicity fluctuations together withmore » the small range of participants available generate a dynamical bias in centrality classes based on particle multiplicity. We propose to use the zero-degree energy, which we expect not to introduce a dynamical bias, as an alternative event-centrality estimator. Based on zero-degree energy-centrality classes, the Npart dependence of particle production is studied. Under the assumption that the multiplicity measured in the Pb-going rapidity region scales with the number of Pb participants, an approximate independence of the multiplicity per participating nucleon measured at mid-rapidity of the number of participating nucleons is observed. Furthermore, at high-pT the p-Pb spectra are found to be consistent with the pp spectra scaled by Ncoll for all centrality classes. Our results represent valuable input for the study of the event-activity dependence of hard probes in p-Pb collisions and, hence, help to establish baselines for the interpretation of the Pb-Pb data.« less

  6. Centrality dependence of particle production in p-Pb collisions at sNN=5.02TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2015-06-08

    Here, we report measurements of the primary charged-particle pseudorapidity density and transverse momentum distributions in p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02TeV and investigate their correlation with experimental observables sensitive to the centrality of the collision. Centrality classes are defined by using different event-activity estimators, i.e., charged-particle multiplicities measured in three different pseudorapidity regions as well as the energy measured at beam rapidity (zero degree). The procedures to determine the centrality, quantified by the number of participants (Npart) or the number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions (Ncoll) are described. We show that, in contrast to Pb-Pb collisions, in p–Pb collisions large multiplicitymore » fluctuations together with the small range of participants available generate a dynamical bias in centrality classes based on particle multiplicity. We propose to use the zero-degree energy, which we expect not to introduce a dynamical bias, as an alternative event-centrality estimator. Based on zero-degree energy-centrality classes, the Npart dependence of particle production is studied. Under the assumption that the multiplicity measured in the Pb-going rapidity region scales with the number of Pb participants, an approximate independence of the multiplicity per participating nucleon measured at mid-rapidity of the number of participating nucleons is observed. Furthermore, at high-pT the p–Pb spectra are found to be consistent with the pp spectra scaled by Ncoll for all centrality classes. Our results represent valuable input for the study of the event-activity dependence of hard probes in p–Pb collisions and, hence, help to establish baselines for the interpretation of the Pb-Pb data.« less

  7. Centrality dependence of particle production in p -Pb collisions at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lokesh, K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petris, M.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We report measurements of the primary charged-particle pseudorapidity density and transverse momentum distributions in p -Pb collisions at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV and investigate their correlation with experimental observables sensitive to the centrality of the collision. Centrality classes are defined by using different event-activity estimators, i.e., charged-particle multiplicities measured in three different pseudorapidity regions as well as the energy measured at beam rapidity (zero degree). The procedures to determine the centrality, quantified by the number of participants (Npart) or the number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions (Ncoll) are described. We show that, in contrast to Pb-Pb collisions, in p -Pb collisions large multiplicity fluctuations together with the small range of participants available generate a dynamical bias in centrality classes based on particle multiplicity. We propose to use the zero-degree energy, which we expect not to introduce a dynamical bias, as an alternative event-centrality estimator. Based on zero-degree energy-centrality classes, the Npart dependence of particle production is studied. Under the assumption that the multiplicity measured in the Pb-going rapidity region scales with the number of Pb participants, an approximate independence of the multiplicity per participating nucleon measured at mid-rapidity of the number of participating nucleons is observed. Furthermore, at high-pT the p -Pb spectra are found to be consistent with the p p spectra scaled by Ncoll for all centrality classes. Our results represent valuable input for the study of the event-activity dependence of hard probes in p -Pb collisions and, hence, help to establish baselines for the interpretation of the Pb-Pb data.

  8. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-01

    The 'Restricted Collision List' (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke-Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  9. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-15

    The ‘Restricted Collision List’ (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke–Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  10. Collision orbits and chaos in the free-fall three-body problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, K.; Umehara, H.

    In this short report, the authors want to stress the chaotic nature of the final motions of the problem with reference to the distribution of binary collision curves and triple collision points. The calculation extends to the escapes at the first three collapses of the triple system. The Aarseth code to obtain the final motions is used.

  11. Computations of Drop Collision and Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Juric, Damir; Nas, Selman; Mortazavi, Saeed

    1996-01-01

    Computations of drops collisions, coalescence, and other problems involving drops are presented. The computations are made possible by a finite difference/front tracking technique that allows direct solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a multi-fluid system with complex, unsteady internal boundaries. This method has been used to examine the various collision modes for binary collisions of drops of equal size, mixing of two drops of unequal size, behavior of a suspension of drops in linear and parabolic shear flows, and the thermal migration of several drops. The key results from these simulations are reviewed. Extensions of the method to phase change problems and preliminary results for boiling are also shown.

  12. Search for Binary Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Grundy, W. M.; Ryan, E. L.; Benecchi, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have reexamined 41 Trojan asteroids observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to search for unresolved binaries. We have identified one candidate binary with a separation of 53 milliarcsec, about the width of the diffraction limited point-spread function (PSF). Sub-resolution-element detection of binaries is possible with HST because of the high signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the stability of the PSF. Identification and confirmation of binary Trojans is important because a Trojan Tour is one of five possible New Frontiers missions. A binary could constitute a potentially high value target because of the opportunity to study two objects and to test models of the primordial nature of binaries. The potential to derive mass-based physical information from the binary orbit could yield more clues to the origin of Trojans.

  13. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  14. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  15. Trompe L'Oeil 'binary' pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Finn, Lee S.; Wasserman, Ira

    1990-01-01

    A freely precessing pulsar produces pulse phase residuals which can mimic those of a pulsar in a binary orbit. In particular, discrete sets of phase residuals due to precessional motion of an isolated pulsar are sampled; it is shown that this data is well fit by residuals from a binary pulsar in a sufficiently tight orbit. Analytic and numerical relationships between the projected orbital size, a(p) sin i, and the orbital eccentricity, e, of a misidentified binary pulsar; are found the observations that would distinguish between these models are discussed. Regardless of the mechanism that causes the precession, the maximum amplitude of the phase residual is pi/2: consequently, a(p)sin i is (approximately) bounded by cP(puls)/4. The newly discovered 'binary' millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster 47 Tuc is discussed, and it is shown that the periodic frequency modulation reported cannot be explained by free precession.

  16. Capacitor-Chain Successive-Approximation ADC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    A proposed successive-approximation analog-to-digital converter (ADC) would contain a capacitively terminated chain of identical capacitor cells. Like a conventional successive-approximation ADC containing a bank of binary-scaled capacitors, the proposed ADC would store an input voltage on a sample-and-hold capacitor and would digitize the stored input voltage by finding the closest match between this voltage and a capacitively generated sum of binary fractions of a reference voltage (Vref). However, the proposed capacitor-chain ADC would offer two major advantages over a conventional binary-scaled-capacitor ADC: (1) In a conventional ADC that digitizes to n bits, the largest capacitor (representing the most significant bit) must have 2(exp n-1) times as much capacitance, and hence, approximately 2(exp n-1) times as much area as does the smallest capacitor (representing the least significant bit), so that the total capacitor area must be 2(exp n) times that of the smallest capacitor. In the proposed capacitor-chain ADC, there would be three capacitors per cell, each approximately equal to the smallest capacitor in the conventional ADC, and there would be one cell per bit. Therefore, the total capacitor area would be only about 3(exp n) times that of the smallest capacitor. The net result would be that the proposed ADC could be considerably smaller than the conventional ADC. (2) Because of edge effects, parasitic capacitances, and manufacturing tolerances, it is difficult to make capacitor banks in which the values of capacitance are scaled by powers of 2 to the required precision. In contrast, because all the capacitors in the proposed ADC would be identical, the problem of precise binary scaling would not arise.

  17. Parameter Biases Introduced by Approximate Gravitational Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Benjamin; Coughlin, Scott; Le, John; Skeehan, Connor; Kalogera, Vicky

    2013-04-01

    The production of the most accurate gravitational waveforms from compact binary mergers require Einstein's equations to be solved numerically, a process far too expensive to produce the ˜10^7 waveforms necessary to estimate the parameters of a measured gravitational wave signal. Instead, parameter estimation depends on approximate or phenomenological waveforms to characterize measured signals. As part of the Ninja collaboration, we study the biases introduced by these methods when estimating the parameters of numerically produced waveforms.

  18. Molecular vibrational states during a collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recamier, Jose A.; Jauregui, Rocio

    1995-01-01

    Alternative algebraic techniques to approximate a given Hamiltonian by a harmonic oscillator are described both for time-independent and time-dependent systems. We apply them to the description of a one dimensional atom-diatom collision. From the resulting evolution operator, we evaluate vibrational transition probabilities as well as other time-dependent properties. As expected, the ground vibrational state becomes a squeezed state during the collision.

  19. Suppression of hadrons with large transverse momentum in central Au+Au collisions at root square[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-01-14

    Transverse momentum spectra for charged hadrons and for neutral pions in the range 1 GeV/ccollisions at root square[s(NN)] = 130 GeV. At high p(T) the spectra from peripheral nuclear collisions are consistent with scaling the spectra from p+p collisions by the average number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The spectra from central collisions are significantly suppressed when compared to the binary-scaled p+p expectation, and also when compared to similarly binary-scaled peripheral collisions, indicating a novel nuclear-medium effect in central nuclear collisions at RHIC energies.

  20. PHOEBE: PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Matijevic, Gal; Latkovic, Olivera; Vilardell, Francesc; Wils, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability.

  1. Ωccc production in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hang; Liu, Yunpeng; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the production of Ωccc baryon in high energy nuclear collisions via quark coalescence mechanism. The wave function of Ωccc is solved from the Schrödinger equation for the bound state of three charm quarks by using the hyperspherical method. The production cross section of Ωccc per binary collision in a central Pb+Pb collision at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV reaches 9 nb, which is at least two orders of magnitude larger than that in a p+p collision at the same energy. Therefore, it is most probable to discover Ωccc in heavy ion collisions at LHC, and the observation will be a clear signature of the quark-gluon plasma formation.

  2. Collision risk management in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, A. B.; Peterson, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    A systematic method has been developed for managing long-term collision risk posed to operational satellites in geosynchronous orbit. Long-term collision risk reduction is achieved by proper selection of local collision probability thresholds that trigger actions to reduce risk. Such actions can be requests for more accurate orbital data, special sensor tasking, or collision avoidance maneuvers. The cost of collision risk reduction is measured by the frequency of actions taken to reduce the collision risk. This action frequency is dependent on the accuracy of the orbital data and the frequency of close approaches. A case study was performed for a set of satellites. The analysis used position error models for two-line element sets. A conjunction simulation was used to process approximately three years of archived orbital data, including publicly available two-line element sets, in order to generate conjunction statistics. From these results, a graphical representation called a χ-plot was generated. This plot permits the selection of thresholds as a function of total risk reduction and tolerable action frequency. Results of the study indicate that collision risk management in geosynchronous orbit can be very costly using data of insufficiently high accuracy, because data errors induce high action frequency for even modest amounts of collision risk reduction.

  3. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  4. Approximate learning algorithm in Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2009-11-01

    Boltzmann machines can be regarded as Markov random fields. For binary cases, they are equivalent to the Ising spin model in statistical mechanics. Learning systems in Boltzmann machines are one of the NP-hard problems. Thus, in general we have to use approximate methods to construct practical learning algorithms in this context. In this letter, we propose new and practical learning algorithms for Boltzmann machines by using the belief propagation algorithm and the linear response approximation, which are often referred as advanced mean field methods. Finally, we show the validity of our algorithm using numerical experiments.

  5. Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. |; Solovev, E.A.

    1999-08-01

    Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom{endash}negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 ); Solovev, E.A. )

    1999-08-01

    Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom[endash]negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  7. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  8. Life and Death of Binaries Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, J. G.

    2002-09-01

    On any astronomical timescale, binaries near the Galactic Center are strongly affected by interactions with their environment. We shall consider these processes. The high density of stars and possibly WIMPS (weakly interacting, massive particles) cause interactions that change the semimajor axes and eccentricities of the binaries. Interactions with more massive stars may, through exchange collisions, lead to a progressive increase in the masses of the binary components. Some binaries are destroyed through the coalescence of their components due to the high eccentricity that they attain. Others will be destroyed by encounters with energetic intruders that are capable of dissociating the binaries. The binaries that most easily surivive in this hostile environment have small semimajor axes and only white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole components,as such objects have little chance of coalescence under normal circumstances. These compact objects are also massive enough compared to the mass of the average star near the Galactic center that there is much less danger of their binary being disrupted in an encounter. Even binaries with compact companions have short lifetimes if their semimajor axes are less than 2 A.U. because they are forced into coalescence by the emission of gravitational radiation. The tidal field of the central black hole will distrupt binaries that pass close enough to it. If WIMPS make up any sizeable fraction of the mass density at the Galactic Center, they will cause a steady contraction of the semimajor axes of the binaries that may be measurable if one binary component is a pulsar.

  9. Irradiation-induced composition patterns in binary solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, Santosh; El-Azab, Anter

    2013-09-28

    A theoretical/computational model for the irradiation-driven compositional instabilities in binary solid solutions has been developed. The model is suitable for investigating the behavior of structural alloys and metallic nuclear fuels in a reactor environment as well as the response of alloy thin films to ion beam irradiation. The model is based on a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the dynamics of vacancies, interstitials, and lattice atoms under irradiation. The dynamics of these species includes the stochastic generation of defects by collision cascades as well as the defect reactions and diffusion. The atomic fluxes in this model are derived based on the transitions of lattice defects. The set of reaction-diffusion equations are stiff, hence a stiffly stable method, also known as the Gear method, has been used to numerically approximate the equations. For the Cu-Au alloy in the solid solution regime, the model results demonstrate the formation of compositional patterns under high-temperature particle irradiation, with Fourier space properties (Fourier spectrum, average wavelength, and wavevector) depending on the cascade damage characteristics, average composition, and irradiation temperature.

  10. MODELING FLOWS AROUND MERGING BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Meter, James R.; Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Wise, John H.; Miller, M. Coleman; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2010-03-10

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies. The final stages of the black hole coalescence produce strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. In cases where the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a step toward solving this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, three-dimensional general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We find qualitative differences in collision and outflow speeds, including a signature of the merger when the net angular momentum of the matter is low, between the results from single and binary black holes, and between nonrotating and rotating holes in binaries. If future magnetohydrodynamic results confirm these differences, it may allow assessment of the properties of the binaries as well as yielding an identifiable electromagnetic counterpart to the attendant gravitational wave signal.

  11. A binary main-belt comet.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Jessica; Jewitt, David; Mutchler, Max; Weaver, Harold; Larson, Stephen

    2017-09-20

    Asteroids are primitive Solar System bodies that evolve both collisionally and through disruptions arising from rapid rotation. These processes can lead to the formation of binary asteroids and to the release of dust, both directly and, in some cases, through uncovering frozen volatiles. In a subset of the asteroids called main-belt comets, the sublimation of excavated volatiles causes transient comet-like activity. Torques exerted by sublimation measurably influence the spin rates of active comets and might lead to the splitting of bilobate comet nuclei. The kilometre-sized main-belt asteroid 288P (300163) showed activity for several months around its perihelion 2011 (ref. 11), suspected to be sustained by the sublimation of water ice and supported by rapid rotation, while at least one component rotates slowly with a period of 16 hours (ref. 14). The object 288P is part of a young family of at least 11 asteroids that formed from a precursor about 10 kilometres in diameter during a shattering collision 7.5 million years ago. Here we report that 288P is a binary main-belt comet. It is different from the known asteroid binaries in its combination of wide separation, near-equal component size, high eccentricity and comet-like activity. The observations also provide strong support for sublimation as the driver of activity in 288P and show that sublimation torques may play an important part in binary orbit evolution.

  12. A binary main-belt comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Jessica; Jewitt, David; Mutchler, Max; Weaver, Harold; Larson, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    Asteroids are primitive Solar System bodies that evolve both collisionally and through disruptions arising from rapid rotation. These processes can lead to the formation of binary asteroids and to the release of dust, both directly and, in some cases, through uncovering frozen volatiles. In a subset of the asteroids called main-belt comets, the sublimation of excavated volatiles causes transient comet-like activity. Torques exerted by sublimation measurably influence the spin rates of active comets and might lead to the splitting of bilobate comet nuclei. The kilometre-sized main-belt asteroid 288P (300163) showed activity for several months around its perihelion 2011 (ref. 11), suspected to be sustained by the sublimation of water ice and supported by rapid rotation, while at least one component rotates slowly with a period of 16 hours (ref. 14). The object 288P is part of a young family of at least 11 asteroids that formed from a precursor about 10 kilometres in diameter during a shattering collision 7.5 million years ago. Here we report that 288P is a binary main-belt comet. It is different from the known asteroid binaries in its combination of wide separation, near-equal component size, high eccentricity and comet-like activity. The observations also provide strong support for sublimation as the driver of activity in 288P and show that sublimation torques may play an important part in binary orbit evolution.

  13. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  14. Approximation of Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    Approximation of laws is an important theme in the philosophy of science. If we can make sense of the idea that two scientific laws are "close" to each other, then we can also analyze such methodological notions as approximate explanation of laws, approximate reduction of theories, approximate empirical success of theories, and approximate truth of laws. Proposals for measuring the distance between quantitative scientific laws were given in Niiniluoto (1982, 1987). In this paper, these definitions are reconsidered as a response to the interesting critical remarks by Liu (1999).

  15. THE ROLE OF KOZAI CYCLES IN NEAR-EARTH BINARY ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-03-15

    We investigate the Kozai mechanism in the context of near-Earth binaries and the Sun. The Kozai effect can lead to changes in eccentricity and inclination of the binary orbit, but it can be weakened or completely suppressed by other sources of pericenter precession, such as the oblateness of the primary body. Through numerical integrations including primary oblateness and three bodies (the two binary components and the Sun), we show that Kozai cycles cannot occur for the closely separated near-Earth binaries in our sample. We demonstrate that this is due to pericenter precession around the oblate primary, even for very small oblateness values. Since the majority of observed near-Earth binaries are not well separated, we predict that Kozai cycles do not play an important role in the orbital evolution of most near-Earth binaries. For a hypothetical wide binary modeled after 1998 ST27, the separation is large at 16 primary radii and so the orbital effects of primary oblateness are lessened. For this wide binary, we illustrate the possible excursions in eccentricity and inclination due to Kozai cycles as well as depict stable orientations for the binary's orbital plane. Unstable orientations lead to collisions between binary components, and we suggest that the Kozai effect acting in wide binaries may be a route to the formation of near-Earth contact binaries.

  16. The extreme Kuiper Belt binary 2001 QW322.

    PubMed

    Petit, J-M; Kavelaars, J J; Gladman, B J; Margot, J L; Nicholson, P D; Jones, R L; Parker, J Wm; Ashby, M L N; Bagatin, A Campo; Benavidez, P; Coffey, J; Rousselot, P; Mousis, O; Taylor, P A

    2008-10-17

    The study of binary Kuiper Belt objects helps to probe the dynamic conditions present during planet formation in the solar system. We report on the mutual-orbit determination of 2001 QW322, a Kuiper Belt binary with a very large separation whose properties challenge binary-formation and -evolution theories. Six years of tracking indicate that the binary's mutual-orbit period is approximately 25 to 30 years, that the orbit pole is retrograde and inclined 50 degrees to 62 degrees from the ecliptic plane, and, most surprisingly, that the mutual orbital eccentricity is <0.4. The semimajor axis of 105,000 to 135,000 kilometers is 10 times that of other near-equal-mass binaries. Because this weakly bound binary is prone to orbital disruption by interlopers, its lifetime in its present state is probably less than 1 billion years.

  17. Case A Binary Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C A; Eggleton, P P

    2001-03-28

    We undertake a comparison of observed Algol-type binaries with a library of computed Case A binary evolution tracks. The library consists of 5500 binary tracks with various values of initial primary mass M{sub 10}, mass ratio q{sub 0}, and period P{sub 0}, designed to sample the phase-space of Case A binaries in the range -0.10 {le} log M{sub 10} {le} 1.7. Each binary is evolved using a standard code with the assumption that both total mass and orbital angular momentum are conserved. This code follows the evolution of both stars until the point where contact or reverse mass transfer occurs. The resulting binary tracks show a rich variety of behavior which we sort into several subclasses of Case A and Case B. We present the results of this classification, the final mass ratio and the fraction of time spent in Roche Lobe overflow for each binary system. The conservative assumption under which we created this library is expected to hold for a broad range of binaries, where both components have spectra in the range G0 to B1 and luminosity class III - V. We gather a list of relatively well-determined observed hot Algol-type binaries meeting this criterion, as well as a list of cooler Algol-type binaries where we expect significant dynamo-driven mass loss and angular momentum loss. We fit each observed binary to our library of tracks using a {chi}{sup 2}-minimizing procedure. We find that the hot Algols display overall acceptable {chi}{sup 2}, confirming the conservative assumption, while the cool Algols show much less acceptable {chi}{sup 2} suggesting the need for more free parameters, such as mass and angular momentum loss.

  18. Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    We proposed to search for high-temperature, flare-produced Fe XXIII line emission from active cool star binary systems using the ALEXIS all-sky survey. Previous X-ray transient searches with ARIEL V and HEAO-1, and subsequent shorter duration monitoring with the GINGA and EXOSAT satellites demonstrated that active binaries can produce large (EM approximately equals 10(exp 55-56/cu cm) X-ray flares lasting several hours or longer. Hot plasma from these flares at temperatures of 10(exp 7)K or more should produce Fe XXIII line emission at lambda = 132.8 A, very near the peak response of ALEXIS telescopes 1A and 2A. Our primary goals were to estimate flare frequency for the largest flares in the active binary systems, and, if the data permitted, to derive a distribution of flare energy vs. frequency for the sample as a whole. After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent L(sub EUV).

  19. Collision Repair Campaign

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  20. Approximate symmetries of Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Christopher T.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-08-01

    We explore the relationship between approximate symmetries of a gapped Hamiltonian and the structure of its ground space. We start by considering approximate symmetry operators, defined as unitary operators whose commutators with the Hamiltonian have norms that are sufficiently small. We show that when approximate symmetry operators can be restricted to the ground space while approximately preserving certain mutual commutation relations. We generalize the Stone-von Neumann theorem to matrices that approximately satisfy the canonical (Heisenberg-Weyl-type) commutation relations and use this to show that approximate symmetry operators can certify the degeneracy of the ground space even though they only approximately form a group. Importantly, the notions of "approximate" and "small" are all independent of the dimension of the ambient Hilbert space and depend only on the degeneracy in the ground space. Our analysis additionally holds for any gapped band of sufficiently small width in the excited spectrum of the Hamiltonian, and we discuss applications of these ideas to topological quantum phases of matter and topological quantum error correcting codes. Finally, in our analysis, we also provide an exponential improvement upon bounds concerning the existence of shared approximate eigenvectors of approximately commuting operators under an added normality constraint, which may be of independent interest.

  1. The formation of eccentric compact binary inspirals and the role of gravitational wave emission in binary-single stellar encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-03-20

    The inspiral and merger of eccentric binaries leads to gravitational waveforms distinct from those generated by circularly merging binaries. Dynamical environments can assemble binaries with high eccentricity and peak frequencies within the LIGO band. In this paper, we study binary-single stellar scatterings occurring in dense stellar systems as a source of eccentrically inspiraling binaries. Many interactions between compact binaries and single objects are characterized by chaotic resonances in which the binary-single system undergoes many exchanges before reaching a final state. During these chaotic resonances, a pair of objects has a non-negligible probability of experiencing a very close passage. Significant orbital energy and angular momentum are carried away from the system by gravitational wave (GW) radiation in these close passages, and in some cases this implies an inspiral time shorter than the orbital period of the bound third body. We derive the cross section for such dynamical inspiral outcomes through analytical arguments and through numerical scattering experiments including GW losses. We show that the cross section for dynamical inspirals grows with increasing target binary semi-major axis a and that for equal-mass binaries it scales as a {sup 2/7}. Thus, we expect wide target binaries to predominantly contribute to the production of these relativistic outcomes. We estimate that eccentric inspirals account for approximately 1% of dynamically assembled non-eccentric merging binaries. While these events are rare, we show that binary-single scatterings are a more effective formation channel than single-single captures for the production of eccentrically inspiraling binaries, even given modest binary fractions.

  2. FORMATION OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N.; Heinke, C. O.; Woods, T. E.; Chaichenets, S.; Fregeau, J.; Lombardi, J. C.

    2010-07-10

    Inspired by the recent identification in extragalactic globular clusters of the first candidate black hole-white dwarf (BH-WD) X-ray binaries, where the compact accretors may be stellar-mass black holes (BHs), we explore how such binaries could be formed in a dynamical environment. We provide analyses of the formation rates via well-known formation channels like binary exchange and physical collisions and propose that the only possibility of forming BH-WD binaries is via coupling these usual formation channels with subsequent hardening and/or triple formation. In particular, we find that the most important mechanism for the creation of a BH-WD X-ray binary from an initially dynamically formed BH-WD binary is mass transfer induced in a triple system via the Kozai mechanism. Furthermore, we find that BH-WD binaries that evolve into X-ray sources can be formed by exchanges of a BH into a WD-WD binary or possibly by collisions of a BH and a giant star. If BHs undergo significant evaporation from the cluster or form a completely detached subcluster of BHs, then we cannot match the observationally inferred production rates even using the most optimistic estimates of formation rates. To explain the observations with stellar-mass BH-WD binaries, at least 1% of all formed BHs, or presumably 10% of the BHs present in the core now, must be involved in interactions with the rest of the core stellar population.

  3. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  4. PLANET FORMATION IN HIGHLY INCLINED BINARY SYSTEMS. I. PLANETESIMALS JUMP INWARD AND PILE UP

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Jiwei; Zhou Jilin; Payne, Matthew J.; Ge Jian; Thebault, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    Most detected planet-bearing binaries are in wide orbits, for which a high inclination, i{sub B} , between the binary orbital plane and the plane of the planetary disk around the primary is likely to be common. In this paper, we investigate the intermediate stages-from planetesimals to planetary embryos/cores-of planet formation in such highly inclined cases. Our focus is on the effects of gas drag on the planetesimals' orbital evolution, in particular on the evolution of the planetesimals' semimajor axis distribution and their mutual relative velocities. We first demonstrate that a non-evolving axisymmetric disk model is a good approximation for studying the effects of gas drag on a planetesimal in the highly inclined case (30 deg. < i{sub B} < 150 deg.). We then find that gas drag plays a crucial role, and the results can be generally divided into two categories, i.e., the Kozai-on regime and the Kozai-off regime, depending on the specific value of i{sub B} . For both regimes, a robust outcome over a wide range of parameters is that planetesimals migrate/jump inward and pile up, leading to a severely truncated and dense planetesimal disk around the primary. In this compact and dense disk, collision rates are high but relative velocities are low, providing conditions that are favorable for planetesimal growth and potentially allow for the subsequent formation of planets.

