Science.gov

Sample records for binary compact object

  1. Thermodynamics of magnetized binary compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Uryu, Koji; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Markakis, Charalampos

    2010-11-15

    Binary systems of compact objects with electromagnetic field are modeled by helically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes with charged and magnetized perfect fluids. Previously derived thermodynamic laws for helically symmetric perfect-fluid spacetimes are extended to include the electromagnetic fields, and electric currents and charges; the first law is written as a relation between the change in the asymptotic Noether charge {delta}Q and the changes in the area and electric charge of black holes, and in the vorticity, baryon rest mass, entropy, charge and magnetic flux of the magnetized fluid. Using the conservation laws of the circulation of magnetized flow found by Bekenstein and Oron for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic fluid, and also for the flow with zero conducting current, we show that, for nearby equilibria that conserve the quantities mentioned above, the relation {delta}Q=0 is satisfied. We also discuss a formulation for computing numerical solutions of magnetized binary compact objects in equilibrium with emphasis on a first integral of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic-Euler equation.

  2. Evolution of binaries with compact objects in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical interactions that take place between objects in dense stellar systems lead to frequent formation of exotic stellar objects, unusual binaries, and systems of higher multiplicity. They are most important for the formation of binaries with neutron stars and black holes, which are usually observationally revealed in mass-transferring binaries. Here we review the current understanding of compact object's retention, of the metallicity dependence on the formation of low-mass X-ray binaries with neutron stars, and how mass-transferring binaries with a black hole and a white dwarf can be formed. We discuss as well one old unsolved puzzle and two new puzzles posed by recent observations: what descendants do ultra-compact X-ray binaries produce, how are very compact triples formed, and how can black hole low-mass X-ray binaries acquire non-degenerate companions?

  3. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Mergers of Binary Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2016-03-01

    The inspiral and eventual merger of two compact objects in binary systems are important in astrophysics across the electromagnetic spectrum and as potential gravitational-wave sources. In this talk I will select a few topics of current interest to highlight compact-object mergers, including in the context of multi-messenger astrophysics.

  4. Compact Object Binaries with Spinning Neutron Stars in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nicholas A.

    The inspiral and merger of binary neutron stars (BNS) is one of the most promising potential sources of gravitational waves for ground-based detectors like Advanced LIGO. BNS mergers are also likely a source of counterpart electromagnetic radiation. It is important to perform simulations of BNS to better understand and model their gravitational wave emission as well as their electromagnetic emission. The parameter space of BNS binaries is quite large, and one aspect that has not been well studied in neutron star spin. In this thesis, we focus on investigating spinning neutron stars in compact object binaries. Using the SpEC code, developed by the SXS collaboration, we begin by presenting a new code to create initial data for binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins. We introduce a novel method of measuring neutron star spin, and show that it is accurate and robust. We evolve several spinning binary configurations and show that their properties agree remarkably well with Post-Newtonian predictions. We also show that we are able to control the eccentricity of the binaries to 0.1%. Thereafter, we proceed to extend our code to black hole.neutron star (BHNS) binaries. We create many data sets across the BHNS parameter space, varying neutron star spin magnitude, spin direction, compactness, and black hole mass, spin and spin direction. We are able to create initial data sets with neutron star spins near the mass shedding limit, and nearly extremal black hole spins. Finally, we investigate spurious gravitational radiation in binary black hole systems. We study its parameter space dependence, by introducing three diagnostics, investigating them as a function of black hole spin and black hole separation, and comparing two different methods of constructing initial data.

  5. Evidence for a binary origin of a central compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, Victor; Pühlhofer, Gerd; Kavanagh, Patrick; Santangelo, Andrea; Suleimanov, Valery; Klochkov, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    Central compact objects (CCOs) are thought to be young thermally emitting isolated neutron stars that were born during the preceding core-collapse supernova explosion. Here, we present evidence that at least in one case the CCO could have been formed within a binary system. We show that the highly reddened optical source IRAS 17287-3443, located 25 arcsec away from the CCO candidate XMMUJ173203.3-344518 and classified previously as a post asymptotic giant branch star, is indeed surrounded by a dust shell. This shell is heated by the central star to temperatures of ˜90 K and observed as extended infrared emission in 8-160 μm band. The dust temperature also increases in the vicinity of the CCO which implies that it likely resides within the shell. We estimate the total dust mass to be ˜0.4-1.5 M⊙ which significantly exceeds expected dust yields by normal stars and thus likely condensed from supernova ejecta. Taking into account that both the age of the supernova remnant and the duration of active mass-loss phase by the optical star are much shorter than the total lifetime of either object, the supernova and the onset of the active mass-loss phase of the companion have likely occurred approximately simultaneously. This is most easily explained if the evolution of both objects is interconnected. We conclude, therefore, that both stars were likely members of the same binary system disrupted by a supernova.

  6. Higher order spin effects in inspiralling compact objects binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsat, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    We present recent progress on higher order spin effects in the post-Newtonian dynamics of compact objects binaries. We present first an extension of a Lagrangian formalism for point particle with spins, where finite size effects are represented by an additional multipolar structure. When applied to the case of a spin-induced octupole, the formalism allows for the computation of the cubic-in-spin effects that enter at the order 3.5PN. We also report on results obtained for quadratic-in-spin effects at the next-to-leading order 3PN. In both cases, we recover existing results for the dynamics, and derive for the first time the gravitational wave energy flux and orbital phasing. These results will be useful for the data analysis of the upcoming generation of advanced detectors of gravitational waves. NASA Grant 11-ATP-046.

  7. Nonconformally flat initial data for binary compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Uryu, Koji; Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Friedman, John L.; Shibata, Masaru

    2009-12-15

    A new method is described for constructing initial data for a binary neutron-star system in quasiequilibrium circular orbit. Two formulations for nonconformally flat data, waveless and near-zone helically symmetric, are introduced; in each formulation, the Einstein-Euler system, written in 3+1 form on an asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurface, is exactly solved for all metric components, including the spatially nonconformally flat potentials, and for irrotational flow. A numerical method applicable to both formulations is explained with an emphasis on the imposition of a spatial gauge condition. Results are shown for solution sequences of irrotational binary neutron-stars with matter approximated by parametrized equations of state that use a few segments of polytropic equations of state. The binding energy and total angular momentum of solution sequences computed within the conformally flat--Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews--formulation are closer to those of the third post-Newtonian (3PN) two point particles up to the closest orbits, for the more compact stars, whereas sequences resulting from the waveless/near-zone helically symmetric formulations deviate from the 3PN curve even more for the sequences with larger compactness. We think it likely that this correction reflects an overestimation in the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation as well as in the 3PN formula, by {approx}1 cycle in the gravitational-wave phase during the last several orbits. The work suggests that imposing spatial conformal flatness results in an underestimate of the quadrupole deformation of the components of binary neutron-star systems in the last few orbits prior to merger.

  8. Nonconformally flat initial data for binary compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryū, Kōji; Limousin, François; Friedman, John L.; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Shibata, Masaru

    2009-12-01

    A new method is described for constructing initial data for a binary neutron-star system in quasiequilibrium circular orbit. Two formulations for nonconformally flat data, waveless and near-zone helically symmetric, are introduced; in each formulation, the Einstein-Euler system, written in 3+1 form on an asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurface, is exactly solved for all metric components, including the spatially nonconformally flat potentials, and for irrotational flow. A numerical method applicable to both formulations is explained with an emphasis on the imposition of a spatial gauge condition. Results are shown for solution sequences of irrotational binary neutron-stars with matter approximated by parametrized equations of state that use a few segments of polytropic equations of state. The binding energy and total angular momentum of solution sequences computed within the conformally flat—Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews—formulation are closer to those of the third post-Newtonian (3PN) two point particles up to the closest orbits, for the more compact stars, whereas sequences resulting from the waveless/near-zone helically symmetric formulations deviate from the 3PN curve even more for the sequences with larger compactness. We think it likely that this correction reflects an overestimation in the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation as well as in the 3PN formula, by ˜1 cycle in the gravitational-wave phase during the last several orbits. The work suggests that imposing spatial conformal flatness results in an underestimate of the quadrupole deformation of the components of binary neutron-star systems in the last few orbits prior to merger.

  9. Distinguishing types of compact-object binaries using the gravitational-wave signatures of their mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; Haster, Carl-Johan; Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the distinguishability of populations of coalescing binary neutron stars, neutron-star black hole binaries, and binary black holes, whose gravitational-wave signatures are expected to be observed by the advanced network of ground-based interferometers LIGO and Virgo. We consider population-synthesis predictions for plausible merging binary distributions in mass space, along with measurement accuracy estimates from the main gravitational-wave parameter-estimation pipeline. We find that for our model compact-object binary mass distribution, we can always distinguish binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron-star binaries, but not necessarily black hole-neutron-star binaries and binary black holes; however, with a few tens of detections, we can accurately identify the three subpopulations and measure their respective rates.

  10. Binary compact object mergers in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steve; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We present work on the dynamics and gravitational wae emission of binary black holes in a modified theory of gravity. Our particular model is inspired by low energy string theory and includes additional matter fields, such as a dilaton, not necessarily present in vacuum general relativity. We consider deviations from standard predictions for gravitational wave signatures and examine alternative scalar and electromagnetic channels for emission.

