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Sample records for binary compact object

  1. Thermodynamics of magnetized binary compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Uryu, Koji; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Markakis, Charalampos

    2010-11-15

    Binary systems of compact objects with electromagnetic field are modeled by helically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes with charged and magnetized perfect fluids. Previously derived thermodynamic laws for helically symmetric perfect-fluid spacetimes are extended to include the electromagnetic fields, and electric currents and charges; the first law is written as a relation between the change in the asymptotic Noether charge {delta}Q and the changes in the area and electric charge of black holes, and in the vorticity, baryon rest mass, entropy, charge and magnetic flux of the magnetized fluid. Using the conservation laws of the circulation of magnetized flow found by Bekenstein and Oron for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic fluid, and also for the flow with zero conducting current, we show that, for nearby equilibria that conserve the quantities mentioned above, the relation {delta}Q=0 is satisfied. We also discuss a formulation for computing numerical solutions of magnetized binary compact objects in equilibrium with emphasis on a first integral of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic-Euler equation.

  2. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Mergers of Binary Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2016-03-01

    The inspiral and eventual merger of two compact objects in binary systems are important in astrophysics across the electromagnetic spectrum and as potential gravitational-wave sources. In this talk I will select a few topics of current interest to highlight compact-object mergers, including in the context of multi-messenger astrophysics.

  3. Higher order spin effects in inspiralling compact objects binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsat, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    We present recent progress on higher order spin effects in the post-Newtonian dynamics of compact objects binaries. We present first an extension of a Lagrangian formalism for point particle with spins, where finite size effects are represented by an additional multipolar structure. When applied to the case of a spin-induced octupole, the formalism allows for the computation of the cubic-in-spin effects that enter at the order 3.5PN. We also report on results obtained for quadratic-in-spin effects at the next-to-leading order 3PN. In both cases, we recover existing results for the dynamics, and derive for the first time the gravitational wave energy flux and orbital phasing. These results will be useful for the data analysis of the upcoming generation of advanced detectors of gravitational waves. NASA Grant 11-ATP-046.

  4. Nonconformally flat initial data for binary compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Uryu, Koji; Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Friedman, John L.; Shibata, Masaru

    2009-12-15

    A new method is described for constructing initial data for a binary neutron-star system in quasiequilibrium circular orbit. Two formulations for nonconformally flat data, waveless and near-zone helically symmetric, are introduced; in each formulation, the Einstein-Euler system, written in 3+1 form on an asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurface, is exactly solved for all metric components, including the spatially nonconformally flat potentials, and for irrotational flow. A numerical method applicable to both formulations is explained with an emphasis on the imposition of a spatial gauge condition. Results are shown for solution sequences of irrotational binary neutron-stars with matter approximated by parametrized equations of state that use a few segments of polytropic equations of state. The binding energy and total angular momentum of solution sequences computed within the conformally flat--Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews--formulation are closer to those of the third post-Newtonian (3PN) two point particles up to the closest orbits, for the more compact stars, whereas sequences resulting from the waveless/near-zone helically symmetric formulations deviate from the 3PN curve even more for the sequences with larger compactness. We think it likely that this correction reflects an overestimation in the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation as well as in the 3PN formula, by {approx}1 cycle in the gravitational-wave phase during the last several orbits. The work suggests that imposing spatial conformal flatness results in an underestimate of the quadrupole deformation of the components of binary neutron-star systems in the last few orbits prior to merger.

  5. Tidal torque induced by orbital decay in compact object binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Rossi, Elena M.

    2013-01-01

    As we observe in the moon-earth system, tidal interactions in binary systems can lead to angular momentum exchange. The presence of viscosity is generally regarded as the condition for such transfer to happen. In this paper, we show how the orbital evolution can cause a persistent torque between the binary components, even for inviscid bodies. This preferentially occurs at the final stage of coalescence of compact binaries, when the orbit shrinks successively by gravitational waves and plunging on a time-scale shorter than the viscous time-scale. The total orbital energy transferred to the secondary by this torque is ˜10-2 of its binding energy. We further show that this persistent torque induces a differentially rotating quadrupolar perturbation. Specializing to the case of a secondary neutron star, we find that this non-equilibrium state has an associated free energy of 1047-1048 erg, just prior to coalescence. This energy is likely stored in internal fluid motions, with a sizeable amount of differential rotation. By tapping this free energy reservoir, a pre-existing weak magnetic field could be amplified up to a strength of ≈1015 G. Such a dynamically driven tidal torque can thus recycle an old neutron star into a magnetar, with possible observational consequences at merger.

  6. Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award Talk: Formation and Evolution of Compact Objects in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogera, Vicky

    2008-04-01

    Ever since their discovery, first as X-ray sources and later as radio pulsars, binary stellar systems harboring neutron stars or black holes have been pivotal in our efforts to understand the formation and evolution of these most compact objects and the implications for gravitational wave searches. I will review some recent surprising results linking the formation of neutron stars and black holes. I will also discuss how studies of double compact objects can help uncover the origin of short gamma-ray bursts and assess the prospects for gravitational wave detections in the near future.

  7. Compact Objects In Binary Systems: Formation and Evolution of X-ray Binaries and Tides in Double White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Francesca

    Binary star systems hosting black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs are unique laboratories for investigating both extreme physical conditions, and stellar and binary evolution. Black holes and neutron stars are observed in X-ray binaries, where mass accretion from a stellar companion renders them X-ray bright. Although instruments like Chandra have revolutionized the field of X-ray binaries, our theoretical understanding of their origin and formation lags behind. Progress can be made by unravelling the evolutionary history of observed systems. As part of my thesis work, I have developed an analysis method that uses detailed stellar models and all the observational constraints of a system to reconstruct its evolutionary path. This analysis models the orbital evolution from compact-object formation to the present time, the binary orbital dynamics due to explosive mass loss and a possible kick at core collapse, and the evolution from the progenitor's Zero Age Main Sequence to compact-object formation. This method led to a theoretical model for M33 X-7, one of the most massive X-ray binaries known and originally marked as an evolutionary challenge. Compact objects are also expected gravitational wave (GW) sources. In particular, double white dwarfs are both guaranteed GW sources and observed electromagnetically. Although known systems show evidence of tidal deformation and a successful GW astronomy requires realistic models of the sources, detached double white dwarfs are generally approximated to point masses. For the first time, I used realistic models to study tidally-driven periastron precession in eccentric binaries. I demonstrated that its imprint on the GW signal yields constrains on the components' masses and that the source would be misclassified if tides are neglected. Beyond this adiabatic precession, tidal dissipation creates a sink of orbital angular momentum. Its efficiency is strongest when tides are dynamic and excite the components' free

  8. Insights into stellar and binary evolution from gravitational-wave observations of merging compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Advanced LIGO finished its first observing run (O1) at the begining of 2016, at a sensitivity ~3 times that of the initial LIGO detectors. This increased sensitivity makes the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves a realistic prospect over the next few years. One of the most promising sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors is the merger of two compact objects; neutron stars or black holes. These objects are formed as the end point of the evolution of massive stars in close binaries. There remain many poorly understood processes in the lives of massive stars and the evolution of close binary systems. These processes include the distribution of kicks received by black holes at birth, the amount of angular momentum lost from a system during a mass transfer episode, and the common envelope event. One way of attempting to understand these processes is to attempt to constrain them observationally using eventual gravitational-wave observations of compact binary mergers. Here we present recent work on this front.

  9. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post)5/2-Newtonian order. V. Spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Lawrence E.

    1995-07-01

    We examine the effects of spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings on the inspiral of a coalescing binary system of spinning compact objects and on the gravitational radiation emitted therefrom. Using a formalism developed by Blanchet, Damour, and Iyer we calculate the contributions due to the spins of the bodies to the symmetric trace-free radiative multipole moments which are used to calculate the waveform, energy loss, and angular momentum loss from the inspiraling binary. Using equations of motion which include terms due to spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings we evolve the orbit of a coalescing binary and use the orbit to calculate the emitted gravitational waveform. We find the spins of the bodies affect the waveform in several ways: (1) the spin terms contribute to the orbital decay of the binary, and thus to the accumulated phase of the gravitational waveform; (2) the spins cause the orbital plane to precess, which changes the orientation of the orbital plane with respect to an observer, thus causing the shape of the waveform to be modulated; (3) the spins contribute directly to the amplitude of the waveform. We discuss the size and importance of spin effects for the case of two coalescing neutron stars, and for the case of a neutron star orbiting a rapidly rotating 10Msolar black hole.

  10. Compact symmetric objects and supermassive binary black holes in the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, S. E.; Taylor, G. B.; Ortiz, A. A.; Tremblay, C. D.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Romani, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    We present multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) follow-up observations of VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey sources identified as likely compact symmetric objects (CSOs) or supermassive binary black holes (SBBHs). We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 11 sources observed with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. While no new SBBHs can be confirmed from these observations, we have identified 24 CSOs in the sample, 15 of which are newly designated, and refuted 52 candidates leaving 33 unconfirmed candidates. This is the first large uniform sample of CSOs which can be used to elicit some of the general properties of these sources, including morphological evolution and environmental interaction. We have detected polarized emission from two of these CSOs the properties of which are consistent with active galactic nuclei unification schemes.

  11. THE LOCATIONS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AS EVIDENCE FOR COMPACT OBJECT BINARY PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.

    2013-10-10

    We present a detailed investigation of Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV/optical observations of 22 short gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and sub-galactic environments. Utilizing the high angular resolution and depth of HST we characterize the host galaxy morphologies, measure precise projected physical and host-normalized offsets between the bursts and host centers, and calculate the locations of the bursts with respect to their host light distributions (rest-frame UV and optical). We calculate a median short GRB projected physical offset of 4.5 kpc, about 3.5 times larger than that for long GRBs, and find that ≈25% of short GRBs have offsets of ∼> 10 kpc. When compared to their host sizes, the median offset is 1.5 half-light radii (r{sub e} ), about 1.5 times larger than the values for long GRBs, core-collapse supernovae, and Type Ia supernovae. In addition, ≈20% of short GRBs having offsets of ∼> 5r{sub e} , and only ≈25% are located within 1r{sub e} . We further find that short GRBs severely under-represent their hosts' rest-frame optical and UV light, with ≈30%-45% of the bursts located in regions of their host galaxies that have no detectable stellar light, and ≈55% in the regions with no UV light. Therefore, short GRBs do not occur in regions of star formation or even stellar mass. This demonstrates that the progenitor systems of short GRBs must migrate from their birth sites to their eventual explosion sites, a signature of kicks in compact object binary systems. Utilizing the full sample of offsets, we estimate natal kick velocities of ≈20-140 km s{sup –1}. These independent lines of evidence provide the strongest support to date that short GRBs result from the merger of compact object binaries (NS-NS/NS-BH)

  12. The multimessenger picture of compact object encounters: binary mergers versus dynamical collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, S.; Piran, T.; Nakar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We explore the multimessenger signatures of encounters between two neutron stars (ns2) and between a neutron star and a stellar mass black hole (nsbh). We focus on the differences between gravitational-wave-driven binary mergers and dynamical collisions that occur, for example, in globular clusters. Our discussion is based on Newtonian hydrodynamics simulations that incorporate a nuclear equation of state and a multiflavour neutrino treatment. For both types of encounters we compare the gravitational wave and neutrino emission properties. We also calculate the rates at which nearly unbound mass is delivered back to the central remnant in a ballistic-fallback-plus-viscous-disc model and we analyse the properties of the dynamically ejected matter. Last but not least we address the electromagnetic transients that accompany each type of encounter. We find that dynamical collisions are at least as promising as binary mergers for producing (short) gamma-ray bursts, but they also share the same possible caveats in terms of baryonic pollution. All encounter remnants produce peak neutrino luminosities of at least ˜1053 erg s-1, some of the collision cases exceed this value by more than an order of magnitude. The canonical ns2 merger case ejects more than 1 per cent of a solar mass of extremely neutron-rich (Ye ˜ 0.03) material, an amount that is consistent with double neutron star mergers being a major source of r-process in the galaxy. nsbh collisions eject very large amounts of matter (˜0.15 M⊙) which seriously constrains their admissible occurrence rates. The compact object collision rate (sum of ns2 and nsbh) must therefore be less, likely much less, than 10 per cent of the ns2 merger rate. The radioactively decaying ejecta produce optical-ultraviolet `macronova' which, for the canonical merger case, peak after ˜0.4 d with a luminosity of ˜5 × 1041 erg s-1. ns2 (nsbh) collisions reach up to two (four) times larger peak luminosities. The dynamic ejecta deposit a

  13. DC CIRCUIT POWERED BY ORBITAL MOTION: MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS IN COMPACT OBJECT BINARIES AND EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Dong

    2012-09-20

    The unipolar induction DC circuit model, originally developed by Goldreich and Lynden-Bell for the Jupiter-Io system, has been applied to different types of binary systems in recent years. We show that there exists an upper limit to the magnetic interaction torque and energy dissipation rate in such a model. This arises because when the resistance of the circuit is too small, the large current flow severely twists the magnetic flux tube connecting the two binary components, leading to the breakdown of the circuit. Applying this limit, we find that in coalescing neutron star binaries, magnetic interactions produce negligible correction to the phase evolution of the gravitational waveform, even for magnetar-like field strengths. However, energy dissipation in the binary magnetosphere may still give rise to electromagnetic radiation prior to the final merger. For ultracompact white dwarf binaries, we find that unipolar induction does not provide adequate energy dissipation to explain the observed X-ray luminosities of several sources. For exoplanetary systems containing close-in Jupiters or super-Earths, the magnetic torque and energy dissipation induced by the orbital motion are negligible, except possibly during the early T Tauri phase, when the stellar magnetic field is stronger than 10{sup 3} G.

  14. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: FORMATION OF COMPACT BINARIES, MERGER/COLLISION PRODUCTS AND G2-LIKE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Snezana; Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B. E-mail: antonini@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-02-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of binaries around massive black holes (MBHs) in nuclear stellar clusters. We focus on their secular evolution due to the perturbation by the MBHs, while simplistically accounting for their collisional evolution. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbits around MBHs are strongly affected by secular processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (e.g., Kozai-Lidov cycles). During periapsis approach, dissipative processes such as tidal friction may become highly efficient, and may lead to shrinkage of a binary orbit and even to its merger. Binaries in this environment can therefore significantly change their orbital evolution due to the MBH third-body perturbative effects. Such orbital evolution may impinge on their later stellar evolution. Here we follow the secular dynamics of such binaries and its coupling to tidal evolution, as well as the stellar evolution of such binaries on longer timescales. We find that stellar binaries in the central parts of nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are highly likely to evolve into eccentric and/or short-period binaries, and become strongly interacting binaries either on the main sequence (at which point they may even merge), or through their later binary stellar evolution. The central parts of NSCs therefore catalyze the formation and evolution of strongly interacting binaries, and lead to the enhanced formation of blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and possible supernova progenitors. Induced mergers/collisions may also lead to the formation of G2-like cloud-like objects such as the one recently observed in the Galactic center.

  15. Rapid Compact Binary Coalescence Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Chris; Brady, Patrick; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Ochsner, Evan; Qi, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The first observation run with second generation gravitational-wave observatories will conclude at the beginning of 2016. Given their unprecedented and growing sensitivity, the benefit of prompt and accurate estimation of the orientation and physical parameters of binary coalescences is obvious in its coupling to electromagnetic astrophysics and observations. Popular Bayesian schemes to measure properties of compact object binaries use Markovian sampling to compute the posterior. While very successful, in some cases, convergence is delayed until well after the electromagnetic fluence has subsided thus diminishing the potential science return. With this in mind, we have developed a scheme which is also Bayesian and simply parallelizable across all available computing resources, drastically decreasing convergence time to a few tens of minutes. In this talk, I will emphasize the complementary use of results from low latency gravitational-wave searches to improve computational efficiency and demonstrate the capabilities of our parameter estimation framework with a simulated set of binary compact object coalescences.

  16. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  17. THE MASS-LOSS-INDUCED ECCENTRIC KOZAI MECHANISM: A NEW CHANNEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CLOSE COMPACT OBJECT-STELLAR BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shappee, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2013-03-20

    Over a broad range of initial inclinations and eccentricities, an appreciable fraction of hierarchical triple star systems with similar masses are essentially unaffected by the Kozai-Lidov mechanism (KM) until the primary in the central binary evolves into a compact object. Once it does, it may be much less massive than the other components in the ternary, enabling the 'eccentric Kozai mechanism (EKM)': the mutual inclination between the inner and outer binaries can flip signs driving the inner binary to very high eccentricity, leading to a close binary or collision. We demonstrate this 'mass-loss-induced eccentric Kozai' (MIEK) mechanism by considering an example system and defining an ad hoc minimal separation between the inner two members at which tidal effects become important. For fixed initial masses and semimajor axes, but uniform distributions of eccentricity and cosine of the mutual inclination, {approx}10% of systems interact tidally or collide while the primary is on the main sequence (MS) due to the KM or EKM. Those affected by the EKM are not captured by earlier quadrupole-order secular calculations. We show that fully {approx}30% of systems interact tidally or collide for the first time as the primary swells to AU scales, mostly as a result of the KM. Finally, {approx}2% of systems interact tidally or collide for the first time after the primary sheds most of its mass and becomes a white dwarf (WD), mostly as a result of the MIEK mechanism. These findings motivate a more detailed study of mass loss in triple systems and the formation of close neutron star (NS)/WD-MS and NS/WD-NS/WD binaries without an initial common envelope phase.

  18. Approaching the Post-Newtonian Regime with Numerical Relativity: A Compact-Object Binary Simulation Spanning 350 Gravitational-Wave Cycles.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, Béla; Blackman, Jonathan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pan, Yi

    2015-07-17

    We present the first numerical-relativity simulation of a compact-object binary whose gravitational waveform is long enough to cover the entire frequency band of advanced gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, for mass ratio 7 and total mass as low as 45.5M_{⊙}. We find that effective-one-body models, either uncalibrated or calibrated against substantially shorter numerical-relativity waveforms at smaller mass ratios, reproduce our new waveform remarkably well, with a negligible loss in detection rate due to modeling error. In contrast, post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms and existing calibrated phenomenological inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms display greater disagreement with our new simulation. The disagreement varies substantially depending on the specific post-Newtonian approximant used. PMID:26230780

  19. Approaching the Post-Newtonian Regime with Numerical Relativity: A Compact-Object Binary Simulation Spanning 350 Gravitational-Wave Cycles.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, Béla; Blackman, Jonathan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pan, Yi

    2015-07-17

    We present the first numerical-relativity simulation of a compact-object binary whose gravitational waveform is long enough to cover the entire frequency band of advanced gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, for mass ratio 7 and total mass as low as 45.5M_{⊙}. We find that effective-one-body models, either uncalibrated or calibrated against substantially shorter numerical-relativity waveforms at smaller mass ratios, reproduce our new waveform remarkably well, with a negligible loss in detection rate due to modeling error. In contrast, post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms and existing calibrated phenomenological inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms display greater disagreement with our new simulation. The disagreement varies substantially depending on the specific post-Newtonian approximant used.

  20. Gravitational wave astrophysics with compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime that convey information about changing gravitational fields. Large-scale detection projects are currently in operation, and more advanced detectors are being designed and built. Though we have yet to make a direct detection of a gravitational wave signal, upgrades to current detectors are expected to bring the first detections within the next year or two. Gravitational waves will bring us information about astrophysical phenomena that is complementary to the information gained from photon-based observations (e.g., telescopes and radio receivers). One of the primary sources of gravitational waves are binary systems: two massive objects that orbit around each other due to their mutual gravitational attraction. These systems can have very predictable gravitational wave signatures due to their repetitive motions, making them ideal gravitational wave sources. In this dissertation, I present two research projects pertaining to gravitational wave astrophysics and compact binary systems. In the first, I explore interactions between compact binary systems near the center of our galaxy with the supermassive black hole that resides there. I am interested in the final state of the binary as a result of the interaction, ranging from small perturbations to the orbit up to total disruption. In the case of disruption, I characterize the new orbits formed between the binary components and the central black hole, known as extreme mass ratio inspirals. For binaries that survive the encounter, I examine the changes they experience, and find on average, they will merge together as a result of gravitational wave emission faster than before the encounter. In the second project, I propose a new method of measuring the radius of the swirling disc of gas and dust that encircles some stars in compact binary systems, known as the accretion disc. This method relies on the use of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational wave

  1. The effects of host galaxy properties on merging compact binaries detectable by LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'shaughnessy, R.; Bellovary, J. M.; Brooks, A.; Shen, S.; Governato, F.; Christensen, C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation can produce present-day galaxies with a large range of assembly and star formation histories. A detailed study of the metallicity evolution and star formation history of such simulations can assist in predicting LIGO-detectable compact object binary mergers. Recent simulations of compact binary evolution suggest the compact object merger rate depends sensitively on the progenitor's metallicity. Rare low-metallicity star formation during galaxy assembly can produce more detected compact binaries than typical star formation. Using detailed simulations of galaxy and chemical evolution, we determine how sensitively the compact binary populations of galaxies with similar present-day appearance depend on the details of their assembly. We also demonstrate by concrete example the extent to which dwarf galaxies overabundantly produce compact binary mergers, particularly binary black holes, relative to more massive galaxies. We discuss the implications for transient multimessenger astronomy with compact binary sources.

  2. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post)5/2-Newtonian order. II. Higher-order wave forms and radiation recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Alan G.

    1992-08-01

    Using formulas developed by Blanchet, Damour, and Iyer, we obtain a symmetric trace-free multipolar expansion of the gravitational radiation from a coalescing binary system which is sufficiently accurate to allow a post-Newtonian calculation of the linear momentum carried off by the gravitational radiation prior to a binary coalescence. We briefly examine the structure of the post-quadrupole corrections to the wave form for an orbiting binary system near coalescence. The post-Newtonian correction to the momentum ejection allows a more accurate calculation of the system recoil velocity (radiation rocket effect). We find that the higher-order correction actually reduces the net momentum ejection. Furthermore, the post-Newtonian correction to the momentum flux has only a weak dependence on the mass ratio of the objects in the binary, suggesting that previous test mass calculations may be quite accurate. We estimate an upper bound of the center-of-mass velocity of 1 km s-1 for neutron star binaries very near coalescence. In an appendix we give a self-contained (albeit less rigorous) derivation of the gravitational wave form using the Epstein-Wagoner formalism.

  3. COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-06-01

    COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

  4. Winds from disks in compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1993-10-27

    We herein present an observational and theoretical review of the winds of compact binaries. After a brief consideration of the accretion disk coronae and winds of X-ray binaries, the review concentrates on the winds of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Specifically, we consider the related problems of the geometry and mass-loss rate of the winds of CVs, their ionization state and variability, and the results from studies of eclipsing CVs. Finally, the properties of bona fide accretion disk wind models are reviewed.

  5. Fundamental properties of accreting compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Jennifer L.

    Galactic accreting compact objects, such as stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars, can give us a unique perspective into the behavior of matter in extreme conditions. However, the exact nature of accretion onto these objects is not yet well understood. X-ray studies provide us with a means to observe the innermost regions around these objects and to explore our theories of general relativistic physics. Through X-ray analyses we can constrain the physical parameters necessary to make logical deductions regarding compact object properties, such as disk winds, relativistic jets, the Kerr metric, and the neutron star equation of state. Here we present spectral modeling results from three accreting X-ray binaries. Specifically, we analyze Suzaku spectra from two stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries, GRS 1915+105 and H1743-322, and one neutron star X-ray binary, 4U 1636-53. For GRS 1915+105 and 4U 1636-53, we use the relativistic iron line, which is part of a reflection spectrum, as a diagnostic for measuring black hole spin and neutron star radius, respectively. We find that while we can exclude a spin of zero at the 2σ level of confidence for GRS 1915+105, data selection and disk reflection modeling nuances can be important when estimating the spin value. For 4U 1636-53, we provide upper limits on the neutron star radius by estimating the radial extent of the inner accretion disk, which are important for constraining models for the neutron star equation of state. Moreover, when testing for the presence of disk winds in H1743-322 (which are key to understanding the nature of accretion disk outflow), we do not detect Fe XXV or Fe XXVI absorption lines in its spectra of H1743-322; implying that disk winds may be state dependent.

  6. Fundamental Properties of Accreting Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Galactic accreting compact objects, such as stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars can give us a unique perspective into the behavior of matter in extreme conditions. However, the exact nature of accretion onto these objects is not yet well understood. X-ray studies provide us with a means to observe the innermost regions around these objects and to test our theories of general relativistic physics. Through X-ray analyses we can constrain the physical parameters necessary to make logical deductions regarding compact object properties, such as disk winds, relativistic jets, the Kerr metric, and the neutron star equation of state. Here we present spectral modeling results from three accreting X-ray binaries. Specifically, we analyze Suzaku spectra from two stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries, GRS 1915+105 and H1743-322, and one neutron star X-ray binary, 4U 1636-53. For GRS 1915+105 and 4U 1636-53, we use the relativistic iron line, which is part of a reflection spectrum, as a diagnostic for measuring black hole spin and neutron star radius, respectively. We find that while we can exclude a spin of zero at the 2 sigma level of confidence for GRS 1915+105, data selection and disk reflection modeling nuances can be important when estimating the spin value. For 4U 1636-53, we provide upper limits on the neutron star radius by estimating the radial extent of the inner accretion disk, which are important for constraining models for the neutron star equation of state. Moreover, when testing for the presence of disk winds in H1743-322 (which are key to understanding the nature of accretion disk outflow), we do not detect Fe XXV or Fe XXVI absorption lines in its spectra of H1743-322; implying that disk winds may be state dependent.

  7. Accretion-powered Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2003-12-01

    Preface; The workshop logo; A short history of the CV workshop F. A. Córdova; Part I. Observations: 1. Low mass x-ray binaries A. P. Cowley, P. C. Schmidtke, D. Crampton, J. B. Hutchings, C. A. Haswell, E. L. Robinson, K. D. Horne, H. M. Johnston, S. R. Kulkarni, S. Kitamoto, X. Han, R. M. Hjellming, R. M. Wagner, S. L. Morris, P. Hertz, A. N. Parmar, L. Stella, P. Giommi, P. J. Callanan, T. Naylor, P. A. Charles, C. D. Bailyn, J. N. Imamura, T. Steiman-Cameron, J. Kristian, J. Middleditch, L. Angelini and J. P. Noris; 2. Nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables R. S. Polidan, C. W. Mauche, R. A. Wade, R. H. Kaitchuck, E. M. Schlegel, P. A. Hantzios, R. C. Smith, J. H. Wood, F. Hessman, A. Fiedler, D. H. P. Jones, J. Casares, P. A. Charles, J. van Paradijs, E. Harlaftis, T. Naylor, G. Sonneborn, B. J. M. Hassall, K. Horne, C. A. la Dous, A. W. Shafter, N. A. Hawkins, D. A. H. Buckley, D. J. Sullivan, F. V. Hessman, V. S. Dhillon, T. R. Marsh, J. Singh, S. Seetha, F. Giovannelli, A. Bianchini, E. M. Sion, D. J. Mullan, H. L. Shipman, G. Machin, P. J. Callanan, S. B. Howell, P. Szkody, E. M. Schlegel and R. F. Webbink; 3. Magnetic cataclysmic variables C. Hellier, K. O. Mason, C. W. Mauche, G. S. Miller, J. C. Raymond, F. K. Lamb, J. Patterson, A. J. Norton, M. G. Watson, A. R. King, I. M. McHardy, H. Lehto, J. P. Osborne, E. L. Robinson, A. W. Shafter, S. Balachandran, S. R. Rosen, J. Krautter, W. Buchholz, D. A. H. Buckley, I. R. Tuoly, D. Crampton, B. Warner, R. M. Prestage, B. N. Ashoka, M. Mouchet, J. M. Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M. Hameury, P. Szkody, P. Garnavich, S. Howell, T. Kii, M. Cropper, K. Mason, J. Bailey, D. T. Wickramasinghe, L. Ferrario, K. Beuermann, A. D. Schwope, H.-C. Thomas, S. Jordan, J. Schachter, A. V. Filippenko, S. M. Kahn, F. B. S. Paerels, K. Mukai, M. L. Edgar, S. Larsson, R. F. Jameson, A. R. King, A. Silber, R. Remillard, H. Bradt, M. Ishida, T. Ohashi and G. D. Schmidt; Part II. Accretion Theory: 4. Nonmagnetic W. Kley, F. Geyer, H. Herold, H

  8. TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong

    2012-09-01

    Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  9. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  10. Searching for gravitational waves from compact binaries with precessing spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, Ian; Privitera, Stephen; Bohé, Alejandro; Buonanno, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Current searches for gravitational waves from compact-object binaries with the LIGO and Virgo observatories employ waveform models with spins aligned (or antialigned) with the orbital angular momentum. Here, we derive a new statistic to search for compact objects carrying generic (precessing) spins. Applying this statistic, we construct banks of both aligned- and generic-spin templates for binary black holes and neutron star-black hole binaries, and compare the effectualness of these banks towards simulated populations of generic-spin systems. We then use these banks in a pipeline analysis of Gaussian noise to measure the increase in background incurred by using generic- instead of aligned-spin banks. Although the generic-spin banks have roughly a factor of ten more templates than the aligned-spin banks, we find an overall improvement in signal recovery at a fixed false-alarm rate for systems with high-mass ratio and highly precessing spins. This gain in sensitivity comes at a small loss of sensitivity (≲4 %) for systems that are already well covered by aligned-spin templates. Since the observation of even a single binary merger with misaligned spins could provide unique astrophysical insights into the formation of these sources, we recommend that the method described here be developed further to mount a viable search for generic-spin binary mergers in LIGO/Virgo data.

  11. The origin of ultra-compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Miyaji, Shigeki; Saio, Hideyuki

    1987-01-01

    The origin of ultra-compact binaries composed of a neutron star and a low-mass (about 0.06 solar mass) white dwarf is considered. Taking account of the systemic losses of mass and angular momentum, it was found that a serious difficulty exists in the scenarios which involve tidal captures of a normal star (a main sequence star or a red giant) by a neutron star. This difficulty can be avoided if a red giant star is captured by a massive white dwarf (M is approx. greater than 1.2 solar masses), which becomes a neutron star through the accretion induced collapse.

  12. Double compact objects. II. Cosmological merger rates

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Berti, Emanuele; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2013-12-10

    The development of advanced gravitational wave (GW) observatories, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, provides impetus to refine theoretical predictions for what these instruments might detect. In particular, with the range increasing by an order of magnitude, the search for GW sources is extending beyond the 'local' universe and out to cosmological distances. Double compact objects (neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS), black hole-neutron star (BH-NS), and black hole-black hole (BH-BH) systems) are considered to be the most promising GW sources. In addition, NS-NS and/or BH-NS systems are thought to be the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts and may also be associated with kilonovae. In this paper, we present the merger event rates of these objects as a function of cosmological redshift. We provide the results for four cases, each one investigating a different important evolution parameter of binary stars. Each case is also presented for two metallicity evolution scenarios. We find that (1) in most cases NS-NS systems dominate the merger rates in the local universe, while BH-BH mergers dominate at high redshift, (2) BH-NS mergers are less frequent than other sources per unit volume, for all time, and (3) natal kicks may alter the observable properties of populations in a significant way, allowing the underlying models of binary evolution and compact object formation to be easily distinguished. This is the second paper in a series of three. The third paper will focus on calculating the detection rates of mergers by GW telescopes.

  13. Spinning compact binary dynamics and chameleon orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, László Árpád; Keresztes, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the conservative evolution of spinning compact binaries to second post-Newtonian (2PN) order accuracy, with leading-order spin-orbit, spin-spin and mass quadrupole-monopole contributions included. As a main result we derive a closed system of first-order differential equations in a compact form, for a set of dimensionless variables encompassing both orbital elements and spin angles. These evolutions are constrained by conservation laws holding at 2PN order. As required by the generic theory of constrained dynamical systems we perform a consistency check and prove that the constraints are preserved by the evolution. We apply the formalism to show the existence of chameleon orbits, whose local, orbital parameters evolve from elliptic (in the Newtonian sense) near pericenter, towards hyperbolic at large distances. This behavior is consistent with the picture that general relativity predicts stronger gravity at short distances than Newtonian theory does.

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON THE COMPACT OBJECT MASS IN THE ECLIPSING HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY XMMU J013236.7+303228 IN M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Varun B.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.

    2012-09-20

    We present optical spectroscopic measurements of the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) XMMU J013236.7+303228 in M 33. Based on spectra taken at multiple epochs of the 1.73 day binary orbital period we determine physical as well as orbital parameters for the donor star. We find the donor to be a B1.5IV subgiant with effective temperature T = 22, 000-23, 000 K. From the luminosity, temperature, and known distance to M 33 we derive a radius of R 8.9 {+-} 0.5 R{sub Sun }. From the radial-velocity measurements, we determine a velocity semi-amplitude of K{sub opt} = 63 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}. Using the physical properties of the B star determined from the optical spectrum, we estimate the star's mass to be M{sub opt} = 11 {+-} 1 M{sub Sun }. Based on the X-ray spectrum, the compact companion is likely a neutron star, although no pulsations have yet been detected. Using the spectroscopically derived B star mass we find the neutron star companion mass to be M{sub X} = 2.0 {+-} 0.4 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the neutron star mass in the HMXB Vela X-1, but heavier than the canonical value of 1.4 M{sub Sun} found for many millisecond pulsars. We attempt to use as an additional constraint that the B star radius inferred from temperature, flux, and distance should equate to the Roche radius, since the system accretes by Roche lobe overflow. This leads to substantially larger masses, but by trying to apply the technique to known systems, we find that the masses are consistently overestimated. Attempting to account for that in our uncertainties, we derive M{sub X} = 2.2{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} M{sub Sun} and M{sub opt} = 13 {+-} 4 M{sub Sun }. We conclude that precise constraints require detailed modeling of the shape of the Roche surface.

  15. Two Improved Access Methods on Compact Binary (CB) Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shishibori, Masami; Koyama, Masafumi; Okada, Makoto; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2000-01-01

    Discusses information retrieval and the use of binary trees as a fast access method for search strategies such as hashing. Proposes new methods based on compact binary trees that provide faster access and more compact storage, explains the theoretical basis, and confirms the validity of the methods through empirical observations. (LRW)

  16. Recognition of compact astrophysical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H. (Editor); Rothschild, R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics and the Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics at the Univ. of Md. collaberated on a graduate level course with this title. This publication is an edited version of notes used as the course text. Topics include stellar evolution, pulsars, binary stars, X-ray signatures, gamma ray sources, and temporal analysis of X-ray data.

  17. ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF COMPACT WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David L.; Bildsten, Lars; Steinfadt, Justin D. R. E-mail: bildsten@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2012-10-10

    The newfound prevalence of extremely low mass (ELM, M{sub He} < 0.2 M{sub Sun }) helium white dwarfs (WDs) in tight binaries with more massive WDs has raised our interest in understanding the nature of their mass transfer. Possessing small (M{sub env} {approx} 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }) but thick hydrogen envelopes, these objects have larger radii than cold WDs and so initiate mass transfer of H-rich material at orbital periods of 6-10 minutes. Building on the original work of D'Antona et al., we confirm the 10{sup 6} yr period of continued inspiral with mass transfer of H-rich matter and highlight the fact that the inspiraling direct-impact double WD binary HM Cancri likely has an ELM WD donor. The ELM WDs have less of a radius expansion under mass loss, thus enabling a larger range of donor masses that can stably transfer matter and become a He mass transferring AM CVn binary. Even once in the long-lived AM CVn mass transferring stage, these He WDs have larger radii due to their higher entropy from the prolonged H-burning stage.

  18. Composite gravitational-wave detection of compact binary coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew; Searle, Antony C.

    2011-04-15

    The detection of gravitational waves from compact binaries relies on a computationally burdensome processing of gravitational-wave detector data. The parameter space of compact-binary-coalescence gravitational waves is large and optimal detection strategies often require nearly redundant calculations. Previously, it has been shown that singular value decomposition of search filters removes redundancy. Here we will demonstrate the use of singular value decomposition for a composite detection statistic. This can greatly improve the prospects for a computationally feasible rapid detection scheme across a large compact binary parameter space.

  19. Studies of compact objects with Einstein - Review and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray images and spectra of a wide range of systems containing compact objects were obtained with the Einstein X-ray Observatory. Accreting white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes were observed in binary systems in the Galaxy, and new constraints were derived for their formation, nature and evolution. Massive black holes were studied in active galactic nuclei, and X-ray spectra (and evolution) of AGN have led to a new model for the diffuse X-ray background.

  20. Interactive stars - Normal and compact stars in close binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    The missions planned for the 1990's will greatly expand the knowledge of close binary systems and the physical phenomena that can be studied in a member of a close binary, from stellar active regions to the highest density black hole candidates known. These systems and the phenomena are reviewed with reference to major outstanding questions, the expected capability to answer them, and the expansion of capability that would be necessary. A 'super' XMM or LAMAR experiment with larger area, but similar moderate energy resolution and moderate spatial resolution, could detect 0.1 millisecond bursts from Cyg X-1 and 1 millisecond bursts in quiescent black hole candidates, measure Doppler and gravitational energy shifts in the iron line features for black holes and neutron stars. It would also identify these objects in galaxies a few Mpc away and open the way for evolution studies. A somewhat less ambitious goal would be high energy resolution of about the area of LAMAR to make full use of the information in the emission lines in both normal and compact binaries.

  1. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF COMPACT BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES AND OTHER EXOTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B.

    2012-09-20

    The environment near supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galactic nuclei contains a large number of stars and compact objects. A fraction of these are likely to be members of binaries. Here we discuss the binary population of stellar black holes and neutron stars near SMBHs and focus on the secular evolution of such binaries, due to the perturbation by the SMBH. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbit around the SMBH are strongly affected by secular Kozai processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (Kozai cycles). During periapsis approach, at the highest eccentricities during the Kozai cycles, gravitational wave (GW) emission becomes highly efficient. Some binaries in this environment can inspiral and coalesce at timescales much shorter than a Hubble time and much shorter than similar binaries that do not reside near an SMBH. The close environment of SMBHs could therefore serve as a catalyst for the inspiral and coalescence of binaries and strongly affect their orbital properties. Such compact binaries would be detectable as GW sources by the next generation of GW detectors (e.g., advanced-LIGO). Our analysis shows that {approx}0.5% of such nuclear merging binaries will enter the LIGO observational window while on orbits that are still very eccentric (e {approx}> 0.5). The efficient GW analysis for such systems would therefore require the use of eccentric templates. We also find that binaries very close to the SMBH could evolve through a complex dynamical (non-secular) evolution, leading to emission of several GW pulses during only a few years (though these are likely to be rare). Finally, we note that the formation of close stellar binaries, X-ray binaries, and their merger products could be induced by similar secular processes, combined with tidal friction rather than GW emission as in the case of compact object binaries.

  2. The formation of eccentric compact binary inspirals and the role of gravitational wave emission in binary-single stellar encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-03-20

    The inspiral and merger of eccentric binaries leads to gravitational waveforms distinct from those generated by circularly merging binaries. Dynamical environments can assemble binaries with high eccentricity and peak frequencies within the LIGO band. In this paper, we study binary-single stellar scatterings occurring in dense stellar systems as a source of eccentrically inspiraling binaries. Many interactions between compact binaries and single objects are characterized by chaotic resonances in which the binary-single system undergoes many exchanges before reaching a final state. During these chaotic resonances, a pair of objects has a non-negligible probability of experiencing a very close passage. Significant orbital energy and angular momentum are carried away from the system by gravitational wave (GW) radiation in these close passages, and in some cases this implies an inspiral time shorter than the orbital period of the bound third body. We derive the cross section for such dynamical inspiral outcomes through analytical arguments and through numerical scattering experiments including GW losses. We show that the cross section for dynamical inspirals grows with increasing target binary semi-major axis a and that for equal-mass binaries it scales as a {sup 2/7}. Thus, we expect wide target binaries to predominantly contribute to the production of these relativistic outcomes. We estimate that eccentric inspirals account for approximately 1% of dynamically assembled non-eccentric merging binaries. While these events are rare, we show that binary-single scatterings are a more effective formation channel than single-single captures for the production of eccentrically inspiraling binaries, even given modest binary fractions.

  3. Evolution of binary stars in multiple-population globular clusters - II. Compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Sollima, Antonio; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey of N-body simulations aimed at exploring the evolution of compact binaries in multiple-population globular clusters. We show that as a consequence of the initial differences in the structural properties of the first-generation (FG) and the second-generation (SG) populations and the effects of dynamical processes on binary stars, the SG binary fraction decreases more rapidly than that of the FG population. The difference between the FG and SG binary fraction is qualitatively similar to but quantitatively smaller than that found for wider binaries in our previous investigations. The evolution of the radial variation of the binary fraction is driven by the interplay between binary segregation, ionization and ejection. Ionization and ejection counteract in part the effects of mass segregation but for compact binaries the effects of segregation dominate and the inner binary fraction increases during the cluster evolution. We explore the variation of the difference between the FG and the SG binary fraction with the distance from the cluster centre and its dependence on the binary binding energy and cluster structural parameters. The difference between the binary fraction in the FG and the SG populations found in our simulations is consistent with the results of observational studies finding a smaller binary fraction in the SG population.

  4. Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Jeremey; Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2012-03-01

    We propose to search for nuclear density or greater compact ultra dense objects (CUDOs), which could constitute a significant fraction of the dark matter [1]. Considering their high density, the gravitational tidal forces are significant and atomic-density matter cannot stop an impacting CUDO, which punctures the surface of the target body, pulverizing, heating and entraining material near its trajectory through the target [2]. Because impact features endure over geologic timescales, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Mercury and large asteroids are well-suited to act as time-integrating CUDO detectors. There are several potential candidates for CUDO structure such as strangelet fragments or more generally dark matter if mechanisms exist for it to form compact objects. [4pt] [1] B. J. Carr, K. Kohri, Y. Sendouda, & J.'i. Yokoyama, Phys. Rev. D81, 104019 (2010). [0pt] [2] L. Labun, J. Birrell, J. Rafelski, Solar System Signatures of Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects, arXiv:1104.4572.

  5. Searches for compact binary inspirals in LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel, Drew

    2008-04-01

    We describe the methodology and subtleties associated with searches for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binary systems, which have been applied to the search for low mass (Mtotal= 2-35 Msun) compact binary coalescence waveforms in the LIGO Fifth Science run (S5) first year data. We discuss the astrophysics of coalescing binaries, including the predicted waveforms and source populations. We describe the pipeline employed by the LSC to search for such waveforms in LIGO data, how we suppress false signals originating from instrumental noise, how we evaluate the search efficiency for systems which may include spinning component masses, how we establish confidence in likely detection candidates, and how we formulate Bayesian upper limits on the coalescence rate as a function of total mass of the binary system.

  6. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Meiksin, A.; Joss, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    A highly compact binary represents a system which is composed of a collapsed object (degenerate dwarf, neutron star, or black hole) in orbit with a low-mass (equal to or less than 0.5 solar mass) secondary star. Matter may be transferred from the secondary to the collapsed star due to the decay of the orbit resulting from the emission of gravitational radiation. The present investigation has the objective to study quantitatively the evolution of highly compact binaries in globular cluster cores, subject to the interplay of gravitational radiation and collisions with field stars. The investigation is exploratory in nature. The numerical methods employed are based on the techniques developed by Rappaport et al. (1982). It is found that occasional close encounters with field stars strongly dominate the evolution of highly compact binaries in dense globular cluster cores. Attention is given to the applicability of the findings to observations of X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables.

  7. Compact binary hashing for music retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin S.

    2014-03-01

    With the huge volume of music clips available for protection, browsing, and indexing, there is an increased attention to retrieve the information contents of the music archives. Music-similarity computation is an essential building block for browsing, retrieval, and indexing of digital music archives. In practice, as the number of songs available for searching and indexing is increased, so the storage cost in retrieval systems is becoming a serious problem. This paper deals with the storage problem by extending the supervector concept with the binary hashing. We utilize the similarity-preserving binary embedding in generating a hash code from the supervector of each music clip. Especially we compare the performance of the various binary hashing methods for music retrieval tasks on the widely-used genre dataset and the in-house singer dataset. Through the evaluation, we find an effective way of generating hash codes for music similarity estimation which improves the retrieval performance.

  8. Parameter Estimation for Compact Binaries with Ground-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations Using the LALInference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, J.; Raymond, V.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Graff, P.; Vitale, S.; Aylott, B.; Blackburn, K.; Christensen, N.; Coughlin, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin operation in the coming years, with compact binary coalescence events a likely source for the first detections. The gravitational waveforms emitted directly encode information about the sources, including the masses and spins of the compact objects. Recovering the physical parameters of the sources from the GW observations is a key analysis task. This work describes the LALInference software library for Bayesian parameter estimation of compact binary signals, which builds on several previous methods to provide a well-tested toolkit which has already been used for several studies. We show that our implementation is able to correctly recover the parameters of compact binary signals from simulated data from the advanced GW detectors. We demonstrate this with a detailed comparison on three compact binary systems: a binary neutron star (BNS), a neutron star - black hole binary (NSBH) and a binary black hole (BBH), where we show a cross-comparison of results obtained using three independent sampling algorithms. These systems were analysed with non-spinning, aligned spin and generic spin configurations respectively, showing that consistent results can be obtained even with the full 15-dimensional parameter space of the generic spin configurations. We also demonstrate statistically that the Bayesian credible intervals we recover correspond to frequentist confidence intervals under correct prior assumptions by analysing a set of 100 signals drawn from the prior. We discuss the computational cost of these algorithms, and describe the general and problem-specific sampling techniques we have used to improve the efficiency of sampling the compact binary coalescence (CBC) parameter space.

  9. A complete waveform model for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Eliu; Agarwal, Bhanu; George, Daniel; Kumar, Prayush

    2016-03-01

    The detection of compact binaries with significant eccentricity in the sensitivity band of gravitational wave detectors will provide critical insights on the dynamics and formation channels of these events. In order to search for these systems and place constraints on their rates, we present an inspiral-merger-ringdown time domain waveform model that describes the GW emission from compact binaries on orbits with low to moderate values of eccentricity. We use this model to explore the detectability of these events in the context of advanced LIGO.

  10. A template bank to search for gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: I. Physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2006-09-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries are searched for using the matched filtering technique. As the model waveform depends on a number of parameters, it is necessary to filter the data through a template bank covering the astrophysically interesting region of the parameter space. The choice of templates is defined by the maximum allowed drop in signal-to-noise ratio due to the discreteness of the template bank. In this paper we describe the template-bank algorithm that was used in the analysis of data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) and GEO 600 detectors to search for signals from binaries consisting of non-spinning compact objects. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the efficiency of the bank and show that its performance is satisfactory for the design sensitivity curves of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors GEO 600, initial LIGO, advanced LIGO and Virgo. The bank is efficient in searching for various compact binaries such as binary primordial black holes, binary neutron stars, binary black holes, as well as a mixed binary consisting of a non-spinning black hole and a neutron star.

  11. Double Compact objects as the most promising gravitational wave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhong

    2015-08-01

    Gravitational Wave (GW) Astronomy is an emerging branch of observational astronomy which aims to collect observational data through observing the most promising GW sources such as double compact objects (DOCs: NS+WD, NS+NS, BH+NS, BH+BH binaries). DOCs not only can be observed by eLISA during the inspiral phase, but also, at some level, can be detected by ground based detectors during the merged phase. Note that these kinds of sources are also potential electromagnetic (EM) emitters. To study DCOs, a binary population synthesis approach is displayed in this poster. We discuss how to understand the relationship between EM information and GW data using multiobservation astronomy. A preliminary result in the context of GW triggers can be introduced in the poster.

  12. Spinning compact binary : Independent variables and dynamically preserved spin configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, Laszlo Arpad

    2010-04-15

    We establish the set of independent variables suitable to monitor the complicated evolution of the spinning compact binary during the inspiral. Our approach is valid up to the second post-Newtonian order, including leading order spin-orbit, spin-spin and mass quadrupole-mass monopole effects, for generic (noncircular, nonspherical) orbits. Then, we analyze the conservative spin dynamics in terms of these variables. We prove that the only binary black hole configuration allowing for spin precessions with equal angular velocities about a common instantaneous axis roughly aligned to the normal of the osculating orbit, is the equal mass and parallel (aligned or antialigned) spin configuration. This analytic result puts limitations on what particular configurations can be selected in numerical investigations of compact binary evolutions, even in those including only the last orbits of the inspiral.

  13. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-07-01

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the tidal Love numbers in general relativity, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution, even in the static case. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  14. Compact Binary Progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Perna, Rosalba; Rezzolla, Luciano; Troja, Eleonora; Lazzati, Davide

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy epsilon(sub jet) = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 Solar M, favoring "high-mass" binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses approx >1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since "high-mass" systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of approx. 0.9 or higher.

  15. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. N.

    2015-05-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO and eLISA will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present progress in the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar- tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as “direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations,” appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity. In another, mixed black hole- neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter.

  16. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar-tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as ``Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein equations,'' appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, mixed black hole-neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter. In another, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity.

  17. DOUBLE COMPACT OBJECTS. III. GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE DETECTION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; O’Shaughnessy, Richard; Mandel, Ilya; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Pannarale, Francesco

    2015-06-20

    The unprecedented range of second-generation gravitational-wave (GW) observatories calls for refining the predictions of potential sources and detection rates. The coalescence of double compact objects (DCOs)—i.e., neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS), black hole–neutron star (BH–NS), and black hole–black hole (BH–BH) binary systems—is the most promising source of GWs for these detectors. We compute detection rates of coalescing DCOs in second-generation GW detectors using the latest models for their cosmological evolution, and implementing inspiral-merger-ringdown gravitational waveform models in our signal-to-noise ratio calculations. We find that (1) the inclusion of the merger/ringdown portion of the signal does not significantly affect rates for NS–NS and BH–NS systems, but it boosts rates by a factor of ∼1.5 for BH–BH systems; (2) in almost all of our models BH–BH systems yield by far the largest rates, followed by NS–NS and BH–NS systems, respectively; and (3) a majority of the detectable BH–BH systems were formed in the early universe in low-metallicity environments. We make predictions for the distributions of detected binaries and discuss what the first GW detections will teach us about the astrophysics underlying binary formation and evolution.

  18. MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary aim of the MACHO Project is to test the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way is made up of objects like brown dwarfs or planets: these objects have come to be known as MACHOs, for MAssive Compact Halo Objects. The signature of these objects is the occasional amplification of the light from extragalactic stars by the gravitational lens effect. The amplification can be large, but events are extremely rare: it is necessary to monitor photometrically several million stars for a period of years in order to obtain a useful detection rate. For this purpose MACHO has a two channel system that employs eight CCDs, mounted on the 50 inch telescope at Mt. Stromlo. The high data rate (several GBytes per night) is accommodated by custom electronics and on-line data reduction. The Project has taken more than 27,000 images with this system since June 1992. Analysis of a subset of these data has yielded databases containing light curves in two colors for 8 million stars in the LMC and 10 million in the bulge of the Milky Way. A search for microlensing has turned up four candidates toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and 45 toward the Galactic Bulge. The web page for data provides links to MACHO Project data portals and various specialized interfaces for viewing or searching the data. (Specialized Interface)

  19. Fast large-scale object retrieval with binary quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shifu; Zeng, Dan; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Zhijiang; Tian, Qi

    2015-11-01

    The objective of large-scale object retrieval systems is to search for images that contain the target object in an image database. Where state-of-the-art approaches rely on global image representations to conduct searches, we consider many boxes per image as candidates to search locally in a picture. In this paper, a feature quantization algorithm called binary quantization is proposed. In binary quantization, a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) feature is quantized into a descriptive and discriminative bit-vector, which allows itself to adapt to the classic inverted file structure for box indexing. The inverted file, which stores the bit-vector and box ID where the SIFT feature is located inside, is compact and can be loaded into the main memory for efficient box indexing. We evaluate our approach on available object retrieval datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is fast and achieves excellent search quality. Therefore, the proposed approach is an improvement over state-of-the-art approaches for object retrieval.

  20. Binary partition trees for object detection.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, Veronica; Marques, Ferran; Salembier, Philippe

    2008-11-01

    This paper discusses the use of Binary Partition Trees (BPTs) for object detection. BPTs are hierarchical region-based representations of images. They define a reduced set of regions that covers the image support and that spans various levels of resolution. They are attractive for object detection as they tremendously reduce the search space. In this paper, several issues related to the use of BPT for object detection are studied. Concerning the tree construction, we analyze the compromise between computational complexity reduction and accuracy. This will lead us to define two parts in the BPT: one providing accuracy and one representing the search space for the object detection task. Then we analyze and objectively compare various similarity measures for the tree construction. We conclude that different similarity criteria should be used for the part providing accuracy in the BPT and for the part defining the search space and specific criteria are proposed for each case. Then we discuss the object detection strategy based on BPT. The notion of node extension is proposed and discussed. Finally, several object detection examples illustrating the generality of the approach and its efficiency are reported.

  1. Recent developments in the tidal deformability of spinning compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    We review recent work on the theory of tidal deformability and the tidal Love numbers of a slowly spinning compact object within general relativity. Angular momentum introduces couplings between distortions of different parity and new classes of spin-induced, tidal Love numbers emerge. Due to spin-tidal effects, a rotating object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second-order in the spin. The tidal Love numbers depend strongly on the object’s internal structure. All tidal Love numbers of a Kerr black hole (BH) were proved to be exactly zero to first-order in the spin and also to second-order in the spin, at least in the axisymmetric case. For a binary system close to the merger, various components of the tidal field become relevant. Preliminary results suggest that spin-tidal couplings can introduce important corrections to the gravitational waveforms of spinning neutron star (NS) binaries approaching the merger.

  2. DISTINGUISHING COMPACT BINARY POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELS USING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF COALESCING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Simon; Ohme, Frank; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The coalescence of compact binaries containing neutron stars or black holes is one of the most promising signals for advanced ground-based laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, with the first direct detections expected over the next few years. The rate of binary coalescences and the distribution of component masses is highly uncertain, and population synthesis models predict a wide range of plausible values. Poorly constrained parameters in population synthesis models correspond to poorly understood astrophysics at various stages in the evolution of massive binary stars, the progenitors of binary neutron star and binary black hole systems. These include effects such as supernova kick velocities, parameters governing the energetics of common envelope evolution and the strength of stellar winds. Observing multiple binary black hole systems through GWs will allow us to infer details of the astrophysical mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we simulate GW observations from a series of population synthesis models including the effects of known selection biases, measurement errors and cosmology. We compare the predictions arising from different models and show that we will be able to distinguish between them with observations (or the lack of them) from the early runs of the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. This will allow us to narrow down the large parameter space for binary evolution models.