  5. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  6. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  7. Binary Galaxies in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Peter Shun Sang

    1994-01-01

    CCD images of the binary-rich clusters of galaxies A373, A408, A667, A890, and A1250 taken at the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope show that about half the binary galaxies' are actually star-galaxy or star-star pairs. These clusters are not binary-rich. N-body simulations are used to study the effect of static cluster potentials on binary and single galaxies. The softening procedure is discussed in detail. Since Plummer softening is not self-consistent, and since the force laws for various other density models are similar to each other, uniform-density softening is used. The choice of the theoretical galaxy model in terms of the potential at various locations. A fixed cluster potential cannot stabilize binary galaxies against merger, but can disrupt even quite tightly bound binaries. A moderately good predictor of whether a binary merges or disrupts is the mean torque over a quarter of the initial binary period. But the dynamics of the situation is quite complicated, and depends on an interplay between the motion of the binary through the cluster and the absorption of orbital energy by the galaxies. There is also a substantial amount of mass loss. Simulations of single galaxies in cluster show that this mass loss is due mainly to the cluster potential, and not to an interplay between the merging binary and the cluster. This mass loss is driven partially by virial equilibrium responding to the initial tidal truncation by the cluster. Besides verifying some general results of mass loss from satellite systems in the tidal field of larger bodies, it was found that the galaxy loses mass at an exponential rate.

  8. Simulated Ten Pin Bowling Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Jacob; Howald, Craig

    2011-04-01

    This work investigates the results of the dynamics in the collisions that occur in ten pin bowling. A finite element modeling system (LS-Dyna) was used to construct simplified but approximately physically realistic models and simulate collisions involving the twelve body system composed of a ball, ten pins, and a floor. The investigation focuses on the qualitative features of the map of final pin configuration as a function of the initial conditions. To appropriately limit the breadth of the initial configuration space investigated, the only variables adjusted were the position of the ball upon entering the pins and the initial angle of velocity relative to the long axis of the lane. Results concerning the size and shape of the sets of initial conditions that lead to similar final configurations, in particular those leading to none of the pins remaining standing (aka "strikes"), are shown.

  9. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  10. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  11. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  12. Green Ampt approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Li, L.; Jeng, D.-S.; Crapper, M.

    2005-10-01

    The solution to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is expressible in terms of the Lambert W-1 function. Approximations for Green and Ampt infiltration are thus derivable from approximations for the W-1 function and vice versa. An infinite family of asymptotic expansions to W-1 is presented. Although these expansions do not converge near the branch point of the W function (corresponds to Green-Ampt infiltration with immediate ponding), a method is presented for approximating W-1 that is exact at the branch point and asymptotically, with interpolation between these limits. Some existing and several new simple and compact yet robust approximations applicable to Green-Ampt infiltration and flux are presented, the most accurate of which has a maximum relative error of 5 × 10 -5%. This error is orders of magnitude lower than any existing analytical approximations.

  13. Tidal torques on infrequently colliding particle disks in binary systems and the truncation of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Lecar, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions leading to the truncation, at the 2:1 resonance, of a disk of infrequently colliding particles surrounding the primary of a binary system are studied numerically and analytically. Attention is given to the case in which the mass ratio, q, is sufficiently small (less than about 0.1) and the radius of the disk centered on the primary allowably larger, so that first-order orbit-orbit resonances between ring material and the secondary can lie within it. Collisions are found to be less frequent than q to the -2/3 power orbital periods (the period of the forced eccentricity at the 2:1 resonance), and truncation occurs and Kirkwood gaps are produced only if the particle eccentricity is less than some critical value, estimated to be of order q to the 5/9 power, or approximately 0.02 for the sun-Jupiter case having q equal to 10 to the -3rd power.

  14. Tidal torques on infrequently colliding particle disks in binary systems and the truncation of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Lecar, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions leading to the truncation, at the 2:1 resonance, of a disk of infrequently colliding particles surrounding the primary of a binary system are studied numerically and analytically. Attention is given to the case in which the mass ratio, q, is sufficiently small (less than about 0.1) and the radius of the disk centered on the primary allowably larger, so that first-order orbit-orbit resonances between ring material and the secondary can lie within it. Collisions are found to be less frequent than q to the -2/3 power orbital periods (the period of the forced eccentricity at the 2:1 resonance), and truncation occurs and Kirkwood gaps are produced only if the particle eccentricity is less than some critical value, estimated to be of order q to the 5/9 power, or approximately 0.02 for the sun-Jupiter case having q equal to 10 to the -3rd power.

  15. Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, B. V.

    In high energy p-p and alpha-alpha collisions, baryons are observed predominantly at rapidities near those of target and projectile; the mean rapidity shift of projectile and target nucleons is approximately one unit. In the central rapidity region, the number of baryons is quite small. In fact, the number of baryons and antibaryons is rather similar, indicating that most of these baryons are CREATED particles rather than projectile and target fragments. Antibaryon production is of interest in heavy ion collisions as enhanced antiquark production has been predicted as a potential signature of quark-gluon plasma formation. Antibaryons also provide a sensitive probe of the hadronic environment, via annihilation and/or mean field effects upon their final distributions. However, the collision dynamics also affect the baryon and antibaryon distributions. Baryons are more shifted toward midrapidity in nucleus-nucleus and p-p nucleus collisions than in p-p collisions, increasing the probability of annihilating the antibaryons. The interpretation of antibaryon yields is further complicated by collective processes which may take place in the dense hadronic medium formed in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Jahns and coworkers have shown that multistep processes can increase antibaryon production near threshold. Antiproton production is clearly very interesting, but is sensitive to a combination of processes taking place in the collision. The final number of observed antiprotons depends on the balance between mechanisms for extra antiproton production beyond those from the individual nucleon-nucleon collisions and annihilation with surrounding baryons. We can hope to sort out these things by systematic studies, varying the system size and beam energy. I will review what is known about antiproton production at both the AGS and SPS, and look at trends going from p-p to p-nucleus to nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  16. Frankenstein's glue: transition functions for approximate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolás

    2007-09-01

    Approximations are commonly employed to find approximate solutions to the Einstein equations. These solutions, however, are usually only valid in some specific spacetime region. A global solution can be constructed by gluing approximate solutions together, but this procedure is difficult because discontinuities can arise, leading to large violations of the Einstein equations. In this paper, we provide an attempt to formalize this gluing scheme by studying transition functions that join approximate analytic solutions together. In particular, we propose certain sufficient conditions on these functions and prove that these conditions guarantee that the joined solution still satisfies the Einstein equations analytically to the same order as the approximate ones. An example is also provided for a binary system of non-spinning black holes, where the approximate solutions are taken to be given by a post-Newtonian expansion and a perturbed Schwarzschild solution. For this specific case, we show that if the transition functions satisfy the proposed conditions, then the joined solution does not contain any violations to the Einstein equations larger than those already inherent in the approximations. We further show that if these functions violate the proposed conditions, then the matter content of the spacetime is modified by the introduction of a matter shell, whose stress energy tensor depends on derivatives of these functions.

  17. Delta-ray production in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.E.; Toburen, L.H.

    1980-07-01

    The stochastic energy concentrations randomly deposited in submicron volumes in and near the paths of charged particles is needed. Computational methods, especially Monte Carlo methods, required a comprehensive set of basic interaction cross sections for the primary and all secondary radiation products. Of particular importance for high LET radiations are the cross sections for the production of energetic secondary electrons, delta-rays, in primary ionizing events. In this paper, we review the present state of available data on the production of delta-rays by fast positive ions in collision with targets of biological interest. The systematics in the cross sections for proton ionization of molecular targets are discussed, indicating what scaling is possible and summarizing what can be concluded regarding the dependence of the mean delta-ray energies on the chemical makeup of the medium. A comparison of typical data is made with the binary-encounter approximation to illustrate the limitations of this theoretical treatment of the ionization process. A bibliography of relevant published works on this topic is included.

  18. Taming the binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, D.

    2008-07-01

    Astrometric binaries are both a gold mine and a nightmare. They are a gold mine because they are sometimes the unique source of orbital inclination for spectroscopic binaries, thus making it possible for astrophysicists to get some clues about the mass of the often invisible secondary. However, this is an ideal situation in the sense that one benefits from the additional knowledge that it is a binary for which some orbital parameters are somehow secured (e.g. the orbital period). On the other hand, binaries are a nightmare, especially when their binary nature is not established yet. Indeed, in such cases, depending on the time interval covered by the observations compared to the orbital period, either the parallax or the proper motion can be severely biased if the successive positions of the binary are modelled assuming it is a single star. With large survey campaigns sometimes monitoring some stars for the first time ever, it is therefore crucial to design robust reduction pipelines in which such troublesome objects are quickly identified and either removed or processed accordingly. Finally, even if an object is known not to be a single star, the binary model might turn out not to be the most appropriate for describing the observations. These different situations will be covered.

  19. Gravitational Wave Physics with Binary Love Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves from the late inspiral of neutron star binaries encode rich information about their internal structure at supranuclear densities through their tidal deformabilities. However, extracting the individual tidal deformabilities of the components of a binary is challenging with future ground-based gravitational wave interferometers due to degeneracies between them. We overcome this difficulty by finding new, approximate universal relations between the individual tidal deformabilities that depend on the mass ratio of the two stars and are insensitive to their internal structure. Such relations have applications not only to gravitational wave astrophysics, but also to nuclear physics as they improve the measurement accuracy of tidal parameters. Moreover, the relations improve our ability to test extreme gravity and perform cosmology with gravitational waves emitted from neutron star binaries.

  20. Fluctuating initial conditions in heavy ion collisions from the Glauber approach

    SciTech Connect

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Bozek, Piotr; Rybczynski, Maciej

    2007-11-15

    In the framework of the Glauber approach applied to the initial stage of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions we analyze the shape parameters of the early-formed system (fireball) and their event-by-event fluctuations. We test a variety of models: the conventional wounded-nucleon model, a model admixing binary collisions to the wounded nucleons, a model with hot spots, and the hot-spot model where the deposition of energy occurs with a superimposed probability distribution. We look in detail at the so-called participant harmonic moments, {epsilon}*, obtained by an averaging procedure where in each event the system is translated to its center of mass and aligned with the major principal axis of the ellipse of inertia. Quantitative comparisons indicate substantial relative effects for {epsilon}* in variants of Glauber models. However, the dependence of the scaled standard deviation {delta}{epsilon}*/, {epsilon}* on the chosen model is weak. For all models the values range from about 0.5 for the central collisions to about 0.3-0.4 for peripheral collisions, for both gold-gold and copper-copper collisions. They are dominated by statistics and change only by 10-15% from model to model. We provide an approximate analytic expansion for the harmonic moments and their fluctuations given in terms of the fixed-axes moments. For central collisions and in the absence of correlations the expansion gives the simple formula {delta}{epsilon}*/{epsilon}*{approx_equal}{radical}(4/{pi}-1)=0.52. Similarly, we obtain expansions for the radial profiles of the higher harmonics. We investigate the relevance of the shape-fluctuation effects for jet quenching and find them important only for very central events. Finally, we make some comments of relevance for hydrodynamics, the elliptic flow, and its fluctuations. We argue how smooth hydrodynamics leads to the known result v{sub 4}{approx}v{sub 2}{sup 2} and, further, to the prediction {delta}v{sub 4}/v{sub 4}=2{delta}v{sub 2}/v{sub 2}.

  1. Tidal Evolution of Solar System Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Patrick A.; Margot, J. L.

    2007-10-01

    We approximate tidal evolution timescales for small (radius < 200 km), rocky bodies [1, 2] following a fission event, interpreted here as any process resulting in the placement of mass into orbit above the synchronous height, and explicitly calculate timescales for well-characterized systems. Binaries with nearly equal mass components orbit within 6 primary radii and have likely fully despun rapidly while smaller secondaries despin more slowly and end their tidal evolution at wider separations. The final separation of the components is limited by the conversion of spin to orbital angular momentum. Binary systems with separations beyond this limit require a different formation mechanism such as n-body capture. The product μQ, where μ is the rigidity and Q is the tidal dissipation factor, combines the idealized elastic properties of the asteroid that affect the tidal strength. Since binaries in the Main Belt must evolve to their current configuration within the age of the Solar System, a binary near this limit would place an upper bound on μQ for the system. Precise orbit, density, and component size information are required because ten percent errors in primary radius and density can cause approximately 20 and 25 percent changes in μQ, respectively. Assuming μQ of 1011 N/m2, many near-Earth binaries, if produced through fission, have tidally evolved for longer than their typical dynamical lifetime of 10 My [3]. This implies that either these binaries were formed prior to injection into the near-Earth region or μQ is at least an order of magnitude smaller than assumed, which might occur for highly fractured or rubble pile bodies. The effect of a non-spherical primary is also analyzed. [1] A. W. Harris and W. R. Ward, AREPS, 10, 1982. [2] S. J. Weidenschilling et al., in Asteroids II, 1989. [3] B. J. Gladman et al., Science, 277, 1997.

  2. Binary frequency and origin of the OB runaway stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, D.R.; Bolton, C.T.

    1986-06-01

    A radial velocity survey of the bright northern OB runaway stars has been undertaken to determine the frequency of binary stars in this high-velocity group. A total of 634 high-dispersion spectrograms of 36 proposed runaway stars were obtained over a two year period. Approximately half of the stars are velocity-variable; these include seven spectroscopic binaries, one possible beta-Cephei variable, and 10 stars with emission lines in their spectra. The latter group contains seven of the eight Be stars observed and three luminous O stars, and it is argued that their variability is caused by nonradial pulsation. Fifteen of the program stars have a peculiar radial velocity greater than 30 km/s; five others are probable runaways on the basis of distance from the galactic plane and proper motion. Only two of the confirmed and probable runaways, HD 3950 and HD 198846 (Y Cyg), are binaries, and both are double-lines systems. New orbital elements are presented for HD 3950 and the five new binary systems found among the low-velocity stars. The statisical methods used to assess velocity variability and periodic signals are described in detail. The higher fractional abundance of runaways among more massive stars, their binary frequency, and the properties of the runaway binaries suggest that they obtained their high velocities through single-binary, binary-binary, or n-body close encounters during the early dynamical evolution of associations. 208 references.

  3. Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    RD-A1II58 265 INTRINSIC NILPOTENT APPROXIMATION(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST 1/2 OF TECH CAMBRIDGE LAB FOR INFORMATION AND, DECISION UMCLRSSI SYSTEMS C...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER LIDS-R-1482 7. AUTHOR(.) S...certain infinite-dimensional filtered Lie algebras L by (finite-dimensional) graded nilpotent Lie algebras or g . where x E M, (x,,Z) E T*M/O. It

  4. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  5. Spectra of identified particles, geometry categorization and bias and global observables in d + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    Geometry selection in d + Au / p + Pb collisions is crucial for understanding the physics underlying modified nuclear parton distribution functions, gluon saturation or shadowing, initial state energy loss, and possible hydrodynamic flow in these small systems. The PHENIX Collaboration tests for auto-correlation biases in the geometry determination in small collision systems. These biases are well understood and an order of magnitude smaller at RHIC as compared to the LHC. As a result, auto-correlation biases are unable to describe the suppression of high transverse momentum (pT) π0's seen in the ratio of central-to-peripheral d + Au collisions. The centrality dependent d + Au pion, kaon and proton yields relative to binary collision-scaled p + p yields are also reported, including the high pTπ0 and KS0. At intermediate pT, between 2and 5GeV / c, baryons are enhanced in central d + Au collisions. The baryon enhancement is present in d + Au and Au + Au collisions and increases with centrality. We compare identified particle yields in peripheral Au + Au collisions to central d + Au collisions that have a comparable number of participants and binary collisions. The pT dependence of this ratio is strikingly similar for mesons and baryons.

  6. STELLAR COLLISIONS AND BLUE STRAGGLER STARS IN DENSE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert

    2013-11-10

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are abundantly observed in all Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) where data exist. However, observations alone cannot reveal the relative importance of various formation channels or the typical formation times for this well-studied population of anomalous stars. Using a state-of-the-art Hénon-type Monte Carlo code that includes all relevant physical processes, we create 128 models with properties typical of the observed GGCs. These models include realistic numbers of single and binary stars, use observationally motivated initial conditions, and span large ranges in central density, concentration, binary fraction, and mass. Their properties can be directly compared with those of observed GGCs. We can easily identify the BSSs in our models and determine their formation channels and birth times. We find that for central densities above ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉} pc{sup –3}, the dominant formation channel is stellar collisions, while for lower density clusters, mass transfer in binaries provides a significant contribution (up to 60% in our models). The majority of these collisions are binary-mediated, occurring during three-body and four-body interactions. As a result, a strong correlation between the specific frequency of BSSs and the binary fraction in a cluster can be seen in our models. We find that the number of BSSs in the core shows only a weak correlation with the collision rate estimator Γ traditionally used by observers, in agreement with the latest Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data. Using an idealized 'full mixing' prescription for collision products, our models indicate that the BSSs observed today may have formed several Gyr ago. However, denser clusters tend to have younger (∼1 Gyr) BSSs.

  7. Stellar Collisions and Blue Straggler Stars in Dense Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert

    2013-11-01

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are abundantly observed in all Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) where data exist. However, observations alone cannot reveal the relative importance of various formation channels or the typical formation times for this well-studied population of anomalous stars. Using a state-of-the-art Hénon-type Monte Carlo code that includes all relevant physical processes, we create 128 models with properties typical of the observed GGCs. These models include realistic numbers of single and binary stars, use observationally motivated initial conditions, and span large ranges in central density, concentration, binary fraction, and mass. Their properties can be directly compared with those of observed GGCs. We can easily identify the BSSs in our models and determine their formation channels and birth times. We find that for central densities above ~103 M ⊙ pc-3, the dominant formation channel is stellar collisions, while for lower density clusters, mass transfer in binaries provides a significant contribution (up to 60% in our models). The majority of these collisions are binary-mediated, occurring during three-body and four-body interactions. As a result, a strong correlation between the specific frequency of BSSs and the binary fraction in a cluster can be seen in our models. We find that the number of BSSs in the core shows only a weak correlation with the collision rate estimator Γ traditionally used by observers, in agreement with the latest Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data. Using an idealized "full mixing" prescription for collision products, our models indicate that the BSSs observed today may have formed several Gyr ago. However, denser clusters tend to have younger (~1 Gyr) BSSs.

  8. Formation of Tidal Captures and Gravitational Wave Inspirals in Binary-single Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    We perform the first systematic study of how dynamical stellar tides and general relativistic (GR) effects affect the dynamics and outcomes of binary-single interactions. For this, we have constructed an N-body code that includes tides in the affine approximation, where stars are modeled as self-similar ellipsoidal polytropes, and GR corrections using the commonly used post-Newtonian formalism. Using this numerical formalism, we are able resolve the leading effect from tides and GR across several orders of magnitude in both stellar radius and initial target binary separation. We find that the main effect from tides is the formation of two-body tidal captures that form during the chaotic and resonant evolution of the triple system. The two stars undergoing the capture spiral in and merge. The inclusion of tides can thus lead to an increase in the stellar coalescence rate. We also develop an analytical framework for calculating the cross section of tidal inspirals between any pair of objects with similar mass. From our analytical and numerical estimates, we find that the rate of tidal inspirals relative to collisions increases as the initial semimajor axis of the target binary increases and the radius of the interacting tidal objects decreases. The largest effect is therefore found for triple systems hosting white dwarfs and neutron stars (NSs). In this case, we find the rate of highly eccentric white dwarf—NS mergers to likely be dominated by tidal inspirals. While tidal inspirals occur rarely, we note that they can give rise to a plethora of thermonuclear transients, such as Ca-rich transients.

  9. Origin of the moon - The collision hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    By the impact or collision hypothesis, the author means any theory that seeks to derive the Moon-forming material from the outcome of one or more collisions between the Earth and other Sun-orbiting bodies. The impacting body or bodies must be large - larger than the Moon and perhaps even larger than Mars. This definition does not assume that the formation of the Moon was necessarily a singular event. Among proponents of the collision hypothesis, there are those who think that a single event overwhelmingly dominated and those who think that a few (or even many) impact events were needed. There are even versions of the collision hypothesis that are not very different from extreme versions of one of the alternative origin scenarios of capture, fission, and binary accretion! This review proceeds by advancing 10 propositions that the author believes embody the most important issues confronting the theory. These propositions may or may not be true, but they form a framework for asking the right questions.

  10. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    Much of human reasoning is approximate in nature. Formal models of reasoning traditionally try to be precise and reject the fuzziness of concepts in natural use and replace them with non-fuzzy scientific explicata by a process of precisiation. As an alternate to this approach, it has been suggested that rather than regard human reasoning processes as themselves approximating to some more refined and exact logical process that can be carried out with mathematical precision, the essence and power of human reasoning is in its capability to grasp and use inexact concepts directly. This view is supported by the widespread fuzziness of simple everyday terms (e.g., near tall) and the complexity of ordinary tasks (e.g., cleaning a room). Spatial reasoning is an area where humans consistently reason approximately with demonstrably good results. Consider the case of crossing a traffic intersection. We have only an approximate idea of the locations and speeds of various obstacles (e.g., persons and vehicles), but we nevertheless manage to cross such traffic intersections without any harm. The details of our mental processes which enable us to carry out such intricate tasks in such apparently simple manner are not well understood. However, it is that we try to incorporate such approximate reasoning techniques in our computer systems. Approximate spatial reasoning is very important for intelligent mobile agents (e.g., robots), specially for those operating in uncertain or unknown or dynamic domains.

  11. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  12. Inelastic transitions in slow heavy-particle atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdo''rfer, J.

    2001-05-01

    It is a generally held belief that inelastic transition probabilities and cross sections in slow, nearly adiabatic atomic collisions decrease exponentially with the inverse of the collision velocity v [i.e., {sigma}{proportional_to}exp(-const/v)]. This notion is supported by the Landau-Zener approximation and the hidden crossings approximation. We revisit the adiabatic limit of ion-atom collisions and show that for very slow collisions radial transitions are dominated by the topology of the branch points of the radial velocity rather than the branch points of the energy eigensurface. This can lead to a dominant power-law dependence of inelastic cross sections, {sigma}{proportional_to}v{sup n}. We illustrate the interplay between different contributions to the transition probabilities in a one-dimensional collision system for which the exact probabilities can be obtained from a direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Scho''dinger equation.

  13. The monoenergetic approximation in stellarator neoclassical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landreman, Matt

    2011-08-01

    In 'monoenergetic' stellarator neoclassical calculations, to expedite computation, ad hoc changes are made to the kinetic equation so speed enters only as a parameter. Here we examine the validity of this approach by considering the effective particle trajectories in a model magnetic field. We find monoenergetic codes systematically under-predict the true trapped particle fraction. The error in the trapped ion fraction can be of order unity for large but experimentally realizable values of the radial electric field, suggesting some results of these codes may be unreliable in this regime. This inaccuracy is independent of any errors introduced by approximation of the collision operator.

  14. Binary Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2006-05-01

    A review of observations and theories regarding binary asteroids and binary trans-Neptunian objects [collectively, binary minor planets (BMPs)] is presented. To date, these objects have been discovered using a combination of direct imaging, lightcurve analysis, and radar. They are found throughout the Solar System, and present a challenge for theorists modeling their formation in the context of Solar System evolution. The most promising models invoke rotational disruption for the smallest, shortest-lived objects (the asteroids nearest to Earth), consistent with the observed fast rotation of these bodies; impacts for the larger, longer-lived asteroids in the main belt, consistent with the range of size ratios of their components and slower rotation rates; and mutual capture for the distant, icy, trans-Neptunian objects, consistent with their large component separations and near-equal sizes. Numerical simulations have successfully reproduced key features of the binaries in the first two categories; the third remains to be investigated in detail.

  15. Binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve; Goodman, Jeremy; Mateo, Mario; Phinney, E. S.; Pryor, Carlton; Richer, Harvey B.; Verbunt, Frank; Weinberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that globular clusters contain a substantial number of binaries most of which are believed to be primordial. We discuss different successful optical search techniques, based on radial-velocity variables, photometric variables, and the positions of stars in the color-magnitude diagram. In addition, we review searches in other wavelengths, which have turned up low-mass X-ray binaries and more recently a variety of radio pulsars. On the theoretical side, we give an overview of the different physical mechanisms through which individual binaries evolve. We discuss the various simulation techniques which recently have been employed to study the effects of a primordial binary population, and the fascinating interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics which drives globular-cluster evolution.

  16. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  17. From Binaries to Triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freismuth, T.; Tokovinin, A.

    2002-12-01

    About 10% of all binary systems are close binaries (P<1000 days). Among those with P<10d, over 40% are known to belong to higher-multiplicity systems (triples, quadruples, etc.). Do ALL close systems have tertiary companions? For a selection of 12 nearby, and apparently "single" close binaries with solar-mass dwarf primary components from the 8-th catalogue of spectroscopic binary orbits, images in the B and R filters were taken at the CTIO 0.9m telescope and suitable tertiary candidates were be identified on color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Of the 12 SBs, four were found to have tertiary candidates: HD 67084, HD 120734, HD 93486, and VV Mon. However, none of these candidates were found to be common proper motion companions. Follow up observations using adaptive optics reveal a companion to HD 148704. Future observations are planned.