  11. The exotic remnants of compact object binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duez, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The collision and merger of a neutron star with a black hole or another neutron star is a strong source of gravitational waves and a promising setup for the creation of bright infrared (kilonova) and gamma ray (gamma ray burst) transients. These violent events can be modeled by numerical simulations incorporating general relativity, fluid dynamics, and nuclear physics. In this talk, I will explain the findings of some of these simulations. Depending on the properties of the binary, the merger leaves a black hole, a black hole accreting matter from a torus at an incredible rate, or a massive spinning neutron star. The latter two cases are characterized by the importance of differential rotation, magnetohydrodynamic processes, and neutrino radiation. To understand these systems, I will focus on what we know of their dynamical and thermal equilibrium structure, what we know of the dynamical instabilities to which they might be prone, and what we can tentatively say about their subsequent secular evolution from outflow, magnetic, radiative, and other effects. Computer simulations are becoming ever more impressive but remain unequal to the problem at hand, so I will address the challenges still posed by small-scale magnetohydrodynamic effects and by radiation transport. The author is a member of the SXS Collaboration and acknowledges support from NSF.

  12. Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award Talk: Formation and Evolution of Compact Objects in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogera, Vicky

    2008-04-01

    Ever since their discovery, first as X-ray sources and later as radio pulsars, binary stellar systems harboring neutron stars or black holes have been pivotal in our efforts to understand the formation and evolution of these most compact objects and the implications for gravitational wave searches. I will review some recent surprising results linking the formation of neutron stars and black holes. I will also discuss how studies of double compact objects can help uncover the origin of short gamma-ray bursts and assess the prospects for gravitational wave detections in the near future.

  13. Greatly Enhanced Merger Rates of Compact-object Binaries in Non-spherical Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Antonini, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The Milky Way and a significant fraction of galaxies are observed to host a central massive black hole (MBH) embedded in a non-spherical nuclear star cluster. We study the secular orbital evolution of compact-object binaries in these environments and characterize the excitation of extremely large eccentricities that can lead to mergers by gravitational radiation. We find that the eccentricity excitation occurs most efficiently when the nodal precession timescale of the binary’s orbit around the MBH due to the non-spherical cluster becomes comparable (within a factor of ∼10) to the timescale on which the binary is torqued by the MBH due to the Lidov–Kozai (LK) mechanism. We show that in this regime the perturbations due to the cluster increase the fraction of systems that reach extreme eccentricities (1{--}e∼ {10}-4{--}{10}-6) by a factor of ∼10–100 compared to the idealized case of a spherical cluster, increasing the merger rates of compact objects by a similar factor. We identify two main channels that lead to this extreme eccentricity excitation: (i) chaotic diffusion of the eccentricities due to resonance overlap; (ii) cluster-driven variations of the mutual inclinations between the binary orbit and its center-of-mass orbit around the MBH, which can intensify the LK oscillations. We estimate that our mechanism can produce BH–BH and BH–neutron star binary merger rates of up to ≈ 15 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1 and ≈ 0.4 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, respectively. Thus, we propose the cluster-enhanced LK mechanism as a new channel for the merger of compact-object binaries, competing with scenarios that invoke isolated binary evolution or dynamical formation in globular clusters.

  14. Synthetic model of the gravitational wave background from evolving binary compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorkin, Irina; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Silk, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the stochastic gravitational wave background from various astrophysical sources is a key objective in view of upcoming observations with ground- and space-based gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO, VIRGO, eLISA, and the pulsar timing array. We develop a synthetic model framework that follows the evolution of single and binary compact objects in an astrophysical context. We describe the formation and merger rates of binaries, the evolution of their orbital parameters with time, and the spectrum of emitted gravitational waves at different stages of binary evolution. Our approach is modular and allows us to test and constrain different ingredients of the model, including stellar evolution, black hole formation scenarios, and the properties of binary systems. We use this framework in the context of a particularly well-motivated astrophysical setup to calculate the gravitational wave background from several types of sources, including inspiraling stellar-mass binary black holes that have not merged during a Hubble time. We find that this signal, albeit weak, has a characteristic shape that can help constrain the properties of binary black holes in a way complementary to observations of the background from merger events. We discuss possible applications of our framework in the context of other gravitational wave sources, such as supermassive black holes.

  15. Compact Objects In Binary Systems: Formation and Evolution of X-ray Binaries and Tides in Double White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Francesca

    Binary star systems hosting black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs are unique laboratories for investigating both extreme physical conditions, and stellar and binary evolution. Black holes and neutron stars are observed in X-ray binaries, where mass accretion from a stellar companion renders them X-ray bright. Although instruments like Chandra have revolutionized the field of X-ray binaries, our theoretical understanding of their origin and formation lags behind. Progress can be made by unravelling the evolutionary history of observed systems. As part of my thesis work, I have developed an analysis method that uses detailed stellar models and all the observational constraints of a system to reconstruct its evolutionary path. This analysis models the orbital evolution from compact-object formation to the present time, the binary orbital dynamics due to explosive mass loss and a possible kick at core collapse, and the evolution from the progenitor's Zero Age Main Sequence to compact-object formation. This method led to a theoretical model for M33 X-7, one of the most massive X-ray binaries known and originally marked as an evolutionary challenge. Compact objects are also expected gravitational wave (GW) sources. In particular, double white dwarfs are both guaranteed GW sources and observed electromagnetically. Although known systems show evidence of tidal deformation and a successful GW astronomy requires realistic models of the sources, detached double white dwarfs are generally approximated to point masses. For the first time, I used realistic models to study tidally-driven periastron precession in eccentric binaries. I demonstrated that its imprint on the GW signal yields constrains on the components' masses and that the source would be misclassified if tides are neglected. Beyond this adiabatic precession, tidal dissipation creates a sink of orbital angular momentum. Its efficiency is strongest when tides are dynamic and excite the components' free

  16. Insights into stellar and binary evolution from gravitational-wave observations of merging compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Advanced LIGO finished its first observing run (O1) at the begining of 2016, at a sensitivity ~3 times that of the initial LIGO detectors. This increased sensitivity makes the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves a realistic prospect over the next few years. One of the most promising sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors is the merger of two compact objects; neutron stars or black holes. These objects are formed as the end point of the evolution of massive stars in close binaries. There remain many poorly understood processes in the lives of massive stars and the evolution of close binary systems. These processes include the distribution of kicks received by black holes at birth, the amount of angular momentum lost from a system during a mass transfer episode, and the common envelope event. One way of attempting to understand these processes is to attempt to constrain them observationally using eventual gravitational-wave observations of compact binary mergers. Here we present recent work on this front.

  17. THE LOCATIONS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AS EVIDENCE FOR COMPACT OBJECT BINARY PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.

    2013-10-10

    We present a detailed investigation of Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV/optical observations of 22 short gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and sub-galactic environments. Utilizing the high angular resolution and depth of HST we characterize the host galaxy morphologies, measure precise projected physical and host-normalized offsets between the bursts and host centers, and calculate the locations of the bursts with respect to their host light distributions (rest-frame UV and optical). We calculate a median short GRB projected physical offset of 4.5 kpc, about 3.5 times larger than that for long GRBs, and find that ≈25% of short GRBs have offsets of ∼> 10 kpc. When compared to their host sizes, the median offset is 1.5 half-light radii (r{sub e} ), about 1.5 times larger than the values for long GRBs, core-collapse supernovae, and Type Ia supernovae. In addition, ≈20% of short GRBs having offsets of ∼> 5r{sub e} , and only ≈25% are located within 1r{sub e} . We further find that short GRBs severely under-represent their hosts' rest-frame optical and UV light, with ≈30%-45% of the bursts located in regions of their host galaxies that have no detectable stellar light, and ≈55% in the regions with no UV light. Therefore, short GRBs do not occur in regions of star formation or even stellar mass. This demonstrates that the progenitor systems of short GRBs must migrate from their birth sites to their eventual explosion sites, a signature of kicks in compact object binary systems. Utilizing the full sample of offsets, we estimate natal kick velocities of ≈20-140 km s{sup –1}. These independent lines of evidence provide the strongest support to date that short GRBs result from the merger of compact object binaries (NS-NS/NS-BH)

  18. Compact object mergers: observations of supermassive binary black holes and stellar tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, S.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    The capture and disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and the formation and coalescence of binaries, are inevitable consequences of the presence of SMBHs at the cores of galaxies. Pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and binary SMBHs are important stages in the evolution of galaxy mergers, and an intense search for these systems is currently ongoing. In the early and advanced stages of galaxy merging, observations of the triggering of accretion onto one or both BHs inform us about feedback processes and BH growth. Identification of the compact binary SMBHs at parsec and sub-parsec scales provides us with important constraints on the interaction processes that govern the shrinkage of the binary beyond the ``final parsec''. Coalescing binary SMBHs are among the most powerful sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the universe. Stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) appear as luminous, transient, accretion flares when part of the stellar material is accreted by the SMBH. About 30 events have been identified by multi-wavelength observations by now, and they will be detected in the thousands in future ground-based or space-based transient surveys. The study of TDEs provides us with a variety of new astrophysical tools and applications, related to fundamental physics or astrophysics. Here, we provide a review of the current status of observations of SMBH pairs and binaries, and TDEs, and discuss astrophysical implications.

  19. Resonant Excitation of White Dwarf Oscillations in Compact Object Binaries: 1. The No Back Reaction Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rathore, Y.