  3. Distinguishing Compact Binary Population Synthesis Models Using Gravitational Wave Observations of Coalescing Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Simon; Ohme, Frank; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The coalescence of compact binaries containing neutron stars or black holes is one of the most promising signals for advanced ground-based laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, with the first direct detections expected over the next few years. The rate of binary coalescences and the distribution of component masses is highly uncertain, and population synthesis models predict a wide range of plausible values. Poorly constrained parameters in population synthesis models correspond to poorly understood astrophysics at various stages in the evolution of massive binary stars, the progenitors of binary neutron star and binary black hole systems. These include effects such as supernova kick velocities, parameters governing the energetics of common envelope evolution and the strength of stellar winds. Observing multiple binary black hole systems through GWs will allow us to infer details of the astrophysical mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we simulate GW observations from a series of population synthesis models including the effects of known selection biases, measurement errors and cosmology. We compare the predictions arising from different models and show that we will be able to distinguish between them with observations (or the lack of them) from the early runs of the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. This will allow us to narrow down the large parameter space for binary evolution models.

  4. The lack of large compact symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, `baby' (< 103 yr) and `young' (103-105 yr) radio galaxies have been found and classified, although their numbers are still small (tens). Also, they have many different names, depending on the type of survey and scientific context in which they were found: compact steep spectrum sources (CSS), giga-Hertz peaked spectrum sources (GPS) and compact-medium symmetric objects (C-MSO). The latter have the radio galaxy structure more obvious and correspond to the `babies' (CSOs; < 1 kpc) and `young' (MSOs; 1-15 kpc) radio galaxies. The log-size distribution of CSOs shows a sharp drop at 0.3 kpc. This trend continues through flat-spectrum MSOs (over the full 1-15 kpc size range). In order to find out if this lack of large CSOs and flat-spectrum MSOs is due to poor sampling (lack of surveys that probe efficiently the 0.3-15 kpc size range) and/or has physical meaning (e.g. if the lobes of CSOs expand as they grow and age, they might become CSSs, `disappearing' from the flat-spectrum MSO statistics), we have built a sample of 157 flat-spectrum radio sources with structure on ˜0.3-15 kpc scales. We are using new, archived and published data to produce and inspect hundreds of multi-frequency multi-instrument maps and models. We have already found 13 new secure CSO/MSOs. We expect to uncover ˜30-40 new CSOs and MSOs, most on the 0.3-15 kpc size range, when our project is complete.

  5. Short Grbs From Compact Object Collisions In Gcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2008-03-01

    We propose a theoretical investigation of a new mechanism by which short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) production can be achieved. In this new paradigm, it is supposed that the compact objects are contained within a globular cluster (GC), and that close encounters rather than pure gravitational wave emission drives them together. Although event rates within galaxies are found to be much too low to be of interest, such encounters may be frequent enough in GCs to have an important effect on the production of SGRBs. Precise modeling of the dynamics allows for a detailed description of the encounter, and preliminary calculations show that there is in principle no problem in accounting for the global energy budget of a typical SGRB. The particulars of each collision, however, are variable in several aspects, and can lead to interesting diversity. First and most importantly, the nature of the encounter is highly dependent on the impact parameter. This is in contrast to the merger scenario, in which the masses of the compact objects dictate the characteristic length and luminosity scale for SGRB activity. Second, the nature of the compact star itself can produce very different outcomes. Third, the presence of tidal tails in which material will fall back onto the central object at a later time is a generic feature of the present set of calculations. The mass involved in these structures is considerably larger than for binary mergers. It is thus possible, in principle, to account genericaly in this scenario for a prompt episode of energy release as well as for activity many dynamical time scales later. Finally, due to the large star density in the star cluster core, there is the possibility for the interaction of the external shock with a denser external medium than that of the IGM.

  6. SPH Methods in the Modelling of Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    We review the current status of compact object simulations that are based on the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The first main part of this review is dedicated to SPH as a numerical method. We begin by discussing relevant kernel approximation techniques and discuss the performance of different kernel functions. Subsequently, we review a number of different SPH formulations of Newtonian, special- and general relativistic ideal fluid dynamics. We particularly point out recent developments that increase the accuracy of SPH with respect to commonly used techniques. The second main part of the review is dedicated to the application of SPH in compact object simulations. We discuss encounters between two white dwarfs, between two neutron stars and between a neutron star and a stellar-mass black hole. For each type of system, the main focus is on the more common, gravitational wave-driven binary mergers, but we also discuss dynamical collisions as they occur in dense stellar systems such as cores of globular clusters.

  7. Gravitational-wave Emission from Compact Galactic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissanke, Samaya; Vallisneri, Michele; Nelemans, Gijs; Prince, Thomas A.

    2012-10-01

    Compact Galactic binaries where at least one member is a white dwarf (WD) or neutron star constitute the majority of individually detectable sources for future low-frequency space-based gravitational-wave (GW) observatories; they also form an unresolved continuum, the dominant Galactic foreground at frequencies below a few mHz. Due to the paucity of electromagnetic observations, the majority of studies of Galactic-binary populations so far have been based on population-synthesis simulations. However, recent surveys have reported several new detections of WD binaries, providing new constraints for population estimates. In this article, we evaluate the impact of revised local densities of interacting WD binaries on future GW observations. Specifically, we consider five scenarios that explain these densities with different assumptions on the formation of interacting systems; we simulate corresponding populations of detached and interacting WD binaries; we estimate the number of individually detectable GW sources and the magnitude of the confusion-noise foreground, as observed by space-based detectors with 5 and 1 Mkm arms. We confirm earlier estimates of thousands of detached-binary detections, but project only a few ten to a few hundred detections of interacting systems. This reduction is partly due to our assessment of detection prospects, based on the iterative identification and subtraction of bright sources with respect to both instrument and confusion noise. We also confirm earlier estimates for the confusion-noise foreground, except in one scenario that explains smaller local densities of interacting systems with smaller numbers of progenitor detached systems.

  8. Finding Compact Hot Subdwarf Binaries in the Galactic Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, T.; Geier, S.; McLeod, A.; Groot, P.; Verbeek, K.; Schaffenroth, V.; Heber, U.; Heuser, C.; Ziegerer, E.; Östensen, R.; Nemeth, P.; Dhillon, V.; Butterley, T.; Littlefair, S.; Wilson, R.; Telting, J.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B.

    2014-04-01

    We started a new project which aims to find compact hot subdwarf binaries at low Galactic latitudes. Targets are selected from several photometric surveys and a spectroscopic follow-up campaign to find radial velocity variations on timescales as short as tens of minutes has been started. Once radial variations are detected phase-resolved spectroscopy is obtained to measure the radial velocity curve and the mass function of the system. The observing strategy is described and the discovery of two short period hot subdwarf binaries is presented. UVEX J032855.25+503529.8 contains a hot subdwarf B star (sdB) orbited by a cool M-dwarf in a P=0.11017 days orbit. The lightcurve shows a strong reflection effect but no eclipses are visible. HS 1741+2133 is a short period (P=0.20 days) sdB most likely with a white dwarf (WD) companion.

  9. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Joss, P. C.; Webbink, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    A new theoretical treatment of the evolution of highly compact binary systems is presented. The evolution is calculated until almost the entire mass of the secondary has been transferred to the primary or lost from the system. It is assumed that gravitational radiation from the system is the cause of mass transfer. It is found that the structure of the mass-losing star can be approximated by an n = 3/2 polytrope, and as a result a relatively large number of different cases can be explored and some general conclusions drawn. An explanation is found for the existence of a cutoff in the orbital period distribution among the cataclysmic variables and light is shed upon the possible generic relationships among cataclysmic variables, the low-mass X-ray binaries, and the spectrally soft transient X-ray sources.

  10. The dynamic ejecta of compact object mergers and eccentric collisions.

    PubMed

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2013-06-13

    Compact object mergers eject neutron-rich matter in a number of ways: by the dynamical ejection mediated by gravitational torques, as neutrino-driven winds, and probably also a good fraction of the resulting accretion disc finally becomes unbound by a combination of viscous and nuclear processes. If compact binary mergers indeed produce gamma-ray bursts, there should also be an interaction region where an ultra-relativistic outflow interacts with the neutrino-driven wind and produces moderately relativistic ejecta. Each type of ejecta has different physical properties, and therefore plays a different role for nucleosynthesis and for the electromagnetic (EM) transients that go along with compact object encounters. Here, we focus on the dynamic ejecta and present results for over 30 hydrodynamical simulations of both gravitational wave-driven mergers and parabolic encounters as they may occur in globular clusters. We find that mergers eject approximately 1 per cent of a Solar mass of extremely neutron-rich material. The exact amount, as well as the ejection velocity, depends on the involved masses with asymmetric systems ejecting more material at higher velocities. This material undergoes a robust r-process and both ejecta amount and abundance pattern are consistent with neutron star mergers being a major source of the 'heavy' (A>130) r-process isotopes. Parabolic collisions, especially those between neutron stars and black holes, eject substantially larger amounts of mass, and therefore cannot occur frequently without overproducing gala- ctic r-process matter. We also discuss the EM transients that are powered by radioactive decays within the ejecta ('macronovae'), and the radio flares that emerge when the ejecta dissipate their large kinetic energies in the ambient medium. PMID:23630377

  11. New Evidence for a Black Hole in the Compact Binary Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. Its known to consist of a massive. Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. Yet one of the most basic of pa.ranietern the mass of the compact object - is not known. Nor is it even clear whether its is a neutron star or a black hole. In this Paper we present our analysis of the broad-band high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship which has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than 4.2 solar mass thus clearly indicative of a black hole and as such resolving a longstanding issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a. range of recently published distance estimates constrains the compact object mass to lie between 4.2 solar mass and 14.4 solar mass. Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate is approx. l0 solar mass, with the. error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared-envelope evolutionary models of compact binaries. as well as establishing Cygnus X-3 as the first confirmed accretion-powered galactic gamma: ray source.

  12. NEW EVIDENCE FOR A BLACK HOLE IN THE COMPACT BINARY CYGNUS X-3

    SciTech Connect

    Shrader, Chris R.; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-07-20

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. It is known to consist of a massive, Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. However, one of the most basic of parameters-the mass of the compact object-is not known, nor is it even clear whether it is a neutron star or a black hole (BH). In this paper, we present our analysis of the broadband high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship that has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than 4.2 M{sub sun}, thus clearly indicative of a BH and as such, resolves a long-standing issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a range of recently published distance estimates constrain the compact object mass to lie between 4.2 M{sub sun} and 14.4 M{sub sun}. Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate, is {approx}10 M{sub sun}, with an error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared-envelope evolutionary models of compact binaries, as well as establishing Cygnus X-3 as the first confirmed accretion-powered galactic gamma-ray source.

  13. Fast and accurate inference on gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rory; Field, Scott E.; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments, we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced-order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the computational cost of inference by removing redundant computations. In this paper, we construct the first reduced-order models of gravitational-wave signals that include the effects of spin precession, inspiral, merger, and ringdown in compact object binaries and that are valid for component masses describing binary neutron star, binary black hole, and mixed binary systems. This work utilizes the waveform model known as "IMRPhenomPv2." Our ROM enables the use of a fast reduced-order quadrature (ROQ) integration rule which allows us to approximate Bayesian probability density functions at a greatly reduced computational cost. We find that the ROQ rule can be used to speed-up inference by factors as high as 300 without introducing systematic bias. This corresponds to a reduction in computational time from around half a year to half a day for the longest duration and lowest mass signals. The ROM and ROQ rules are available with the main inference library of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, LALInference.

  14. Compact Binary Mergers as Multimessenger Sources of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    On the centennial anniversary of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we are on the verge of directly detecting one of its most remarkable predictions - gravitational waves (GWs). The inspiral and merger of compact binaries - binaries with black hole, neutron star or white dwarf companions - are among the most promising sources of GWs. Many of these sources are likely to generate observable electromagnetic (EM) and/or neutrino counterparts to the GWs, constituting a major advance in multimessenger astronomy. By way of illustration, we describe recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations in general relativity (GRMHD) that show how black hole-neutron star mergers can launch jets, lending support to the idea that such mergers could be the engines that power short-hard gamma-ray bursts. We also discuss other recent GRMHD simulations that show how an inspiraling, supermassive binary black hole in a galaxy core stirs and accretes magnetized plasma that orbits the holes in a circumbinary disk. This process can generate ``precursor'' and ``aftermath'' EM radiation with respect to the peak GW emission at merger. Computer-generated movies highlighting some of these simulations will be shown. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grant PHY-1300903 and NASA Grant NNX13AH44G at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  15. Targeted coherent search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    SciTech Connect

    Harry, I. W.; Fairhurst, S.

    2011-04-15

    We introduce a method for conducting a targeted, coherent search for compact binary coalescences. The search is tailored to be used as a follow-up to electromagnetic transients such as gamma-ray bursts. We derive the coherent search statistic for Gaussian detector noise and discuss the benefits of a coherent, multidetector search over coincidence methods. To mitigate the effects of nonstationary data, we introduce a number of signal consistency tests, including the null signal-to-noise ratio, amplitude consistency, and several {chi}{sup 2} tests. We demonstrate the search performance on Gaussian noise and on data from LIGO's fourth science run and verify that the signal consistency tests are capable of removing the majority of noise transients, giving the search an efficiency comparable to that achieved in Gaussian noise.

  16. A massive pulsar in a compact relativistic binary.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, John; Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G

    2013-04-26

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict substantial deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 ± 0.04 solar mass (M⊙) pulsar in a 2.46-hour orbit with a 0.172 ± 0.003 M⊙ white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling. PMID:23620056

  17. A massive pulsar in a compact relativistic binary.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, John; Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G

    2013-04-26

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict substantial deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 ± 0.04 solar mass (M⊙) pulsar in a 2.46-hour orbit with a 0.172 ± 0.003 M⊙ white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.

  18. Spinning compact binary inspiral. II. Conservative angular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, Laszlo Arpad

    2010-11-15

    We establish the evolution equations of the set of independent variables characterizing the 2PN rigorous conservative dynamics of a spinning compact binary, with the inclusion of the leading order spin-orbit, spin-spin, and mass quadrupole-mass monopole effects, for generic (noncircular, nonspherical) orbits. More specifically, we give a closed system of first order ordinary differential equations for the orbital elements of the osculating ellipse and for the angles characterizing the spin orientations with respect to the osculating orbit. We also prove that (i) the relative angle of the spins stays constant for equal mass black holes, irrespective of their orientation, and (ii) the special configuration of equal mass black holes with equal, but antialigned spins, both laying in the plane of motion (leading to the largest recoil found in numerical simulations) is preserved at 2PN level of accuracy, with leading order spin-orbit, spin-spin, and mass quadrupolar contributions included.

  19. Second post-Newtonian Lagrangian dynamics of spinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li; Wu, Xin; Ma, DaZhu

    2016-09-01

    The leading-order spin-orbit coupling is included in a post-Newtonian Lagrangian formulation of spinning compact binaries, which consists of the Newtonian term, first post-Newtonian (1PN) and 2PN non-spin terms and 2PN spin-spin coupling. This leads to a 3PN spin-spin coupling occurring in the derived Hamiltonian. The spin-spin couplings are mainly responsible for chaos in the Hamiltonians. However, the 3PN spin-spin Hamiltonian is small and has different signs, compared with the 2PN spin-spin Hamiltonian equivalent to the 2PN spin-spin Lagrangian. As a result, the probability of the occurrence of chaos in the Lagrangian formulation without the spin-orbit coupling is larger than that in the Lagrangian formulation with the spin-orbit coupling. Numerical evidences support this claim.

  20. Gravitational Radiation Reaction of Inspiralling Compact Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Michael E.; Will, Clifford M.

    1998-04-01

    We outline a technique for obtaining the spacetime metric and local equations of motion for compact binary systems to high post-Newtonian (PN) order. Our approach is based upon direct integration of the ``relaxed Einstein equations'' (DIRE) and casts its solution as a retarded flat-spacetime integral involving a non-compact source. Although mathematical ambiguities have accompanied similar approaches in the past, we obtain results manifestly free of divergences to high PN orders using a method first introduced by Will and Wiseman(C.M. Will and A.G. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. D 54), 4813 (1996).. To 3.5 PN ((v/c)^7 beyond Newtonian) order we calculate the radiation reaction terms in the equations of motion and compare our results with other treatments (B.R. Iyer and C.M. Will, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70), 113 (1993); Phys. Rev. D 52, 6882 (1995); L. Blanchet, Phys. Rev. D 47, 4392 (1993); ibid. 55 714 (1997). We discuss the status of obtaining the non-dissipative, 3PN terms in the equations of motion.

  1. The coupled effect of tides and stellar winds on the evolution of compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2014-10-01

    We follow the evolution of compact binaries under the coupled effect of tides and stellar winds until the onset of Roche lobe overflow. These binaries contain a compact object (either a black hole, a neutron star or a planet) and a stellar component. We integrate the full set of tidal equations, which are based on Hut's model for tidal evolution, and we couple them with the angular momentum loss in a stellar wind. Our aim is twofold. First, we wish to highlight some interesting evolutionary outcomes of the coupling. When tides are coupled with a non-massive stellar wind, one interesting outcome is that in certain types of binaries, the stellar spin tends to reach a quasi-equilibrium state, where the effects of tides and wind are counteracting each other. When tides are coupled with a massive wind, we parametrize the evolution in terms of the decoupling radius, at which the wind decouples from the star. Even for small decoupling radii, this wind braking can drive systems on the main sequence to Roche lobe overflow that otherwise would fail to do so. Our second aim is to inspect whether simple time-scale considerations are a good description of the evolution of the systems. We find that simple time-scale considerations, which rely on neglecting the coupling between tides and stellar winds, do not accurately represent the true evolution of compact binaries. The outcome of the coupled evolution of the rotational and orbital elements can strongly differ from simple time-scale considerations, as already pointed out by Barker and Ogilvie in the case of short-period planetary systems.

  2. The Search for Low Mass Compact Binary Inspirals in the First Year of S5 LIGO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel, Drew; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We report on the search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binary systems with total mass from 2-35 solar masses in the LIGO Fifth Science run (S5) first calendar year data. We describe the pipeline employed by the LSC to search for such waveforms in LIGO data, how we suppress false signals originating from instrumental noise, how we evaluate the search efficiency for systems which may include spinning component objects, and how we establish confidence in likely detection candidates. Finally, we describe Bayesian coalescence rate calculations as a function of mass of the binary system and for several canonical mass systems including mass distributions representing binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and black hole neutron star binaries.

  3. Third post-Newtonian gravitational waveforms for compact binary systems in general orbits: Instantaneous terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.

    2015-04-01

    We compute the instantaneous contributions to the spherical harmonic modes of gravitational waveforms from compact binary systems in general orbits up to the third post-Newtonian (PN) order. We further extend these results for compact binaries in quasielliptical orbits using the 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of the conserved dynamics of compact binaries in eccentric orbits. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian formalism, starting from the different mass and current-type multipole moments, we compute the spin-weighted spherical harmonic decomposition of the instantaneous part of the gravitational waveform. These are terms which are functions of the retarded time and do not depend on the history of the binary evolution. Together with the hereditary part, which depends on the binary's dynamical history, these waveforms form the basis for construction of accurate templates for the detection of gravitational wave signals from binaries moving in quasielliptical orbits.

  4. Short Gamma-ray Bursts from Dynamically Assembled Compact Binaries in Globular Clusters: Pathways, Rates, Hydrodynamics, and Cosmological Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; van de Ven, Glenn

    2010-09-01

    We present a detailed assessment of the various dynamical pathways leading to the coalescence of compact objects in globular clusters (GCs) and Short Gamma-ray Burst (SGRB) production. We consider primordial binaries, dynamically formed binaries (through tidal two-body and three-body exchange interactions), and direct impacts of compact objects (WD/NS/BH). Here, we show that if the primordial binary fraction is small, close encounters dominate the production rate of coalescing compact systems. We find that the two dominant channels are the interaction of field neutron stars (NSs) with dynamically formed binaries and two-body encounters. Under such conditions, we estimate the redshift distribution and host galaxy demographics of SGRB progenitors, and find that GCs can provide a significant contribution to the overall observed rate. Regarding the newly identified channel of close stellar encounters involving WD/NS/BH, we have carried out precise modeling of the hydrodynamical evolution, giving us a detailed description of the resulting merged system. Our calculations show that there is in principle no problem in accounting for the global energy budget of a typical SGRB. The particulars of each encounter, however, are variable in several aspects and can lead to interesting diversity. First and most importantly, the characteristics of the encounter are highly dependent on the impact parameter. This is in contrast to the merger scenario, where the masses of the compact objects dictate a typical length and luminosity scale for SGRB activity. Second, the nature of the compact star itself can produce very different outcomes. Finally, the presence of tidal tails in which material will fall back onto the central object at a later time is a robust feature of the present set of calculations. The mass involved in these structures is considerably larger than for binary mergers. It is thus possible to account generically in this scenario for a prompt episode of energy release, as

  5. Octupolar invariants for compact binaries on quasicircular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Patrick; Kavanagh, Chris; Dolan, Sam R.; Ottewill, Adrian C.; Warburton, Niels; Wardell, Barry

    2015-12-01

    We extend the gravitational self-force methodology to identify and compute new O (μ ) tidal invariants for a compact body of mass μ on a quasicircular orbit about a black hole of mass M ≫μ . In the octupolar sector we find seven new degrees of freedom, made up of 3 +3 conservative/dissipative `electric' invariants and 3 +1 `magnetic' invariants, satisfying 1 +1 and 1 +0 trace conditions. We express the new invariants for equatorial circular orbits on Kerr spacetime in terms of the regularized metric perturbation and its derivatives; and we evaluate the expressions in the Schwarzschild case. We employ both Lorenz gauge and Regge-Wheeler gauge numerical codes, and the functional series method of Mano, Suzuki and Takasugi. We present (i) highly-accurate numerical data and (ii) high-order analytical post-Newtonian expansions. We demonstrate consistency between numerical and analytical results, and prior work. We explore the application of these invariants in effective one-body models and binary black hole initial-data formulations.

  6. Search for Compact Binary Signals Using Coherent WaveBurst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Chris

    2009-05-01

    Compact binary coalescence (CBC) is one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves. These sources are usually searched for with matched filters which require accurate calculation of the GW waveforms and generation of large template banks. We present a complementary search technique based on burst algorithms. Initially designed for detection of un-modeled bursts, which can span a very large set of waveform morphologies, the search algorithm presented here is constrained for targeted detection of the smaller subset of CBC signals. The constraint is based on the assumption of elliptical polarization. We expect that the algorithm will be sensitive to CBC signals in a wide range of masses, mass ratios, and spin parameters. We also present preliminary studies of the algorithm on test data as well as the sensitivity of the search to different types of simulated waveforms. Also, we compare the performance of the constrained search and the coherent WaveBurst search used for the burst analysis of LIGO data.

  7. Substellar objects around the sdB eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liying; Qian, Shengbang; Liao, Wenping; Zhao, Ergang; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    The sdB-type eclipsing binary consists a very hot subdwarf B (sdB) type primary and a low mass secondary with short period. They are detached binaries and show very narrow eclipse profiles, which benefits the determination of the precise eclipse times. With the precise times of light minimum, we can detected small mass objects around them by analyzing the observed-calculated (O-C) curve based on the light time effect. For searching the substellar objects orbiting around the binaries, we have monitored sdB-type eclipsing binaries for decades. A group of brown dwarfs and planets have been detected since then. In the present paper, we focus on the target NSVS07826147, which may be another exoplanet host candidate among the group of the sdB-type eclipsing binaries.

  8. The PyCBC search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Samantha A.; Nitz, Alexander H.; Harry, Ian W.; Biwer, Christopher M.; Brown, Duncan A.; Cabero, Miriam; Capano, Collin D.; Dal Canton, Tito; Dent, Thomas; Fairhurst, Stephen; Kehl, Marcel S.; Keppel, Drew; Krishnan, Badri; Lenon, Amber; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pekowsky, Larne P.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Saulson, Peter R.; West, Matthew; Willis, Joshua L.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the PyCBC search for gravitational waves from compact-object binary coalescences in advanced gravitational-wave detector data. The search was used in the first Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) observing run and unambiguously identified two black hole binary mergers, GW150914 and GW151226. At its core, the PyCBC search performs a matched-filter search for binary merger signals using a bank of gravitational-wave template waveforms. We provide a complete description of the search pipeline including the steps used to mitigate the effects of noise transients in the data, identify candidate events and measure their statistical significance. The analysis is able to measure false-alarm rates as low as one per million years, required for confident detection of signals. Using data from initial LIGO's sixth science run, we show that the new analysis reduces the background noise in the search, giving a 30 % increase in sensitive volume for binary neutron star systems over previous searches.

  9. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSITING HOT COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Howell, Steve B.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoff; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; Jenkins, Jon; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Monet, David G.

    2010-04-20

    Kepler photometry has revealed two unusual transiting companions: one orbiting an early A-star and the other orbiting a late B-star. In both cases, the occultation of the companion is deeper than the transit. The occultation and transit with follow-up optical spectroscopy reveal a 9400 K early A-star, KOI-74 (KIC 6889235), with a companion in a 5.2 day orbit with a radius of 0.08 R {sub sun} and a 10,000 K late B-star KOI-81 (KIC 8823868) that has a companion in a 24 day orbit with a radius of 0.2 R {sub sun}. We infer a temperature of 12,250 K for KOI-74b and 13,500 K for KOI-81b. We present 43 days of high duty cycle, 30 minute cadence photometry, with models demonstrating the intriguing properties of these objects, and speculate on their nature.

  10. Gravitational-wave phasing for low-eccentricity inspiralling compact binaries to 3PN order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Blake; Favata, Marc; Arun, K. G.; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2016-06-01

    Although gravitational radiation causes inspiralling compact binaries to circularize, a variety of astrophysical scenarios suggest that binaries might have small but non-negligible orbital eccentricities when they enter the low-frequency bands of ground- and space-based gravitational-wave detectors. If not accounted for, even a small orbital eccentricity can cause a potentially significant systematic error in the mass parameters of an inspiralling binary [M. Favata, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 101101 (2014)]. Gravitational-wave search templates typically rely on the quasicircular approximation, which provides relatively simple expressions for the gravitational-wave phase to 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order. Damour, Gopakumar, Iyer, and others have developed an elegant but complex quasi-Keplerian formalism for describing the post-Newtonian corrections to the orbits and waveforms of inspiralling binaries with any eccentricity. Here, we specialize the quasi-Keplerian formalism to binaries with low eccentricity. In this limit, the nonperiodic contribution to the gravitational-wave phasing can be expressed explicitly as simple functions of frequency or time, with little additional complexity beyond the well-known formulas for circular binaries. These eccentric phase corrections are computed to 3PN order and to leading order in the eccentricity for the standard PN approximants. For a variety of systems, these eccentricity corrections cause significant corrections to the number of gravitational-wave cycles that sweep through a detector's frequency band. This is evaluated using several measures, including a modification of the useful cycles. By comparing to numerical solutions valid for any eccentricity, we find that our analytic solutions are valid up to e0≲0.1 for comparable-mass systems, where e0 is the eccentricity when the source enters the detector band. We also evaluate the role of periodic terms that enter the phasing and discuss how they can be incorporated into some of

  11. Status and Future of Deep Searches for Compact Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, Alexander` Harvey; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Deep offline searches for gravitational waves from binary black hole, binary neutron star, and neutron star- black hole mergers were conducted during the first Advanced LIGO observing run, and recently Advanced LIGO announced the first detection of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger. We discuss the recent results, the methodology of the high latency searches, along with improvements for the upcoming observing runs.

  12. The binary Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31.

    PubMed

    Veillet, Christian; Parker, Joel Wm; Griffin, Ian; Marsden, Brian; Doressoundiram, Alain; Buie, Marc; Tholen, David J; Connelley, Michael; Holman, Matthew J

    2002-04-18

    The recent discovery of a binary asteroid during a spacecraft fly-by generated keen interest, because the orbital parameters of binaries can provide measures of the masses, and mutual eclipses could allow us to determine individual sizes and bulk densities. Several binary near-Earth, main-belt and Trojan asteroids have subsequently been discovered. The Kuiper belt-the region of space extending from Neptune (at 30 astronomical units) to well over 100 AU and believed to be the source of new short-period comets-has become a fascinating new window onto the formation of our Solar System since the first member object, not counting Pluto, was discovered in 1992 (ref. 13). Here we report that the Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31 is binary with a highly eccentric orbit (eccentricity e approximately 0.8) and a long period (about 570 days), very different from the Pluto/Charon system, which was hitherto the only previously known binary in the Kuiper belt. Assuming a density in the range of 1 to 2 g cm-3, the albedo of the binary components is between 0.05 and 0.08, close to the value of 0.04 generally assumed for Kuiper-belt objects. PMID:11961547

  13. Inspiralling compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits: The complete third post-Newtonian energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.; Qusailah, Moh'd S. S.

    2008-03-15

    The instantaneous contributions to the third post-Newtonian (3PN) gravitational wave luminosity from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in a quasi-elliptical orbit is computed using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism. The necessary inputs for this calculation include the 3PN accurate mass quadrupole moment for general orbits and the mass octupole and current quadrupole moments at 2PN. Using the recently obtained 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits, the flux is averaged over the binary's orbit. Supplementing this by the important hereditary contributions arising from tails, tails of tails, and tails-squared terms calculated in a previous paper, the complete 3PN energy flux is obtained. The final result presented in this paper would be needed for the construction of ready-to-use templates for binaries moving on noncircular orbits, a plausible class of sources not only for the space-based detectors like LISA but also for the ground-based ones.

  14. Effect of metallicity on the gravitational-wave signal from the cosmological population of compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Leszczynska, I.; Regimbau, T.; Bulik, T.; Dominik, M.; Belczynski, K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Recent studies on stellar evolution have shown that the properties of compact objects strongly depend on the metallicity of the environment in which they were formed. Aims: Using some very simple assumptions on the metallicity of the stellar populations, we explore how this property affects the unresolved gravitational-wave background from extragalactic compact binaries. Methods: We obtained a suit of models using population synthesis code, estimated the gravitational-wave background they produce, and discuss its detectability with second- (advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo) and third- (Einstein Telescope) generation detectors. Results: Our results show that the background is dominated by binary black holes for all considered models in the frequency range of terrestrial detectors, and that it could be detected in most cases by advanced LIGO/Virgo, and with Einstein Telescope with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. The observed peak in a gravitational-wave spectrum depends on the metallicity of the stellar population.

  15. The ``Uberbank'': A search for compact binary coalescences in the first Observing run of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capano, Collin; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Modeled searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence (CBC) use a ``bank'' of template waveforms to search the wide range of parameters that binaries may have. Recent advances in waveform modeling and template placement techniques have opened up the possibility to efficiently search for systems with non-precessing spin, using waveforms that model the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of coalescing binaries. I discuss how these advances were combined to produce the template bank used to search for CBCs in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO. This bank covered the full range of plausible masses and non-precessing spins of binary neutron stars, stellar-mass binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a neutron star and a stellar-mass black hole.

  16. Classification of compact binaries: an X-ray analog to the HR diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Raymond, John C.; Gopalan, Giri; Boroson, Bram Seth; Bornn, Luke

    2016-06-01

    X-ray binary systems (XRBs), when examined in an appropriate coordinate system derived from X-ray spectral and intensity information, appear to cluster based on their compact object type. We introduce such a coordinate system, in which two coordinates are hardness ratios and the third is a broadband X-ray intensity. In Gopalan, Vrtilek, & Bornn (2015) we developed a Bayesian statistical model that estimates the probability that an XRB contains a black hole, non-pulsing neutron star, or pulsing neutron star, depending on its location in our coordinate space. In particular, we utilized a latent variable model in which the latent variables follow a Gaussian process prior distribution. Here we expand our work to incorporate systems where the compact object is a white dwarf: cataclysmic variables (CVs). The fact that the CVs also fall into a location spatially distinct from the other XRB types supports the use of X-ray color-color-intensity diagrams as 3-dimensional analogs to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for normal stars.

  17. What Are the Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2002-04-01

    Recent Chandra observations of the compact central objects in supernova remnants have shown puzzling results that do not seem to be consistent with either black holes or neutron stars. (See e.g. Pavlov, Sanwal, Garmire and Zavlin, astro-ph-0112322.) In particular, the inferred effective emitting surface is too small to be the entire surface of a neutron star, but too bright to be a black hole. We discuss the possibility that these compact objects might be red holes instead of black holes or neutron stars. Red holes, which occur in alternate theories of gravity, naturally predict both the greater brightness of the emissions and the smaller effective size of the emitting surface from a collapsed object of the appropriate mass.

  18. The rotational broadening of V395 Carinae. Implications on the compact object's mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbaz, T.; Watson, C. A.

    2007-11-01

    Context: The masses previously obtained for the X-ray binary 2S 0921-630 inferred a compact object that was either a high-mass neutron star or low-mass black-hole, but used a previously published value for the rotational broadening (v sin i) with large uncertainties. Aims: We aim to determine an accurate mass for the compact object through an improved measurement of the secondary star's projected equatorial rotational velocity. Methods: We have used UVES echelle spectroscopy to determine the v sin i of the secondary star (V395 Car) in the low-mass X-ray binary 2S 0921-630 by comparison to an artificially broadened spectral-type template star. In addition, we have also measured v sin i from a single high signal-to-noise ratio absorption line profile calculated using the method of Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD). Results: We determine v sin i to lie between 31.3±0.5 km s-1 to 34.7±0.5 km s-1 (assuming zero and continuum limb darkening, respectively) in disagreement with previous results based on intermediate resolution spectroscopy obtained with the 3.6 m NTT. Using our revised v sin i value in combination with the secondary star's radial velocity gives a binary mass ratio of 0.281±0.034. Furthermore, assuming a binary inclination angle of 75° gives a compact object mass of 1.37±0.13 M_⊙. Conclusions: We find that using relatively low-resolution spectroscopy can result in systemic uncertainties in the measured v sin i values obtained using standard methods. We suggest the use of LSD as a secondary, reliable check of the results as LSD allows one to directly discern the shape of the absorption line profile. In the light of the new v sin i measurement, we have revised down the compact object's mass, such that it is now compatible with a canonical neutron star mass. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under the programme 077.D-0579A.

  19. Compact binary mergers as the origin of r-process elements in the Galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya; Prantzos, Nikos

    2014-05-02

    Compact binary mergers (of double neutron star and black hole-neutron star systems) are suggested to be the major site of the r-process elements in the Galaxy by recent hydrodynamical and nucleosynthesis studies. It has been pointed out, however, that estimated long lifetimes of compact binaries are in conflict with the presence of r-process-enhanced stars at the metallicity [Fe/H] ∼ −3. To resolve this problem, we examine the role of compact binary mergers in the early Galactic chemical evolution on the assumption that our Galactic halo was formed from merging sub-halos. The chemical evolutions are modeled for sub-halos with their total stellar masses between 10{sup 4}M{sub ⊙} and 2 × 10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙}. The lifetimes of compact binaries are assumed to be 100 Myr (95%) and 1 Myr (5%) according to recent binary population synthesis studies. We find that the r-process abundances (relative to iron; [r/Fe]) start increasing at [Fe/H] ≤ −3 if the star formation rates are smaller for less massive sub-halos. Our models also suggest that the star-to-star scatter of [r/Fe]'s observed in Galactic halo stars can be interpreted as a consequence of greater gas outflow rates for less massive sub-halos. In addition, the sub-solar [r/Fe]'s (observed as [Ba/Fe] ∼ −1.5 for [Fe/H] < −3) are explained by the contribution from the short-lived (∼ 1 Myr) binaries. Our result indicates, therefore, that compact binary mergers can be potentially the origin of the r-process elements throughout the Galactic history.

  20. Searching for Substellar Objects around HW Vir-like Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.-Y.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhao, E.-G.; Liao, W.-P.; Liu, L.; He, J.-J.; Zola, S.

    2014-08-01

    HW Vir-like eclipsing binaries are a group of detached binary systems that consists a very hot subdwarf B (sdB) type primary and a fully convective M-type secondary with short period. They display very narrow eclipse profiles, which give highly precise eclipse times. By analyzing the constructed observed-calculated (O-C) diagram based on the sdB eclipsing timings, We found very small-amplitude orbital period variations due to the presence of potential substellar object tertiaries (exoplanets and brown dwarfs) can be detected. The discovery of circumbinary substellar objects orbiting HW Vir-like eclipsing binaries has very important implications for the formation of sdB stars and the fates of low-mass companion systems, etc. A search for the substellar objects around the HW Vir-like Binaries is one of the projects of our research group of Yunnan Observatories (YNO), which has been started from 2006. In this paper, we will present some new results on our three targets of this project, i.e. NSVS14256825, HS0705+6700 and NSVS07826147.

  1. Detectability of eccentric compact binary coalescences with advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, M.; Meyers, P.; Thrane, E.; Luo, J.; Christensen, N.

    2015-03-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. While most binaries are expected to possess circular orbits, some may be eccentric, for example, if they are formed through dynamical capture. Eccentric orbits can create difficulty for matched filtering searches due to the challenges of creating effective template banks to detect these signals. In previous work, we showed how seedless clustering can be used to detect low-mass (Mtotal≤10 M⊙) compact binary coalescences for both spinning and eccentric systems, assuming a circular post-Newtonian expansion. Here, we describe a parametrization that is designed to maximize sensitivity to low-eccentricity (0 ≤ɛ ≤0.6 ) systems, derived from the analytic equations. We show that this parametrization provides a robust and computationally efficient method for detecting eccentric low-mass compact binaries. Based on these results, we conclude that advanced detectors will have a chance of detecting eccentric binaries if optimistic models prove true. However, a null observation is unlikely to firmly rule out models of eccentric binary populations.

  2. Gravitational effects of condensate dark matter on compact stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: fayinwang@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We study the gravitational effect of non-self-annihilating dark matter on compact stellar objects. The self-interaction of condensate dark matter can give high accretion rate of dark matter onto stars. Phase transition to condensation state takes place when the dark matter density exceeds the critical value. A compact degenerate dark matter core is developed and alter the structure and stability of the stellar objects. Condensate dark matter admixed neutron stars is studied through the two-fluid TOV equation. The existence of condensate dark matter deforms the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and lower their maximum baryonic masses and radii. The possible effects on the Gamma-ray Burst rate in high redshift are discussed.

  3. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models.

  4. Parameter estimation for inspiraling eccentric compact binaries including pericenter precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikóczi, Balázs; Kocsis, Bence; Forgács, Péter; Vasúth, Mátyás

    2012-11-01

    Inspiraling supermassive black hole binary systems with high orbital eccentricity are important sources for space-based gravitational wave observatories like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. Eccentricity adds orbital harmonics to the Fourier transform of the gravitational wave signal, and relativistic pericenter precession leads to a three-way splitting of each harmonic peak. We study the parameter estimation accuracy for such waveforms with different initial eccentricity, using the Fisher matrix method and a Monte Carlo sampling of the initial binary orientation. The eccentricity improves the parameter estimation by breaking degeneracies between different parameters. In particular, we find that the source localization precision improves significantly for higher-mass binaries due to eccentricity. The typical sky position errors are ˜1deg for a nonspinning, 107M⊙, equal-mass binary at redshift z=1, if the initial eccentricity 1 yr before merger is e0˜0.6. Pericenter precession does not affect the source localization accuracy significantly, but it does further improve the mass and eccentricity estimation accuracy systematically by a factor of 3-10 for masses between 106M⊙ and 107M⊙ for e0˜0.3.

  5. Listening For Long-Lived Breathing Modes of Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, O. W.; Pravica, D. W.

    2003-03-01

    Lowest-frequency standing-wave solutions for graviton and photon waves are obtained from the linearized general relativistic equations [Teukolsky, 1973. ApJ. 185, 635] which determine the gravitational and electromagnetic fields in the region immediately surrounding a compact object. The wave functions, obtained via the complex scaling method for various angles of rotation in the complex plane (as described by [W. Hunziker, 1986. Ann. Inst. H. Poincare' Phys. Theor. 45, 339] and [D. W. Pravica, 1999. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 455, 3003]), are subsequently rotated back to the real axis to determine the radial distribution of energy in each respective oscillation. These waves are resonances, where the electromagnetic oscillations are driven by oscillations in the metric, which are, in turn, caused by the source of the gravitational waves. They have finite lifetimes in the time domain, and are also localized in the spatial domain, extending from the surface of the compact object out to a few times 3M in the radial direction. Their maxima occur at a radial distance slightly larger than 3M in the case of gravitons but at a distance of 3M in the case of photons, which in fact causes slightly lower frequencies for the gravitational than the electromagnetic standing waves. Similarities and differences are discussed between compact-object resonance states (obtained from the Zerilli or Regge-Wheeler potentials in Schrodinger-type equations), and bound, low-energy hydrogenic wavefunctions (obtained from the Schrodinger equation for a single electron). Results obtained for some compact objects of small specific angular momentum compare well with corresponding experimentally measured asymptotic QPO frequencies.

  6. High-resolution x-ray imaging of a globular cluster core: compact binaries in 47Tuc.

    PubMed

    Grindlay, J E; Heinke, C; Edmonds, P D; Murray, S S

    2001-06-22

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 1") deep x-ray images of the globular cluster 47Tucanae (NGC 104) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study the population of compact binaries in the high stellar density core. A 70-kilosecond exposure of the cluster reveals a centrally concentrated population of faint (Lx approximately 10(30-33) ergs per second) x-ray sources, with at least 108 located within the central 2' x 2.5' and greater, similar half with Lx approximately 10(30.5) ergs per second. All 15 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) recently located precisely by radio observations are identified, though 2 are unresolved by Chandra. The x-ray spectral and temporal characteristics, as well as initial optical identifications with the Hubble Space Telescope, suggest that greater, similar50 percent are MSPs, about 30 percent are accreting white dwarfs, about 15 percent are main-sequence binaries in flare outbursts, and only two to three are quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries containing neutron stars, the conventional progenitors of MSPs. An upper limit of about 470 times the mass of the sun is derived for the mass of an accreting central black hole in the cluster. These observations provide the first x-ray "color-magnitude" diagram for a globular cluster and census of its compact object and binary population. PMID:11358997

  7. Detection, classification, and tracking of compact objects in video imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotto, Mark J.; Nebrich, Mark A.

    2012-06-01

    A video data conditioner (VDC) for automated full-­motion video (FMV) detection, classification, and tracking is described. VDC extends our multi-­stage image data conditioner (IDC) to video. Key features include robust detection of compact objects in motion imagery, coarse classification of all detections, and tracking of fixed and moving objects. An implementation of the detection and tracking components of the VDC on an Apple iPhone is discussed. Preliminary tracking results of naval ships captured during the Phoenix Express 2009 Photo Exercise are presented.

  8. Preon stars: a new class of cosmic compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, J.; Sandin, F.

    2005-06-01

    In the context of the standard model of particle physics, there is a definite upper limit to the density of stable compact stars. However, if a more fundamental level of elementary particles exists, in the form of preons, stability may be re-established beyond this limiting density. We show that a degenerate gas of interacting fermionic preons does allow for stable compact stars, with densities far beyond that in neutron stars and quark stars. In keeping with tradition, we call these objects “preon stars”, even though they are small and light compared to white dwarfs and neutron stars. We briefly note the potential importance of preon stars in astrophysics, e.g., as a candidate for cold dark matter and sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, and a means for observing them.

  9. Gravitational waves from compact binaries inspiralling along post-Newtonian accurate eccentric orbits: Data analysis implications

    SciTech Connect

    Tessmer, Manuel; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2008-10-15

    Compact binaries inspiralling along eccentric orbits are plausible gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the ground-based laser interferometers. We explore the losses in the event rates incurred when searching for GWs from compact binaries inspiralling along post-Newtonian accurate eccentric orbits with certain obvious nonoptimal search templates. For the present analysis, GW signals having 2.5 post-Newtonian (PN) accurate orbital evolution are modeled following the phasing formalism, presented by T. Damour, A. Gopakumar, and B. R. Iyer [Phys. Rev. D 70, 064028 (2004)]. We demonstrate that the search templates that model in a gauge-invariant manner GWs from compact binaries inspiralling under quadrupolar radiation reaction along 2PN accurate circular orbits are very efficient in capturing our somewhat realistic GW signals. However, three types of search templates based on the adiabatic, complete adiabatic, and gauge-dependent complete nonadiabatic approximants, detailed in P. Ajith, B. R. Iyer, C. A. K. Robinson, and B. S. Sathyaprakash, Phys. Rev. D 71, 044029 (2005), relevant for the circular inspiral under the quadrupolar radiation reaction were found to be inefficient in capturing the above-mentioned eccentric signal. We conclude that further investigations will be required to probe the ability of various types of PN accurate circular templates, employed to analyze the LIGO/VIRGO data, to capture GWs from compact binaries having tiny orbital eccentricities.

  10. Gravitational waves from compact binaries inspiralling along post-Newtonian accurate eccentric orbits: Data analysis implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessmer, Manuel; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2008-10-01

    Compact binaries inspiralling along eccentric orbits are plausible gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the ground-based laser interferometers. We explore the losses in the event rates incurred when searching for GWs from compact binaries inspiralling along post-Newtonian accurate eccentric orbits with certain obvious nonoptimal search templates. For the present analysis, GW signals having 2.5 post-Newtonian (PN) accurate orbital evolution are modeled following the phasing formalism, presented by T. Damour, A. Gopakumar, and B. R. Iyer [Phys. Rev. D 70, 064028 (2004)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.70.064028]. We demonstrate that the search templates that model in a gauge-invariant manner GWs from compact binaries inspiralling under quadrupolar radiation reaction along 2PN accurate circular orbits are very efficient in capturing our somewhat realistic GW signals. However, three types of search templates based on the adiabatic, complete adiabatic, and gauge-dependent complete nonadiabatic approximants, detailed in P. Ajith, B. R. Iyer, C. A. K. Robinson, and B. S. Sathyaprakash, Phys. Rev. D 71, 044029 (2005)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.71.044029, relevant for the circular inspiral under the quadrupolar radiation reaction were found to be inefficient in capturing the above-mentioned eccentric signal. We conclude that further investigations will be required to probe the ability of various types of PN accurate circular templates, employed to analyze the LIGO/VIRGO data, to capture GWs from compact binaries having tiny orbital eccentricities.

  11. Searching for Spectroscopic Binaries within Transition Disk Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Saul A.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Llama, Joe

    2016-03-01

    Transition disks (TDs) are intermediate stage circumstellar disks characterized by an inner gap within the disk structure. To test whether these gaps may have been formed by closely orbiting, previously undetected stellar companions, we collected high-resolution optical spectra of 31 TD objects to search for spectroscopic binaries (SBs). Twenty-four of these objects are in Ophiuchus and seven are within the Coronet, Corona Australis, and Chameleon I star-forming regions. We measured radial velocities for multiple epochs, obtaining a median precision of 400 ms-1. We identified double-lined SB SSTc2d J163154.7-250324 in Ophiuchus, which we determined to be composed of a K7(±0.5) and a K9(±0.5) star, with orbital limits of a < 0.6 au and P < 150 days. This results in an SB fraction of {0.04}-0.03+0.12 in Ophiuchus, which is consistent with other spectroscopic surveys of non-TD objects in the region. This similarity suggests that TDs are not preferentially sculpted by the presence of close binaries and that planet formation around close binaries may take place over similar timescales to that around single stars. This paper is based on data gathered with the 6.5 m Clay Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  12. Inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a new precessing convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2016-05-01

    It is customary to use a precessing convention, based on Newtonian orbital angular momentum L N, to model inspiral gravitational waves from generic spinning compact binaries. A key feature of such a precessing convention is its ability to remove all spin precession induced modulations from the orbital phase evolution. However, this convention usually employs a postNewtonian (PN) accurate precessional equation, appropriate for the PN accurate orbital angular momentum L, to evolve the L N-based precessing source frame. This motivated us to develop inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a precessing convention that explicitly use L to describe the binary orbits. Our approach introduces certain additional 3PN order terms in the orbital phase and frequency evolution equations with respect to the usual L N-based implementation of the precessing convention. The implications of these additional terms are explored by computing the match between inspiral waveforms that employ L and L N-based precessing conventions. We found that the match estimates are smaller than the optimal value, namely 0.97, for a non-negligible fraction of unequal mass spinning compact binaries.

  13. Electromagnetic field and cylindrical compact objects in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of different fluid parameters particularly electromagnetic field and f(R) corrections on the evolution of cylindrical compact object. We have explored the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and dynamical equations. An expression for the mass function has been found in comparison with the Misner-Sharp formalism in modified gravity, after which different mass-radius diagrams are drawn. The coupled dynamical transport equation have been formulated to discuss the role of thermoinertial effects on the inertial mass density of the cylindrical relativistic interior. Finally, we have presented a framework, according to which all possible solutions of the metric f(R)-Maxwell field equations coupled with static fluid can be written through set of scalar functions. It is found that modified gravity induced by Lagrangians f(R) = αR2, f(R) = αR2 - βR and f(R)=α R^2-β R/1+γ R are likely to host more massive cylindrical compact objects with smaller radii as compared to general relativity.

  14. Object tracking on mobile devices using binary descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savakis, Andreas; Quraishi, Mohammad Faiz; Minnehan, Breton

    2015-03-01

    With the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, advanced applications are relying on computer vision techniques to provide novel experiences for users. Currently, few tracking approaches take into consideration the resource constraints on mobile devices. Designing efficient tracking algorithms and optimizing performance for mobile devices can result in better and more efficient tracking for applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper, we use binary descriptors, including Fast Retina Keypoint (FREAK), Oriented FAST and Rotated BRIEF (ORB), Binary Robust Independent Features (BRIEF), and Binary Robust Invariant Scalable Keypoints (BRISK) to obtain real time tracking performance on mobile devices. We consider both Google's Android and Apple's iOS operating systems to implement our tracking approach. The Android implementation is done using Android's Native Development Kit (NDK), which gives the performance benefits of using native code as well as access to legacy libraries. The iOS implementation was created using both the native Objective-C and the C++ programing languages. We also introduce simplified versions of the BRIEF and BRISK descriptors that improve processing speed without compromising tracking accuracy.

  15. Tail effects in the third post-Newtonian gravitational wave energy flux of compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.; Qusailah, Moh'd S. S.

    2008-03-15

    The far-zone flux of energy contains hereditary (tail) contributions that depend on the entire past history of the source. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism, we propose and implement a semianalytical method in the frequency domain to compute these contributions from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits up to third post-Newtonian (3PN) order. The method explicitly uses the quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits at 1PN order and exploits the doubly periodic nature of the motion to average the 3PN fluxes over the binary's orbit. Together with the instantaneous (nontail) contributions evaluated in a companion paper, it provides crucial inputs for the construction of ready-to-use templates for compact binaries moving on quasi-elliptic orbits, an interesting class of sources for the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo, as well as space-based detectors like LISA.

  16. Compact Binary Merger Rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo Upper Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-01

    We compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH-BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ˜2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH-BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z ≃ 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (\\lt 150 {M}⊙ ) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to {M}{{tot,z}}≃ 400 {M}⊙ . (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH-BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS-NS, BH-NS, BH-BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH-BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.

  17. Is there a compact companion orbiting the late O-type binary star HD 164816?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepl, L.; Hambaryan, V. V.; Pribulla, T.; Tetzlaff, N.; Chini, R.; Neuhäuser, R.; Popov, S. B.; Stahl, O.; Walter, F. M.; Hohle, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength (X-ray, γ-ray, optical and radio) study of HD 164816, a late O-type X-ray detected spectroscopic binary. X-ray spectra are analysed and the X-ray photon arrival times are checked for pulsation. In addition, newly obtained optical spectroscopic monitoring data on HD 164816 are presented. They are complemented by available radio data from several large-scale surveys as well as the Fermi γ-ray data from its Large Area Telescope. We report the detection of a low energy excess in the X-ray spectrum that can be described by a simple absorbed blackbody model with a temperature of ˜50 eV as well as a 9.78 s pulsation of the X-ray source. The soft X-ray excess, the X-ray pulsation and the kinematical age would all be consistent with a compact object like a neutron star as companion to HD 164816. The size of the soft X-ray excess emitting area is consistent with a circular region with a radius of about 7 km, typical for neutron stars, while the emission measure (EM) of the remaining harder emission is typical for late O-type single or binary stars. If HD 164816 includes a neutron star born in a supernova, this supernova should have been very recent and should have given the system a kick, which is consistent with the observation that the star HD 164816 has a significantly different radial velocity than the cluster mean. In addition we confirm the binarity of HD 164816 itself by obtaining an orbital period of 3.82 d, projected masses m1sin3i = 2.355(69) M⊙, m2sin3i = 2.103(62) M⊙ apparently seen at low inclination angle, determined from high-resolution optical spectra.

  18. Compact binary merger rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo upper limits

    DOE PAGES

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaugnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-03

    Here, we compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH–BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ~2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH–BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z sime 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (more » $$\\lt 150\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to $${M}_{{\\rm{tot,z}}}\\simeq 400\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$. (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH–BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS–NS, BH–NS, BH–BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH–BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.« less

  19. Gravitational radiation from inspiralling compact binaries completed at the third post-Newtonian order.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc; Damour, Thibault; Esposito-Farèse, Gilles; Iyer, Bala R

    2004-08-27

    The gravitational radiation from point particle binaries is computed at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) approximation of general relativity. Three previously introduced ambiguity parameters, coming from the Hadamard self-field regularization of the 3PN source-type mass quadrupole moment, are consistently determined by means of dimensional regularization, and proved to have the values xi=-9871/9240, kappa=0, and zeta=-7/33. These results complete the derivation of the general relativistic prediction for compact binary inspiral up to 3.5PN order, and should be of use for searching and deciphering the signals in the current network of gravitational wave detectors.