  18. Binary technetium halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Erik Vaughan

    In this work, the synthetic and coordination chemistry as well as the physico-chemical properties of binary technetium (Tc) chlorides, bromides, and iodides were investigated. Resulting from these studies was the discovery of five new binary Tc halide phases: alpha/beta-TcCl3, alpha/beta-TcCl 2, and TcI3, and the reinvestigation of the chemistries of TcBr3 and TcX4 (X = Cl, Br). Prior to 2009, the chemistry of binary Tc halides was poorly studied and defined by only three compounds, i.e., TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. Today, ten phases are known (i.e., TcF6, TcF5, TcCl4, TcBr 4, TcBr3, TcI3, alpha/beta-TcCl3 and alpha/beta-TcCl2) making the binary halide system of Tc comparable to those of its neighboring elements. Technetium binary halides were synthesized using three methods: reactions of the elements in sealed tubes, reactions of flowing HX(g) (X = Cl, Br, and I) with Tc2(O2CCH3)4Cl2, and thermal decompositions of TcX4 (X = Cl, Br) and alpha-TcCl 3 in sealed tubes under vacuum. Binary Tc halides can be found in various dimensionalities such as molecular solids (TcF6), extended chains (TcF5, TcCl4, alpha/beta-TcCl2, TcBr 3, TcI3), infinite layers (beta-TcCl3), and bidimensional networks of clusters (alpha-TcCl3); eight structure-types with varying degrees of metal-metal interactions are now known. The coordination chemistry of Tc binary halides can resemble that of the adjacent elements: molybdenum and ruthenium (beta-TcCl3, TcBr3, TcI 3), rhenium (TcF5, alpha-TcCl3), platinum (TcCl 4, TcBr4), or can be unique (alpha-TcCl2 and beta-TcCl 2) in respect to other known transition metal binary halides. Technetium binary halides display a range of interesting physical properties that are manifested from their electronic and structural configurations. The thermochemistry of binary Tc halides is extensive. These compounds can selectively volatilize, decompose, disproportionate, or convert to other phases. Ultimately, binary Tc halides may find application in the nuclear fuel

  19. The X-ray binary, UW CMa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The UW CMa is a close, eclipsing binary composed of an O7f primary with a stron wind and a less luminous O-type companion. It was found that UW CMa a variable X-ray source, whose X-ray variations are in phase with its optical light curve. Since both components of the binary system are O stars, accretion by a compact object is ruled out as a mechanism for generating X-rays. The UW CMa represents a new class of X-ray binaries, in which X-rays result from the collision of a wind from one star with the surface or wind of the other star. It is hypothesised that the impact of a wind against a star generates a shock wave about 0.25 stellar radii above the stellar surface, and material behind the shock front, heated to bout 10 million degrees, radiates the X-ray apparent X-ray variability is due to its location between the two stars, where it undergoes eclipses. The high temperature region maintains an ionization cavity in the wind, as detected with IUE. The ionization cavity is the source of depletion of absorbing ions in the wind between the two stars.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of energy exchanges during hydrogen collision with graphite sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jizhong; Li Shouyang; Wang Dezhen; Stirner, Thomas; Chen Junlin

    2010-06-15

    Experiments show that the energy of particles incident on divertor plates in fusion devices seldom exceeds 100 eV. Trim code and its variants are not suitable to predict the sputtering yield of carbon-based divertor plates for this energy range and, therefore, a dynamic model, taking into account the C-H bond formation and breaking, and the structure of carbon, is needed. In this paper, the molecular dynamics method is employed to investigate collision processes between incident hydrogen atoms and a graphene sheet. The simulation results demonstrate that the collision processes cannot be adequately described by a simple binary approximation. The energy transfer from the projectile to the graphite sheet exhibits a very complicated behavior when the kinetic energy of the incident hydrogen atom is below 30 eV, strongly depending on the impact position. When its kinetic energy is lower than 0.35 eV, the incident hydrogen is always reflected back from the single, perfect graphite sheet; when its kinetic energy is higher than 0.35 eV, then whether the incident particle penetrates the graphite sheet, is reflected back or is adsorbed depends on the impact position. In certain areas of the graphite sheet, either adsorption or reflection of an incident hydrogen atom can occur in two different energy ranges.

  1. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  2. Learning binary matroid ports

    SciTech Connect

    Coullard, C.; Hellerstein, L.

    1994-12-31

    Given a binary matroid M specified by a port oracle, we can in polynomial number of calls to the oracle construct a binary representation for M. For general matroids, we can in polynomial number of calls to a port oracle determine whether a given subset is independent (that is, we can simulate an independence oracle with a port oracle). The work is related to a theorem of Lehman on matroid ports, and is motivated by issues in computational learning theory.

  3. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  4. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  5. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  6. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  7. Template bank for gravitational waveforms from coalescing binary black holes: Nonspinning binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Ajith, P.; Hewitson, M.; Babak, S.; Chen, Y.; Krishnan, B.; Whelan, J. T.; Dorband, N.; Pollney, D.; Rezzolla, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Bruegmann, B.; Hannam, M.; Husa, S.; Sperhake, U.; Diener, P.; Gonzalez, J.; Santamaria, L.; Thornburg, J.

    2008-05-15

    Gravitational waveforms from the inspiral and ring-down stages of the binary black-hole coalescences can be modeled accurately by approximation/perturbation techniques in general relativity. Recent progress in numerical relativity has enabled us to model also the nonperturbative merger phase of the binary black-hole coalescence problem. This enables us to coherently search for all three stages of the coalescence of nonspinning binary black holes using a single template bank. Taking our motivation from these results, we propose a family of template waveforms which can model the inspiral, merger, and ring-down stages of the coalescence of nonspinning binary black holes that follow quasicircular inspiral. This two-dimensional template family is explicitly parametrized by the physical parameters of the binary. We show that the template family is not only effectual in detecting the signals from black-hole coalescences, but also faithful in estimating the parameters of the binary. We compare the sensitivity of a search (in the context of different ground-based interferometers) using all three stages of the black-hole coalescence with other template-based searches which look for individual stages separately. We find that the proposed search is significantly more sensitive than other template-based searches for a substantial mass range, potentially bringing about remarkable improvement in the event rate of ground-based interferometers. As part of this work, we also prescribe a general procedure to construct interpolated template banks using nonspinning black-hole waveforms produced by numerical relativity.

  8. Covariant approximation averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Eigo; Arthur, Rudy; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in Nf=2 +1 lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  9. Atomic and Molecular Depolarizing Collision Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is divided in three parts: after having recalled the different types of collisions with the different types of perturbers and having provided rough orders of magnitude of the collision rates, three cases are discussed. Although the most frequent type of depolarizing collision is the one of the collisions with the surrounding Hydrogen atoms, we discuss in the first part a particular case where the depolarizing collision effect is due to collisions with electrons and protons. This is the case of the Hydrogen lines observed in solar prominences. We recall how the interpretation of polarization observations in two lines has led to the joint determination of the magnetic field vector and the electron and proton density, and we show that this density determination gives results in agreement with the densities determined by interpretation of the Stark effect, provided that this last effect be evaluated in the impact approximation scheme which is indeed more valid than the quasistatic approach at these densities. In the second part, we describe a method that has been recently developed for the computation of the depolarizing rates in the case of collisions with the neutral Hydrogen atom. The case of molecular lines is less favourable, because, even if depolarizing collision rates computation may be soon expected and begin to be done inside the ground level of the molecule, calculations inside the excited states are far from the present ability. In the third part, we present an example where the excited state depolarizing rates were evaluated together with the magnetic field through the differential Hanle effect interpretation, based on the fact that the molecule provides a series of lines of different sensitivities that can be compared. This led to an experimental/observational determination of these rates, waiting for future theoretical computations for comparison.

  10. Approximate Bayesian Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisewski, Jessi

    2015-08-01

    Explicitly specifying a likelihood function is becoming increasingly difficult for many problems in astronomy. Astronomers often specify a simpler approximate likelihood - leaving out important aspects of a more realistic model. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) provides a framework for performing inference in cases where the likelihood is not available or intractable. I will introduce ABC and explain how it can be a useful tool for astronomers. In particular, I will focus on the eccentricity distribution for a sample of exoplanets with multiple sub-populations.

  11. Deconfinement phase transition in an expanding quark system in the relaxation time approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenwei; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the effects of nonequilibrium and collision terms on the deconfinement phase transition of an expanding quark system in Friedberg-Lee model in relaxation time approximation. By calculating the effective quark potential, the critical temperature of the phase transition is dominated by the mean field, while the collisions among quarks and mesons change the time structure of the phase transition significantly.

  12. The Dusty, Solar Type Spectroscopic Binary BD +20 307

    SciTech Connect

    Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael H.; Henry, Gregory W.; Zuckerman, B.; Muno, M. P.

    2009-02-16

    The dustiest known main-sequence star, BD +20 307, is actually a double-lined binary with a period of 3.4202 days and a circular orbit. The system is also metal poor with [Fe/H] = -0.4. The components are late-F and early-G dwarfs and have a mass ratio of 1.07. The photometric period of about 3.5 days indicates that the components are synchronously rotating. The metal poor, binary nature invalidates the idea that the object is a very young single star with a warm planet-making dust disk. Instead, the metal poor nature of the system and the lithium abundances of the components argue that the system is likely several billion years old, and so the dust disk results from the recent collision of two planetary mass rocky objects. Thus, BD +20 307 may well be the first known system with planets orbiting a close binary star.

  13. Simulation of Droplets Collisions Using Two-Phase Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, A.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows (Mazloomi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:174502, 2015) is used to simulate binary droplet collisions. The entropy-based stabilization, together with a new polynomial equation of state, enhances performance of the model and allow us to simulate droplet collision for various Weber and Reynolds numbers and large liquid to vapor density ratio. Different types of droplet collision outcomes, namely coalescence, stretching separation and reflexive separation are recovered in a range of impact parameter for two equal sized droplets. The results demonstrated the essential role played by the surface tension, kinematic viscosity, impact parameter and relative velocity in the droplet collision dynamics leading to coalescence or separation collision outcomes. Comparison between numerical results and experiments in both coalescence and separation collisions demonstrate viability of the presented model.

  14. Planetary Formation and Dynamics in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    As of today, over 500 exoplanets have been detected since the first exoplanet was discovered around a solar-like star in 1995. The planets in binaries could be common as stars are usually born in binary or multiple star systems. Although current observations show that the planet host rate in multiple star systems is around 17%, this fraction should be considered as a lower limit because of noticeable selection effects against binaries in planet searches. Most of the current known planet-bearing binary systems are S-types, meaning the companion star acts as a distant satellite, typically orbiting the inner star-planet system over 100 AU away. Nevertheless, there are four systems with a smaller separation of 20 AU, including the Gamma Cephei, GJ 86, HD 41004, and HD 196885. In addition to the planets in circumprimary (S-type) orbits discussed above, planets in circumbinary (P-type) orbits have been found in only two systems. In this thesis, we mainly study the planet formation in the S-type binary systems. In chapter 1, we first summarize current observational facts of exoplanets both in single-star and binary systems, then review the theoretical models of planet formation, with special attention to the application in binary systems. Perturbative effects from stellar companions render the planet formation process in binary systems even more complex than that in single-star systems. The perturbations from a binary companion can excite planetesimal orbits, and increase their mutual impact velocities to the values that might exceed their escape velocity or even the critical velocity for the onset of eroding collisions. The intermediate stage of the formation process---from planetesimals to planetary embryos---is thus the most problematic. In the following chapters, we investigate whether and how the planet formation goes through such a problematic stage. In chapter 2, we study the effects of gas dissipation on the planetesimals' mutual accretion. We find that in a

  15. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the delta Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) HETGS (High Energy Transmission Grating), have a total exposure time approximately equal to 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about plus or minus15 percent within a single approximately equal to125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S (sub XV), Si (sub XIII), and Ne (sub IX). For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi = 0.0 when the secondary delta Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.

  16. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the delta Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) HETGS (High Energy Transmission Grating), have a total exposure time approximately equal to 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about plus or minus15 percent within a single approximately equal to125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S (sub XV), Si (sub XIII), and Ne (sub IX). For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi = 0.0 when the secondary delta Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.

  17. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C.; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E.

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of their technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. Their method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) the authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing; (2) they also show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  18. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C. |; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of the technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. The method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) The authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing. (2) They show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  19. On Stochastic Approximation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Hans

    This paper deals with a stochastic process for the approximation of the root of a regression equation. This process was first suggested by Robbins and Monro. The main result here is a necessary and sufficient condition on the iteration coefficients for convergence of the process (convergence with probability one and convergence in the quadratic…

  20. Approximating Integrals Using Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.; Caudle, Kyle A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a discussion on Monte Carlo methods, which outlines how to use probability expectations to approximate the value of a definite integral. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on this technique and then to show several examples using visual basic as a programming tool. It is an interesting method because it combines two branches of…

  1. Approximating Integrals Using Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.; Caudle, Kyle A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a discussion on Monte Carlo methods, which outlines how to use probability expectations to approximate the value of a definite integral. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on this technique and then to show several examples using visual basic as a programming tool. It is an interesting method because it combines two branches of…

  2. Modern geothermal power: Binary cycle geothermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    In the second part of the review of modern geothermal power plant technologies and equipment, a role, a usage scale, and features of application of binary cycle plants in the geothermal economy are considered. Data on the use of low-boiling fluids, their impact on thermal parameters and performance of geothermal binary power units are presented. A retrospective of the use of various low-boiling fluids in industrial binary power units in the world since 1965 is shown. It is noted that the current generating capacity of binary power units running on hydrocarbons is equal to approximately 82.7% of the total installed capacity of all the binary power units in the world. At the same time over the past 5 years, the total installed capacity of geothermal binary power units in 25 countries increased by more than 50%, reaching nearly 1800 MW (hereinafter electric power is indicated), by 2015. A vast majority of the existing binary power plants recovers heat of geothermal fluid in the range of 100-200°C. Binary cycle power plants have an average unit capacity of 6.3 MW, 30.4 MW at single-flash power plants, 37.4 MW at double-flash plants, and 45.4 MW at power plants working on superheated steam. The largest binary cycle geothermal power plants (GeoPP) with an installed capacity of over 60 MW are in operation in the United States and the Philippines. In most cases, binary plants are involved in the production process together with a steam cycle. Requirements to the fluid ensuring safety, reliability, and efficiency of binary power plants using heat of geothermal fluid are determined, and differences and features of their technological processes are shown. Application of binary cycle plants in the technological process of combined GeoPPs makes it possible to recover geothermal fluid more efficiently. Features and advantages of binary cycle plants using multiple fluids, including a Kalina Cycle, are analyzed. Technical characteristics of binary cycle plants produced by various

  3. Morphological Moments of Binary Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, N.; Sidyakin, S.

    2017-05-01

    The concept of morphological moments of binary images is introduced. Morphological moments can be used as a shape descriptor combining an integral width description of an object with a description of its spatial distribution. The relationship between the proposed descriptor and the disc cover of the figure is discussed and an exact analytical method for descriptor calculation is proposed within the continuous morphology framework. The approach is based on the approximation of the shape by a polygonal figure and the extraction of its medial representation in the form of the continuous skeleton and the radial function. The proposed method for calculation of morphological moments achieves high accuracy and it is computationally efficient. Experimentations have been conducted. Obtained results indicate that the morphological moments are a more informative and rich shape descriptor than the area of the disc cover. Application of morphological moments to the font recognition task improves the recognition quality.

  4. Formation of Short-Period Binary Pulsars in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasio; Pfahl; Rappaport

    2000-03-20

    We present a new dynamical scenario for the formation of short-period binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters. Our work is motivated by the recent observations of 20 radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. In a dense cluster such as 47 Tuc, most neutron stars acquire binary companions through exchange interactions with primordial binaries. The resulting systems have semimajor axes in the range approximately 0.1-1 AU and neutron star companion masses approximately 1-3 M middle dot in circle. For many of these systems, we find that when the companion evolves off the main sequence and fills its Roche lobe, the subsequent mass transfer is dynamically unstable. This leads to a common envelope phase and the formation of short-period neutron star-white dwarf binaries. For a significant fraction of these binaries, the decay of the orbit due to gravitational radiation will be followed by a period of stable mass transfer driven by a combination of gravitational radiation and tidal heating of the companion. The properties of the resulting short-period binaries match well those of observed binary pulsars in 47 Tuc.

  5. First law of mechanics for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tiec, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    Using the canonical Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian formalism, a "first law of mechanics" is established for binary systems of point masses moving along generic stable bound (eccentric) orbits. This relationship is checked to hold within the post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity, up to third order. Several applications are discussed, including the use of gravitational self-force results to inform post-Newtonian theory and the effective one-body model for eccentric-orbit compact binaries.

  6. Improved initial data for binary black hole simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throwe, William

    2014-03-01

    Asymptotically matched approximate analytic metrics can provide realistic initial data for binary black hole simulations. We have simulated these data using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) and observe that they show decreased junk radiation and physical parameter drift as compared to commonly used initial data. We have generalized previous asymptotically matched data sets to allow for arbitrary initial hole velocities, and have demonstrated that this method can be used to adjust the eccentricity of the simulated binaries, including describing binary systems with quasicircular orbits.

  7. Dynamics of Compact Binaries in Effective Field Theory Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrodin, Delphine

    2010-02-01

    Coalescing compact binaries are predicted to be powerful emitters of gravitational waves, and provide a strong gravity environment ideal for the testing of gravity theories. We study the gravitational dynamics in the early inspiral phase of coalescing compact binaries using Non-Relativistic General Relativity (NRGR) - an effective field theory formalism based on the Post-Newtonian approximation to General Relativity, but which provides a consistent lagrangian framework and a systematic way in which to study binary dynamics and gravitational wave emission. We calculate in this framework the spin-orbit correction to the newtonian potential at 2.5 PN. )

  8. Gravitational radiation from dual neutron star elliptical binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hils, Dieter

    1991-01-01

    General expressions are derived for the gravitational radiation incident on earth due to elliptical binary systems in the Galaxy. These results are applied to dual neutron star elliptical binaries. Calculations show that eccentric dual neutron star binaries lead to a moderate increase in gravitational flux density compared with circular systems for frequencies above approximately 0.0001 Hz. Tables of various quantities such as average gravitational luminosity, number of sources per unit bandwidth, energy spectral flux density, and gravitational wave strain density are given.

  9. CIRCUMBINARY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ACCRETION INTO INSPIRALING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Scott C.; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela; Zlochower, Yosef; Krolik, Julian H.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2012-08-10

    We have simulated the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a circumbinary disk surrounding an equal-mass binary comprising two non-spinning black holes during the period in which the disk inflow time is comparable to the binary evolution time due to gravitational radiation. Both the changing spacetime and the binary orbital evolution are described by an innovative technique utilizing high-order post-Newtonian approximations. Prior to the beginning of the inspiral, the structure of the circumbinary disk is predicted well by extrapolation from Newtonian results: a gap of roughly two binary separation radii is cleared, and matter piles up at the outer edge of this gap as inflow is retarded by torques exerted by the binary; the accretion rate is roughly half its value at large radius. During inspiral, the inner edge of the disk initially moves inward in coordination with the shrinking binary, but-as the orbital evolution accelerates-the inward motion of the disk edge falls behind the rate of binary compression. In this stage, the binary torque falls substantially, but the accretion rate decreases by only 10%-20%. When the binary separation is tens of gravitational radii, the rest-mass efficiency of disk radiation is a few percent, suggesting that supermassive binary black holes could be very luminous at this stage of their evolution. Inner disk heating is modulated at a beat frequency comparable to the binary orbital frequency. However, a disk with sufficient surface density to be luminous may be optically thick, suppressing periodic modulation of the luminosity.

  10. Optimizing the Zeldovich approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Pellman, Todd F.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1994-01-01

    We have recently learned that the Zeldovich approximation can be successfully used for a far wider range of gravitational instability scenarios than formerly proposed; we study here how to extend this range. In previous work (Coles, Melott and Shandarin 1993, hereafter CMS) we studied the accuracy of several analytic approximations to gravitational clustering in the mildly nonlinear regime. We found that what we called the 'truncated Zeldovich approximation' (TZA) was better than any other (except in one case the ordinary Zeldovich approximation) over a wide range from linear to mildly nonlinear (sigma approximately 3) regimes. TZA was specified by setting Fourier amplitudes equal to zero for all wavenumbers greater than k(sub nl), where k(sub nl) marks the transition to the nonlinear regime. Here, we study the cross correlation of generalized TZA with a group of n-body simulations for three shapes of window function: sharp k-truncation (as in CMS), a tophat in coordinate space, or a Gaussian. We also study the variation in the crosscorrelation as a function of initial truncation scale within each type. We find that k-truncation, which was so much better than other things tried in CMS, is the worst of these three window shapes. We find that a Gaussian window e(exp(-k(exp 2)/2k(exp 2, sub G))) applied to the initial Fourier amplitudes is the best choice. It produces a greatly improved crosscorrelation in those cases which most needed improvement, e.g. those with more small-scale power in the initial conditions. The optimum choice of kG for the Gaussian window is (a somewhat spectrum-dependent) 1 to 1.5 times k(sub nl). Although all three windows produce similar power spectra and density distribution functions after application of the Zeldovich approximation, the agreement of the phases of the Fourier components with the n-body simulation is better for the Gaussian window. We therefore ascribe the success of the best-choice Gaussian window to its superior treatment

  11. Measured and calculated SF-6 collision and swarm ion transport data in SF6 -Ar and SF6 -Xe mixtures.

    PubMed

    Benhenni, M; de Urquijo, J; Yousfi, M; Hernandez-Avila, J L; Merbahi, N; Hinojosa, G; Eichwald, O

    2005-03-01

    The measurement of the mobility of SF-6 in the mixtures SF6 -Ar and SF6 -Xe is reported over the density-reduced electric field strength E/N 1-180 Td (1 Townsend = 10(-17) V cm(2)), from a time-resolved pulsed Townsend technique. Simultaneously, the mobility of SF-6 in the same binary mixtures has been calculated from a set of collision cross sections for SF-6 -Ar, SF-6 -Xe, and SF-6 - SF6 using a Monte Carlo simulation procedure for ion transport. The good agreement between measured and calculated mobilities in these gas mixtures has led us to conclude that the validation of our cross section sets is confirmed. The elastic collision cross section, a predominant process for ion energies lower than about 10 eV, was determined from a semiclassical JWKB approximation using a rigid core potential model for the ion-neutral systems under consideration. This elastic cross section was then added to several other inelastic collision cross sections found in the literature for ion conversion, electron detachment of SF-6 and charge transfer. Moreover, the calculations of the mobility and the ratios of the transverse and longitudinal diffusion coefficients to the mobility were extended into a much wider E/N range from 1 to 4000 Td. Additionally, we have also calculated the energy distribution functions and the reaction coefficients for ion conversion and electron detachment. Finally, we have shown that the range of validity for the calculation of the mobility in gas mixtures from Blanc's law is only valid for the low E/N region, where the interaction is dominated by elastic collisions and the ion distribution function remains essentially Maxwellian.

  12. Entropies of short binary sequences in heart period dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cysarz, D; Bettermann, H; van Leeuwen, P

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic aspects of R-R intervals have often been analyzed by means of linear and nonlinear measures. The goal of this study was to analyze binary sequences, in which only the dynamic information is retained, by means of two different aspects of regularity. R-R interval sequences derived from 24-h electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings of 118 healthy subjects were converted to symbolic binary sequences that coded the beat-to-beat increase or decrease in the R-R interval. Shannon entropy was used to quantify the occurrence of short binary patterns (length N = 5) in binary sequences derived from 10-min intervals. The regularity of the short binary patterns was analyzed on the basis of approximate entropy (ApEn). ApEn had a linear dependence on mean R-R interval length, with increasing irregularity occurring at longer R-R interval length. Shannon entropy of the same sequences showed that the increase in irregularity is accompanied by a decrease in occurrence of some patterns. Taken together, these data indicate that irregular binary patterns are more probable when the mean R-R interval increases. The use of surrogate data confirmed a nonlinear component in the binary sequence. Analysis of two consecutive 24-h ECG recordings for each subject demonstrated good intraindividual reproducibility of the results. In conclusion, quantification of binary sequences derived from ECG recordings reveals properties that cannot be found using the full information of R-R interval sequences.

  13. Asymptotic orderings and approximations of the Master kinetic equation for large hard spheres systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, Massimo; Asci, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the problem is posed of determining the physically-meaningful asymptotic orderings holding for the statistical description of a large N-body system of hard spheres, i.e., formed by N ≡1/ε ≫ 1 particles, which are allowed to undergo instantaneous and purely elastic unary, binary or multiple collisions. Starting point is the axiomatic treatment recently developed [Tessarotto et al., 2013-2016] and the related discovery of an exact kinetic equation realized by Master equation which advances in time the 1-body probability density function (PDF) for such a system. As shown in the paper the task involves introducing appropriate asymptotic orderings in terms of ε for all the physically-relevant parameters. The goal is that of identifying the relevant physically-meaningful asymptotic approximations applicable for the Master kinetic equation, together with their possible relationships with the Boltzmann and Enskog kinetic equations, and holding in appropriate asymptotic regimes. These correspond either to dilute or dense systems and are formed either by small-size or finite-size identical hard spheres, the distinction between the various cases depending on suitable asymptotic orderings in terms of ε.

  14. Light-assisted collisions in ultracold Tm atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, I. S.; Pyatchenkov, S. V.; Snigirev, S. A.; Luchnikov, I. A.; Kalganova, E. S.; Vishnyakova, G. A.; Kublikova, D. N.; Bushmakin, V. S.; Davletov, E. T.; Tsyganok, V. V.; Belyaeva, O. V.; Khoroshilov, A.; Sorokin, V. N.; Sukachev, D. D.; Akimov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We studied light-assisted collisions of Tm atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), working on a weak cooling transition at 530.7 nm [4 f13(F2o) 6 s2,J =7 /2 ,F =4 to 4 f12(H36) 5 d5 /26 s2,J =9 /2 ,F =5 ]. We observed a strong influence from radiation trapping and light-assisted collisions on the dynamics of this trap. We carefully separated these two contributions and measured the binary loss rate constant at different laser powers and detuning frequencies near the cooling transition. Analyzing losses from the MOT, we found the light-assisted inelastic binary loss rate constant to reach values of up to β =10-9c m3/s and gave the upper bound on a branching ratio k <0.8 ×10-6 for the 530.7 nm transition.

  15. Binary AGB stars observed with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfeld, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are stars at the end of their lifetime with low to intermediate masses. They are important in the Galactic context, since they contribute a lot of dust to the interstellar medium (ISM) and influence the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Many AGB stars show peculiar outflow morphologies depending on their mass-loss rates. The outflowing wind of these stars collides with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). The collisions with the ISM result in the formation of bow shocks or rings, well visible in the latest Herschel Space Observatory images made with the on-board PACS instrument. Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleight-Taylor instabilities were found in the bow shock regions. With the help of Herschel and within the framework of the MESS (Mass loss of Evolved StarS) Guaranteed Time Key Program it was tried to distinguish between the different morphologies. The outflow morphologies were categorized in 4 main classes: "fermata", "eye", "ring", and "irregular"; also point sources showing no resolved circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) were found. Some of the AGB stars in the MESS sample are known binary stars and the binary state of some other objects is still in discussion. A new attempt to clarify the binarity of the objects can be made by checking their outflow morphology and to compare the results with known morphological (a-)symmetries in binary systems. This Thesis discusses 14 binary AGB candidates from the MESS sample, the previous findings and the Herschel results. Herschel observes at infrared wavelengths. Light at this wavelengths can be seen through the dust, which is formed in the surrounding environment of these stars. For the unknown cases it is difficult to determine the binary state, because AGB stars can have very strong wind outflows, making the detection of a companion difficult. Photo- and spectroscopy, CO line outflow measurements or composite spectra can be used to identify features caused directly o! r indirectly by the

  16. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  17. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  18. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  19. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  20. Applied Routh approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Routh approximation technique for reducing the complexity of system models was applied in the frequency domain to a 16th order, state variable model of the F100 engine and to a 43d order, transfer function model of a launch vehicle boost pump pressure regulator. The results motivate extending the frequency domain formulation of the Routh method to the time domain in order to handle the state variable formulation directly. The time domain formulation was derived and a characterization that specifies all possible Routh similarity transformations was given. The characterization was computed by solving two eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. The application of the time domain Routh technique to the state variable engine model is described, and some results are given. Additional computational problems are discussed, including an optimization procedure that can improve the approximation accuracy by taking advantage of the transformation characterization.