    2004-06-14

    We consider the evolution of white dwarfs with compact object companions (specifically black holes with masses up to {approx} 10{sup 6} M{sub {circle_dot}}, neutron stars, and other white dwarfs). We suppose that the orbits are initially quite elliptical and then shrink and circularize under the action of gravitational radiation. During this evolution, the white dwarfs will pass through resonances when harmonics of the orbital frequency match the stellar oscillation eigenfrequencies. As a star passes through these resonances, the associated modes will be excited and can be driven to amplitudes that are so large that there is a back reaction on the orbit which, in turn, limits the growth of the modes. A formalism is presented for describing this dynamical interaction for a non-rotating star in the linear approximation when the orbit can be treated as non-relativistic. A semi-analytical expression is found for computing the resonant energy transfer as a function of stellar and orbital parameters for the regime where back reaction may be neglected. This is used to calculate the results of passage through a sequence of resonances for several hypothetical systems. It is found that the amplitude of the {ell} = m = 2 f-mode can be driven into the non-linear regime for appropriate initial conditions. We also discuss where the no back reaction approximation is expected to fail, and the qualitative effects of back reaction.

  20. DC CIRCUIT POWERED BY ORBITAL MOTION: MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS IN COMPACT OBJECT BINARIES AND EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Dong

    2012-09-20

    The unipolar induction DC circuit model, originally developed by Goldreich and Lynden-Bell for the Jupiter-Io system, has been applied to different types of binary systems in recent years. We show that there exists an upper limit to the magnetic interaction torque and energy dissipation rate in such a model. This arises because when the resistance of the circuit is too small, the large current flow severely twists the magnetic flux tube connecting the two binary components, leading to the breakdown of the circuit. Applying this limit, we find that in coalescing neutron star binaries, magnetic interactions produce negligible correction to the phase evolution of the gravitational waveform, even for magnetar-like field strengths. However, energy dissipation in the binary magnetosphere may still give rise to electromagnetic radiation prior to the final merger. For ultracompact white dwarf binaries, we find that unipolar induction does not provide adequate energy dissipation to explain the observed X-ray luminosities of several sources. For exoplanetary systems containing close-in Jupiters or super-Earths, the magnetic torque and energy dissipation induced by the orbital motion are negligible, except possibly during the early T Tauri phase, when the stellar magnetic field is stronger than 10{sup 3} G.

  1. A Statistical Approach to Identifying Compact Objects in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa D.

    2013-04-01

    A standard approach towards statistical inferences in astronomy has been the application of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to reduce dimensionality. However, for non-linear distributions this is not always an effective approach. A non-linear technique called ``diffusion maps" (Freema \\eta 2009; Richard \\eta 2009; Lee \\& Waterman 2010), a robust eigenmode-based framework, allows retention of the full ``connectivity" of the data points. Through this approach we define the highly non-linear geometry of X-ray binaries in a color-color-intensity diagram in an efficient and statistically sound manner providing a broadly applicable means of distinguishing between black holes and neutron stars in Galactic X-ray binaries.

  2. On the likelihood of detecting gravitational waves from Population III compact object binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Ryu, Taeho; Perna, Rosalba; Berti, Emanuele; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Bulik, Tomasz

    2017-11-01

    We study the contribution of binary black hole (BH-BH) mergers from the first, metal-free stars in the Universe (Pop III) to gravitational wave detection rates. Our study combines initial conditions for the formation of Pop III stars based on N-body simulations of binary formation (including rates, binary fraction, initial mass function, orbital separation and eccentricity distributions) with an updated model of stellar evolution specific for Pop III stars. We find that the merger rate of these Pop III BH-BH systems is relatively small (≲ 0.1 Gpc-3 yr-1) at low redshifts (z < 2), where it can be compared with the LIGO empirical estimate of 9-240 Gpc-3 yr-1. The predicted rates are even smaller for Pop III double neutron star (NS) and BH-NS mergers. Our rates are compatible with those of Hartwig et al., but significantly smaller than those found in previous work . We explain the reasons for this discrepancy by means of detailed model comparisons and point out that (i) identification of Pop III BH-BH mergers may not be possible by Advanced LIGO, and (ii) the stochastic gravitational wave background from Pop III mergers may be lower than recently estimated. We further estimate gravitational wave detection rates for third-generation interferometric detectors. Our calculations are relevant for low to moderately rotating Pop III stars. We can now exclude a significant (>1 per cent) contribution of these stars to low-redshift BH-BH mergers. However, it remains to be tested whether (and at what level) rapidly spinning Pop III stars in the homogeneous evolution scenario can contribute to BH-BH mergers in the local Universe.

  3. On the mass of the compact object in the black hole binary A0620-00

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haswell, Carole A.; Robinson, Edward L.; Horne, Keith; Stiening, Rae F.; Abbott, Timothy M. C.

    1993-01-01

    Multicolor orbital light curves of the black hole candidate binary A0620-00 are presented. The light curves exhibit ellipsoidal variations and a grazing eclipse of the mass donor companion star by the accretion disk. Synthetic light curves were generated using realistic mass donor star fluxes and an isothermal blackbody disk. For mass ratios of q = M sub 1/M sub 2 = 5.0, 10.6, and 15.0 systematic searches were executed in parameter space for synthetic light curves that fit the observations. For each mass ratio, acceptable fits were found only for a small range of orbital inclinations. It is argued that the mass ratio is unlikely to exceed q = 10.6, and an upper limit of 0.8 solar masses is placed on the mass of the companion star. These constraints imply 4.16 +/- 0.1 to 5.55 +/- 0.15 solar masses. The lower limit on M sub 1 is more than 4-sigma above the mass of a maximally rotating neutron star, and constitutes further strong evidence in favor of a black hole primary in this system.

  4. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: FORMATION OF COMPACT BINARIES, MERGER/COLLISION PRODUCTS AND G2-LIKE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Snezana; Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B. E-mail: antonini@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-02-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of binaries around massive black holes (MBHs) in nuclear stellar clusters. We focus on their secular evolution due to the perturbation by the MBHs, while simplistically accounting for their collisional evolution. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbits around MBHs are strongly affected by secular processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (e.g., Kozai-Lidov cycles). During periapsis approach, dissipative processes such as tidal friction may become highly efficient, and may lead to shrinkage of a binary orbit and even to its merger. Binaries in this environment can therefore significantly change their orbital evolution due to the MBH third-body perturbative effects. Such orbital evolution may impinge on their later stellar evolution. Here we follow the secular dynamics of such binaries and its coupling to tidal evolution, as well as the stellar evolution of such binaries on longer timescales. We find that stellar binaries in the central parts of nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are highly likely to evolve into eccentric and/or short-period binaries, and become strongly interacting binaries either on the main sequence (at which point they may even merge), or through their later binary stellar evolution. The central parts of NSCs therefore catalyze the formation and evolution of strongly interacting binaries, and lead to the enhanced formation of blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and possible supernova progenitors. Induced mergers/collisions may also lead to the formation of G2-like cloud-like objects such as the one recently observed in the Galactic center.

  5. Rapid Compact Binary Coalescence Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, Chris; Brady, Patrick; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Ochsner, Evan; Qi, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The first observation run with second generation gravitational-wave observatories will conclude at the beginning of 2016. Given their unprecedented and growing sensitivity, the benefit of prompt and accurate estimation of the orientation and physical parameters of binary coalescences is obvious in its coupling to electromagnetic astrophysics and observations. Popular Bayesian schemes to measure properties of compact object binaries use Markovian sampling to compute the posterior. While very successful, in some cases, convergence is delayed until well after the electromagnetic fluence has subsided thus diminishing the potential science return. With this in mind, we have developed a scheme which is also Bayesian and simply parallelizable across all available computing resources, drastically decreasing convergence time to a few tens of minutes. In this talk, I will emphasize the complementary use of results from low latency gravitational-wave searches to improve computational efficiency and demonstrate the capabilities of our parameter estimation framework with a simulated set of binary compact object coalescences.

  6. The Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries and its implications for compact object formation and natal kicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Igoshev, Andrei P.; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study the imprints that different models for black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) formation have on the Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries (XRBs) that contain these objects. We find that the root mean square of the height above the Galactic plane of BH- and NS-XRBs is a powerful proxy to discriminate among different formation scenarios, and that binary evolution following the BH/NS formation does not significantly affect the Galactic distributions of the binaries. We find that a population model in which at least some BHs receive a (relatively) high natal kick fits the observed BH-XRBs best. For the NS case, we find that a high natal kick distribution, consistent with the one derived from the measurement of pulsar proper motion, is the most preferable. We also analyse the simple method we previously used to estimate the minimal peculiar velocity of an individual BH-XRB at birth. We find that this method may be less reliable in the bulge of the Galaxy for certain models of the Galactic potential, but that our estimate is excellent for most of the BH-XRBs.

  7. The Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries and its implications for compact object formation and natal kicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Igoshev, Andrei P.; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the imprints that different models for black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) formation have on the Galactic distribution of X-ray binaries (XRBs) which contain these objects. We find that the root mean square of the height above the Galactic plane of BH- and NS-XRBs is a powerful proxy to discriminate among different formation scenarios, and that binary evolution following the BH/NS formation does not significantly affect the Galactic distributions of the binaries. We find that a population model in which at least some BHs receive a (relatively) high natal kick fits the observed BH-XRBs best. For the NS case, we find that a high NK distribution, consistent with the one derived from the measurement of pulsar proper motion, is the most preferable. We also analyse the simple method we previously used to estimate the minimal peculiar velocity of an individual BH-XRB at birth. We find that this method may be less reliable in the bulge of the Galaxy for certain models of the Galactic potential, but that our estimate is excellent for most of the BH-XRBs.