  20. Tidal invariants for compact binaries on quasi-circular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Niels; Dolan, Sam; Nolan, Patrick; Ottewill, Adrian; Wardell, Barry

    2015-04-01

    We extend the gravitational self-force approach to encompass `self-interaction' tidal effects for a compact body of mass μ on a quasi-circular orbit around a black hole of mass M >> μ . Specifically, we define and calculate at O(μ) (conservative) shifts in the eigenvalues of the electric- and magnetic-type tidal tensors, and a (dissipative) shift in a scalar product between their eigenbases. This approach yields four gauge-invariant functions, from which one may construct other tidal quantities such as the curvature scalars and the speciality index. First, we analyze the general case of a geodesic in a regular perturbed vacuum spacetime admitting a helical Killing vector and a reflection symmetry. Next, we specialize to focus on circular orbits in the equatorial plane of Kerr spacetime at O(μ) . We present accurate numerical results for the Schwarzschild case for orbital radii up to the light-ring, calculated via independent implementations in Lorenz and Regge-Wheeler gauges. We show that our results are consistent with leading-order post-Newtonian expansions, and demonstrate the existence of additional structure in the strong-field regime. We anticipate that our strong-field results will inform (e.g.) effective one-body models for the gravitational two-body probl

  1. Tidal invariants for compact binaries on quasicircular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Sam R.; Nolan, Patrick; Ottewill, Adrian C.; Warburton, Niels; Wardell, Barry

    2015-01-01

    We extend the gravitational self-force approach to encompass "self-interaction" tidal effects for a compact body of mass μ on a quasicircular orbit around a black hole of mass M ≫μ . Specifically, we define and calculate at O (μ ) (conservative) shifts in the eigenvalues of the electric- and magnetic-type tidal tensors, and a (dissipative) shift in a scalar product between their eigenbases. This approach yields four gauge-invariant functions, from which one may construct other tidal quantities such as the curvature scalars and the speciality index. First, we analyze the general case of a geodesic in a regular perturbed vacuum spacetime admitting a helical Killing vector and a reflection symmetry. Next, we specialize to focus on circular orbits in the equatorial plane of Kerr spacetime at O (μ ) . We present accurate numerical results for the Schwarzschild case for orbital radii up to the light ring, calculated via independent implementations in Lorenz and Regge-Wheeler gauges. We show that our results are consistent with leading-order post-Newtonian expansions, and demonstrate the existence of additional structure in the strong-field regime. We anticipate that our strong-field results will inform (e.g.) effective one-body models for the gravitational two-body problem that are invaluable in the ongoing search for gravitational waves.

  2. Gravitational waves and the death-dance of compact stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1996-05-01

    The completion of a network of advanced laser-interferometric gravitational-wave observatories (US LIGO and European VIRGO projects) around 2001 will make possible the study of the inspiral and coalescence of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), using gravitational radiation. To extract useful information from the waves, such as the masses and spins of the bodies, theoretical general relativistic gravitational waveforms will be used as templates, cross-correlated against the detector output, in a matched filtering process. Because the broad-band detectors will be very sensitive to the non-linearly evolving phase of the waves, the templates must be extremely accurate in their treatment of the gravitational back-reaction on the orbital frequency, probably as accurate as O[(v/c)^6] beyond the predictions of the quadrupole formula. This presents a major challenge to theorists. Recently, templates accurate to O[(v/c)^4] were obtained by two independent methods (L. Blanchet, T. Damour, B. R. Iyer, C. M. Will and A. G. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 3515 (1995), and extensions to O[(v/c)^5] and higher are in progress. We summarize one of these methods, which extends and improves an earlier framework due to Epstein and Wagoner (R. Epstein and R. V. Wagoner, Astrophys. J. 210), 764 (1975), in which Einstein's equations are recast as a flat spacetime wave equation with source comprised of matter confined to compact regions and gravitational non-linearities extending to infinity. The new method (C. M. Will and A. G. Wiseman, Phys. Rev. D, submitted), carried through O[(v/c)^4], is free of divergences or undefined integrals, correctly predicts all gravitational wave ``tail'' effects caused by backscatter of the outgoing radiation off the background curved spacetime, and yields radiation that propagates asymptotically along true null cones of the curved spacetime.

  3. Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational Wave Sources: Mergers of Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Atish; Kaplan, David L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Mergers of compact objects are considered prime sources of gravitational waves (GW) and will soon be targets of GW observatories such as the Advanced-LIGO and VIRGO. Finding electromagnetic counterparts of these GW sources will be important to understand their nature. We discuss possible electromagnetic signatures of the mergers. We show that the BH-BH mergers could have luminosities which exceed Eddington luminosity from unity to several orders of magnitude depending on the masses of the merging BHs. As a result these mergers could be explosive, release up to 1051 erg of energy and shine as radio transients. At any given time we expect about a few such transients in the sky at GHz frequencies, which could be detected to be about 300 Mpc. It has also been argued that these radio transients would look alike radio supernovae with comparable detection rates. Multi-band follow-up could, however, distinguish between the mergers and supernovae.

  4. TOWARD EARLY-WARNING DETECTION OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM COMPACT BINARY COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Kipp; Cariou, Romain; Chapman, Adrian; Fotopoulos, Nickolas; Privitera, Stephen; Searle, Antony; Singer, Leo; Weinstein, Alan; Crispin-Ortuzar, Mireia; Frei, Melissa; Hanna, Chad; Kara, Erin; Keppel, Drew; Liao, Laura

    2012-04-01

    Rapid detection of compact binary coalescence (CBC) with a network of advanced gravitational-wave detectors will offer a unique opportunity for multi-messenger astronomy. Prompt detection alerts for the astronomical community might make it possible to observe the onset of electromagnetic emission from CBC. We demonstrate a computationally practical filtering strategy that could produce early-warning triggers before gravitational radiation from the final merger has arrived at the detectors.

  5. Modulation of a chirp gravitational wave from a compact binary due to gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2005-05-15

    A possible wave effect in the gravitational lensing phenomenon is discussed. We consider the interference of two coherent gravitational waves of slightly different frequencies from a compact binary, due to the gravitational lensing by a galaxy halo. This system shows the modulation of the wave amplitude. The lensing probability of such the phenomenon is of order 10{sup -5} for a high-z source, but it may be advantageous to the observation due to the magnification of the amplitude.

  6. A search for massive compact halo objects in our galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Alock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Cook, K.; Park, H. ); Griest, K.; Stubbs, C. . Center for Particle Astrophysics); Freeman, K.; Peterson, B.; Quinn, P.; Rodgers, A. . Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories); Bennett, D.P.

    1990-12-19

    MAssive Compact Halo Objects such as brown dwarfs, Jupiters, and black holes are prime candidates to comprise the dark halo of our galaxy. Paczynski noted that these objects (dubbed MACHOs) can be detected via gravitational microlensing of stars in the Magellanic Clouds with the caveat that only about one in 10{sup 6} stars will be lensed at any given time. Our group is currently involved in constructing a dedicated observing system at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia. We will use a refurbished 1.27 meter telescope and an innovative two-color CCD camera with 3.4 {times} 10{sup 7} pixels to monitor 10{sup 6} {minus} 10{sup 7} stars in the Magellanic Clouds. During the first year of operation (1991--1992), we hope to detect (or rule out) objects in the mass range 0.001M{sub {circle dot}} {le} M {le} 0.1M{sub {circle dot}}, and after five years, we hope to have covered the range 10{sup {minus}6}M{sub {circle dot}} < M {approx lt} 100M{sub {circle dot}}. 4 refs.

  7. Super-spinning compact objects generated by thick accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-03-01

    If astrophysical black hole candidates are the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity, the value of their spin parameter must be subject to the theoretical bound |a{sub *}| ≤ 1. In this work, we consider the possibility that these objects are either non-Kerr black holes in an alternative theory of gravity or exotic compact objects in General Relativity. We study the accretion process when their accretion disk is geometrically thick with a simple version of the Polish doughnut model. The picture of the accretion process may be qualitatively different from the one around a Kerr black hole. The inner edge of the disk may not have the typical cusp on the equatorial plane any more, but there may be two cusps, respectively above and below the equatorial plane. We extend previous work on the evolution of the spin parameter and we estimate the maximum value of a{sub *} for the super-massive black hole candidates in galactic nuclei. Since measurements of the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs require η > 0.15, we infer the ''observational'' bound |a{sub *}|∼<1.3, which seems to be quite independent of the exact nature of these objects. Such a bound is only slightly weaker than |a{sub *}|∼<1.2 found in previous work for thin disks.

  8. Formation of millisecond pulsars with low-mass helium white dwarf companions in very compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Kun; Li, X.-D.

    2014-08-20

    Binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs) are thought to have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). If the mass transfer in LMXBs is driven by nuclear evolution of the donor star, the final orbital period is predicted to be well correlated with the mass of the white dwarf (WD), which is the degenerate He core of the donor. Here we show that this relation can be extended to very small WD mass (∼0.14-0.17 M {sub ☉}) and narrow orbital period (about a few hours), depending mainly on the metallicities of the donor stars. There is also discontinuity in the relation, which is due to the temporary contraction of the donor when the H-burning shell crosses the hydrogen discontinuity. BMSPs with low-mass He WD companions in very compact binaries can be accounted for if the progenitor binary experienced very late Case A mass transfer. The WD companion of PSR J1738+0333 is likely to evolve from a Pop II star. For PSR J0348+0432, to explain its extreme compact orbit in the Roche-lobe-decoupling phase, even lower metallicity (Z = 0.0001) is required.

  9. Symplectic structure of post-Newtonian Hamiltonian for spinning compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xin; Xie Yi

    2010-04-15

    The phase space of a Hamiltonian system is symplectic. However, the post-Newtonian Hamiltonian formulation of spinning compact binaries in existing publications does not have this property, when position, momentum, and spin variables [X,P,S{sub 1},S{sub 2}] compose its phase space. This may give a convenient application of perturbation theory to the derivation of the post-Newtonian formulation, but also makes classic theories of a symplectic Hamiltonian system a serious obstacle in application, especially in diagnosing integrability and nonintegrability from a dynamical system theory perspective. To completely understand the dynamical characteristic of the integrability or nonintegrability for the binary system, we construct a set of conjugate spin variables and reexpress the spin Hamiltonian part so as to make the complete Hamiltonian formulation symplectic. As a result, it is directly shown with the least number of independent isolating integrals that a conservative Hamiltonian compact binary system with both one spin and the pure orbital part to any post-Newtonian order is typically integrable and not chaotic. And a conservative binary system consisting of two spins restricted to the leading order spin-orbit interaction and the pure orbital part at all post-Newtonian orders is also integrable, independently on the mass ratio. For all other various spinning cases, the onset of chaos is possible.

  10. Hot Collionsal Plasma Emissions in the Ultra-compact Binary Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Marshall, Herman

    2016-07-01

    4U 1626-67 is an ultra-compact binary pulsar with a pulse period of 7.7 sec and an orbital period of 40 min. Its X-ray spectrum varies distinctively before and after torque reversal episodes. 4U 1626-67 is a peculiar ultra-compact binary in that it not only truncates its accretion disk at the magnetospheric radius, but also emits Ne and O Doppler X-ray lines, The nature of these lines have remained quite mysterious but we can now show that these lines originate from a coronal type plasma with temperatures up to 10 Million degrees located at the magnetospheric radius. The disk line fits constrain the source distance to about 5 kpc. We also observe consistent variations in the disk lines before and after torque reversal. The observed disk lines constrain the angle of inclination to 38 degrees, which is is significantly larger than previously assumed. We discuss these findings in the context of accreting X-ray binaries and binary pulsar properties.

  11. Gravitational lens effects of a cosmological density of compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Amplification of quasar light by a cosmological density of compact objects causes significant effects on many quasars in magnitude-limited samples. For lens masses solar mass less than 100,000 solar mass the continuum would be amplified by a magnitude or more but the line emission would not. Examination of the UV selected sample of Marshall et al. (1983) gives limits to more than 90 percent statistical confidence of Omega(c) less than 0.1 for a mass between 200 and 100,000 solar mass, where Omega(c) is the mean density of objects of mass M relative to the closure density. Preliminary results from an X-ray selected sample may probe to more than 0.1 solar mass and give a value for Omega(c) of less than one. These limits indicate that the remnants of an early population of massive stars cannot make a cosmologically significant contribution to the mass density of the universe. On a separate topic, recent work on the enhanced surface density of quasars near galaxies due to lensing by stars in the galaxy halos is reviewed.

  12. Detecting compact galactic binaries using a hybrid swarm-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffanais, Yann; Porter, Edward K.

    2016-03-01

    Compact binaries in our galaxy are expected to be one of the main sources of gravitational waves for the future eLISA mission. During the mission lifetime, many thousands of galactic binaries should be individually resolved. However, the identification of the sources and the extraction of the signal parameters in a noisy environment are real challenges for data analysis. So far, stochastic searches have proven to be the most successful for this problem. In this work, we present the first application of a swarm-based algorithm combining Particle Swarm Optimization and Differential Evolution. These algorithms have been shown to converge faster to global solutions on complicated likelihood surfaces than other stochastic methods. We first demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm for the case of a single binary in a 1-mHz search bandwidth. This interesting problem gave the algorithm plenty of opportunity to fail, as it can be easier to find a strong noise peak rather than the signal itself. After a successful detection of a fictitious low-frequency source, as well as the verification binary RXJ 0806.3 +1527 , we then applied the algorithm to the detection of multiple binaries, over different search bandwidths, in the cases of low and mild source confusion. In all cases, we show that we can successfully identify the sources and recover the true parameters within a 99% credible interval.

  13. Electromagnetic Powers Of Merging And Collapsing Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-09-01

    Understanding possible EM signatures of the merging and collapsing compact object is important for identifying possible sources of LIGO & LISA signals. We estimate the electromagnetic powers that can be produced as a precursor to the merger, as a prompt emission during the collapse of a NS and at the spin-down stage of the resulting Kerr BH. In particular, we find exact non-linear time-dependent structure of magnetospheres of spinning and collapsing NSs in Schwarzschild geometry. Based on this solution, we argue that the collapse of a NS into the BH happens smoothly, without natural formation of current sheets or other dissipative structures on the open field lines and, thus, does not allow the magnetic field to become disconnected from the star and escape to infinity. Thus, as long as an isolated Kerr BH can produce plasma and currents, it does not lose its open magnetic field lines, its magnetospheric structure evolved towards a split monopole and the BH spins down electromagnetically (the closed field lines get absorbed by the hole). The "no hair theorem", which assumes that the outside medium is a vacuum, is not applicable in this case: highly conducting plasma introduces a topological constraint forbidding the disconnection of the magnetic field lines from the BH. Eventually, a single random large scale spontaneous reconnection event will lead to magnetic field release, shutting down the BH engine forever.

  14. Compact massive objects in Virgo galaxies: the black hole population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Haardt, Francesco; Gültekin, Kayhan

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the distribution of massive black holes (MBHs) in the Virgo cluster. Observations suggest that active galactic nuclei activity is widespread in massive galaxies (M* >~ 1010Msolar), while at lower galaxy masses star clusters are more abundant, which might imply a limited presence of central black holes in these galaxy-mass regimes. We explore if this possible threshold in MBH hosting is linked to nature, nurture or a mixture of both. The nature scenario arises naturally in hierarchical cosmologies, as MBH formation mechanisms typically are efficient in biased systems, which would later evolve into massive galaxies. Nurture, in the guise of MBH ejections following MBH mergers, provides an additional mechanism that is more effective for low mass, satellite galaxies. The combination of inefficient formation, and lower retention of MBHs, leads to the natural explanation of the distribution of compact massive objects in Virgo galaxies. If MBHs arrive to the correlation with the host mass and velocity dispersion during merger-triggered accretion episodes, sustained tidal stripping of the host galaxies creates a population of MBHs which lie above the expected scaling between the holes and their host mass, suggesting a possible environmental dependence.

  15. Evolution of the spin parameter of accreting compact objects with non-Kerr quadrupole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2011-05-01

    There is robust observational evidence supporting the existence of 5−20 M{sub s}un compact bodies in X-ray binary systems and of 10{sup 5}−10{sup 9} M{sub s}un bodies at the center of many galaxies. All these objects are commonly interpreted as black holes, even is there is no direct evidence that they have an event horizon. A fundamental limit for a black hole in 4-dimensional general relativity is the Kerr bound |a{sub *}| ≤ 1, where a{sub *} is the spin parameter. This is just the condition for the existence of the event horizon. The accretion process can spin a black hole up to a{sub *} ≈ 0.998 and some super-massive objects in galactic nuclei could be rapidly rotating black holes with spin parameter close to this limit. However, if these super-massive objects are not black holes, the Kerr bound does not hold and the accretion process can spin them up to a{sub *} > 1. In this paper, I consider compact bodies with non-Kerr quadrupole moment. I study the evolution of the spin parameter due to accretion and I find its equilibrium value. Future experiments like the gravitational wave detector LISA will be able to test if the super-massive objects at the center of galaxies are the black holes predicted by general relativity. If they are not black holes, some of them may be super-spinning objects with a{sub *} > 1.

  16. Modulated gamma-ray emission from compact millisecond pulsar binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.

    2014-01-01

    Context. A significant number of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have been discovered within binary systems. Tens of these MSPs emit γ-rays that are modulated with the pulsar period since this emission is produced in the inner pulsar magnetosphere. In several such binary systems, the masses of the companion stars have been derived allowing two classes of objects to be distinguished, which are called the black widow and the redback binaries. Pulsars in these binary systems are expected to produce winds that create conditions for acceleration of electrons, when colliding with stellar winds. These electrons should interact with the anisotropic radiation from the companion stars producing γ-ray emission modulated with the orbital period of the binary system, similar to what is observed in the massive TeV γ-ray binary systems. Aims: We consider the interaction of a MSP wind with a very inhomogeneous stellar wind from the companion star within binary systems of the black widow and redback types. Our aim is to determine the features of γ-ray emission produced in the collision region of the winds from a few typical MSP binary systems. Methods: It is expected that the pulsar wind should mix efficiently with the inhomogeneous stellar wind. The mixed winds move outside the binary with relatively low velocity. Electrons accelerated in such mixed, turbulent winds can interact with the magnetic field and strong radiation from the companion star, producing not only synchrotron radiation but also γ-rays in the inverse Compton process, fluxes of which are expected to be modulated on the periods of the binary systems. Applying numerical methods, we calculated the GeV-TeV gamma-ray spectra and the light curves expected from some MSP binary systems. Results: Gamma-ray emission, produced within the binary systems, is compared with the sensitivities of the present and future gamma-ray telescopes. It is concluded that energetic MSP binary systems create a new class of TeV

  17. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric hydrodynamical Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Bondi-Hoyle accretion configurations occur as soon as a gravitating body is immersed in an ambient medium with a supersonic relative velocity. From wind-accreting X-ray binaries to runaway neutron stars, such a regime has been witnessed many times and is believed to account for shock formation, the properties of which can be only marginally derived analytically. In this paper, we present the first results of the numerical characterization of the stationary flow structure of Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a compact object, from the large-scale accretion radius down to the vicinity of the compact body. For different Mach numbers, we study the associated bow shock. It turns out that those simulations confirm the analytical prediction by Foglizzo & Ruffert concerning the topology of the inner sonic surface with an adiabatic index of 5/3. They also enable us to derive the related mass accretion rates, the position and the temperature of the bow shock, as function of the flow parameters, along with the transverse density and temperature profiles in the wake.

  18. Effect of eccentricity on searches for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries in ground-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan A.; Zimmerman, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Inspiralling compact binaries are expected to circularize before their gravitational-wave signals reach the sensitive frequency band of ground-based detectors. Current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries using the LIGO and Virgo detectors therefore use circular templates to construct matched filters. Binary formation models have been proposed which suggest that some systems detectable by the LIGO-Virgo network may have non-negligible eccentricity. We investigate the ability of the restricted 3.5 post-Newtonian order TaylorF2 template bank, used by LIGO and Virgo to search for gravitational waves from compact binaries with masses M≤35M⊙, to detect binaries with nonzero eccentricity. We model the gravitational waves from eccentric binaries using the x-model post-Newtonian formalism proposed by Hinder et al. [I. Hinder, F. Hermann, P. Laguna, and D. Shoemaker, arXiv:0806.1037v1]. We find that small residual eccentricities (e0≲0.05 at 40 Hz) do not significantly affect the ability of current LIGO searches to detect gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries with total mass 2M⊙

  19. Probability distribution function for inclinations of merging compact binaries detected by gravitational wave interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    We analytically discuss probability distribution functions (PDFs) for inclinations of merging compact binaries whose gravitational waves are coherently detected by a network of ground-based interferometers. These PDFs would be useful for studying the possibility of (1) simultaneously detecting electromagnetic signals (such as gamma-ray bursts) associated with binary mergers and (2) statistically constraining the related theoretical models using actual observational data from multi-messenger astronomy. Our approach is similar to Schutz (2011), but we explicitly include the dependence of the polarization angles of the binaries, based on the concise formulation given in Cutler & Flanagan (1994). We find that the overall profiles of the PDFs are similar for any network of second-generation detectors (Advanced-LIGO, Advanced-Virgo, KAGRA and LIGO-India). For example, 5.1 per cent of detected binaries would have inclination angle less than 10° with at most 0.1 per cent differences between the potential networks. A perturbative expression is also provided for generating the PDFs with a small number of parameters given by directional averages of the quantity ɛ that characterizes the asymmetry of network sensitivities to two incoming orthogonal polarization modes.

  20. Study of statistical properties of hybrid statistic in coherent multidetector compact binary coalescences search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we revisit the coherent gravitational wave search problem of compact binary coalescences with multidetector network consisting of advanced interferometers like LIGO-Virgo. Based on the loss of the optimal multidetector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we construct a hybrid statistic as a best of maximum-likelihood-ratio (MLR) statistic tuned for face-on and face-off binaries. The statistical properties of the hybrid statistic is studied. The performance of this hybrid statistic is compared with that of the coherent MLR statistic for generic inclination angles. Owing to the single synthetic data stream, the hybrid statistic gives few false alarms compared to the multidetector MLR statistic and small fractional loss in the optimum SNR for a large range of binary inclinations. We demonstrate that, for a LIGO-Virgo network and binary inclination ɛ <7 0 ° and ɛ >11 0 ° , the hybrid statistic captures more than 98% of the network optimum matched filter SNR with a low false alarm rate. The Monte Carlo exercise with two distributions of incoming inclination angles—namely, U [cos ɛ ] and a more realistic distribution proposed by B. F. Schutz [Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 125023 (2011)]—are performed with the hybrid statistic and give approximately 5% and 7% higher detection probabilities, respectively, compared to the two stream multidetector MLR statistic for a fixed false alarm probability of 1 0-5.

  1. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-07-20

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

  2. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: Hexagonal template placement and its efficiency in detecting physical signals

    SciTech Connect

    Cokelaer, T.

    2007-11-15

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from the ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the design of a template bank that covers the astrophysically pertinent parameter space. In an earlier paper, we described a template bank that is based on a square lattice. Although robust, we showed that the square placement is overefficient, with the implication that it is computationally more demanding than required. In this paper, we present a template bank based on an hexagonal lattice, which size is reduced by 40% with respect to the proposed square placement. We describe the practical aspects of the hexagonal template bank implementation, its size, and computational cost. We have also performed exhaustive simulations to characterize its efficiency and safeness. We show that the bank is adequate to search for a wide variety of binary systems (primordial black holes, neutron stars, and stellar-mass black holes) and in data from both current detectors (initial LIGO, Virgo and GEO600) as well as future detectors (advanced LIGO and EGO). Remarkably, although our template bank placement uses a metric arising from a particular template family, namely, stationary phase approximation, we show that it can be used successfully with other template families (e.g., Pade resummation and effective one-body approximation). This quality of being effective for different template families makes the proposed bank suitable for a search that would use several of them in parallel (e.g., in a binary black hole search). The hexagonal template bank described in this paper is currently used to search for nonspinning inspiralling compact binaries in data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)

  3. Recent achievements in the Hamiltonian treatment of the dynamics and motion of compact binaries in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Schäfer, Gerhard

    2014-01-14

    The current knowledge in the post-Newtonian (PN) dynamics and motion of non-spinning and spinning compact binaries will be presented based on the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian approach to general relativity. The presentation will cover the binary dynamics with non-spinning components up to the 4PN order and for spinning binaries up to the next-to-next-to-leading order in the spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings. Radiation reaction will be treated for both non-spinning and spinning binaries. Explicit analytic expressions for the motion will be given, innermost stable circular orbits will be discussed.

  4. Evolution of Compact Binary Populations in Globular Clusters: A Boltzmann Study. II. Introducing Stochasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Ghosh, Pranab

    2008-06-01

    We continue the exploration that we began in Paper I of using the Boltzmann scheme to study the evolution of compact binary populations of globular clusters, introducing in this paper our method of handling the stochasticity inherent in the dynamical processes of binary formation, destruction, and hardening in globular clusters. We describe these stochastic processes as "Wiener processes," whereupon the Boltzmann equation becomes a stochastic partial differential equation, the solution of which involves the use of "Itō calculus" (this use being the first, to our knowledge, in this subject), in addition to ordinary calculus. As in Paper I, we focus on the evolution of (1) the number of X-ray binaries NXB in globular clusters and (2) the orbital period distribution of these binaries. We show that, although the details of the fluctuations in the above quantities differ from one "realization" to another of the stochastic processes, the general trends follow those found in the continuous-limit study of Paper I, and the average result over many such realizations is very close to the continuous-limit result. We investigate the dependence of NXB found by these calculations on two essential globular cluster properties, namely, the star-star and star-binary encounter rate parameters Γ and γ, for which we coined the name "Verbunt parameters" in Paper I. We compare our computed results with those from Chandra observations of Galactic globular clusters, showing that the expected scalings of NXB with the Verbunt parameters are in good agreement with those observed. We indicate additional features that can be incorporated into the scheme in the future, as well as how more elaborate problems can be tackled.

  5. Topics in the Detection of Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Shasvath Jagat

    Orbiting compact binaries - such as binary black holes, binary neutron stars and neutron star-black hole binaries - are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves observable by ground-based interferometric detectors. Despite numerous sophisticated engineering techniques, the gravitational wave signals will be buried deep within noise generated by various instrumental and environmental processes, and need to be extracted via a signal processing technique referred to as matched filtering. Matched filtering requires large banks of signal templates that are faithful representations of the true gravitational waveforms produced by astrophysical binaries. The accurate and efficient production of templates is thus crucial to the success of signal processing and data analysis. To that end, the dissertation presents a numerical technique that calibrates existing analytical (Post-Newtonian) waveforms, which are relatively inexpensive, to more accurate fiducial waveforms that are computationally expensive to generate. The resulting waveform family is significantly more accurate than the analytical waveforms, without incurring additional computational costs of production. Certain kinds of transient background noise artefacts, called "glitches'', can masquerade as gravitational wave signals for short durations and throw-off the matched-filter algorithm. Identifying glitches from true gravitational wave signals is a highly non-trivial exercise in data analysis which has been attempted with varying degrees of success. We present here a machine-learning based approach that exploits the various attributes of glitches and signals within detector data to provide a classification scheme that is a significant improvement over previous methods. The dissertation concludes by investigating the possibility of detecting a non-linear DC imprint, called the Christodoulou memory, produced in the arms of ground-based interferometers by the recently detected gravitational waves. The

  6. Electromagnetic power of merging and collapsing compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    Understanding possible electromagnetic signatures of merging and collapsing compact objects is important for identifying possible sources of the LIGO signal. Electromagnetic emission can be produced as a precursor to the merger, as a prompt emission during the collapse of a neutron star and at the spin-down stage of the resulting Kerr-Newman black hole. For the neutron star-neutron star mergers, the precursor power scales as L≈BNS2GMNSRNS8/(Rorb7c), while for the neutron star-black hole mergers, it is (GM/(c2RNS))2 times smaller. We demonstrate that the time evolution of the axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields can be expressed in terms of the hyperbolic Grad-Shafranov equation, and we formulate the generalization of Ferraro’s law of isorotation to time-dependent angular velocity. We find an exact nonlinear time-dependent Michel-type (split-monopole) structure of magnetospheres driven by spinning and collapsing neutron stars in Schwarzschild geometry. Based on this solution, we argue that the collapse of a neutron star into a black hole happens smoothly, without the natural formation of current sheets or other dissipative structures on the open field lines; thus, it does not allow the magnetic field to become disconnected from the star and escape to infinity. Therefore, as long as an isolated Kerr black hole can produce plasma and currents, it does not lose its open magnetic field lines. Its magnetospheric structure evolves towards a split monopole, and the black hole spins down electromagnetically (the closed field lines get absorbed by the hole). The “no-hair theorem,” which assumes that the outside medium is a vacuum, is not applicable in this case: highly conducting plasma introduces a topological constraint forbidding the disconnection of the magnetic field lines from the black hole. Eventually, a single random large scale spontaneous reconnection event will lead to magnetic field release, shutting down the electromagnetic black hole engine forever

  7. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. Hence, by the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays need not reflect the true variation of the mass supply rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale t_{{visc}} also to spread around a mean value. In high mass X-ray binaries, which are thought to be primarily wind-fed, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller and thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the low mass X-ray binaries which are primarily fed by Roche lobe overflow. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a detailed knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales, such as when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term All Sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift satellites by different methods to look for such smearing effects and to infer what these results can tell us about the viscous processes inside the respective disks. We employ three different methods to seek imprints of periodicity on the X-ray variation and found that in all the cases, the location of the peak in the power density spectra is consistent with the orbital frequencies. Interestingly, in high mass X-ray binaries the peaks are sharp with high rms values, consistent with a small Keplerian disk in a wind fed system. However, in low mass X-ray binaries with larger Keplerian disk component, the peaks are spreaded out with much lower rms values. X-ray reflections, or superhump phenomena which may also cause such X-ray modulations would not be affected by the size of

  8. Compact binary systems in scalar-tensor gravity. II. Tensor gravitational waves to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan N.

    2014-04-01

    We derive the tensor gravitational waveform generated by a binary of nonspinning compact objects (black holes or neutron stars) in a general class of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The waveform is accurate to second post-Newtonian order beyond the leading order quadrupole approximation. We use the direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations formalism, appropriately adapted to scalar-tensor theories, along with previous results for the equations of motion in these theories. The self-gravity of the compact objects is treated with an approach developed by Eardley. The scalar field causes deviations from the general relativistic waveform that depend only on a small number of parameters. Among the effects of the scalar field are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. One of these, a dipole-dipole coupling, produces a zero-frequency "gravitational-wave memory" equivalent to the Christodoulou memory of general relativity. In the special case of two black holes, the waveform reduces to the general relativistic waveform. For a mixed (black hole-neutron star) system, the waveform is identical to that of Einstein's theory to first post-Newtonian order, with deviations at higher order depending only on a single parameter. The behavior in these cases matches that found for the equations of motion.

  9. Matched filtering of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries: Computational cost and template placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Benjamin J.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    1999-07-01

    We estimate the number of templates, computational power, and storage required for a one-step matched filtering search for gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries. Our estimates for the one-step search strategy should serve as benchmarks for the evaluation of more sophisticated strategies such as hierarchical searches. We use a discrete family of two-parameter wave form templates based on the second post-Newtonian approximation for binaries composed of nonspinning compact bodies in circular orbits. We present estimates for all of the large- and mid-scale interferometers now under construction: LIGO (three configurations), VIRGO, GEO600, and TAMA. To search for binaries with components more massive than mmin=0.2Msolar while losing no more than 10% of events due to coarseness of template spacing, the initial LIGO interferometers will require about 1.0×1011 flops (floating point operations per second) for data analysis to keep up with data acquisition. This is several times higher than estimated in previous work by Owen, in part because of the improved family of templates and in part because we use more realistic (higher) sampling rates. Enhanced LIGO, GEO600, and TAMA will require computational power similar to initial LIGO. Advanced LIGO will require 7.8×1011 flops, and VIRGO will require 4.8×1012 flops to take full advantage of its broad target noise spectrum. If the templates are stored rather than generated as needed, storage requirements range from 1.5×1011 real numbers for TAMA to 6.2×1014 for VIRGO. The computational power required scales roughly as m-8/3min and the storage as m-13/3min. Since these scalings are perturbed by the curvature of the parameter space at second post-Newtonian order, we also provide estimates for a search with mmin=1Msolar. Finally, we sketch and discuss an algorithm for placing the templates in the parameter space.

  10. Compaction, cratering and collision frequency on chondritic parent objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, M. G.; Beitz, E.; Blum, J.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the compaction of an asteroid with radius 100 km due to an impact with a small asteroid for impact velocities between 3 and 5 km s. The crater formed on the target surface as a result of such an impact is calculated. The number of impacts on the target with the distribution of small asteroids during the age of the Solar System is computed.

  11. Post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational-wave memory for quasicircular, inspiralling compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Favata, Marc

    2009-07-15

    The Christodoulou memory is a nonlinear contribution to the gravitational-wave field that is sourced by the gravitational-wave stress-energy tensor. For quasicircular, inspiralling binaries, the Christodoulou memory produces a growing, nonoscillatory change in the gravitational-wave 'plus' polarization, resulting in the permanent displacement of a pair of freely-falling test masses after the wave has passed. In addition to its nonoscillatory behavior, the Christodoulou memory is interesting because even though it originates from 2.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order multipole interactions, it affects the waveform at leading (Newtonian/quadrupole) order. The memory is also potentially detectable in binary black-hole mergers. While the oscillatory pieces of the gravitational-wave polarizations for quasicircular, inspiralling compact binaries have been computed to 3PN order, the memory contribution to the polarizations has only been calculated to leading order (the next-to-leading order 0.5PN term has previously been shown to vanish). Here the calculation of the memory for quasicircular, inspiralling binaries is extended to 3PN order. While the angular dependence of the memory remains qualitatively unchanged, the PN correction terms tend to reduce the memory's magnitude. Explicit expressions are given for the memory contributions to the plus polarization and the spin-weighted spherical-harmonic modes of the metric and curvature perturbations. Combined with the recent results of Blanchet et al.[Classical Quantum Gravity 25, 165003 (2008)], this completes the waveform polarizations to 3PN order. This paper also discusses: (i) the difficulties in extracting the memory from numerical relativity simulations, (ii) other nonoscillatory effects that enter the waveform polarizations at high PN orders, and (iii) issues concerning the observability of the memory in gravitational-wave detectors.

  12. DOUBLE COMPACT OBJECTS. I. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE COMMON ENVELOPE ON MERGER RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Berti, Emanuele; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The last decade of observational and theoretical developments in stellar and binary evolution provides an opportunity to incorporate major improvements to the predictions from population synthesis models. We compute the Galactic merger rates for NS-NS, BH-NS, and BH-BH mergers with the StarTrack code. The most important revisions include updated wind mass-loss rates (allowing for stellar-mass black holes up to 80 M {sub Sun }), a realistic treatment of the common envelope phase (a process that can affect merger rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude), and a qualitatively new neutron star/black hole mass distribution (consistent with the observed {sup m}ass gap{sup )}. Our findings include the following. (1) The binding energy of the envelope plays a pivotal role in determining whether a binary merges within a Hubble time. (2) Our description of natal kicks from supernovae plays an important role, especially for the formation of BH-BH systems. (3) The masses of BH-BH systems can be substantially increased in the case of low metallicities or weak winds. (4) Certain combinations of parameters underpredict the Galactic NS-NS merger rate and can be ruled out. (5) Models incorporating delayed supernovae do not agree with the observed NS/BH 'mass gap', in accordance with our previous work. This is the first in a series of three papers. The second paper will study the merger rates of double compact objects as a function of redshift, star formation rate, and metallicity. In the third paper, we will present the detection rates for gravitational-wave observatories, using up-to-date signal waveforms and sensitivity curves.

  13. UNDERSTANDING COMPACT OBJECT FORMATION AND NATAL KICKS. III. THE CASE OF CYGNUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-03-10

    In recent years, accurate observational constraints have become available for an increasing number of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs). Together with proper-motion measurements, we could reconstruct the full evolutionary history of XRBs back to the time of compact object formation. In this paper, we present the first study of the persistent X-ray source Cygnus X-1 that takes into account all available observational constraints. Our analysis accounts for three evolutionary phases: orbital evolution and motion through the Galactic potential after the formation of a black hole (BH), and binary orbital dynamics at the time of core collapse. We find that the mass of the BH immediate progenitor is 15.0-20.0 M{sub Sun }, and at the time of core collapse, the BH has potentially received a small kick velocity of {<=}77 km s{sup -1} at 95% confidence. If the BH progenitor mass is less than {approx}17 M{sub Sun }, a non-zero natal kick velocity is required to explain the currently observed properties of Cygnus X-1. Since the BH has only accreted mass from its companion's stellar wind, the negligible amount of accreted mass does not explain the observationally inferred BH spin of a{sub *} > 0.95, and the origin of this extreme BH spin must be connected to the BH formation itself. Right after the BH formation, we find that the BH companion is a 19.8-22.6 M{sub Sun} main-sequence star, orbiting the BH at a period of 4.7-5.2 days. Furthermore, recent observations show that the BH companion is currently super-synchronized. This super-synchronism indicates that the strength of tides exerted on the BH companion should be weaker by a factor of at least two compared to the usually adopted strength.

  14. Study of compact objects in the Antlia cluster: globular clusters and ultra-compact dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caso, J. P.; Bassino, L. P.; Richtler, T.; Faifer, F. R.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Calderón, J. P.

    We present preliminary results of the study of globular clusters associated with dwarf elliptical galaxies in the Antlia cluster. This study includes the selection of candidates and the analysis of their photometric properties. Their luminosities are compared with those of NGC 3258 ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs).

  15. Low-latency analysis pipeline for compact binary coalescences in the advanced gravitational wave detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Buskulic, D.; Germain, V.; Guidi, G. M.; Marion, F.; Montani, M.; Mours, B.; Piergiovanni, F.; Wang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-band template analysis (MBTA) pipeline is a low-latency coincident analysis pipeline for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. MBTA runs with a low computational cost, and can identify candidate GW events online with a sub-minute latency. The low computational running cost of MBTA also makes it useful for data quality studies. Events detected by MBTA online can be used to alert astronomical partners for electromagnetic follow-up. We outline the current status of MBTA and give details of recent pipeline upgrades and validation tests that were performed in preparation for the first advanced detector observing period. The MBTA pipeline is ready for the outset of the advanced detector era and the exciting prospects it will bring.

  16. Efficiently enclosing the compact binary parameter space by singular-value decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew

    2011-10-15

    Gravitational-wave searches for the merger of compact binaries use matched filtering as the method of detecting signals and estimating parameters. Such searches construct a fine mesh of filters covering a signal parameter space at high density. Previously it has been shown that singular-value decomposition can reduce the effective number of filters required to search the data. Here we study how the basis provided by the singular-value decomposition changes dimension as a function of template-bank density. We will demonstrate that it is sufficient to use the basis provided by the singular-value decomposition of a low-density bank to accurately reconstruct arbitrary points within the boundaries of the template bank. Since this technique is purely numerical, it may have applications to interpolating the space of numerical relativity waveforms.

  17. Parameter estimation for compact binary inspirals with a simple noise realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongcho; Kim, Chunglee; Lee, Hyung Won

    2016-05-01

    In the context of parameter estimation of gravitational waves (GWs), detector noise is assumed to be Gaussian and stationary. In reality, many electric glitches, which are neither Gaussian nor stationary, were observed and reported in publications by the LSC-Virgo collabotation. Proper noise reduction is important in GW data analysis, as these glitches would limit, if not downgrade, the quality of parameter estimation. In this work, we investigate the accuracy of results obtained by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation for compact binary inspirals with the LIGO-Virgo network when non-Gaussian, stationary noise is remained in data of each interferometer. Spiky, delta function-like glitches, which are stationary, do not affect correlations between parameters. However, most likely values of chirp mass and distance seem to be shifted by the specific frequencies and amplitudes of glitches.

  18. Automatic moving object extraction toward compact video representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianping; Fujita, Gen; Furuie, Makoto; Onoye, Takao; Shirakawa, Isao; Wu, Lide

    2000-02-01

    An automatic object-oriented video segmentation and representation algorithm is proposed, where the local variance contrast and the frame differences contrast are jointly exploited for meaningful moving object extinction because these two visual features can indicate the spatial homogeneity of the gray levels and the temporal coherence of the motion fields efficiently. The 2D entropic thresholding technique and the watershed transformation method are further developed to determine the global feature thresholds adaptively according to the variation of the video components. The obtained video components are first represented by a group of 4 X 4 blocks coarsely, and then the meaningful moving objects are generated by an iterative region-merging procedure according to the spatiotemporal similarity measure. The temporal tracking procedure is further proposed to obtain more semantic moving objects among frames. Therefore, the proposed automatic moving object extraction algorithm can detect the appearance of new objects as well as the disappearance of existing objects efficiently because the correspondence of the video objects among frames is also established. Moreover, an object- oriented video representation and indexing approach is suggested, where both the operation of the camera (i.e., change of the viewpoint) and the birth or death of the individual objects are exploited to detect the breakpoints of the video data and to select the key frames adaptively.

  19. The 2.5PN gravitational wave polarizations from inspiralling compact binaries in circular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, K. G.; Blanchet, Luc; Iyer, Bala R.; Qusailah, Moh'd. S. S.

    2004-08-01

    Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian and matching formalism, we compute the gravitational wave form of inspiralling compact binaries moving in quasi-circular orbits at the second and a half post-Newtonian (2.5PN) approximation to general relativity. The inputs we use include notably the mass-type quadrupole at the 2.5PN order, the mass octupole and current quadrupole at the 2PN order, the mass 25-pole and current 24-pole at 1PN. The nonlinear hereditary terms come from the monopole quadrupole multipole interactions or tails, present at the 1.5PN, 2PN and 2.5PN orders, and the quadrupole quadrupole interaction arising at the 2.5PN level. In particular, the specific effect of nonlinear memory is computed using a simplified model of binary evolution in the past. The 'plus' and 'cross' wave polarizations at the 2.5PN order are obtained in ready-to-use form, extending the 2PN results calculated earlier by Blanchet, Iyer, Will and Wiseman.

  20. Learning about compact binary merger: The interplay between numerical relativity and gravitational-wave astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgarte, Thomas; Brady, Patrick R.; Creighton, Jolien D E; Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans; DeVoe, Ricky

    2008-04-15

    Activities in data analysis and numerical simulation of gravitational waves have to date largely proceeded independently. In this work we study how waveforms obtained from numerical simulations could be effectively used within the data analysis effort to search for gravitational waves from black hole binaries. To this end we analyze the cross-correlation between different numerical waveforms weighted by the detector's noise. This allow us to propose measures to quantify the accuracy of numerical waveforms for the purpose of data analysis, study how sensitive the analysis is to errors in the waveforms, and propose a way to efficiently encode the waveform's information for its use as a member of the template bank. We estimate that {approx}100 templates (and {approx}10 simulations with different mass ratios) are needed to detect waves from nonspinning binary black holes with total masses in the range 100M{sub {center_dot}}{<=}M{<=}400M{sub {center_dot}} using initial LIGO. Of course, many more simulation runs will be needed to confirm that the correct physics is captured in the numerical evolutions. From this perspective, we also discuss sources of systematic errors in numerical waveform extraction and provide order of magnitude estimates for the computational cost of simulations that could be used to estimate the cost of parameter space surveys. Finally, we discuss what information from near-future numerical simulations of compact binary systems would be most useful for enhancing the detectability of such events with contemporary gravitational-wave detectors and emphasize the role of numerical simulations for the interpretation of eventual gravitational-wave observations.

  1. Third post-Newtonian angular momentum flux and the secular evolution of orbital elements for inspiralling compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Arun, K. G.; Blanchet, Luc; Iyer, Bala R.; Sinha, Siddhartha

    2009-12-15

    The angular-momentum flux from an inspiralling binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits is computed at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism. The 3PN angular-momentum flux involves the instantaneous, tail, and tail-of-tails contributions as for the 3PN energy flux, and in addition a contribution due to nonlinear memory. We average the angular-momentum flux over the binary's orbit using the 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits. The averaged angular-momentum flux provides the final input needed for gravitational-wave phasing of binaries moving in quasi-elliptical orbits. We obtain the evolution of orbital elements under 3PN gravitational radiation reaction in the quasi-elliptic case. For small eccentricities, we give simpler limiting expressions relevant for phasing up to order e{sup 2}. This work is important for the construction of templates for quasi-eccentric binaries, and for the comparison of post-Newtonian results with the numerical relativity simulations of the plunge and merger of eccentric binaries.

  2. The Fate of Fallback Matter around Newly Born Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Rosalba; Duffell, Paul; Cantiello, Matteo; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of fallback disks around young neutron stars (NSs) has been invoked over the years to explain a large variety of phenomena. Here we perform a numerical investigation of the formation of such disks during a supernova (SN) explosion, considering both NS and black hole (BH) remnants. Using the public code MESA, we compute the angular momentum distribution of the pre-SN material, for stars with initial masses M in the range 13-40 M ⊙, initial surface rotational velocities v surf between 25% and 75% of the critical velocity, and for metallicities Z of 1%, 10%, and 100% of the solar value. These pre-SN models are exploded with energies E varying between 1050-3 × 1052 erg, and the amount of fallback material is computed. We find that, if magnetic torques play an important role in angular momentum transport, then fallback disks around NSs, even for low-metallicity main-sequence stars, are not an outcome of SN explosions. Formation of such disks around young NSs can only happen under the condition of negligible magnetic torques and a fine-tuned explosion energy. For those stars that leave behind BH remnants, disk formation is ubiquitous if magnetic fields do not play a strong role; however, unlike the NS case, even with strong magnetic coupling in the interior, a disk can form in a large region of the Z, M, v surf, E parameter space. Together with the compact, hyperaccreting fallback disks widely discussed in the literature, we identify regions in the above parameter space that lead to extended, long-lived disks around BHs. We find that the physical conditions in these disks may be conducive to planet formation, hence leading to the possible existence of planets orbiting BHs.

  3. Compact and extended objects from self-interacting phantom fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Makhmudov, Arislan; Urazalina, Ainur; Singleton, Douglas; Scott, John

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate localized and extended objects for gravitating, self-interacting phantom fields. The phantom fields come from two scalar fields with a "wrong-sign" (negative) kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian. This study covers several solutions supported by these phantom fields: phantom balls, traversable wormholes, phantom cosmic strings, and "phantom" domain walls. These four systems are solved numerically, and we try to draw out general, interesting features in each case.

  4. Search for Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO and Virgo Data from S5 and VSR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of the first search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence using data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. Five months of data were collected during the concurrent S5 (UGO) and VSRI (Virgo) science runs. The search focused on signals from binary mergers with a total mass between 2 and 35 Solar Mass. No gravitational waves are identified. The cumulative 90%-confidence upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence are calculated for non-spinning binary neutron stars, black hole-neutron star systems, and binary black holes to be 8.7 x 10(exp -3) / yr-1/L(sub 10) 2.2 x 10-3 yr-1L101, and 4.4 x 10(exp -4)3) / yr-1/L(sub 10) respectively, where L (sub 10) is 10(exp 10) times the blue solar luminosity. These upper limits are compared with astrophysical expectations.

  5. Search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence in LIGO and Virgo data from S5 and VSR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballinger, T.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belletoile, A.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; de Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Ely, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh–Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Mak, C.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Pardi, S.; Pareja, M.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Tseng, K.; Turner, L.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report the results of the first search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence using data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo detectors. Five months of data were collected during the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory’s S5 and Virgo’s VSR1 science runs. The search focused on signals from binary mergers with a total mass between 2 and 35M⊙. No gravitational waves are identified. The cumulative 90%-confidence upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence are calculated for nonspinning binary neutron stars, black hole-neutron star systems, and binary black holes to be 8.7×10-3yr-1L10-1, 2.2×10-3yr-1L10-1, and 4.4×10-4yr-1L10-1, respectively, where L10 is 1010 times the blue solar luminosity. These upper limits are compared with astrophysical expectations.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Predictions for the rates of compact binary coalescences observable by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, K.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Blomberg, A.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J. P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mackowski, J. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Mak, C.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Pardi, S.; Pareja, M.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabaste, O.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rogstad, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the initial and advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 Myr-1 per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 Myr-1 MWEG-1 to 1000 Myr-1 MWEG-1 (Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 601 L179; Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 614 L137 (erratum)). We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial LIGO-Virgo interferometers, with a plausible range between 2 × 10-4 and 0.2 per year. The likely binary neutron-star detection rate for the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network increases to 40 events per year, with a range between 0.4 and 400 per year.

  7. Magnetar-like Activity from the Central Compact Object in the SNR RCW103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, N.; Borghese, A.; Esposito, P.; Coti Zelati, F.; Bachetti, M.; Israel, G. L.; De Luca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The 6.67 hr periodicity and the variable X-ray flux of the central compact object (CCO) at the center of the supernova remnant RCW 103, named 1E 161348–5055, have been always difficult to interpret within the standard scenarios of an isolated neutron star (NS) or a binary system. On 2016 June 22, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift detected a magnetar-like short X-ray burst from the direction of 1E 161348–5055, also coincident with a large long-term X-ray outburst. Here, we report on Chandra, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, and Swift (BAT and XRT) observations of this peculiar source during its 2016 outburst peak. In particular, we study the properties of this magnetar-like burst, we discover a hard X-ray tail in the CCO spectrum during outburst, and we study its long-term outburst history (from 1999 to 2016 July). We find the emission properties of 1E 161348–5055 consistent with it being a magnetar. However, in this scenario, the 6.67 hr periodicity can only be interpreted as the rotation period of this strongly magnetized NS, which therefore represents the slowest pulsar ever detected, by orders of magnitude. We briefly discuss the viable slow-down scenarios, favoring a picture involving a period of fall-back accretion after the supernova explosion, similarly to what is invoked (although in a different regime) to explain the “anti-magnetar” scenario for other CCOs.

  8. Magnetar-like Activity from the Central Compact Object in the SNR RCW103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, N.; Borghese, A.; Esposito, P.; Coti Zelati, F.; Bachetti, M.; Israel, G. L.; De Luca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The 6.67 hr periodicity and the variable X-ray flux of the central compact object (CCO) at the center of the supernova remnant RCW 103, named 1E 161348-5055, have been always difficult to interpret within the standard scenarios of an isolated neutron star (NS) or a binary system. On 2016 June 22, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift detected a magnetar-like short X-ray burst from the direction of 1E 161348-5055, also coincident with a large long-term X-ray outburst. Here, we report on Chandra, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, and Swift (BAT and XRT) observations of this peculiar source during its 2016 outburst peak. In particular, we study the properties of this magnetar-like burst, we discover a hard X-ray tail in the CCO spectrum during outburst, and we study its long-term outburst history (from 1999 to 2016 July). We find the emission properties of 1E 161348-5055 consistent with it being a magnetar. However, in this scenario, the 6.67 hr periodicity can only be interpreted as the rotation period of this strongly magnetized NS, which therefore represents the slowest pulsar ever detected, by orders of magnitude. We briefly discuss the viable slow-down scenarios, favoring a picture involving a period of fall-back accretion after the supernova explosion, similarly to what is invoked (although in a different regime) to explain the “anti-magnetar” scenario for other CCOs.

  9. Inspiralling compact binaries in scalar-tensor theories of gravity: Equations of motion to 2.5 post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, Saeed; Will, Clifford

    2012-03-01

    We derive the scalar-tensor equations of motion for non-spinning compact objects, including black holes and neutron stars, to order (v/c)^5 beyond Newtonian order. We use the DIRE (Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein Equations) formalism [1] adapted to scalar- tensor theory, coupled with Eardley's scheme [2] for incorporating compact, quasi- stationary, self-gravitating bodies. We find that to this order of the PN approximation, binary black hole behavior in this class of theories is indistinguishable from that predicted by general relativity. Supported in part by the NSF, PHY 09-65133.[4pt] [1] A. G. Wiseman and C. M. Will, Phys. Rev. D 54, 4813 (1996); M. E. Pati and C. M. Will, Phys. Rev. D 62, 124015 (2000); ibid. 65, 104008 (2002).[0pt] [2] D. M. Eardley, Astrophys. J. Lett. 196, L59 (1975).

  10. A compact ADPLL based on symmetrical binary frequency searching with the same circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangbiao; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Ping; Liao, Pengfei; Liu, Junjie; Li, Zhaoji

    2015-03-01

    A compact all-digital phase-locked loop (C-ADPLL) based on symmetrical binary frequency searching (BFS) with the same circuit is presented in this paper. The minimising relative frequency variation error Δη (MFE) rule is derived as guidance of design and is used to weigh the accuracy of the digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) clock frequency. The symmetrical BFS is used in the coarse-tuning process and the fine-tuning process of DCO clock frequency to achieve the minimum Δη of the locked DCO clock, which simplifies the circuit architecture and saves the die area. The C-ADPLL is implemented in a 0.13 μm one-poly-eight-metal (1P8M) CMOS process and the on-chip area is only 0.043 mm2, which is much smaller. The measurement results show that the peak-to-peak (Pk-Pk) jitter and the root-mean-square jitter of the DCO clock frequency are 270 ps at 72.3 MHz and 42 ps at 79.4 MHz, respectively, while the power consumption of the proposed ADPLL is only 2.7 mW (at 115.8 MHz) with a 1.2 V power supply. The measured Δη is not more than 1.14%. Compared with other ADPLLs, the proposed C-ADPLL has simpler architecture, smaller size and lower Pk-Pk jitter.

  11. Fokker action of nonspinning compact binaries at the fourth post-Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Laura; Blanchet, Luc; Bohé, Alejandro; Faye, Guillaume; Marsat, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    The Fokker action governing the motion of compact binary systems without spins is derived in harmonic coordinates at the fourth post-Newtonian approximation (4PN) of general relativity. Dimensional regularization is used for treating the local ultraviolet (UV) divergences associated with point particles, followed by a renormalization of the poles into a redefinition of the trajectories of the point masses. Effects at the 4PN order associated with wave tails propagating at infinity are included consistently at the level of the action. A finite part procedure based on analytic continuation deals with the infrared (IR) divergencies at spatial infinity, which are shown to be fully consistent with the presence of near-zone tails. Our end result at 4PN order is Lorentz invariant and has the correct self-force limit for the energy of circular orbits. However, we find that it differs from the recently published result derived within the ADM Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity [T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.064058]. More work is needed to understand this discrepancy.