  1. Topics in Metric Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeb, William Edward

    This thesis develops effective approximations of certain metrics that occur frequently in pure and applied mathematics. We show that distances that often arise in applications, such as the Earth Mover's Distance between two probability measures, can be approximated by easily computed formulas for a wide variety of ground distances. We develop simple and easily computed characterizations both of norms measuring a function's regularity -- such as the Lipschitz norm -- and of their duals. We are particularly concerned with the tensor product of metric spaces, where the natural notion of regularity is not the Lipschitz condition but the mixed Lipschitz condition. A theme that runs throughout this thesis is that snowflake metrics (metrics raised to a power less than 1) are often better-behaved than ordinary metrics. For example, we show that snowflake metrics on finite spaces can be approximated by the average of tree metrics with a distortion bounded by intrinsic geometric characteristics of the space and not the number of points. Many of the metrics for which we characterize the Lipschitz space and its dual are snowflake metrics. We also present applications of the characterization of certain regularity norms to the problem of recovering a matrix that has been corrupted by noise. We are able to achieve an optimal rate of recovery for certain families of matrices by exploiting the relationship between mixed-variable regularity conditions and the decay of a function's coefficients in a certain orthonormal basis.

  2. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  3. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2008-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5 M⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44) orbit around an unevolved companion.

  4. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  5. Binary catalogue of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard; Bazso, Akos; Zechner, Renate; Funk, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Since 1995 there is a database which list most of the known exoplanets (The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia at http://exoplanet.eu/). With the growing number of detected exoplanets in binary and multiple star systems it became more important to mark and to separate them into a new database, which is not available in the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. Therefore we established an online database (which can be found at: http://www.univie.ac.at/adg/schwarz/multiple.html) for all known exoplanets in binary star systems and in addition for multiple star systems, which will be updated regularly and linked to the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. The binary catalogue of exoplanets is available online as data file and can be used for statistical purposes. Our database is divided into two parts: the data of the stars and the planets, given in a separate list. We describe also the different parameters of the exoplanetary systems and present some applications.

  6. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  7. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H₂, and four normal alkanes + N₂.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Ahren W; Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2014-09-28

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N2. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N2 and H2 + N2 and with recent experimental results for CnH(2n+2) + N2, n = 2-4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structure of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R(-12) repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N2 and H2 + N2 (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N2 by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R(-12) interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N2 and H2 + N2, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N2, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard-Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above ∼700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard-Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N2. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be

  8. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H2 and four normal alkanes + N2

    DOE PAGES

    Jasper, Ahren W.; Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A.; ...

    2014-09-30

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N2. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N2 and H2 + N2 and with recent experimental results for C n H2n+2 + N2, n = 2–4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structuremore » of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R–12 repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N2 and H2 + N2 (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N2 by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R–12 interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N2 and H2 + N2, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N2, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard–Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above –700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard–Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N2. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity

  9. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  10. Exact linearized Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jeong -Young; Held, Eric D.

    2006-10-05

    In the moment expansion, the Rosenbluth potentials, the linearized Coulomb collision operators, and the moments of the collision operators are analytically calculated for any moment. The explicit calculation of Rosenbluth potentials converts the integro-differential form of the Coulomb collision operator into a differential operator, which enables one to express the collision operator in a simple closed form for any arbitrary mass and temperature ratios. In addition, it is shown that gyrophase averaging the collision operator acting on arbitrary distribution functions is the same as the collision operator acting on the corresponding gyrophase averaged distribution functions. The moments of the collision operator are linear combinations of the fluid moments with collision coefficients parametrized by mass and temperature ratios. Furthermore, useful forms involving the small mass-ratio approximation are easily found since the collision operators and their moments are expressed in terms of the mass ratio. As an application, the general moment equations are explicitly written and the higher order heat flux equation is derived.

  11. Exact linearized Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.

    2006-10-15

    In the moment expansion, the Rosenbluth potentials, the linearized Coulomb collision operators, and the moments of the collision operators are analytically calculated for any moment. The explicit calculation of Rosenbluth potentials converts the integro-differential form of the Coulomb collision operator into a differential operator, which enables one to express the collision operator in a simple closed form for any arbitrary mass and temperature ratios. In addition, it is shown that gyrophase averaging the collision operator acting on arbitrary distribution functions is the same as the collision operator acting on the corresponding gyrophase averaged distribution functions. The moments of the collision operator are linear combinations of the fluid moments with collision coefficients parametrized by mass and temperature ratios. Useful forms involving the small mass-ratio approximation are easily found since the collision operators and their moments are expressed in terms of the mass ratio. As an application, the general moment equations are explicitly written and the higher order heat flux equation is derived.

  12. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2005-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1700. There are now 80 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 103 pulsars in 24 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights have been the discovery of the first ever double pulsar system and a recent flurry of discoveries in globular clusters, in particular Terzan 5.

  13. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    We present preliminary results of our implementation of a novel electrophoresis separation technique: Binary Oscillatory Cross flow Electrophoresis (BOCE). The technique utilizes the interaction of two driving forces, an oscillatory electric field and an oscillatory shear flow, to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged species. Analytical and numerical studies have indicated that this technique is capable of separating proteins with electrophoretic mobilities differing by less than 10%. With an experimental device containing a separation chamber 20 cm long, 5 cm wide, and 1 mm thick, an order of magnitude increase in throughput over commercially available electrophoresis devices is theoretically possible.

  14. Beam scanning binary logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Mukai, Seiji; Watanabe, Masanobu; Mori, Masahiko; Yajima, Hiroyoshi

    1990-07-01

    A beam-scanning laser diode (BSLD) is presently applied to a novel optoelectronic logic operation, designated 'beam-scanning binary logic' (BSBL), that covers the implementation of both the basic logic gates and a spatial code encoder for photodetection, while allowing a greater reduction of the number of active devices than ordinary binary logic operations. BSBL executes multifunctional logic operations simultaneously. The data connections between logic gates in BSLD are flexible, due to the ability to electrically control both output power and laser-beam direction.

  15. T Tauri Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudorov, A. E.; Eretnova, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the excess radius-age, and the eccentricity-period relations are constructed for double-lined spectroscopic T Tauri binaries. The masses and the ages of the classical T Tauri and the weak-line T Tauri stars are compared. All components of T Tauri stars have the excess radius in comparison with initial Main Sequence stars of corresponding mass. The younger the star the more excess radius it has. The overwhelming majority of close binaries (P<10d) have eccentricity near to zero. The fraction of quadruple systems in our sample are higher than for Main Sequence stars.

  16. Workshop on Colliding Winds in Binary Stars to Honor Jorge Sahade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemela, Virpi; Morrell, Nidia; Pismis, Paris; Torres-Peimbert, Silvia

    1996-12-01

    Topics considered include: the beginning of the story; mass flow in and out of close binaries; winds of massive, main sequence close binaries; chromospheric activity, stellar winds and red stragglers; uv observations of mass transfer in algols; the circumstellar matter in pre-supernovae of type Ia; observations of colliding winds in O-type binaries; colliding winds in massive binaries involving Wolf-Rayet stars; episodic dust formation by Wolf-Rayet stars: smoke signals from colliding winds; x-ray emission from colliding wind binaries; colliding stellar winds: a new method of determining mass-loss rates via x-ray spectroscopy; sudden radiative braking in colliding hot-star winds; optical observations of colliding winds in gamma2 velorum; left overs for dinner; HD 5980: the Wolf-Rayet binary that became a luminous blue variable; the erupting Wolf-Rayet binary HD 5980 in the small magellanic cloud: spectral transition from B1.5Ia(+) to WN6 and the accompanying light curve; the elliptic orbit of the WR binary system CV serpentis; evidence for colliding winds in WR 146; is there wind-wind collision in WR 141 (HD 193928)?; search for interacting winds in the WN7 + O binary; line formation in CH Cyg: a symbiotic binary; period analysis of radial velocity of pleione; H(alpha) detection of colliding winds in O-type binaries; HD 5980 in the infrared; photometric and polarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet eclipsing binary HD 5980 in the small magellanic cloud, and analysis of linear polarization in two Wolf-Rayet binary systems.

  17. Traffic volume and collisions involving transit and nontransit vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ragland, D R; Hundenski, R J; Holman, B L; Fisher, J M

    1992-10-01

    This study reports an analysis of collisions occurring between public transit vehicles operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway System (Muni), the public transit agency for the City of San Francisco, and nontransit vehicles. The analysis, focusing on weekday collisions during 1987, demonstrated a strong association between hourly transit collisions rates and hourly traffic volume. The collision rate varied from 0.01 per 1,000 Muni vehicle-hours of operation during the interval 5 A.M. to 6 A.M., a time of very low traffic volume, to 0.93 (approximately 1 collision per 1,000 Muni vehicle-hours of operation) during the interval 5 P.M. to 6 P.M., a time of very high traffic volume. Using a power function to predict either the total number of collisions, or the rate of collisions per 1,000 Muni vehicle-hours, almost 90% of total variation was accounted for by traffic volume. A very similar pattern was found for collisions judged either avoidable or unavoidable. A peak in the collision rate between 2 A.M. and 3 A.M. could not be accounted for by traffic volume alone. That peak occurred in the one-hour interval following the 2 A.M. closing of bars in San Francisco, and was composed entirely of a sharp increase in unavoidable collisions. Increasing traffic volume appeared to operate through two mechanisms: (i) an increase in the number of opportunities for a collision, defined as a quantity proportional to the product of the number of Muni and non-Muni vehicles; (ii) an increase in the probability of a collision occurring between any given pair of vehicles.

  18. Approximate option pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chalasani, P.; Saias, I.; Jha, S.

    1996-04-08

    As increasingly large volumes of sophisticated options (called derivative securities) are traded in world financial markets, determining a fair price for these options has become an important and difficult computational problem. Many valuation codes use the binomial pricing model, in which the stock price is driven by a random walk. In this model, the value of an n-period option on a stock is the expected time-discounted value of the future cash flow on an n-period stock price path. Path-dependent options are particularly difficult to value since the future cash flow depends on the entire stock price path rather than on just the final stock price. Currently such options are approximately priced by Monte carlo methods with error bounds that hold only with high probability and which are reduced by increasing the number of simulation runs. In this paper the authors show that pricing an arbitrary path-dependent option is {number_sign}-P hard. They show that certain types f path-dependent options can be valued exactly in polynomial time. Asian options are path-dependent options that are particularly hard to price, and for these they design deterministic polynomial-time approximate algorithms. They show that the value of a perpetual American put option (which can be computed in constant time) is in many cases a good approximation to the value of an otherwise identical n-period American put option. In contrast to Monte Carlo methods, the algorithms have guaranteed error bounds that are polynormally small (and in some cases exponentially small) in the maturity n. For the error analysis they derive large-deviation results for random walks that may be of independent interest.

  19. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  20. Critical phenomena at the threshold of immediate merger in binary black hole systems: The extreme mass ratio case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Carsten; Akcay, Sarp; Barack, Leor; Nagar, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    In numerical simulations of black hole binaries, Pretorius and Khurana [Classical Quantum Gravity 24, S83 (2007)CQGRDG0264-938110.1088/0264-9381/24/12/S07] have observed critical behavior at the threshold between scattering and immediate merger. The number of orbits scales as n≃-γln⁡|p-p*| along any one-parameter family of initial data such that the threshold is at p=p*. Hence, they conjecture that in ultrarelativistic collisions almost all the kinetic energy can be converted into gravitational waves if the impact parameter is fine-tuned to the threshold. As a toy model for the binary, they consider the geodesic motion of a test particle in a Kerr black hole spacetime, where the unstable circular geodesics play the role of critical solutions, and calculate the critical exponent γ. Here, we incorporate radiation reaction into this model using the self-force approximation. The critical solution now evolves adiabatically along a sequence of unstable circular geodesic orbits under the effect of the self-force. We confirm that almost all the initial energy and angular momentum are radiated on the critical solution. Our calculation suggests that, even for infinite initial energy, this happens over a finite number of orbits given by n∞≃0.41/η, where η is the (small) mass ratio. We derive expressions for the time spent on the critical solution, number of orbits and radiated energy as functions of the initial energy and impact parameter.

  1. Beyond the Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto

    1989-01-01

    The three most successful models for describing scattering from random rough surfaces are the Kirchhoff approximation (KA), the small-perturbation method (SPM), and the two-scale-roughness (or composite roughness) surface-scattering (TSR) models. In this paper it is shown how these three models can be derived rigorously from one perturbation expansion based on the extinction theorem for scalar waves scattering from perfectly rigid surface. It is also shown how corrections to the KA proportional to the surface curvature and higher-order derivatives may be obtained. Using these results, the scattering cross section is derived for various surface models.

  2. Binary coding for hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chang, Chein-I.; Chang, Chein-Chi; Lin, Chinsu

    2004-10-01

    Binary coding is one of simplest ways to characterize spectral features. One commonly used method is a binary coding-based image software system, called Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) for remotely sensed imagery developed by Mazer et al. For a given spectral signature, the SPAM calculates its spectral mean and inter-band spectral difference and uses them as thresholds to generate a binary code word for this particular spectral signature. Such coding scheme is generally effective and also very simple to implement. This paper revisits the SPAM and further develops three new SPAM-based binary coding methods, called equal probability partition (EPP) binary coding, halfway partition (HP) binary coding and median partition (MP) binary coding. These three binary coding methods along with the SPAM well be evaluated for spectral discrimination and identification. In doing so, a new criterion, called a posteriori discrimination probability (APDP) is also introduced for performance measure.

  3. Eclipsing Binary Update, No. 2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    Contents: 1. Wrong again! The elusive period of DHK 41. 2. Stars observed and not observed. 3. Eclipsing binary chart information. 4. Eclipsing binary news and notes. 5. A note on SS Arietis. 6. Featured star: TX Ursae Majoris.

  4. Numerically Solvable Model for Resonant Collisions of Electronswith Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Houfek, Karel; Rescigno, T.N.; McCurdy, C.W.

    2006-01-27

    We describe a simple model for electron-molecule collisions that has one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom and that can be solved to arbitrarily high precision, without making the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by employing a combination of the exterior complex scaling method and a finite-element implementation of the discrete variable representation. We compare exact cross sections for vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment with results obtained using the local complex potential approximation as commonly applied in the ''boomerang'' model, and suggest how this two-dimensional model can be used to test the underpinnings of contemporary nonlocal approximations to resonant collisions.

  5. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  6. Orbits For Sixteen Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Z.; Novakovic, B.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper orbits for 13 binaries are recalculated and presented. The reason is that recent observations show higher residuals than the corresponding ephemerides calculated by using the orbital elements given in the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars. The binaries studied were: WDS 00182+7257 = A 803, WDS 00335+4006 = HO 3, WDS 00583+2124 = BU 302, WDS 01011+6022 = A 926, WDS 01014+1155 = BU 867, WDS 01112+4113 = A 655, WDS 01361-2954 + HJ 3447, WDS 02333+5219 = STT 42 AB, WDS 04362+0814 = A 1840 AB, WDS 08017-0836 = A 1580, WDS 08277-0425 = A 550, WDS 17471+1742 = STF 2215 and WDS 18025+4414 = BU 1127 Aa-B. In addition, for three binaries - WDS 01532+1526 = BU 260, WDS 02563+7253 =STF 312 AB and WDS 05003+3924 = STT 92 AB - the orbital elements are calculated for the first time. In this paper the authors present not only the orbital elements, but the masses, dynamical parallaxes, absolute magnitudes and ephemerides for the next five years, as well.

  7. Planetary systems in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Genya

    In this thesis we investigate the orbital evolution of planets in binaries. Unlike our own Solar System, at least one out of five planetary systems known to date is associated with additional stellar companions. Despite their large distances from the planetary systems, these stellar companions play an important role in significantly altering the planetary architecture over very long timescales. Most of the planets in binaries are found in hierarchical configurations in which a planet orbits around a component of a wide stellar binary. The evolution of such hierarchical triples has been analytically understood through the framework of the Kozai mechanism, in which the orbital eccentricity of a planet secularly grows through angular momentum exchange with the stellar companion. The aim of our first study is to investigate the global effect of stellar companions in exciting planetary eccentricities through the Kozai mechanism, using synthetic eccentricity distributions computed numerically from various initial assumptions motivated by observational studies. As inferred from observations and theoretical planet formation simulations, newly formed planetary systems are more likely to be oligarchic, containing multiple giant planets. However, the long-term evolution of gravitationally coupled planets perturbed by a stellar companion has been little understood in the previous studies. From a large ensemble of numerical integrations of double-planet systems in binaries, we have found that there are various evolutionary classes of multiple planets in binaries compared to simple hierarchical triple systems containing only one planet. Using the Kozai mechanism and the Laplace-Lagrange secular theory, we also provide analytic criteria that can readily predict the secular evolutionary behavior of a pair of planetary orbits in binaries. In the last part of this thesis we discuss an alternative channel of planetary migration induced by a combined effect of dissipative tidal forces

  8. Correlated binary regression with covariates specific to each binary observation.

    PubMed

    Prentice, R L

    1988-12-01

    Regression methods are considered for the analysis of correlated binary data when each binary observation may have its own covariates. It is argued that binary response models that condition on some or all binary responses in a given "block" are useful for studying certain types of dependencies, but not for the estimation of marginal response probabilities or pairwise correlations. Fully parametric approaches to these latter problems appear to be unduly complicated except in such special cases as the analysis of paired binary data. Hence, a generalized estimating equation approach is advocated for inference on response probabilities and correlations. Illustrations involving both small and large block sizes are provided.

  9. On the quantum Landau collision operator and electron collisions in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-03-15

    The quantum Landau collision operator, which extends the widely used Landau/Fokker-Planck collision operator to include quantum statistical effects, is discussed. The quantum extension can serve as a reference model for including electron collisions in non-equilibrium dense plasmas, in which the quantum nature of electrons cannot be neglected. In this paper, the properties of the Landau collision operator that have been useful in traditional plasma kinetic theory and plasma transport theory are extended to the quantum case. We outline basic properties in connection with the conservation laws, the H-theorem, and the global and local equilibrium distributions. We discuss the Fokker-Planck form of the operator in terms of three potentials that extend the usual two Rosenbluth potentials. We establish practical closed-form expressions for these potentials under local thermal equilibrium conditions in terms of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein integrals. We study the properties of linearized quantum Landau operator, and extend two popular approximations used in plasma physics to include collisions in kinetic simulations. We apply the quantum Landau operator to the classic test-particle problem to illustrate the physical effects embodied in the quantum extension. We present useful closed-form expressions for the electron-ion momentum and energy transfer rates. Throughout the paper, similarities and differences between the quantum and classical Landau collision operators are emphasized.

  10. Entropy production in collisions of gravitational shock waves and of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.; Pufu, Silviu S.; Yarom, Amos

    2008-09-15

    We calculate the area of a marginally trapped surface formed by a head-on collision of gravitational shock waves in AdS{sub D}. We use this to obtain a lower bound on the entropy produced after the collision. A comparison to entropy production in heavy-ion collisions is included. We also discuss an O(D-2) remnant of conformal symmetry, which is present in a class of gravitational shockwave collisions in AdS{sub D} and which might be approximately realized (with D=5) in central heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful technique for estimating the posterior distribution of a model’s parameters. It is especially important when the model to be fit has no explicit likelihood function, which happens for computational (or simulation-based) models such as those that are popular in cognitive neuroscience and other areas in psychology. However, ABC is usually applied only to models with few parameters. Extending ABC to hierarchical models has been difficult because high-dimensional hierarchical models add computational complexity that conventional ABC cannot accommodate. In this paper we summarize some current approaches for performing hierarchical ABC and introduce a new algorithm called Gibbs ABC. This new algorithm incorporates well-known Bayesian techniques to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the ABC approach for estimation of hierarchical models. We then use the Gibbs ABC algorithm to estimate the parameters of two models of signal detection, one with and one without a tractable likelihood function. PMID:24297436

  12. Approximate strip exchanging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapnoneel; Thakur, Ashok Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have been modelled by a variety of primitives such as reversals, transpositions, block moves and block interchanges. We consider such a genome rearrangement primitive Strip Exchanges. Given a permutation, the challenge is to sort it by using minimum number of strip exchanges. A strip exchanging move interchanges the positions of two chosen strips so that they merge with other strips. The strip exchange problem is to sort a permutation using minimum number of strip exchanges. We present here the first non-trivial 2-approximation algorithm to this problem. We also observe that sorting by strip-exchanges is fixed-parameter-tractable. Lastly we discuss the application of strip exchanges in a different area Optical Character Recognition (OCR) with an example.

  13. Accreting Binary Populations in the Earlier Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that X-ray binaries dominate the hard X-ray emission from normal star-forming galaxies. Thanks to the deepest (2-4 Ms) Chandra surveys, such galaxies are now being studied in X-rays out to z approximates 4. Interesting X-ray stacking results (based on 30+ galaxies per redshift bin) suggest that the mean rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity from z=3-4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), is comparable to the most powerful starburst galaxies in the local Universe. This result possibly indicates a similar production mechanism for accreting binaries over large cosmological timescales. To understand and constrain better the production of X-ray binaries in high-redshift LBGs, we have utilized XMM-Newton observations of a small sample of z approximates 0.1 GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs); local analogs to high-redshift LBGs. Our observations enable us to study the X-ray emission from LBG-like galaxies on an individual basis, thus allowing us to constrain object-to-object variances in this population. We supplement these results with X-ray stacking constraints using the new 3.2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (completed spring 2010) and LBG candidates selected from HST, Swift UVOT, and ground-based data. These measurements provide new X-ray constraints that sample well the entire z=0-4 baseline

  14. Accreting Binary Populations in the Earlier Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that X-ray binaries dominate the hard X-ray emission from normal star-forming galaxies. Thanks to the deepest (2-4 Ms) Chandra surveys, such galaxies are now being studied in X-rays out to z approximates 4. Interesting X-ray stacking results (based on 30+ galaxies per redshift bin) suggest that the mean rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity from z=3-4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), is comparable to the most powerful starburst galaxies in the local Universe. This result possibly indicates a similar production mechanism for accreting binaries over large cosmological timescales. To understand and constrain better the production of X-ray binaries in high-redshift LBGs, we have utilized XMM-Newton observations of a small sample of z approximates 0.1 GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs); local analogs to high-redshift LBGs. Our observations enable us to study the X-ray emission from LBG-like galaxies on an individual basis, thus allowing us to constrain object-to-object variances in this population. We supplement these results with X-ray stacking constraints using the new 3.2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (completed spring 2010) and LBG candidates selected from HST, Swift UVOT, and ground-based data. These measurements provide new X-ray constraints that sample well the entire z=0-4 baseline

  15. Formation of Binaries at the Stage of Rarefied Preplanetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, Sergei I.

    2009-05-01

    Last years, new arguments in favor of the model of rarefied preplanetesimals - clumps have been found by several scientists. The models of binary formation due to the gravitational interactions or collisions of future binary components with an object (or objects) that were inside their Hill sphere, which were considered by several authors for solid objects, could be more effective for rarefied preplanetesimals. For example, due to almost circular heliocentric orbits, duration of their motion inside the Hill sphere could be longer and minimum distances could be smaller than for solid bodies. Some collided rarefied preplanetesimals had a greater density at distances closer to their centers, and sometimes there could be two centers of contraction inside the rotating preplanetesimal formed as a result of a collision of two rarefied preplanetesimals. The observed separation distance can characterize the sizes of contracted preplanetesimals. In particular, binaries with close masses separated by a large distance and with any value of the eccentricity of the orbit of the secondary component relative to the primary component could be formed. Most of rarefied preasteroids could contract into solid asteroids before they collided with other preasteroids. Formation of some binaries could be caused by that the angular momentum that they obtained at the stage of rarefied preplanetesimals was greater than that could exist for solid bodies. During contraction of a rotating rarefied preplanetesimal, some material could form a cloud (that transformed into a disk) of material moving around the contracting primary. One or several satellites of the primary could be formed from this cloud. The angular momentum of a discovered trans-Neptunian or asteroidal binary is smaller than the typical angular momentum of two identical rarefied preplanetesimals having the same total mass and encountering to the Hill sphere from circular heliocentric orbits (Ipatov S.I. 2009, LPSC XL, #1021).

  16. Maximum noise-immunity of a digital communications channel with binary coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderskii, V. A.; Strokov, V. V.

    1987-07-01

    The maximum noise-immunity of a digital comunications channel with binary coding is analyzed as a function of the coding rate. The investigation is carried out for two limiting cases: binary-continuous and binary symmetric channels. It is concluded that the results obtained can be used to estimate the degree to which the noise-immunity values of actual digital channels approximate the maximally possible values.

  17. Partial volume morphology: eliminating precision loss in binary morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Joshua D.

    2017-03-01

    Binary morphology has innumerable applications in biomedical imaging, from segmentation to denoising. However, it suffers from inherently low precision. This is primarily because binary morphology is a binary technique, where each image voxel is all-or-nothing included or excluded. Many desirable structuring element shapes, especially circles or spheres, are poorly approximated on regular grids. Making things worse, common workflows involving multiple binary morphology iterations, such as opening or closing, compound this error. Also, small structuring elements often cannot be applied to 3D anisotropic image volumes. This work describes an extension to the theory of binary morphology, dubbed partial volume morphology or PVM, which allows the structuring element and/or image to hold fractional gray values to account for partial volumes. Partial volume morphology enables arbitrarily shaped structuring elements to be used, regardless of the underlying image resolution, with arbitrary precision. This technique also extends to 3D anisotropic volumes, allowing high precision morphological operations in anisotropic datasets heretofore impossible with binary morphology. This technique can be applied to a binary segmentation, where it provides subtle improvements and eliminates precision error in the intermediate steps of a multiple-operation workflow. Additionally, PVM is particularly suited for use on `soft' segmentated data, where the partial volume contribution or probability at each point can be found. With segmentation and structuring elements both partial volume aware, partial volume morphology reaches its full potential as a high precision analytical tool. An open source reference implementation in Python, pvmpy, is provided.

  18. Asteroidal collision probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F.; Greenberg, R.

    1993-05-01

    Several past calculations of collision probabilities between pairs of bodies on independent orbits have yielded inconsistent results. We review the methodologies and identify their various problems. Greenberg's (1982) collision probability formalism (now with a corrected symmetry assumption) is equivalent to Wetherill's (1967) approach, except that it includes a way to avoid singularities near apsides. That method shows that the procedure by Namiki and Binzel (1991) was accurate for those cases where singularities did not arise.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  20. Redshift Factor and the First Law of Binary Black Hole Mechanics in Numerical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Lewis, Adam G M; Pfeiffer, Harald P

    2016-11-04

    The redshift factor z is an invariant quantity of fundamental interest in post-Newtonian and self-force descriptions of compact binaries. It connects different approximation schemes, and plays a central role in the first law of binary black hole mechanics, which links local quantities to asymptotic measures of energy and angular momentum in these systems. Through this law, the redshift factor is conjectured to have a close relation to the surface gravity of the event horizons of black holes in circular orbits. We propose and implement a novel method for extracting the redshift factor on apparent horizons in numerical simulations of quasicircular binary inspirals. Our results confirm the conjectured relationship between z and the surface gravity of the holes and that the first law holds to a remarkable degree for binary inspirals. The redshift factor enables tests of analytic predictions for z in spacetimes where the binary is only approximately circular, giving a new connection between analytic approximations and numerical simulations.

  1. Redshift Factor and the First Law of Binary Black Hole Mechanics in Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Lewis, Adam G. M.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.