  8. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  9. Gravitational waves from compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas Pacheco, José Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Large ground-based laser beam interferometers are presently in operation both in the USA (LIGO) and in Europe (VIRGO) and potential sources that might be detected by these instruments are revisited. The present generation of detectors does not have a sensitivity high enough to probe a significant volume of the universe and, consequently, predicted event rates are very low. The planned advanced generation of interferometers will probably be able to detect, for the first time, a gravitational signal. Advanced LIGO and EGO instruments are expected to detect few (some): binary coalescences consisting of either two neutron stars, two black holes or a neutron star and a black hole. In space, the sensitivity of the planned LISA spacecraft constellation will allow the detection of the gravitational signals, even within a “pessimistic" range of possible signals, produced during the capture of compact objects by supermassive black holes, at a rate of a few tens per year.

  10. Testing the Binary Black Hole Nature of a Compact Binary Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnendu, N. V.; Arun, K. G.; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2017-09-01

    We propose a novel method to test the binary black hole nature of compact binaries detectable by gravitational wave (GW) interferometers and, hence, constrain the parameter space of other exotic compact objects. The spirit of the test lies in the "no-hair" conjecture for black holes where all properties of a Kerr black hole are characterized by its mass and spin. The method relies on observationally measuring the quadrupole moments of the compact binary constituents induced due to their spins. If the compact object is a Kerr black hole (BH), its quadrupole moment is expressible solely in terms of its mass and spin. Otherwise, the quadrupole moment can depend on additional parameters (such as the equation of state of the object). The higher order spin effects in phase and amplitude of a gravitational waveform, which explicitly contains the spin-induced quadrupole moments of compact objects, hence, uniquely encode the nature of the compact binary. Thus, we argue that an independent measurement of the spin-induced quadrupole moment of the compact binaries from GW observations can provide a unique way to distinguish binary BH systems from binaries consisting of exotic compact objects.

  11. Testing the Binary Black Hole Nature of a Compact Binary Coalescence.

    PubMed

    Krishnendu, N V; Arun, K G; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2017-09-01

    We propose a novel method to test the binary black hole nature of compact binaries detectable by gravitational wave (GW) interferometers and, hence, constrain the parameter space of other exotic compact objects. The spirit of the test lies in the "no-hair" conjecture for black holes where all properties of a Kerr black hole are characterized by its mass and spin. The method relies on observationally measuring the quadrupole moments of the compact binary constituents induced due to their spins. If the compact object is a Kerr black hole (BH), its quadrupole moment is expressible solely in terms of its mass and spin. Otherwise, the quadrupole moment can depend on additional parameters (such as the equation of state of the object). The higher order spin effects in phase and amplitude of a gravitational waveform, which explicitly contains the spin-induced quadrupole moments of compact objects, hence, uniquely encode the nature of the compact binary. Thus, we argue that an independent measurement of the spin-induced quadrupole moment of the compact binaries from GW observations can provide a unique way to distinguish binary BH systems from binaries consisting of exotic compact objects.

  12. Model-independent inference on compact-binary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; Farr, Will M.; Colonna, Andrea; Stevenson, Simon; Tiňo, Peter; Veitch, John

    2017-03-01

    The recent advanced LIGO detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes enhance the prospect of exploring binary evolution via gravitational-wave observations of a population of compact-object binaries. In the face of uncertainty about binary formation models, model-independent inference provides an appealing alternative to comparisons between observed and modelled populations. We describe a procedure for clustering in the multidimensional parameter space of observations that are subject to significant measurement errors. We apply this procedure to a mock data set of population-synthesis predictions for the masses of merging compact binaries convolved with realistic measurement uncertainties, and demonstrate that we can accurately distinguish subpopulations of binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and mixed neutron star-black hole binaries with tens of observations.

  13. Approaching the Post-Newtonian Regime with Numerical Relativity: A Compact-Object Binary Simulation Spanning 350 Gravitational-Wave Cycles.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, Béla; Blackman, Jonathan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E; Pan, Yi

    2015-07-17

    We present the first numerical-relativity simulation of a compact-object binary whose gravitational waveform is long enough to cover the entire frequency band of advanced gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, for mass ratio 7 and total mass as low as 45.5M_{⊙}. We find that effective-one-body models, either uncalibrated or calibrated against substantially shorter numerical-relativity waveforms at smaller mass ratios, reproduce our new waveform remarkably well, with a negligible loss in detection rate due to modeling error. In contrast, post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms and existing calibrated phenomenological inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms display greater disagreement with our new simulation. The disagreement varies substantially depending on the specific post-Newtonian approximant used.

  14. Evidence for a Binary Companion to the Enigmatic Compact Central Object 1E 1207.4-5209

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Zavlin, V. E.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2006-01-01

    Located in the supernova remnant G296.5+10.0, 1E 1207.4-5209 is a 0.424 s period X-ray pulsar that exhibits strong absorption lines in its energy spectrum. The physical origin of the spectral features in 1E 1207.4-5209 and more generally, the absence of similar features in other radio-quiet neutron stars remains a mystery. Another, possibly related, anomalous property of 1E 1207.4-5209 is its non-monotonic spin frequency evolution. Zavlin, Pavlov & Sanwal(2004) proposed that the irregular spin-down was caused by either (i) frequent, recurrent glitches, (ii) the presence of a fall-back disk or (iii) a binary companion. Here, we report on a sequence of seven XMM-Newton observations of 1E 1207.4-5209 performed during a 40 day window between 2005 June 22 and July 3 1. Due to unanticipated phase noise, we identified three statistically-acceptable phase-coherent timing solutions with frequency time derivatives of +0.9, -2.6, and +1.6 x 10-12 Hz/s (listed in descending order of significance). We concluded that the local frequency derivative during our XMM-Newton observing campaign differs from the long-term spin-down rate by more than an order of magnitude. This measurement strongly supports the binary interpretation for the observed spin irregularities in 1E 1207.4-5209. We identified a family of orbital solutions that are consistent with our phase-connected solution as well as all archival data. We will discuss possible orbital solutions, prospects for constraining binary parameters with future observations, and consequences for the nature of 1E 1207.4-5209.

  15. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    PubMed

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2006-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs) within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA). Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars - compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  16. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    PubMed

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  17. The effects of host galaxy properties on merging compact binaries detectable by LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, R.; Bellovary, J. M.; Brooks, A.; Shen, S.; Governato, F.; Christensen, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation can produce present-day galaxies with a large range of assembly and star formation histories. A detailed study of the metallicity evolution and star formation history of such simulations can assist in predicting Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)-detectable compact object binary mergers. Recent simulations of compact binary evolution suggest that the compact object merger rate depends sensitively on the progenitor's metallicity. Rare low-metallicity star formation during galaxy assembly can produce more detected compact binaries than typical star formation. Using detailed simulations of galaxy and chemical evolution, we determine how sensitively the compact binary populations of galaxies with a similar present-day appearance depend on the details of their assembly. We also demonstrate by concrete example the extent to which dwarf galaxies overabundantly produce compact binary mergers, particularly binary black holes, relative to more massive galaxies. We discuss the implications for transient multimessenger astronomy with compact binary sources.

  18. Detecting compact binary coalescences with seedless clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, M.; Thrane, E.; Christensen, N.

    2014-10-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. Although matched filtering is the optimal search method for well-modeled systems, alternative detection strategies can be used to guard against theoretical errors (e.g., involving new physics and/or assumptions about spin or eccentricity) while providing a measure of redundancy. In a previous paper, we showed how "seedless clustering" can be used to detect long-lived gravitational-wave transients in both targeted and all-sky searches. In this paper, we apply seedless clustering to the problem of low-mass (Mtotal≤10M⊙) compact binary coalescences for both spinning and eccentric systems. We show that seedless clustering provides a robust and computationally efficient method for detecting low-mass compact binaries.

  19. Spin supplementary conditions for spinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikóczi, Balázs

    2017-03-01

    We consider different spin supplementary conditions (SSC) for a spinning compact binary with the leading-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction. The Lagrangian of the binary system can be constructed, but it is acceleration-dependent in two cases of SSC. We rewrite the generalized Hamiltonian formalism proposed by Ostrogradsky and compute the conserved quantities and the dissipative part of relative motion during the gravitational radiation of each SSC. We give the orbital elements and observed quantities of the SO dynamics, for instance, the energy and the orbital angular momentum losses and waveforms, and discuss their SSC dependence.

  20. Winds from disks in compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1993-10-27

    We herein present an observational and theoretical review of the winds of compact binaries. After a brief consideration of the accretion disk coronae and winds of X-ray binaries, the review concentrates on the winds of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Specifically, we consider the related problems of the geometry and mass-loss rate of the winds of CVs, their ionization state and variability, and the results from studies of eclipsing CVs. Finally, the properties of bona fide accretion disk wind models are reviewed.