  12. Radio flares of compact binary mergers: the effect of non-trivial outflow geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-10-01

    The next generation gravitational waves (GW) detectors are most sensitive to GW emitted by compact (neutron star/black hole) binary mergers. If one of those is a neutron star the merger will also emit electromagnetic radiation via three possible channels: gamma-ray bursts and their (possibly orphan) afterglows, Li-Paczynski Macronovae and radio flares. This accompanying electromagnetic radiation is vitally important in confirming the GW detections. It could also reveal a wealth of information regarding the merger and will open a window towards multimessenger astronomy. Identifying and characterizing these counterparts is therefore of utmost importance. In this work, we explore late time radio flares emitted by the dynamically ejected outflows. We build upon previous work and consider the effect of the outflow's non-trivial geometry. Using an approximate method, we estimate the radio light-curves for several ejected matter distributions obtained in numerical simulations. Our method provides an upper limit to the effect of non-sphericity. Together with the spherical estimates, the resulting light curves bound the actual signal. We find that while non-spherical geometries can in principle lead to an enhanced emission, in most cases they result in an increase in the time-scale compared with a corresponding spherical configuration. This would weaken somewhat these signals and might decrease the detection prospects.

  13. A RAY-TRACING ALGORITHM FOR SPINNING COMPACT OBJECT SPACETIMES WITH ARBITRARY QUADRUPOLE MOMENTS. I. QUASI-KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Johannsen, Tim

    2012-01-20

    We describe a new numerical algorithm for ray tracing in the external spacetimes of spinning compact objects characterized by arbitrary quadrupole moments. Such spacetimes describe non-Kerr vacuum solutions that can be used to test the no-hair theorem in conjunction with observations of accreting black holes. They are also appropriate for neutron stars with spin frequencies in the {approx_equal} 300-600 Hz range, which are typical of the bursting sources in low-mass X-ray binaries. We use our algorithm to show that allowing for the quadrupole moment of the spacetime to take arbitrary values leads to observable effects in the profiles of relativistic broadened fluorescent iron lines from geometrically thin accretion disks.

  14. On the observed mass distribution of compact stellar remnants in close binary systems and possible interpretations proposed for the time being

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    It turns out that accumulation of data during 40-years observational studies just emphasized a contrast between pulsars and black hole (BH) candidates in Galactic close binary stellar systems: (1) the mass spectrum of these degenerate stellar objects (or collapsars) shows an evident absence of objects with masses within the interval from 2M_(Sun) (with a first peak at about 1.4M_(Sun)) to approximately 6M_(Sun), (2) and in close binary stellar systems with a low-massive (about 0.6M_(Sun)) optical companion the most probable mass value (the peak in the mass distribution of BH candidates) turned out to be close to 6.7M_(Sun). This puzzle of discrete mass spectra of collapsars in close binary systems demands some solution and explanation in stellar evolution scenarios in connection with the core-collapse supernovae explosion mechanism and in context of a relation between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar strong field - an analogue of BH in General Relativity - is investigated in a totally non-metric, dynamical model of gravitational interaction theory, in which extremely compact objects of the masses M_Q approx.= 6.7M_(Sun) with a quark-gluon plasma bag of radius r^* = GM_Q/c^2 approx.= 10 km exist.

  15. Estimating detection rates of compact binary inspirals with networks of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    In a recent paper, Schutz proposed an analytical approximation for simplifying the treatment of the polarization angle and conveniently evaluating relative detection rates of compact binary inspirals for various networks of ground-based interferometers. We derive relative event rates by strictly handling the polarization angle, and we quantitatively examine the validity of Schutz's approximation. The associated error of the approximation is rigorously shown to be less than 1.02%, irrespective of the details of the detector networks.

  16. Accelerating Compact Object Mergers in Triple Systems with the Kozai Resonance: A Mechanism for "Prompt" Type Ia Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Other Exotica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2011-11-01

    White dwarf-white dwarf (WD-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers may produce Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), respectively. A general problem is how to produce binaries with semi-major axes small enough to merge in significantly less than the Hubble time (t H), and thus accommodate the observation that these events closely follow episodes of star formation. I explore the possibility that such systems are not binaries at all, but actually coeval, or dynamical formed, triple systems. The tertiary induces Kozai oscillations in the inner binary, driving it to high eccentricity, and reducing its gravitational wave (GW) merger timescale. This effect significantly increases the allowed range of binary period P such that the merger time is t merge < t H. In principle, Chandrasekhar-mass binaries with P ~ 300 days can merge in <~ t H if they contain a prograde solar-mass tertiary at high enough inclination. For retrograde tertiaries, the maximum P such that t merge <~ t H is yet larger. In contrast, P <~ 0.3 days is required in the absence of a tertiary. I discuss implications of these findings for the production of transients formed via compact object binary mergers. Based on the statistics of solar-type binaries, I argue that many such binaries should be in triple systems affected by the Kozai resonance. If true, expectations for the mHz GW signal from individual sources, the diffuse background, and the foreground for GW experiments like LISA are modified. This work motivates future studies of triples systems of A, B, and O stars, and new types of searches for WD-WD binaries in triple systems.

  17. Spectroscopy of the short-hard GRB 130603B. The host galaxy and environment of a compact object merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thöne, C. C.; Rowlinson, A.; García-Benito, R.; Levan, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Goldoni, P.; Schulze, S.; Zafar, T.; Wiersema, K.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Melandri, A.; D'Avanzo, P.; Oates, S.; D'Elia, V.; De Pasquale, M.; Krühler, T.; van der Horst, A. J.; Xu, D.; Watson, D.; Piranomonte, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Kaper, L.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Cano, Z.; Covino, S.; Flores, H.; Greiss, S.; Hammer, F.; Hartoog, O. E.; Hellmich, S.; Heuser, C.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Mottola, S.; Sparre, M.; Sollerman, J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vestergaard, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes, which makes them promising sources of gravitational waves. The detection of a "kilonova"-likesignature associated to the Swift-detected GRB 130603B has suggested that this event is the result of a compact object merger. Aims: Our knowledge on SGRB has been, until now, mostly based on the absence of supernova signatures and the analysis of the host galaxies to which they cannot always be securely associated. Further progress has been significantly hampered by the faintness and rapid fading of their optical counterparts (afterglows), which has so far precluded spectroscopy of such events. Afterglow spectroscopy is the key tool to firmly determine the distance at which the burst was produced, crucial to understand its physics, and study its local environment. Methods: Here we present the first spectra of a prototypical SGRB afterglow in which both absorption and emission features are clearly detected. Together with multi-wavelength photometry we study the host and environment of GRB 130603B. Results: From these spectra we determine the redshift of the burst to be z = 0.3565 ± 0.0002, measure rich dynamics both in absorption and emission, and a substantial line of sight extinction of AV = 0.86 ± 0.15 mag. The GRB was located at the edge of a disrupted arm of a moderately star forming galaxy with near-solar metallicity. Unlike for most long GRBs (LGRBs), NHX/AV is consistent with the Galactic ratio, indicating that the explosion site differs from those found in LGRBs. Conclusions: The merger is not associated with the most star-forming region of the galaxy; however, it did occur in a dense region, implying a rapid merger or a low natal kick velocity for the compact object binary. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Mass bounds for compact spherically symmetric objects in generalized gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, Piyabut; Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2016-09-01

    We derive upper and lower bounds on the mass-radius ratio of stable compact objects in extended gravity theories, in which modifications of the gravitational dynamics via-á-vis standard general relativity are described by an effective contribution to the matter energy-momentum tensor. Our results include the possibility of a variable coupling between the matter sector and the gravitational field and are valid for a large class of generalized gravity models. The generalized continuity and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations are expressed in terms of the effective mass, density, and pressure, given by the bare values plus additional contributions from the total energy-momentum tensor, and general theoretical limits for the maximum and minimum mass-radius ratios are explicitly obtained. As applications of the formalism developed herein, we consider compact bosonic objects, described by scalar-tensor gravitational theories with self-interacting scalar field potentials, and charged compact objects, respectively. For Higgs-type models, we find that these bounds can be expressed in terms of the value of the potential at the surface of the compact object. Minimizing the energy with respect to the radius, we obtain explicit upper and lower bounds on the mass, which admits a Chandrasekhar-type representation. For charged compact objects, we consider the effects of the Poincaré stresses on the equilibrium structure and obtain bounds on the radial and tangential stresses. As a possible astrophysical test of our results, we obtain the general bound on the gravitational redshift for compact objects in extended gravity theories and explicitly compute the redshift restrictions for objects with nonzero effective surface pressure. General implications of minimum mass bounds for the gravitational stability of fundamental particles and for the existence of holographic duality between bulk and boundary degrees of freedom are also considered.

  19. Parameter estimation of eccentric inspiraling compact binaries using an enhanced post circular model for ground-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baosan; Cao, Zhoujian; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Hsien-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Inspiraling compact binaries have been identified as one of the most promising sources for gravitational-wave detection. These binaries are always expected to have been circularized by the gravitational radiation when they enter the detector's frequency band. However, recent studies indicate that some binaries may still possess a significant eccentricity. In light of the enhanced post-circular waveform model for eccentric binaries in the frequency domain, we do a systematic study of the possible signal-to-noise ratio loss if one uses quasicircular waveform templates to analyze the eccentric signal, and revisit the problem of parameter estimation of gravitational-wave chirp signals from eccentric compact binaries. We confirm previous results from other researchers that the resulting signal-to-noise ratio loss becomes larger than 5% for eccentricity bigger than 0.1 and the resulting parameter estimation bias is more than 0.1%. We study the parameter estimation accuracy for such a waveform with different initial eccentricities from 0.1 to 0.4 by using the Fisher matrix method. As expected, the eccentricity improves the parameter estimation accuracy significantly by breaking degeneracies between different parameters. Particularly, we find that the eccentricity errors improve by 2 orders of magnitude from 10-2 to 10-4 when eccentricity grows from 0.1 to 0.4, and the estimated errors of the chirp mass are about 10-3 for a binary black hole using the Advanced LIGO detector. For the Einstein Telescope detector, the estimated accuracy of parameters will be 2 orders of magnitude higher.

  20. GR-AMRVAC code applications: accretion onto compact objects, boson stars versus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; Grandclément, P.; Casse, F.; Vincent, F. H.; Straub, O.; Dauvergne, F.

    2016-08-01

    In the close vicinity of a compact object strong gravity imprints its signature onto matter. Systems that contain at least one compact object are observed to exhibit extreme physical properties and typically emit highly energetic radiation. The nature of the compact objects that produce the strongest gravitational fields is to date not settled. General relativistic numerical simulations of fluid dynamics around black holes, neutron stars, and other compact objects such as boson stars (BSs) may give invaluable insights into this fundamental question. In order to study the behavior of fluid in the strong gravity regime of an arbitrary compact object we develop a new general relativistic hydrodynamics code. To this end we extend the existing versatile adaptive mesh refinement code MPI-AMRVAC into a general relativistic hydrodynamics framework and adapt it for the use of numerically given spacetime metrics. In the present article we study accretion flows in the vicinity of various types of BSs whose numerical metrics are calculated by the KADATH spectral solver library. We design specific tests to check the reliability of any code intending to study BSs and compare the solutions with those obtained in the context of Schwarzschild black holes. We perform the first ever general relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of gas accretion by a BS. The behavior of matter at small distances from the center of a BS differs notably from the black hole case. In particular we demonstrate that in the context of Bondi spherical accretion the mass accretion rate onto non-rotating BSs remains constant whereas it increases for Schwarzschild black holes. We also address the scenario of non-spherical accretion onto BSs and show that this may trigger mass ejection from the interior of the BS. This striking feature opens the door to forthcoming investigations regarding accretion-ejection flows around such types of compact objects.

  1. Derivation of local-in-time fourth post-Newtonian ADM Hamiltonian for spinless compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaranowski, Piotr; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives full details of the computation within the canonical formalism of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner of the local-in-time part of the fourth post-Newtonian, i.e. of power eight in one over speed of light, conservative Hamiltonian of spinless compact binary systems. The Hamiltonian depends only on the bodies' positions and momenta. Dirac delta distributions are taken as source functions. Their full control is furnished by dimensional continuation, by means of which the occurring ultraviolet (UV) divergences are uniquely regularized. The applied near-zone expansion of the time-symmetric Green function leads to infrared (IR) divergences. Their analytic regularization results in one single ambiguity parameter. Unique fixation of it was successfully performed in T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014) through far-zone matching. Technically as well as conceptually (backscatter binding energy), the level of the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics is reached. In a first run a computation of all terms is performed in three-dimensional space using analytic Riesz-Hadamard regularization techniques. Then divergences are treated locally (i.e., around particles' positions for UV and in the vicinity of spatial infinity for IR divergences) by means of combined dimensional and analytic regularization. Various evolved analytic expressions are presented for the first time. The breakdown of the Leibniz rule for distributional derivatives is addressed as well as the in general nondistributive law when regularizing value of products of functions evaluated at their singular point.

  2. Improved resummation of post-Newtonian multipolar waveforms from circularized compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Iyer, Bala R.; Nagar, Alessandro

    2009-03-15

    We improve and generalize a resummation method of post-Newtonian multipolar waveforms from circular (nonspinning) compact binaries introduced in Refs. 1,2. One of the characteristic features of this resummation method is to replace the usual additive decomposition of the standard post-Newtonian approach by a multiplicative decomposition of the complex multipolar waveform h{sub lm} into several (physically motivated) factors: (i) the Newtonian waveform, (ii) a relativistic correction coming from an 'effective source', (iii) leading-order tail effects linked to propagation on a Schwarzschild background, (iv) a residual tail dephasing, and (v) residual relativistic amplitude corrections f{sub lm}. We explore here a new route for resumming f{sub lm} based on replacing it by its l-th root: {rho}{sub lm}=f{sub lm}{sup 1/l}. In the extreme-mass-ratio case, this resummation procedure results in a much better agreement between analytical and numerical waveforms than when using standard post-Newtonian approximants. We then show that our best approximants behave in a robust and continuous manner as we deform them by increasing the symmetric mass ratio {nu}{identical_to}m{sub 1}m{sub 2}/(m{sub 1}+m{sub 2}){sup 2} from 0 (extreme-mass-ratio case) to 1/4 (equal-mass case). The present paper also completes our knowledge of the first post-Newtonian corrections to multipole moments by computing ready-to-use explicit expressions for the first post-Newtonian contributions to the odd-parity (current) multipoles.

  3. Novel scheme for rapid parallel parameter estimation of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, C.; Brady, P.; Ochsner, E.; O'Shaughnessy, R.

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a highly parallelizable architecture for estimating parameters of compact binary coalescence using gravitational-wave data and waveform models. Using a spherical harmonic mode decomposition, the waveform is expressed as a sum over modes that depend on the intrinsic parameters (e.g., masses) with coefficients that depend on the observer dependent extrinsic parameters (e.g., distance, sky position). The data is then prefiltered against those modes, at fixed intrinsic parameters, enabling efficiently evaluation of the likelihood for generic source positions and orientations, independent of waveform length or generation time. We efficiently parallelize our intrinsic space calculation by integrating over all extrinsic parameters using a Monte Carlo integration strategy. Since the waveform generation and prefiltering happens only once, the cost of integration dominates the procedure. Also, we operate hierarchically, using information from existing gravitational-wave searches to identify the regions of parameter space to emphasize in our sampling. As proof of concept and verification of the result, we have implemented this algorithm using standard time-domain waveforms, processing each event in less than one hour on recent computing hardware. For most events we evaluate the marginalized likelihood (evidence) with statistical errors of ≲5 %, and even smaller in many cases. With a bounded runtime independent of the waveform model starting frequency, a nearly unchanged strategy could estimate neutron star (NS)-NS parameters in the 2018 advanced LIGO era. Our algorithm is usable with any noise curve and existing time-domain model at any mass, including some waveforms which are computationally costly to evolve.

  4. High-ionization accretion signatures in compact binary candidates from SOAR Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. S.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Cieslinski, D.; Jablonski, F.; Silva, K. M. G.; Almeida, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The increasing number of synoptic surveys made by small robotic telescopes, like the photometric Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS - Drake et al., 2009, ApJ, 696, 870), represents a unique opportunity for the discovery of new variable objects and also to improve the samples of many classes of variables. Our goal in this work was the discovery of new polars, a subclass of magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs) with no accretion disk, and Close Binary Supersoft X-ray Sources (CBSS), strong candidates to Type Ia Supernova progenitors. Both are rare objects and probe interesting accretion scenarios. Finding spectral features associated to high-ionization mass accretion constrains the CBSS or magnetic CV nature for the candidates, expanding the hitherto small samples of these classes (specially CBSS) and allowing for detailed observational follow-up. We used the Goodman Spectrograph on SOAR 4.1 m Telescope to search for signatures of high-ionization mass accretion, as He II 468,6 nm emission line and inverted Balmer decrement, on 39 variable objects selected mostly from CRTS. In this sample we found 14 strong candidates to mCVs, 1 Nova in the final stages of eruption, 14 candidates to Dwarf Novae, 5 extragalactic sources (AGN), 1 object previously identified as a Black Hole Nova, 3 objects with pure absorption spectral features and 1 unidentified object with low S/N ratio. The mCVs candidates found in this work will be studied using time-resolved spectroscopic, polarimetric, and photometric observations in a follow-up project.

  5. An accurate geometric distance to the compact binary SS Cygni vindicates accretion disc theory.

    PubMed

    Miller-Jones, J C A; Sivakoff, G R; Knigge, C; Körding, E G; Templeton, M; Waagen, E O

    2013-05-24

    Dwarf novae are white dwarfs accreting matter from a nearby red dwarf companion. Their regular outbursts are explained by a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disc, described by the disc instability model that has since been successfully extended to other accreting systems. However, the prototypical dwarf nova, SS Cygni, presents a major challenge to our understanding of accretion disc theory. At the distance of 159 ± 12 parsecs measured by the Hubble Space Telescope, it is too luminous to be undergoing the observed regular outbursts. Using very long baseline interferometric radio observations, we report an accurate, model-independent distance to SS Cygni that places the source substantially closer at 114 ± 2 parsecs. This reconciles the source behavior with our understanding of accretion disc theory in accreting compact objects.

  6. An accurate geometric distance to the compact binary SS Cygni vindicates accretion disc theory.

    PubMed

    Miller-Jones, J C A; Sivakoff, G R; Knigge, C; Körding, E G; Templeton, M; Waagen, E O

    2013-05-24

    Dwarf novae are white dwarfs accreting matter from a nearby red dwarf companion. Their regular outbursts are explained by a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disc, described by the disc instability model that has since been successfully extended to other accreting systems. However, the prototypical dwarf nova, SS Cygni, presents a major challenge to our understanding of accretion disc theory. At the distance of 159 ± 12 parsecs measured by the Hubble Space Telescope, it is too luminous to be undergoing the observed regular outbursts. Using very long baseline interferometric radio observations, we report an accurate, model-independent distance to SS Cygni that places the source substantially closer at 114 ± 2 parsecs. This reconciles the source behavior with our understanding of accretion disc theory in accreting compact objects. PMID:23704566

  7. The BlackGEM Array: Searching for Gravitational Wave Source Counterparts to Study Ultra-Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, S.; Groot, P.; Nelemans, G.; Klein-Wolt, M.

    2015-07-01

    The rates and physics of ultra-compact binaries consisting of neutron stars and black holes are poorly known, mostly due to the lack of a good sample to study such systems. In two years from now, the LIGO and Virgo interferometers are expected to be able to directly detect the gravitational waves (GW) emitted by such binaries when they merge, opening up a completely new window on the sky to study ultra-compact binaries. The combination of a GW detection with electromagnetic observations would be especially powerful to characterize the systems and the merger events. Unfortunately, however, the electromagnetic counterparts will be hard to find. The sky localization of the GW detections will be rather poor, with typical error boxes spanning ˜100 square degrees, and the optical sources are expected to be faint (˜22nd magnitude) and not long lasting (˜1 day). In this contribution we discuss the possibilities of finding the electromagnetic counterparts of these binaries, thereby paying particular attention to the dedicated BlackGEM array of optical telescopes that will be deployed at the ESO site in La Silla (Chile) in 2015 and 2016. In the first phase, the array will consist of four 60-cm telescopes with a field of view of 2.7 square degrees each. Apart from going after GW triggers, the array will also perform a deep southern sky survey in Sloan u, g, r, i, and z filters, down to 23rd magnitude in the g band, and a survey to characterize the transient and variable sky on timescales of hours and days. The latter will be a valuable resource to search for variable stars across the sky, including eclipsing, reflecting, and beaming binary stars.

  8. The Equations of Motion of Compact Binaries in the Neighborhood of Supermassive Black Hole

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsievich, Alexander; Bobrik, Alexey

    2010-03-24

    By the use of Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann method, the equations of motion of a binary star system in the field of a supermassive black hole are derived. In spite of the fact that the motion of a binary system as a whole can be relativistic or even ultra-relativistic with respect to the supermassive black hole, it is shown, that under the assumption of non-relativistic relative motion of the stars in binary system, the motion of the binary system as a whole satisfies the Mathisson-Papapetrou equations with additional terms depending on quadrupole moments. Exemplary case of ultrarelativistic motion of a binary neutron star in the vicinity of non-rotating black hole is considered. It it shown that the motion of binary's center of mass may considerably differ from geodesic motion.

  9. Bidirectional motion observed in the compact symmetric object 1946+708.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G B; Vermeulen, R C; Pearson, T J

    1995-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of bidirectional motions in an extragalactic radio jet. The radio source 1946+708 is a compact symmetric object with striking S-symmetry identified with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.101. From observations 2 years apart we have determined the velocities of four compact components in the jet, the fastest of which has an apparent velocity of 1.09 h-1c. By pairing up the components, assuming they were simultaneously ejected in opposite directions, we derive a 1 lower limit on the Hubble constant, H0 > 42 km.s-1.Mpc-1. PMID:11607603

  10. Search for Gravitational Waves from Low Mass Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO's Sixth Science Run and Virgo's Science Runs 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries using LIGO and Virgo observations between July 7, 2009, and October 20. 2010. We searched for signals from binaries with total mass between 2 and 25 Stellar Mass; this includes binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a black hole and neutron star. The detectors were sensitive to systems up to 40 Mpc distant for binary neutron stars, and further for higher mass systems. No gravitational-wave signals were detected. We report upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence as a function of total mass. including the results from previous LIGO and Virgo observations. The cumulative 90% confidence rate upper limits of the binary coalescence of binary neutron star, neutron star-black hole, and binary black hole systems are 1.3 x 10(exp -4), 3.1 x 10(exp -5), and 6.4 x 10(exp -6)/cu Mpc/yr, respectively. These upper limits are up to a factor 1.4 lower than previously derived limits. We also report on results from a blind injection challenge.

  11. Gravitational radiation reaction in the equations of motion of compact binaries to 3.5 post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissanke, Samaya; Blanchet, Luc

    2005-03-01

    We compute the radiation-reaction force on the orbital motion of compact binaries to the 3.5 post-Newtonian (3.5PN) approximation, i.e. one PN order beyond the dominant effect. The method is based on a direct PN iteration of the near-zone metric and equations of motion of an extended isolated system, using appropriate 'asymptotically matched' flat-spacetime retarded potentials. The formalism is subsequently applied to binary systems of point particles, with the help of the Hadamard self-field regularization. Our result is the 3.5PN acceleration term in a general harmonic coordinate frame. Restricting the expression to the centre-of-mass frame, we find perfect agreement with the result derived in a class of coordinate systems by Iyer and Will using the energy and angular-momentum balance equations.

  12. Using full information when computing modes of post-Newtonian waveforms from inspiralling compact binaries in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, Lawrence E.

    2008-02-15

    The increasing sophistication and accuracy of numerical simulations of compact binaries (especially binary black holes) presents the opportunity to test the regime in which post-Newtonian (PN) predictions for the emitted gravitational waves are accurate. In order to confront numerical results with those of post-Newtonian theory, it is convenient to compare multipolar decompositions of the two waveforms. It is pointed out here that the individual modes can be computed to higher post-Newtonian order by examining the radiative multipole moments of the system, rather than by decomposing the 2.5PN polarization waveforms. In particular, the dominant (l=2, m={+-}2) mode can be computed to 3PN order. Individual modes are computed to as high a post-Newtonian order as possible given previous post-Newtonian results.

  13. Casimir potential of a compact object enclosed by a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-11-15

    We study the electromagnetic Casimir interaction of a compact object contained inside a closed cavity of another compact object. We express the interaction energy in terms of the objects' scattering matrices and translation matrices that relate the coordinate systems appropriate to each object. When the enclosing object is an otherwise empty metallic spherical shell, much larger than the internal object, and the two are sufficiently separated, the Casimir force can be expressed in terms of the static electric and magnetic multipole polarizabilities of the internal object, which is analogous to the Casimir-Polder result. Although it is not a simple power law, the dependence of the force on the separation of the object from the containing sphere is a universal function of its displacement from the center of the sphere, independent of other details of the object's electromagnetic response. Furthermore, we compute the exact Casimir force between two metallic spheres contained one inside the other at arbitrary separations. Finally, we combine our results with earlier work on the Casimir force between two spheres to obtain data on the leading-order correction to the proximity force approximation for two metallic spheres both outside and within one another.

  14. Next-to-leading order spin-orbit and spin(a)-spin(b) Hamiltonians for n gravitating spinning compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, Johannes; Steinhoff, Jan

    2011-02-15

    We derive the post-Newtonian next-to-leading order conservative spin-orbit and spin(a)-spin(b) gravitational interaction Hamiltonians for arbitrary many compact objects. The spin-orbit Hamiltonian completes the knowledge of Hamiltonians up to and including 2.5 post Newtonian for the general relativistic three-body problem. The new Hamiltonians include highly nontrivial three-body interactions, in contrast to the leading order consisting of two-body interactions only. This may be important for the study of effects like Kozai resonances in mergers of black holes with binary black holes. The derivation was done via two independent methods giving fully consistent results.

  15. Binary neutron stars with generic spin, eccentricity, mass ratio, and compactness: Quasi-equilibrium sequences and first evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Moldenhauer, Niclas; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Markakis, Charalampos M.; Brügmann, Bernd; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Information about the last stages of a binary neutron star inspiral and the final merger can be extracted from quasiequilibrium configurations and dynamical evolutions. In this article, we construct quasiequilibrium configurations for different spins, eccentricities, mass ratios, compactnesses, and equations of state. For this purpose we employ the sgrid code, which allows us to construct such data in previously inaccessible regions of the parameter space. In particular, we consider spinning neutron stars in isolation and in binary systems; we incorporate new methods to produce highly eccentric and eccentricity-reduced data; we present the possibility of computing data for significantly unequal-mass binaries with mass ratios q ≃2 ; and we create equal-mass binaries with individual compactness up to C ≃0.23 . As a proof of principle, we explore the dynamical evolution of three new configurations. First, we simulate a q =2.06 mass ratio which is the highest mass ratio for a binary neutron star evolved in numerical relativity to date. We find that mass transfer from the companion star sets in a few revolutions before merger and a rest mass of ˜10-2M⊙ is transferred between the two stars. This amount of mass accretion corresponds to ˜1051 ergs of accretion energy. This configuration also ejects a large amount of material during merger (˜7.6 ×1 0-2M⊙), imparting a substantial kick to the remnant neutron star. Second, we simulate the first merger of a precessing binary neutron star. We present the dominant modes of the gravitational waves for the precessing simulation, where a clear imprint of the precession is visible in the (2,1) mode. Finally, we quantify the effect of an eccentricity-reduction procedure on the gravitational waveform. The procedure improves the waveform quality and should be employed in future precision studies. However, one also needs to reduce other errors in the waveforms, notably truncation errors, in order for the improvement due to

  16. Formalism for testing theories of gravity using lensing by compact objects. II. Probing post-post-Newtonian metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, Charles R.; Petters, A.O.

    2006-02-15

    We study gravitational lensing by compact objects in gravity theories that can be written in a post-post-Newtonian (PPN) framework: i.e., the metric is static and spherically symmetric, and can be written as a Taylor series in m /r, where m is the gravitational radius of the compact object. Working invariantly, we compute corrections to standard weak-deflection lensing observables at first and second order in the perturbation parameter {epsilon}={theta}/{theta}{sub E}, where {theta} is the angular gravitational radius and {theta}{sub E} is the angular Einstein ring radius of the lens. We show that the first-order corrections to the total magnification and centroid position vanish universally for gravity theories that can be written in the PPN framework. This arises from some surprising, fundamental relations among the lensing observables in PPN gravity models. We derive these relations for the image positions, magnifications, and time delays. A deep consequence is that any violation of the universal relations would signal the need for a gravity model outside the PPN framework (provided that some basic assumptions hold). In practical terms, the relations will guide observational programs to test general relativity, modified gravity theories, and possibly the cosmic censorship conjecture. We use the new relations to identify lensing observables that are accessible to current or near-future technology, and to find combinations of observables that are most useful for probing the spacetime metric. We give explicit applications to the galactic black hole, microlensing, and the binary pulsar J0737-3039.

  17. A search for pulsations from the compact object of GRB 060218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabal, N.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: A fraction of massive stars are expected to collapse into compact objects (accreting black holes or rapidly rotating neutron stars) that successfully produce gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We examine the possibility of directly observing these gamma-ray burst compact objects (GCOs) using post-explosion observations of past and future GRB sites. Methods: We present a search for early pulsations from the nearby (z=0.0335) gamma-ray burst GRB 060218, which exhibited features possibly consistent with a rapidly spinning neutron star as its underlying GCO. We also consider alternative techniques that could potentially achieve a detection of GCOs either in the Local Volume or near the plane of our own Galaxy. Results: We report the non-detection of pulsations from the GCO of GRB 060218. In particular, fast fourier transform analysis applied to the light curve shows no significant power over the range of frequencies 0.78 mHz < f < 227 Hz with an upper limit on the pulsed fraction of ~2%. In addition, we present detection limits of current high-resolution archival X-ray images of galaxies within the Local Volume. The existing data could be harnessed to rule out the presence of any background contaminants at the GRB position of future nearby events. Conclusions: The null detection of pulsations from the GCO of GRB 060218 is most likely explained by the fact that the afterglow emission occurs near the head of the jet and should be far removed from the compact object. We also find that the comparison of pre- and post-explosion explosion images of future GRBs within the Local Volume, as well as the firm identification of a GCO within an ancient GRB remnant near the Galactic plane are extremely challenging with current GeV/TeV capabilities. Finally, we conclude that only under some very exceptional circumstances will it be possible to directly detect the compact object responsible for gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Evolution and modelling of compacted binary mixture porosity. Application to pharmaceutical tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masteau, J.-C.; Thomas, G.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this work consists in following physical property variations in relation with geometrical textural parameters during pharmaceutical component compaction. Models are developed to explain porosity variations of granular media submitted to increasing uniaxial pressure. These models are based on reaction mechanisms analogous to these presented in quasi chemical descriptions. Vacancy annihilation occurring when pressure increases is studied in two cases (with or without internal grain porosity). Reaction mechanisms describing different granular rearrangement phenomena are proposed. The behaviour of pure compounds as well as that of binary mixtures are studied from a theoretical point of view, and the model results proposed in this case are compared with the ones derived from experiments. In particular mixtures of one excipient, lactose, and one active principle, ketoprofen, are analysed in order to estimate porosity evolution of such mixtures, and determine mixture effects on tablet properties. The prediction limits which could be done by mixture models giving an expected behaviour starting from pure components only are discussed. Des modèles sont présentés pour décrire les variations de propriétés physiques, dépendant de paramètres texturaux, pendant la compression de produits pharmaceutiques purs ou mélangés. Ils permettent d'expliquer les variations de porosité du milieu granulaire soumis à l'augmentation d'une pression uniaxiale dans une matrice. Ces modèles sont fondés sur des mécanismes de réactions analogues à celles utilisées en quasi-chimie. La disparition des lacunes, lorsque la pression augmente, est étudiée pour deux types de systèmes granulaires (avec ou sans porosité interne). Des mécanismes réactionnels décrivant les différents phénomènes de réarrangements granulaires sont présentés. Le comportement de produits purs et de mélanges binaires de poudres pures est étudié d'un point de vue théorique, et les r

  19. SUBARU AND GEMINI OBSERVATIONS OF SS 433: NEW CONSTRAINT ON THE MASS OF THE COMPACT OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, K.; Ueda, Y.; Fabrika, S.; Barsukova, E. A.; Sholukhova, O.; Medvedev, A.; Goranskij, V. P.

    2010-02-01

    We present results of optical spectroscopic observations of the mass donor star in SS 433 with Subaru and Gemini, with an aim to best constrain the mass of the compact object. Subaru/Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph observations were performed on four nights of 2007 October 6-8 and 10, covering the orbital phase of phi = 0.96 - 0.26. We first calculate the cross-correlation function (CCF) of these spectra with that of the reference star HD 9233 in the wavelength range of 4740-4840 A. This region is selected to avoid 'strong' absorption lines accompanied with contaminating emission components, which most probably originate from the surroundings of the donor star, such as the wind and gas stream. The same analysis is applied to archive data of Gemini/GMOS taken at phi = 0.84 - 0.30 by Hillwig and Gies. From the Subaru and Gemini CCF results, the amplitude of the radial velocity curve of the donor star is determined to be 58.3 +- 3.8 km s{sup -1} with a systemic velocity of 59.2 +- 2.5 km s{sup -1}. Together with the radial velocity curve of the compact object, we derive the mass of the donor star and compact object to be M{sub O} = 12.4 +- 1.9 M{sub sun} and M{sub X} = 4.3 +- 0.6 M{sub sun}, respectively. We conclude, however, that these values should be taken as upper limits. From the analysis of the averaged absorption line profiles of strong lines (mostly ions) and weak lines (mostly neutrals) observed with Subaru, we find evidence for heating effects from the compact object. Using a simple model, we find that the true radial velocity amplitude of the donor star could be as low as 40 +- 5 km s{sup -1} in order to produce the observed absorption-line profiles. Taking into account the heating of the donor star may lower the derived masses to M{sub O} = 10.4{sup +2.3}{sub -1.9} M{sub sun} and M{sub X} = 2.5{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} M{sub sun}. Our final constraint, 1.9 M{sub sun} <=M{sub X}<= 4.9 M{sub sun}, indicates that the compact object in SS 433 is most likely a

  20. Faster implementation of the hierarchical search algorithm for detection of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Anand S.; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Lazzarini, Albert

    2003-04-01

    The first scientific runs of kilometer scale laser interferometric detectors such as LIGO are under way. Data from these detectors will be used to look for signatures of gravitational waves from astrophysical objects such as inspiraling neutron-star black-hole binaries using matched filtering. The computational resources required for online flat-search implementation of the matched filtering are large if searches are carried out for a small total mass. A flat search is implemented by constructing a single discrete grid of densely populated template waveforms spanning the dynamical parameters—masses, spins—which are correlated with the interferometer data. The correlations over the kinematical parameters can be maximized a prioriwithout constructing a template bank over them. Mohanty and Dhurandhar showed that a significant reduction in computational resources can be accomplished by using a hierarchy of such template banks where candidate events triggered by a sparsely populated grid are followed up by the regular, dense flat-search grid. The estimated speedup in this method was a factor ˜25 over the flat search. In this paper we report an improved implementation of the hierarchical search, wherein we extend the domain of hierarchy to an extra dimension—namely, the time of arrival of the signal in the bandwidth of the interferometer. This is accomplished by lowering the Nyquist sampling rate of the signal in the trigger stage. We show that this leads to further improvement in the efficiency of data analysis and speeds up the online computation by a factor of ˜65 70 over the flat search. We also take into account and discuss issues related to template placement, trigger thresholds, and other peculiar problems that do not arise in earlier implementation schemes of the hierarchical search. We present simulation results for 2PN waveforms embedded in the noise expected for initial LIGO detectors.

  1. Using electromagnetic observations to aid gravitational-wave parameter estimation of compact binaries observed with LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; van der Sluys, M.; Nelemans, G.

    2012-08-01

    We present a first-stage study of the effect of using knowledge from electromagnetic (EM) observations in the gravitational wave (GW) data analysis of Galactic binaries that are predicted to be observed by the new Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) in the low-frequency range, 10-4 Hz < f < 1 Hz. In particular, we examine the extent to which the accuracy of GW parameter estimation improves if we use available information from EM data. We do this by investigating whether correlations exist between the GW parameters that describe these binaries and whether some of these parameters are also available from EM observations. We used verification binaries, which are known as the guaranteed sources for eLISA and will test the functioning of the instrument. We find that of the seven parameters that characterise such a binary, only a few are correlated. The most useful result is the strong correlation between amplitude and inclination, which can be used to constrain the parameter uncertainty in amplitude by making use of the constraint of inclination from EM measurements. The improvement can be up to a factor of ~6.5, but depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the source data. Moreover, we find that this strong correlation depends on the inclination. For mildly face-on binaries (ι ≲ 45°), EM data on inclination can improve the estimate of the GW amplitude by a significant factor. However, for edge-on binaries (ι ~ 90°), the inclination can be determined accurately from GW data alone, thus GW data can be used to select systems that will likely be eclipsing binaries for EM follow-up.

  2. Micro-tidal Disruption Events by Stellar Compact Objects and the Production of Ultra-long GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.; Li, Zhuo; Lombardi, James C., Jr.; Milcarek, Stephen R., Jr.

    2016-06-01

    We explore full/partial tidal disruption events (TDEs) of stars/planets by stellar compact objects (black holes (BHs) or neutron stars (NSs)), which we term micro-TDEs. Disruption of a star/planet with mass M ⋆ may lead to the formation of a debris disk around the BH/NS. Efficient accretion of a fraction ({f}{acc}=0.1 of the debris may then give rise to bright, energetic, long (103–104 s), X-ray/gamma-ray flares, with total energies of up to ({f}{acc}/0.1)× {10}52 ({M}\\star /0.6 {M}ȯ ) erg, possibly resembling ultra-long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)/X-ray flashes (XRFs). The energy of such flares depends on the poorly constrained accretion processes. Significantly fainter flares might be produced if most of the disk mass is blown away through strong outflows. We suggest three dynamical origins for such disruptions. In the first, a star/planet is tidally disrupted following a close random encounter with a BH/NS in a dense cluster. We estimate the BH (NS) micro-TDE rates from this scenario to be a few × {10}-6 (a few × {10}-7) {{{yr}}}-1 per Milky Way galaxy. Another scenario involves the interaction of wide companions due to perturbations by stars in the field, likely producing comparable but lower rates. Finally, a third scenario involves a BH/NS that gains a natal velocity kick at birth, leading to a close encounter with a binary companion and the tidal disruption of that companion. Such events could be associated with a supernova, or even with a preceding GRB/XRF event, and would likely occur hours to days after the prompt explosion; the rates of such events could be larger than those obtained from the other scenarios, depending on the preceding complex binary stellar evolution.

  3. Micro-tidal Disruption Events by Stellar Compact Objects and the Production of Ultra-long GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.; Li, Zhuo; Lombardi, James C., Jr.; Milcarek, Stephen R., Jr.

    2016-06-01

    We explore full/partial tidal disruption events (TDEs) of stars/planets by stellar compact objects (black holes (BHs) or neutron stars (NSs)), which we term micro-TDEs. Disruption of a star/planet with mass M ⋆ may lead to the formation of a debris disk around the BH/NS. Efficient accretion of a fraction ({f}{acc}=0.1 of the debris may then give rise to bright, energetic, long (103-104 s), X-ray/gamma-ray flares, with total energies of up to ({f}{acc}/0.1)× {10}52 ({M}\\star /0.6 {M}⊙ ) erg, possibly resembling ultra-long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)/X-ray flashes (XRFs). The energy of such flares depends on the poorly constrained accretion processes. Significantly fainter flares might be produced if most of the disk mass is blown away through strong outflows. We suggest three dynamical origins for such disruptions. In the first, a star/planet is tidally disrupted following a close random encounter with a BH/NS in a dense cluster. We estimate the BH (NS) micro-TDE rates from this scenario to be a few × {10}-6 (a few × {10}-7) {{{yr}}}-1 per Milky Way galaxy. Another scenario involves the interaction of wide companions due to perturbations by stars in the field, likely producing comparable but lower rates. Finally, a third scenario involves a BH/NS that gains a natal velocity kick at birth, leading to a close encounter with a binary companion and the tidal disruption of that companion. Such events could be associated with a supernova, or even with a preceding GRB/XRF event, and would likely occur hours to days after the prompt explosion; the rates of such events could be larger than those obtained from the other scenarios, depending on the preceding complex binary stellar evolution.

  4. Nonprecessional spin-orbit effects on gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Benjamin J.; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Ohashi, Akira

    1998-05-01

    We derive all second post-Newtonian (2PN), non-precessional effects of spin-orbit coupling on the gravitational waveforms emitted by an inspiraling binary composed of spinning, compact bodies in a quasicircular orbit. Previous post-Newtonian calculations of spin-orbit effects (at 1.5PN order) relied on a fluid description of the spinning bodies. We simplify the calculations by introducing into post-Newtonian theory a δ-function description of the influence of the spins on the bodies' energy-momentum tensor. This description was recently used by Mino, Shibata, and Tanaka (MST) in Teukolsky-formalism analyses of particles orbiting massive black holes, and is based on prior work by Dixon. We compute the 2PN contributions to the waveforms by combining the MST energy-momentum tensor with the formalism of Blanchet, Damour, and Iyer for evaluating the binary's radiative multipoles, and with the well-known 1.5PN order equations of motion for the binary. Our results contribute at 2PN order only to the amplitudes of the waveforms. The secular evolution of the waveforms' phase-the quantity most accurately measurable by LIGO-is not affected by our results until 2.5PN order, at which point other spin-orbit effects also come into play. We plan to evaluate the entire 2.5PN spin-orbit contribution to the secular phase evolution in a future paper, using the techniques of this paper.

  5. Resonant-plane locking and spin alignment in stellar-mass black-hole binaries: A diagnostic of compact-binary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Kesden, Michael; Berti, Emanuele; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    We study the influence of astrophysical formation scenarios on the precessional dynamics of spinning black-hole binaries by the time they enter the observational window of second- and third-generation gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO/Virgo, LIGO-India, KAGRA, and the Einstein Telescope. Under the plausible assumption that tidal interactions are efficient at aligning the spins of few-solar mass black-hole progenitors with the orbital angular momentum, we find that black-hole spins should be expected to preferentially lie in a plane when they become detectable by gravitational-wave interferometers. This “resonant plane” is identified by the conditions ΔΦ=0° or ΔΦ=±180°, where ΔΦ is the angle between the components of the black-hole spins in the plane orthogonal to the orbital angular momentum. If the angles ΔΦ can be accurately measured for a large sample of gravitational-wave detections, their distribution will constrain models of compact binary formation. In particular, it will tell us whether tidal interactions are efficient and whether a mechanism such as mass transfer, stellar winds, or supernovae can induce a mass-ratio reversal (so that the heavier black hole is produced by the initially lighter stellar progenitor). Therefore, our model offers a concrete observational link between gravitational-wave measurements and astrophysics. We also hope that it will stimulate further studies of precessional dynamics, gravitational-wave template placement, and parameter estimation for binaries locked in the resonant plane.

  6. Prediction of mechanical properties of compacted binary mixtures containing high-dose poorly compressible drug.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2011-01-17

    The aim of the study was to develop, compare and validate predictive model for mechanical property of binary systems. The mechanical properties of binary mixtures of ibuprofen (IBN) a poorly compressible high dose drug, were studied in presence of different excipients. The tensile strength of tablets of individual components viz. IBN, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP) and binary mixtures of IBN with excipients was measured at various relative densities. Prediction of the mechanical property of binary mixtures, from that of single components, was attempted using Ryshkewitch-Duckworth (R-D) and Percolation theory, by assuming a linear mixing rule or a power law mixing rule. The models were compared, and the best model was proposed based on the distribution of residuals and the Akaike's information criterion. Good predictions were obtained with the power law combined with linear mixing rule, using R-D and Percolation models. The results indicated that the proposed model can well predict the mechanical properties of binary system containing predominantly poorly compressible drug candidate. The predictions of these models and conclusions can be systematically generalized to other pharmaceutical powders.

  7. HIDES spectroscopy of bright detached eclipsing binaries from the Kepler field - I. Single-lined objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Sybilski, P.; Ratajczak, M.; Maehara, H.; Konacki, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of our spectroscopic observations of nine detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, that only show one set of spectral lines. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from the high-resolution spectra obtained with the HIgh-Dispersion Echelle Spectrograph (HIDES) instrument, attached to the 1.88-m telescope at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and from the public Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment archive. In our sample, we found five single-lined binaries, with one component dominating the spectrum. The orbital and light-curve solutions were found for four of them, and compared with isochrones, in order to estimate absolute physical parameters and evolutionary status of the components. For the fifth case, we only update the orbital parameters, and estimate the properties of the unseen star. Two other systems show orbital motion with a period known from the eclipse timing variations (ETVs). For these we obtained parameters of outer orbits, by translating the ETVs to RVs of the centre of mass of the eclipsing binary, and combining with the RVs of the outer star. Of the two remaining ones, one is most likely a blend of a faint background DEB with a bright foreground star, which lines we see in the spectra, and the last case is possibly a quadruple bearing a sub-stellar mass object. Where possible, we compare our results with literature, especially with results from asteroseismology. We also report possible detections of solar-like oscillations in our RVs.

  8. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Compact bodies which are not at rest compare to an homogeneous ambient environment are believed to undergo Bondi-Hoyle axisymmetric accretion as soon as their relative velocity reaches supersonic levels. Contrary to its spherical counterpart, B-H accretion presents flow structures difficult to analytically derive, hence the need for numerical investigations. The broad dynamics at stake when a tiny compact object engulfs surrounding material at a much larger scale has made numerical consistency a polemical issue as it has prevented both scales to be grasped for reasonable wind velocities. We designed a numerical setup which reconciliates the requirement for finite size accretor with steady states properties of the Bondi-Hoyle flow independent of the size of the inner boundary. The robustness of this setup is evaluated accordingly to predictions concerning the mass accretion rate evolution with the Mach number at infinity and the topology of the sonic surface as determined by te{Foglizzo1996}. It provides an estimation of the mass accretion rates and thus, of the expected X-ray luminosity for an idealized B-H configuration which might not be too far off for isolated compact objects like runaway neutron stars or hyper-luminous X-ray sources.

  9. The number of O-type runaways, the number of O and Wolf-Rayet stars with a compact companion and the formation rate of double pulsars predicted by massive close binary evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donder, E.; Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.

    1997-02-01

    Using a detailed model of massive close binary evolution and accounting properly for the effects of asymmetric supernova explosions (SN) where we use recent observations of pulsar runaway velocities, we determine the theoretically expected number of post-SN O-type stars with and without a compact companion (CC), the number of O-type runaways, the number of WR+CC systems and the formation rate of binary pulsars in our Galaxy. We conclude that o at least 50% of the O-type runaways are formed through the binary scenario, o less than 3% of all WR stars may hide a CC, o the formation rate of binary pulsars in our Galaxy =~0.003-0.01 times the formation rate of massive stars; this corresponds roughly to a binary pulsar formation rate of the order of 10^-5^/year in agreement with the observations. Our results reveal a significant fraction of single WR stars but with a binary history. We also predict the existence of 'weird' WR stars, i.e a WR star with a CC in its centre (descendants of Thorne-˙(Z)ytkow objects).

  10. Properties of long gamma-ray bursts from massive compact binaries.

    PubMed

    Church, Ross P; Levan, Andrew J; Davies, Melvyn B; Kim, Chunglee

    2013-06-13

    We consider the implications of a model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts in which the progenitor is spun up in a close binary by tidal interactions with a massive black-hole companion. We investigate a sample of such binaries produced by a binary population synthesis, and show that the model predicts several common features in the accretion on to the newly formed black hole. In all cases, the accretion rate declines as approximately t(-5/3) until a break at a time of order 10(4) s. The accretion rate declines steeply thereafter. Subsequently, there is flaring activity, with the flare peaking between 10(4) and 10(5) s, the peak time being correlated with the flare energy. We show that these times are set by the semi-major axis of the binary, and hence the process of tidal spin-up; furthermore, they are consistent with flares seen in the X-ray light curves of some long gamma-ray bursts. PMID:23630369

  11. Properties of long gamma-ray bursts from massive compact binaries.

    PubMed

    Church, Ross P; Levan, Andrew J; Davies, Melvyn B; Kim, Chunglee

    2013-06-13

    We consider the implications of a model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts in which the progenitor is spun up in a close binary by tidal interactions with a massive black-hole companion. We investigate a sample of such binaries produced by a binary population synthesis, and show that the model predicts several common features in the accretion on to the newly formed black hole. In all cases, the accretion rate declines as approximately t(-5/3) until a break at a time of order 10(4) s. The accretion rate declines steeply thereafter. Subsequently, there is flaring activity, with the flare peaking between 10(4) and 10(5) s, the peak time being correlated with the flare energy. We show that these times are set by the semi-major axis of the binary, and hence the process of tidal spin-up; furthermore, they are consistent with flares seen in the X-ray light curves of some long gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Analysis of objects in binary images. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Desiree M.

    1991-01-01

    Digital image processing techniques are typically used to produce improved digital images through the application of successive enhancement techniques to a given image or to generate quantitative data about the objects within that image. In support of and to assist researchers in a wide range of disciplines, e.g., interferometry, heavy rain effects on aerodynamics, and structure recognition research, it is often desirable to count objects in an image and compute their geometric properties. Therefore, an image analysis application package, focusing on a subset of image analysis techniques used for object recognition in binary images, was developed. This report describes the techniques and algorithms utilized in three main phases of the application and are categorized as: image segmentation, object recognition, and quantitative analysis. Appendices provide supplemental formulas for the algorithms employed as well as examples and results from the various image segmentation techniques and the object recognition algorithm implemented.

  13. An X-ray View of the Zoo of Compact Objects and Associated Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse explosions of massive stars leave behind some of the most exotic compact objects in the Universe. These include: rotation-powered pulsars like the Crab, powering pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) observed across the electromagnetic spectrum; highly magnetized neutron stars ("magnetars") shining or bursting at high-energies; and X-ray emitting “Central Compact Objects” (CCOs) with intrinsic properties and emission mechanism that remain largely unknown. I will highlight this observed diversity of compact stellar remnants from an X-ray perspective, and address the connection between their properties and those of their hosting supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular I will highlight topics related to their formation and evolution, including: 1) which supernovae make magnetars and the shell-less PWNe?, 2) what can we learn from the apparent age discrepancy between SNRs and their associated pulsars? I will conclude with prospects for observations of SNRs with the upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray mission. The unprecedented spectral resolution on board of ASTRO-H’s micro-calorimeter will particularly open a new discovery window for supernova progenitors' science.

  14. COMPACT OBJECT COALESCENCE RATE ESTIMATION FROM SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, Carlo Enrico; Dietz, Alexander; Cavaglia, Marco

    2013-04-20

    Recent observational and theoretical results suggest that short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) originate from the merger of compact binary systems of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. The observation of SGRBs with known redshifts allows astronomers to infer the merger rate of these systems in the local universe. We use data from the SWIFT satellite to estimate this rate to be in the range {approx}500-1500 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. This result is consistent with earlier published results which were obtained through alternative approaches. We estimate the number of coincident observations of gravitational-wave signals with SGRBs in the advanced gravitational-wave detector era. By assuming that all SGRBs are created by neutron star-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) mergers, we estimate the expected rate of coincident observations to be in the range {approx_equal} 0.2-1 ({approx_equal} 1-3) yr{sup -1}.

  15. A central compact object in Kes 79: the hypercritical regime and neutrino expectation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, C. G.; Fraija, N.

    2016-11-01

    We present magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a strong accretion on to magnetized proto-neutron stars for the Kesteven 79 (Kes 79) scenario. The supernova remnant Kes 79, observed with the Chandra ACIS-I instrument during approximately 8.3 h, is located in the constellation Aquila at a distance of 7.1 kpc in the galactic plane. It is a galactic and a very young object with an estimate age of 6 kyr. The Chandra image has revealed, for the first time, a point-like source at the centre of the remnant. The Kes 79 compact remnant belongs to a special class of objects, the so-called central compact objects (CCOs), which exhibits no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. In this work, we show that the submergence of the magnetic field during the hypercritical phase can explain such behaviour for Kes 79 and others CCOs. The simulations of such regime were carried out with the adaptive-mesh-refinement code FLASH in two spatial dimensions, including radiative loss by neutrinos and an adequate equation of state for such regime. From the simulations, we estimate that the number of thermal neutrinos expected on the Hyper-Kamiokande Experiment is 733 ± 364. In addition, we compute the flavour ratio on Earth for a progenitor model.

  16. A central compact object in the center of a new supernova remnant shell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    2010-10-01

    We propose timing observations of the point-like central X-ray source discovered in the center of a newly identified supernova remnant shell HESS J1731-347 / G353.6-0.7. The source most likely belongs to a yet very small class of so-called Central Compact Objects (CCOs) - presumably young thermally emitting low-magnetized neutron stars born in supernova explosions which produced the remnants. Since only a handful of CCOs are currently known any addition to this class is highly valuable. With the proposed observation we like to search for expected but not yet identified pulsations of this putative neutron star.

  17. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  18. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-01

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory "Dulkyn" which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  19. First spectroscopy of a short-hard GRB: the environment of a compact object merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Thöne, Christina C.; Rowllinson, Antonia; Benito, Rubén García; Levan, Andrew J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Goldoni, Paolo; Schulze, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely elusive family of cosmic explosions. They are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects (such as a neutron stars or black holes). Their optical counterparts were not discovered until 2005, and since then, there had been no successful spectroscopic observations. Here we present the first spectra of a short GRB, which we use to study the environment and derive implications on the progenitors of these cosmic explosions. This poster is based on the work by de Ugarte Postigo et al. (2014).

  20. Head-on infall of two compact objects: Third post-Newtonian energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Iyer, Bala R.

    2010-11-15

    Head-on infall of two compact objects with arbitrary mass ratio is investigated using the multipolar post-Minkowskian approximation method. At the third post-Newtonian order the energy flux, in addition to the instantaneous contributions, also includes hereditary contributions consisting of the gravitational-wave tails, tails-of-tails, and the tail-squared terms. The results are given both for infall from infinity and also for infall from a finite distance. These analytical expressions should be useful for the comparison with the high accuracy numerical relativity results within the limit in which post-Newtonian approximations are valid.