    2016-11-01

    The redshift factor z is an invariant quantity of fundamental interest in post-Newtonian and self-force descriptions of compact binaries. It connects different approximation schemes, and plays a central role in the first law of binary black hole mechanics, which links local quantities to asymptotic measures of energy and angular momentum in these systems. Through this law, the redshift factor is conjectured to have a close relation to the surface gravity of the event horizons of black holes in circular orbits. We propose and implement a novel method for extracting the redshift factor on apparent horizons in numerical simulations of quasicircular binary inspirals. Our results confirm the conjectured relationship between z and the surface gravity of the holes and that the first law holds to a remarkable degree for binary inspirals. The redshift factor enables tests of analytic predictions for z in spacetimes where the binary is only approximately circular, giving a new connection between analytic approximations and numerical simulations.

  2. Searching for Widely Separated Asymmetric Binaries in the Kuiper Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Elizabeth A.; Noll, K. S.

    2007-10-01

    We have searched for widely separated transneptunian binaries in dithered observations using the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys High Resolution Channel. In order to automate the combining of images, we have have developed a pipeline of several scripts, utilizing the power of Python to drive the MultiDrizzle PyRAF task within STSDAS and the accessiblity of IDL to interact with the graphical display. We rely on MultiDrizzle to geometrically correct, sub-pixel shift, and drizzle multiple images of target objects. This process removes cosmic rays; with four images we find no artifacts from multiple cosmic ray hits in the drizzled images. We have examined the drizzled images for possible faint companions that would be missed in cosmic-ray impacted images. However, there are numerous image artifacts that require additional investigation to rule out possible close companions. Searching for distant, faint secondaries allows us to better understand transneptunian populations, since the fraction of binaries is a fundamental and characteristic quality. Asymmetric systems, that is, systems with a large brightness difference between primary and secondary, are common among the brightest (largest) Kuiper Belt objects (Brown et al. 2006, Brown and Suer 2007), and may be the result of collisions. Small satellites appear to be absent among the fainter (smaller) objects. A detailed search, like the one we are performing, can further constrain the roles of collisions and capture in forming binaries among the small body populations of the solar system.

  3. On stress relaxation timescales for dense binary particulate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shaolin

    2015-06-01

    We study contact stress relaxation timescales, especially the temporal correlation involved in dense binary particulate systems, which offers insight into the intriguing relationship between the contact stresses and the contact time of particle interactions under non-equilibrium state. The contact time (also referred to as contact age) of a pair of particles is defined by the duration between current time and the instant when the contact was formed. The interspecies inter-particles contact stresses are derived from Liouville's theorem. We apply particle dynamics methods (e.g. molecular dynamics, discrete element method) to simulate 3D dense binary particulate systems with periodic boundary conditions. External perturbation is exerted on the system to balance the dissipation of energy due to the viscoelastic collisions. The contact stresses, Reynolds stresses, and the probability density function of the contact time of particles are predicted at different volume fraction of particles. The obtained stress-strain rate data are used to examine the constitutive relation of macroscopic materials. The study targets the impact of the short-term and the long-term contact/collision on the contact stress relaxation. The simulation results reveal distinct effects of the short-term and the long-term contact/collision on the contact stresses, which have been treated by only an averaged expression of particle interactions in discrete element methods before.

  4. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  5. Encoding of multi-alphabet sources by binary arithmetic coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Muling; Oka, Takahumi; Kato, Shigeo; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Naoto

    1998-12-01

    In case of encoding a multi-alphabet source, the multi- alphabet symbol sequence can be encoded directly by a multi- alphabet arithmetic encoder, or the sequence can be first converted into several binary sequences and then each binary sequence is encoded by binary arithmetic encoder, such as the L-R arithmetic coder. Arithmetic coding, however, requires arithmetic operations for each symbol and is computationally heavy. In this paper, a binary representation method using Huffman tree is introduced to reduce the number of arithmetic operations, and a new probability approximation for L-R arithmetic coding is further proposed to improve the coding efficiency when the probability of LPS (Least Probable Symbol) is near 0.5. Simulation results show that our proposed scheme has high coding efficacy and can reduce the number of coding symbols.

  6. Reading Watermarks from Printed Binary Images with a Camera Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramila, Anu; Keskinarkaus, Anja; Seppänen, Tapio

    In this paper, we propose a method for reading a watermark from a printed binary image with a camera phone. The watermark is a small binary image which is protected with (15, 11) Hamming error coding and embedded in the binary image by utilizing flippability scores of the pixels and block based relationships. The binary image is divided into blocks and fixed number of bits is embedded in each block. A frame is added around the image in order to overcome 3D distortions and lens distortions are corrected by calibrating the camera. The results obtained are encouraging and when the images were captured freehandedly by rotating the camera approximately -2 - 2 degrees, the amount of fully recovered watermarks was 96.3%.

  7. Planetesimal Accretion in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Scholl, H.

    2000-11-01

    Planetesimal accretion in close binary systems is a complex process for the gravitational perturbations of the companion star on the planetesimal orbits. These perturbations excite high eccentricities that can halt the accumulation process of planetesimals into planets also in those regions around the star where stable planetary orbits would eventually be possible. However, the evolution of a planetesimal swarm is also affected by collisions and gas drag. In particular, gas drag combined with the secular perturbations of the secondary star forces a strong alignment of all the planetesimal periastra. Since periastra are also coupled to eccentricities via the secular perturbations of the companion, the orbits of the planetesimals, besides all being aligned, also have very close values of eccentricity. This orbital ``phasing'' strongly reduces the contribution of the eccentricity to the relative velocities between planetesimals, and the impact speeds are dominated by the Keplerian shear: accretion becomes possible. This behavior is not limited to small planetesimals but also affects bodies as large as 100 km in diameter. The effects of gas drag are in fact enhanced by the presence of the constant forced component in the orbital eccentricity of the planetesimals. We describe analytically the periastron alignment by using the secular equations developed by Heppenheimer, and we test the prediction of the theory with a numerical code that integrates the orbits of a swarm of planetesimals perturbed by gas drag and collisions. The gas density is assumed to decrease outward, and the collisions are modeled as inelastic. Our computations are focused on the α Centauri system, which is a good candidate for terrestrial planets as we will show. The impact velocities between planetesimals of different sizes are computed at progressively increasing distances from the primary star and are compared with estimates for the maximum velocity for accretion. According to our simulations in

  8. Hybrid Approximate Message Passing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Sundeep; Fletcher, Alyson K.; Goyal, Vivek K.; Byrne, Evan; Schniter, Philip

    2017-09-01

    The standard linear regression (SLR) problem is to recover a vector $\\mathbf{x}^0$ from noisy linear observations $\\mathbf{y}=\\mathbf{Ax}^0+\\mathbf{w}$. The approximate message passing (AMP) algorithm recently proposed by Donoho, Maleki, and Montanari is a computationally efficient iterative approach to SLR that has a remarkable property: for large i.i.d.\\ sub-Gaussian matrices $\\mathbf{A}$, its per-iteration behavior is rigorously characterized by a scalar state-evolution whose fixed points, when unique, are Bayes optimal. AMP, however, is fragile in that even small deviations from the i.i.d.\\ sub-Gaussian model can cause the algorithm to diverge. This paper considers a "vector AMP" (VAMP) algorithm and shows that VAMP has a rigorous scalar state-evolution that holds under a much broader class of large random matrices $\\mathbf{A}$: those that are right-rotationally invariant. After performing an initial singular value decomposition (SVD) of $\\mathbf{A}$, the per-iteration complexity of VAMP can be made similar to that of AMP. In addition, the fixed points of VAMP's state evolution are consistent with the replica prediction of the minimum mean-squared error recently derived by Tulino, Caire, Verd\\'u, and Shamai. The effectiveness and state evolution predictions of VAMP are confirmed in numerical experiments.

  9. Exact linearized Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Jeong -Young; Held, Eric D.

    2006-10-05

    In the moment expansion, the Rosenbluth potentials, the linearized Coulomb collision operators, and the moments of the collision operators are analytically calculated for any moment. The explicit calculation of Rosenbluth potentials converts the integro-differential form of the Coulomb collision operator into a differential operator, which enables one to express the collision operator in a simple closed form for any arbitrary mass and temperature ratios. In addition, it is shown that gyrophase averaging the collision operator acting on arbitrary distribution functions is the same as the collision operator acting on the corresponding gyrophase averaged distribution functions. The moments of the collisionmore » operator are linear combinations of the fluid moments with collision coefficients parametrized by mass and temperature ratios. Furthermore, useful forms involving the small mass-ratio approximation are easily found since the collision operators and their moments are expressed in terms of the mass ratio. As an application, the general moment equations are explicitly written and the higher order heat flux equation is derived.« less

  10. Temperature Dependence of Stark Broadening Dominated by Strong Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gigosos, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Konjevic, N.

    2006-11-22

    The influence of electron temperature in the broadening of spectral lines dominated by strong collisions has been studied. Computer simulation allows us to study the effects of strong and weak collisions separately. Results shown here are focused on some Sr+ and Ba+ resonance lines as examples of lines broadened dominantly by strong collisions. The exact numerical integration of the perturbation process due to the collision with a single particle permits the evaluation of Weisskopf radius. This parameter is usually defined as rw {approx} 1/v {approx} 1/{radical}T, obtained from Bora approximation that is correct for high temperatures. However, at low temperatures the full integration of the collision process permits to test the relationship rw {approx} 1/T1/6. This calculation has allowed us to study the influence of temperature on the broadening of the lines dominated by strong collisions. This study has been done in two ways : through a plasma simulation and analyzing the calculated Weisskopf radius for an individual collision. The obtained results show that at low temperatures the width of the line increases for increasing temperature as a consequence of an increase of the number of collisions not compensated by the decrease of Weisskopf radius.

  11. Countably QC-Approximating Posets

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuxin; Xu, Luoshan

    2014-01-01

    As a generalization of countably C-approximating posets, the concept of countably QC-approximating posets is introduced. With the countably QC-approximating property, some characterizations of generalized completely distributive lattices and generalized countably approximating posets are given. The main results are as follows: (1) a complete lattice is generalized completely distributive if and only if it is countably QC-approximating and weakly generalized countably approximating; (2) a poset L having countably directed joins is generalized countably approximating if and only if the lattice σc(L)op of all σ-Scott-closed subsets of L is weakly generalized countably approximating. PMID:25165730

  12. Visually guided collision avoidance and collision achievement.

    PubMed

    Regan; Gray

    2000-03-01

    To survive on today's highways, a driver must have highly developed skills in visually guided collision avoidance. To play such games as cricket, tennis or baseball demands accurate, precise and reliable collision achievement. This review discusses evidence that some of these tasks are performed by predicting where an object will be at some sharply defined instant, several hundred milliseconds in the future, while other tasks are performed by utilizing the fact that some of our motor actions change what we see in ways that obey lawful relationships, and can therefore be learned. Several monocular and binocular visual correlates of the direction of an object's motion relative to the observer's head have been derived theoretically, along with visual correlates of the time to collision with an approaching object. Although laboratory psychophysics can identify putative neural mechanisms by showing which of the known correlates are processed by the human visual system independently of other visual information, it is only field research on, for example, driving, aviation and sport that can show which visual cues are actually used in these activities. This article reviews this research and describes a general psychophysically based rational approach to the design of such field studies.

  13. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  14. Parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Crockett, Thomas W.; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Binary dissection is widely used to partition non-uniform domains over parallel computers. This algorithm does not consider the perimeter, surface area, or aspect ratio of the regions being generated and can yield decompositions that have poor communication to computation ratio. Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm in which each cut is chosen to minimize load + lambda x(shape). In a 2 (or 3) dimensional problem, load is the amount of computation to be performed in a subregion and shape could refer to the perimeter (respectively surface) of that subregion. Shape is a measure of communication overhead and the parameter permits us to trade off load imbalance against communication overhead. When A is zero, the algorithm reduces to plain binary dissection. This algorithm can be used to partition graphs embedded in 2 or 3-d. Load is the number of nodes in a subregion, shape the number of edges that leave that subregion, and lambda the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. An algorithm is presented that finds the depth d parametric dissection of an embedded graph with n vertices and e edges in O(max(n log n, de)) time, which is an improvement over the O(dn log n) time of plain binary dissection. Parallel versions of this algorithm are also presented; the best of these requires O((n/p) log(sup 3)p) time on a p processor hypercube, assuming graphs of bounded degree. How PBD is applied to 3-d unstructured meshes and yields partitions that are better than those obtained by plain dissection is described. Its application to the color image quantization problem is also discussed, in which samples in a high-resolution color space are mapped onto a lower resolution space in a way that minimizes the color error.

  15. Binary Optics Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Daniel

    1996-04-02

    This software is a set of tools for the design and analysis of binary optics. It consists of a series of stand-alone programs written in C and some scripts written in an application-specific language interpreted by a CAD program called DW2000. This software can be used to optimize the design and placement of a complex lens array from input to output and produce contours, mask designs, and data exported for diffractive optic analysis.

  16. Processing Of Binary Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H. S.

    1985-07-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the area of digital processing of binary images in the context of document processing is presented here. The topics covered include input scan, adaptive thresholding, halftoning, scaling and resolution conversion, data compression, character recognition, electronic mail, digital typography, and output scan. Emphasis has been placed on illustrating the basic principles rather than descriptions of a particular system. Recent technology advances and research in this field are also mentioned.

  17. Double Eclipsing Binary Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, P.; Pejcha, O.

    2012-06-01

    The parameters of the mutual orbit of eclipsing binaries that are physically connected can be obtained by precision timing of minima over time through light travel time effect, apsidal motion or orbital precession. This, however, requires joint analysis of data from different sources obtained through various techniques and with insufficiently quantified uncertainties. In particular, photometric uncertainties are often underestimated, which yields too small uncertainties in minima timings if determined through analysis of a χ2 surface. The task is even more difficult for double eclipsing binaries, especially those with periods close to a resonance such as CzeV344, where minima get often blended with each other. This code solves the double binary parameters simultaneously and then uses these parameters to determine minima timings (or more specifically O-C values) for individual datasets. In both cases, the uncertainties (or more precisely confidence intervals) are determined through bootstrap resampling of the original data. This procedure to a large extent alleviates the common problem with underestimated photometric uncertainties and provides a check on possible degeneracies in the parameters and the stability of the results. While there are shortcomings to this method as well when compared to Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, the ease of the implementation of bootstrapping is a significant advantage.

  18. Ultracold sodium and rubidium mixtures: collisions, interactions and heteronuclear molecule formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Chandra S

    2013-02-06

    This program centers on quantum gases of 23Na and 87Rb, with the goal of observing collisions and interactions in binary mixtures. In the current period our research has focused on single species interactions and dynamics with a 23Na Bose-Einstein condensate.

  19. Coincidence studies of ion-molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik

    1998-05-01

    Two of the simplest collision systems one can imagine are H^+ + H(1s) and H^+ + D(1s). Electron transfer is resonant in the first and nearly resonant in the latter because of the 3.7 meV gap between the H(1s) and D(1s). Once the collision velocity becomes small enough quantum effects become more pronounced and the electron transfer rate as a function of collision energy exhibits many resonances(G. Hunter and M. Kuriyan, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 358), 321 (1977).^,(J.P. Davis and W.R. Thorson, Can. J. Phys. 56), 996 (1978).. However, most of the interesting features appear at very low energies, of a few meV, and these collision systems which are the ``theorist's dream'' become a nightmare to experimentalists. Nevertheless, we are undertaking the challenging measurement of near resonant electron transfer in the H^+ + D(1s) collision system. When a HD molecule is ionized quickly, such that the transition to the HD^+ molecular ion is vertical, about 1% of the HD^+(1sσ) is in the vibrational continuum. The transition probability falls off approximately exponentially above threshold and its width is about 200 meV. During the dissociation, the electron initially centered on the D core can make a transition to the H core when the 2pσ and 1sσ potential energy curves associated with the two dissociation limits get close to each other. It is important to note that during molecular dissociation the ``avoided crossing'' is crossed only once in contrast to twice during a full collision. Using a localized cold HD target and 3D imaging of the low energy H^+ and D^+ dissociation fragments one can experimentally determine the transition probability between these two states as a function of the dissociation energy. Clearly, a recoil energy resolution of the order of a meV is necessary, which is the primary experimental challenge.

  20. Binary-Signal Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2011-01-01

    Binary communication through long cables, opto-isolators, isolating transformers, or repeaters can become distorted in characteristic ways. The usual solution is to slow the communication rate, change to a different method, or improve the communication media. It would help if the characteristic distortions could be accommodated at the receiving end to ease the communication problem. The distortions come from loss of the high-frequency content, which adds slopes to the transitions from ones to zeroes and zeroes to ones. This weakens the definition of the ones and zeroes in the time domain. The other major distortion is the reduction of low frequency, which causes the voltage that defines the ones or zeroes to drift out of recognizable range. This development describes a method for recovering a binary data stream from a signal that has been subjected to a loss of both higher-frequency content and low-frequency content that is essential to define the difference between ones and zeroes. The method makes use of the frequency structure of the waveform created by the data stream, and then enhances the characteristics related to the data to reconstruct the binary switching pattern. A major issue is simplicity. The approach taken here is to take the first derivative of the signal and then feed it to a hysteresis switch. This is equivalent in practice to using a non-resonant band pass filter feeding a Schmitt trigger. Obviously, the derivative signal needs to be offset to halfway between the thresholds of the hysteresis switch, and amplified so that the derivatives reliably exceed the thresholds. A transition from a zero to a one is the most substantial, fastest plus movement of voltage, and therefore will create the largest plus first derivative pulse. Since the quiet state of the derivative is sitting between the hysteresis thresholds, the plus pulse exceeds the plus threshold, switching the hysteresis switch plus, which re-establishes the data zero to one transition

  1. Fast approximate stochastic tractography.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Thompson, Paul M; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Tu, Zhuowen

    2012-01-01

    Many different probabilistic tractography methods have been proposed in the literature to overcome the limitations of classical deterministic tractography: (i) lack of quantitative connectivity information; and (ii) robustness to noise, partial volume effects and selection of seed region. However, these methods rely on Monte Carlo sampling techniques that are computationally very demanding. This study presents an approximate stochastic tractography algorithm (FAST) that can be used interactively, as opposed to having to wait several minutes to obtain the output after marking a seed region. In FAST, tractography is formulated as a Markov chain that relies on a transition tensor. The tensor is designed to mimic the features of a well-known probabilistic tractography method based on a random walk model and Monte-Carlo sampling, but can also accommodate other propagation rules. Compared to the baseline algorithm, our method circumvents the sampling process and provides a deterministic solution at the expense of partially sacrificing sub-voxel accuracy. Therefore, the method is strictly speaking not stochastic, but provides a probabilistic output in the spirit of stochastic tractography methods. FAST was compared with the random walk model using real data from 10 patients in two different ways: 1. the probability maps produced by the two methods on five well-known fiber tracts were directly compared using metrics from the image registration literature; and 2. the connectivity measurements between different regions of the brain given by the two methods were compared using the correlation coefficient ρ. The results show that the connectivity measures provided by the two algorithms are well-correlated (ρ = 0.83), and so are the probability maps (normalized cross correlation 0.818 ± 0.081). The maps are also qualitatively (i.e., visually) very similar. The proposed method achieves a 60x speed-up (7 s vs. 7 min) over the Monte Carlo sampling scheme, therefore

  2. Properties of the Boltzmann equation in the classical approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, Thomas; Gelis, François; Tanji, Naoto; Wu, Bin

    2014-12-30

    We examine the Boltzmann equation with elastic point-like scalar interactions in two different versions of the the classical approximation. Although solving numerically the Boltzmann equation with the unapproximated collision term poses no problem, this allows one to study the effect of the ultraviolet cutoff in these approximations. This cutoff dependence in the classical approximations of the Boltzmann equation is closely related to the non-renormalizability of the classical statistical approximation of the underlying quantum field theory. The kinetic theory setup that we consider here allows one to study in a much simpler way the dependence on the ultraviolet cutoff, since one has also access to the non-approximated result for comparison.

  3. Properties of the Boltzmann equation in the classical approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Epelbaum, Thomas; Gelis, François; Tanji, Naoto; ...

    2014-12-30

    We examine the Boltzmann equation with elastic point-like scalar interactions in two different versions of the the classical approximation. Although solving numerically the Boltzmann equation with the unapproximated collision term poses no problem, this allows one to study the effect of the ultraviolet cutoff in these approximations. This cutoff dependence in the classical approximations of the Boltzmann equation is closely related to the non-renormalizability of the classical statistical approximation of the underlying quantum field theory. The kinetic theory setup that we consider here allows one to study in a much simpler way the dependence on the ultraviolet cutoff, since onemore » has also access to the non-approximated result for comparison.« less

  4. Conservative Analytical Collision Probability for Design of Orbital Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2004-01-01

    The literature offers a number of approximations for analytically and/or efficiently computing the probability of collision between two space objects. However, only one of these techniques is a completely analytical approximation that is suitable for use in the preliminary design phase, when it is more important to quickly analyze a large segment of the trade space than it is to precisely compute collision probabilities. Unfortunately, among the types of formations that one might consider, some combine a range of conditions for which this analytical method is less suitable. This work proposes a simple, conservative approximation that produces reasonable upper bounds on the collision probability in such conditions. Although its estimates are much too conservative under other conditions, such conditions are typically well suited for use of the existing method.

  5. Conservative Analytical Collision Probabilities for Orbital Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2004-01-01

    The literature offers a number of approximations for analytically and/or efficiently computing the probability of collision between two space objects. However, only one of these techniques is a completely analytical approximation that is suitable for use in the preliminary design phase, when it is more important to quickly analyze a large segment of the trade space than it is to precisely compute collision probabilities. Unfortunately, among the types of formations that one might consider, some combine a range of conditions for which this analytical method is less suitable. This work proposes a simple, conservative approximation that produces reasonable upper bounds on the collision probability in such conditions. Although its estimates are much too conservative under other conditions, such conditions are typically well suited for use of the existing method.

  6. Initial results of a full kinetic simulation of RF H{sup −} source including Coulomb collision process

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, S.; Shibata, T.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    In order to evaluate Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) more correctly for radio frequency inductively coupled plasma (RF-ICP) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) simulation code has been improved by taking into account electron-electron Coulomb collision. Binary collision model is employed to model Coulomb collision process and we have successfully modeled it. The preliminary calculation including Coulomb collision has been done and it is shown that Coulomb collision doesn’t have significant effects under the condition: electron density n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and high gas pressure p{sub H{sub 2}} = 3 Pa, while it is necessary to include Coulomb collision under high electron density and low gas pressure conditions.

  7. Visual binary stars: data to investigate formation of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva,, D.; Malkov,, O.; Yungelson, L.; Chulkov, D.

    Statistics of orbital parameters of binary stars as well as statistics of their physical characteristics bear traces of star formation history. However, statistical investigations of binaries are complicated by incomplete or missing observational data and by a number of observational selection effects. Visual binaries are the most common type of observed binary stars, with the number of pairs exceeding 130 000. The most complete list of presently known visual binary stars was compiled by cross-matching objects and combining data of the three largest catalogues of visual binaries. This list was supplemented by the data on parallaxes, multicolor photometry, and spectral characteristics taken from other catalogues. This allowed us to compensate partly for the lack of observational data for these objects. The combined data allowed us to check the validity of observational values and to investigate statistics of the orbital and physical parameters of visual binaries. Corrections for incompleteness of observational data are discussed. The datasets obtained, together with modern distributions of binary parameters, will be used to reconstruct the initial distributions and parameters of the function of star formation for binary systems.

  8. Local Submodularization for Binary Pairwise Energies.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Lena; Boykov, Yuri; Veksler, Olga; Ayed, Ismail Ben; Delong, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Many computer vision problems require optimization of binary non-submodular energies. We propose a general optimization framework based on local submodular approximations (LSA). Unlike standard LP relaxation methods that linearize the whole energy globally, our approach iteratively approximates the energy locally. On the other hand, unlike standard local optimization methods (e.g., gradient descent or projection techniques) we use non-linear submodular approximations and optimize them without leaving the domain of integer solutions. We discuss two specific LSA algorithms based on trust region and auxiliary function principles, LSA-TR and LSA-AUX. The proposed methods obtain state-of-the-art results on a wide range of applications such as binary deconvolution, curvature regularization, inpainting, segmentation with repulsion and two types of shape priors. Finally, we discuss a move-making extension to the LSA-TR approach. While our paper is focused on pairwise energies, our ideas extend to higher-order problems. The code is available online.

  9. Electron Ionization Cross Sections in the Distorted-Wave Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-18

    solution T(rl, r2 ) of the Schr ~ dinger equation is not known. Moreover, it is difficult to satisfy condition (9) for effective charges Z and Z’ as... computing time . It is therefore suitable for a production of large number of data needed in the analysis and interpretation of hot plasmas in laboratory...goal was to develop an approximation based on the quantum-mechanical approach to the collision problem, simple enough so that it would be suitable

  10. Mixing Diagnostics in Confined, High-Speed Droplet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Brian; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Fast mixing remains a major challenge in droplet-based microfluidics. The low Reynolds number operating regime of most mixing devices signifies orderly flows that are devoid of any inertial characteristics. To increase droplet mixing rates, a novel technique is under development that uses a high Reynolds number gaseous phase for droplet generation and transport and promotes mixing through binary droplet collisions at velocities near 1m/s. Limitations in existing mixing diagnostic methodologies has persuaded cultivation of a new technique for measuring droplet collision mixing in confined microchannels. The technique employs single fluorophore laser-induced fluorescence, custom image processing, and meaningful statistical analysis for monitoring and quantifying mixing in high-speed droplet collisions. Mixing progress is revealed through two statistics that separate the roles of convective rearrangement and molecular diffusion during the mixing process. The end result is a viewing window into the rich dynamics of droplet collisions with spatial and temporal resolutions of 1 μm and 25 μs, respectively. Experimental results obtained across a decade of Reynolds and Peclet numbers reveal a direct link between droplet mixing time and the collision convective timescale. This work provides valuable insight into the emerging field of two-phase gas-liquid microfluidics and opens the door to fundamental research possibilities not offered by traditional oil-based architectures.

  11. Wide- and contact-binary formation in substructured young stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, J.; Boily, C. M.; Moraux, E.; Roos, O.

    2017-02-01

    We explore with collisional gravitational N-body models the evolution of binary stars in initially fragmented and globally subvirial clusters of stars. Binaries are inserted in the (initially) clumpy configurations so as to match the observed distributions of the field-binary-stars' semimajor axes a and binary fraction versus primary mass. The dissolution rate of wide binaries is very high at the start of the simulations, and is much reduced once the clumps are eroded by the global infall. The transition between the two regimes is sharper as the number of stars N is increased, from N = 1.5 k up to 80 k. The fraction of dissolved binary stars increases only mildly with N, from ≈15 per cent to ≈25 per cent for the same range in N. We repeated the calculation for two initial system mean number densities of 6 per pc3 (low) and 400 per pc3 (high). We found that the longer free-fall time of the low-density runs allows for prolonged binary-binary interactions inside clumps and the formation of very tight (a ≈ 0.01 au) binaries by exchange collisions. This is an indication that the statistics of such compact binaries bear a direct link to their environment at birth. We also explore the formation of wide (a ≳ 5 × 104 au) binaries and find a low (≈0.01 per cent) fraction mildly bound to the central star cluster. The high-precision astrometric mission Gaia could identify them as outflowing shells or streams.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Statistical test on binary stars non-coevality (Valle+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Valle, G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2016-01-01

    The table contains the W0.95 critical values, for the 1087 binary systems considered in the paper. Tha table also lists the parameters of the beta distributions approximating the empirical W distributions. (1 data file).