  1. COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-06-01

    COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

  2. Accretion-powered Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2003-12-01

    Preface; The workshop logo; A short history of the CV workshop F. A. Córdova; Part I. Observations: 1. Low mass x-ray binaries A. P. Cowley, P. C. Schmidtke, D. Crampton, J. B. Hutchings, C. A. Haswell, E. L. Robinson, K. D. Horne, H. M. Johnston, S. R. Kulkarni, S. Kitamoto, X. Han, R. M. Hjellming, R. M. Wagner, S. L. Morris, P. Hertz, A. N. Parmar, L. Stella, P. Giommi, P. J. Callanan, T. Naylor, P. A. Charles, C. D. Bailyn, J. N. Imamura, T. Steiman-Cameron, J. Kristian, J. Middleditch, L. Angelini and J. P. Noris; 2. Nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables R. S. Polidan, C. W. Mauche, R. A. Wade, R. H. Kaitchuck, E. M. Schlegel, P. A. Hantzios, R. C. Smith, J. H. Wood, F. Hessman, A. Fiedler, D. H. P. Jones, J. Casares, P. A. Charles, J. van Paradijs, E. Harlaftis, T. Naylor, G. Sonneborn, B. J. M. Hassall, K. Horne, C. A. la Dous, A. W. Shafter, N. A. Hawkins, D. A. H. Buckley, D. J. Sullivan, F. V. Hessman, V. S. Dhillon, T. R. Marsh, J. Singh, S. Seetha, F. Giovannelli, A. Bianchini, E. M. Sion, D. J. Mullan, H. L. Shipman, G. Machin, P. J. Callanan, S. B. Howell, P. Szkody, E. M. Schlegel and R. F. Webbink; 3. Magnetic cataclysmic variables C. Hellier, K. O. Mason, C. W. Mauche, G. S. Miller, J. C. Raymond, F. K. Lamb, J. Patterson, A. J. Norton, M. G. Watson, A. R. King, I. M. McHardy, H. Lehto, J. P. Osborne, E. L. Robinson, A. W. Shafter, S. Balachandran, S. R. Rosen, J. Krautter, W. Buchholz, D. A. H. Buckley, I. R. Tuoly, D. Crampton, B. Warner, R. M. Prestage, B. N. Ashoka, M. Mouchet, J. M. Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M. Hameury, P. Szkody, P. Garnavich, S. Howell, T. Kii, M. Cropper, K. Mason, J. Bailey, D. T. Wickramasinghe, L. Ferrario, K. Beuermann, A. D. Schwope, H.-C. Thomas, S. Jordan, J. Schachter, A. V. Filippenko, S. M. Kahn, F. B. S. Paerels, K. Mukai, M. L. Edgar, S. Larsson, R. F. Jameson, A. R. King, A. Silber, R. Remillard, H. Bradt, M. Ishida, T. Ohashi and G. D. Schmidt; Part II. Accretion Theory: 4. Nonmagnetic W. Kley, F. Geyer, H. Herold, H

  3. TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong

    2012-09-01

    Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  4. Fundamental properties of accreting compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Jennifer L.

    Galactic accreting compact objects, such as stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars, can give us a unique perspective into the behavior of matter in extreme conditions. However, the exact nature of accretion onto these objects is not yet well understood. X-ray studies provide us with a means to observe the innermost regions around these objects and to explore our theories of general relativistic physics. Through X-ray analyses we can constrain the physical parameters necessary to make logical deductions regarding compact object properties, such as disk winds, relativistic jets, the Kerr metric, and the neutron star equation of state. Here we present spectral modeling results from three accreting X-ray binaries. Specifically, we analyze Suzaku spectra from two stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries, GRS 1915+105 and H1743-322, and one neutron star X-ray binary, 4U 1636-53. For GRS 1915+105 and 4U 1636-53, we use the relativistic iron line, which is part of a reflection spectrum, as a diagnostic for measuring black hole spin and neutron star radius, respectively. We find that while we can exclude a spin of zero at the 2σ level of confidence for GRS 1915+105, data selection and disk reflection modeling nuances can be important when estimating the spin value. For 4U 1636-53, we provide upper limits on the neutron star radius by estimating the radial extent of the inner accretion disk, which are important for constraining models for the neutron star equation of state. Moreover, when testing for the presence of disk winds in H1743-322 (which are key to understanding the nature of accretion disk outflow), we do not detect Fe XXV or Fe XXVI absorption lines in its spectra of H1743-322; implying that disk winds may be state dependent.

  5. Fundamental Properties of Accreting Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Galactic accreting compact objects, such as stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars can give us a unique perspective into the behavior of matter in extreme conditions. However, the exact nature of accretion onto these objects is not yet well understood. X-ray studies provide us with a means to observe the innermost regions around these objects and to test our theories of general relativistic physics. Through X-ray analyses we can constrain the physical parameters necessary to make logical deductions regarding compact object properties, such as disk winds, relativistic jets, the Kerr metric, and the neutron star equation of state. Here we present spectral modeling results from three accreting X-ray binaries. Specifically, we analyze Suzaku spectra from two stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries, GRS 1915+105 and H1743-322, and one neutron star X-ray binary, 4U 1636-53. For GRS 1915+105 and 4U 1636-53, we use the relativistic iron line, which is part of a reflection spectrum, as a diagnostic for measuring black hole spin and neutron star radius, respectively. We find that while we can exclude a spin of zero at the 2 sigma level of confidence for GRS 1915+105, data selection and disk reflection modeling nuances can be important when estimating the spin value. For 4U 1636-53, we provide upper limits on the neutron star radius by estimating the radial extent of the inner accretion disk, which are important for constraining models for the neutron star equation of state. Moreover, when testing for the presence of disk winds in H1743-322 (which are key to understanding the nature of accretion disk outflow), we do not detect Fe XXV or Fe XXVI absorption lines in its spectra of H1743-322; implying that disk winds may be state dependent.

  6. Estimating gravitational radiation from super-emitting compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Chad; Johnson, Matthew C.; Lehner, Luis

    2017-06-01

    Binary black hole mergers are among the most violent events in the Universe, leading to extreme warping of spacetime and copious emission of gravitational radiation. Even though black holes are the most compact objects they are not necessarily the most efficient emitters of gravitational radiation in binary systems. The final black hole resulting from a binary black hole merger retains a significant fraction of the premerger orbital energy and angular momentum. A nonvacuum system can in principle shed more of this energy than a black hole merger of equivalent mass. We study these super-emitters through a toy model that accounts for the possibility that the merger creates a compact object that retains a long-lived time-varying quadrupole moment. This toy model may capture the merger of (low mass) neutron stars, but it may also be used to consider more exotic compact binaries. We hope that this toy model can serve as a guide to more rigorous numerical investigations into these systems.

  7. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  8. New developments in studies of compact X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent developments, both observational and theoretical, on the study of X-ray binaries and the compact objects they contain are discussed. The recent discovery of the first binary periods for the globular cluster X-ray sources has stimulated a new model for their origin. As a variant of the 'standard' tidal capture origin model, this predicts an enhanced number of neutron stars in globular clusters. Long term timing studies of X-ray binaries may be consistent with many of these systems, primarily X-ray burst sources, being in fact hierarchical triple systems. Finally, the radio studies of Cyg X-3 and other X-ray binaries suggest that nonthermal processes are as important, energetically, as accretion processes in these systems.

  9. Exploring the Parameter Space of Compact Binary Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jim W.; Mandel, Ilya; Neijssel, Coenraad J.; Stevenson, Simon; Vigna-Gómez, Alejandro

    2017-06-01

    As we enter the era of gravitational wave astronomy, we are beginning to collect observations which will enable us to explore aspects of astrophysics of massive stellar binaries which were previously beyond reach. In this paper we describe COMPAS (Compact Object Mergers: Population Astrophysics and Statistics), a new platform to allow us to deepen our understanding of isolated binary evolution and the formation of gravitational-wave sources. We describe the computational challenges associated with their exploration, and present preliminary results on overcoming them using Gaussian process regression as a simulation emulation technique.

  10. The origin of ultra-compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Miyaji, Shigeki; Saio, Hideyuki

    1987-01-01

    The origin of ultra-compact binaries composed of a neutron star and a low-mass (about 0.06 solar mass) white dwarf is considered. Taking account of the systemic losses of mass and angular momentum, it was found that a serious difficulty exists in the scenarios which involve tidal captures of a normal star (a main sequence star or a red giant) by a neutron star. This difficulty can be avoided if a red giant star is captured by a massive white dwarf (M is approx. greater than 1.2 solar masses), which becomes a neutron star through the accretion induced collapse.

  11. The origin of ultra-compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Miyaji, Shigeki; Saio, Hideyuki

    The origin of ultra-compact binaries composed of a neutron star and a low-mass (about 0.06 solar mass) white dwarf is considered. Taking account of the systemic losses of mass and angular momentum, it was found that a serious difficulty exists in the scenarios which involve tidal captures of a normal star (a main sequence star or a red giant) by a neutron star. This difficulty can be avoided if a red giant star is captured by a massive white dwarf (M is approx. greater than 1.2 solar masses), which becomes a neutron star through the accretion induced collapse.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON THE COMPACT OBJECT MASS IN THE ECLIPSING HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY XMMU J013236.7+303228 IN M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Varun B.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.