  1. Reconstructing the Sky Location of Gravitational-Wave Detected Compact Binary Systems: Methodology for Testing and Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidney, T.; Aylott, B.; Christensen, N.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Feroz, F.; Gair, J.; Grover, K.; Graff, P.; Hanna, C.; Kalogera, V.; Mandel, I.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Pitkin, M.; Price, L.; Raymond, V.; Roever, C.; Singer, L.; vanderSluys, M.; Smith, R. J. E.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Vitale, S.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of reconstructing the sky position of compact binary coalescences detected via gravitational waves is a central one for future observations with the ground-based network of gravitational-wave laser interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Different techniques for sky localization have been independently developed. They can be divided in two broad categories: fully coherent Bayesian techniques, which are high latency and aimed at in-depth studies of all the parameters of a source, including sky position, and "triangulation-based" techniques, which exploit the data products from the search stage of the analysis to provide an almost real-time approximation of the posterior probability density function of the sky location of a detection candidate. These techniques have previously been applied to data collected during the last science runs of gravitational-wave detectors operating in the so-called initial configuration. Here, we develop and analyze methods for assessing the self consistency of parameter estimation methods and carrying out fair comparisons between different algorithms, addressing issues of efficiency and optimality. These methods are general, and can be applied to parameter estimation problems other than sky localization. We apply these methods to two existing sky localization techniques representing the two above-mentioned categories, using a set of simulated inspiralonly signals from compact binary systems with a total mass of equal to or less than 20M solar mass and nonspinning components. We compare the relative advantages and costs of the two techniques and show that sky location uncertainties are on average a factor approx. equals 20 smaller for fully coherent techniques than for the specific variant of the triangulation-based technique used during the last science runs, at the expense of a factor approx. equals 1000 longer processing time.

  2. Reconstructing the sky location of gravitational-wave detected compact binary systems: Methodology for testing and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidery, T.; Aylott, B.; Christensen, N.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Feroz, F.; Gair, J.; Grover, K.; Graff, P.; Hanna, C.; Kalogera, V.; Mandel, I.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Pitkin, M.; Price, L.; Raymond, V.; Röver, C.; Singer, L.; van der Sluys, M.; Smith, R. J. E.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Vitale, S.

    2014-04-01

    The problem of reconstructing the sky position of compact binary coalescences detected via gravitational waves is a central one for future observations with the ground-based network of gravitational-wave laser interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Different techniques for sky localization have been independently developed. They can be divided in two broad categories: fully coherent Bayesian techniques, which are high latency and aimed at in-depth studies of all the parameters of a source, including sky position, and "triangulation-based" techniques, which exploit the data products from the search stage of the analysis to provide an almost real-time approximation of the posterior probability density function of the sky location of a detection candidate. These techniques have previously been applied to data collected during the last science runs of gravitational-wave detectors operating in the so-called initial configuration. Here, we develop and analyze methods for assessing the self consistency of parameter estimation methods and carrying out fair comparisons between different algorithms, addressing issues of efficiency and optimality. These methods are general, and can be applied to parameter estimation problems other than sky localization. We apply these methods to two existing sky localization techniques representing the two above-mentioned categories, using a set of simulated inspiral-only signals from compact binary systems with a total mass of ≤20M⊙ and nonspinning components. We compare the relative advantages and costs of the two techniques and show that sky location uncertainties are on average a factor ≈20 smaller for fully coherent techniques than for the specific variant of the triangulation-based technique used during the last science runs, at the expense of a factor ≈1000 longer processing time.

  3. THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY ORION PROJECT: ECLIPSING BINARIES AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; RamIrez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, Steve B.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2011-08-15

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3.{sup 0}5 x 2.{sup 0}3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 {+-} 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known

  4. Time evolution of accreting magnetofluid around a compact object-Newtonian analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Fahimeh; Shaghaghian, Mahboobeh; Pazhouhesh, Reza

    2015-07-01

    Time evolution of a thick disc with finite conductivity around a nonrotating compact object is presented. Along with the Maxwell equations and the Ohm's law, the Newtonian limit of the relativistic fluid equations governing the motion of a finitely conducting plasma is derived. The magnetofluid is considered to possess only the poloidal components of the electromagnetic field. Moreover, the shear viscous stress is neglected, as well as the self-gravity of the disc. In order to solve the equations, we have used a self-similar solution. The main features of this solution are as follows. The azimuthal velocity is somewhat increased from the Keplerian value in the equator plane to the super-Keplerian values at the surface of disc. Moreover, the radial velocity is obtained proportional to the meridional velocity. Magnetofluid does not have any nonzero component of the current density. Subsequently, the electromagnetic force is vanished and does not play any role in the force balance. While the pressure gradient maintains the disc structure in latitudinal direction, magnetofluid has no accretion on the central compact object. Analogously to the parameter α in the standard model, our calculations contain one parameter η0 which specifies the size of the electrical resistivity.

  5. Accretion-driven gravitational radiation from nonrotating compact objects: Infalling quadrupolar shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Díaz, Guillermo; Pons, José A.; Font, José A.

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports results from numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation emitted from non-rotating compact objects (both neutron stars and Schwarzschild black holes) as a result of the accretion of matter. We adopt a hybrid procedure in which we evolve numerically, and assuming axisymmetry, the linearized equations describing metric and fluid perturbations coupled to a fully nonlinear hydrodynamics code that calculates the motion of the accreting matter. The initial matter distribution, which is initially at rest, is shaped in the form of extended quadrupolar shells of either dust or obeying a perfect fluid equation of state. Self-gravity of the accreting layers of fluid is neglected, as well as radiation reaction effects. We use this idealized setup in order to understand the qualitative features appearing in the energy spectrum of the gravitational wave emission from compact stars or black holes, subject to accretion processes involving extended objects. A comparison for the case of point-like particles falling radially onto black holes is also provided. Our results show that, when the central object is a black hole, the spectrum is far from having only one clear, monochromatic peak at the frequency of the fundamental quasi-normal mode. On the contrary, it shows a complex pattern, with distinctive interference fringes produced by the interaction between the infalling matter and the underlying perturbed spacetime, in close agreement with results for point-like particles. Remarkably, most of the energy is emitted at frequencies lower than that of the fundamental mode of the black hole. Similar results are obtained for extended shells accreting onto neutron stars, but in this case the contribution of the stellar fundamental mode stands clearly in the energy spectrum. Our analysis illustrates that the gravitational wave signal driven by accretion onto compact objects is influenced more by the details and dynamics of the process, and the external

  6. Parameter estimation of inspiralling compact binaries using 3.5 post-Newtonian gravitational wave phasing: The nonspinning case

    SciTech Connect

    Arun, K.G.; Iyer, Bala R; Sathyaprakash, B.S.; Sundararajan, Pranesh A

    2005-04-15

    We revisit the problem of parameter estimation of gravitational-wave chirp signals from inspiralling nonspinning compact binaries in the light of the recent extension of the post-Newtonian (PN) phasing formula to order (v/c){sup 7} beyond the leading Newtonian order. We study in detail the implications of higher post-Newtonian orders from 1PN up to 3.5PN in steps of 0.5PN ({approx}v/c), and examine their convergence. In both initial and advanced detectors the estimation of the chirp mass (M) and symmetric mass ratio ({eta}) improve at higher PN orders but oscillate with every half-a-PN order. In initial LIGO, for a 10M{sub {center_dot}}-10M{sub {center_dot}} binary at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10, the improvement in the estimation of M ({eta}) at 3.5PN relative to 2PN is {approx}19% (52%). We compare parameter estimation in different detectors and assess their relative performance in two different ways: at a fixed SNR, with the aim of understanding how the bandwidth improves parameter estimation, and for a fixed source, to gauge the importance of sensitivity. Errors in parameter estimation at a fixed SNR are smaller for VIRGO than for both initial and advanced LIGO. This is because of the larger bandwidth over which it observes the signals. However, for sources at a fixed distance it is advanced LIGO that achieves the lowest errors owing to its greater sensitivity. Finally, we compute the amplitude corrections due to the 'frequency-sweep' in the Fourier domain representation of the waveform within the stationary phase approximation and discuss its implication on parameter estimation. We find that the amplitude corrections change the errors in M and {eta} by less than 10% for initial LIGO at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. Our analysis makes explicit the significance of higher PN order modeling of the inspiralling compact binary on parameter estimation.

  7. [Objective assessment of facial paralysis using local binary pattern in infrared thermography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xulong; Hong, Wenxue; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Zhenying

    2013-02-01

    Facial paralysis is a frequently-occurring disease, which causes the loss of the voluntary muscles on one side of the face due to the damages the facial nerve and results in an inability to close the eye and leads to dropping of the angle of the mouth. There have been few objective methods to quantitatively diagnose it and assess this disease for clinically treating the patients so far. The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Facial paralysis usually causes an alteration of the temperature distribution of body with the disease. This paper presents the use of the histogram distance of bilateral local binary pattern (LBP) in the facial infrared thermography to measure the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution for objective assessing the severity of facial paralysis. Using this new method, we performed a controlled trial to assess the facial nerve function of the healthy subjects and the patients with Bell's palsy respectively. The results showed that the mean sensitivity and specificity of this method are 0.86 and 0.89 respectively. The correlation coefficient between the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution and the severity of facial paralysis is an average of 0.657. Therefore, the histogram distance of local binary pattern in the facial infrared thermography is an efficient clinical indicator with respect to the diagnosis and assessment of facial paralysis.

  8. Comparison of post-Newtonian templates for compact binary inspiral signals in gravitational-wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Ochsner, Evan; Pan Yi; Iyer, Bala R.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2009-10-15

    The two-body dynamics in general relativity has been solved perturbatively using the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation. The evolution of the orbital phase and the emitted gravitational radiation are now known to a rather high order up to O(v{sup 8}), v being the characteristic velocity of the binary. The orbital evolution, however, cannot be specified uniquely due to the inherent freedom in the choice of parameter used in the PN expansion, as well as the method pursued in solving the relevant differential equations. The goal of this paper is to determine the (dis)agreement between different PN waveform families in the context of initial and advanced gravitational-wave detectors. The waveforms employed in our analysis are those that are currently used by Initial LIGO/Virgo, that is, the time-domain PN models TaylorT1, TaylorT2, TaylorT3, the Fourier-domain representation TaylorF2 (or stationary phase approximant), and the effective-one-body model, and two more recent models, TaylorT4 and TaylorEt. For these models we examine their overlaps with one another for a number of different binaries at 2PN, 3PN, and 3.5PN orders to quantify their differences. We then study the overlaps of these families with the prototype effective-one-body family, currently used by Initial LIGO, calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations to help us decide whether there exist preferred families, in terms of detectability and computational cost, that are the most appropriate as search templates. We conclude that as long as the total mass remains less than a certain upper limit M{sub crit}, all template families at 3.5PN order (except TaylorT3 and TaylorEt) are equally good for the purpose of detection. The value of M{sub crit} is found to be {approx}12M{sub {center_dot}} for Initial, Enhanced, and Advanced LIGO. From a purely computational point of view, we recommend that 3.5PN TaylorF2 be used below M{sub crit} and that the effective-one-body model calibrated to numerical

  9. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF MAXI J1659-152: A COMPACT BINARY WITH A BLACK HOLE ACCRETOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kennea, J. A.; Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P. A.; Curran, P. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-07-20

    We report on the detection and follow-up high-cadence monitoring observations of MAXI J1659-152, a bright Galactic X-ray binary transient with a likely black hole accretor, by Swift over a 27 day period after its initial outburst detection. MAXI J1659-152 was discovered almost simultaneously by Swift and the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image on 2010 September 25, and was monitored intensively from the early stages of the outburst through the rise to a brightness of {approx}0.5 Crab by the Swift X-ray, UV/Optical, and the hard X-ray Burst Alert Telescopes. We present temporal and spectral analysis of the Swift observations. The broadband light curves show variability characteristic of black hole candidate transients. We present the evolution of thermal and non-thermal components of the 0.5-150 keV combined X-ray spectra during the outburst. MAXI J1659-152 displays accretion state changes typically associated with black hole binaries, transitioning from its initial detection in the hard state, to the steep power-law state, followed by a slow evolution toward the thermal state, signified by an increasingly dominant thermal component associated with the accretion disk, although this state change did not complete before Swift observations ended. We observe an anti-correlation between the increasing temperature and decreasing radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk, suggesting that the inner edge of the accretion disk infalls toward the black hole as the disk temperature increases. We observed significant evolution in the absorption column during the initial rise of the outburst, with the absorption almost doubling, suggestive of the presence of an evolving wind from the accretion disk. We detect quasi-periodic oscillations that evolve with the outburst, as well as irregular shaped dips that recur with a period of 2.42 {+-} 0.09 hr, strongly suggesting an orbital period that would make MAXI J1659-152 the shortest period black hole binary yet known.

  10. On the Nature of the Compact Object in SS 433. Observational Evidence of X-Ray Photon Index Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray spectral properties observed from black hole , candidate (BHC) binary SS 433. We have analyzed Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) data from this source, coordinated with Green Bank Interferometer/RATAN-600. We show that SS 433 undergoes a X-ray spectral transition from the low hard state (LHS) to the intermediate state (IS). We show that the X-ray broad-band energy spectra during all spectral states are well fit by a sum of so called "Bulk Motion Comptonization (BMC) component" and by two (broad and narrow) Gaussians for the continuum and line emissions respectively. In addition to these spectral model components we also find a strong feature that we identify as a" blackbody-like (BB)" component which color temperature is in the range of 4-5 keV in 24 IS spectra during the radio outburst decay in SS 433. Our observational results on the "high temperature BB" bump leads us to suggest the presence of gravitationally redshifted annihilation line emission in this source. In fact this spectral feature has been recently reproduced in Monte Carlo simulations by Laurent and Titarchuk. We have also established the photon index saturation at about 2.3 in index vs mass accretion correlation. This index-mass accretion correlation allows us to evaluate the low limit of black hole (BH) mass of compact object in SS 433, M(sub bh) approximately > 2 solar masses, using the scaling method using BHC GX 339-4 as a reference source. Our estimate of the BH mass in SS 433 is consistent with recent BH mass measurement using the radial-velocity measurements of the binary system by Hillwig & Gies who find that M(sub x)( = (4.3 +/- 0.8) solar masses. This is the smallest BH mass found up to now among all BH sources. Moreover, the index saturation effect versus mass accretion rate revealed in SS 433, like in a number of other BH candidates, is the strong observational evidence for the presence of a BH in SS 433.

  11. Light scalar field constraints from gravitational-wave observations of compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Horbatsch, Michael; Alsing, Justin

    2012-06-01

    Scalar-tensor theories are among the simplest extensions of general relativity. In theories with light scalars, deviations from Einstein’s theory of gravity are determined by the scalar mass ms and by a Brans-Dicke-like coupling parameter ωBD. We show that gravitational-wave observations of nonspinning neutron star-black hole binary inspirals can be used to set lower bounds on ωBD and upper bounds on the combination ms/ωBD. We estimate via a Fisher matrix analysis that individual observations with signal-to-noise ratio ρ would yield (ms/ωBD)(ρ/10)≲10-15, 10-16, and 10-19eV for Advanced LIGO, ET, and eLISA, respectively. A statistical combination of multiple observations may further improve these bounds.

  12. On the Nature of Compact Object in SS~433. An Observational Evidence of Black Hole Mass in SS 433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    We present an analysis of X-ray spectral properties observed from black hole candidate (BHC) binary SS 433. We analyze RXTE data from this source, coordinated with Green Bank Interferometer/RATAN-600. We show that SS 433 demonstrates a X-ray spectral transition from low hard state to intermediate state (IS). We show that the X-ray broad-band energy spectra during all spectral states are well fit by a sum of so called "Bulk Motion Comptoniza-tion (BMC)" component and by two (broad and narrow) Gaussians for the continuum and line emissions respectively. In addition to these spectral model components we also find a strong feature of "blackbody-like (BB)" bump which color temperature is in the range of 4-5 keV in 24 IS spectra during radio outburst decay in SS 433. Our observational results on the "high temperature BB" bump leads us to support the presence of gravitationally redshifted annihila-tion lines in this source. We also established the photon index saturation at about 2.3 in index vs mass accretion correlation. This index-mass accretion correlation allows us to evaluate the low limit of black hole (BH) mass of compact object in SS 433, greater than 2 solar masses, using the scaling method using BHC GX 339-4 as a reference source. Our estimate of BH mass in SS 433 is consistent with the recent BH mass measurement by Hillwig Gies who find that BH mass about 4.3 solar masses. It is the smallest BH mass up to now found among all BHC sources where BH masses have been estimated so far. Moreover, the index saturation effect versus mass accretion rate revealed in SS 433, like in a number of other BHCs, is the strongest observational evidence of the presence of BH in SS 433.

  13. Exploring the Environs of Compact Symmetric Objects in the Nuclei of Galaxies and Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.; Xu, W.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Pearson, T. J.

    1994-12-01

    Two large Caltech--Jodrell Bank VLBI surveys at 5 GHz have recently been completed (CJ1 -- Xu et al. 1994, ApJS, submitted; CJ2 -- Taylor et al. 1994, ApJS, in press; Henstock et al. 1994, ApJS, submitted). Together with the Pearson--Readhead survey (1988, ApJ, 328, 114) these provide ~ 1 mas resolution images for a flux limited sample of 321 sources. One of the most interesting findings of these surveys was the discovery of three confirmed compact symmetric objects (CSOs) and forty additional candidate CSOs. These are compact (size ~ 100 pc) sources with emission on both sides of the central engine that is thought to be free of beaming effects. To account for their small sizes the CSOs must be either young or severely confined by a dense neutral medium. If these objects are young (ages ~ 3000 yrs) and growing at rates typical of equally luminous, but 1000 times larger, radio galaxies like Cygnus A then they must be a common phase in the evolution of galaxies, or perhaps a recurrent one. Alternatively, if the CSOs are strongly confined and longer lived then the large amount of material required for their confinement should have several observational consequences -- large amounts of neutral and molecular gas, high induced Faraday rotations, and possibly severe reddening and distortions of the starlight from the host galaxy. In an effort to discriminate between the above models we have performed deep infrared imaging of a number of CSOs and CSO candidates. We also report on high-dynamic range imaging with the VLA to look for large Faraday rotation measures, or for extended components that might be the result of a previous active phase. We have also observed one nearby CSO candidate in CO 1-0 with the Owens Valley millimeter array to search for molecular gas.

  14. TRANSITS AND LENSING BY COMPACT OBJECTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD: DISRUPTED STARS ORBITING BLUE STRAGGLERS

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2011-05-15

    Kepler's first major discoveries are two hot (T > 10,000 K) small-radius objects orbiting stars in its field. A viable hypothesis is that these are the cores of stars that have each been eroded or disrupted by a companion star. The companion, which is the star monitored today, is likely to have gained mass from its now-defunct partner and can be considered to be a blue straggler. KOI-81 is almost certainly the product of stable mass transfer; KOI-74 may be as well, or it may be the first clear example of a blue straggler created through three-body interactions. We show that mass-transfer binaries are common enough that Kepler should discover {approx}1000 white dwarfs orbiting main-sequence stars. Most of these, like KOI-74 and KOI-81, will be discovered through transits, but many will be discovered through a combination of gravitational lensing and transits, while lensing will dominate for a subset. In fact, some events caused by white dwarfs will have the appearance of 'anti-transits' - i.e., short-lived enhancements in the amount of light received from the monitored star. Lensing and other mass-measurement methods provide a way to distinguish white dwarf binaries from planetary systems. This is important for the success of Kepler's primary mission, in light of the fact that white dwarf radii are similar to the radii of terrestrial planets, and that some white dwarfs will have orbital periods that place them in the habitable zones of their stellar companions. By identifying transiting and/or lensing white dwarfs, Kepler will conduct pioneering studies of white dwarfs and of the end states of mass transfer. It may also identify orbiting neutron stars or black holes. The calculations inspired by the discovery of KOI-74 and KOI-81 have implications for ground-based wide-field surveys as well as for future space-based surveys.

  15. Microarcsecond astrometric observatory Theia: from dark matter to compact objects and nearby earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien; Léger, Alain; Anglada Escudé, Guillem; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Spolyar, Douglas; Labadie, Lucas; Shao, Mike; Holl, Berry; Goullioud, Renaud; Crouzier, Antoine; Boehm, Céline; Krone-Martins, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Theia is a logical successor to Gaia, as a focused, very high precision astrometry mission which addresses two key science objectives of the ESA Cosmic Vision program: the nature of dark matter and the search for habitable planets. Theia addresses a number of other science cases strongly synergistic with ongoing/planned missions, such as the nature of compact objects, motions of stars in young stellar clusters, follow-up of Gaia objects of interest. Theia s "point and stare" operational mode will enable us to answer some of the most profound questions that the results of the Gaias survey will ask. Extremely-high-precision astrometry at 1-μas level can only be reached from space. The Theia spacecraft, which will carry a 0.8-m telescope, is foreseen to operate at L2 for 3,5 years. The preliminary Theia mission assessment allowed us to identify a safe and robust mission architecture that demonstrates the mission feasibility within the Soyuz ST launch envelope and a small M-class mission cost cap. We present here these features of the mission that has been submitted to the last ESA M4 call in January 2015.

  16. Constraining the propagation speed of gravitational waves with compact binaries at cosmological distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    When testing gravity in a model-independent way, one of the crucial tests is measuring the propagation speed of a gravitational wave (GW). In general relativity, a GW propagates with the speed of light, while in the alternative theories of gravity, the propagation speed could deviate from the speed of light due to the modification of gravity or spacetime structure at a quantum level. Previously, we proposed a method to measure the GW speed by directly comparing the arrival times between a GW and a photon from the binary merger of neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, assuming that it is associated with a short gamma-ray burst. The sensitivity is limited by the intrinsic time delay between a GW and a photon at the source. In this paper, we extend the method to distinguish the intrinsic time delay from the true signal caused by anomalous GW speed with multiple events at cosmological distances, considering the redshift distribution of GW sources, redshift-dependent GW propagation speed, and the statistics of intrinsic time delays. We show that an advanced GW detector such as the Einstein Telescope will be able to robustly constrain the GW propagation speed at a precision of ˜10-16 . We also discuss the optimal statistic to measure the GW speed by performing numerical simulations.

  17. Less accurate but more efficient family of search templates for detection of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronopoulos, Andreas E.; Apostolatos, Theocharis A.

    2001-08-01

    gravitational waves from inspiraling, compact, nonspinning, binaries. Apart from this useful quantitative result, this study constitutes an application of the template-numbering technique, introduced by Owen, for families of templates that are not described by the same mathematical expression as the assumed signals. For example, this analysis will be very useful when constructing sufficiently simple templates for detecting precessing spinning binaries.

  18. Selection, statistics and photometry of compact galaxies with different instrumental equipment. III - Selection and statistics with objective prism plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, N.

    Tautenburg objective prism plates were compared to previously investigated methods on the basis of photographic sky plates with limiting identification magnitudes of 19.0 m (B). In a test field of 0.8 sq deg, compact galaxies were selected using the objective prism method, and results were compared to those obtained using Tautenburg Schmidt plates and FOA plates. The objective prism method was found superior, and results indicated that the number of starlike compact galaxies is larger than the number found by previously used methods.

  19. Gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries: Angular momentum flux, evolution of the orbital elements, and the waveform to the second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopakumar, A.; Iyer, Bala R.

    1997-12-01

    The post-post-Newtonian (2PN) accurate mass quadrupole moment, for compact binaries of arbitrary mass ratio, moving in general orbits is obtained by the multipolar post Minkowskian approach of Blanchet, Damour, and Iyer. Using this, for binaries in general orbits, the 2PN contributions to the gravitational waveform, and the associated far-zone energy and angular momentum fluxes are computed. For quasielliptic orbits, the energy and angular momentum fluxes are averaged over an orbital period, and employed to determine the 2PN corrections to the rate of decay of the orbital elements.

  20. Observations of Mutual Eclipses by the Binary Kuiper Belt Object Manwe-Thorondor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Benecchi, Susan D.; Grundy, William M.; Thirouin, Audrey; Verbiscer, Anne J.

    2016-10-01

    The binary Kuiper Belt Object (385446) Manwe-Thorondor (aka 2003 QW111) is currently undergoing mutual events whereby the two ~100-km bodies alternately eclipse and occult each other as seen from Earth [1]. Such events are extremely rare among KBOs (Pluto-Charon and Sila-Nunam being notable exceptions). For Manwe-Thorondor, the events occur over ~0.5-d periods 4 to 5 times per year until the end of 2019. Here we report the results of observations to be made with the Soar 4m telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile on 2016 Aug 25 and 26 UT, covering one of the deepest predicted eclipses. We use these observations to constrain the rotational variability of the two bodies, determine their physical properties (size, shape, albedo, density), and set limits on the presence of any prominent surface features.[1] Grundy, W. et al. 2012, Icarus, 220, 74

  1. SETI implications of gravitational assist via chaotic trajectories of binary objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeden, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Extrapolating from the technique of gravitational assist via chaotic trajectories of binary objects, this paper considers how such techniques might be used in other systems. We examine which types of systems are the best candidates for harvesting gravitational energy for payload ejection. We also consider what signatures might be present in either the asteroid orbits or radiation of the central body if extraterrestrial intelligences were to use such techniques about these candidate systems. The simulation studies show that current technology cannot approach the sensitivity needed to detect either of these signals. Instead, we provide these results as guidance to studies in coming decades on patterns that may indicate the use of an asteroid ejection system.

  2. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of 1E1743.1-2843: Indications of a Neutron Star LMXB Nature of the Compact Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Krivonos, Roman A.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the persistent X-ray source 1E1743.1-2843, located in the Galactic Center region. The source was observed between 2012 September and October by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, providing almost simultaneous observations in the hard and soft X-ray bands. The high X-ray luminosity points to the presence of an accreting compact object. We analyze the possibilities of this accreting compact object being either a neutron star (NS) or a black hole, and conclude that the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum from 0.3 to 40 keV fits a blackbody spectrum with {kT}˜ 1.8 {keV} emitted from a hot spot or an equatorial strip on an NS surface. This spectrum is thermally Comptonized by electrons with {{kT}}e˜ 4.6 {keV}. Accepting this NS hypothesis, we probe the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) nature of the source. While the lack of Type-I bursts can be explained in the LMXB scenario, the absence of pulsations in the 2 mHz-49 Hz frequency range, the lack of eclipses and of an IR companion, and the lack of a {K}α line from neutral or moderately ionized iron strongly disfavor interpreting this source as a HMXB. We therefore conclude that 1E1743.1-2843 is most likely an NS-LMXB located beyond the Galactic Center. There is weak statistical evidence for a soft X-ray excess which may indicate thermal emission from an accretion disk. However, the disk normalization remains unconstrained due to the high hydrogen column density ({N}{{H}}˜ 1.6× {10}23 {{cm}}-2).

  3. Evidence for Recent Resurfacing of the Binary Kuiper Belt Object 1997 CS29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Schaefer, B.; Schaefer, M.; Tourtellotte, S.

    2009-09-01

    At solar phase angles less than 0.1 deg, some icy bodies exhibit an extraordinary opposition surge, suddenly brightening by 50% at near zero phase. Verbiscer et al [1] observed this phenomena for the icy Galilean satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea and suggest the surge results from the light-scattering properties of freshly resurfaced icy regoliths. Buratti et al [2] and Earle et al [3] observed a similarly sharp opposition surge on Neptune's icy satellite Triton, which is known to have active cryovolcanoes. Here we examine the solar phase curves of 9 Trans-Neptunian Objects that we have measured at phase angles smaller than 0.1 deg (Rabinowitz et al [4], Schaefer et al [5]), including previously unpublished observations 1997 CS29 and 2005 UJ438. This sample includes hot and cold classical Kuiper-Belt objects, Plutinos, Centaurs, and three binary TNOs. Of all these targets, only 1997 CS29 has a sharp surge at near zero phase, and a nearly flat phase curve at large angles. Since this target is also a binary with an unusually large and close companion [6], we suggest that both 1997 CS29 and its companion have been resurfaced by each other's impact ejecta via the mechanism proposed by Stern [7], with fresh surface material producing the opposition spike. [1] Verbiscer, A., et al. 2007, Science, 315, 815; [2] Buratti, B. et al. 2007, Workshop on Ices, Oceans, and Fire: Satellites of the Outer Solar System, Boulder Colorado; [3] Earle, D., et al. 2008, BAAS, 40, 480; [4] Rabinowitz, D. et al. 2007, AJ, 133, 26; [5] Schaefer, B., et al. 2009, AJ, 137, 129; [6] Stephens, D. & Knoll, K. 2006, AJ, 131,1142;[7] Stern, S. A. 2009, Icarus, 199, 571.

  4. COMPACT STELLAR BINARY ASSEMBLY IN THE FIRST NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS AND r-PROCESS SYNTHESIS IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; MacLeod, Morgan; Trenti, Michele; Roberts, Luke F.; Lee, William H.; Saladino-Rosas, Martha I.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of elemental abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP-r) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-process material in CEMP-r stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP-r stars.

  5. Hunting for Buried Treasure: Prospecting for a Population of Compact Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; DeWitt, C.; Gosling, A. J.; Blundell, K.; Blum, R.; Olsen, K.; Sarajedini, A.

    2010-03-01

    I describe the observational campaign we have undertaken to determine the nature of the faint discrete X-ray source population discovered in the Galactic Center (GC). Data obtained to date includes a deep Chandra survey; deep, high resolution IR imaging from VLT/ISAAC, CTIO/ISPI, and the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey; and IR spectroscopy from VLT/ISAAC and IRTF/SpeX. Astrometric cross-correlation of our ISAAC imaging with the revised X-ray source position catalogs from Muno et al. (2003, 2006) results in a statistically significant excess in the number of candidate IR counterparts to the 130 X-ray sources encompassed within our 26 ISAAC fields. Cross-correlation of our ISPI imaging of the central 17' square around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 Chandra sources, with the X-ray catalog reveals 2214 candidate IR counterparts. We explore the likelihood of these astrometric matches being actual physical counterparts and find that, statistically, 443+/-56 are likely to be true counterparts. We categorize these matches by X-ray and IR characteristics (hardness, colour, magnitude). After statistical analysis, we find that by selecting carefully from the subset of X-ray hard, highly reddened candidate matches, we can identify 91 IR sources which have a 45% probability of being true physical counterparts. In both the ISAAC and ISPI data we find an over-abundance of relatively unextinguished, bright, blue candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources as compared to the IR field star population. It is likely that these matches are dominated by local, massive X-ray active stars. We will use the multi-object IR spectrograph FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South to perform a spectroscopic survey of the identified candidate counterparts, to search for emission line signatures which are a hallmark of accreting binaries. By determining the nature of these X-ray sources, this FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey will have a dramatic impact on our knowledge of the Galactic accreting binary

  6. Von Zeipel's theorem for a magnetized circular flow around a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Pugliese, D.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze a class of physical properties, forming the content of the so-called von Zeipel theorem, which characterizes stationary, axisymmetric, non-selfgravitating perfect fluids in circular motion in the gravitational field of a compact object. We consider the extension of the theorem to the magnetohydrodynamic regime, under the assumption of an infinitely conductive fluid, both in the Newtonian and in the relativistic framework. When the magnetic field is toroidal, the conditions required by the theorem are equivalent to integrability conditions, as it is the case for purely hydrodynamic flows. When the magnetic field is poloidal, the analysis for the relativistic regime is substantially different with respect to the Newtonian case and additional constraints, in the form of PDEs, must be imposed on the magnetic field in order to guarantee that the angular velocity depends only on the specific angular momentum . In order to deduce such physical constraints, it is crucial to adopt special coordinates, which are adapted to the surfaces. The physical significance of these results is briefly discussed.

  7. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  8. VLBA OBSERVATIONS OF H I IN THE ARCHETYPE COMPACT SYMMETRIC OBJECT B2352+495

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Rodriguez, C.; Pihlstroem, Y.; Taylor, G. B.; Tremblay, S.; Vermeulen, R. C.

    2010-01-15

    B2352+495 is a prototypical example of a compact symmetric object. It has a double radio lobe symmetrically located with respect to a central flat-spectrum radio core (the location of the active galactic nucleus) and has a physical extent of less than 200 pc. In this work, we report Very Long Baseline Array observation of 21 cm H I absorption toward B2352+495 to investigate the properties of this remarkable radio source, in particular, to explore whether the radio emission can be confined by circumnuclear material (frustration scenario) or whether the source is likely to be young. We confirmed the two H I absorption features previously detected toward B2352+495-a broad line nearly centered at the systemic velocity of the galaxy and a narrow redshifted component. The atomic gas from the broad absorption component is likely associated with circumnuclear material, consistent with the current paradigm of clumpy H I distribution in toroidal structures around supermassive black holes.

  9. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  10. Stability of coorbital objects around the Pluto-Charon binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarante, A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary system is dynamical interesting with its retinue of four small moons. The system is relatively full with few remaining stable locations evenly-spaced for additional moons on uninclined, circular orbits; most of these are Trojan (Tadpole/Horseshoe) orbits (Pires et al. 2011; Porter and Stern 2015). In this work, we study the coorbital region of each moon with long time integrations taking into account the gravitational effects of the satellites Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra. We numerically simulate a sample of 10,000 test particles initially located randomly around each moon's orbit (Figure). All test particles start on nearly circular and uninclined orbits and are followed for 5000 years. The results of our numerical simulations show stable coorbital objects - both Tadpoles and Horseshoes - for each of the small moons (Table). Horseshoe orbits are most common at all moons, although Hydra also has a sizeable population of Tadpole orbits. We also find interesting cases where the orbits switch from L4 Tadpoles to Horseshoes and even to L5 Tadpoles. These transitioning orbits comprise less than 1% of coorbital objects at all moons, and are most common at Styx. We have also investigated eccentric and inclined orbits and will report on our findings.

  11. WHAT IS ON TAP? THE ROLE OF SPIN IN COMPACT OBJECTS AND RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Walton, Dominic J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Nandra, Kirpaul

    2013-07-10

    We examine the role of spin in launching jets from compact objects across the mass scale. Our work includes 3 different Seyfert samples with a total of 37 unique Seyferts, as well as 11 stellar-mass black holes, and 13 neutron stars. We find that when the Seyfert reflection lines are modeled with simple Gaussian line features (a crude proxy for inner disk radius and therefore spin), only a slight inverse correlation is found between the Doppler-corrected radio luminosity at 5 GHz (a proxy for jet power) and line width. When the Seyfert reflection features are fit with more relativistically blurred disk reflection models that measure spin, there is a tentative positive correlation between the Doppler-corrected radio luminosity and the spin measurement. Further, when we include stellar-mass black holes in the sample, to examine the effects across the mass scale, we find a slightly stronger correlation with radio luminosity per unit mass and spin, at a marginal significance (2.3{sigma} confidence level). Finally, when we include neutron stars, in order to probe lower spin values, we find a positive correlation (3.3{sigma} confidence level) between radio luminosity per unit mass and spin. Although tentative, these results suggest that spin may have a role in determining the jet luminosity. In addition, we find a slightly more significant correlation (4.4{sigma} and 4.1{sigma} confidence level, respectively) between radio luminosity per bolometric luminosity and spin, as well as radio luminosity corrected for the fundamental plane (i.e., log ({nu}L{sub R}/L{sub Bol}{sup 0.67}/M{sub BH}{sup 0.78})) and spin, using our entire sample of black holes and neutrons stars. Again, although tentative, these relations point to the possibility that the mass accretion rate, i.e., bolometric luminosity, is also important in determining the jet luminosity, in addition to spin. Our analysis suggests that mass accretion rate and disk or coronal magnetic field strength may be the

  12. 1RXS J180408.9-342058: An ultra compact X-ray binary candidate with a transient jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present a detailed near-infrared/optical/UV study of the transient low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 performed during its 2015 outburst, which is aimed at determining the nature of its companion star. Methods: We obtained three optical spectra (R ~ 1000) at the 2.1 m San Pedro Mártir Observatory telescope (México). We performed optical and NIR photometric observations with both the REM telescope and the New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla. We obtained optical and UV observations from the Swift archive. Finally, we performed optical polarimetry of the source using the EFOSC2 instrument mounted on the NTT. Results: The optical spectrum of the source is almost featureless since the hydrogen and He I emissions lines, typically observed in LMXBs, are not detected. Similarly, carbon and oxygen lines are not observed either. We marginally detect the He II 4686 Å emission line, suggesting the presence of helium in the accretion disc. No significant optical polarisation level was observed. Conclusions: The lack of hydrogen and He I emission lines in the spectrum implies that the companion is likely not a main-sequence star. Driven by the tentative detection of the He II 4686 Å emission line, we suggest that the system could harbour a helium white dwarf. If this is the case, 1RXS J180408.9-342058 would be an ultra-compact X-ray binary. By combining an estimate of the mass accretion rate together with evolutionary tracks for a He white dwarf, we obtain a tentative orbital period of ~40 min. We also built the NIR-optical-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source at two different epochs. One SED was gathered when the source was in the soft X-ray state and this SED is consistent with the presence of a single thermal component. The second SED, obtained when the source was in the hard X-ray state, shows a thermal component along with a tail in the NIR, which likely indicates the presence of a (transient) jet. Based on observations made with

  13. Formalism for testing theories of gravity using lensing by compact objects: Static, spherically symmetric case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeton, Charles R.; Petters, A. O.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing a general, unified, and rigorous analytical framework for using gravitational lensing by compact objects to test different theories of gravity beyond the weak-deflection limit. In this paper we present the formalism for computing corrections to lensing observables for static, spherically symmetric gravity theories in which the corrections to the weak-deflection limit can be expanded as a Taylor series in one parameter, namely, the gravitational radius of the lens object. We take care to derive coordinate-independent expressions and compute quantities that are directly observable. We compute series expansions for the observables that are accurate to second order in the ratio ɛ=ϑ•/ϑE of the angle subtended by the lens’s gravitational radius to the weak-deflection Einstein radius, which scales with mass as ɛ∝M1/2•. The positions, magnifications, and time delays of the individual images have corrections at both first and second order in ɛ, as does the differential time delay between the two images. Interestingly, we find that the first-order corrections to the total magnification and centroid position vanish in all gravity theories that agree with general relativity in the weak-deflection limit, but they can remain nonzero in modified theories that disagree with general relativity in the weak-deflection limit. For the Reissner-Nordström metric and a related metric from heterotic string theory, our formalism reveals an intriguing connection between lensing observables and the condition for having a naked singularity, which could provide an observational method for testing the existence of such objects. We apply our formalism to the galactic black hole and predict that the corrections to the image positions are at the level of 10 μarc s (microarcseconds), while the correction to the time delay is a few hundredths of a second. These corrections would be measurable today if a pulsar were found to be lensed by the galactic black hole, and

  14. KINETIC THEORY OF EQUILIBRIUM AXISYMMETRIC COLLISIONLESS PLASMAS IN OFF-EQUATORIAL TORI AROUND COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-11-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modeling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion disks. However, accretion disk coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can also be determined in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than a fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic, multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution function are constructed, which are expressed in terms of generalized Maxwellian functions characterized by isotropic temperature and non-uniform fluid fields. The conditions for the existence of off-equatorial tori are investigated. It is proved that these levitating systems are admitted under general conditions when both gravitational and magnetic fields contribute to shaping the spatial profiles of equilibrium plasma fluid fields. Then, specifically, kinetic effects carried by the equilibrium solution are explicitly provided and identified here with diamagnetic energy-correction and electrostatic contributions. It is shown that these kinetic terms characterize the plasma equation of state by introducing non-vanishing deviations from the assumption of thermal pressure.

  15. Orbital studies of cataclysmic binaries. II - Three objects from the Palomar-Green sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, J. R.

    1986-04-01

    I obtained radial-velocity spectra of PG 0834 + 488, PG 1003 + 678 = CH UMa, and PG 1711 + 336 = V795 Her to determine their orbital periods. PG 0834 + 488 has an apparently normal dwarf-nova type spectrum, and its orbital period is here found to be 6.4 hr with no cycle-count ambigu- ity. The present data show no visible absorption from a secondary star. PG 1003 + 678 = CH UMa most likely has a period of 8.3 hr, which is an alias of the preliminary period of 12.5 hr announced by Thorstensen (1985); the 12.5 hr period remains possible. It shows absorption features in its spectrum characteristic of a late-type secondary star, and these features appear to have velocities in antiphase to the emission lines. The velocity amplitude is small and the lines narrow, suggesting a low inclination. PG 1711 + 336 = V795 Her has a most likely period of 14.8 hr, unusually long for a cataclysmic binary; because of the weakness of the emission lines, some doubt remains about the period. The 2.75 hr photometric period determined by Baidak et al. (1985) is not indicated in the velocities. The emission lines are weak and the flux distribution very blue. The object is evidently a nova-like variable in a perpetual high state. if the photometric and spectroscopic periods are both correct, it may be a very slow DQ Her star as well.

  16. A Low Density for Binary Kuiper Belt Object (26308) 1998 SM165

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, John R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Noll, K. S.

    2006-09-01

    The densities of Kuiper Belt objects provide valuable clues to their composition, internal structure, and origin. To extend our limited knowledge of KBO densities, we have been attempting to obtain radiometric diameters for binary KBOs, which have masses determined from the satellite orbits, using the MIPS mid-IR imager on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Due to higher than expected KBO albedos, and MIPS's lower than expected 70 µm sensitivity, our 2006 campaign concentrated on long exposures on a single target, (26308) 1998 SM165, one of the brightest and warmest known KBO binaries. 7.5 hour integration times at both 24 and 70 µm yielded monochromatic fluxes of 0.11 ± 0.01 mJy at 23.7 microns and 6.1 ± 1.1 mJy at 71.4 microns. From these we derive a relatively model-independent diameter of 287 ± 36 km for the primary and 96 ± 12 km for the satellite, assuming similar albedos. The derived V geometric albedo (using HV = 6.13, Romanishin and Tegler 2006 Icarus 179 523) is 0.07 ± 0.02. The system mass from HST (Margot et al. 2004, DPS 36, 08.03) then yields a system density of 0.51 +0.29 -0.14 g cm-3, comparable to that for KBO (47171) 1999 TC36 (Stansberry et al. 2006, Ap. J. 643, 556). This density is also comparable to that of the similarly-sized planetary satellites Amalthea (D=200 km, ρ=0.86) and Hyperion (D=250 km, ρ=0.6), but much lower than the density of Phoebe (D=200 km, ρ=1.63), and suggests both high porosity and a dominantly water ice composition for this KBO, despite its low albedo and red color. Supporting visible-wavelength lightcurve observations obtained at Lowell Observatory also yielded a revised rotation rate of 8.40 ± 0.05 hours for 1998 SM165.

  17. Quark Phase Transition in Compact Objects and Multimessenger Astronomy: Neutrino Signals, Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.; Vlasyuk, V. V.; Petkov, V. B.

    2016-06-01

    The International Workshop on Quark Phase Transition in Compact Objects and Multimessenger Astronomy: Neutrino Signals, Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts (October, 7-14, 2015) was dedicated to Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) Phase Transitions and observational signals of these transitions related to formation of compact astrophysical objects. The aim of this workshop was to bring together researchers working on the problems of behavior of matter under critical conditions achievable in such astrophysical objects as "strange" or "hybrid" stars and in laboratories at heavy-ion collisions to discuss fundamental issues and recent developments. Topics included both observations (radio, optical and X-ray astronomy, gamma ray bursts, gravitational waves, neutrino detection, heavy-ion collisions, etc.) and theory (supernova simulations, proto-neutron and neutron stars, equation of state of dense matter, neutron star cooling, unstable modes, nucleosynthesis, explosive transitions, quark-gluon plasma).

  18. Towards low-latency real-time detection of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences in the era of advanced detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing; Hooper, Shaun; Wen, Linqing; Chen, Yanbei

    2012-05-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of gravitational wave events will help shed light on the nature of the sources, and more can be learned if the EM follow-ups can start as soon as the gravitational wave event becomes observable. In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient time-domain algorithm capable of detecting inspiral gravitational waves from coalescing binaries of compact objects with nearly no further delay in addition to the time required to condition the data into a time series of calibrated gravitational-wave strain. Our algorithm, if can be expanded to include sky localization, will serve as the first step towards triggering EM observation before the merger. The key to the efficiency of our algorithm arises from the use of chains of so-called infinite impulse response filters, which filter time-series data recursively. Computational cost is further reduced by a template interpolation technique that requires filtering only done for a “coarse bank”, much sparser than the “fine bank” normally required to sufficiently recover the optimal signal-to-noise ratio: the filter chain of each coarse-bank template is divided into several sections, filtering output from these sections are combined appropriately to reconstruct the output of each of the nearby fine-bank templates. The filter construction and interpolation techniques are illustrated in this paper using Newtonian-chirp waveforms, although these will be generalizable to more accurate post-Newtonian waveforms. Towards future detectors with sensitivity extending to lower frequencies, our algorithm’s computational cost is shown to increase rather insignificantly compared to the conventional time-domain correlation method using finite impulse response filters.

  19. Searching for gravitational-waves from compact binary coalescences while dealing with challenges of real data and simulated waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanga, Waduthanthree Thilina

    Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts the existence of gravitational waves (GWs). Direct detection of GWs will provide enormous amount of new information about physics, astronomy and cosmology. Scientists around the world are currently working towards the first direct detection of GWs. The global network of ground-based GW detectors are currently preparing for their first advanced detector Science runs. In this thesis we focus on detection of GWs from compact binary coalescence (CBC) systems. Ability to accurately model CBC GW waveforms makes them the most promising source for the first direct detection of GWs. In this thesis we try to address several challenges associated with detecting CBC signals buried in ground-based GW detector data for past and future searches. Data analysis techniques we employ to detect GW signals assume detector noise is Gaussian and stationary. However, in reality, detector data is neither Gaussian nor stationary. To estimate the performance loss due to these features, we compare the efficiencies of detecting CBC signals in simulated Gaussian and real data. Additionally, we also demonstrate the effectiveness of multi-detector signal based consistency tests such ad null-stream. Despite, non-Gaussian and non-stationary features of real detector data, with effective data quality studies and signal-based vetoes we can approach the performance of Gaussian and stationary data. As we are moving towards advanced detector era, it is important to be prepared for future CBC searches. In this thesis we investigate the performances of non-spinning binary black hole (BBH) searches in simulated Gaussian using advanced detector noise curves predicted for 2015--2016. In the same study, we analyze the GW detection probabilities of latest pN-NR hybrid waveforms submitted to second version of Numerical Injection Analysis (NINJA-2) project. The main motivation for this study is to understand the ability to detect realistic BBH signals of

  20. A blind hierarchical coherent search for gravitational-wave signals from coalescing compact binaries in a network of interferometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sukanta; Dayanga, Thilina; Ghosh, Shaon; Talukder, Dipongkar

    2011-07-01

    We describe a hierarchical data analysis pipeline for coherently searching for gravitational-wave signals from non-spinning compact binary coalescences (CBCs) in the data of multiple earth-based detectors. This search assumes no prior information on the sky position of the source or the time of occurrence of its transient signals and, hence, is termed 'blind'. The pipeline computes the coherent network search statistic that is optimal in stationary, Gaussian noise. More importantly, it allows for the computation of a suite of alternative multi-detector coherent search statistics and signal-based discriminators that can improve the performance of CBC searches in real data, which can be both non-stationary and non-Gaussian. Also, unlike the coincident multi-detector search statistics that have been employed so far, the coherent statistics are different in the sense that they check for the consistency of the signal amplitudes and phases in the different detectors with their different orientations and with the signal arrival times in them. Since the computation of coherent statistics entails searching in the sky, it is more expensive than that of the coincident statistics that do not require it. To reduce computational costs, the first stage of the hierarchical pipeline constructs coincidences of triggers from the multiple interferometers, by requiring their proximity in time and component masses. The second stage follows up on these coincident triggers by computing the coherent statistics. Here, we compare the performances of this hierarchical pipeline with and without the second (or coherent) stage in Gaussian noise. Although introducing hierarchy can be expected to cause some degradation in the detection efficiency compared to that of a single-stage coherent pipeline, nevertheless it improves the computational speed of the search considerably. The two main results of this work are as follows: (1) the performance of the hierarchical coherent pipeline on Gaussian data

  1. Third-and-a-half order post-Newtonian equations of motion for relativistic compact binaries using the strong field point particle limit

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Yousuke

    2009-12-15

    We report our rederivation of the equations of motion for relativistic compact binaries through the third-and-a-half post-Newtonian (3.5 PN) order approximation to general relativity using the strong field point particle limit to describe self-gravitating stars instead of the Dirac delta functional. The computation is done in harmonic coordinates. Our equations of motion describe the orbital motion of the binary consisting of spherically symmetric nonrotating stars. The resulting equations of motion fully agree with the 3.5 PN equations of motion derived in the previous works. We also show that the locally defined energy of the star has a simple relation with its mass up to the 3.5 PN order.

  2. Understanding compact object formation and natal kicks. IV. The case of IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Ansari, Asna; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey; Glebbeek, Evert E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ansari@ldeo.columbia.edu

    2014-08-01

    The extragalactic X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has attracted attention as it is possibly the host of the most massive stellar-mass black-hole (BH) known to date. Here we consider all available observational constraints and construct its evolutionary history up to the instant just before the formation of the BH. Our analysis accounts for the simplest possible history, which includes three evolutionary phases: binary orbital dynamics at core collapse, common envelope (CE) evolution, and evolution of the BH-helium star binary progenitor of the observed system. We derive the complete set of constraints on the progenitor system at various evolutionary stages. Specifically, right before the core collapse event, we find the mass of the BH immediate progenitor to be ≳ 31 M{sub ☉} (at 95% of confidence, same hereafter). The magnitude of the natal kick imparted to the BH is constrained to be ≲ 130 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, we find that the 'enthalpy' formalism recently suggested by Ivanova and Chaichenets is able to explain the existence of IC 10 X-1 without the need to invoke unreasonably high CE efficiencies. With this physically motivated formalism, we find that the CE efficiency required to explain the system is in the range of ≅ 0.6-1.

  3. A STATE TRANSITION OF THE LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARY IN THE LOW-METALLICITY BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXY I Zw 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaret, Philip; Feng Hua

    2013-06-10

    We present a measurement of the X-ray spectrum of the luminous X-ray binary in I Zw 18, the blue compact dwarf galaxy with the lowest known metallicity. We find the highest flux yet observed, corresponding to an intrinsic luminosity near 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} establishing it as an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). The energy spectrum is dominated by disk emission with a weak or absent Compton component and there is no significant timing noise; both are indicative of the thermal state of stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries and inconsistent with the Compton-dominated state typical of most ULX spectra. A previous measurement of the X-ray spectrum shows a harder spectrum that is well described by a power law. Thus, the binary appears to exhibit spectral states similar to those observed from stellar-mass black hole binaries. If the hard state occurs in the range of luminosities found for the hard state in stellar-mass black hole binaries, then the black hole mass must be at least 85 M{sub Sun }. Spectral fitting of the thermal state shows that disk luminosities for which thin disk models are expected to be valid are produced only for relatively high disk inclinations, {approx}> 60 Degree-Sign , and rapid black hole spins. We find a{sub *} > 0.98 and M > 154 M{sub Sun} for a disk inclination of 60 Degree-Sign . Higher inclinations produce higher masses and somewhat lower spins.

  4. Real-time imaging of moving living objects using a compact terahertz scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang-Pil; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Lee, Eui Su; Ko, Hyunsung; Lee, Il-Min; Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we design a compact terahertz (THz) reflection scanner with a scan rate of 20 frames/s. This scanner is based on a benzocyclobutene-embedded InGaAs Schottky barrier diode detector having a maximum responsivity of 300 V/W at 250 GHz and a minimum noise equivalent power of 38 pW/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} . With this scanner, details such as sharp head and tail and wrinkled segments in a moving caterpillar are observed. The thin and thick parts of the moving caterpillar that are presented in light gray and dark gray, respectively, on the gray scale are also well distinguished.

  5. Prospects for detecting the Christodoulou memory of gravitational waves from a coalescing compact binary and using it to measure neutron-star radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Daniel

    1994-09-01

    A coalescing compact binary, during its last tenth of a second of life, emits a burst of gravitational waves consisting of a high-frequency ``chirp,'' with frequencies much greater than 100 Hz, superimposed on a gradually growing memory, known as the Christodoulou memory. Most of the memory's growth occurs over the last few hundredths of a second, so its signal has strong Fourier components at f~100 Hz. The planned LIGO and/or VIRGO broadband gravitational-wave detectors have optimal performance at frequencies around 100 Hz and should be well suited, in terms of frequencies, to detect the growth of the memory amidst the chirp. If one or both of the binary's components is a neutron star (the other being either a neutron star or a black hole), then the growth of the memory will be cut off by the star's tidal disruption. The larger the neutron star's radius the sooner the cutoff and correspondingly the weaker the total memory. Therefore, from a LIGO and/or VIRGO measurement of the memory's strength, one could hope to infer the neutron-star radius. The prospects for such measurements to succeed are evaluated quantitatively and found to be poor because of the weakness of the memory. Even under optimistic circumstances the memory is so weak that only for a black-hole-black-hole binary is there much chance of detecting it, and then the prospects are only marginal.

  6. Lightman-Eardley instabilities and accretion disk thickening. [for compact astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    After reviewing the role of Compton scattering in accretion disks around black holes, it is discussed whether Lightman-Eardley (LE) secular instabilities can trigger and maintain Pringle-Rees (PR) thermal instabilities. The radiative-transfer-equation and equation-of-state criteria for LE stability in alpha-viscosity-law disk models and dynamic viscosity criteria for more general situations is derived. On the basis of these considerations the LE instability is insufficient for inducing PR instabilities and hot thick inner regions important in accretion-disk models of compact hard X-ray sources. The density thinning due to radial velocity gradients in the accretion flow is suggested as a more likely and satisfactory mechanism.