  13. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-08-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  14. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  15. Bowen-York-type initial data for binaries with neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Michael; Laguna, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    A new approach to construct initial data for binary systems with neutron star components is introduced. The approach is a generalization of the puncture initial data method for binary black holes based on Bowen-York solutions to the momentum constraint. As with binary black holes, the method allows setting orbital configurations with direct input from post-Newtonian approximations and involves solving only the Hamiltonian constraint. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated with evolutions of double neutron star and black hole-neutron star binaries in quasicircular orbits.

  16. Probability Quantization for Multiplication-Free Binary Arithmetic Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K. -M.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to improve on Witten's binary arithmetic coding procedure of tracking a high value and a low value. The new method approximates the probability of the less probable symbol, which improves the worst-case coding efficiency.

  17. Probability Quantization for Multiplication-Free Binary Arithmetic Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K. -M.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to improve on Witten's binary arithmetic coding procedure of tracking a high value and a low value. The new method approximates the probability of the less probable symbol, which improves the worst-case coding efficiency.

  18. Shear viscosity for a heated granular binary mixture at low density.

    PubMed

    Montanero, José María; Garzó, Vicente

    2003-02-01

    The shear viscosity for a heated granular binary mixture of smooth hard spheres at low density is analyzed. The mixture is heated by the action of an external driving force (Gaussian thermostat) that exactly compensates for cooling effects associated with the dissipation of collisions. The study is made from the Boltzmann kinetic theory, which is solved by using two complementary approaches. First, a normal solution of the Boltzmann equation via the Chapman-Enskog method is obtained up to first order in the spatial gradients. The mass, heat, and momentum fluxes are determined and the corresponding transport coefficients identified. As in the free cooling case [V. Garzó and J. W. Dufty, Phys. Fluids 14, 1476 (2002)], practical evaluation requires a Sonine polynomial approximation, and here it is mainly illustrated in the case of the shear viscosity. Second, to check the accuracy of the Chapman-Enskog results, the Boltzmann equation is numerically solved by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The simulation is performed for a system under uniform shear flow, using the Gaussian thermostat to control inelastic cooling. The comparison shows an excellent agreement between theory and simulation over a wide range of values of the restitution coefficients and the parameters of the mixture (masses, concentrations, and sizes).

  19. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  20. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  1. Elliptic waveforms for inspiralling compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikóczi, Balázs

    2010-03-01

    The inspiral of supermassive black hole binary systems with high orbital eccentricity are the most promising sources for the gravitational wave observatories. The importance of elliptic gravitational waveforms in various physical scenarios has been emphasized by several authors (Wahlquist 1987, Moreno-Garrido, Buitrago and Mediavilla 1994, Martel and Poisson 1999). Taking into account the eccentricity of the orbit in the total waveform improves the parameter estimation for these sources, as it is shown by the construction and analyzation of the Fisher information matrix. In our work we use the Fourier-Bessel analysis of the Kepler motion and the stationary phase approximation of time-depend waveforms.

  2. The Search for Trojan Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline, William J.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Dumas, C.; Close, L. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Durda, D. D.; Levison, H. F.; Hamilton, D. P.; Nesvorny, D.; Storrs, A.; Enke, B.; Menard, F.

    2007-10-01

    We report on observations of Jupiter Trojan asteroids in search of binaries. We made observations using HST/ACS of 35 small (V = 17.5-19.5) objects in Cycle 14, without detecting any binaires. We have also observed a few dozen Trojans in our ground-based study of larger Trojans, discovering only one binary. The result is that the frequency of moderately-separated binaries among the Trojans seem rather low, likely less than 5%. Although we have only statistics of small numbers, it appears that the binary frequencies are more akin to the larger Main-Belt asteroids, than to the frequency in the TNO region, which probably exceeds 10%. The low frequency is inconsistent with the projections based on Trojan contact binaries by Mann et al. (2006, BAAS 38, 6509), although our work cannot detect very close or contact binaries. We discovered and characterized the orbit and density of the first Trojan binary, (617) Patroclus using the Gemini AO system (Merline et al. 2001 IAUC 7741). A second binary, (624) Hecktor, has now been reported by Marchis et al. (2006, IAUC 8732). In a broad survey of Main Belt asteroids, we found that, among the larger objects, the binary fraction is about 2%, while we are finding that the fraction is significantly higher among smaller asteroids (and this is even more apparent from lightcurve discoveries). Further, characteristics of these smaller systems indicate a distinctly different formation mechanism the the larger MB binaries. Because the Trojans have compositions that are more like the KBOs, while they live in a collisional environment much more like the Main Belt than the KBOs, these objects should hold vital clues to binary formation mechanics. And because there seems to be a distinct difference in larger and smaller main-belt binaries, we sought to detect such differences among the Trojans as well.

  3. Radio emission from binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the radio emission from binary star systems - the emission processes that occur, the characteristics of the binary systems inferred from the radio observations, and the reasons for the activity. Several classes of binary stars are described including those with two main sequence stars, those with one normal star and a white dwarf, and those containing a neutron star or a black hole.

  4. Three-body collision contributions to recombination and collision-induced dissociation. 1: Cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, R.T.; Walker, R.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-04-10

    Atomic and molecular recombination and collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions comprise two of the most fundamental types of chemical reactions. They are important in all gas phase chemistry; for example, about half of the 196 reactions identified as important in combustion chemistry are recombination or CID reactions. Many of the current chemical kinetics textbooks and kinetics papers treat atomic and molecular recombination and CID as occurring only via sequences of two-body collisions. Actually, there is considerable evidence from experiment and classical trajectory calculations for contributions by true three-body collisions to the recombination of atomic and diatomic radicals, and that evidence is reviewed. Then, an approximate quantum method treating both two-body and three-body collisions simultaneously and on equal footing is used to calculate cross sections for the reaction Ne{sub 2} + H {rightleftharpoons} Ne + Ne + H. The results provide clear quantum evidence that direct three-body collisions do contribute significantly to recombination and CID.

  5. COLLISIONAL EVOLUTION OF ULTRA-WIDE TRANS-NEPTUNIAN BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Alex H.; Kavelaars, J. J.

    2012-01-10

    The widely separated, near-equal mass binaries hosted by the cold classical Kuiper Belt are delicately bound and subject to disruption by many perturbing processes. We use analytical arguments and numerical simulations to determine their collisional lifetimes given various impactor size distributions and include the effects of mass loss and multiple impacts over the lifetime of each system. These collisional lifetimes constrain the population of small (R {approx}> 1 km) objects currently residing in the Kuiper Belt and confirm that the size distribution slope at small size cannot be excessively steep-likely q {approx}< 3.5. We track mutual semimajor axis, inclination, and eccentricity evolution through our simulations and show that it is unlikely that the wide binary population represents an evolved tail of the primordially tight binary population. We find that if the wide binaries are a collisionally eroded population, their primordial mutual orbit planes must have preferred to lie in the plane of the solar system. Finally, we find that current limits on the size distribution at small radii remain high enough that the prospect of detecting dust-producing collisions in real time in the Kuiper Belt with future optical surveys is feasible.

  6. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  7. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  8. Binary module test. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.R.; Colley, T.C.; Pundyk, J.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this project was to design and test a binary loop module representative of and scaleable to commercial size units. The design was based on state-of-the-art heat exchanger technology, and the purpose of the tests was to confirm performance of a supercritical boiling cycle using isobutane and a mixture of isobutane and isopentane as the secondary working fluid. The module was designed as one percent of a 50 MW unit. It was installed at Magma Power's East Mesa geothermal field and tested over a period of approximately 4 months. Most of the test runs were with isobutane but some data were collected for hydrocarbon mixtures. The results of the field tests are reported. In general these results indicate reasonably good heat balances and agreement with overall heat transfer coefficients calculated by current stream analysis methods and available fluid property data; however, measured pressure drops across the heat exchangers were 20 percent higher than estimated. System operation was stable under all conditions tested.

  9. Density waves at the interface of a binary complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Schwabe, Mierk; Zhdanov, Sergey; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Lipaev, Andrey M.; Molotkov, Vladimir I.; Fortov, Vladimir E.; Zhang, Jing; Du, Cheng-Ran

    2017-01-01

    Density waves were studied in a phase-separated binary complex plasma under microgravity conditions. For the big particles, waves were self-excited by the two-stream instability, while for small particles, they were excited by heartbeat instability with the presence of reversed propagating pulses of a different frequency. By studying the dynamics of wave crests at the interface, we recognize a “collision zone” and a “merger zone” before and after the interface, respectively. The results provide a generic picture of wave-wave interaction at the interface between two “mediums”.

  10. Black-hole binary evolutions with the LEAN code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperhake, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Numerical simulations of black-hole binaries, obtained with the Lean code, are presented. The code is demonstrated to produce state-of-the-art evolutions of inspiralling and merging black holes with convergent waveforms. We further compare results from head-on collisions of Brill-Lindquist and Kerr-Schild data to study the dependency of the waveforms on the choice of initial data type. In this comparison we find good qualitative agreement between the results of both data types, but observe a systematic discrepancy of about 10% in the wave amplitudes. Several attempts to explain the observed discrepancy are discussed.

  11. Multiwavelength Studies of gamma-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragona, Christina

    2011-01-01

    High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) consist of an O or B star orbited by either a neutron star or a black hole. Of the 114 known Galactic HMXBs, a handful of these objects, dubbed gamma-ray binaries, have been observed to produce MeV-TeV emission. The very high energy emission can be produced either by accretion from the stellar wind onto a black hole or a collision between the stellar wind and a relativistic pulsar wind. Both these scenarios make gamma-ray binaries valuable nearby systems for studying the physics of shocks and jets. Currently, the nature of the compact object and the high energy production mechanism is unknown or unconfirmed in over half of these systems. My goal for this dissertation is to constrain the parameters describing two of these systems: LS 5039 and HD 259440. LS 5039 exhibits gamma-ray emission modulated with its orbital period. The system consists of an ON6.5V((f)) star and an unidentified compact companion. Using optical spectra from the CTIO 1.5m telescope, we found LS 5039 to have an orbital period of 3.90608 d and an eccentricity of 0.337. Spectra of the Halpha line observed with SOAR indicate a mass loss rate of ˜ 1.9x10 -8 M yr-1. Observations taken with ATCA at 13 cm, 6 cm, and 3 cm indicate radio fluxes between 10--40 mJy. The measurements show variability with time, indicating a source other than thermal emission from the stellar wind. HD 259440 is a B0pe star that was proposed as the optical counterpart to the gamma-ray source HESS J0632+057. Using optical spectra from the KPNO CF, KPNO 2.1m, and OHP telescopes, we find a best fit stellar effective temperature of 27500--30000 K, a log surface gravity of 3.75--4.0, a mass of 13.2--19.0 Msolar, and a radius of 6.0--9.6 Rsolar. By fitting the spectral energy distribution, we find a distance between 1.1--1.7 kpc. We do not detect any significant radial velocity shifts in our data, ruling out orbital periods shorter than one month. If HD 259440 is a binary, it is likely a long

  12. Particle acceleration in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Cygnus X-3 massive binary system is one of the powerful sources of radio and X-ray emission consisting of an accreting compact object, probably a black hole, with a Wolf-Rayet star companion. Based on the detections of ultra high energy gamma-rays by Kiel and Havera Park, Cygnus X-3 has been proposed to be one of the most powerful sources of charged cosmic ray particles in the Galaxy. The results of long-term observations of the Cyg X-3 binary at energies 800 GeV-85 TeV detected by SHALON in 1995 are presented with images, integral spectra and spectral energy distribution. The identification of source with Cygnus X-3 detected by SHALON was secured by the detection of its 4.8 hour orbital period in TeV gamma-rays. During the whole observation period of Cyg X-3 with SHALON significant flux increases were detected at energies above 0.8 TeV. These TeV flux increases are correlated with flaring activity at a lower energy range of X-ray and/or at observations of Fermi LAT as well as with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The variability of very high-energy gamma-radiation and correlation of radiation activity in the wide energy range can provide essential information on particle mechanism production up to very high energies. Whereas, modulation of very high energy emission connected to the orbital motion of the binary system, provides an understanding of the emission processes, nature and location of particle acceleration.

  13. Very Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olling, Robert; Shaya, E.

    2011-01-01

    We develop Bayesian statistical methods for discovering and assigning probabilities to physical stellar companions. The probabilities depend on similarities in "corrected" proper motion, parallax, and the phase-space density of field stars. Very wide binaries with separations over 10,000 AU have recently been predicted to form during the dissolution process of low-mass star clusters. In this case, these wide systems would still carry information about the density and size of the star cluster in which they formed. Alternatively, Galactic tides and weak interactions with passing stars peel off stars from such very wide binaries in less than 1/2 of a Hubble time. In the past, these systems have been used to rule in/out MACHOs or less compact dark (matter) objects. Ours is the first all-sky survey to locate escaped companions that are still drifting along with each other, long after their binary bond has been broken. We test stars for companionship up to an apparent separation of 8 parsec: 10 to 100 times wider than previous searches. Among Hipparcos stars within 100 pc, we find about 260 systems with separations between 0.01 and 1 pc, and another 190 with separation from 1 to 8 parsec. We find a number of previously unnoticed naked-eye companions, among which: Capella & 50 Per; Alioth, Megrez & Alcor; gamma & tau Cen; phi Eri & eta Hor; 62 & 63 Cnc; gamma & tau Per; zeta & delta Hya; beta01, beta02 & beta03 Tuc; 44 & 58 Oph and pi & rho Cep. At least 15 of our candidates are exoplanet host stars.

  14. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  15. Ecospheres around binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, B.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific investigations concerning ecospheres of other stars are very important for understanding the posibilities of existence and evolution of extraterrestrial life. In several last years astronomers discovered hundreds of extrasolar planets. Identification of stars with ecospheres is the first step in selecting those planets which could be inhabited. Usually an ecosphere of a single star is considered but it may also exist in planetary systems with two suns. This possibility is very promising in search for life on other planets as more that 60 % of stars reside in binary or multiple systems.

  16. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  17. BINARY STORAGE ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-06-10

    A binary storage device is described comprising a toggle provided with associsted improved driver circuits adapted to produce reliable action of the toggle during clearing of the toggle to one of its two states. or transferring information into and out of the toggle. The invention resides in the development of a self-regulating driver circuit to minimize the fluctuation of the driving voltages for the toggle. The disclosed driver circuit produces two pulses in response to an input pulse: a first or ''clear'' pulse beginning nt substantially the same time but endlrg slightly sooner than the second or ''transfer'' output pulse.

  18. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  19. Uniform Approximation of a Maxwellian Thermostat by Finite Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Loss, M.; Tossounian, H.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2017-04-01

    We study a system of M particles in contact with a large but finite reservoir of {N ≫ M} particles within the framework of the Kac master equation modeling random collisions. The reservoir is initially in equilibrium at temperature {T=β^{-1}}. We show that for large N, this evolution can be approximated by an effective equation in which the reservoir is described by a Maxwellian thermostat at temperature T. This approximation is proven for a suitable {L^2} norm as well as for the Gabetta-Toscani-Wennberg (GTW) distance and is uniform in time.

  20. Analytic saddlepoint approximation for ionization energy loss distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; George, R. N.; Mathews, D. G.

    2017-09-01

    We present a saddlepoint approximation for ionization energy loss distributions, valid for arbitrary relativistic velocities of the incident particle 0 < v / c < 1 , provided that ionizing collisions are still the dominant energy loss mechanism. We derive a closed form solution closely related to Moyal's distribution. This distribution is intended for use in simulations with relatively low computational overhead. The approximation generally reproduces the Vavilov most probable energy loss and full width at half maximum to better than 1% and 10%, respectively, with significantly better agreement as Vavilov's κ approaches 1.

  1. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  2. Some (Apparently) Very Wide Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Stephens, Robert D.

    2016-10-01

    We present lightcurves for some of the approximately one dozen asteroids that appear to be very widely-separated binaries. Jacobsen et al. (2014, ApJ 780) attribute their formation to a somewhat complex series of events involving BYORP.The lightcurves consist of two components: Period 1 (P1) is very long, P1 = 50-600 h, with amplitudes of A1 = 0.23-1.0 mag. The second period and amplitudes are similar to the primaries of close binary systems, i.e., P2 = 2.2-3.6 h, A2 ~ 0.10 mag. Two candidates have secondary periods in the range of 5-7 hours. The most exceptional example is (19204) Joshuatree, which has values of P1 = 480 h, A1 = 0.25 mag and P2 = 21.25 h, A2 = 0.08 mag. Based on Jacobson et al. (2014, ApJ 780) and Pravec et al. (2016, Icarus 267), we suggest that P1 represents the primary (larger) body of the system and P2 represents the spin rate of the satellite.Supporting this supposition is that the large amplitude (A1) must be from the larger body, otherwise the dilution of amplitude would require the smaller body to be unreasonably elongate. The limiting size ratio for binaries is around 0.6 (see Pravec et al. 2010, Nature 466, Fig. 1), or a magnitude difference of about 1.0. For a secondary 1.0 mag fainter than the primary to produce a combined lightcurve amplitude of ~0.4 mag would require that the secondary undiluted amplitude to be several magnitudes (near-infinite elongation) and also a near equatorial aspect. This is not likely.Given the lack of mutual events, these can be considered to be only possible binaries. Since the orbital period is probably very long, it seems extremely unlikely that mutual events will ever be seen.The changing landscape of binary asteroid discoveries and theories calls for something beyond descriptive terms such as "suspicious", "possible", "likely", and "confirmed" in order to allow more accurate statistical studies. To this end, we are introducing a new "B" rating in the asteroid lightcurve database (Warner et al., 2009

  3. Observable fractions of core-collapse supernova light curves brightened by binary companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Liu, Zheng-Wei; Izzard, Robert G.

    2015-07-01

    Many core-collapse supernova progenitors are presumed to be in binary systems. If a star explodes in a binary system, the early supernova light curve can be brightened by the collision of the supernova ejecta with the companion star. The early brightening can be observed when the observer is in the direction of the hole created by the collision. Based on a population synthesis model, we estimate the fractions of core-collapse supernovae in which the light-curve brightening by the collision can be observed. We find that 0.19 per cent of core-collapse supernova light curves can be observed with the collisional brightening. Type Ibc supernova light curves are more likely to be brightened by the collision (0.53 per cent) because of the high fraction of the progenitors being in binary systems and their proximity to the companion stars. Type II and IIb supernova light curves are less affected (˜10-3 and ˜10-2 per cent, respectively). Although the early, slow light-curve declines of some Type IIb and Ibc supernovae are argued to be caused by the collision with the companion star (e.g. SN 2008D), the small expected fraction, as well as the unrealistically small separation required, disfavour the argument. The future transient survey by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is expected to detect ˜10 Type Ibc supernovae with the early collisional brightening per year, and they will be able to provide information on supernova progenitors in binary systems.

  4. Observational Types of Binaries in the Binary Star Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O.; Kovaleva, D.; Kaygorodov, P.

    2017-06-01

    In the present paper we describe observational types of binaries, included in BDB, the Binary star database, which presently contains data on physical and positional parameters for about 260 000 components of 120 000 stellar systems of multiplicity 2 to more than 20, taken from a large variety of published catalogues and databases.

  5. The binary Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31.

    PubMed

    Veillet, Christian; Parker, Joel Wm; Griffin, Ian; Marsden, Brian; Doressoundiram, Alain; Buie, Marc; Tholen, David J; Connelley, Michael; Holman, Matthew J

    2002-04-18

    The recent discovery of a binary asteroid during a spacecraft fly-by generated keen interest, because the orbital parameters of binaries can provide measures of the masses, and mutual eclipses could allow us to determine individual sizes and bulk densities. Several binary near-Earth, main-belt and Trojan asteroids have subsequently been discovered. The Kuiper belt-the region of space extending from Neptune (at 30 astronomical units) to well over 100 AU and believed to be the source of new short-period comets-has become a fascinating new window onto the formation of our Solar System since the first member object, not counting Pluto, was discovered in 1992 (ref. 13). Here we report that the Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31 is binary with a highly eccentric orbit (eccentricity e approximately 0.8) and a long period (about 570 days), very different from the Pluto/Charon system, which was hitherto the only previously known binary in the Kuiper belt. Assuming a density in the range of 1 to 2 g cm-3, the albedo of the binary components is between 0.05 and 0.08, close to the value of 0.04 generally assumed for Kuiper-belt objects.

  6. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: White Dwarf Binaries, LISA and GAIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Michael; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves has ushered in a new era in astronomy. The low-frequency band covered by the future LISA detector provides unprecedented opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy. With the Global Astrometric Interferometer for Astrophysics (GAIA) mission, we expect to discover about 1,000 eclipsing binary systems composed of a WD and a main sequence star - a sizeable increase from the approximately 34 currently known binaries of this type. In advance of the first GAIA data release and the launch of LISA within the next decade, we used the Binary Stellar Evolution (BSE) code simulate the evolution of White Dwarf Binaries (WDB) in a fixed galaxy population of about 196,000 sources. Our goal is to assess the detectability of a WDB by LISA and GAIA using the parameters from our population synthesis, we calculate GW strength h, and apparent GAIA magnitude G. We can then use a scale factor to make a prediction of how many multi- messenger sources we expect to be detectable by both LISA and GAIA in a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. We create binaries 10 times to ensure randomness in distance assignment and average our results. We then determined whether or not astronomical chirp is the difference between the total chirp and the GW chirp. With Astronomical chirp and simulations of mass transfer and tides, we can gather more information about the internal astrophysics of stars in ultra-compact binary systems.

  7. Time-step Considerations in Particle Simulation Algorithms for Coulomb Collisions in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A; Friedman, A; Caflisch, R

    2009-10-29

    The accuracy of first-order Euler and higher-order time-integration algorithms for grid-based Langevin equations collision models in a specific relaxation test problem is assessed. We show that statistical noise errors can overshadow time-step errors and argue that statistical noise errors can be conflated with time-step effects. Using a higher-order integration scheme may not achieve any benefit in accuracy for examples of practical interest. We also investigate the collisional relaxation of an initial electron-ion relative drift and the collisional relaxation to a resistive steady-state in which a quasi-steady current is driven by a constant applied electric field, as functions of the time step used to resolve the collision processes using binary and grid-based, test-particle Langevin equations models. We compare results from two grid-based Langevin equations collision algorithms to results from a binary collision algorithm for modeling electronion collisions. Some guidance is provided regarding how large a time step can be used compared to the inverse of the characteristic collision frequency for specific relaxation processes.

  8. Optimal filters for detecting cosmic bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, J. D.; Feeney, S. M.; Johnson, M. C.; Peiris, H. V.

    2012-05-01

    A number of well-motivated extensions of the ΛCDM concordance cosmological model postulate the existence of a population of sources embedded in the cosmic microwave background. One such example is the signature of cosmic bubble collisions which arise in models of eternal inflation. The most unambiguous way to test these scenarios is to evaluate the full posterior probability distribution of the global parameters defining the theory; however, a direct evaluation is computationally impractical on large datasets, such as those obtained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck. A method to approximate the full posterior has been developed recently, which requires as an input a set of candidate sources which are most likely to give the largest contribution to the likelihood. In this article, we present an improved algorithm for detecting candidate sources using optimal filters, and apply it to detect candidate bubble collision signatures in WMAP 7-year observations. We show both theoretically and through simulations that this algorithm provides an enhancement in sensitivity over previous methods by a factor of approximately two. Moreover, no other filter-based approach can provide a superior enhancement of these signatures. Applying our algorithm to WMAP 7-year observations, we detect eight new candidate bubble collision signatures for follow-up analysis.

  9. Impulse formalism for atom-diatom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.D. ); Bakshi, P.M. ); Sindoni, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    An exact formulation of the impulse approach (IA), or quantum-mechanical spectator model, is applied to atom-diatom collisions. Results are compared with previous work on the IA, which has always involved the peaking approximation (PA). The PA is seen to overestimate (underestimate) differential cross sections for processes involving projectile atom energy loss (gain). The internal consistency of the IA is explored by subjecting it to semidetailed balancing. For small scattering angles the IA is seen to be an inadequate theory, probably due to the neglect of double- and higher-collision terms in the multiple-collision expansion of the three-body {ital T} matrix. For large scattering angles, where the IA does appear to describe the scattering process accurately, the exact calculation is shown to give the same results as when only the energy-conserving on-the-energy-shell two-body processes are considered. An accurate approximation method is also developed for rapid computation of inelastic differential cross sections. Finally, the calculated results are compared with the experimental measurements, and the need to explore two-body potentials more complicated than the hard-core potential is pointed out.

  10. Spacecraft Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussy-Virat, Charles

    The rapid increase of the number of objects in orbit around the Earth poses a serious threat to operational spacecraft and astronauts. In order to effectively avoid collisions, mission operators need to assess the risk of collision between the satellite and any other object whose orbit is likely to approach its trajectory. Several algorithms predict the probability of collision but have limitations that impair the accuracy of the prediction. An important limitation is that uncertainties in the atmospheric density are usually not taken into account in the propagation of the covariance matrix from current epoch to closest approach time. The Spacecraft Orbital Characterization Kit (SpOCK) was developed to accurately predict the positions and velocities of spacecraft. The central capability of SpOCK is a high accuracy numerical propagator of spacecraft orbits and computations of ancillary parameters. The numerical integration uses a comprehensive modeling of the dynamics of spacecraft in orbit that includes all the perturbing forces that a spacecraft is subject to in orbit. In particular, the atmospheric density is modeled by thermospheric models to allow for an accurate representation of the atmospheric drag. SpOCK predicts the probability of collision between two orbiting objects taking into account the uncertainties in the atmospheric density. Monte Carlo procedures are used to perturb the initial position and velocity of the primary and secondary spacecraft from their covariance matrices. Developed in C, SpOCK supports parallelism to quickly assess the risk of collision so it can be used operationally in real time. The upper atmosphere of the Earth is strongly driven by the solar activity. In particular, abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind cause important disturbances of the atmospheric density, hence of the drag acceleration that spacecraft are subject to. The Probability Distribution Function (PDF) model was developed to predict the solar wind speed

  11. DALI: Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellentin, Elena

    2015-07-01

    DALI (Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods) is a fast approximation of non-Gaussian likelihoods. It extends the Fisher Matrix in a straightforward way and allows for a wider range of posterior shapes. The code is written in C/C++.