    2012-09-20

    We present optical spectroscopic measurements of the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) XMMU J013236.7+303228 in M 33. Based on spectra taken at multiple epochs of the 1.73 day binary orbital period we determine physical as well as orbital parameters for the donor star. We find the donor to be a B1.5IV subgiant with effective temperature T = 22, 000-23, 000 K. From the luminosity, temperature, and known distance to M 33 we derive a radius of R 8.9 {+-} 0.5 R{sub Sun }. From the radial-velocity measurements, we determine a velocity semi-amplitude of K{sub opt} = 63 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}. Using the physical properties of the B star determined from the optical spectrum, we estimate the star's mass to be M{sub opt} = 11 {+-} 1 M{sub Sun }. Based on the X-ray spectrum, the compact companion is likely a neutron star, although no pulsations have yet been detected. Using the spectroscopically derived B star mass we find the neutron star companion mass to be M{sub X} = 2.0 {+-} 0.4 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the neutron star mass in the HMXB Vela X-1, but heavier than the canonical value of 1.4 M{sub Sun} found for many millisecond pulsars. We attempt to use as an additional constraint that the B star radius inferred from temperature, flux, and distance should equate to the Roche radius, since the system accretes by Roche lobe overflow. This leads to substantially larger masses, but by trying to apply the technique to known systems, we find that the masses are consistently overestimated. Attempting to account for that in our uncertainties, we derive M{sub X} = 2.2{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} M{sub Sun} and M{sub opt} = 13 {+-} 4 M{sub Sun }. We conclude that precise constraints require detailed modeling of the shape of the Roche surface.

  13. Near-Infrared Observations of Compact Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khargharia, Juthika

    Low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are a subset of compact binary systems in which a main-sequence or slightly evolved star fills its Roche lobe and donates mass to a neutron star or a black hole (BH) via an accretion disk. Robust estimates of compact object masses in these systems are required to enhance our current understanding of the physics of compact object formation, accretion disks and jets. Compact object masses are typically determined at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths when the system is in quiescence and the donor star is the dominant source of flux. Previous studies have assumed that any non-stellar contribution at these wavelengths is minimal. However, this assumption is rarely true. By performing NIR spectroscopy, we determined the fractional donor star contribution to the NIR flux and the compact object masses in two LMXBs: V404 Cyg and Cen X-4. In our analysis, it was assumed that the light curve morphology remains consistent throughout quiescence. It has now been shown in several systems that veiling measurements from non-stellar sources are meaningful only if acquired contemporaneously with light curve measurements. We accounted for this in the measurement of the BH mass in the LMXB, XTE J1118+480. LMXBs are also considered to be the most likely candidates responsible for the formation of milli-second pulsars (MSP). Here, I present the unique case of PSR J1903+0327 that challenges this currently accepted theory of MSP formation and is a potential candidate for testing General Relativity. Observations in the NIR come with their own set of challenges. NIR detector arrays used in these observations generally have high dark current and readout noise. In an effort to lower the read noise in NICFPS at APO, we present a study done on the Hawaii-1RG engineering grade chip that served as a test bed for reducing the read noise in NICFPS.

  14. Probing the Environment of Accreting Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Manfred

    2011-04-01

    X-ray binaries are the topic of this thesis. They consist of a compact object -- a black hole or a neutron star -- and an ordinary star, which loses matter to the compact object. The gravitational energy released through this process of mass accretion is largely converted into X-rays. The latter are used in the present work to screen the environment of the compact object. The main focus in the case of a massive star is on its wind, which is not homogeneous, but may display structures in form of temperature and density variations. Since great importance is, in multiple respects, attached to stellar winds in astrophysics, there is large interest in general to understand these structures more thoroughly. In particular for X-ray binaries, whose compact object obtains matter from the wind of its companion star, the state of the wind can decisively influence mass accretion and its related radiation processes. A detailed introduction to the fundamentals of stellar winds, compact objects, accretion and radiation processes in X-ray binaries, as well as to the employed instruments and analysis methods, is given in chapter 1. The focus of this investigation is on Cygnus X-1, a binary system with a black hole and a blue supergiant, which form a persistently very bright X-ray source because of accretion from the stellar wind. It had been known for a long time that this source -- when the black hole is seen through the dense stellar wind -- often displays abrupt absorption events whose origin is suspected to be in clumps in the wind. More detailed physical properties of these clumps and of the wind in general are explored in this work. Observations that were specifically acquired for this study, as well as archival data from different satellite observatories, are analyzed in view of signatures of the wind and its fine structures. These results are presented in chapter 2. In a first part of the analysis, the statistical distribution of the brightness of Cyg X-1, as measured since

  15. Parameter estimation of gravitational wave compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haster, Carl-Johan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The first detections of gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes have allowed unprecedented inference on the astrophysical parameters of such binaries. Given recent updates in detector capabilities, gravitational wave model templates and data analysis techniques, in this talk I will describe the prospects of parameter estimation of compact binary coalescences during the second observation run of the LIGO-Virgo collaboration.

  16. Recognition of compact astrophysical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H. (Editor); Rothschild, R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics and the Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics at the Univ. of Md. collaberated on a graduate level course with this title. This publication is an edited version of notes used as the course text. Topics include stellar evolution, pulsars, binary stars, X-ray signatures, gamma ray sources, and temporal analysis of X-ray data.

  17. Accretion Disk Outflows from Compact Object Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian

    Nuclear reactions play a key role in the accretion disks and outflows associated with the merger of binary compact objects and the central engines of gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. The proposed research program will investigate the impact of nucleosynthesis on these events and their observable signatures by means of analytic calculations and numerical simulations. One focus of this research is rapid accretion following the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) binary companion. Tidal disruption shreds the WD into a massive torus composed of C, O, and/or He, which undergoes nuclear reactions and burns to increasingly heavier elements as it flows to smaller radii towards the central compact object. The nuclear energy so released is comparable to that released gravitationally, suggesting that burning could drastically alter the structure and stability of the accretion flow. Axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of the torus including nuclear burning will be performed to explore issues such as the mass budget of the flow (accretion vs. outflows) and its thermal stability (steady burning and accretion vs. runaway explosion). The mass, velocity, and composition of outflows from the disk will be used in separate radiative transfer calculations to predict the lightcurves and spectra of the 56Ni-decay powered optical transients from WD-NS/WD-BH mergers. The possible connection of such events to recently discovered classes of sub-luminous Type I supernovae will be assessed. The coalescence of NS-NS/NS-BH binaries also results in the formation of a massive torus surrounding a central compact object. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of such accretion disks will be performed, which for the first time follow the effects of weak interactions and the nuclear energy released by Helium recombination. The nucleosynthetic yield of disk outflows will be calculated using a detailed

  18. Studies of compact objects with Einstein - Review and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray images and spectra of a wide range of systems containing compact objects were obtained with the Einstein X-ray Observatory. Accreting white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes were observed in binary systems in the Galaxy, and new constraints were derived for their formation, nature and evolution. Massive black holes were studied in active galactic nuclei, and X-ray spectra (and evolution) of AGN have led to a new model for the diffuse X-ray background.

  19. Studying Variance in the Galactic Ultra-compact Binary Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane; Breivik, Katelyn

    2017-01-01

    In the years preceding LISA, Milky Way compact binary population simulations can be used to inform the science capabilities of the mission. Galactic population simulation efforts generally focus on high fidelity models that require extensive computational power to produce a single simulated population for each model. Each simulated population represents an incomplete sample of the functions governing compact binary evolution, thus introducing variance from one simulation to another. We present a rapid Monte Carlo population simulation technique that can simulate thousands of populations on week-long timescales, thus allowing a full exploration of the variance associated with a binary stellar evolution model.

  20. Dynamics of Compact Binaries in Effective Field Theory Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrodin, Delphine

    2010-02-01

    Coalescing compact binaries are predicted to be powerful emitters of gravitational waves, and provide a strong gravity environment ideal for the testing of gravity theories. We study the gravitational dynamics in the early inspiral phase of coalescing compact binaries using Non-Relativistic General Relativity (NRGR) - an effective field theory formalism based on the Post-Newtonian approximation to General Relativity, but which provides a consistent lagrangian framework and a systematic way in which to study binary dynamics and gravitational wave emission. We calculate in this framework the spin-orbit correction to the newtonian potential at 2.5 PN. )

  1. The multi-messenger picture of compact binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, enormous progress has been achieved in the understanding of the various facets of coalescing double neutron star and neutron black hole binary systems. One hopes that the mergers of such compact binaries can be routinely detected with the advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational wave detector facilities, maybe as early as in 2016. From the theoretical side, there has also been mounting evidence that compact binary mergers could be major sources of heavy elements and these ideas have gained recent observational support from the detection of an event that has been interpreted as a "macronova", an electromagnetic transient powered by freshly produced, radioactively decaying heavy elements. In addition, compact binaries are the most plausible triggers of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) and the last decade has witnessed the first detection of a sGRB afterglow and subsequent observations have delivered a wealth of information on the environments in which such bursts occur. To date, compact binary mergers can naturally explain most — though not all — of the observed sGRB properties. This paper reviews major recent developments in various areas related to compact binary mergers.

  2. Learning Compact Binary Face Descriptor for Face Recognition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiwen; Liong, Venice Erin; Zhou, Xiuzhuang; Zhou, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Binary feature descriptors such as local binary patterns (LBP) and its variations have been widely used in many face recognition systems due to their excellent robustness and strong discriminative power. However, most existing binary face descriptors are hand-crafted, which require strong prior knowledge to engineer them by hand. In this paper, we propose a compact binary face descriptor (CBFD) feature learning method for face representation and recognition. Given each face image, we first extract pixel difference vectors (PDVs) in local patches by computing the difference between each pixel and its neighboring pixels. Then, we learn a feature mapping to project these pixel difference vectors into low-dimensional binary vectors in an unsupervised manner, where 1) the variance of all binary codes in the training set is maximized, 2) the loss between the original real-valued codes and the learned binary codes is minimized, and 3) binary codes evenly distribute at each learned bin, so that the redundancy information in PDVs is removed and compact binary codes are obtained. Lastly, we cluster and pool these binary codes into a histogram feature as the final representation for each face image. Moreover, we propose a coupled CBFD (C-CBFD) method by reducing the modality gap of heterogeneous faces at the feature level to make our method applicable to heterogeneous face recognition. Extensive experimental results on five widely used face datasets show that our methods outperform state-of-the-art face descriptors.