  7. Topics of LIGO physics: Template banks for the inspiral of precessing, compact binaries, and design of the signal-recycling cavity for advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi

    This thesis deals with the detection of gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of precessing, compact binaries using interferometric gravitational- wave detectors (e.g., LIGO), and the design of the signal-recycling cavity for Advanced LIGO (the second generation LIGO). The detection of complicated signals from the inspiral of precessing binaries using the standard matched filter technique requires a computational cost far exceeding what is available with current technology. Alessandra Buonanno, Yanbei Chen, and Michele Vallisneri (BCV) proposed the use of detection template families (DTFs)---phenomenological templates capable of mimicking inspiral waveforms while having simpler functional forms. In Chapter 2 (in collaboration with BCV, and Hideyuki Tagoshi), a BCV2 DTF suggested by BCV is studied. We show a good signal-matching performance of this DTF, propose a template-placement strategy, and estimate that the computational cost required by this DTF is feasible. We also propose a BCV2P DTF to estimate binary parameters. In Chapters 3 and 4 (in collaboration with BCV), I investigate a physical template family (PTF) suggested by BCV. This PTF uses the most accurate known waveforms for inspiraling, precessing binaries with one spinning component, formulated using a new precessing convention to reduce computational cost. PTF has the obvious advantages of a perfect signal snatching, a lower false-alarm rate, and direct estimates of binary parameters. We show how this PTF can be used to detect inspiral waveforms from general precessing binaries. The second part of this thesis concerns a potential problem in the current design of the signal-recycling cavity (SRC) for Advanced LIGO: The SRC is nearly degenerate. In Chapter 5, I show with a numerical simulation that if the current design is used, there will be a serious constraint on the magnitude of mirror deformations, in order to keep the reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio below a few percent. This

  8. In search of a signature of binary Kuiper Belt Objects in the Pluto-Charon crater population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, Amanda Marie; Parker, Alex; Singer, Kelsi N.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Weaver, Harold A.; New Horizons Geology, Geophysics and Imaging Science Theme Team

    2016-10-01

    In July 2015, New Horizons flew by Pluto and Charon, allowing mapping of the encounter hemisphere at high enough resolution to produce crater counts from the surfaces of the pair. We investigate the distribution of craters in search of a signature of binary impactors. The Kuiper Belt -- especially the cold classical region -- has a large fraction of binary objects, many of which are close-in, equal-mass binaries. We will present results on how the distribution of craters seen on Pluto and Charon compares to a random distribution of single body impactors on the surfaces of each. Examining the surfaces of Pluto and Charon proves challenging due to resurfacing, and the presence of tectonic and other geographic features. For example, the informally-named Cthulhu region is among the oldest on Pluto, yet it abuts a craterless region millions of years young. On Charon, chastmata divide the surface into regions informally named Vulcan Planum and Oz terra. In our statistics, we pay careful attention to the boundaries of where craters may appear, and the dependence of our results on crater size. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  9. Reconstruction of binary geological images using analytical edge and object models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahifard, Mohammad J.; Ahmadi, Sadegh

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction of fields using partial measurements is of vital importance in different applications in geosciences. Solving such an ill-posed problem requires a well-chosen model. In recent years, training images (TI) are widely employed as strong prior models for solving these problems. However, in the absence of enough evidence it is difficult to find an adequate TI which is capable of describing the field behavior properly. In this paper a very simple and general model is introduced which is applicable to a fairly wide range of binary images without any modifications. The model is motivated by the fact that nearly all binary images are composed of simple linear edges in micro-scale. The analytic essence of this model allows us to formulate the template matching problem as a convex optimization problem having efficient and fast solutions. The model has the potential to incorporate the qualitative and quantitative information provided by geologists. The image reconstruction problem is also formulated as an optimization problem and solved using an iterative greedy approach. The proposed method is capable of recovering the image unknown values with accuracies about 90% given samples representing as few as 2% of the original image.

  10. On Relativistic Disk Spectroscopy in Compact Objects with X-ray CCD Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; D'Aì, A.; Bautz, M. W.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Freyberg, M. J.; Haberl, F.; Kennea, J.; Nowak, M. A.; Reis, R. C.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Tsujimoto, M.

    2010-12-01

    X-ray charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the workhorse detectors of modern X-ray astronomy. Typically covering the 0.3-10.0 keV energy range, CCDs are able to detect photoelectric absorption edges and K shell lines from most abundant metals. New CCDs also offer resolutions of 30-50 (E/ΔE), which is sufficient to detect lines in hot plasmas and to resolve many lines shaped by dynamical processes in accretion flows. The spectral capabilities of X-ray CCDs have been particularly important in detecting relativistic emission lines from the inner disks around accreting neutron stars and black holes. One drawback of X-ray CCDs is that spectra can be distorted by photon "pile-up," wherein two or more photons may be registered as a single event during one frame time. We have conducted a large number of simulations using a statistical model of photon pile-up to assess its impacts on relativistic disk line and continuum spectra from stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars. The simulations cover the range of current X-ray CCD spectrometers and operational modes typically used to observe neutron stars and black holes in X-ray binaries. Our results suggest that severe photon pile-up acts to falsely narrow emission lines, leading to falsely large disk radii and falsely low spin values. In contrast, our simulations suggest that disk continua affected by severe pile-up are measured to have falsely low flux values, leading to falsely small radii and falsely high spin values. The results of these simulations and existing data appear to suggest that relativistic disk spectroscopy is generally robust against pile-up when this effect is modest.

  11. TRANSITION FROM REGULAR TO CHAOTIC CIRCULATION IN MAGNETIZED CORONAE NEAR COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopacek, O.; Karas, V.; Kovar, J.; StuchlIk, Z.

    2010-10-20

    Accretion onto black holes and compact stars brings material in a zone of strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. We study dynamical properties of motion of electrically charged particles forming a highly diluted medium (a corona) in the regime of strong gravity and large-scale (ordered) magnetic field. We start our work from a system that allows regular motion, then we focus on the onset of chaos. To this end, we investigate the case of a rotating black hole immersed in a weak, asymptotically uniform magnetic field. We also consider a magnetic star, approximated by the Schwarzschild metric and a test magnetic field of a rotating dipole. These are two model examples of systems permitting energetically bound, off-equatorial motion of matter confined to the halo lobes that encircle the central body. Our approach allows us to address the question of whether the spin parameter of the black hole plays any major role in determining the degree of the chaoticness. To characterize the motion, we construct the recurrence plots (RPs) and we compare them with Poincare surfaces of section. We describe the RPs in terms of the recurrence quantification analysis, which allows us to identify the transition between different dynamical regimes. We demonstrate that this new technique is able to detect the chaos onset very efficiently and provide its quantitative measure. The chaos typically occurs when the conserved energy is raised to a sufficiently high level that allows the particles to traverse the equatorial plane. We find that the role of the black hole spin in setting the chaos is more complicated than initially thought.

  12. Planets or Pretense?: The Search for Substellar Objects around Post Common Envelope Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Adam; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Parsons, Steven; Caceres, Claudio; Canovas, Hector

    2015-12-01

    Many believe post-common envelope binary systems (PCEBs), consisting of a white dwarf and a close main-sequence companion, host a unique class of planetary system. Given the well known age and history of the host binary stars, these systems have the potential to provide new insights into the evolution of planetary systems. However, the existence of the planets should be treated with some skepticism as their presence has so far been inferred only by the indirect method of eclipse timing variations. This method has proved somewhat flawed, as many of the claimed planetary systems have been found dynamically unstable, and others have dramatically failed when confronted with more recent high-precision times. It is therefore of the utmost importance that complementary observations be performed to test the planetary hypothesis, and we have recently performed two such pioneering observations:1. We use SPHERE on the VLT to image the PCEB V471 Tau. A circumbinary companion to this PCEB has been predicted for more than 30 years with eclipse timings, but only recently has a direct detection become technically possible.2. We use ALMA to search for dusty material around the young PCEB NN Ser. The planetary model for NN Ser is one of the most convincing, and these planets would likely be present alongside considerable dusty material, now detectable thanks to the sensitivity of ALMA.I will present the results of these two important observations and discuss their far-reaching implications for the existence and charactistics of planetary systems around PCEBs.

  13. Exploring a New Population of Compact Objects: X-ray and IR Observations of the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Gosling, Andrew J.; Eikenberry, Stephen E.; Muno, Michael P.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Mikles, Valerie J.; Dewitt, Curtis

    2008-10-01

    I describe the IR and X-ray observational campaign we have undertaken for the purpose of determining the nature of the faint discrete X-ray source population discovered by Chandra in the Galactic Center (GC). Data obtained for this project includes a deep Chandra survey of the Galactic Bulge; deep, high resolution IR imaging from VLT/ISAAC, CTIO/ISPI, and the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) and IR spectroscopy from VLT/ISAAC and IRTF/SpeX. By cross-correlating the GC X-ray imaging from Chandra with our IR surveys, we identify candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources via astrometry. Using a detailed IR extinction map, we are deriving magnitudes and colors for all the candidates. Having thus established a target list, we will use the multi-object IR spectrograph FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South to carry out a spectroscopic survey of the candidate counterparts, to search for emission line signatures which are a hallmark of accreting binaries. By determining the nature of these X-ray sources, this FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey will have a dramatic impact on our knowledge of the Galactic accreting binary population.

  14. Stable levitation and alignment of compact objects by Casimir spring forces.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium-unlike the direction of the torque-can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material. PMID:20366865

  15. Stable Levitation and Alignment of Compact Objects by Casimir Spring Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium--unlike the direction of the torque--can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material.

  16. A large spectroscopic sample of L and T dwarfs from UKIDSS LAS: peculiar objects, binaries, and space density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, F.; Jones, H. R. A.; Day-Jones, A. C.; Pinfield, D. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Burningham, B.; Zhang, Z. H.; Smart, R. L.; Gomes, J. I.; Smith, L.

    2015-06-01

    We present the spectroscopic analysis of a large sample of late-M, L, and T dwarfs from the United Kingdom Deep Infrared Sky Survey. Using the YJHK photometry from the Large Area Survey and the red-optical photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we selected a sample of 262 brown dwarf candidates and we have followed-up 196 of them using the echelle spectrograph X-shooter on the Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage (0.30-2.48 μm) and moderate resolution (R ˜ 5000-9000) of X-shooter allowed us to identify peculiar objects including 22 blue L dwarfs, 2 blue T dwarfs, and 2 low-gravity M dwarfs. Using a spectral indices-based technique, we identified 27 unresolved binary candidates, for which we have determined the spectral type of the potential components via spectral deconvolution. The spectra allowed us to measure the equivalent width of the prominent absorption features and to compare them to atmospheric models. Cross-correlating the spectra with a radial velocity standard, we measured the radial velocity of our targets, and we determined the distribution of the sample, which is centred at -1.7 ± 1.2 km s-1 with a dispersion of 31.5 km s-1. Using our results, we estimated the space density of field brown dwarfs and compared it with the results of numerical simulations. Depending on the binary fraction, we found that there are (0.85 ± 0.55) × 10-3 to (1.00 ± 0.64) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the L4-L6.5 range, (0.73 ± 0.47) × 10-3 to (0.85 ± 0.55) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the L7-T0.5 range, and (0.74 ± 0.48) × 10-3 to (0.88 ± 0.56) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the T1-T4.5 range. We notice that there seems to be an excess of objects in the L-T transition with respect to the late-T dwarfs, a discrepancy that could be explained assuming a higher binary fraction than expected for the L-T transition, or that objects in the high-mass end and low-mass end of this regime form in different environments, i.e. following

  17. Advanced LIGO's ability to detect apparent violations of the cosmic censorship conjecture and the no-hair theorem through compact binary coalescence detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Madeline; Creighton, Jolien D. E.; Ochsner, Evan; Nielsen, Alex B.

    2013-10-01

    We study the ability of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) to detect apparent violations of the cosmic censorship conjecture and the no-hair theorem. The cosmic censorship conjecture, which is believed to be true in the theory of general relativity, limits the spin-to-mass-squared ratio of a Kerr black hole, χ≡j/m2≤1. The no-hair theorem, which is also believed to be true in the theory of general relativity, suggests a particular value for the tidal Love number of a nonrotating black hole (k2=0). Using the Fisher matrix formalism, we examine the measurability of the spin and tidal deformability of compact binary systems involving at least one putative black hole. Using parameter measurement errors and correlations obtained from the Fisher matrix, we determine the smallest detectable violation of bounds implied by the cosmic censorship conjecture and the no-hair theorem. We examine the effect of excluding unphysical areas of parameter space when determining the smallest detectable apparent violations, and we examine the effect of different post-Newtonian corrections to the amplitude of the compact binary coalescence gravitational waveform, as given in Arun et al. [Phys. Rev. D 79, 104023 (2009)]. In addition, we perform a brief study of how the recently calculated 3.0 pN and 3.5 pN spin-orbit corrections to the phase [Marsat et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 30, 055007 (2013)] affect spin and mass parameter measurability. We find that physical priors on the symmetric mass ratio and higher harmonics in the gravitational waveform could significantly affect the ability of aLIGO to investigate cosmic censorship and the no-hair theorem for certain systems.

  18. Segmentation, modeling and classification of the compact objects in a pile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Alok; Funka-Lea, Gareth; Wohn, Kwangyoen

    1990-01-01

    The problem of interpreting dense range images obtained from the scene of a heap of man-made objects is discussed. A range image interpretation system consisting of segmentation, modeling, verification, and classification procedures is described. First, the range image is segmented into regions and reasoning is done about the physical support of these regions. Second, for each region several possible three-dimensional interpretations are made based on various scenarios of the objects physical support. Finally each interpretation is tested against the data for its consistency. The superquadric model is selected as the three-dimensional shape descriptor, plus tapering deformations along the major axis. Experimental results obtained from some complex range images of mail pieces are reported to demonstrate the soundness and the robustness of our approach.

  19. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  20. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  1. Hydrodynamic, Atomic Kinetic, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer Models of the X-ray Spectra of Compact Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2008-02-08

    We describe the results of an effort, funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, to model, using FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamic simulations, XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC atomic data, and Monte Carlo radiation transport, the radiatively-driven photoionized wind and accretion flow of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this final report, we describe the purpose, approach, and technical accomplishments of this effort, including maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of the X-ray emission lines of the well-studied HMXB Vela X-1.

  2. Towards a formalism for mapping the spacetimes of massive compact objects: Bumpy black holes and their orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Nathan A.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2004-06-01

    Astronomical observations have established that extremely compact, massive objects are common in the Universe. It is generally accepted that these objects are, in all likelihood, black holes. As observational technology has improved, it has become possible to test this hypothesis in ever greater detail. In particular, it is or will be possible to measure the properties of orbits deep in the strong field of a black hole candidate (using x-ray timing or future gravitational-wave measurements) and to test whether they have the characteristics of black hole orbits in general relativity. Past work has shown that, in principle, such measurements can be used to map the spacetime of a massive compact object, testing in particular whether the object’s multipolar structure satisfies the rather strict constraints imposed by the black hole hypothesis. Performing such a test in practice requires that we be able to compare against objects with the “wrong” multipole structure. In this paper, we present tools for constructing the spacetimes of bumpy black holes: objects that are almost black holes, but that have some multipoles with the wrong value. In this first analysis, we focus on objects with no angular momentum. Generalization to bumpy Kerr black holes should be straightforward, albeit labor intensive. Our construction has two particularly desirable properties. First, the spacetimes which we present are good deep into the strong field of the object—we do not use a “large r” expansion (except to make contact with weak field intuition). Second, our spacetimes reduce to the exact black hole spacetimes of general relativity in a natural way, by dialing the “bumpiness” of the black hole to zero. We propose that bumpy black holes can be used as the foundation for a null experiment: if black hole candidates are indeed the black holes of general relativity, their bumpiness should be zero. By comparing the properties of orbits in a bumpy spacetime with those measured

  3. Galactic microlensing as a method of detecting massive compact halo objects

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The dark matter of the Galaxy may well consist of Jupiters, brown dwarfs, or the remnants of an early generation of stars. In 1986, Paczynski suggested that a population of such objects could be detected by watching for microlensing of stars in the LMC. Using a more realistic model of the halo density and velocity structure this paper recalculates the microlensing optical depth, the microlensing event rate, and the average duration of an event, correcting an error, but finding rough agreement with Paczynski's estimates. Also calculated is the distribution of microlensing events as a function of their duration and amplitude, finding that photometric measurements more frequent than the average event duration are needed to detect a substantial fraction of the events. 24 refs.

  4. Discovery of new objects in the Orion nebula on HST images - Shocks, compact sources, and protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Wen, Zheng; Hu, Xihai

    1993-01-01

    We have reduced and analyzed a set of narrow-band HST images of a portion of M42 south of the Trapezium. Many new emission-line sources were found, some quite long but so narrow that they are not seen on ground-based images. These include thin shells which are high-ionization shocks. The structure around Orion HH 3 is resolved into multiple components. Slit spectroscopy data establish the high expansion velocities of all these regions. The other objects seen are compact sources. Although some had been detected in VLA surveys and several had been seen from the ground optically, the new images show previously undetected structure and clearly establish that most are protoplanetary disks, which are neutral disks surrounding low-mass pre-main-sequence stars and are ionized from the outside by Theta sup 1 C and Theta sup 2 A Ori.

  5. Theoretical Study of Compact Objects: Pulsars, Thermally Emitting Neutron Stars and Magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    This proposal focuses on understanding the various observational manifestations of magnetized neutron stars (NSs), including pulsars, radio-quiet thermally emitting NSs and magnetars. This is motivated by the recent and ongoing observational progress in the study of isolated NSs, made possible by space telescopes such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, and the prospect of near-future observations by NASA's Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission (to be launched in 2014). Recent observations have raised a number of puzzles/questions that beg for theoretical understanding and modeling. The proposed research projects are grouped into two parts: (1) Theoretical modeling of surface (or near surface) X-ray emission from magnetized NSs, including the study of the physics of electron/ion cyclotron lines, radiative transfer during magnetar bursts, dense plasma refractive effect, partially ionized atmospheres, and calculations of X-ray polarization signatures of isolated and accreting magnetic NSs, in anticipation of their detections by GEMS. (2) Theoretical study and observational constraint on the internal structure and evolution of magnetic fields in young neutron stars in supernova remnants. The proposed research will improve our understanding of different populations of NSs and their underlying physical processes (including the extreme physics of strong-field quantum electrodynamics) and enhance the scientific return from the current and future NASA astrophysics missions. It is relevant to NASA's objective, ``Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe''.

  6. AN ULTRA-LOW-MASS AND SMALL-RADIUS COMPACT OBJECT IN 4U 1746-37?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhaosheng; Qu, Zhijie; Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin; Chen, Li; Qu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    Photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts have already been used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars. RXTE observed three PRE bursts in 4U 1746-37, all with low touchdown fluxes. We discuss here the possibility of a low-mass neutron star in 4U 1746-37 because the Eddington luminosity depends on stellar mass. With typical values of hydrogen mass fraction and color correction factor, a Monte Carlo simulation was applied to constrain the mass and radius of a neutron star in 4U 1746-37. 4U 1746-37 has a high inclination angle. Two geometric effects, the reflection of the far-side accretion disk and the obscuration of the near-side accretion disk, have also been included in the mass and radius constraints of 4U 1746-37. If the reflection of the far-side accretion disk is accounted for, a low-mass compact object (mass of 0.41 ± 0.14 M {sub ☉} and radius of 8.73 ± 1.54 km at 68% confidence) exists in 4U 1746-37. If another effect operated, 4U 1746-37 may contain an ultra-low-mass and small-radius object (M = 0.21 ± 0.06 M {sub ☉}, R = 6.26 ± 0.99 km at 68% confidence). Combining all possibilities, the mass of 4U 1746-37 is 0.41{sub −0.30}{sup +0.70} M{sub ⊙} at 99.7% confidence. For such low-mass neutron stars, it could be reproduced by a self-bound compact star, i.e., a quark star or quark-cluster star.

  7. Phase retrieval in 4f optical system: background compensation and sparse regularization of object with binary amplitude.

    PubMed

    Migukin, Artem; Agour, Mostafa; Katkovnik, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Generally, wave field reconstructions obtained by phase-retrieval algorithms are noisy, blurred, and corrupted by various artifacts such as irregular waves, spots, etc. These distortions, arising due to many factors, such as nonidealities of the optical system (misalignment, focusing errors), dust on optical elements, reflections, and vibration, are hard to localize and specify. It is assumed that there is a cumulative disturbance called "background," which describes mentioned distortions in the coherent imaging system manifested at the sensor plane. Here we propose a novel iterative phase-retrieval algorithm compensating for these distortions in the optical system. An estimate of this background is obtained via special calibration experiments, and then it is used for the object reconstruction. The algorithm is based on the maximum likelihood approach targeting on the optimal object reconstruction from noisy data and imaging enhancement using a priori information on the object amplitude. In this work we demonstrate the compensation of the distortions of the optical trace for a complex-valued object with a binary amplitude. The developed algorithm results in state-of-the-art filtering, and sharp reconstruction imaging of the object amplitude can be achieved. PMID:23292403

  8. DIRECT IMAGING OF A COMPACT MOLECULAR OUTFLOW FROM A VERY LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECT: L1521F-IRS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Bourke, Tyler L.

    2013-09-01

    Studying the physical conditions of very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; L{sub bol} < 0.1 L{sub Sun }) is important for understanding the earliest evolutionary stage of protostars and brown dwarfs. We report interferometric observations of the VeLLO L1521F-IRS, in {sup 12}CO (2-1) line emission and the 1.3 mm continuum emission, using the Submillimeter Array. With the {sup 12}CO (2-1) high-resolution observations, we have spatially resolved a compact but poorly collimated molecular outflow associated with L1521F-IRS for the first time. The blueshifted and redshifted lobes are aligned along the east and west side of L1521F-IRS with a lobe size of Almost-Equal-To 1000 AU. The estimated outflow mass, maximum outflow velocity, and outflow force are (9.0-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }, 7.2 km s{sup -1}, and (7.4-66) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively. The estimated outflow parameters such as size, mass, and momentum rate are similar to values derived for other VeLLOs, and are located at the lower end of values compared to previously studied outflows associated with low- to high-mass star-forming regions. Low-velocity less collimated (1.5 km s{sup -1}/1200 AU) and higher-velocity compact (4.0 km s{sup -1}/920 AU) outflow components are suggested by the data. These velocity structures are not consistent with those expected in the jet-driven or wind-driven outflow models, perhaps suggesting a remnant outflow from the first hydrostatic core as well as an undeveloped outflow from the protostar. Detection of an infrared source and compact millimeter continuum emission suggests the presence of the protostar, while its low bolometric luminosity (0.034-0.07 L{sub Sun }) and small outflow suggests that L1521F is in the earliest protostellar stage (<10{sup 4} yr) and contains a substellar mass object. The bolometric (or internal) luminosity of L1521F-IRS suggests that the current mass accretion rate is an order of

  9. Topics of LIGO physics: Quantum noise in advanced interferometers and template banks for compact-binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanbei

    2003-12-01

    This thesis deals with the planning for advanced interferometeric gravitational-wave detectors, as well as the detection of inspiral waves using first-generation interferometers. In Chapters 2 4 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno), the signal recycling interferometer proposed for LIGO-II is studied in the two-photon formalism. This study reveals the optical spring effect, which allows the interferometer to beat the standard quantum limit, while in the same time introduces a dynamical instability. A classical control system is designed to suppress this instability. In Chapter 5 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Nergis Mavalvala), the quantum noise in heterodyne readout schemes for advanced interferometers is studied. In Chapter 6 (in collaboration with Patricia Purdue), a QND Speed-Meter interferometer with Michelson topology is proposed, analyzed and shown to be a promising candidate for third-generation interferometers (LIGO-III or EURO). This design requires adding a kilometer-scale cavity into the interferometer. In Chapter 7, Sagnac interferometers are analyzed and shown to exhibit a similar broadband QND performance without the need of additional cavity—as expected since these interferometers are sensitive only to time-dependent mirror displacement, and are automatic speed meters. In Chapter 8 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Michele Vallisneri), the Post-Newtonian (PN) breakdown at late-stage inspirals of non-spinning binary black holes (with 5 M⊙ < m1, m2 < 20 M⊙ ) is studied. We propose the use of Detection Template Families (DTFs)—extensions of ordinary PN templates that can mimic all different PN waveforms and hence are plausible to catch the real waveform, yet do not provide straightforward parameter estimation. In Chapter 9 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Michele Vallisneri), binaries carrying spins are studied using an adiabatic PN model. Based on features of the precession dynamics, we

  10. Second post-Newtonian radiative evolution of the relative orientations of angular momenta in spinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, László Á.

    2000-07-01

    The radiative evolution of the relative orientations of the spin and orbital angular momentum vectors S1, S2 and L, characterizing a binary system on an eccentric orbit is studied up to the second post-Newtonian order. As an intermediate result, all Burke-Thorne type instantaneous radiative changes in the spins are shown to average out over a radial period. It is proved that spin-orbit and spin-spin terms contribute to the radiative angular evolution equations, while Newtonian, first and second post-Newtonian terms together with the leading order tail terms do not. In complement to the spin-orbit contribution, given earlier, the spin-spin contribution is computed and split into two-body and self-interaction parts. The latter provide the second post-Ne wtonian order corrections to the 3/2 order Lense-Thirring description.

  11. Spectroscopic observations of V443 Herculis - A symbiotic binary with a low mass white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrzycka, Danuta; Kenyon, Scott J.; Mikolajewska, Joanna

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and existing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary V443 Herculis. This binary system consists of a normal M5 giant and a hot compact star. These two objects have comparable luminosities: about 1500 solar for the M5 giant and about 1000 solar for the compact star. We identify three nebular regions in this binary: a small, highly ionized volume surrounding the hot component, a modestly ionized shell close to the red giant photosphere, and a less dense region of intermediate ionization encompassing both binary components. The system parameters for V443 Her suggest the hot component currently declines from a symbiotic nova eruption.

  12. Study of a new central compact object: The neutron star in the supernova remnant G15.9+0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Sasaki, M.; Santangelo, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present our study of the central point source CXOU J181852.0-150213 in the young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G15.9+0.2 based on the recent ~90 ks Chandra observations. The point source was discovered in 2005 in shorter Chandra observations and was hypothesized to be a neutron star associated with the SNR. Our X-ray spectral analysis strongly supports the hypothesis of a thermally emitting neutron star associated with G15.9+0.2. We conclude that the object belongs to the class of young cooling low-magnetized neutron stars referred to as central compact objects (CCOs). We modeled the spectrum of the neutron star with a blackbody spectral function and with our hydrogen and carbon neutron star atmosphere models, assuming that the radiation is uniformly emitted by the entire stellar surface. Under this assumption, only the carbon atmosphere models yield a distance that is compatible with a source located in the Galaxy. In this respect, CXOU J181852.0-150213 is similar to two other well-studied CCOs, the neutron stars in Cas A and in HESS J1731-347, for which carbon atmosphere models were used to reconcile their emission with the known or estimated distances.

  13. Use of Binary Partition Tree and energy minimization for object-based classification of urban land cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Bijker, Wietske; Stein, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Two main challenges are faced when classifying urban land cover from very high resolution satellite images: obtaining an optimal image segmentation and distinguishing buildings from other man-made objects. For optimal segmentation, this work proposes a hierarchical representation of an image by means of a Binary Partition Tree (BPT) and an unsupervised evaluation of image segmentations by energy minimization. For building extraction, we apply fuzzy sets to create a fuzzy landscape of shadows which in turn involves a two-step procedure. The first step is a preliminarily image classification at a fine segmentation level to generate vegetation and shadow information. The second step models the directional relationship between building and shadow objects to extract building information at the optimal segmentation level. We conducted the experiments on two datasets of Pléiades images from Wuhan City, China. To demonstrate its performance, the proposed classification is compared at the optimal segmentation level with Maximum Likelihood Classification and Support Vector Machine classification. The results show that the proposed classification produced the highest overall accuracies and kappa coefficients, and the smallest over-classification and under-classification geometric errors. We conclude first that integrating BPT with energy minimization offers an effective means for image segmentation. Second, we conclude that the directional relationship between building and shadow objects represented by a fuzzy landscape is important for building extraction.

  14. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  15. Three-dimensional spectroscopy of local luminous compact blue galaxies: kinematic maps of a sample of 22 objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Gallego, J.; Castander, F. J.; Garland, C. A.; Gruel, N.; Pisano, D. J.; Zamorano, J.

    2011-12-01

    We use three-dimensional optical spectroscopy observations of a sample of 22 local luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) to create kinematic maps. By means of these, we classify the kinematics of these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disc (RD), perturbed rotation (PR) and complex kinematics (CK). We find 48 per cent are RDs, 28 per cent are PRs and 24 per cent are CKs. RDs show rotational velocities that range between ˜50 and ˜200 km s-1, and dynamical masses that range between ˜1 × 109 and ˜3 × 1010 M⊙. We also address the following two fundamental questions through the study of the kinematic maps: (i) What processes are triggering the current starburst in LCBGs? We search our maps of the galaxy velocity fields for signatures of recent interactions and close companions that may be responsible for the enhanced star formation in our sample. We find that 5 per cent of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10 per cent of a minor merger and 45 per cent of a companion. This argues in favour of ongoing interactions with close companions as a mechanism for the enhanced star formation activity in these galaxies. (ii) What processes may eventually quench the current starbust in LCBGs? Velocity and velocity width maps, together with emission line ratio maps, can reveal signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) activity or supernova (SN)-driven galactic winds that could halt the current burst. We find only 5 per cent of objects with clear evidence of AGN activity and 27 per cent with kinematics consistent with SN-driven galactic winds. Therefore, a different mechanism may be responsible for quenching the star formation in LCBGs. Finally, from our analysis, we find that the velocity widths of RDs, rather than accounting exclusively for the rotational nature of these objects, may account as well for other kinematic components and may not be good tracers of their dynamical masses.

  16. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  17. AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A.; O'Brien, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Gallo, E.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  18. An Evolving Compact Jet in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary Maxi J1836-194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; O'Brien, K.; Soria, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Homan, J.; Altanirano, D.; Curran, P. A.; Rupen, M. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Dhawan, V.; Fender, R. P.; Gallo, E.; Gandhi, P.; Heinz, S.; Koerding, E. G.; Krimm, H. A.; Maitra, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from approx 10(exp 11) to approx 4 × 10(exp 13) Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  19. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  20. The End of Accretion: The X-Ray Binary/Millisecond Pulsar Transition Object PSR J1023+0038

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Millisecond radio pulsars (MSRPs), those spinning hundreds of times per second, have long been understood to be old pulsars that have been spun up by the accretion of matter from a companion in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase. Yet the details of this transformation, particularly the end of the accretion process and the birth of a radio pulsar, remain mysterious. I will describe the discovery and detailed study of the first object known to transition between MSRP and LMXB states, PSR J1023+0038. By dint of a multiwavelength campaign of observations in the RMSP state, we are able to measure all the key system parameters and show the existence of an X-ray shock close to the pulsar-facing side of the companion. Since the discovery of PSR J1023+0038, two more objects (XSS J12270-4859 and M28I) have been found to make the same transition, and the study of these transitioning objects has become an active field of research. Most interestingly, PSR J1023+0038 has transitioned back into an LMXB state, with an active accretion disk and a puzzling increase in gamma-ray flux. Our detailed picture of the system allows us to test models of accretion against the phenomena we observe in PSR J1023+0038, and in fact these observations challenge current models: in spite of the low luminosity of the system (and low inferred accretion rate) some material is penetrating the centrifugal barrier and falling on the neutron-star surface. Key evidence for explaining this puzzling behaviour will come when PSR J1023+0038 returns to an MSRP state and we are able to compare pulsar timing models from after the LMXB state with those we obtained in this work.

  1. Discovery of a 105-ms X-ray Pulsar in Kesteven-79: On the Nature of Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Seward, F. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of 105-ms X-ray pulsations from the compact central object (CCO) in the supernova remnant \\snr\\ using data acquired with the {\\it Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission). Using two observations of the pulsar taken 6-days apart we derive an upper limit on its spin-down rate of $\\dot P < 9 \\times 10"{-14}$-s-${-l)$,a nd find no evidence for binary orbital motion. The implied energy loss rate is $\\dot E < 3 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-s$A{-1)$, polar magnetic field strength is $B-{\\rm p) < 3 \\times 10A{12)$-G, and spin-down age is $\\tau > 18.5$-kyr. The latter exceeds the remnant's estimated age, suggesting that the pulsar was born spinning near its current period. The X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ is best characterized as a blackbody of temperature $kT {BB) =, 0.43\\pm0.02$ keV, radius $R-{BB) \\approx 1.3$-km, and $I{\\rm bol) = 5.2 \\times 10A{33)$ ergs-sSA{-1)$ at $d = 7.1$-kpc. The sinusoidal light curve is modulated with a pulsed fraction of $>45\\%$, suggestive of a small hot spot on the surface of the rotating neutron star. The lack of a discernible pulsar wind nebula is consistent with an interpretation of \\psr\\ as a rotation-powered pulsar whose spin-down luminosity falls below the empirical threshold for generating bright wind nebulae, $\\dot E-{\\rm c) = 4 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-sSA{-I)$. The age discrepancy suggests that its $\\dot E$ has always been below $\\dot E c$, perhaps a distinguishing property of the CCOs. Alternatively, the X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ suggests a low-luminosity AXP, but the weak inferred $B-{\\rm p)$ field is incompatible with a magnetar theory of its X-ray luminosity. The ordinary spin parameters discovered from \\psr\\ highlight the inability of existing theories to explain the high luminosities and temperatures of CCO thermal X-ray spectra.

  2. Radioactivity and Thermalization in the Ejecta of Compact Object Mergers and Their Impact on Kilonova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel; Wu, Meng-Ru; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    One promising electromagnetic signature of compact object mergers are kilonovae: approximately isotropic radioactively powered transients that peak days to weeks post-merger. Key uncertainties in kilonova modeling include the emission profiles of the radioactive decay products—non-thermal β -particles, α -particles, fission fragments, and γ -rays—and the efficiency with which their kinetic energy is absorbed by the ejecta. The radioactive energy emitted, along with its thermalization efficiency, sets the luminosity budget and is therefore crucial for predicting kilonova light curves. We outline uncertainties in the radioactivity, describe the processes by which the decay products transfer energy to the ejecta, and calculate time-dependent thermalization efficiencies for each particle type. We determine the net thermalization efficiency and explore its dependence on r-process yields—in particular, the production of α -decaying translead nuclei—and on ejecta mass, velocity, and magnetic fields. We incorporate our results into detailed radiation transport simulations, and calculate updated kilonova light curve predictions. Thermalization effects reduce kilonova luminosities by a factor of roughly 2 at peak, and by an order of magnitude at later times (15 days or more after explosion). We present analytic fits to time-dependent thermalization efficiencies, which can be used to improve light curve models. We revisit the putative kilonova that accompanied gamma-ray burst 130603B, and estimate the mass ejected in that event. We find later time kilonova light curves can be significantly impacted by α -decay from translead isotopes; data at these times may therefore be diagnostic of ejecta abundances.

  3. Parsec-scale H I absorption structure in a low-redshift galaxy seen against a compact symmetric object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, A. D.; Zwaan, M. A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Péroux, C.; Liske, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present global VLBI observations of the 21-cm transition of atomic hydrogen seen in absorption against the radio source J0855+5751. The foreground absorber (SDSS J085519.05+575140.7) is a dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026. As the background source is heavily resolved by VLBI, the data allow us to map the properties of the foreground H I gas with a spatial resolution of 2 pc. The absorbing gas corresponds to a single coherent structure with an extent >35 pc, but we also detect significant and coherent variations, including a change in the H I optical depth by a factor of 5 across a distance of ≲ 6 pc. The large size of the structure provides support for the Heiles & Troland model of the interstellar medium, as well as its applicability to external galaxies. The large variations in H I optical depth also suggest that caution should be applied when interpreting TS measurements from radio-detected DLAs. In addition, the distorted appearance of the background radio source is indicative of a strong jet-cloud interaction in its host galaxy. We have measured its redshift (z = 0.541 86) using optical spectroscopy on the William Herschel Telescope and this confirms that J0855+5751 is an FR II radio source with a physical extent of <1 kpc and supports the previous identification of this source as a compact symmetric object. These sources often show absorption associated with the host galaxy and we suggest that both H I and OH should be searched for in J0855+5751.

  4. NON-THERMAL RADIATION FROM COLLISIONS OF COMPACT OBJECTS WITH INTERMEDIATE-SCALE JETS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, W.; Banasiński, P.

    2015-07-10

    Massive black holes in active galaxies are immersed in huge concentrations of late-type stars in the galactic bulges and also early-type massive stars in the nuclear stellar clusters, which are additionally surrounded by quasi-spherical halos on a scale of several kpc that contain from a few hundred up to several thousand globular clusters (GCs). It is expected that significant numbers of red giant stars, massive stars, and also GCs can move through the jet expelled from the central engine of the active galaxy. We consider collisions of stars from the galactic bulge, nuclear cluster, and GCs with the jet plasma. As a result of such collisions, multiple shocks are expected to appear in the jet around these compact objects. Therefore, the plasma in the kpc-scale jet can be significantly disturbed. We show that particles can be accelerated on these shocks up to multi-TeV energies. TeV leptons emit synchrotron radiation, extending up to X-ray energies, and also comptonize radiation produced in a stellar cluster and also the microwave background radiation to TeV γ-ray energies. We show that such non-thermal radiation is likely to be detectable from the intermediate-scale jets of nearby active galaxies for a reasonable number of stars and GCs immersed within the jet. As an example, we calculate the expected non-thermal emission in X-ray and gamma-ray energies from the nearby radio galaxy Cen A, from which steady gamma-ray emission with a complex spectrum has recently been reported by Fermi and the HESS Observatories.

  5. EFFECT OF A HIGH OPACITY ON THE LIGHT CURVES OF RADIOACTIVELY POWERED TRANSIENTS FROM COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel

    2013-09-20

    The coalescence of compact objects is a promising astrophysical source of detectable gravitational wave signals. The ejection of r-process material from such mergers may lead to a radioactively powered electromagnetic counterpart signal which, if discovered, would enhance the science returns. As very little is known about the optical properties of heavy r-process elements, previous light-curve models have adopted opacities similar to those of iron group elements. Here we consider the effect of heavier elements, particularly the lanthanides, which increase the ejecta opacity by several orders of magnitude. We include these higher opacities in time-dependent, multi-wavelength radiative transport calculations to predict the broadband light curves of one-dimensional models over a range of parameters (ejecta masses {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and velocities {approx}0.1-0.3 c). We find that the higher opacities lead to much longer duration light curves which can last a week or more. The emission is shifted toward the infrared bands due to strong optical line blanketing, and the colors at later times are representative of a blackbody near the recombination temperature of the lanthanides (T {approx} 2500 K). We further consider the case in which a second mass outflow, composed of {sup 56}Ni, is ejected from a disk wind, and show that the net result is a distinctive two component spectral energy distribution, with a bright optical peak due to {sup 56}Ni and an infrared peak due to r-process ejecta. We briefly consider the prospects for detection and identification of these transients.

  6. Spin-Down Measurement of PSR J1852+0040 in Kesteven 79: Central Compact Objects as Anti-Magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2010-01-01

    Using XMM-Newton and Chandra, we achieved phase-connected timing of the 105 ms X-ray pulsar PSR J1852+0040 that provides the first measurement of the spin-down rate of a member of the class of central compact objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants. We measure \\dot{P} = (8.68 ± 0.09) × 10^{-18}, and find no evidence for timing noise or variations in X-ray flux over 4.8 year. In the dipole spin-down formalism, this implies a surface magnetic field strength Bs = 3.1 × 1010 G, the smallest ever measured for a young neutron star, and consistent with being a fossil field. In combination with upper limits on Bs from other CCO pulsars, this is strong evidence in favor of the "anti-magnetar" explanation for their low luminosity and lack of magnetospheric activity or synchrotron nebulae. While this dipole field is small, it can prevent accretion of sufficient fall-back material so that the observed X-ray luminosity of Lx = 5.3 × 1033(d/7.1 kpc)2 erg s-1 must instead be residual cooling. The spin-down luminosity of PSR J1852+0040, \\dot{E} = 3.0 × 10^{32} erg s-1, is an order of magnitude smaller than Lx . Fitting of the X-ray spectrum to two blackbodies finds small emitting radii, R 1 = 1.9 km and R 2 = 0.45 km, for components of kT 1 = 0.30 keV and kT 2 = 0.52 keV, respectively. Such small, hot regions are ubiquitous among CCOs, and are not yet understood in the context of the anti-magnetar picture because anisotropic surface temperature is usually attributed to the effects of strong magnetic fields.

  7. Time-domain analysis of a dynamically tuned signal recycled interferometer for the detection of chirp gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we study a particular method of detection of chirp signals from coalescing compact binary stars—the so-called dynamical tuning, i.e., amplification of the signal via tracking of its instantaneous frequency by the tuning of a signal-recycled detector. The motion of the signal-recycling mirror, the position of which defines the tuning of the detector, causes nonstationarity of the detector. The dynamically tuned detector can be simulated in a quasistationary approximation if the mirror position, amplitude, and frequency of a chirp signal are changing slowly. A time-domain consideration developed for signal-recycled interferometers, in particular GEO 600, describes the signal and noise evolution in the more general case of a purely nonstationary detector. We prove that the shot noise from the dark port and optical losses remains white in this case. The analysis of the transient effects shows that during the perfect tracking of the chirp frequency only transients from fast amplitude changes arise because the transients from changes of the detector tuning and signal frequency completely cancel each other. The slow change of the amplitude in this case establishes a so-called virtually stationary detection, meaning the signal fields at the detector hold their stationary values at each instance of time, corresponding to the instantaneous parameters of the gravitational wave and of the detector. The signal-to-noise-ratio gain from the implementation of dynamical tuning, calculated in this paper, is ˜17 for a shot noise-limited GEO 600-like detector and ˜7 for a detector with both shot and displacement noise.

  8. Soft X-Ray Extended Emissions of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts as Electromagnetic Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers: Possible Origin and Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ~1050-51 erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ~100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ~0.1 M ⊙ around BHs formed after the mergers and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to >~ 1052 erg can be extracted with an observed timescale of >~ 30(1 + z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of α < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ~ 10-(2-4) M ⊙, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ~ 10-2 M ⊙, possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ~ 10-4 M ⊙, possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ˜ 6 yr-1 (Δ Ω softEE/4π) (R}GW/40 yr-1) for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ~0.°1 angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like the Wide-Field MAXI. Here, ΔΩsoftEE is the beaming factor of the soft EEs and R}GW is the NS-NS merger rate detectable by the advanced LIGO, the advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

  9. EFFECTS OF ROTATIONALLY INDUCED MIXING IN COMPACT BINARY SYSTEMS WITH LOW-MASS SECONDARIES AND IN SINGLE SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Robinson, Edward L.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-08-20

    Many population synthesis and stellar evolution studies have addressed the evolution of close binary systems in which the primary is a compact remnant and the secondary is filling its Roche lobe, thus triggering mass transfer. Although tidal locking is expected in such systems, most studies have neglected the rotationally induced mixing that may occur. Here we study the possible effects of mixing in mass-losing stars for a range of secondary star masses and metallicities. We find that tidal locking can induce rotational mixing prior to contact and thus affect the evolution of the secondary star if the effects of the Spruit-Tayler dynamo are included both for angular momentum and chemical transport. Once contact is made, the effect of mass transfer tends to be more rapid than the evolutionary timescale, so the effects of mixing are no longer directly important, but the mass-transfer strips matter to inner layers that may have been affected by the mixing. These effects are enhanced for secondaries of 1-1.2 M{sub Sun} and for lower metallicities. We discuss the possible implications for the paucity of carbon in the secondaries of the cataclysmic variable SS Cyg and the black hole candidate XTE J1118+480 and for the progenitor evolution of Type Ia supernovae. We also address the issue of the origin of blue straggler stars in globular and open clusters. We find that for models that include rotation consistent with that observed for some blue straggler stars, evolution is chemically homogeneous. This leads to tracks in the H-R diagram that are brighter and bluer than the non-rotating main-sequence turn-off point. Rotational mixing could thus be one of the factors that contribute to the formation of blue stragglers.

  10. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  11. mJIVE-20: A survey for compact mJy radio objects with the very long baseline array

    SciTech Connect

    Deller, A. T.; Middelberg, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present the description and early results of the mJy Imaging VLBA Exploration at 20 cm (mJIVE-20). mJIVE-20 is a large project on the Very Long Baseline Array which is systematically inspecting a large sample of mJy radio sources, pre-selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) survey made with the Very Large Array, to identify any compact emission that may be present. The survey is being undertaken using filler time on the VLBA, which utilizes short segments scheduled in bad weather and/or with a reduced number of antennas, during which no highly rated science projects can be scheduled. The newly available multifield capability of the VLBA makes it possible for us to inspect of the order of 100 sources per hour of observing time with a 6.75σ detection sensitivity of approximately 1 mJy beam{sup –1}. The results of the mJIVE-20 survey are made publicly available as soon as the data are calibrated. After 18 months of observing, over 20,000 FIRST sources have been inspected, with 4336 very long baseline interferometry detections. These initial results suggest that within the range 1-200 mJy, fainter sources are somewhat more likely to be dominated by a very compact component than brighter sources. Over half of all arcsecond-scale mJy radio sources contain a compact component, although the fraction of sources that are dominated by milliarcsecond scale structure (where the majority of the arcsecond scale flux is recovered in the mJIVE-20 image) is smaller at around 30%-35%, increasing toward lower flux densities. Significant differences are seen depending on the optical classification of the source. Radio sources with a stellar/point-like counterpart in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are more likely to be detected overall, but this detection likelihood appears to be independent of the arcsecond-scale radio flux density. The trend toward higher radio compactness for fainter sources is confined to sources that are not detected in SDSS

  12. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  13. Circinus X-1: a Laboratory for Studying the Accretion Phenomenon in Compact Binary X-Ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson-Saba, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the binary X-ray source Circinus X-1 provide samples of a range of spectral and temporal behavior whose variety is thought to reflect a broad continuum of accretion conditions in an eccentric binary system. The data support an identification of three or more X-ray spectral components, probably associated with distinct emission regions.

  14. Planets in Evolved Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.

    2011-03-01

    Exo-planets are typically thought to form in protoplanetary disks left over from protostellar disk of their newly formed host star. However, additional planetary formation and evolution routes may exist in old evolved binary systems. Here we discuss the implications of binary stellar evolution on planetary systems in such environments. In these binary systems stellar evolution could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and could be transferred to its binary companion, and may form an accretion disk around it. This raises the possibility that such a disk could provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing first generation planets surviving the post-MS evolution of such systems would be dynamically effected by the mass loss in the systems and may also interact with the newly formed disk. Such planets and/or planetesimals may also serve as seeds for the formation of the second generation planets, and/or interact with them, possibly forming atypical planetary systems. Second generation planetary systems should be typically found in white dwarf binary systems, and may show various observational signatures. Most notably, second generation planets could form in environment which are inaccessible, or less favorable, for first generation planets. The orbital phase space available for the second generation planets could be forbidden (in terms of the system stability) to first generation planets in the pre-evolved progenitor binaries. In addition planets could form in metal poor environments such as globular clusters and/or in double compact object binaries. Observations of exo-planets in such forbidden or unfavorable regions could possibly serve to uniquely identify their second generation character. Finally, we point out a few observed candidate second generation planetary systems, including Gl 86, HD 27442 and all of the

  15. Black Hole Formation in Galactic X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, Bart; Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.

    2006-12-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of proper motions have been measured for Galactic black hole X-ray binaries. When supplemented with accurate determinations of other system parameters, these kinematical constraints harbor a wealth of information on compact object formation, such as wether or not black holes receive kicks at birth. In this presentation, we present constraints on the formation of the black hole X-ray binaries GRO J1655-40 and XTE J1118+480. We particularly explore the origin of the compact objects in these X-ray binaries by modeling the ongoing mass transfer phase, tracing the motion in the Galaxy back to the birth site of the black hole, and examining the dynamics of core-collapses of the black hole progenitor.

  16. OBSERVATIONAL UPPER BOUND ON THE COSMIC ABUNDANCES OF NEGATIVE-MASS COMPACT OBJECTS AND ELLIS WORMHOLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Asada, Hideki

    2013-05-01

    The latest result in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) has set the first cosmological constraints on negative-mass compact objects and Ellis wormholes. There are no multiple images lensed by the above two exotic objects for {approx}50, 000 distant quasars in the SQLS data. Therefore, an upper bound is put on the cosmic abundances of these lenses. The number density of negative-mass compact objects is n < 10{sup -8}(10{sup -4}) h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} at the mass scale |M| > 10{sup 15}(10{sup 12}) M{sub Sun }, which corresponds to the cosmological density parameter |{Omega}| < 10{sup -4} at the galaxy and cluster mass range |M| = 10{sup 12-15} M{sub Sun }. The number density of the Ellis wormhole is n < 10{sup -4} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} for a range of the throat radius a = 10-10{sup 4} pc, which is much smaller than the Einstein ring radius.

  17. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Esposito, Paolo; Crawford III, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Freire, Paulo

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  18. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Wang, Zhilu; Berry, Christopher P. L.; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of ≳100 solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass-ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above 100 M⊙ with 95 per cent confidence provided the massive body exceeds 130 M⊙. For source masses above ˜200 M⊙, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sensitivity is particularly important for massive sources, since sensitivity to the inspiral phase is critical for measuring the mass of the stellar-mass companion. We show that we can accurately infer source parameters for cosmologically redshifted signals by applying appropriate corrections. We investigate the impact of uncertainty in the model gravitational waveforms and conclude that our main results are likely robust to systematics.

  19. Search for dust shells in W Ser binaries and similar object: RX Cassiopeiae and TX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranova, O. G.; Shenavrin, V. I.

    1997-11-01

    The results of UBVRJHKLM photometry for a strongly interacting W Ser binary (RX Cas) and an Algol-type system (TX UMa) are analyzed. The spectral classification of the stellar components of the binaries is made, and the sources of excess emission at wavelengths lambda 3.5 and 5 m are analyzed. The weak excess at lambda 5 microns are analyzed. The weak excess at lambda 5 microns in TX UMa is shown to be associated with the emission of an ionized shell with a volume emission measure ~ 2.7 x 10^57 cm^-3. The excess at lambda 3.5 and 5 microns in RX Cas is attributable to the emission of an optically thin circumstellar dust shell with a grain temperature ~ 600-700 K. The luminosity is ~ 3 x 10^33 erg s^-1, the radius of the dust shell is ~ 4.6 x 10^14 cm, the optical depth at lambda 1.25 microns is ~10^-3, and the mass is ~10^23 g.

  20. Formation of Kuiper Belt Binaries by Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Youdin, Andrew N.; Richardson, Derek C.

    2010-09-01

    A large fraction of ~100 km class low-inclination objects in the classical Kuiper Belt (KB) are binaries with comparable masses and a wide separation of components. A favored model for their formation is that they were captured during the coagulation growth of bodies in the early KB. However, recent studies have suggested that large, gsim100 km objects can rapidly form in the protoplanetary disks when swarms of locally concentrated solids collapse under their own gravity. Here, we examine the possibility that KB binaries formed during gravitational collapse when the excess of angular momentum prevented the agglomeration of available mass into a solitary object. We find that this new mechanism provides a robust path toward the formation of KB binaries with observed properties, and can explain wide systems such as 2001 QW322 and multiples such as (47171) 1999 TC36. Notably, the gravitational collapse is capable of producing ~100% binary fraction for a wide range of the swarm's initial angular momentum values. The binary components have similar masses (~80% have a secondary-over-primary radius ratio >0.7) and their separation ranges from ~1000 to ~100,000 km. The binary orbits have eccentricities from e = 0 to ~1, with the majority having e < 0.6. The binary orbit inclinations with respect to the initial angular momentum of the swarm range from i = 0 to ~90°, with most cases having i < 50°. The total binary mass represents a characteristic fraction of the collapsing swarm's total initial mass, M tot, suggesting M tot equivalent to that of a radius ~100-250 km compact object. Our binary formation mechanism also implies that the primary and secondary components in each binary pair should have identical bulk composition, which is consistent with the current photometric data. We discuss the applicability of our results to the Pluto-Charon, Orcus-Vanth, (617) Patroclus-Menoetius, and (90) Antiope binary systems.

  1. Be/X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    The interest in X/ γ-ray Astronomy has grown enormously in the last decades thanks to the ability to send X-ray space missions above the Earth’s atmosphere. There are more than half a million X-ray sources detected and over a hundred missions (past and currently operational) devoted to the study of cosmic X/ γ rays. With the improved sensibilities of the currently active missions new detections occur almost on a daily basis. Among these, neutron-star X-ray binaries form an important group because they are among the brightest extra-solar objects in the sky and are characterized by dramatic variability in brightness on timescales ranging from milliseconds to months and years. Their main source of power is the gravitational energy released by matter accreted from a companion star and falling onto the neutron star in a relatively close binary system. Neutron-star X-ray binaries divide into high-mass and low-mass systems according to whether the mass of the donor star is above ˜8 or below ˜2 M⊙, respectively. Massive X-ray binaries divide further into supergiant X-ray binaries and Be/X-ray binaries depending on the evolutionary status of the optical companion. Virtually all Be/X-ray binaries show X-ray pulsations. Therefore, these systems can be used as unique natural laboratories to investigate the properties of matter under extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called “Be phenomenon”, such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/ R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass

  2. Thermodynamics of static black objects in D dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with D-4 compact dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahabandu, C.; Suranyi, P.; Vaz, C.; Wijewardhana, L. C.

    2006-02-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of static black objects such as black holes, black strings and their generalizations to D dimensions (“black branes”) in a gravitational theory containing the four-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet term in the action, with D-4 dimensions compactified torus. The entropies of black holes and black branes are compared to obtain information on the stability of these objects and to find their phase diagrams. We demonstrate the existence of a critical mass, which depends on the scale of the compactified dimensions, below which the black hole entropy dominates over the entropy of the black membrane.

  3. VERITAS Observations of Gamma-ray Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Jamie; VERITAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray emitting binary systems constitute a small fraction of the high-energy catalogue, with only five objects confirmed to emit photons above 100 GeV. They comprise a compact object (black hole or neutron star) and a high-mass stellar companion, with gamma-ray emission arising as the result of particle acceleration within the system. The details of how and where this acceleration takes place, and the mechanisms which modulate the subsequent emission, remain unclear. We report here on recent observations of gamma-ray binary systems with the VERITAS observatory.

  4. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  5. An improved catalog of halo wide binary candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé and Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio and Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ∼ a {sup –1} (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  6. An Improved Catalog of Halo Wide Binary Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé & Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio & Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ~ a -1 (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  7. Spectral formation in black hole and neutron star binaries: theory vs observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfanov, Marat

    2016-07-01

    I will discuss spectral formation in X-ray binaries with particular emphasis on the dichotomy between black holes and neutron stars. Predictions of theoretical models will be confronted with observations of compact X-ray sources in the Milky Way and beyond. I will discuss how the difference in the nature of the compact object leads to observable differences between accreting neutron stars and black holes and how accretion regimes change across the mass accretion rate range. This will be illustrated with observations of X-ray binaries in the Milky Way and external galaxies, the latter providing us with a unique possibility to explore accretion at its extremities.

  8. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Simulations at Georgia Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland

    2009-05-01

    Mixed compact object binaries consisting of a black hole and a neutron star are expected to be not only one of the primary sources of gravitational radiation to be observed by interferometric detectors but also the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts. We report on the status of our effort at Georgia Tech to model these mixed binary systems using the moving puncture method. The results are obtained with an enhanced version our vacuum MayaKranc code coupled to the hydrodynamics Whisky code. We present preliminary results of gravitational waveforms and the disruption of the neutron star for simple polytropic equations of state.