  12. Multiple cosmic collisions and the microwave background power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Kozaczuk, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Collisions between cosmic bubbles of different vacua are a generic feature of false vacuum eternal inflation scenarios. While previous studies have focused on the consequences of a single collision event in an observer’s past, we begin here an investigation of the more general scenario allowing for many “mild” collisions intersecting our past light cone (and one another). We discuss the general features of multiple collision scenarios and consider their impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum, treating the collisions perturbatively. In a large class of models, one can approximate a multiple collision scenario as a superposition of individual collision events governed by nearly isotropic and scale-invariant distributions, most appearing to take up less than half of the sky. In this case, the shape of the expected CMB temperature spectrum maintains statistical isotropy and typically features a dramatic increase in power in the low multipoles relative to that of the best-fit ΛCDM model, which is in tension particularly with the observed quadrupole. We argue that this predicted spectrum is largely model independent and can be used to outline features of the underlying statistical distributions of colliding bubbles consistent with CMB temperature measurements.

  13. New insights on the orbital debris collision hazard at GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Darren S.; Di Pentino, Frank R.

    2013-04-01

    An analysis is performed of the orbital debris collision hazard to operational spacecraft at geosynchronous orbit (GEO). As part of the examination, the contribution of individual components of the population are considered and presented to provide a clearer linkage between object characteristic and resulting risk. Our examination of GEO collision risk reveals several critical new insights: (1) the current probability of collision in GEO is relatively low, yet the future is difficult to predict due to our limited ability to observe objects in GEO and the uncertainty in past and future debris-generating events in GEO; (2) the probability of collision in GEO is not uniform by longitude — it is seven times greater in regions centered about the geopotential wells; (3) the probability of a mission-terminating collision is greatly dependent upon the approximately 2200 objects in the 10 cm-1 m range observed in GEO but not yet cataloged; (4) hardware relocated to GEO "graveyard" disposal orbits pose a potential additional, but not fully understood, collision hazard to operational GEO satellites; and (5) the collision hazard throughout the course of a day or year is highly episodic (i.e. non-uniform).

  14. J/psi production at high transverse momenta in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, B. I.

    2009-10-27

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC presents measurements of J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} at mid-rapidity and high transverse momentum (p{sub T} > 5 GeV/c) in p+p and central Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}sNN = 200 GeV. The inclusive J/{psi} production cross section for Cu+Cu collisions is found to be consistent at high p{sub T} with the binary collision-scaled cross section for p+p collisions, in contrast to previous measurements at lower p{sub T}, where a suppression of J/{psi} production is observed relative to the expectation from binary scaling. Azimuthal correlations of J/{psi} with charged hadrons in p+p collisions provide an estimate of the contribution of B-meson decays to J/{psi} production of 13% {+-} 5%.

  15. Novel ID-based anti-collision approach for RFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Gan; Li, Wen-Bin

    2016-09-01

    Novel correlation ID-based (CID) anti-collision approach for RFID under the banner of the Internet of Things (IOT) has been presented in this paper. The key insights are as follows: according to the deterministic algorithms which are based on the binary search tree, we propose a method to increase the association between tags so that tags can initiatively send their own ID under certain trigger conditions, at the same time, we present a multi-tree search method for querying. When the number of tags is small, by replacing the actual ID with the temporary ID, it can greatly reduce the number of times that the reader reads and writes to tag's ID. Active tags send data to the reader by the way of modulation binary pulses. When applying this method to the uncertain ALOHA algorithms, the reader can determine the locations of the empty slots according to the position of the binary pulse, so it can avoid the decrease in efficiency which is caused by reading empty slots when reading slots. Theory and experiment show that this method can greatly improve the recognition efficiency of the system when applied to either the search tree or the ALOHA anti-collision algorithms.

  16. Cepheid Binary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remage Evans, Nancy

    Blue main sequence companions of binary Cepheids can be used to determine Clio luminosity of the Cepheids. By matching the composite spectrum of the companion and the Cepheid with those of standard stars, the spectral type of the companion and the magnitude difference between the two stars can be determined. The main sequence absolute magnitude calibration of the companion then leads to the absolute magnitude of the Cepheid. The aim of this project is to obtain low dispersion SWP spectra of three Cepheids (T Vul, Y Lac, and RS Ori) for which the LWP spectra show excess flux at 2500 from the companion. In addition, we request LWP low dispersion spectra of five Cepheids to complete the survey of all Cepheids brighter than 8" magnitude to look for companions. Archival IUE spectra are non-existant or inadequate (no LWP or overexposed). The purpose of this survey is to accurately determine the percentage of Cepheids which are binaries, to compare with evolutionary predictions. This IUE survey will identify definitively Cepheids with blue companions, about which there is come confusion from groundbased photometric techniques, and hence prevent distortions to such parameters as luminosity, color and reddening. In addition, the distribution of mass ratios (from the spectral type of the main sequence mass and the evolutionary mass of the Cepheid (Evans and Bolton, 1989)), is basic information about star formation.

  17. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H{sub 2}, and four normal alkanes + N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, Ahren W. Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2014-09-28

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N{sub 2}. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} and with recent experimental results for C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2} + N{sub 2}, n = 2–4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structure of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R{sup −12} repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N{sub 2} by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R{sup −12} interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2}, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N{sub 2}, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard–Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above ∼700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard–Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for

  18. Multiplicity distributions in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, A.; Casado, J.A.; Pajares, C.; Ramallo, A.V.; Tran Tranh Van, J.

    1987-05-01

    Multiplicity distributions in nuclear collisions are calculated in the framework of the dual parton model. A comparison with experimental data is performed. The multiplicity distributions for /sup 16/O-/sup 207/Pb collisions at 200 Gev/c per nucleon is predicted. The fluctuations of the energy density in the central rapidity region for such collisions are estimated.

  19. On the unreasonable effectiveness of the post-Newtonian approximation in gravitational physics.

    PubMed

    Will, Clifford M

    2011-04-12

    The post-Newtonian approximation is a method for solving Einstein's field equations for physical systems in which motions are slow compared to the speed of light and where gravitational fields are weak. Yet it has proven to be remarkably effective in describing certain strong-field, fast-motion systems, including binary pulsars containing dense neutron stars and binary black hole systems inspiraling toward a final merger. The reasons for this effectiveness are largely unknown. When carried to high orders in the post-Newtonian sequence, predictions for the gravitational-wave signal from inspiraling compact binaries will play a key role in gravitational-wave detection by laser-interferometric observatories.

  20. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  1. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  2. Taylor Approximations and Definite Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of approximating the value of a definite integral by approximating the integrand rather than using numerical methods to approximate the value of the definite integral. Particular cases considered include examples where the integral is improper, such as an elliptic integral. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  3. Taylor Approximations and Definite Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of approximating the value of a definite integral by approximating the integrand rather than using numerical methods to approximate the value of the definite integral. Particular cases considered include examples where the integral is improper, such as an elliptic integral. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  4. Approximate equilibria for Bayesian games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallozzi, Lina; Pusillo, Lucia; Tijs, Stef

    2008-07-01

    In this paper the problem of the existence of approximate equilibria in mixed strategies is central. Sufficient conditions are given under which approximate equilibria exist for non-finite Bayesian games. Further one possible approach is suggested to the problem of the existence of approximate equilibria for the class of multicriteria Bayesian games.

  5. Planning 3-D collision-free paths using spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Susan; Kelley, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    A scheme for the representation of objects, the Successive Spherical Approximation (SSA), facilitates the rapid planning of collision-free paths in a 3-D, dynamic environment. The hierarchical nature of the SSA allows collision-free paths to be determined efficiently while still providing for the exact representation of dynamic objects. The concept of a freespace cell is introduced to allow human 3-D conceptual knowledge to be used in facilitating satisfying choices for paths. Collisions can be detected at a rate better than 1 second per environment object per path. This speed enables the path planning process to apply a hierarchy of rules to create a heuristically satisfying collision-free path.

  6. Modelling droplet collision outcomes for different substances and viscosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerfeld, Martin; Kuschel, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The main objective of the present study is the derivation of models describing the outcome of binary droplet collisions for a wide range of dynamic viscosities in the well-known collision maps (i.e. normalised lateral droplet displacement at collision, called impact parameter, versus collision Weber number). Previous studies by Kuschel and Sommerfeld (Exp Fluids 54:1440, 2013) for different solution droplets having a range of solids contents and hence dynamic viscosities (here between 1 and 60 mPa s) revealed that the locations of the triple point (i.e. coincidence of bouncing, stretching separation and coalescence) and the critical Weber number (i.e. condition for the transition from coalescence to separation for head-on collisions) show a clear dependence on dynamic viscosity. In order to extend these findings also to pure liquids and to provide a broader data basis for modelling the viscosity effect, additional binary collision experiments were conducted for different alcohols (viscosity range 1.2-15.9 mPa s) and the FVA1 reference oil at different temperatures (viscosity range 3.0-28.2 mPa s). The droplet size for the series of alcohols was around 365 and 385 µm for the FVA1 reference oil, in each case with fixed diameter ratio at Δ= 1. The relative velocity between the droplets was varied in the range 0.5-3.5 m/s, yielding maximum Weber numbers of around 180. Individual binary droplet collisions with defined conditions were generated by two droplet chains each produced by vibrating orifice droplet generators. For recording droplet motion and the binary collision process with good spatial and temporal resolution high-speed shadow imaging was employed. The results for varied relative velocity and impact angle were assembled in impact parameter-Weber number maps. With increasing dynamic viscosity a characteristic displacement of the regimes for the different collision scenarios was also observed for pure liquids similar to that observed for solutions. This

  7. Vacancy-rearrangement theory in the first Magnus approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    In the present paper we employ the first Magnus approximation (M1A), a unitarized Born approximation, in semiclassical collision theory. We have found previously that the M1A gives a substantial improvement over the first Born approximation (B1A) and can give a good approximation to a full coupled channels calculation of the mean L-shell vacancy probability per electron, p/sub L/, when the L-vacancies are accompanied by a K-shell vacancy (p/sub L/ is obtained experimentally from measurements of K/sub ..cap alpha../-satellite intensities). For sufficiently strong projectile-electron interactions (sufficiently large Z/sub p/ or small v) the M1A ceases to reproduce the coupled channels results, but it is accurate over a much wider range of Z/sub p/ and v than the B1A. 27 references.

  8. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Space collision threat mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatezalo, Aleksandar; Stipanović, Dušan; Mehra, Raman K.; Pham, Khanh

    2014-06-01

    Mitigation of possible collision threats to current and future operations in space environments is an important an challenging task considering high nonlinearity of orbital dynamics and discrete measurement updates. Such discrete observations are relatively scarce with respect to space dynamics including possible unintentional or intentional rocket propulsion based maneuvers even in scenarios when measurement collections are focused to a one single target of interest. In our paper, this problem is addressed in terms of multihypothesis and multimodel estimation in conjunction with multi-agent multigoal game theoretic guaranteed evasion strategies. Collision threat estimation is formulated using conditional probabilities of time dependent hypotheses and spacecraft controls which are computed using Liapunov-like approach. Based on this formulation, time dependent functional forms of multi-objective utility functions are derived given threat collision risk levels. For demonstrating developed concepts, numerical methods are developed using nonlinear filtering methodology for updating hypothesis sets and corresponding conditional probabilities. Space platform associated sensor resources are managed using previously developed and demonstrated information-theoretic objective functions and optimization methods. Consequently, estimation and numerical methods are evaluated and demonstrated on a realistic Low Earth Orbit collision encounter.

  10. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  11. Collision avoidance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.; Cour-Palais, B. G.; Taylor, R. E.; Landry, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Collisions in earth orbital space between operational payloads and various forms of space debris (nonoperational payloads, nonfunctional mission-related objects and fragments resulting from collisions and explosions) are discussed and possible means of avoiding them are considered. From 10,000 to 15,000 objects are estimated to be in earth orbital space, most of which represent spacecraft fragments and debris too small to be detected and tracked by earth-based sensors, and it is considered likely that some of them will be or have already been involved in direct collisions with the ever increasing number of operational satellites and space stations. Means of protecting proposed large space structures and smaller spacecraft from significant damage by larger space objects, particularly in the 400-4000 km altitude range where most debris occurs, include structural redundancy and the double shielding of sensitive components. Other means of collision avoidance are the collection or relocation of satellites, rocket bodies and other objects by the Space Shuttle, the prevention of explosions and the disposal of spent rocket parts by reentry. Finally, a management structure would be required to administer guidelines for the prevention and elimination of space debris.

  12. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  13. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Benacquista, Matthew J; Downing, Jonathan M B

    2013-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10(4)-10(6) stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  14. Multilevel Models for Binary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The methods and models for categorical data analysis cover considerable ground, ranging from regression-type models for binary and binomial data, count data, to ordered and unordered polytomous variables, as well as regression models that mix qualitative and continuous data. This article focuses on methods for binary or binomial data, which are…

  15. Multilevel Models for Binary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The methods and models for categorical data analysis cover considerable ground, ranging from regression-type models for binary and binomial data, count data, to ordered and unordered polytomous variables, as well as regression models that mix qualitative and continuous data. This article focuses on methods for binary or binomial data, which are…

  16. Formation of Kuiper-belt binaries by dynamical friction and three-body encounters.

    PubMed

    Goldreich, Peter; Lithwick, Yoram; Sari, Re'em

    2002-12-12

    The Kuiper belt is a disk of icy bodies that orbit the Sun beyond Neptune; the largest known members are Pluto and its companion Charon. A few per cent of Kuiper-belt bodies have recently been found to be binaries with wide separations and mass ratios of the order of unity. Collisions were too infrequent to account for the observed number of binaries, implying that these binaries formed through collisionless interactions mediated by gravity. These interactions are likely to have been most effective during the period of runaway accretion, early in the Solar System's history. Here we show that a transient binary forms when two large bodies penetrate one another's Hill sphere (the region where their mutual forces are larger than the tidal force of the Sun). The loss of energy needed to stabilize the binary orbit can then occur either through dynamical friction from surrounding small bodies, or through the gravitational scattering of a third large body. Our estimates slightly favour the former mechanism. We predict that five per cent of Kuiper-belt objects are binaries with apparent separations greater than 0.2 arcsec, and that most are in tighter binaries or systems of higher multiplicity.

  17. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  18. Magnetic activity of interacting binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Colin A.

    2017-10-01

    Interacting binaries provide unique parameter regimes, both rapid rotation and tidal distortion, in which to test stellar dynamo theories and study the resulting magnetic activity. Close binaries such as cataclysmic variables (CVs) have been found to differentially rotate, and so can provide testbeds for tidal dissipation efficiency in stellar convective envelopes, with implications for both CV and planet-star evolution. Furthermore, CVs show evidence of preferential emergence of magnetic flux tubes towards the companion star, as well as large, long-lived prominences that form preferentially within the binary geometry. Moreover, RS CVn binaries also show clear magnetic interactions between the two components in the form of coronal X-ray emission. Here, we review several examples of magnetic interactions in different types of close binaries.

  19. Equilibrium shapes of rubble-pile binaries: The Darwin ellipsoids for gravitationally held granular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2010-02-01

    Binaries are in vogue; many minor-planets like asteroids are being found to be binary or contact-binary systems. Even ternaries like 87 Sylvia have been discovered. The densities of these binaries are often estimated to be very low, and this, along with suspected accretionary origins, hints at a rubble interior. As in the case of fluid objects, a rubble-pile is unable to sustain all manners of spin, self-gravitation, and tidal interactions. This motivates the present study of the possible ellipsoidal shapes and mutual separations that members of a rubble-pile binary system may achieve. Conversely, knowledge of a granular binary's shape and separation will constrain its internal structure - the ability of the binary's members to sustain elongated shapes and/or maintain contact will hint at appreciable internal frictional strength. Because the binary's members are allowed to be of comparable mass, the present investigation constitutes an extension of the second classical Darwin problem to granular aggregates. General equations defining the ellipsoidal rubble-pile binary system's equilibrium are developed. These are then specialized to a pair of spin-locked, possibly unequal, prolate ellipsoidal granular aggregates aligned along their long axes. We observe that contact rubble-pile binaries can indeed exist. Further, depending on the binary's geometry, an equilibrium contact binary's members may, in fact, disrupt if separated. These results are applied to four suspected or known binaries: 216 Kleopatra, 25143 Itokawa, 624 Hektor and 90 Antiope. This exercise helps to bound the shapes and/or provide information about the interiors of these binaries. The binary's interior will be modeled as a rigid-plastic, cohesionless material with a Drucker-Prager yield criterion. This rheology is a reasonable first model for rubble piles. We employ an approximate volume-averaging procedure that is based on the classical method of moments, and is an extension of the virial method

  20. BINARY ASTROMETRIC MICROLENSING WITH GAIA

    SciTech Connect

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2015-04-15

    We investigate whether or not Gaia can specify the binary fractions of massive stellar populations in the Galactic disk through astrometric microlensing. Furthermore, we study whether or not some information about their mass distributions can be inferred via this method. In this regard, we simulate the binary astrometric microlensing events due to massive stellar populations according to the Gaia observing strategy by considering (i) stellar-mass black holes, (ii) neutron stars, (iii) white dwarfs, and (iv) main-sequence stars as microlenses. The Gaia efficiency for detecting the binary signatures in binary astrometric microlensing events is ∼10%–20%. By calculating the optical depth due to the mentioned stellar populations, the numbers of the binary astrometric microlensing events being observed with Gaia with detectable binary signatures, for the binary fraction of about 0.1, are estimated to be 6, 11, 77, and 1316, respectively. Consequently, Gaia can potentially specify the binary fractions of these massive stellar populations. However, the binary fraction of black holes measured with this method has a large uncertainty owing to a low number of the estimated events. Knowing the binary fractions in massive stellar populations helps with studying the gravitational waves. Moreover, we investigate the number of massive microlenses for which Gaia specifies masses through astrometric microlensing of single lenses toward the Galactic bulge. The resulting efficiencies of measuring the mass of mentioned populations are 9.8%, 2.9%, 1.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. The numbers of their astrometric microlensing events being observed in the Gaia era in which the lens mass can be inferred with the relative error less than 0.5 toward the Galactic bulge are estimated as 45, 34, 76, and 786, respectively. Hence, Gaia potentially gives us some information about the mass distribution of these massive stellar populations.

  1. Binary rototranslational hyper-Rayleigh spectra of H(2)-He gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Godet, J-L; Bancewicz, T; Głaz, W; Maroulis, G; Haskopoulos, A

    2009-11-28

    The collision-induced rototranslational hyper-Rayleigh spectra of gaseous H(2)-He mixture are computed and discussed in the binary regime. As the input data we use our ab initio computed H(2)-He collision-induced first dipole hyperpolarizability tensor Deltabeta(R). Both the vector and the septor part of the H(2)-He hyper-Rayleigh spectra are evaluated at room temperature (T=295 K). The spectra are calculated assuming the full quantum computations based on the Schrödinger equation of the relative translational motion in the isotropic H(2)-He potential as well as using semiclassical methods.

  2. VLTI-AMBER Velocity-Resolved Aperture-Synthesis Imaging of Eta Carinae with a Spectral Resolution of 12 000: Studies of the Primary Star Wind and Innermost Wind-Wind Collision Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Clementel, N.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; de Wit, W.-J.; Grellmann, R.; Groh, J.; Guieu, S.; Gull, T.; Heininger, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Hummel, C. A.; Kraus, S.; Madura, T.; Mehner, A.; Merand, A.; Millour, F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ohnaka, K.; Patru, F.; Petrov, R. G.; Rengaswamy, S.; Richardson, N. D.; Rivinius, T.; Schoeller, M.; Teodoro, M.; Wittkowski, M.

    2016-01-01

    The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. Eta Carinae is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the luminous blue variable phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Aims. We want to investigate the structure and kinematics of Car's primary star wind and wind-wind collision zone with a high spatial resolution of approx.6 mas (approx.14 au) and high spectral resolution of R = 12 000. Methods. Observations of Car were carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results. We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 di erent spectral channels distributed across the Br(gamma) 2.166 micron emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to -376 km/s measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of -277 km/s, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is 126. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (approx.18:8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (approx.13:6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three

  3. VLTI-AMBER Velocity-Resolved Aperture-Synthesis Imaging of Eta Carinae with a Spectral Resolution of 12 000: Studies of the Primary Star Wind and Innermost Wind-Wind Collision Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Clementel, N.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; de Wit, W.-J.; Grellmann, R.; Groh, J.; Guieu, S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. Eta Carinae is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the luminous blue variable phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Aims. We want to investigate the structure and kinematics of Car's primary star wind and wind-wind collision zone with a high spatial resolution of approx.6 mas (approx.14 au) and high spectral resolution of R = 12 000. Methods. Observations of Car were carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results. We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 di erent spectral channels distributed across the Br(gamma) 2.166 micron emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to -376 km/s measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of -277 km/s, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is 126. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (approx.18:8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (approx.13:6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three

  4. VLTI-AMBER velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis imaging of η Carinae with a spectral resolution of 12 000. Studies of the primary star wind and innermost wind-wind collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Clementel, N.; Corcoran, M. F.; Damineli, A.; de Wit, W.-J.; Grellmann, R.; Groh, J.; Guieu, S.; Gull, T.; Heininger, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Hummel, C. A.; Kraus, S.; Madura, T.; Mehner, A.; Mérand, A.; Millour, F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ohnaka, K.; Patru, F.; Petrov, R. G.; Rengaswamy, S.; Richardson, N. D.; Rivinius, T.; Schöller, M.; Teodoro, M.; Wittkowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The mass loss from massive stars is not understood well. η Carinae is a unique object for studying the massive stellar wind during the luminous blue variable phase. It is also an eccentric binary with a period of 5.54 yr. The nature of both stars is uncertain, although we know from X-ray studies that there is a wind-wind collision whose properties change with orbital phase. Aims: We want to investigate the structure and kinematics of η Car's primary star wind and wind-wind collision zone with a high spatial resolution of ~6 mas (~14 au) and high spectral resolution of R = 12 000. Methods: Observations of η Car were carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) and the AMBER instrument between approximately five and seven months before the August 2014 periastron passage. Velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images were reconstructed from the spectrally dispersed interferograms. Interferometric studies can provide information on the binary orbit, the primary wind, and the wind collision. Results: We present velocity-resolved aperture-synthesis images reconstructed in more than 100 different spectral channels distributed across the Brγ 2.166 μm emission line. The intensity distribution of the images strongly depends on wavelength. At wavelengths corresponding to radial velocities of approximately -140 to - 376 km s-1 measured relative to line center, the intensity distribution has a fan-shaped structure. At the velocity of - 277 km s-1, the position angle of the symmetry axis of the fan is ~126°. The fan-shaped structure extends approximately 8.0 mas (~18.8 au) to the southeast and 5.8 mas (~13.6 au) to the northwest, measured along the symmetry axis at the 16% intensity contour. The shape of the intensity distributions suggests that the obtained images are the first direct images of the innermost wind-wind collision zone. Therefore, the observations provide velocity-dependent image structures that can be used to test three

  5. VLSI binary updown counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Trieu-Kie (Inventor); Hsu, In-Shek (Inventor); Reed, Irving S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pipeline binary updown counter is comprised of simple stages that may be readily replicated. Each stage is defined by the Boolean logic equation: A(sub n)(t) = A(sub n)(t - 1) exclusive OR (U AND P(sub n)) inclusive OR (D AND Q(sub n)), where A(sub n)(t) denotes the value of the nth bit at time t. The input to the counter has three values represented by two binary signals U and D such that if both are zero, the input is zero, if U = 0 and D = 1, the input is -1 and if U = 1 and D = 0, the input is +1. P(sub n) represents a product of A(sub k)'s for 1 is less than or equal to k is less than or equal to -1, while Q(sub n) represents the product of bar A's for 1 is less than or equal to K is less than or equal to n - 1, where bar A(sub k) is the complement of A(sub k) and P(sub n) and Q(sub n) are expressed as the following two equations: P(sub n) = A(sub n - 1) A(sub n - 2)...A(sub 1) and Q(sub n) = bar A(sub n - 1) bar A(sub n - 2)...bar A(sub 1), which can be written in recursive form as P(sub n) = P(sub n - 1) AND bar A(sub n - 1) and Q(sub n) = Q(sub n - 1) AND bar A(sub n - 1) with the initial values P(sub 1) = 1 and Q(sub 1) = 1.

  6. Bubble, bubble, flow and Hubble: large scale galaxy flow from cosmological bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Larjo, Klaus; Levi, Thomas S. E-mail: tslevi@phas.ubc.ca

    2010-08-01

    We study large scale structure in the cosmology of Coleman-de Luccia bubble collisions. Within a set of controlled approximations we calculate the effects on galaxy motion seen from inside a bubble which has undergone such a collision. We find that generically bubble collisions lead to a coherent bulk flow of galaxies on some part of our sky, the details of which depend on the initial conditions of the collision and redshift to the galaxy in question. With other parameters held fixed the effects weaken as the amount of inflation inside our bubble grows, but can produce measurable flows past the number of efolds required to solve the flatness and horizon problems.

  7. Operator of pair electron-ion collisions in alternating electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, A. A.

    2008-12-15

    Collisions of electrons with ions in the presence of an alternating electromagnetic field are considered. Based on the first principles (the Liouville equations for N particles), a general expression for the collisional operator in the approximation of pair collisions at an arbitrary scattering potential, including that depending periodically on time, is derived. The problem of collisions in plasma in the presence of an electromagnetic field can be reduced to this case by introducing drift coordinates. It is shown that the method of test particles can be applied to the problem of particle collisions in an alternating electromagnetic field.

  8. Automatic Aircraft Collision Avoidance System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, Mark (Inventor); Hook, Loyd (Inventor); McWherter, Shaun (Inventor); Willhite, Jaimie (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention is a system and method of compressing a DTM to be used in an Auto-GCAS system using a semi-regular geometric compression algorithm. In general, the invention operates by first selecting the boundaries of the three dimensional map to be compressed and dividing the three dimensional map data into regular areas. Next, a type of free-edged, flat geometric surface is selected which will be used to approximate terrain data of the three dimensional map data. The flat geometric surface is used to approximate terrain data for each regular area. The approximations are checked to determine if they fall within selected tolerances. If the approximation for a specific regular area is within specified tolerance, the data is saved for that specific regular area. If the approximation for a specific area falls outside the specified tolerances, the regular area is divided and a flat geometric surface approximation is made for each of the divided areas. This process is recursively repeated until all of the regular areas are approximated by flat geometric surfaces. Finally, the compressed three dimensional map data is provided to the automatic ground collision system for an aircraft.

  9. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p-Pb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-09-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm T}$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range $0.15binary collision scaling of particle production in pp collisions, leading to a nuclear modification factor consistent with unity for $p_{\\mathrm T}$ larger than 2 GeV/$c$, with a weak indication of a Cronin-like enhancement for $p_{\\rm T}$ around 4 GeV/$c$. The measurement is compared to theoretical calculations and to data in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV.