  3. Compact binary evolutions with the Z4c formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, David; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Thierfelder, Marcus; Cao, Zhoujian; Tichy, Wolfgang; Brügmann, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Numerical relativity simulations of compact binaries with the Z4c and Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura-Oohara-Kojima (BSSNOK) formulations are compared. The Z4c formulation is advantageous in every case considered. In simulations of nonvacuum spacetimes, the constraint violations due to truncation errors are between 1 and 3 orders of magnitude lower in the Z4c evolutions. Improvements are also found in the accuracy of the computed gravitational radiation. For equal-mass irrotational binary neutron star evolutions, we find that the absolute errors in phase and amplitude of the waveforms can be up to a factor of 4 smaller. The quality of the Z4c numerical data is also demonstrated by a remarkably accurate computation of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass from surface integrals. For equal-mass nonspinning binary puncture black hole evolutions, we find that the absolute errors in phase and amplitude of the waveforms can be up to a factor of 2 smaller. In the same evolutions, we find that away from the punctures the Hamiltonian constraint violation is reduced by between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the utility of gravitational radiation controlling, constraint preserving boundary conditions for the Z4c formulation is demonstrated. The evolution of spacetimes containing a single compact object confirms earlier results in spherical symmetry. The boundary conditions avoid spurious and nonconvergent effects present in high resolution runs with either formulation with a more naive boundary treatment. We conclude that Z4c is preferable to BSSNOK for the numerical solution of the 3+1 Einstein equations with the puncture gauge.

  4. The formation of eccentric compact binary inspirals and the role of gravitational wave emission in binary-single stellar encounters

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-03-20

    The inspiral and merger of eccentric binaries leads to gravitational waveforms distinct from those generated by circularly merging binaries. Dynamical environments can assemble binaries with high eccentricity and peak frequencies within the LIGO band. In this paper, we study binary-single stellar scatterings occurring in dense stellar systems as a source of eccentrically inspiraling binaries. Many interactions between compact binaries and single objects are characterized by chaotic resonances in which the binary-single system undergoes many exchanges before reaching a final state. During these chaotic resonances, a pair of objects has a non-negligible probability of experiencing a very close passage. Significant orbital energy and angular momentum are carried away from the system by gravitational wave (GW) radiation in these close passages, and in some cases this implies an inspiral time shorter than the orbital period of the bound third body. We derive the cross section for such dynamical inspiral outcomes through analytical arguments and through numerical scattering experiments including GW losses. We show that the cross section for dynamical inspirals grows with increasing target binary semi-major axis a and that for equal-mass binaries it scales as a {sup 2/7}. Thus, we expect wide target binaries to predominantly contribute to the production of these relativistic outcomes. We estimate that eccentric inspirals account for approximately 1% of dynamically assembled non-eccentric merging binaries. While these events are rare, we show that binary-single scatterings are a more effective formation channel than single-single captures for the production of eccentrically inspiraling binaries, even given modest binary fractions.

  5. Status of searches for compact binaries in aLIGO with PyCBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biwer, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Advanced LIGO began its first observing in September 2015. Gravitational waves from binary neutron stars, binary black holes and neutron star-black hole binaries are an important science goal for Advanced LIGO. The PyCBC search uses match filtering to correlate LIGO data with a bank of templates to search for transient gravitational-wave from compact object binaries with a total mass between 2 and 100 solar masses with spin. In this talk, we describe results of the PyCBC search during the first aLIGO observing run. LIGO.

  6. Hunting the Huntsmen: Compact Pulsar Binaries with Giant Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swihart, Samuel; Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Sand, David J.; Cheung, Chi C.; Johnson, Tyrel J.

    2017-01-01

    Our group has been pursuing follow-up observations of unassociated Fermi-LAT γ-ray sources in an effort to identify new Milky Way compact binaries. Some of our recent observations include the preliminary discovery of a long-period (~8.1d), γ-ray bright binary with a heavy (~1.9 M) neutron star (NS) primary and giant secondary (~0.5 M) that shows some unusual variability characteristics in multiple wavelengths. Evolutionary models of compact binaries indicate that this system is likely in the late phases of typical millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary formation in the Galactic field, phases which up until now have been unobserved. This system also appears remarkably similar to the recently discovered NS binary 1FGL J1417.7-4407 (Strader et al. 2015), which showed optical, X-ray, and γ-ray signatures consistent with transitional MSPs in their disk state. Despite this evidence, 1FGL J1417.7-4407 was simultaneously found to host a radio MSP, implying accreting material is not reaching the pulsar surface and further bringing into question how and when these systems switch on or off as radio MSPs. The confirmation of a second long-period γ-ray bright binary system with a massive NS primary and giant secondary would show that the rich phenomenology that can be observed when an accretion disk is present remains unclear, and facilitates a discussion on whether such systems constitute a distinct class of compact binaries.

  7. Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Jeremey; Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2012-03-01

    We propose to search for nuclear density or greater compact ultra dense objects (CUDOs), which could constitute a significant fraction of the dark matter [1]. Considering their high density, the gravitational tidal forces are significant and atomic-density matter cannot stop an impacting CUDO, which punctures the surface of the target body, pulverizing, heating and entraining material near its trajectory through the target [2]. Because impact features endure over geologic timescales, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Mercury and large asteroids are well-suited to act as time-integrating CUDO detectors. There are several potential candidates for CUDO structure such as strangelet fragments or more generally dark matter if mechanisms exist for it to form compact objects. [4pt] [1] B. J. Carr, K. Kohri, Y. Sendouda, & J.'i. Yokoyama, Phys. Rev. D81, 104019 (2010). [0pt] [2] L. Labun, J. Birrell, J. Rafelski, Solar System Signatures of Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects, arXiv:1104.4572.

  8. Compact objects in relativistic theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada da Silva, Hector

    2017-05-01

    In this dissertation we discuss several aspects of compact objects, i.e. neutron stars and black holes, in relativistic theories of gravity. We start by studying the role of nuclear physics (encoded in the so-called equation of state) in determining the properties of neutron stars in general relativity. We show that low-mass neutron stars are potentially useful astrophysical laboratories that can be used to constrain the properties of the equation of state. More specifically, we show that various bulk properties of these objects, such as their quadrupole moment and tidal deformability, are tightly correlated. Next, we develop a formalism that aims to capture how generic modifications from general relativity affect the structure of neutron stars, as predicted by a broad class of gravity theories, in the spirit of the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism (PPN). Our "post-Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff" formalism provides a toolbox to study both stellar structure and the interior/exterior geometries of static, spherically symmetric relativistic stars. We also apply the formalism to parametrize deviations from general relativity in various astrophysical observables related with neutron stars, including surface redshift, apparent radius, Eddington luminosity. We then turn our attention to what is arguably the most well-motivated and well-investigated generalization of general relativity: scalar-tensor theory. We start by considering theories where gravity is mediated by a single extra scalar degree of freedom (in addition to the metric tensor). An interesting class of scalar-tensor theories passes all experimental tests in the weak-field regime of gravity, yet considerably deviates from general relativity in the strong-field regime in the presence of matter. A common assumption in modeling neutron stars is that the pressure within these object is spatially isotropic. We relax this assumption and examine how pressure anisotropy affects the mass, radius and moment of inertia

  9. Compact binary hashing for music retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin S.

    2014-03-01

    With the huge volume of music clips available for protection, browsing, and indexing, there is an increased attention to retrieve the information contents of the music archives. Music-similarity computation is an essential building block for browsing, retrieval, and indexing of digital music archives. In practice, as the number of songs available for searching and indexing is increased, so the storage cost in retrieval systems is becoming a serious problem. This paper deals with the storage problem by extending the supervector concept with the binary hashing. We utilize the similarity-preserving binary embedding in generating a hash code from the supervector of each music clip. Especially we compare the performance of the various binary hashing methods for music retrieval tasks on the widely-used genre dataset and the in-house singer dataset. Through the evaluation, we find an effective way of generating hash codes for music similarity estimation which improves the retrieval performance.

  10. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Meiksin, A.; Joss, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    A highly compact binary represents a system which is composed of a collapsed object (degenerate dwarf, neutron star, or black hole) in orbit with a low-mass (equal to or less than 0.5 solar mass) secondary star. Matter may be transferred from the secondary to the collapsed star due to the decay of the orbit resulting from the emission of gravitational radiation. The present investigation has the objective to study quantitatively the evolution of highly compact binaries in globular cluster cores, subject to the interplay of gravitational radiation and collisions with field stars. The investigation is exploratory in nature. The numerical methods employed are based on the techniques developed by Rappaport et al. (1982). It is found that occasional close encounters with field stars strongly dominate the evolution of highly compact binaries in dense globular cluster cores. Attention is given to the applicability of the findings to observations of X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables.

  11. First law of mechanics for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tiec, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    Using the canonical Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian formalism, a "first law of mechanics" is established for binary systems of point masses moving along generic stable bound (eccentric) orbits. This relationship is checked to hold within the post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity, up to third order. Several applications are discussed, including the use of gravitational self-force results to inform post-Newtonian theory and the effective one-body model for eccentric-orbit compact binaries.