  9. Search for Binary Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Grundy, W. M.; Ryan, E. L.; Benecchi, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have reexamined 41 Trojan asteroids observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to search for unresolved binaries. We have identified one candidate binary with a separation of 53 milliarcsec, about the width of the diffraction limited point-spread function (PSF). Sub-resolution-element detection of binaries is possible with HST because of the high signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the stability of the PSF. Identification and confirmation of binary Trojans is important because a Trojan Tour is one of five possible New Frontiers missions. A binary could constitute a potentially high value target because of the opportunity to study two objects and to test models of the primordial nature of binaries. The potential to derive mass-based physical information from the binary orbit could yield more clues to the origin of Trojans.

  10. Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Constraints on Binary Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogera, V.

    2004-12-01

    In the coming decade gravitational-wave astronomy is expected to develop as a new field of astronomical research and exploration of the cosmos. In this talk I summarize the outcome of a recent workshop ``Imagining the Future: Gravitational Wave Astronomy" and discuss a specific example of how gravitational-wave observations could be used in the future to improve our understanding of binary evolution and compact objects. This work is partially supported by NSF Gravitational Physics Program and a NASA ATP awards.

  11. Modeling the X-rays from the central compact object PSR J1852+0040 in Kesteven 79: Evidence for a strongly magnetized neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-08-01

    I present modeling of the X-ray pulsations from the central compact object (CCO) PSR J1852+0040 in the Galactic supernova remnant Kesteven 79. In the context of thermal surface radiation from a rotating neutron star (NS), a conventional polar cap model can reproduce the broad, large-amplitude X-ray pulse only with a 'pencil plus fan' beam emission pattern, which is characteristic of ≳ 10{sup 12} G NS atmospheres, much greater than the ∼10{sup 10} G external dipole field inferred from the pulsar spin-down rate. This discrepancy can be explained by an axially displaced dipole. For other beaming patterns, it is necessary to invoke high-aspect-ratio emitting regions that are greatly longitudinally elongated, possibly due to an extremely offset dipole. For all assumed emission models, the existence of strong internal magnetic fields (≳ 10{sup 14} G) that preferentially channel internal heat to only a portion of the exterior is required to account for the implied high-temperature contrast across the stellar surface. This lends further observational evidence in support of the 'hidden' strong magnetic field scenario, in which CCOs possess submerged magnetic fields that are substantially stronger than the external dipole field, presumably due to burial by fallback of supernova ejecta. I also conduct phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and find no evidence for prominent spin-phase-dependent absorption features that could be produced by cyclotron absorption/scattering.

  12. A compact quasi 3D threshold voltage modeling and performance analysis of a novel linearly graded binary metal alloy quadruple gate MOSFET for subdued short channel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkhel, Saheli; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2015-06-01

    In the present era of low power devices, to keep pace with the aggressive scaling demands, the concept of surrounding gate MOS geometry is gradually being popular among the researchers for enhancing the performance of nanoscale MOSFETs due to the inherent benefit of the gate-all-around geometry compared to the conventional planar structures. In this research endeavour, we have, for the first time, incorporated the novel theory of work function engineering of a binary metal alloy gate with continuous horizontal variation of mole fraction in a fully depleted quadruple gate MOSFET, thereby proposing a new structure namely Work Function Engineered Gate Quadruple Gate MOSFET (WFEG QG MOSFET). A detailed analytical modeling of this novel WFEG QG MOS structure has been formulated to present a quasi 3D threshold voltage model based on 3D scaling equation instead of the tedious solution of 3D Poisson's equation. The device short channel effects have been included by calculating the natural length of the proposed QG device using the effective number of gate (ENG) concept. An overall comparative performance analysis of the WFEG QG MOS and normal QG MOSFET has been done to establish the superiority of the proposed WFEG structure over its QG equivalent in terms of reduced Short Channel Effects (SCEs), Drain Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL) and Threshold Voltage Roll Off (TVRO). The results of our analytical modeling are found to be in good agreement with the simulation results, thereby establishing the accuracy of our modeling.

  13. Poynting-Flux-Driven Bubbles and Shocks Around Merging Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, M. V.; Loeb, A.

    2013-04-01

    Merging binaries of compact relativistic objects are thought to be progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts. Because of the strong magnetic field of one or both binary members and high orbital frequencies, these binaries are strong sources of energy in the form of Poynting flux. The steady injection of energy by the binary forms a bubble filled with matter with the relativistic equation of state, which pushes on the surrounding plasma and can drive a shock wave in it. Unlike the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution for a point-like explosion, the shock wave here is continuously driven by the ever-increasing pressure inside the bubble. We calculate from the first principles the dynamics and evolution of the bubble and the shock surrounding it, demonstrate that it exhibits finite time singularity and find the corresponding analytical solution. We predict that such binaries can be observed as radio sources a few hours before and after the merger.

  14. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Relativistic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Lehner, L.; Olabarrieta, I.; Tohline, J. E.; Liebling, S. L.; Rahman, T.; Hirschman, E.; Neilsen, D.

    2006-09-01

    We present recent results from our efforts to evolve relativistic binaries composed of compact objects. We simultaneously solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations to evolve the material components of the binary and Einstein's equations to evolve the space-time. These two codes are coupled through an adaptive mesh refinement driver (had). One of the ultimate goals of this project is to address the merger of a neutron star and black hole and assess the possible observational signature of such systems as gamma ray bursts. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311 and in part through NASA's ATP program grant NAG5-13430. The computations were performed primarily at NCSA through grant MCA98N043 and at LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  15. The Spin-down of PSR J0821-4300 and PSR J1210-5226: Confirmation of Central Compact Objects as Anti-magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Alford, J.

    2013-03-01

    Using XMM-Newton and Chandra, we measure period derivatives for the second and third known pulsars in the class of central compact objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants, proving that these young neutron stars have exceptionally weak dipole magnetic field components. For the 112 ms PSR J0821-4300 in Puppis A, \\dot{P} = (9.28 +/- 0.36) \\times 10^{-18}. Its proper motion, μ = 61 ± 9 mas yr-1, was also measured using Chandra. This contributes a kinematic term to the period derivative via the Shklovskii effect, which is subtracted from \\dot{P} to derive dipole Bs = 2.9 × 1010 G, a value similar to that of the first measured CCO, PSR J1852+0040 in Kes 79, which has Bs = 3.1 × 1010 G. Antipodal surface hot spots with different temperatures and areas are deduced from the X-ray spectrum and pulse profiles. Paradoxically, such nonuniform surface temperature appears to require strong crustal magnetic fields, probably toroidal or quadrupolar components much stronger than the external dipole. A spectral feature, consisting of either an emission line at ≈0.75 keV or an absorption line at ≈0.46 keV, is modulated in strength with the rotation. It may be due to a cyclotron process in a magnetic field on the surface that is slightly stronger than the dipole deduced from the spin-down. We also timed anew the 424 ms PSR J1210-5226, resolving previous ambiguities about its spin-down rate. Its \\dot{P} is (2.22 ± 0.02) × 10-17, corresponding to Bs = 9.8 × 1010 G. This is also compatible with a cyclotron resonance interpretation of its prominent absorption line at 0.7 keV and its harmonics. These results deepen the mystery of the origin and evolution of CCOs: Why are their numerous descendants not evident?

  16. The neutron star in HESS J1731-347: Central compact objects as laboratories to study the equation of state of superdense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Pühlhofer, G.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Santangelo, A.; Werner, K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Central compact objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants are isolated thermally emitting neutron stars (NSs). They are most probably characterized by a magnetic field strength that is roughly two orders of magnitude lower than that of most of the radio and accreting pulsars. The thermal emission of CCOs can be modeled to obtain constraints on the physical parameters of the star such as its mass, radius, effective temperature, and chemical composition. Aims: The CCO in HESS J1731-347 is one of the brightest objects in this class. Starting from 2007, it was observed several times with different X-ray satellites. Here we present our analysis of two new XMM-Newton observations of the source performed in 2013 which increase the total exposure time of the data available for spectral analysis by a factor of about five compared to the analyses presented before. Methods: We use our numerical spectral models for carbon and hydrogen atmospheres to fit the spectrum of the CCO. From our fits, we derive constraints on the physical parameters of the emitting star such as its mass, radius, distance, and effective temperature. We also use the new data to derive new upper limits on the source pulsations and to confirm the absence of a long-term flux and spectral variability. Results: The analysis shows that atmosphere models are clearly preferred by the fit over the blackbody spectral function. Under the assumption that the X-ray emission is uniformly produced by the entire star surface (supported by the lack of pulsations), hydrogen atmosphere models lead to uncomfortably large distances of the CCO, above 7-8 kpc. On the other hand, the carbon atmosphere model formally excludes distances above 5-6 kpc and is compatible with the source located in the Scutum-Crux (~3 kpc) or Norma-Cygnus (~4.5 kpc) Galactic spiral arm. We provide and discuss the corresponding confidence contours in the NS mass-radius plane. The measured effective temperature indicates that the NS is

  17. Period Evolution of Double White Dwarf Binaries Under the Influence of Gravitational Wave Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kylee; Benacquista, Matt; Belczynski, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects, such as Double White Dwarf (DWD) binaries, are the most populous producers of gravitational waves (GW) at low frequencies. The gravitational radiation (GR) emitted from the Galactic DWD binary population will create an unresolvable signal known as the confusion noise-limit (CNL) in the space-based evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA). It is predicted that many thousand DWD binary signals will rise above the CNL and create resolvable GW signals. In previous work, Heather Johnson, from the University of Texas-Austin, produced ~61 million DWD systems using the binary population features in the StarTrack population synthesis code created by Chris Belczynski. We have created an evolutionary code that continues the period evolution of the DWD binaries under the effects of GR. Our present model only accounts for detached binary systems, but we are working on incorporating more features. Current period evolution models often extrapolate data based on smaller binary populations, however our model will utilize ~61 million binary systems in order to avoid inaccuracies.We then use two standard cylindrical density distributions to populate a galaxy with the evolved systems. We also discuss correlations between the progenitor binaries and the eLISA sources.

  18. CLASSIFYING X-RAY BINARIES: A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, Giri; Bornn, Luke; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil

    2015-08-10

    In X-ray binary star systems consisting of a compact object that accretes material from an orbiting secondary star, there is no straightforward means to decide whether the compact object is a black hole or a neutron star. To assist in this process, we develop a Bayesian statistical model that makes use of the fact that X-ray binary systems appear to cluster based on their compact object type when viewed from a three-dimensional coordinate system derived from X-ray spectral data where the first coordinate is the ratio of counts in the mid- to low-energy band (color 1), the second coordinate is the ratio of counts in the high- to low-energy band (color 2), and the third coordinate is the sum of counts in all three bands. We use this model to estimate the probabilities of an X-ray binary system containing a black hole, non-pulsing neutron star, or pulsing neutron star. In particular, we utilize a latent variable model in which the latent variables follow a Gaussian process prior distribution, and hence we are able to induce the spatial correlation which we believe exists between systems of the same type. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the accurate prediction of system types using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All Sky Monitor data, but it is not flawless. In particular, non-pulsing neutron systems containing “bursters” that are close to the boundary demarcating systems containing black holes tend to be classified as black hole systems. As a byproduct of our analyses, we provide the astronomer with the public R code which can be used to predict the compact object type of XRBs given training data.

  19. Nonthermal X-Rays from Supernova Remnant G330.2+1.0 and the Characteristics of its Central Compact Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Kargaltsev, O.; Pavlov, G.; Mori, K.; Slane, P. O.; Hughes, J. P.; Burrows, D. N.; Garmire, G. P.

    2009-01-01

    We present results from our X-ray data analysis of the supernova remnant (SNR) G330.2+1.0 and its central compact object (CCO), CXOU J160103.1-513353 (J1601 hereafter). Using our XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, the X-ray spectrum of J1601 is described by neutron star (NS) atmosphere models, indicating a small hot region(s) (R 1-2 km, Th 2.5-3.7 MK) and the cool NS surface (R = 10 km, Ts < 1.5 MK). X-ray pulsations are not detected. However, our timing analysis of the XMM-Newton data is limited by poor photon statistics, and thus pulsations with a relatively low amplitude (i.e., an intrinsic pulsed-fraction < 40%) cannot be ruled out. Our results indicate that J1601 is a CCO similar to that in the Cassiopeia A SNR. X-ray emission from SNR G330.2+1.0 is dominated by power law continuum (photon index 2.1-2.5) which primarily originates from thin filaments along the boundary shell. This X-ray spectrum implies synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated electrons with an exponential roll-off frequency 2-3 x 1017 Hz. For the measured widths of the X-ray filaments (D 0.3 pc) and the estimated shock velocity (vs a few x 103 km/s), a downstream magnetic field B 10-50 uG is derived. The estimated maximum electron energy Emax 27-38 TeV suggests that G330.2+1.0 is a candidate TeV source. We detect faint thermal X-ray emission in G330.2+1.0. We estimate a low preshock density n0 0.1 cm-3, which suggests a dominant contribution from an inverse Compton mechanism (than the proton-proton collision) to the prospective gamma-ray emission. Follow-up deep radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray observations will be essential to reveal the details of the shock parameters and the nature of particle accelerations in this SNR.

  20. FORMATION OF KUIPER BELT BINARIES BY GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Youdin, Andrew N.; Richardson, Derek C.

    2010-09-15

    A large fraction of {approx}100 km class low-inclination objects in the classical Kuiper Belt (KB) are binaries with comparable masses and a wide separation of components. A favored model for their formation is that they were captured during the coagulation growth of bodies in the early KB. However, recent studies have suggested that large, {approx}>100 km objects can rapidly form in the protoplanetary disks when swarms of locally concentrated solids collapse under their own gravity. Here, we examine the possibility that KB binaries formed during gravitational collapse when the excess of angular momentum prevented the agglomeration of available mass into a solitary object. We find that this new mechanism provides a robust path toward the formation of KB binaries with observed properties, and can explain wide systems such as 2001 QW{sub 322} and multiples such as (47171) 1999 TC{sub 36}. Notably, the gravitational collapse is capable of producing {approx}100% binary fraction for a wide range of the swarm's initial angular momentum values. The binary components have similar masses ({approx}80% have a secondary-over-primary radius ratio >0.7) and their separation ranges from {approx}1000 to {approx}100,000 km. The binary orbits have eccentricities from e = 0 to {approx}1, with the majority having e < 0.6. The binary orbit inclinations with respect to the initial angular momentum of the swarm range from i = 0 to {approx}90{sup 0}, with most cases having i < 50{sup 0}. The total binary mass represents a characteristic fraction of the collapsing swarm's total initial mass, M{sub tot}, suggesting M{sub tot} equivalent to that of a radius {approx}100-250 km compact object. Our binary formation mechanism also implies that the primary and secondary components in each binary pair should have identical bulk composition, which is consistent with the current photometric data. We discuss the applicability of our results to the Pluto-Charon, Orcus-Vanth, (617) Patroclus

  1. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  2. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  3. Radio detection of the young binary HD 160934

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azulay, R.; Guirado, J. C.; Marcaide, J. M.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Arroyo-Torres, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Precise determination of dynamical masses of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars is essential to calibrate stellar evolution models that are widely used to derive theoretical masses of young low-mass objects. Binary stars in young, nearby loose associations are particularly good candidates for this calibration since all members share a common age. Interestingly, some of these young binaries present a persistent and compact radio emission, which makes them excellent targets for astrometric VLBI studies. Aims: We aim to monitor the orbital motion of the binary system HD 160934, a member of the AB Doradus moving group. Methods: We observed HD 160934 with the Very Large Array and the European VLBI Network at 8.4 and 5 GHz, respectively. The orbital information derived from these observations was analyzed along with previously reported orbital measurements. Results: We show that the two components of the binary, HD 160934 A and HD 160934 c, display compact radio emission at VLBI scales, providing precise information on the relative orbit. Revised orbital elements were estimated. Conclusions: Future VLBI monitoring of this pair should determine precise model-independent mass estimates for the A and c components, which will serve as calibration tests for PMS evolutionary models.

  4. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  5. Error analysis of numerical gravitational waveforms from coalescing binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Heather; Chu, Tony; Kumar, Prayush; Pfeiffer, Harald; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel; Kidder, Lawrence; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) has finished a successful first observation run and will commence its second run this summer. Detection of compact object binaries utilizes matched-filtering, which requires a vast collection of highly accurate gravitational waveforms. This talk will present a set of about 100 new aligned-spin binary black hole simulations. I will discuss their properties, including a detailed error analysis, which demonstrates that the numerical waveforms are sufficiently accurate for gravitational wave detection purposes, as well as for parameter estimation purposes.

  6. Second Einstein Telescope mock data and science challenge: Low frequency binary neutron star data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacher, Duncan; Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Regimbau, Tania; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Einstein Telescope is a conceived third-generation gravitational-wave detector that is envisioned to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than advanced LIGO, Virgo, and Kagra, which would be able to detect gravitational-wave signals from the coalescence of compact objects with waveforms starting as low as 1 Hz. With this level of sensitivity, we expect to detect sources at cosmological distances. In this paper we introduce an improved method for the generation of mock data and analyze it with a new low-latency compact binary search pipeline called gstlal. We present the results from this analysis with a focus on low-frequency analysis of binary neutron stars. Despite compact binary coalescence signals lasting hours in the Einstein Telescope sensitivity band when starting at 5 Hz, we show that we are able to discern various overlapping signals from one another. We also determine the detection efficiency for each of the analysis runs conducted and show a proof of concept method for estimating the number signals as a function of redshift. Finally, we show that our ability to recover the signal parameters has improved by an order of magnitude when compared to the results of the first mock data and science challenge. For binary neutron stars we are able to recover the total mass and chirp mass to within 0.5% and 0.05%, respectively.

  7. Planetary Dynamics and Evolution in Evolved Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai; Kratter, K.; Kenyon, S.

    2011-09-01

    Exo-planets typically form in protoplanetary disks left over from the formation of their host star. We discuss additional evolutionary routes which may may exist in old evolved binary systems. Stellar evolution in binaries could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and (partially) transferred to its binary companion, forming an accretion disk. Planetary orbits around the mass losing star can expand and destabilize, and may result in chaotic evolution. Possible outcomes include exchange of the planet to the companion star, ejection, collision, or tidal capture by one of the binary components. We show that the conditions in the newly formed accretion disk could be very similar to protoplanetary disks. Planets around the accreting companion may interact with the disk, leading to (re)growth and (re)migration of the planets. The disk may also provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing planets and/or planetesimals may serve as seeds for the formation of the second generation planets. Such systems should be found in white dwarf binary systems, and may show various unique observational signatures. Most notably, second generation planets could form in environments which are unfavorable for first generation planets. The phase space available for these planets could be forbidden (unstable) to first generation planets in the pre-evolved progenitor binaries. Planets may also form in double compact object binaries and in metal poor environments. Observations of exo-planets in such unfavorable regions could possibly serve to uniquely identify their second generation character. Finally, we point out a few observed candidate second generation planetary systems (Gl 86, HD 27442 and observed circumbinary planet candidates). A second generation origin for these systems could explain their unique configurations.

  8. Jets and Accretion Disks in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John

    The outflow of material in the form of jets is a common phenomenon in astronomical sources with accretion disks. Even though jets are seen coming from the cores of galaxies, Galactic compact objects in X-ray binaries, and stars as they are forming, we do not understand in detail what accretion disk conditions are necessary to support a relativistic jet. This proposal focuses on multi-wavelength studies of X-ray binaries in order to improve our understanding of the connection between the disk and the jet. Specifically, this proposal includes work on two approved cycle 14 Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) programs, an approved XMM-Newton program, as well as a synthesis study of transient black hole X-ray binaries using archival RXTE and radio data. We plan to use X-ray spectral and timing properties to determine the disk properties during the re-activation of the compact jet (as seen in the radio and infrared) during the decays of black hole transient outbursts, to determine how the inner disk properties change at low mass accretion rates, and to use RXTE along with multi-wavelength observations to constrain the jet properties required for the microquasar Cygnus~X-3 to produce high- energy emission. Due to the ubiquity of jets in astrophysical settings, these science topics are relevant to NASA programs dealing with the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the Universe, and especially to understanding phenomena near black holes.

  9. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Diego Jose; Lai, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 days, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. We present new results (PNAS 112, 30, p 9264) on the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this "LK+tide" mechanism. From secular and N-body calculations, we show how planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Either outcome can explain these planets' elusiveness to detection. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer specific predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like.

  10. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Diego J; Lai, Dong

    2015-07-28

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like. PMID:26159412

  11. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov–Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like. PMID:26159412

  12. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Diego J; Lai, Dong

    2015-07-28

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like.

  13. Self-Consistent Thermal Accretion Disk Corona Models for Compact Objects. I: Properties of the Corona and the Spectrum of Escaping Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Jorn; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We present the properties of accretion disk corona (ADC) models in which the radiation field, the temperature, and the total opacity of the corona are determined self-consistently. We use a nonlinear Monte Carlo code to perform the calculations. As an example, we discuss models in which the corona is situated above and below a cold accretion disk with a plane-parallel (slab) geometry, similar to the model of Haardt & Maraschi. By Comptonizing the soft radiation emitted by the accretion disk, the corona is responsible for producing the high-energy component of the escaping radiation. Our models include the reprocessing of radiation in the accretion disk. Here the photons either are Compton-reflected or photoabsorbed, giving rise to fluorescent line emission and thermal emission. The self- consistent coronal temperature is determined by balancing heating (due to viscous energy dissipation) with Compton cooling, determined using the fully relativistic, angle-dependent cross sections. The total opacity is found by balancing pair productions with annihilations. We find that, for a disk temperature kT(sub BB) approx. less than 200 eV, these coronae are unable to have a self-consistent temperature higher than approx. 140 keV if the total optical depth is approx. less than 0.2, regardless of the compactness parameter of the corona and the seed opacity. This limitation corresponds to the angle-averaged spectrum of escaping radiation having a photon index approx. greater than 1.8 within the 5-30 keV band. Finally, all models that have reprocessing features also predict a large thermal excess at lower energies. These constraints make explaining the X-ray spectra of persistent black hole candidates with ADC models very problematic.

  14. Constraints on Inspiralling Binaries from First LWA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Joanna; Gough, J.; Cutchin, S. E.; Kavic, M.; Simonetti, J. H.; Akukwe, B.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.; Kassim, N. E.

    2014-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star pair is expected to generate a strong transient radio signal. This emission will be strongest at low-frequencies and will disperse as it transverses the interstellar medium, arriving at Earth after coincidentally emitted gravitational or (higher frequency) electromagnetic signals. The rate of compact object merger events is poorly constrained by observations. The first station of Long Wavelength Array (LWA-1) telescope is a low-frequency radio telescope located near Socorro, NM, which is sensitive to a frequency range of 10-88 MHz. I will discuss the sensitivity of LWA-1 to transient radio emission from binary neutron star mergers and a limit set by LWA-1 observations to constrain the rate of such merger events.

  15. Superluminal Jets and Other Properties of Black Holes Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Discoveries in the past few years of radio jets in Galactic black hole candidates have provided a link between active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and the compact stars in binary systems. The availability of binary systems relatively close by is an opportunity to learn about the jet production mechanism on a timescale a million times shorter than that of an AGN. Evidence is clearly seen of correlated high energy X-ray and gamma ray emission to radio emission from jets, linking the accretion and jet production mechanisms. objects such as GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40 and Cyg X-3 show striking properties which distinguish them from other black hole candidates. Our theoretical understanding of these systems is still in the formative stages. I review some of the most recent multiwavelength data and point out questions raised by these observations.

  16. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  17. Compact ultradense matter impactors.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Birrell, Jeremiah

    2013-03-15

    We study interactions of meteorlike compact ultradense objects (CUDO), having nuclear or greater density, with Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System as a possible source of information about novel forms of matter. We study the energy loss in CUDO puncture of the body and discuss differences between regular matter and CUDO impacts.

  18. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  19. The SDSS spectroscopic catalogue of white dwarf-main-sequence binaries: new identifications from DR 9-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Ren, J. J.; Parsons, S. G.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Schreiber, M. R.; García-Berro, E.; Liu, X.-W.; Koester, D.

    2016-06-01

    We present an updated version of the spectroscopic catalogue of white dwarf-main-sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We identify 938 WDMS binaries within the data releases (DR) 9-12 of SDSS plus 40 objects from DR 1-8 that we missed in our previous works, 646 of which are new. The total number of spectroscopic SDSS WDMS binaries increases to 3294. This is by far the largest and most homogeneous sample of compact binaries currently available. We use a decomposition/fitting routine to derive the stellar parameters of all systems identified here (white dwarf effective temperatures, surface gravities and masses, and secondary star spectral types). The analysis of the corresponding stellar parameter distributions shows that the SDSS WDMS binary population is seriously affected by selection effects. We also measure the Na I λλ 8183.27, 8194.81 absorption doublet and H α emission radial velocities (RV) from all SDSS WDMS binary spectra identified in this work. 98 objects are found to display RV variations, 62 of which are new. The RV data are sufficient enough to estimate the orbital periods of three close binaries.

  20. Measuring the Kerr spin parameter of a non-Kerr compact object with the continuum-fitting and the iron line methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2013-08-01

    Under the assumption that astrophysical black hole candidates are the Kerr black holes of general relativity, the continuum-fitting method and the analysis of the Kα iron line are today the only available techniques capable of providing a relatively reliable estimate of the spin parameter of these objects. If we relax the Kerr black hole hypothesis and we try to test the nature of black hole candidates, we find that there is a strong correlation between the measurement of the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution. The properties of the radiation emitted in a Kerr spacetime with spin parameter a{sub *} are indeed very similar, and practically indistinguishable, from the ones of the radiation emitted around a non-Kerr object with different spin. In this paper, I address the question whether measuring the Kerr spin with both the continuum-fitting method and the Kα iron line analysis of the same object can be used to claim the Kerr nature of the black hole candidate in the case of consistent results. In this work, I consider two non-Kerr metrics and it seems that the answer does depend on the specific background. The two techniques may either provide a very similar result (the case of the Bardeen metric) or show a discrepancy (Johannsen-Psaltis background)

  1. Accreting binary population synthesis and feedback prescriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragos, Tassos

    2016-04-01

    will discuss which are the next steps towards a more physically realisitc modelling of accreting compact object populations in the early Universe.

  2. Accuracy of Binary Black Hole Waveform Models for Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Fong, Heather; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Chu, Tony; Brown, Duncan; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Simulating Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) Team

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binaries of compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars, are the primary targets for gravitational-wave (GW) detection with Advanced LIGO. Accurate modeling of the emitted GWs is required to extract information about the binary source. The most accurate solution to the general relativistic two-body problem is available in numerical relativity (NR), which is however limited in application due to computational cost. Current searches use semi-analytic models that are based in post-Newtonian (PN) theory and calibrated to NR. In this talk, I will present comparisons between contemporary models and high-accuracy numerical simulations performed using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC), focusing at the questions: (i) How well do models capture binary's late-inspiral where they lack a-priori accurate information from PN or NR, and (ii) How accurately do they model binaries with parameters outside their range of calibration. These results guide the choice of templates for future GW searches, and motivate future modeling efforts.

  3. Numerical study of the properties of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanco

    2009-10-01

    Compact stars are formed in catastrophic astrophysical events such as supernova explosions and binary stellar collisions. These objects permanently harbor compressed ultra-dense nuclear matter in their interiors. This key feature, together with the ongoing progress in observational astrophysics, make compact stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a wide range of intriguing physicals studies. Several such studies are performed in this thesis. The first activity concerns the widely unknown nuclear equation of state and the core composition of compact stars. Particular attention is paid to the possible presence of hyperons in the cores of neutron stars as well as to stars made of unconfined up, down and strange quarks (strange quark stars). The effects of ultra-strong electric fields on the surfaces of the latter is explored. The second activity aims at investigating the structure and stability of rapidly rotating compact stars. Special attention is paid to the maximal stable rotational frequencies of rotating compact stars. The third activity focuses on the thermal evolution of compact stars, driven by neutrino emission from their cores and by photon emission from the surfaces. It is show that the thermal behavior depends very strongly on the stellar core composition. Moreover, it is found that the thermal evolution of neutron stars is significantly different to that of strange quark stars. The studies performed in this thesis are key for our understanding of the thermal evolution of isolated rotating neutron stars, anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters, and provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of isospin-asymmetric ultra-dense nuclear matter which can not be probed in high-energy collision experiments.

  4. Solar System binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    The discovery of binaries in each of the major populations of minor bodies in the solar system is propelling a rapid growth of heretofore unattainable physical information. The availability of mass and density constraints for minor bodies opens the door to studies of internal structure, comparisons with meteorite samples, and correlations between bulk-physical and surface-spectral properties. The number of known binaries is now more than 70 and is growing rapidly. A smaller number have had the extensive followup observations needed to derive mass and albedo information, but this list is growing as well. It will soon be the case that we will know more about the physical parameters of objects in the Kuiper Belt than has been known about asteroids in the Main Belt for the last 200 years. Another important aspect of binaries is understanding the mechanisms that lead to their formation and survival. The relative sizes and separations of binaries in the different minor body populations point to more than one mechanism for forming bound pairs. Collisions appear to play a major role in the Main Belt. Rotational and/or tidal fission may be important in the Near Earth population. For the Kuiper Belt, capture in multi-body interactions may be the preferred formation mechanism. However, all of these conclusions remain tentative and limited by observational and theoretical incompleteness. Observational techniques for identifying binaries are equally varied. High angular resolution observations from space and from the ground are critical for detection of the relatively distant binaries in the Main Belt and the Kuiper Belt. Radar has been the most productive method for detection of Near Earth binaries. Lightcurve analysis is an independent technique that is capable of exploring phase space inaccessible to direct observations. Finally, spacecraft flybys have played a crucial paradigm-changing role with discoveries that unlocked this now-burgeoning field.

  5. A binary image reconstruction technique for accurate determination of the shape and location of metal objects in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The presence of metals in patients causes streaking artifacts in X-ray CT and has been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. Accurate localization of metals in CT images is a critical step for metal artifacts reduction in CT imaging and many practical applications of CT images. The purpose of this work is to develop a method of auto-determination of the shape and location of metallic object(s) in the image space. The proposed method is based on the fact that when a metal object is present in a patient, a CT image can be divided into two prominent components: high density metal and low density normal tissues. This prior knowledge is incorporated into an objective function as the regularization term whose role is to encourage the solution to take a form of two intensity levels. A computer simulation study and four experimental studies are performed to evaluate the proposed approach. Both simulation and experimental studies show that the presented algorithm works well even in the presence of complicated shaped metal objects. For a hexagonally shaped metal embedded in a water phantom, for example, it is found that the accuracy of metal reconstruction is within sub-millimeter.

  6. Binary Black Hole Mergers in the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gaebel, S.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, H.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The first observational run of the Advanced LIGO detectors, from September 12, 2015 to January 19, 2016, saw the first detections of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers. In this paper, we present full results from a search for binary black hole merger signals with total masses up to 100 M⊙ and detailed implications from our observations of these systems. Our search, based on general-relativistic models of gravitational-wave signals from binary black hole systems, unambiguously identified two signals, GW150914 and GW151226, with a significance of greater than 5 σ over the observing period. It also identified a third possible signal, LVT151012, with substantially lower significance and with an 87% probability of being of astrophysical origin. We provide detailed estimates of the parameters of the observed systems. Both GW150914 and GW151226 provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large velocity, highly nonlinear regime. We do not observe any deviations from general relativity, and we place improved empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. From our observations, we infer stellar-mass binary black hole merger rates lying in the range 9 - 240 Gpc-3 yr-1 . These observations are beginning to inform astrophysical predictions of binary black hole formation rates and indicate that future observing runs of the Advanced detector network will yield many more gravitational-wave detections.

  7. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  8. Science of Compact X- and Gamma-ray Sources: MAXI and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    MAXI and GLAST will be surveying the sky simultaneously. Compact objects that may show variability will be excellent targets for coordinated multiwavelength studies. Gamma-ray bursts (and afterglows), pulsars, high-mass X-ray binaries, microquasars, and active galactic nuclei are all objects whose X- and gamma-ray relationship can be explored by such observations. Of particular interest will be variable unidentified gamma-ray sources, whose contemporaneous observations by MAXI may prove decisive in identifying the source of the high-energy emission.

  9. The origin of the hard X-ray tail in neutron-star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Neutron star X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, relativistic radio jet during low-luminosity, usually hard states, as Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries do. When radio emission is bright, a hard power-law tail without evidence for an exponential cutoff is observed in most systems. Aims: We have developed a jet model that explains many spectral and timing properties of black-hole binaries in the states where a jet is present. Our goal is to investigate whether our jet model can reproduce the hard tail, with the correct range of photon index and the absence of a high-energy cutoff, in neutron-star X-ray binaries. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft, accretion-disk or boundary layer photons in the jet and computed the emergent energy spectra, as well as the time lag of hard photons with respect to softer ones as a function of Fourier frequency. We fit the energy spectra with a power law modified by an exponential cutoff at high energy. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the observed power-law distribution with photon index in the range 1.8-3. With an appropriate choice of the parameters, the cutoff expected from Comptonization is shifted to energies above ~300 keV, producing a pure power law without any evidence for a rollover, in agreement with the observations. Conclusions: Our results reinforce the idea that the link between the outflow (jet) and inflow (disk) in X-ray binaries does not depend on the nature of the compact object, but on the process of accretion. Furthermore, we address the differences between jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries and predict that the break frequency in the spectral energy distribution of neutron-star X-ray binaries, as a class, will be lower than that of black-hole binaries.

  10. (Astrophysics of binary stars, Seyfert galaxies, quasars, and globular clusters. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Press, W.H.

    1985-03-29

    Several problems were investigated. The time-steady accretion of gas irradiated by a self-consistently generated quasar-like continuum was studied. The observed x-ray sources near the core of the Orion molecular cloud were established to be sufficient to supply all the ionization that is needed to drive the molecular chemistry throughout that portion of the cloud in which the greatest density and diversity of molecular species is found. A new suggestion was put forth for a single pass, high gain, O/sup 5 +/ ion laboratory laser at 1035 A. The only evidence for binaries in globular clusters was found to come from binaries in extreme states, cataclysmic variables, and x-ray sources. The various evolutionary paths possible for highly compact binaries in globular clusters where they come under the simultaneous influence of gravitational radiation and gravitational encounters with field stars were analyzed. The secular evolution of a highly compact binary stellar system, composed of a collapsed object and a low-mass secondary star, in the core of a globular cluster was calculated. The dynamics of the narrow line regions of Seyfert galaxies were investigated. New calculations of the soft x-ray opacity of gas having cosmic elemental abunances were developed for a variety of ionization states. Results were presented of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high x-ray luminosity quasars and Seyfert type I nuclei. (GHT)

  11. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  12. Binary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Keegan; Nakajima, Miki; Stevenson, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Can a bound pair of similar mass terrestrial planets exist? We are interested here in bodies with a mass ratio of ~ 3:1 or less (so Pluto/Charon or Earth/Moon do not qualify) and we do not regard the absence of any such discoveries in the Kepler data set to be significant since the tidal decay and merger of a close binary is prohibitively fast well inside of 1AU. SPH simulations of equal mass “Earths” were carried out to seek an answer to this question, assuming encounters that were only slightly more energetic than parabolic (zero energy). We were interested in whether the collision or near collision of two similar mass bodies would lead to a binary in which the two bodies remain largely intact, effectively a tidal capture hypothesis though with the tidal distortion being very large. Necessarily, the angular momentum of such an encounter will lead to bodies separated by only a few planetary radii if capture occurs. Consistent with previous work, mostly by Canup, we find that most impacts are disruptive, leading to a dominant mass body surrounded by a disk from which a secondary forms whose mass is small compared to the primary, hence not a binary planet by our adopted definition. However, larger impact parameter “kissing” collisions were found to produce binaries because the dissipation upon first encounter was sufficient to provide a bound orbit that was then rung down by tides to an end state where the planets are only a few planetary radii apart. The long computational times for these simulation make it difficult to fully map the phase space of encounters for which this outcome is likely but the indications are that the probability is not vanishingly small and since planetary encounters are a plausible part of planet formation, we expect binary planets to exist and be a non-negligible fraction of the larger orbital radius exoplanets awaiting discovery.

  13. Extreme horizontal branch stars - Puzzling objects dominating the UV-light in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    Extreme horizontal branch stars (also known as hot subdwarf stars, sdO/Bs) are located at the bluest extension of the horizontal branch in the HR-diagram. They burn helium in their cores and are the sources of the UV-excess in elliptical galaxies and other old stellar populations. However, the formation of those stars is still unclear. SdO/B stars in the field show a high binary fraction and are likely formed via binary interactions with low-mass stars, substellar objects or compact stellar remnants. Similar objects in globular clusters on the other hand have a significantly lower binary fraction and might therefore be formed in a different way. I will review the state-of-the-art and confront theories of sdO/B formation with most recent observational evidence.

  14. Outflows from Accretion Disks around Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2013-02-01

    We solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for accretion disks in the spherical coordinates (rθφ) to obtain the explicit structure along the θ direction. The results display thinner, quasi-Keplerian disks for Shakura-Sunyaev Disks (SSDs) and thicker, sub-Keplerian disks for Advection Dominated Accretion Flows (ADAFs) and slim disks, which are consistent with previous popular analytical models, while an inflow region and an outflow region always exist, which supports the results of some recent numerical simulation works. Our results indicate that the outflows should be common in various accretion disks and stronger in slim disks and ADAFs.

  15. Radiatively driven plasma jets around compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2002-06-01

    Matter accreting on to black holes may develop shocks due to the centrifugal barrier. Some of the inflowing matter in the post-shock flow is deflected along the axis in the form of jets. Post-shock flow which behaves like a Compton cloud has `hot' electrons emitting high-energy photons. We study the effect of these `hot' photons on the outflowing matter. Radiation from this region could accelerate the outflowing matter, but radiation pressure should also slow it down. We show that the radiation drag restricts the flow from attaining a very high velocity. We introduce the concept of an `equilibrium velocity' (veq~0.5c), which sets the upper limit of the terminal velocity achieved by a cold plasma due to radiation deposition force in the absence of gravity. If the injection energy is Ein, then we find that the terminal velocity v∞ satisfies a relation v2<~veq2+2Ein.

  16. Extracting multipole moments of neutron stars from quasi-periodic oscillations in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge; Muccino, Marco

    2015-06-01

    We consider the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations of low-mass X-ray binaries within the Hartle-Thorne spacetime. We show that the interpretation of the epicyclic frequencies of this spacetime with the observed kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations, within the Relativistic Precession Model, allows us to extract the total mass M, angular momentum J, and quadrupole moment Q of the compact object in a low-mass X-ray binary. We exemplify this fact by analyzing the data of the Z-source GX 5-1. We show that the extracted multipole structure of the compact component of this source deviates from the one expected from a Kerr black hole and instead it points to a neutron star explanation.

  17. Accretion disk dynamics in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peris, Charith Srian

    Accreting X-ray binaries consist of a normal star which orbits a compact object with the former transferring matter onto the later via an accretion disk. These accretion disks emit radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis exploits two regions of the spectrum, exploring the (1) inner disk regions of an accreting black hole binary, GRS1915+105, using X-ray spectral analysis and (2) the outer accretion disks of a set of neutron star and black hole binaries using Doppler Tomography applied on optical observations. X-ray spectral analysis of black hole binary GRS1915+105: GRS1915+105 stands out as an exceptional black hole primarily due to the wild variability exhibited by about half of its X-ray observations. This study focused on the steady X-ray observations of the source, which were found to exhibit significant curvature in the harder coronal component within the RXTE/PCA band-pass. The roughly constant inner-disk radius seen in a majority of the steady-soft observations is strongly reminiscent of canonical soft state black-hole binaries. Remarkably, the steady-hard observations show the presence of growing truncation in the inner-disk. A majority of the steady observations of GRS1915+105 map to the states observed in canonical black hole binaries which suggests that within the complexity of this source is a simpler underlying basis of states. Optical tomography of X-ray binary systems: Doppler tomography was applied to the strong line features present in the optical spectra of X-ray binaries in order to determine the geometric structure of the systems' emitting regions. The point where the accretion stream hits the disk, also referred to as the "hotspot'', is clearly identified in the neutron star system V691 CrA and the black hole system Nova Muscae 1991. Evidence for stream-disk overflows exist in both systems, consistent with relatively high accretion rates. In contrast, V926 Sco does not show evidence for the presence of a hotspot which

  18. Short gamma-ray burst formation rate from BATSE data using E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation and the minimum gravitational-wave event rate of a coalescing compact binary

    SciTech Connect

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: takashi@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-01

    Using 72 short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) with well determined spectral data observed by BATSE, we determine their redshift and luminosity by applying the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs found by Tsutsui et al. For 53 SGRBs with an observed flux brighter than 4 × 10{sup –6} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, the cumulative redshift distribution up to z = 1 agrees well with that of 22 Swift SGRBs. This suggests that the redshift determination by the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs works well. The minimum event rate at z = 0 is estimated as R{sub on−axis}{sup min}=6.3{sub −3.9}{sup +3.1}× 10{sup −10} events Mpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}, so that the minimum beaming angle is 0.°6-7.°8 assuming a merging rate of 10{sup –7}- 4 × 10{sup –6} events Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} suggested from the binary pulsar data. Interestingly, this angle is consistent with that for SGRB 130603B of ∼4°-8°. On the other hand, if we assume a beaming angle of ∼6° suggested from four SGRBs with the observed beaming angle value, then the minimum event rate including off-axis SGRBs is estimated as R{sub all}{sup min}=1.15{sub −0.66}{sup +0.56} × 10{sup −7} events Mpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}. If SGRBs are induced by the coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) and/or black holes (BHs), then this event rate leads to a minimum gravitational-wave detection rate of 3.8{sub −2.2}{sup +1.8} (146{sub −83}{sup +71}) events yr{sup −1} for an NS-NS (NS-BH) binary, respectively, by a worldwide network with KAGRA, advanced-LIGO, advanced-VIRGO, and GEO.

  19. Be stars with white dwarf companions: a new single degenerate binary channel to type Ia supernovae explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Luna, Gerardo; Zemko, Polina; Kotulla, Ralf; Gallagher, Jay; Harbeck, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A handful of supersoft X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds that could not be identified with transient nova outbursts turned out to be mainly massive close binaries. 6 years ago we suggested that several such sources may exist in M31, because we found that a certain fraction of supersoft sources was located in star forming regions. Following that discovery, we clearly identified a Be binary in M31, and are currently collecting data for another candidate in that galaxy. Work is in progress to assess whether the compact object companion really is a hydrogen burning white dwarf (the alternative being a massive stellar-mass black hole). If we can demonstrate that Be+white dwarf interacting close binaries are common, and that hydrogen is often ignited on the white dwarf in these systems, we have discovered a new promising channel towards the explosion of supernovae of type Ia in star forming regions, without invoking double degenerate systems.

  20. X-ray emission mechanism for the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2012-07-01

    We address an unsolved issue in the model of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039, which consists of an O star and a compact object not yet identified. In previous studies, the X-ray emission observed with Suzaku has been assumed to be due to the synchrotron emission from high energy electrons, and the inverse Compton (IC) emission from low energy electrons has been neglected. However, this IC emission can affect the X-ray emission. In this study, we calculate the IC emission from low energy electrons (γ < 10^4) accelerated near the compact object, including those created by the radiative cooling. We find that the IC emission of the low energy electrons can be responsible for the Suzaku band if the minimum Lorentz factor of injected electrons γ_{min} is around 10^3. In addition, we show that the Suzaku light curve is well reproduced if γ_{min} varies in proportion to the Fermi flux.

  1. Jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylafis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Jets have been observed from both neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries. There are many similarities between the two and a few differences. I will offer a physical explanation of the formation and destruction of jets from compact objects and I will discuss the similarities and differences in the two types. The basic concept in the physical explanation is the Cosmic Battery, the mechanism that creates the required magnetic field for the jet ejection. The Cosmic Battery operates efficiently in accretion flows consisting of an inner hot flow and an outer thin accretion disk, independently of the nature of the compact object. It is therefore natural to always expect a jet in the right part of a spectral hardness - luminosity diagram and to never expect a jet in the left part. As a consequence, most of the phenomenology of an outburst can be explained with only one parameter, the mass accretion rate.

  2. Survival of Planets Around Shrinking Stellar Binaries: A New Population of Misaligned Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 days, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via tidal dissipation mediated by Lidov-Kozai oscillations in orbital eccentricity induced by a distant tertiary companion. We explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may be ejected from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like.Reference: D. Munoz and D. Lai 2015, submitted

  3. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  4. X-Ray Spectral and Temporal Studies of the Ultra-Compact System X1916-05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1998-01-01

    Rossi x-ray timing Explorer (RXTE) Cycle 1 data on the ultra-compact low mass x- ray binary (LMXB) X1916-05 is analyzed. In this current report, the scientific objectives of this investigation of hard x-ray studies of bursters and the results achieved are summarized. The scientific objectives are: (1) Period of the x-ray dips in X1916-05; (2) Phase stability of the x-ray dip period; (3) Spectral break energy and its dependence on mass transfer rate; and (4) Qpos detected from this LMXB. A list of published papers resulted from this project is also included.

  5. A Galactic Binary Detection Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.

    2011-01-01

    The Galaxy is suspected to contain hundreds of millions of binary white dwarf systems, a large fraction of which will have sufficiently small orbital period to emit gravitational radiation in band for space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA's main science goal is the detection of cosmological events (supermassive black hole mergers, etc.) however the gravitational signal from the galaxy will be the dominant contribution to the data - including instrumental noise over approximately two decades in frequency. The catalogue of detectable binary systems will serve as an unparalleled means of studying the Galaxy. Furthermore, to maximize the scientific return from the mission, the data must be "cleansed" of the galactic foreground. We will present an algorithm that can accurately resolve and subtract 2:: 10000 of these sources from simulated data supplied by the Mock LISA Data Challenge Task Force. Using the time evolution of the gravitational wave frequency, we will reconstruct the position of the recovered binaries and show how LISA will sample the entire compact binary population in the Galaxy.

  6. A POSSIBLE SIGNATURE OF LENSE-THIRRING PRECESSION IN DIPPING AND ECLIPSING NEUTRON-STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Jeroen

    2012-12-01

    Relativistic Lense-Thirring precession of a tilted inner accretion disk around a compact object has been proposed as a mechanism for low-frequency ({approx}0.01-70 Hz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the light curves of X-ray binaries. A substantial misalignment angle ({approx}15 Degree-Sign -20 Degree-Sign ) between the inner-disk rotation axis and the compact-object spin axis is required for the effects of this precession to produce observable modulations in the X-ray light curve. A consequence of this misalignment is that in high-inclination X-ray binaries the precessing inner disk will quasi-periodically intercept our line of sight to the compact object. In the case of neutron-star systems, this should have a significant observational effect, since a large fraction of the accretion energy is released on or near the neutron-star surface. In this Letter, I suggest that this specific effect of Lense-Thirring precession may already have been observed as {approx}1 Hz QPOs in several dipping/eclipsing neutron-star X-ray binaries.

  7. Close binary stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Although close binary stars are thought theoretically to play a major role in globular cluster dynamics, virtually no non-degenerate close binaries are known in clusters. We review the status of observations in this area, and report on two new programs which are finally yielding candidate systems suitable for further study. One of the objects, a close eclipsing system in omega Cen, is also a big straggler, thus finally proving firm evidence that globular cluster blue stragglers really are binary stars.

  8. Determining Reliability of Existing Gravitational Waveforms in Parameter Estimation for Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos, Cesar; Sandeen, Ben; Chennakesavalu, Shriram; Littenberg, Tyson; Farr, Ben; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational Waves (GWs) were predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity as ripples in space-time that propagate outward from a source. Strong GW sources consist of compact binary systems such as Binary Neutron Stars (BNS) or Binary Black Holes (BBHs) that experience orbital shrinkage (inspiral) and eventual merger. Indirect evidence for the existence of GWs has been obtained through radio pulsar studies in BNS systems. A study of BBHs and other compact objects has limitations in the electromagnetic spectrum, therefore direct detections of GWs will open a new window into their nature. The effort targeting direct GWs detection is anchored on the development of a detector known as Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observation). Although detecting GW sources represents an anticipated breakthrough in physics, making GW astrophysics a reality critically relies on our ability to determine and measure the physical parameters associated with GW sources. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations on high-performance computing clusters for parameter estimation on high dimensional spaces (GW sources - 15 parameters). The quality of GW parameter estimation greatly depends on having the best possible knowledge of the expected waveform. Unfortunately, BBH GW production is very complex and our best waveforms are not valid across the full parameter space. With large-scale simulations we examine quantitatively the limitations of these waveforms in terms of extracting the astrophysical properties of BBH GW sources. We find that current waveforms are inadequate for BBH of unequal masses and demonstrate that improved waveforms are critically needed.

  9. The end of the MACHO era, revisited: New limits on MACHO masses from halo wide binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Allen, Christine

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine an upper bound for the mass of the massive compact halo objects (MACHOs), we use the halo binaries contained in a recent catalog by Allen and Monroy-Rodríguez. To dynamically model their interactions with massive perturbers, a Monte Carlo simulation is conducted, using an impulsive approximation method and assuming a galactic halo constituted by massive particles of a characteristic mass. The results of such simulations are compared with several subsamples of our improved catalog of candidate halo wide binaries. In accordance with Quinn et al., we also find our results to be very sensitive to the widest binaries. However, our larger sample, together with the fact that we can obtain galactic orbits for 150 of our systems, allows a more reliable estimate of the maximum MACHO mass than that obtained previously. If we employ the entire sample of 211 candidate halo stars we, obtain an upper limit of 112 M{sub ☉}. However, using the 150 binaries in our catalog with computed galactic orbits, we are able to refine our fitting criteria. Thus, for the 100 most halo-like binaries we obtain a maximum MACHO mass of 21-68 M{sub ☉}. Furthermore, we can estimate the dynamical effects of the galactic disk using binary samples that spend progressively shorter times within the disk. By extrapolating the limits obtained for our most reliable—albeit smallest—sample, we find that as the time spent within the disk tends to zero, the upper bound of the MACHO mass tends to less than 5 M{sub ☉}. The non-uniform density of the halo has also been taken into account, but the limit obtained, less than 5 M{sub ☉}, does not differ much from the previous one. Together with microlensing studies that provide lower limits on the MACHO mass, our results essentially exclude the existence of such objects in the galactic halo.

  10. The delay time distribution of massive double compact star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennekens, N.; Vanbeveren, D.

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the temporal evolution of binary populations, in general, and double compact-star binaries and mergers, in particular, within a galactic evolution context, a very straightforward method is obviously to implement a detailed binary evolutionary model in a galactic chemical evolution code. To our knowledge, the Brussels galactic chemical evolution code is the only one that fully and consistently accounts for the important effects of interacting binaries on the predictions of chemical evolution. With a galactic code that does not explicitly include binaries, the temporal evolution of the population of double compact star binaries and mergers can be estimated with reasonable accuracy if the delay time distribution (DTD) for these mergers is available. The DTD for supernovae type Ia has been studied extensively in the past decade. In the present paper we present the DTD for merging double neutron-star binaries and mixed systems consisting of a neutron star and a black hole. The latter mergers are very promising sites for producing r-process elements, and the DTDs can be used to study the galactic evolution of these elements with a code that does not explicitly account for binaries.

  11. GW150914: First results from the search for binary black hole coalescence with Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bohémier, K.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cokelaer, T.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Dietz, A.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Goggin, L. M.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Rocchi, A.; Rodriguez, A. C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaría, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    On September 14, 2015, at 09∶50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) simultaneously observed the binary black hole merger GW150914. We report the results of a matched-filter search using relativistic models of compact-object binaries that recovered GW150914 as the most significant event during the coincident observations between the two LIGO detectors from September 12 to October 20, 2015 GW150914 was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 σ .

  12. Radio Emission from Binary Stars in the AB Doradus Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azulay, R.; Guirado, J. C.; Marcaide, J. M.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Ros, E.

    2016-01-01

    Precise determination of dynamical masses of pre-main-sequence stars is essential for calibrating stellar evolution models, that are widely used to derive theoretical masses of young low-mass objects. We have determined the individual masses of the pair AB Dor Ba/Bb using Australian Long Baseline Array observations and archive infrared data, as part of a larger program directed to monitor binary systems in the AB Doradus moving group. We have detected, for the first time, compact radio emission from both stars. This has allowed us to determine the orbital parameters of both the relative and absolute orbits and, consequently, their individual dynamical masses: 0.28+/-0.05 M⊙ and 0.25+/-0.05 M⊙. Comparisons of the dynamical masses with the prediction of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models show that the models underpredict the dynamical masses of the binary components Ba and Bb by 10-30% and 10-40%, respectively.

  13. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso≳1052 erg ), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  14. Neutron-star–black-hole binaries produced by binary-driven hypernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-12-04

    Here, binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso ≳1052 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed “ultrastripped” binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  15. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs. PMID:26684106

  16. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  17. 3D Models of Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Booth, R.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Maercker, M.

    2015-12-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, mass-losing giant and an accreting, compact companion. We present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of two such interacting binaries, RS Oph and Mira AB. RS Oph is also a recurrent nova system, thus we model multiple quiescent mass transfer-nova outburst cycles. The resulting circumstellar structures of both systems are highly complex with the formation of spirals, arcs, shells, equatorial and bipolar outflows. We compare the models to recent observations and discuss the implications of our results for related systems, e.g., bipolar nebulae and jets, chemically peculiar stars, and the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    profile variability (V/R ratio) timescales are shorter and the Hα equivalent widths are smaller in Be/X-ray binaries than in isolated Be stars; and vii) we provide new evidence that the disk in Be/X-ray binaries is, on average, denser than in classical Be stars. Conclusions: We carried out the most complete optical spectroscopic study of the global properties of high-mass X-ray binaries with the analysis of more than 1100 spectra from 20 sources. Our results provide further evidence for the truncation of the disk in Be/X-ray binaries. We conclude that the interaction between the compact object and the Be-type star works in two directions: the massive companion provides the source of matter for accretion, affecting the surroundings of the compact object, and the continuous revolution of the neutron star around the optical counterpart also produces the truncation of the Be star's equatorial disk. The reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A122

  19. A Dynamic Construction Algorithm for the Compact Patricia Trie Using the Hierarchical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Minsoo; Shishibori, Masami; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of information retrieval focuses on the use of binary trees and how to compact it to use less memory and take less time. Explains retrieval algorithms and describes data structure and hierarchical structure. (LRW)

  20. On Poynting-flux-driven bubbles and shocks around merging neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    Merging binaries of compact relativistic objects (neutron stars and black holes) are thought to be progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts and sources of gravitational waves, hence their study is of great importance for astrophysics. Because of the strong magnetic field of one or both binary members and high orbital frequencies, these binaries are strong sources of energy in the form of Poynting flux (e.g. magnetic-field-dominated outflows, relativistic leptonic winds, electromagnetic and plasma waves). The steady injection of energy by the binary forms a bubble (or a cavity) filled with matter with the relativistic equation of state, which pushes on the surrounding plasma and can drive a shock wave in it. Unlike the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution for a point-like explosion, the shock wave here is continuously driven by the ever-increasing pressure inside the bubble. We calculate from the first principles the dynamics and evolution of the bubble and the shock surrounding it and predict that such systems can be observed as radio sources a few hours before and after the merger. At much later times, the shock is expected to settle on to the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor solution, thus resembling an explosion.