  10. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  11. Stripped red giant cores in eclipsing binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.; Heber, U.; Smalley, B.; Marsh, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    Red giant stars can be stripped of their outer layers by stellar collisions or mass transfer in binary star systems such as low mass X-ray binaries. If the star is stripped on or before its first ascent of the red giant branch it will eventually become a very low mass white dwarf composed almost entirely of helium. Very low mass white dwarfs are well known in binary milli-second pulsars and many have recently been found in surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, but the precursor phase during which the remnant evolves to higher effective temperature at nearly constant luminosity has rarely been observed. The cooling timescale for very low mass white dwarfs is very uncertain because they are thought to be born with thick hydrogen envelopes which can sustain weak but stable p-p shell burning, but unstable phases of CNO burning (shell flashes) can remove this hydrogen envelope. The predicted number of shell flashes (if any) is dependent on the mass and composition of the star and other details of the models used. In this talk I present new observations of a bright eclipsing binary star recently discovered in the WASP archive in which a stripped red giant is eclipsed by an A-type dwarf star. These observations were used to derive precise masses and radii for both stars and have be used to test the formation scenario outlined above. In addition, I present the main characteristics of 17 new eclipsing binary stars that are also likely to contain the precursors of very low mass white dwarfs.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF SEVEN ULTRA-WIDE TRANS-NEPTUNIAN BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Alex H.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Petit, Jean-Marc; Jones, Lynne; Gladman, Brett; Parker, Joel

    2011-12-10

    The low-inclination component of the Classical Kuiper Belt is host to a population of extremely widely separated binaries. These systems are similar to other trans-Neptunian binaries (TNBs) in that the primary and secondary components of each system are of roughly equal size. We have performed an astrometric monitoring campaign of a sample of seven wide-separation, long-period TNBs and present the first-ever well-characterized mutual orbits for each system. The sample contains the most eccentric (2006 CH{sub 69}, e{sub m} = 0.9) and the most widely separated, weakly bound (2001 QW{sub 322}, a/R{sub H} {approx_equal} 0.22) binary minor planets known, and also contains the system with lowest-measured mass of any TNB (2000 CF{sub 105}, M{sub sys} {approx_equal} 1.85 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} kg). Four systems orbit in a prograde sense, and three in a retrograde sense. They have a different mutual inclination distribution compared to all other TNBs, preferring low mutual-inclination orbits. These systems have geometric r-band albedos in the range of 0.09-0.3, consistent with radiometric albedo estimates for larger solitary low-inclination Classical Kuiper Belt objects, and we limit the plausible distribution of albedos in this region of the Kuiper Belt. We find that gravitational collapse binary formation models produce an orbital distribution similar to that currently observed, which along with a confluence of other factors supports formation of the cold Classical Kuiper Belt in situ through relatively rapid gravitational collapse rather than slow hierarchical accretion. We show that these binary systems are sensitive to disruption via collisions, and their existence suggests that the size distribution of TNOs at small sizes remains relatively shallow.

  13. Geometrical methods in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliotis, Anastasios

    Currently there exists no known way to construct the Stress-Energy tensor (Tmunu) of the medium produced in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling from purely theoretical grounds. In this work, some steps are taken in that direction. In particular, the evolution of Tmunu at strong coupling and at high energies is being studied for early proper times (tau). This is achieved in the context of the AdS/CFT duality by constructing the evolution of the dual geometry in an AdS5 background. We consider high energy collisions of two shock waves in AdS5 as a model of ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the boundary theory. We first calculate the graviton field produced in the collisions in the LO, NLO and NNLO approximations, corresponding to two, three and four-graviton exchanges with the shock waves. We use this model to study Tmunu and in particular the energy density of the strongly-coupled matter created immediately after the collision because as we argue, the expansion of the energy density (epsilon) in the powers of proper time tau squared corresponds on the gravity side to a perturbative expansion of the metric in graviton exchanges. We point out that shock waves corresponding to physical energy-momentum tensors of the nuclei is likely to completely stop after the collision; on the field theory side, this corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. This motivates a more detailed investigation. For this reason we consider the asymmetric limit where the energy density in one shock wave is much higher than in the other one. In the boundary theory this setup corresponds to proton-nucleus collisions. Employing the eikonal approximation we find the exact high energy analytic solution for the metric in AdS5 for the asymmetric collision of two delta-function shock waves. The solution resums all-order graviton exchanges with the nucleus-shock wave and a single-graviton exchange with the proton

  14. Shock Reflection in a Binary Mixture of Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, S. T.; Baganoff, D.

    1996-11-01

    The standard implementation of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for the simulation of multiple-specie flows uses single-specie transport data as input to an ad hoc combining formula to define parameters used in binary collisions between non-like species. To ascertain the suitability of this approach, we focus on the details of translational nonequilibrium in the flow of a binary mixture of noble gases. Existing experimental results for the one-dimensional reflection of a shock wave in a mixture of helium (He) and xenon (Xe) yield a standard of comparison. The molecular weight and diameter of He:Xe are sufficiently disparate so that the relevant time scales of the reflection process are distinct. Simulations are performed on the Intel Paragon using an adaptation of the DSMC method suitable for the parallel computing environment. Using the best characterizations of noble gas intermolecular potentials that have been published to date, we are able to produce simulations of the reflection process which compare favorably with experiment over a range of Xe concentrations. Investigations of various combining rules to arrive at non-like specie collision parameters indicate that any reasonable combining rule works provided that the single-specie data is physically realistic.

  15. Algorithm Plans Collision-Free Path for Robotic Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul; Diaz-Calderon, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to enable a computer aboard a robot to autonomously plan the path of the manipulator arm of the robot to avoid collisions between the arm and any obstacle, which could be another part of the robot or an external object in the vicinity of the robot. In simplified terms, the algorithm generates trial path segments and tests each segment for potential collisions in an iterative process that ends when a sequence of collision-free segments reaches from the starting point to the destination. The main advantage of this algorithm, relative to prior such algorithms, is computational efficiency: the algorithm is designed to make minimal demands upon the limited computational resources available aboard a robot. This path-planning algorithm utilizes a modified version of the collision-detection method described in "Improved Collision-Detection Method for Robotic Manipulator" (NPO-30356), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 3 (June 2003), page 72. The method involves utilization of mathematical models of the robot constructed prior to operation and similar models of external objects constructed automatically from sensory data acquired during operation. This method incorporates a previously developed method, known in the art as the method of oriented bounding boxes (OBBs), in which an object is represented approximately, for computational purposes, by a box that encloses its outer boundary. Because many parts of a robotic manipulator are cylindrical, the OBB method has been extended in this method to enable the approximate representation of cylindrical parts by use of octagonal or other multiple-OBB assemblies denoted oriented bounding prisms (OBPs). A multiresolution OBB/OBP representation of the robot and its manipulator arm and a multiresolution OBB representation of external objects (including terrain) are constructed and used in a process in which collisions at successively finer resolutions are detected through computational detection of overlaps

  16. Combining global and local approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method based on a linear approximation to a scaling factor, designated the 'global-local approximation' (GLA) method, is presented and shown capable of extending the range of usefulness of derivative-based approximations to a more refined model. The GLA approach refines the conventional scaling factor by means of a linearly varying, rather than constant, scaling factor. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated for a simple beam example with a crude and more refined FEM model.

  17. Combining global and local approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Haftka, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    A method based on a linear approximation to a scaling factor, designated the 'global-local approximation' (GLA) method, is presented and shown capable of extending the range of usefulness of derivative-based approximations to a more refined model. The GLA approach refines the conventional scaling factor by means of a linearly varying, rather than constant, scaling factor. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated for a simple beam example with a crude and more refined FEM model. 6 refs.

  18. Effective potential theory for diffusion in binary ionic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R; Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Self-diffusion and interdiffusion coefficients of binary ionic mixtures are evaluated using the effective potential theory (EPT), and the predictions are compared with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. We find that EPT agrees with molecular dynamics from weak coupling well into the strong-coupling regime, which is a similar range of coupling strengths as previously observed in comparisons with the one-component plasma. Within this range, typical relative errors of approximately 20% and worst-case relative errors of approximately 40% are observed. We also examine the Darken model, which approximates the interdiffusion coefficients based on the self-diffusion coefficients.

  19. Effective potential theory for diffusion in binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Self-diffusion and interdiffusion coefficients of binary ionic mixtures are evaluated using the effective potential theory (EPT), and the predictions are compared with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. We find that EPT agrees with molecular dynamics from weak coupling well into the strong-coupling regime, which is a similar range of coupling strengths as previously observed in comparisons with the one-component plasma. Within this range, typical relative errors of approximately 20% and worst-case relative errors of approximately 40% are observed. We also examine the Darken model, which approximates the interdiffusion coefficients based on the self-diffusion coefficients.

  20. ZERO IMPACT PARAMETER WHITE DWARF COLLISIONS IN FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, W. P.; Athanassiadou, T.; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-11-01

    We systematically explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs (WDs) with the Eulerian adaptive grid code FLASH for 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} and 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} mass pairings. Our models span a range of effective linear spatial resolutions from 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm. However, even the highest resolution models do not quite achieve strict numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving small-scale burning and energy transport. The lack of strict numerical convergence from these idealized configurations suggests that quantitative predictions of the ejected elemental abundances that are generated by binary WD collision and merger simulations should be viewed with caution. Nevertheless, the convergence trends do allow some patterns to be discerned. We find that the 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} head-on collision model produces 0.32 M {sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni and 0.38 M {sub Sun} of {sup 28}Si, while the 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} head-on collision model produces 0.39 M {sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni and 0.55 M {sub Sun} of {sup 28}Si at the highest spatial resolutions. Both mass pairings produce {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun} of unburned {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O. We also find the 0.64 + 0.64 M {sub Sun} head-on collision begins carbon burning in the central region of the stalled shock between the two WDs, while the more energetic 0.81 + 0.81 M {sub Sun} head-on collision raises the initial post-shock temperature enough to burn the entire stalled shock region to nuclear statistical equilibrium.

  1. Phenomenological applications of rational approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzàlez-Solís, Sergi; Masjuan, Pere

    2016-08-01

    We illustrate the powerfulness of Padé approximants (PAs) as a summation method and explore one of their extensions, the so-called quadratic approximant (QAs), to access both space- and (low-energy) time-like (TL) regions. As an introductory and pedagogical exercise, the function 1 zln(1 + z) is approximated by both kind of approximants. Then, PAs are applied to predict pseudoscalar meson Dalitz decays and to extract Vub from the semileptonic B → πℓνℓ decays. Finally, the π vector form factor in the TL region is explored using QAs.

  2. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  3. Binaries and Multiple Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott

    Binary and multiple stellar systems have importance in three main areas of astronomy and astrophysics. First, because of the relatively simple gravitational interaction at work in the case of binary stars, these systems provide a basic check on stellar structure and evolution theory since the masses may be determined through observation. When these masses can be linked to other properties of the two stars, such as luminosity, color, and radius, they can provide very stringent constraints on stellar models. Second, the statistics of binary and multiple star systems provide clues to star formation mechanisms and environmental effects in the galactic gravitational potential and in clusters. Although a number of good results have been obtained in nearby star clusters and associations, knowledge of the field population has been somewhat limited until recently by a lack of large, complete samples of binaries. However, there appears to be a great deal of promise in this area for the coming decade in part due to astrometric satellites such as Hipparcos and Gaia. Third, the binary scenario is invoked to explain several important types of astrophysical phenomena such as Type Ia supernovae, cataclysmic variables, and stellar x-ray sources. Since the first of these mentioned is a standard candle for the extragalactic distance scale, it may even be said binary stars play a minor role in field of cosmology. However, in this chapter, the focus will mainly be on normal stars in binary and multiple-stellar systems. The basic physics of binaries will be reviewed, and the observational methods in use today will be discussed together with their limitations and prospects for the future. Finally, an overview of the current science in the three main areas mentioned where binaries have a significant impact will be given.

  4. The coupled states approximation for scattering of two diatoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heil, T. G.; Kouri, D. J.; Green, S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed development of the coupled-states approximation for the general case of two colliding diatomic molecules. The high-energy limit of the exact Lippman-Schwinger equation is applied, and the analysis follows the Shimoni and Kouri (1977) treatment of atom-diatom collisions where the coupled rotor angular momentum and projection replace the single diatom angular momentum and projection. Parallels to the expression for the differential scattering amplitude, the opacity function, and the nondiagonality of the T matrix are reported. Symmetrized expressions and symmetrized coupled equations are derived. The present correctly labeled coupled-states theory is tested by comparing its calculated results with other computed results for three cases: H2-H2 collisions, ortho-para H2-H2 scattering, and H2-HCl.

  5. The coupled states approximation for scattering of two diatoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heil, T. G.; Kouri, D. J.; Green, S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed development of the coupled-states approximation for the general case of two colliding diatomic molecules. The high-energy limit of the exact Lippman-Schwinger equation is applied, and the analysis follows the Shimoni and Kouri (1977) treatment of atom-diatom collisions where the coupled rotor angular momentum and projection replace the single diatom angular momentum and projection. Parallels to the expression for the differential scattering amplitude, the opacity function, and the nondiagonality of the T matrix are reported. Symmetrized expressions and symmetrized coupled equations are derived. The present correctly labeled coupled-states theory is tested by comparing its calculated results with other computed results for three cases: H2-H2 collisions, ortho-para H2-H2 scattering, and H2-HCl.

  6. Collision Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Ames Research Center teamed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to study human performance factors associated with the use of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance system (TCAS II) in an operational environment. TCAS is designed to alert pilots of the presence of other aircraft in their vicinity, to identify and track those who could be a threat, and to recommend action to avoid a collision. Ames conducted three laboratory experiments. The first showed that pilots were able to use the TCAS II correctly in the allowable time. The second tested pilots' response to changes in the avoidance advisories, and the third examined pilots' reactions to alternative displays. After a 1989 congressional mandate, the FAA ruled that TCAS would be required on all passenger carrying aircraft (to be phased in completely by 1995).

  7. Micro UAV collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, John; Pope, Frank

    2007-04-01

    A range image for micro UAV (unmanned air vehicle) collision avoidance is derived by processing a sequence of conventional images from a single camera on board the UAV. The range image will warn of looming collisions immediately ahead and also provide the 3-D situational awareness over a wide field of view needed for semi-autonomous or autonomous operation of the UAV. This single-camera technique is potentially applicable for other robotic vehicles that may not be large enough for two-camera stereo. The range image is generated by tracking the motion of scene detail along optic flow lines. Performance is estimated in terms of the minimum and maximum ranges of scene detail that can be sensed as a function of its position within the field of view.

  8. The orbital eccentricities of binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Heggie, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    Low-mass binary millisecond pulsars (LMBPs) are born with very small orbital eccentricities, typically of order e(sub i) approximately 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3). In globular clusters, however, higher eccentricities e(sub f) much greater than e(sub i) can be induced by dynamical interactions with passing stars. Here we show that the cross section for this process is much larger than previously estimated. This is becuse, even for initially circular binaries, the induced eccentricity e(sub f) for an encounter with pericenter separation r(sub p) beyond a few times the binary semimajor axis a declines only as a power law (e(sub f) varies as (r(sub p)/a)(exp -5/2), and not as an exponential. We find that all currently known LMBPs in clusters were probably affected by interactions, with their current eccentricities typically greater than at birth by an order of magnitude or more.

  9. Superkicks in hyperbolic encounters of binary black holes.

    PubMed

    Healy, James; Herrmann, Frank; Hinder, Ian; Shoemaker, Deirdre M; Laguna, Pablo; Matzner, Richard A

    2009-01-30

    Generic inspirals and mergers of binary black holes produce beamed emission of gravitational radiation that can lead to a gravitational recoil or kick of the final black hole. The kick velocity depends on the mass ratio and spins of the binary as well as on the dynamics of the binary configuration. Studies have focused so far on the most astrophysically relevant configuration of quasicircular inspirals, for which kicks as large as approximately 3300 km s;(-1) have been found. We present the first study of gravitational recoil in hyperbolic encounters. Contrary to quasicircular configurations, in which the beamed radiation tends to average during the inspiral, radiation from hyperbolic encounters is plunge dominated, resulting in an enhancement of preferential beaming. As a consequence, it is possible in highly relativistic scatterings to achieve kick velocities as large as 10 000 km s;(-1).

  10. The orbital eccentricities of binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Heggie, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    Low-mass binary millisecond pulsars (LMBPs) are born with very small orbital eccentricities, typically of order e(sub i) approximately 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3). In globular clusters, however, higher eccentricities e(sub f) much greater than e(sub i) can be induced by dynamical interactions with passing stars. Here we show that the cross section for this process is much larger than previously estimated. This is becuse, even for initially circular binaries, the induced eccentricity e(sub f) for an encounter with pericenter separation r(sub p) beyond a few times the binary semimajor axis a declines only as a power law (e(sub f) varies as (r(sub p)/a)(exp -5/2), and not as an exponential. We find that all currently known LMBPs in clusters were probably affected by interactions, with their current eccentricities typically greater than at birth by an order of magnitude or more.

  11. Contamination of RR Lyrae stars from Binary Evolution Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karczmarek, P.

    2015-09-01

    A Binary Evolution Pulsator (BEP) is a low-mass (0.26 M_⊙) member of a binary system, which pulsates as a result of a former mass transfer to its companion. The BEP mimics RR~Lyrae-type pulsations, but has completely different internal structure and evolution history. Although there is only one known BEP (OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792), it has been estimated that approximately 0.2% of objects classified as RR Lyrae stars can be undetected Binary Evolution Pulsators. In the present work, this contamination value is re-evaluated using the population synthesis method. The output falls inside a range of values dependent on tuning the parameters in the StarTrack code, and varies from 0.06% to 0.43%.

  12. Discrete Velocity Models for Mixtures Without Nonphysical Collision Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhoff, Niclas; Vinerean, Mirela

    2016-10-01

    An important aspect of constructing discrete velocity models (DVMs) for the Boltzmann equation is to obtain the right number of collision invariants. It is a well-known fact that DVMs can also have extra collision invariants, so called spurious collision invariants, in plus to the physical ones. A DVM with only physical collision invariants, and so without spurious ones, is called normal. For binary mixtures also the concept of supernormal DVMs was introduced, meaning that in addition to the DVM being normal, the restriction of the DVM to any single species also is normal. Here we introduce generalizations of this concept to DVMs for multicomponent mixtures. We also present some general algorithms for constructing such models and give some concrete examples of such constructions. One of our main results is that for any given number of species, and any given rational mass ratios we can construct a supernormal DVM. The DVMs are constructed in such a way that for half-space problems, as the Milne and Kramers problems, but also nonlinear ones, we obtain similar structures as for the classical discrete Boltzmann equation for one species, and therefore we can apply obtained results for the classical Boltzmann equation.

  13. Binary star formation: gravitational fragmentation followed by capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. A.; Chapman, S. J.; Bhattal, A. S.; Disney, M. J.; Pongracic, H.; Whitworth, A. P.

    1995-11-01

    We describe in detail one of a sequence of numerical simulations which realize the mechanism of binary star formation proposed by Pringle. In these simulations, collisions between stable molecular cloud clumps produce dense shocked layers, which cool radiatively and fragment gravitationally. The resulting fragments then condense to form protostellar discs, which at the same time fall together and, as a result of tidal and viscous interactions, capture one another to form binary systems. We refer to this mechanism as shock-induced gravitational fragmentation followed by capture, or SGF+C. When the initial clumps are sufficiently massive and/or the Mach number of the collision is sufficiently high, a large number (>~10) of protostellar discs is produced; under these circumstances, the layer fragments first into filaments, and then into beads along the filaments. The marriage of two protostellar discs in this way is `arranged' in the sense that the protostellar discs involved do not form independently. First, they both condense out of the same layer, and probably also out of the same filament within this layer; this significantly increases the likelihood of them interacting dynamically. Secondly, there tends to be alignment between the orbital and spin angular momenta of the interacting protostellar discs, reflecting the fact that these angular momenta derive mainly from the systematic global angular momentum of the off-axis collision which produced the layer; this alignment of the various angular momenta pre-disposes the discs to very dissipative interactions, thereby increasing the probability of producing a strongly bound, long-lasting union. It is a marriage because the binary orbit stabilizes itself rather quickly. Any subsequent orbit evolution, as the protostellar discs `mop up' the surrounding residual gas and interact tidally, tends to harden the orbit. Therefore, as long as a third body does not intervene, the union is binding. Even if a third body does

  14. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    resonances near the chaotic zone. I investigate the effects of the initial eccentricity distribution of the disk particles and find a negligible effect on the gap size at Jovian planet masses, since collisions tend to erase memory of the initial particle eccentricity distributions. I also find that the presence of Trojan analogs is a potentially powerful diagnostic of planets in the mass range ˜1--10MJup. I apply my model to place new upper limits on planets around Fomalhaut, HR 4796 A, HD 202628, HD 181327, and beta Pictoris. Finally, to show how SMACK can be used to analyze a single debris disk in detail, I present a new model of the beta Pictoris disk and planet system that, for the first time, combines simulations of the colliding planetesimals and the dynamics of the dust grains, allowing me to model features and asymmetries in both submillimeter and scattered light images of the disk. I combine a 100,000 superparticle SMACK simulation with N-body integrations of the dust produced by the simulated collisions. I find that secular perturbations of the planet's measured inclination and eccentricity can explain the observed warp and planetesimal ring, while collisions between planetesimals shape the disk by eroding close-in material. The complex 3D structure of the disk due to the perturbations from the planet creates an azimuthally asymmetric spatial distribution of collisions, which could contribute to the observed azimuthal clump of CO gas seen with ALMA. My simulations of the small dust grains produced by collisions demonstrate that the "birth ring" approximation for beta Pictoris fails to account for the ˜54% of dust mass produced outside of the planetesimal ring. I also reproduce the gross morphology of high-resolution scattered light images of the disk, including the two-disk "x"-pattern seen in scattered light, which has not been replicated by previous dust dynamics models.

  15. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  16. Collision Dynamics of Decimeter Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Johannes; Teiser, J.

    2013-10-01

    The collision dynamics of decimeter bodies are important for the early phase of planet formation. Planets form by accretion of km-sized objects, the so called planetesimals. These planetesimals evolve from small grains, but their formation process is not yet understood entirely. Two groups of models try to explain the formation process. Decimeter bodies and their collision behavior play a vital role in both groups. The threshold between bouncing and fragmentation is especially interesting for coagulation models, as decimeter bodies are the direct precursors to meter sized bodies. But the collision dynamics are also relevant for the models, which describe planetesimal formation by gravitational collapse in dense regions of the protoplanetary disk. We will present preliminary results of our collision experiments. Previous experiments on mutual collisions of decimeter dust agglomerates showed that the threshold between bouncing and fragmentation lies at a collision velocity of 16.2 cm/s, which corresponds to a specific kinetic energy of 5 mJ/kg. We expand these experiments to investigate the conditions for “catastrophic disruption” of decimeter dust bodies. Here, “catastrophic disruption” means that the largest fragment of a collision partner has only half the mass of the original body. Furthermore, we extend the parameter range to ice aggregates. We will present first experimental results of collisions of ice aggregates in the decimeter range. In these first experiments we will analyze the threshold conditions for solid ice. We will investigate the collision dynamics for both central and non-central collisions.

  17. A possible mechanism to explain the lack of binary asteroids among the Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, A.; Farrelly, D.; Lemaître, A.; Hestroffer, D.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Binary asteroids are common in the solar system, including in the Kuiper belt. However, there seems to be a marked disparity between the binary populations in the classical part of the Kuiper belt and the part of the belt in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune - i.e., the region inhabited by the Plutinos. In particular, binary Plutinos are extremely rare. Aims: We study the impact of the 3:2 resonance on the formation of Kuiper belt binaries, according to the Nice model, in order to explain such phenomenon. Methods: Numerical simulations are performed within the 2 + 2 body approximation (Sun/Neptune + binary partners). The MEGNO chaos indicator is used to map out regular and chaotic regions of phase space. Residence times of test (binary) particles within the Hill sphere are compared inside and outside of the 3:2 resonance. The effect of increasing the heliocentric eccentricity of the centre of mass of the binary system is studied. This is done because mean-motion resonances between a planet and an asteroid usually have the effect of increasing the eccentricity of the asteroid. Results: The stable zones in the MEGNO maps are mainly disrupted in the resonant, eccentric case: the number of binary asteroids created in this case is significantly lower than outside the 3:2 resonance. Conclusions: In the 2 + 2 body approximation, the pumping of the eccentricity of the centre of mass of a potential binary destabilises the formation of binaries. This may be a factor in explaining the scarcity of binaries in the Plutino population.

  18. Observation of D0 Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p +p to central Au +Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au +Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV /c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  19. Examining the exobase approximation: DSMC models of Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Waalkes, William; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Johnson, Robert E.; Bieler, Andre; Combi, Michael R.; Nagy, Andrew F.

    2016-07-01

    Chamberlain ([1963] Planet. Space Sci., 11, 901-960) described the use of the exobase layer to determine escape from planetary atmospheres, below which it is assumed that molecular collisions maintain thermal equilibrium and above which collisions are deemed negligible. De La Haye et al. ([2007] Icarus., 191, 236-250) used this approximation to extract the energy deposition and non-thermal escape rates for Titan's atmosphere by fitting the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) density data. De La Haye et al. assumed the gas distributions were composed of an enhanced population of super-thermal molecules (E >> kT) that could be described by a kappa energy distribution function (EDF), and they fit the data using the Liouville theorem. Here we fitted the data again, but we used the conventional form of the kappa EDF. The extracted kappa EDFs were then used with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique (Bird [1994] Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows) to evaluate the effect of collisions on the exospheric profiles. The INMS density data can be fit reasonably well with thermal and various non-thermal EDFs. However, the extracted energy deposition and escape rates are shown to depend significantly on the assumed exobase altitude, and the usefulness of such fits without directly modeling the collisions is unclear. Our DSMC results indicate that the kappa EDFs used in the Chamberlain approximation can lead to errors in determining the atmospheric temperature profiles and escape rates. Gas kinetic simulations are needed to accurately model measured exospheric density profiles, and to determine the altitude ranges where the Liouville method might be applicable.

  20. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Electrophoresis has long been recognized as an effective analytic technique for the separation of proteins and other charged species, however attempts at scaling up to accommodate commercial volumes have met with limited success. In this report we describe a novel electrophoretic separation technique - Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis (BOCE). Numerical simulations indicate that the technique has the potential for preparative scale throughputs with high resolution, while simultaneously avoiding many problems common to conventional electrophoresis. The technique utilizes the interaction of an oscillatory electric field and a transverse oscillatory shear flow to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged protein species. An oscillatory electric field is applied across the narrow gap of a rectangular channel inducing a periodic motion of charged protein species. The amplitude of this motion depends on the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility, alpha = E(sub o)mu/(omega)d, where E(sub o) is the amplitude of the electric field oscillations, mu is the dimensional mobility, omega is the angular frequency of oscillation and d is the channel gap width. An oscillatory shear flow is induced along the length of the channel resulting in the separation of species with different mobilities. We present a model that predicts the oscillatory behavior of charged species and allows estimation of both the magnitude of the induced convective velocity and the effective diffusivity as a function of a in infinitely long channels. Numerical results indicate that in addition to the mobility dependence, the steady state behavior of solute species may be strongly affected by oscillating fluid into and out of the active electric field region at the ends of the cell. The effect is most pronounced using time dependent shear flows of the same frequency (cos((omega)t)) flow mode) as the electric field oscillations. Under such conditions, experiments indicate that