  1. MERGER RATES OF DOUBLE NEUTRON STARS AND STELLAR ORIGIN BLACK HOLES: THE IMPACT OF INITIAL CONDITIONS ON BINARY EVOLUTION PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, S. E. de; Belczynski, K. E-mail: kbelczyn@astrouw.edu.pl

    2015-11-20

    The initial mass function (IMF), binary fraction, and distributions of binary parameters (mass ratios, separations, and eccentricities) are indispensable inputs for simulations of stellar populations. It is often claimed that these are poorly constrained, significantly affecting evolutionary predictions. Recently, dedicated observing campaigns have provided new constraints on the initial conditions for massive stars. Findings include a larger close binary fraction and a stronger preference for very tight systems. We investigate the impact on the predicted merger rates of neutron stars and black holes. Despite the changes with previous assumptions, we only find an increase of less than a factor of 2 (insignificant compared with evolutionary uncertainties of typically a factor of 10–100). We further show that the uncertainties in the new initial binary properties do not significantly affect (within a factor of 2) our predictions of double compact object merger rates. An exception is the uncertainty in IMF (variations by a factor of 6 up and down). No significant changes in the distributions of final component masses, mass ratios, chirp masses, and delay times are found. We conclude that the predictions are, for practical purposes, robust against uncertainties in the initial conditions concerning binary parameters, with the exception of the IMF. This eliminates an important layer of the many uncertain assumptions affecting the predictions of merger detection rates with the gravitational wave detectors aLIGO/aVirgo.

  2. Merger Rates of Double Neutron Stars and Stellar Origin Black Holes: The Impact of Initial Conditions on Binary Evolution Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, S. E.; Belczynski, K.

    2015-11-01

    The initial mass function (IMF), binary fraction, and distributions of binary parameters (mass ratios, separations, and eccentricities) are indispensable inputs for simulations of stellar populations. It is often claimed that these are poorly constrained, significantly affecting evolutionary predictions. Recently, dedicated observing campaigns have provided new constraints on the initial conditions for massive stars. Findings include a larger close binary fraction and a stronger preference for very tight systems. We investigate the impact on the predicted merger rates of neutron stars and black holes. Despite the changes with previous assumptions, we only find an increase of less than a factor of 2 (insignificant compared with evolutionary uncertainties of typically a factor of 10–100). We further show that the uncertainties in the new initial binary properties do not significantly affect (within a factor of 2) our predictions of double compact object merger rates. An exception is the uncertainty in IMF (variations by a factor of 6 up and down). No significant changes in the distributions of final component masses, mass ratios, chirp masses, and delay times are found. We conclude that the predictions are, for practical purposes, robust against uncertainties in the initial conditions concerning binary parameters, with the exception of the IMF. This eliminates an important layer of the many uncertain assumptions affecting the predictions of merger detection rates with the gravitational wave detectors aLIGO/aVirgo.

  3. Hydrodynamical simulations of the tidal stripping of binary stars by massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainetti, Deborah; Lupi, Alessandro; Campana, Sergio; Colpi, Monica

    2016-04-01

    In a galactic nucleus, a star on a low angular momentum orbit around the central massive black hole can be fully or partially disrupted by the black hole tidal field, lighting up the compact object via gas accretion. This phenomenon can repeat if the star, not fully disrupted, is on a closed orbit. Because of the multiplicity of stars in binary systems, also binary stars may experience in pairs such a fate, immediately after being tidally separated. The consumption of both the binary components by the black hole is expected to power a double-peaked flare. In this paper, we perform for the first time, with GADGET2, a suite of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of binary stars around a galactic central black hole in the Newtonian regime. We show that accretion luminosity light curves from double tidal disruptions reveal a more prominent knee, rather than a double peak, when decreasing the impact parameter of the encounter and when elevating the difference between the mass of the star which leaves the system after binary separation and the mass of the companion. The detection of a knee can anticipate the onset of periodic accretion luminosity flares if one of the stars, only partially disrupted, remains bound to the black hole after binary separation. Thus knees could be precursors of periodic flares, which can then be predicted, followed up and better modelled. Analytical estimates in the black hole mass range 105-108 M⊙ show that the knee signature is enhanced in the case of black holes of mass 106-107 M⊙.

  4. Binaries in Globular Clusters Multiple Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucatello, Sara; Sollima, Antonio; Gratton, Raffaele; D'Orazi, Valentina; Vesperini, Enrico; Carretta, Eugenio; Bragaglia, Angela

    2015-08-01

    In spite of considerable theoretical and obsservational effort, the series of events that leads to the formation of Globular Clusters and their multiple populations is still unclear.One of the key matters is where the so-called second generation of stars form and its distribution at the time of its birth with respect to the first generation. Some of the latest modeling has suggested that second generation should form in a compact subsystem concentrated in the inner regions of the primordial, first generation cluster. In this scenario, loss of a large fraction of the cluster mass is expected, mostly comprised of first generation stars. This would account for the mass budget issue (one of the main problems in the self-enrichment scenario) and would imply a considerable contribution of the clusters to the formation of the Galactic Halo.Testing this prediction is hence of great importance, but not so immediate. Long-term, dynamical evolution of multiple-population clusters could blur considerably the signature of the initial different concentrations, leaving at present time some memory in the very central part (Vesperini et al. 2013), which, because of its high density, is generally not accessible to the multi-object high resolution spectrographs that yield the spectra that allow the chemical composition measurements necessary to tag the different populations.An alternative approach to test the prediction of the initial segregation of the second generations is that of determining their binary fractions. In fact, until the two populations are completely mixed, second generation stars will evolve in a denser environment where disruption will occur more rapidly, leading to a smaller binary incidence in such population (Vesperini et al 2011).I will present the results of our long-term radial velocity monitoring of 10 Galactic Globular clusters, discuss the derived binary fractions in the two populations and address the implications of our findings on our understanding of

  5. Encounters between binaries and neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    We simulated encounters between a neutron star and primordial and tidal-capture binaries. In the case of encounters involving a tidal-capture binary, comprising a white dwarf and a main-sequence star, we find that most exchange encounters will produce a single merged object with the white dwarf and neutron star engulfed in a common envelope of gas donated by the main-sequence primary of the original binary. A small fraction of exchanges induce a merger of the white dwarf and main-sequence star, with this object being unbound to the neutron star, and the two objects having a large relative speed at infinity. For encounters involving a primordial binary, fewer encounters require the inclusion of hydrodynamical effects. Those involving collisions or close encounters tend to produce a binary comprised of the two merged stars (now forming one star) and the third star. The binaries produced typically have large enough separations to prevent the formation of a single merged object until subsequent stellar evolution of one of the components causes it to fill its Roche lobe. Clean exchanges produce binaries with large eccentricities; they are typically sufficiently wide to avoid circularization.

  6. High Mass X-ray Binaries in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelov, Blagoy

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), in which a compact object, either black hole or neutron star, is accreting material from a young, massive donor star, often dominate the high-energy emission from nearby star-forming galaxies. These high mass pairs are believed to form in star clusters, where most massive star formation takes place, but to become displaced from their parent clusters either because they are dynamically ejected or because their parent cluster has dissolved. We have conducted a systematic study of the formation and evolution of bright HMXBs in eight nearby galaxies, by detecting HMXBs from their X-ray emission in Chandra X-ray Observatory observations, and identifying their parent clusters and donor stars in optical observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the X-ray and optical properties of these systems to determine the ages of the binaries, whether the compact objects are black holes or neutron stars, and to constrain the masses of the donor stars.

  7. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  8. GIANT OUTBURSTS IN Be/X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Nixon, Chris; Armitage, Philip J.; Lubow, Stephen H.; Price, Daniel J.

    2014-08-01

    Be/X-ray binary systems exhibit both periodic (Type I) X-ray outbursts and giant (Type II) outbursts, whose origins have remained elusive. We suggest that Type II X-ray outbursts occur when a highly misaligned decretion disk around the Be star becomes eccentric, allowing the compact object companion to capture a large amount of material at periastron. Using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we model the long-term evolution of a representative Be/X-ray binary system. We find that periodic (Type I) X-ray outbursts occur when the neutron star is close to periastron for all disk inclinations. Type II outbursts occur for large misalignment angles and are associated with eccentricity growth which occurs on a timescale of about 10 orbital periods. Mass capture from the eccentric decretion disk results in an accretion disk around the neutron star whose estimated viscous time is long enough to explain the extended duration of Type II outbursts. Previous studies suggested that the outbursts are caused by a warped disk but our results suggest that this is not sufficient; the disk must be both highly misaligned and eccentric to initiate a Type II accretion event.

  9. Formation and Destruction of Jets in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylafix, N. D.; Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Christodoulou, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries (XRBs) exhibit radio jets, whose properties depend on the X-ray spectral state e.nd history of the source. In particular, black-hole XRBs emit compact, 8teady radio jets when they are in the so-called hard state. These jets become eruptive as the sources move toward the soft state, disappear in the soft state, and then re-appear when the sources return to the hard state. The jets from neutron-star X-ray binaries are typically weaker radio emitters than the black-hole ones at the same X-ray luminosity and in some cases radio emission is detected in the soft state. Aims. Significant phenomenology has been developed to describe the spectral states of neutron-star and black-hole XRBs, and there is general agreement about the type of the accretion disk around the compact object in the various spectral states. We investigate whether the phenomenology describing the X-ray emission on one hand and the jet appearance and disappearance on the other can be put together in a consistent physical picture. Methods. We consider the so-called Poynting-Robertson cosmic battery (PRCB), which has been shown to explain in a natural way the formation of magnetic fields in the disks of AGNs and the ejection of jets. We investigate whether the PRCB can also explain the [ormation, destruction, and variability or jets in XRBs. Results. We find excellent agreement between the conditions under which the PRCB is efficient (i.e., the type of the accretion disk) and the emission or destruction of the r.adio jet. Conclusions. The disk-jet connection in XRBs can be explained in a natural way using the PRCB.

  10. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  11. Object Oriented Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We apply the object oriented software engineering (OOSE) design methodology for software objects (SOs) to learning objects (LOs). OOSE extends and refines design principles for authoring dynamic reusable LOs. Our learning object class (LOC) is a template from which individualised LOs can be dynamically created for, or by, students. The properties…

  12. Stability of binaries. Part 1: Rigid binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2015-09-01

    We consider the stability of binary asteroids whose members are possibly granular aggregates held together by self-gravity alone. A binary is said to be stable whenever each member is orbitally and structurally stable to both orbital and structural perturbations. To this end, we extend the stability test for rotating granular aggregates introduced by Sharma (Sharma, I. [2012]. J. Fluid Mech., 708, 71-99; Sharma, I. [2013]. Icarus, 223, 367-382; Sharma, I. [2014]. Icarus, 229, 278-294) to the case of binary systems comprised of rubble members. In part I, we specialize to the case of a binary with rigid members subjected to full three-dimensional perturbations. Finally, we employ the stability test to critically appraise shape models of four suspected binary systems, viz., 216 Kleopatra, 25143 Itokawa, 624 Hektor and 90 Antiope.

  13. Predicting binary merger event rates for advanced LIGO/Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Daniel; Belczynski, Chris; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomek; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We discuss estimates of the rates of mergers of binary systems composed of neutron stars and/or stellar mass black holes. We use the StarTrack population synthesis code, and make predictions for the detection rate of compact binary coalescences with the advanced LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. Because these instruments are sensitive to massive (M > 20M⊙) stellar-mass binary black holes mergers out to high redshift (z > 1), we discuss the cosmological effects which must be taken into account when calculating LIGO detection rates, including a generalization of the calculation of the ``peanut factor'' and the sensitive time-volume.

  14. COMPACT REMNANT MASS FUNCTION: DEPENDENCE ON THE EXPLOSION MECHANISM AND METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Dominik, Michal; Kalogera, Vicky; Holz, Daniel E.

    2012-04-10

    The mass distribution of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes provides vital clues into the nature of stellar core collapse and the physical engine responsible for supernova explosions. A number of supernova engines have been proposed: neutrino- or oscillation-driven explosions enhanced by early (developing in 10-50 ms) and late-time (developing in 200 ms) convection as well as magnetic field engines (in black hole accretion disks or neutron stars). Using our current understanding of supernova engines, we derive mass distributions of stellar compact remnants. We provide analytic prescriptions for both single-star models (as a function of initial star mass) and for binary-star models-prescriptions for compact object masses for major population synthesis codes. These prescriptions have implications for a range of observations: X-ray binary populations, supernova explosion energies, and gravitational wave sources. We show that advanced gravitational radiation detectors (like LIGO/VIRGO or the Einstein Telescope) will be able to further test the supernova explosion engine models once double black hole inspirals are detected.

  15. AM CVn Stars: Structure and Evolution of Ultra-Short Period Interacting Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report of a FUSE program to study the physics of accretion and outflows in ultra-compact, helium dominated, disk-accreting binaries. With FUSE, we observed the AM CVn binary V803 Cen, which is one of only two AM CVn systems observed by FUSE to date. V803 Cen is a short-period interacting binary in which a hydrogen-deficient white dwarf transfers mass to another white dwarf via a hot, steady-state accretion disk. Unlike other cataclysmic variables (CVs), AM CVn stars have undergone double common envelope evolution (one for each white dwarf in the binary) and so probe an alternate route of evolution in binary stars. Our goals in this project were to investigate how the structure of the accretion disk and the link between the disk and wind outflows are affected by the absence of hydrogen in the system and by the compact size of the binary and the accretion disk.

  16. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  17. Neutron-star–black-hole binaries produced by binary-driven hypernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-12-04

    Here, binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso ≳1052 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed “ultrastripped” binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compactmore » binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.« less

  18. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  19. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  20. Binary mask programmable hologram.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Zhou, Changhe; Cheung, K W K

    2012-11-19

    We report, for the first time, the concept and generation of a novel Fresnel hologram called the digital binary mask programmable hologram (BMPH). A BMPH is comprised of a static, high resolution binary grating that is overlaid with a lower resolution binary mask. The reconstructed image of the BMPH can be programmed to approximate a target image (including both intensity and depth information) by configuring the pattern of the binary mask with a simple genetic algorithm (SGA). As the low resolution binary mask can be realized with less stringent display technology, our method enables the development of simple and economical holographic video display.

  1. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  2. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  3. Binary Stars in SBS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erastova, L. K.

    2016-06-01

    Thirty spectroscopic binary stars were found in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS). They show composite spectra - WD(DA)+dM or dC (for example Liebert et al. 1994). They may have red color, if the radiation of the red star dominates, and blue one, if the blue star is brighter and have peculiar spectrum in our survey plate. We obtained slit spectra for most of such objects. But we often see the spectrum of one component, because our slit spectra did not cover all optical range. We examine by eye the slit spectra of all SBS stellar objects (˜700) in SDSS DR7, DR8 or DR9 independent on our observations. We confirmed or discovered the duplicity of 30 stars. Usually they are spectroscopic binaries, where one component is WD (DA) and the second one is a red star with or without emission. There also are other components combinations. Sometimes there are emission lines, probably, indicating variable ones.

  4. Third POST Newtonian Equation of Motion for Relativistic Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yousuke

    2006-02-01

    We derive a third post-Newtonian equation of motion for two self-gravitating point masses in a harmonic coordinate using surface integral approach and strong field point particle limit. Our equation of motion is unambiguous, Lorentz invariant (in the post-Newtonian perturbative sense), and conservative (modulo the radiation reaction effect). Namely, we determine the ambiguous parameter found by the other works.

  5. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  6. PHOEBE: PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Matijevic, Gal; Latkovic, Olivera; Vilardell, Francesc; Wils, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability.

  7. Black holes in binary stellar systems and galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    In the last 40 years, following pioneering papers by Ya B Zeldovich and E E Salpeter, in which a powerful energy release from nonspherical accretion of matter onto a black hole (BH) was predicted, many observational studies of black holes in the Universe have been carried out. To date, the masses of several dozen stellar-mass black holes (M_BH = (4{-}20) M_\\odot) in X-ray binary systems and of several hundred supermassive black holes (M_BH = (10^{6}{-}10^{10}) M_\\odot) in galactic nuclei have been measured. The estimated radii of these massive and compact objects do not exceed several gravitational radii. For about ten stellar-mass black holes and several dozen supermassive black holes, the values of the dimensionless angular momentum a_* have been estimated, which, in agreement with theoretical predictions, do not exceed the limiting value a_* = 0.998. A new field of astrophysics, so-called black hole demography, which studies the birth and growth of black holes and their evolutionary connection to other objects in the Universe, namely stars, galaxies, etc., is rapidly developing. In addition to supermassive black holes, massive stellar clusters are observed in galactic nuclei, and their evolution is distinct from that of supermassive black holes. The evolutionary relations between supermassive black holes in galactic centers and spheroidal stellar components (bulges) of galaxies, as well as dark-matter galactic haloes are brought out. The launch into Earth's orbit of the space radio interferometer RadioAstron opened up the real possibility of finally proving that numerous discovered massive and highly compact objects with properties very similar to those of black holes make up real black holes in the sense of Albert Einstein's General Relativity. Similar proofs of the existence of black holes in the Universe can be obtained by intercontinental radio interferometry at short wavelengths \\lambda \\lesssim 1 mm (the international program, Event Horizon Telescope).

  8. NONLINEAR TIDES IN CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Arras, Phil; Quataert, Eliot; Burkart, Josh

    2012-06-01

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: three-mode nonlinear interactions, i.e., the redistribution of energy among stellar modes of oscillation, and nonlinear excitation of stellar normal modes by the time-varying gravitational potential of the companion. This paper, the first in a series, presents the formalism for studying nonlinear tides and studies the nonlinear stability of the linear tidal flow. Although the formalism we present is applicable to binaries containing stars, planets, and/or compact objects, we focus on non-rotating solar-type stars with stellar or planetary companions. Our primary results include the following: (1) The linear tidal solution almost universally used in studies of binary evolution is unstable over much of the parameter space in which it is employed. More specifically, resonantly excited internal gravity waves in solar-type stars are nonlinearly unstable to parametric resonance for companion masses M' {approx}> 10-100 M{sub Circled-Plus} at orbital periods P Almost-Equal-To 1-10 days. The nearly static 'equilibrium' tidal distortion is, however, stable to parametric resonance except for solar binaries with P {approx}< 2-5 days. (2) For companion masses larger than a few Jupiter masses, the dynamical tide causes short length scale waves to grow so rapidly that they must be treated as traveling waves, rather than standing waves. (3) We show that the global three-wave treatment of parametric instability typically used in the astrophysics literature does not yield the fastest-growing daughter modes or instability threshold in many cases. We find a form of parametric instability in which a single parent wave excites a very large number of daughter waves (N Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 3}[P/10 days] for a solar-type star) and drives them as a single coherent unit with

  9. Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E (Editor); Stepinski, T. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars was to bring together workers on accretion disks in the western Gulf region (Texas and Louisiana). Part 2 presents the workshop program, a list of poster presentations, and a list of workshop participants. Accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of these disks form around compact stars, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes that are members of binary systems and reveal themselves as a power source, especially in the x-ray and gamma regions of the spectrum. On the other hand, protostellar disks are believed to be accretion disks associated with young, pre-main-sequence stars and manifest themselves mostly in infrared and radio observations. These disks are considered to be a natural outcome of the star formation process. The focus of this workshop included theory and observations relevant to accretion disks around compact objects and newly forming stars, with the primary purpose of bringing the two communities together for intellectual cross-fertilization. The nature of the workshop was exploratory, to see how much interaction is possible between distinct communities and to better realize the local potential in this subject. A critical workshop activity was identification and documentation of key issues that are of mutual interest to both communities.

  10. On Poynting-Flux-Driven Bubbles and Shocks Around Merging NS/Magnetar Binaries and Implications for SGRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail; Loeb, A.

    2013-04-01

    Merging binaries of compact relativistic objects (neutron stars and black holes) are thought to be progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts and sources of gravitational waves, hence their study is of great importance for astrophysics. Because of the strong magnetic field of one or both binary members and high orbital frequencies, these binaries are strong sources of energy in the form of Poynting flux (e.g., magnetic-field-dominated outflows, relativistic leptonic winds, electromagnetic and plasma waves). The steady injection of energy by the binary forms a bubble (or a cavity) filled with matter with the relativistic equation of state, which pushes on the surrounding plasma and can drive a shock wave in it. Unlike the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution for a point-like explosion, the shock wave here is continuously driven by the ever-increasing pressure inside the bubble. We calculate from the first principles the dynamics and evolution of the bubble and the shock surrounding it and predict that such systems can be observed as radio sources a few hours before and after the merger. At much later times, the shock is expected to settle onto the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor solution, thus resembling an explosion.

  11. THE ELM SURVEY. V. MERGING MASSIVE WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Allende Prieto, Carlos E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: alexg@nhn.ou.edu

    2013-05-20

    We present the discovery of 17 low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) in short-period (P {<=} 1 day) binaries. Our sample includes four objects with remarkable log g {approx_equal} 5 surface gravities and orbital solutions that require them to be double degenerate binaries. All of the lowest surface gravity WDs have metal lines in their spectra implying long gravitational settling times or ongoing accretion. Notably, six of the WDs in our sample have binary merger times <10 Gyr. Four have {approx}>0.9 M{sub Sun} companions. If the companions are massive WDs, these four binaries will evolve into stable mass transfer AM CVn systems and possibly explode as underluminous supernovae. If the companions are neutron stars, then these may be millisecond pulsar binaries. These discoveries increase the number of detached, double degenerate binaries in the ELM Survey to 54; 31 of these binaries will merge within a Hubble time.

  12. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  13. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. OVRO N2H+ Observations of Class 0 Protostars: Constraints on the Formation of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuepeng; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    We present the results of an interferometric study of the N2H+ (1-0) emission from nine nearby, isolated, low-mass protostellar cores, using the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) millimeter array. The main goal of this study is the kinematic characterization of the cores in terms of rotation, turbulence, and fragmentation. Eight of the nine objects have compact N2H+ cores with FWHM radii of 1200-3500 AU, spatially coinciding with the thermal dust continuum emission. The one more evolved (Class I) object in the sample (CB 188) shows only faint and extended N2H+ emission. The mean N2H+ line width was found to be 0.37 km s-1. Estimated virial masses range from 0.3 to 1.2 Msolar. We find that thermal and turbulent energy support are about equally important in these cores, while rotational support is negligible. The measured velocity gradients across the cores range from 6 to 24 km s-1 pc-1. Assuming these gradients are produced by bulk rotation, we find that the specific angular momenta of the observed Class 0 protostellar cores are intermediate between those of dense (prestellar) molecular cloud cores and the orbital angular momenta of wide pre-main-sequence (PMS) binary systems. There appears to be no evolution (decrease) of angular momentum from the smallest prestellar cores via protostellar cores to wide PMS binary systems. In the context that most protostellar cores are assumed to fragment and form binary stars, this means that most of the angular momentum contained in the collapse region is transformed into orbital angular momentum of the resulting stellar binary systems.

  15. CSS Object Found in Galaxy Merger 1015+364 at 2.3 and 8.5 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, Antonio J.; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Other people involved

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ongoing galaxy merger 1015+364 at 2.3 and 8.5 Hz with the Very Long Baseline Array to determine the state of evolution of the merger's resident supermassive black holes. During the merger of two massive galaxies, we expect that the two supermassive black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. In our observations we detected a highly compact radio source with an extent of 21.14 parsecs. For each of two detected radio components, we measured their flux density and spectral index. By looking at their spectra, we concluded our radio detection to be a Compact Steep-Spectrum object (CSS), indicating a young radio object less than a few thousand years in age. This result hints at a connection between the recent merger and the ignition of the central radio source.

  16. Spectroscopic Subsystems in Nearby Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5 m telescope to study short-period systems. The data reduction is described, and mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, and for some of them the orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67 pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem, and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods matches the simple prescription proposed by the author. The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300 AU have an RV difference distribution between their components that is not compatible with the thermal eccentricity distribution f (e) = 2e but rather matches the uniform eccentricity distribution.

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC SUBSYSTEMS IN NEARBY WIDE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-12-15

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5 m telescope to study short-period systems. The data reduction is described, and mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, and for some of them the orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67 pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem, and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods matches the simple prescription proposed by the author. The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300 AU have an RV difference distribution between their components that is not compatible with the thermal eccentricity distribution f (e) = 2e but rather matches the uniform eccentricity distribution.

  18. Binary star systems and extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, Matthew Ward

    For ten years, planets around stars similar to the Sun have been discovered, confirmed, and their properties studied. Planets have been found in a variety of environments previously thought impossible. The results have revolutionized the way in which scientists understand planet and star formation and evolution, and provide context for the roles of the Earth and our own solar system. Over half of star systems contain more than one stellar component. Despite this, binary stars have often been avoided by programs searching for planets. Discovery of giant planets in compact binary systems would indirectly probe the timescales of planet formation, an important quantity in determining by which processes planets form. A new observing method has been developed to perform very high precision differential astrometry on bright binary stars with separations in the range of [approximate] 0.1--1.0 arcseconds. Typical measurement precisions over an hour of integration are on the order of 10 micro-arcseconds (mas), enabling one to look for perturbations to the Keplerian orbit that would indicate the presence of additional components to the system. This method is used as the basis for a new program to find extrasolar planets. The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) is a search for giant planets orbiting either star in 50 binary systems. The goal of this search is to detect or rule out planets in the systems observed and thus place limits on any enhancements of planet formation in binaries. It is also used to measure fundamental properties of the stars comprising the binary, such as masses and distances, useful for constraining stellar models at the 10 -3 level. This method of differential astrometry is applied to three star systems. d Equulei is among the most well-studied nearby binary star systems. Results of its observation have been applied to a wide range of fundamental studies of binary systems and stellar astrophysics. PHASES data are

  19. X-RAY POLARIZATION FROM HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, T.; Blondin, J.

    2015-12-10

    X-ray astronomy allows study of objects that may be associated with compact objects, i.e., neutron stars or black holes, and also may contain strong magnetic fields. Such objects are categorically nonspherical, and likely noncircular when projected on the sky. Polarization allows study of such geometric effects, and X-ray polarimetry is likely to become feasible for a significant number of sources in the future. Potential targets for future X-ray polarization observations are the high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a compact object in orbit with an early-type star. In this paper we show that X-ray polarization from HMXBs has a distinct signature that depends on the source inclination and orbital phase. The presence of the X-ray source displaced from the star creates linear polarization even if the primary wind is spherically symmetric whenever the system is viewed away from conjunction. Direct X-rays dilute this polarization whenever the X-ray source is not eclipsed; at mid-eclipse the net polarization is expected to be small or zero if the wind is circularly symmetric around the line of centers. Resonance line scattering increases the scattering fraction, often by large factors, over the energy band spanned by resonance lines. Real winds are not expected to be spherically symmetric, or circularly symmetric around the line of centers, owing to the combined effects of the compact object gravity and ionization on the wind hydrodynamics. A sample calculation shows that this creates polarization fractions ranging up to tens of percent at mid-eclipse.

  20. GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION IN X-RAY BINARIES: AN APPLICATION TO LSI + 61{sup 0}303

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Paul D.; LeBohec, Stephan; Vincent, Stephane

    2011-04-20

    The X-ray binary LSI + 61{sup 0}303 consisting of a main-sequence Be star and a compact object has been detected in the TeV range with MAGIC and VERITAS, and showed a clear intensity modulation as a function of the orbital phase. We describe a gamma-ray attenuation model and apply it to this system. Our first result is that interaction of high energy photons with the background radiation produced by the main-sequence star alone does not account for the observed modulation. We then include interactions between very high energy radiation and matter and are able to constrain fundamental parameters of the system such as the mass of the compact object and the density of circumstellar matter around the Be star. In our analysis of the TeV data, we find that the compact object has mass M{sub 2} > 2.5 M{sub sun} at the 99% confidence level, implying it is most likely a black hole. However, we find a column density which conflicts with results from X-ray observations, suggesting that attenuation may not play an important role in the modulation.

  1. Inspiral-merger-ringdown models for spinning black-hole binaries at the interface between analytical and numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taracchini, Andrea

    The long-sought direct detection of gravitational waves may only be a few years away, as a new generation of interferometric experiments of unprecedented sensitivity will start operating in 2015. These experiments will look for gravitational waves with frequencies from 10 to about 1000 Hz, thus targeting astrophysical sources such as coalescing binaries of compact objects, core collapse supernovae, and spinning neutron stars, among others. The search strategy for gravitational waves emitted by compact-object binaries consists in filtering the output of the detectors with template waveforms that describe plausible signals, as predicted by general relativity, in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we modeled these systems through the effective-one-body approach to the general-relativistic 2-body problem. This formalism rests on the idea that binary coalescence is universal across different mass ratios, from the test-particle limit to the equal-mass regime. It bridges the gap between post-Newtonian theory (valid in the slow-motion, weak-field limit) and black-hole perturbation theory (valid in the small mass-ratio limit, but not limited to slow motion). The project unfolded along two main avenues of inquiry, with the goal of developing faithful inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms for generic spinning, stellar-mass black-hole binaries. On the one hand, we studied the motion and gravitational radiation of test masses orbiting Kerr black holes in perturbation theory, with the goal of extracting strong-field information that can be incorporated into effective-one-body models. On the other hand, we worked at the interface between analytical and numerical relativity by calibrating effective-one-body models against numerical solutions of Einstein's equations, and testing their accuracy when extrapolated to different regions of the parameter space. In the course of this project, we also studied conservative effects of the 2-body dynamics, namely the

  2. GridRun: A lightweight packaging and execution environment forcompact, multi-architecture binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Shalf, John; Goodale, Tom

    2004-02-01

    GridRun offers a very simple set of tools for creating and executing multi-platform binary executables. These ''fat-binaries'' archive native machine code into compact packages that are typically a fraction the size of the original binary images they store, enabling efficient staging of executables for heterogeneous parallel jobs. GridRun interoperates with existing distributed job launchers/managers like Condor and the Globus GRAM to greatly simplify the logic required launching native binary applications in distributed heterogeneous environments.

  3. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  4. Compact turbidity meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  5. Formation of Kuiper Belt Binaries by Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorny, David; Youdin, A. N.; Richardson, D. C.

    2010-10-01

    A large fraction of 100-km-class low-inclination objects in the classical Kuiper Belt (KB) are binaries with comparable mass and wide separation of components. A favored model for their formation was capture during the coagulation growth of bodies in the early KB. Instead, recent studies suggested that large, 100-km and larger objects can rapidly form in the protoplanetary disks when swarms of locally concentrated solids collapse under their own gravity. Here we examine the possibility that KB binaries formed during gravitational collapse when the excess of angular momentum prevented the agglomeration of available mass into a solitary object. We find that this new mechanism provides a robust path toward the formation of KB binaries with observed properties, and can explain wide systems such as 2001 QW322 and multiples such as (47171) 1999 TC36. Notably, the gravitational collapse is capable of producing 100% binary fraction for a wide range of the swarm's initial angular momentum values. The binary components have similar masses ( 80% have the secondary-over-primary radius ratio >0.7) and their separation ranges from 1,000 to 100,000 km. The binary orbits have eccentricities from e=0 to 1, with the majority having e<0.6. The model inclinations are consistent with the observed general preference for prograde binary orbits. Our binary formation mechanism also implies that the primary and secondary components in each binary pair should have identical bulk composition, which is consistent with the current photometric data.

  6. A compact THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Å vigelj, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is the development of a compact low cost imaging THz system, usable for observation of the objects near to the system and also for stand-off detection. The performance of the system remains at the high standard of more expensive and bulkiest system on the market. It is easy to operate as it is not dependent on any fine mechanical adjustments. As it is compact and it consumes low power, also a portable system was developed for stand-off detection of concealed objects under textile or inside packages. These requirements rule out all optical systems like Time Domain Spectroscopy systems which need fine optical component positioning and requires a large amount of time to perform a scan and the image capture pixel-by-pixel. They are also almost not suitable for stand-off detection due to low output power. In the paper the antenna - bolometer sensor microstructure is presented and the THz system described. Analysis and design guidelines for the bolometer itself are discussed. The measurement results for both near and stand-off THz imaging are also presented.

  7. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  8. Extended Corbet Diagram of HMXBs, LMXBs and radio pulsar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Ali, Esamdin; Yin, Hongxing

    2010-09-01

    The evolutionary scenario of neutron star binaries is still an essential enigma in both stellar astrophysics and high energy astrophysics. In order to explore the scenario, we include the accumulation of data on the orbits and spins of compact binaries in multi-wavelength ranging from radio to X-ray, such as radio pulsar binaries, HMXBs, and LMXBs, filling them into the so called “Corbet Diagram” which initially investigated the period of orbit ( P orb)˜ the period of spin ( P spin) correlation of HMXBs. We find that the evolutionary scenario comes more clearly and makes strong confirmation of the connection between LMXBs and radio pulsar binaries, predicted by the recycle process. However, the origins of radio pulsar binaries sre still unknown. Accretion Induced Collapse (AIP) process may be a mechanism which can explain the origin of the binary millisecond pulsars with relatively longer orbital periods. A correlation of P {orb/1/3} ˜ P {spin/-1} of LMXBs and radio pulsar binaries may exist.

  9. Inverse design of an ultra-compact broadband optical diode based on asymmetric spatial mode conversion.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Francois; Butun, Serkan; Li, Zhongyang; Aydin, Koray

    2016-01-01

    The objective-first inverse-design algorithm is used to design an ultra-compact optical diode. Based on silicon and air only, this optical diode relies on asymmetric spatial mode conversion between the left and right ports. The first even mode incident from the left port is transmitted to the right port after being converted into an odd mode. On the other hand, same mode incident from the right port is reflected back by the optical diode dielectric structure. The convergence and performance of the algorithm are studied, along with a transform method that converts continuous permittivity medium into a binary material design. The optimal device is studied with full-wave electromagnetic simulations to compare its behavior under right and left incidences, in 2D and 3D settings as well. A parametric study is designed to understand the impact of the design space size and initial conditions on the optimized devices performance. A broadband optical diode behavior is observed after optimization, with a large rejection ratio between the two transmission directions. This illustrates the potential of the objective-first inverse-design method to design ultra-compact broadband photonic devices. PMID:27586852

  10. Inverse design of an ultra-compact broadband optical diode based on asymmetric spatial mode conversion

    PubMed Central

    Callewaert, Francois; Butun, Serkan; Li, Zhongyang; Aydin, Koray

    2016-01-01

    The objective-first inverse-design algorithm is used to design an ultra-compact optical diode. Based on silicon and air only, this optical diode relies on asymmetric spatial mode conversion between the left and right ports. The first even mode incident from the left port is transmitted to the right port after being converted into an odd mode. On the other hand, same mode incident from the right port is reflected back by the optical diode dielectric structure. The convergence and performance of the algorithm are studied, along with a transform method that converts continuous permittivity medium into a binary material design. The optimal device is studied with full-wave electromagnetic simulations to compare its behavior under right and left incidences, in 2D and 3D settings as well. A parametric study is designed to understand the impact of the design space size and initial conditions on the optimized devices performance. A broadband optical diode behavior is observed after optimization, with a large rejection ratio between the two transmission directions. This illustrates the potential of the objective-first inverse-design method to design ultra-compact broadband photonic devices. PMID:27586852

  11. Inverse design of an ultra-compact broadband optical diode based on asymmetric spatial mode conversion.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Francois; Butun, Serkan; Li, Zhongyang; Aydin, Koray

    2016-09-02

    The objective-first inverse-design algorithm is used to design an ultra-compact optical diode. Based on silicon and air only, this optical diode relies on asymmetric spatial mode conversion between the left and right ports. The first even mode incident from the left port is transmitted to the right port after being converted into an odd mode. On the other hand, same mode incident from the right port is reflected back by the optical diode dielectric structure. The convergence and performance of the algorithm are studied, along with a transform method that converts continuous permittivity medium into a binary material design. The optimal device is studied with full-wave electromagnetic simulations to compare its behavior under right and left incidences, in 2D and 3D settings as well. A parametric study is designed to understand the impact of the design space size and initial conditions on the optimized devices performance. A broadband optical diode behavior is observed after optimization, with a large rejection ratio between the two transmission directions. This illustrates the potential of the objective-first inverse-design method to design ultra-compact broadband photonic devices.

  12. X-ray Polarization from High Mass Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    The next new astrophysical window will be the advent of measurements of X-ray polarization in the 2-10 keV energy range. This will begin in the next 5 years with the launch -- of small missions such as GEMS in the US and Polarix in Italy, and may continue with IXO in the next decade. Among other things, polarization allows for potentially -- sensitive tests of the geometry of astrophysical sources, on scales which are far too small to be imaged directly. Objects which are circularly symmetric on the sky will produce no net linear polarization, a fact which led to the discovery that Seyfert galaxies are non- spherical. There is only one source in the sky whose X-ray polarization is known, the Crab nebula. Owing to visibility constraints, it is likely that the first astronomical X-ray polarimetry observations will be of objects which have never before been observed with this technique. This motivates thorough and accurate modeling of the polarization properties of the brightest and (otherwise) best understood X-ray sources, for use as calibrators and test sources for X-ray polarimetry. The sources best suited for this are X-ray binaries, in particular those in which the dominant gas component comes from a strong stellar wind from a supergiant companion star. These 'high mass X-ray binaries' (HMXBs) are among the brightest sources in the sky, their orbital elements are relatively well understood, and their orbital variability provides a predictably changing view with respect to an important source of polarization: the strong stellar wind from the companion star. In some HMXBs the X-ray source is luminous enough to ionize the wind almost completely, so the light observed during and near eclipse, and its polarization, is dominated by electron scattering. Modeling these sources is relatively straightforward, though such models do not yet exist, and these can be considered as calibration sources for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters. More generally, spectral observations

  13. Tearing up a misaligned accretion disc with a binary companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Suzan; Nixon, Chris; King, Andrew; Price, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. We calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. We run hydrodynamical simulations to check these results, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and generally enhances accretion on to the central object. This applies in many cases of astrophysical accretion, e.g. supermassive black hole binaries and X-ray binaries.

  14. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY BINARIES IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Croston, Judith H.; Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Woodley, Kristin A.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarazin, Craig L.; Voss, Rasmus [Department of Astrophysics and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a spectral investigation of X-ray binaries (XBs) in NGC 5128 (Cen A), using six 100 ks Chandra observations taken over two months in 2007. We divide our sample into thermally and non-thermally dominated states based on the behavior of the fitted absorption column N{sub H}, and present the spectral parameters of sources with L{sub x} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. The majority of sources are consistent with being neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS LMXBs) and we identify three transient black hole (BH) LMXB candidates coincident with the dust lane, which is the remnant of a small late-type galaxy. Our results also provide tentative support for the apparent 'gap' in the mass distribution of compact objects between {approx}2-5 M{sub Sun }. We propose that BH LMXBs are preferentially found in the dust lane, and suggest this is because of the younger stellar population. The majority ({approx}70%-80%) of potential Roche lobe filling donors in the Cen A halo are {approx}> 12 Gyr old, while BH LMXBs require donors {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun} to produce the observed peak luminosities. This requirement for more massive donors may also explain recent results that claim a steepening of the X-ray luminosity function with age at L{sub x} {>=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for the XB population of early-type galaxies; for older stellar populations, there are fewer stars {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun }, which are required to form the more luminous sources.

  15. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  16. Binaries in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve; Goodman, Jeremy; Mateo, Mario; Phinney, E. S.; Pryor, Carlton; Richer, Harvey B.; Verbunt, Frank; Weinberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that globular clusters contain a substantial number of binaries most of which are believed to be primordial. We discuss different successful optical search techniques, based on radial-velocity variables, photometric variables, and the positions of stars in the color-magnitude diagram. In addition, we review searches in other wavelengths, which have turned up low-mass X-ray binaries and more recently a variety of radio pulsars. On the theoretical side, we give an overview of the different physical mechanisms through which individual binaries evolve. We discuss the various simulation techniques which recently have been employed to study the effects of a primordial binary population, and the fascinating interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics which drives globular-cluster evolution.

  17. Sometimes binary is better

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprows, David

    2015-04-01

    This note uses material involving perfect numbers and Zeno's paradoxes to show that although most students prefer to use base 10 when working with mathematical concepts there are times when the binary system is best.

  18. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  19. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  20. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  1. Scattering from binary optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Douglas W.

    1993-01-01

    There are a number of sources of scattering in binary optics: etch depth errors, line edge errors, quantization errors, roughness, and the binary approximation to the ideal surface. These sources of scattering can be systematic (deterministic) or random. In this paper, scattering formulas for both systematic and random errors are derived using Fourier optics. These formulas can be used to explain the results of scattering measurements and computer simulations.

  2. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  3. Orbits of 6 Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olevic, D.; Cvetkovic, Z.

    In this paper the orbits of binaries WDS 10093+2020 = A 2145, WDS 21074-0814 = BU 368 AB and WDS 22288-0001 = STF 2909 AB are recalculated because of significant deviations of more recent observations from the ephemerides. For binaries WDS 22384-0754 = A 2695, WDS 23474-7118 = FIN 375 Aa and WDS 23578+2508 = McA 76 the orbital elements are calculated for the first time.

  4. Soil compaction across the old rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating soil compaction levels across the Old Rotation, the world’s oldest continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) experiment, has not been conducted since the experiment transitioned to conservation tillage and high residue cover crops with and without irrigation. Our objective was to charact...

  5. Probing the clumpy winds of giant stars with high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Hell, Natalie; Hirsch, Maria; Garcia, Javier; Huenemoerder, David; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Nowak, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Sundqvists, Jon O.; Townsend, Richard D.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Line-driven winds from early type stars are structured, with small, overdense clumps embedded in tenuous hot gas. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), systems where a neutron star or a black hole accretes from the line-driven stellar wind of an O/B-type companion, are ideal for studying such winds: the wind drives the accretion onto the compact object and thus the X-ray production. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-pointlike and effectively X-rays the wind.We used RXTE and Chandra-HETG observations of two of the brightest HMXBs, Cyg X-1 and Vela X-1, to decipher their wind structure. In Cyg X-1, we show that the orbital variability of absorption can be only explained by a clumpy wind model and constrain the porosity of the wind as well as the onion-like structure of the clumps. In Vela X-1 we show, using the newest reference energies for low ionization Si-lines obtained with LLNL’s EBIT-I, that the ionized phase of the circumstellar medium and the cold clumps have different velocities.

  6. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  7. Accretion in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, A.; Blondin, J.; Walter, R.

    2013-09-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibit strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior. In conclusion, the neutron star, in these two examples, acts very efficiently as a probe to study stellar winds.

  8. Stellar winds in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Antonios; Walter, Roland

    2013-06-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibit strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior.

  9. Accretion in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Antonios; Walter, Roland; Blondin, John

    2014-01-01

    Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs) consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibits strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i) A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252-3616) discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density) we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii) A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1) has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism) we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior. In conclusion, the neutron star, in these two examples, acts very effciently as a probe to study stellar winds.

  10. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  11. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  12. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  13. Mutual Orbits of Transneptunian Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Noll, K. S.; Roe, H. G.; Porter, S. B.; Trujillo, C. A.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.

    2012-10-01

    We report the latest results from a program of high spatial resolution imaging to resolve the individual components of binary transneptunian objects. These observations use Hubble Space Telescope and also laser guide star adaptive optics systems on Keck and Gemini telescopes on Mauna Kea. From relative astrometry over multiple epochs, we determine the mutual orbits of the components, and thus the total masses of the systems. Accurate masses anchor subsequent detailed investigations into the physical characteristics of these systems. For instance, dynamical masses enable computation of bulk densities for systems where the component sizes can be estimated from other measurements. Additionally, patterns in the ensemble characteristics of binary orbits offer clues to circumstances in the protoplanetary nebula when these systems formed, as well as carrying imprints of various subsequent dynamical evolution processes. The growing ensemble of known orbits shows intriguing patterns that can shed light on the evolution of this population of distant objects. This work has been supported by an NSF Planetary Astronomy grant and by several Hubble Space Telescope and NASA Keck data analysis grants. The research makes use of data from the Gemini Observatory obtained through NOAO survey program 11A-0017, from a large number of Hubble Space Telescope programs, and from several NASA Keck programs.

  14. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    star determines its fate . Massive stars (with masses more than 50 times that of the Sun) lead a glorious, but short life. They are hot and very luminous and exhaust their energy supply in just a few million years. At the other end of the scale, low-mass stars like the Sun are more economical with their resources. Being cooler and dimmer, they are able to shine for billions of years [2]. But although the mass determines the fate of a star, it is not a trivial matter to measure this crucial parameter. In fact, it can only be determined directly if the star happens to be gravitationally bound to another star in a binary stellar system. Observations of the orbital motions of the two stars as they circle each other allows to "weigh" them, and also provide other important information, e.g. about their sizes and temperatures. Orbital motions The understanding of orbital motions has a long history in astronomy. The basic laws of Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) are still used to calculate the masses of orbiting objects, in the solar system as well as in binary stellar systems. However, while the observations of the motion of the nine planets and moons have allowed us to measure quite accurately the masses of objects in our vicinity, the information needed to "weigh" the binary stellar systems is not that easy to obtain. As a result, the mass estimates of the stars in binary systems are often rather uncertain. A main problem is that the individual stars in many binary systems can not be visually separated, even in the best telescopes. The information about the orbit may then come from the motions of the stars, if these are revealed by spectroscopic observations of the combined light (such systems are referred to as "spectroscopic binaries"). If absorption lines from both components are present in the spectrum, the measured wavelength of these double lines will shift periodically back and forth. This is the well-known Doppler effect and it directly reflects the changing velocities

  15. Eclipsing Binaries in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    We present results of the search for eclipsing binaries in the Magellanic Cloud fields covering central parts of these galaxies. The data were collected during the second phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment survey (OGLE-II) in 1997-2000. In total about 1500 and 3000 eclipsing stars were found in the Small and Large Magellanic Cloud respectively. The photometric data of all objects are available to the astronomical community from the OGLE Internet archive. We also discuss observational prospects for the eclipsing binaries field in relation with the third phase of the OGLE project (OGLE-III) which started in 2001.

  16. Cross-indexing of binary SIFT codes for large-scale image search.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Houqiang; Zhang, Liyan; Zhou, Wengang; Tian, Qi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in mapping visual features into compact binary codes for applications on large-scale image collections. Encoding high-dimensional data as compact binary codes reduces the memory cost for storage. Besides, it benefits the computational efficiency since the computation of similarity can be efficiently measured by Hamming distance. In this paper, we propose a novel flexible scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) binarization (FSB) algorithm for large-scale image search. The FSB algorithm explores the magnitude patterns of SIFT descriptor. It is unsupervised and the generated binary codes are demonstrated to be dispreserving. Besides, we propose a new searching strategy to find target features based on the cross-indexing in the binary SIFT space and original SIFT space. We evaluate our approach on two publicly released data sets. The experiments on large-scale partial duplicate image retrieval system demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  17. The donor star winds in High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lida

    2014-10-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) are essential astrophysical laboratories. These objects represent an advanced stage in the evolution of massive binary systems, after the initially more massive star has already collapsed in a supernova explosion, but its remnant, a neutron star or black hole, remains gravitationally bound. The stellar wind from the OB-type donor is partially accreted onto its compact companion powering its relatively high X-ray luminosity. Since HMXBs accrete from the stellar wind, parameters such as the donor's mass-loss rate, the velocity of the wind, and its clumpiness are of fundamental importance.This proposal takes advantage of the unique capabilities of HST/STIS for UV spectroscopy. We focus on the most populous in the Galaxy class of those HMXBs where the stellar wind of the OB donor is directly accreted onto a neutron star. Recently, a new sub-class of HMXBs - "supergiant fast X-ray transients" - was discovered. It has been proposed that these enigmatic objects can be explained by the specific properties of their donor-star winds. The only way to validate or disprove this hypothesis is by a studying the wind diagnostics lines in the UV spectra of donor stars. The observations proposed here will, for the first time, provide the UV spectra of this important new type of accreting binaries. Our state-of-the art non-LTE expanding stellar atmospheres and 3-D stellar wind simulations allow thorough exploitation of the STIS spectra. As a result we will obtain the wind parameters for a representative sample of six Galactic HMXBs, thus heightening our knowledge thereof considerably.

  18. Determination of the real number of galaxies in clusters of galaxies taking into consideration starlike red compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, N.

    Optical compact galaxies and red starlike objects are selected in two neighboring fields of 0.8 sq deg near the galactic north pole on an objective prism plate. With an identification magnitude of 18.9 m (B), 49 compact galaxies and 96 starlike objects are found in field I. In field II, nine compact galaxies and 41 red starlike objects are found. 55 of the 96 starlike objects in field I are determined to be optical compact galaxies, indicating an enlargement of the number of galaxies by 50 percent. The 96 red objects are also inspected on an FOA plate, 24 of which are found to be compact starlike galaxies.

  19. Cold compaction of water ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; McKinnon, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrostatic compaction of granulated water ice was measured in laboratory experiments at temperatures 77 K to 120 K. We performed step-wise hydrostatic pressurization tests on 5 samples to maximum pressures P of 150 MPa, using relatively tight (0.18-0.25 mm) and broad (0.25-2.0 mm) starting grain-size distributions. Compaction change of volume is highly nonlinear in P, typical for brittle, granular materials. No time-dependent creep occurred on the lab time scale. Significant residual porosity (???0.10) remains even at highest P. Examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a random configuration of fractures and broad distribution of grain sizes, again consistent with brittle behavior. Residual porosity appears as smaller, well-supported micropores between ice fragments. Over the interior pressures found in smaller midsize icy satellites and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), substantial porosity can be sustained over solar system history in the absence of significant heating and resultant sintering. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Eclipsing binaries in the MOST satellite fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, T.; Rucinski, S. M.; Latham, D. W.; Quinn, S. N.; Siwak, M.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Weiss, W. W.

    2010-04-01

    Sixteen new eclipsing binaries have been discovered by the MOST satellite among guide stars used to point its telescope in various fields. Several previously known eclipsing binaries were also observed by MOST with unprecedented quality. Among the objects we discuss in more detail are short-period eclipsing binaries with eccentric orbits in young open clusters: V578 Mon in NGC 2244 and HD 47934 in NGC 2264. Long nearly-continuous photometric runs made it possible to discover three long-period eclipsing binaries with orbits seen almost edge-on: HD 45972 with P = 28.1 days and two systems (GSC 154 1247 and GSC 2141 526) with P > 25 days. The high precision of the satellite data led to discoveries of binaries with very shallow eclipses (e.g., HD 46180 with A = 0.016 mag, and HD 47934 with A = 0.025 mag). Ground-based spectroscopy to support the space-based photometry was used to refine the models of several of the systems. Based on photometric data from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission (jointly operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the Space Division of Dynacon Inc.), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - SpaceFlight Lab and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna), and on spectroscopic data from the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto, and Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institute Washington.

  1. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  2. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  3. Kepler's Cool Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan; Muirhead, P. S.; Johnson, J. A.; Gonzales, A.; Shporer, A.; Plavchan, P.; Lockwood, A.; Morton, T.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most exciting exoplanet results to date have come from the smallest and coolest sample of stars in the Kepler field—the M dwarfs. These cool stars represent the largest stellar population in the Galaxy which in turn harbors one of the largest known exoplanet populations. However, an accurate understanding of their physical properties currently eludes us. Detached, M dwarf eclipsing binary systems provide an accurate and precise, model-independent means of measuring the fundamental properties of low-mass stars shedding light on the rich physics embodied by this spectral class and refining our knowledge of their exoplanets. We have undertaken an observational campaign to obtain masses, radii, and effective temperatures of the Kepler eclipsing binaries having an M dwarf primary with periods between 1 and 60 days. These data will allow detailed comparisons between stellar properties, binary period, rotation, metallicity and activity levels.

  4. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  5. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of post-common-envelope white dwarf + main sequence binaries: The effects of including recombination energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorotovic, M.; Schreiber, M. R.; García-Berro, E.; Camacho, J.; Torres, S.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Detached white dwarf + main sequence (WD+MS) post-common-envelope binaries (PCEBs) are perhaps the most suitable objects for testing predictions of close-compact binary-star evolution theories, in particular, common-envelope (CE) evolution. Consequently, the population of WD+MS PCEBs has been simulated by several authors in the past and the predictions have been compared with the observations. However, most of those theoretical predictions did not take into account the possible contributions to the envelope ejection from additional sources of energy (mostly recombination energy) stored in the envelope. Aims: Here we update existing binary population models of WD+MS PCEBs by assuming that in addition to a fraction αCE of the orbital energy, a fraction αrec of the recombination energy available within the envelope contributes to ejecting the envelope. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of 107 MS+MS binaries for 9 different combinations of αCE and αrec using standard assumptions for the initial primary mass function, binary separations, and initial-mass-ratio distribution and evolved these systems using the publicly available binary star evolution (BSE) code. Results: Including a fraction of the recombination energy leads to a clear prediction of a large number of long orbital period (≳10 days) systems mostly containing high-mass WDs. The fraction of systems with He-core WD primaries (MWD ≲ 0.5 M⊙) increases with the CE efficiency and the existence of very low-mass He WDs (≲0.3 M⊙) is only predicted for high values of the CE efficiency, i.e. αCE ≳ 0.5. All models predict on average longer orbital periods for PCEBs containing C/O-core WDs (MWD ≳ 0.5 M⊙) than for PCEBs containing He WDs. This effect inc