  12. Parameter Estimation for Compact Binaries with Ground-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations Using the LALInference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, J.; Raymond, V.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Graff, P.; Vitale, S.; Aylott, B.; Blackburn, K.; Christensen, N.; Coughlin, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin operation in the coming years, with compact binary coalescence events a likely source for the first detections. The gravitational waveforms emitted directly encode information about the sources, including the masses and spins of the compact objects. Recovering the physical parameters of the sources from the GW observations is a key analysis task. This work describes the LALInference software library for Bayesian parameter estimation of compact binary signals, which builds on several previous methods to provide a well-tested toolkit which has already been used for several studies. We show that our implementation is able to correctly recover the parameters of compact binary signals from simulated data from the advanced GW detectors. We demonstrate this with a detailed comparison on three compact binary systems: a binary neutron star (BNS), a neutron star - black hole binary (NSBH) and a binary black hole (BBH), where we show a cross-comparison of results obtained using three independent sampling algorithms. These systems were analysed with non-spinning, aligned spin and generic spin configurations respectively, showing that consistent results can be obtained even with the full 15-dimensional parameter space of the generic spin configurations. We also demonstrate statistically that the Bayesian credible intervals we recover correspond to frequentist confidence intervals under correct prior assumptions by analysing a set of 100 signals drawn from the prior. We discuss the computational cost of these algorithms, and describe the general and problem-specific sampling techniques we have used to improve the efficiency of sampling the compact binary coalescence (CBC) parameter space.

  13. Gravitational Wave Detection of Compact Binaries Through Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atallah, Dany Victor; Dorrington, Iain; Sutton, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The first detection of gravitational waves (GW), GW150914, as produced by a binary black hole merger, has ushered in the era of GW astronomy. The detection technique used to find GW150914 considered only a fraction of the information available describing the candidate event: mainly the detector signal to noise ratios and chi-squared values. In hopes of greatly increasing detection rates, we want to take advantage of all the information available about candidate events. We employ a technique called Multivariate Analysis (MVA) to improve LIGO sensitivity to GW signals. MVA techniques are efficient ways to scan high dimensional data spaces for signal/noise classification. Our goal is to use MVA to classify compact-object binary coalescence (CBC) events composed of any combination of black holes and neutron stars. CBC waveforms are modeled through numerical relativity. Templates of the modeled waveforms are used to search for CBCs and quantify candidate events. Different MVA pipelines are under investigation to look for CBC signals and un-modelled signals, with promising results. One such MVA pipeline used for the un-modelled search can theoretically analyze far more data than the MVA pipelines currently explored for CBCs, potentially making a more powerful classifier. In principle, this extra information could improve the sensitivity to GW signals. We will present the results from our efforts to adapt an MVA pipeline used in the un-modelled search to classify candidate events from the CBC search.

  14. Analytic gravitational waveforms for generic precessing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Klein, Antoine; Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves from compact binaries are subject to amplitude and phase modulations arising from interactions between the angular momenta of the system. Failure to account for such spin-precession effects in gravitational wave data analysis could hinder detection and completely ruin parameter estimation. In this talk I will describe the construction of closed-form, frequency-domain waveforms for fully-precessing, quasi-circular binary inspirals. The resulting waveforms can model spinning binaries of arbitrary spin magnitudes, spin orientations, and masses during the inspiral phase. I will also describe ongoing efforts to extend these inspiral waveforms to the merger and ringdown phases.

  15. Kepler Observations of Transiting Hot Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Jason; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    We present Kepler lightcurves of two A spectral class stars which show hot, compact transiting companions. Our analysis of 45 days of high duty cycle, ultra precise photometry show the companions have radii of 40% and 90% that of Jupiter based and effective temperatures greater than 10 000K based on the transit and eclipse lightcurve profiles. These objects have properties similar to white dwarfs as they are compact and hot. The lightcurves also suggest the companions have masses less than 10% of the Sun. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Elliptic waveforms for inspiralling compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikóczi, Balázs

    2010-03-01

    The inspiral of supermassive black hole binary systems with high orbital eccentricity are the most promising sources for the gravitational wave observatories. The importance of elliptic gravitational waveforms in various physical scenarios has been emphasized by several authors (Wahlquist 1987, Moreno-Garrido, Buitrago and Mediavilla 1994, Martel and Poisson 1999). Taking into account the eccentricity of the orbit in the total waveform improves the parameter estimation for these sources, as it is shown by the construction and analyzation of the Fisher information matrix. In our work we use the Fourier-Bessel analysis of the Kepler motion and the stationary phase approximation of time-depend waveforms.

  17. Tidal interactions of inspiraling compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars; Cutler, Curt

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the tidal interaction in neutron star-neutron star and neutron star-black hole binaries and argue that they will not be tidally locked during the gravitational inspiral. More specifically, we show that, for inspiraling neutron stars of mass greater than about 1.2 solar mass, the shortest possible tidal synchronization time exceeds the gravitational decay time, so that the neutron star cannot be tidally locked prior to tidal disruption, regardless of its internal viscosity. For smaller mass neutron stars, an implausibly large kinematic viscosity - nearly the speed of light times the stellar radius - is required for tidal locking. We also argue that the mass transfer which occurs when the neutron star reaches the tidal radius will be unstable in neutron star-black hole binaries, and the instability will destroy the neutron star in a few orbital periods. The implications of our work for the detection of these sources by LIGO and other gravitational wave observatories and for the gamma-ray burst scenarios of Paczynski (1986, 1991) are discussed.

  18. Tidal interactions of inspiraling compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars; Cutler, Curt

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the tidal interaction in neutron star-neutron star and neutron star-black hole binaries and argue that they will not be tidally locked during the gravitational inspiral. More specifically, we show that, for inspiraling neutron stars of mass greater than about 1.2 solar mass, the shortest possible tidal synchronization time exceeds the gravitational decay time, so that the neutron star cannot be tidally locked prior to tidal disruption, regardless of its internal viscosity. For smaller mass neutron stars, an implausibly large kinematic viscosity - nearly the speed of light times the stellar radius - is required for tidal locking. We also argue that the mass transfer which occurs when the neutron star reaches the tidal radius will be unstable in neutron star-black hole binaries, and the instability will destroy the neutron star in a few orbital periods. The implications of our work for the detection of these sources by LIGO and other gravitational wave observatories and for the gamma-ray burst scenarios of Paczynski (1986, 1991) are discussed.

  19. Do central compact objects have carbon atmospheres?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Jason; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Halpern, Jules P.

    2017-08-01

    An understanding of the chemical composition of central compact object (CCO) atmospheres is necessary in order to measure their fundamental physical properties. It has been proposed, based on X-ray spectral modeling, that the CCOs in the Cassiopeia A and G353.6-0.7 supernova remnants have uniform-temperature carbon atmospheres. Here, we show that a single-temperature carbon atmosphere model is capable of fitting the spectra of at least seven of the eight currently known central compact objects, with reasonable values of their radii resulting. However, sincetwo of these CCOs are known from their pulsations to have more complex, multi-temperature surfaces, the good fits of their spectra to a single-temperature carbon atmosphere must be a coincidence. This result argues that spectral modeling of a phase-averaged spectrum alone is insufficient evidence that a neutron star has a carbon atmosphere.

  20. Growing Magnetic Fields in Central Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, C. G.; Page, D.

    2011-10-01

    We study the effects of growth models of magnetic fields in Central Compact Objects (CCOs). Such a field evolution is not a new idea (Blandford, Applegate, & Hernquist 1983) but the evolutionary implications not have been followed up completely (Michel 1994). We discussed the new class of neutron stars which belong to five main types that have mainly been recognized in the last ten years. The possibility that a rapid weakly magnetized pulsar might have formed in SN1987A is commented.

  1. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-07-01

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the tidal Love numbers in general relativity, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution, even in the static case. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  2. Physics of accretion flows around compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Several physical and astrophysical problems related to accretion onto black holes and neutron stars are briefly reviewed. I discuss the observed differences between these two types of compact objects in quiescent Soft X-ray Transients. Then I review the status of various non-standard objects suggested as an alternative to black holes. Finally, I present new results and a suggestion about the nature of the jet activity in Active Galactic Nuclei. To cite this article: J.-P. Lasota, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  3. Compact Binary Progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Perna, Rosalba; Rezzolla, Luciano; Troja, Eleonora; Lazzati, Davide

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy epsilon(sub jet) = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 Solar M, favoring "high-mass" binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses approx >1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since "high-mass" systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of approx. 0.9 or higher.

  4. Detectability of compact binary merger macronovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, S.; Feindt, U.; Korobkin, O.; Wu, M.-R.; Sollerman, J.; Goobar, A.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2017-05-01

    We study the optical and near-infrared luminosities and detectability of radioactively powered electromagnetic transients (‘macronovae’) occuring in the aftermath of binary neutron star and neutron star black hole mergers. We explore the transients that result from the dynamic ejecta and those from different types of wind outflows. Based on full nuclear network simulations we calculate the resulting light curves in different wavelength bands. We scrutinize the robustness of the results by comparing (a) two different nuclear reaction networks and (b) two macronova models. We explore in particular how sensitive the results are to the production of α-decaying trans-lead nuclei. We compare two frequently used mass models: the finite-range Droplet model (FRDM) and the nuclear mass model of Duflo and Zuker (DZ31). We find that the abundance of α-decaying trans-lead nuclei has a significant impact on the observability of the resulting macronovae. For example, the DZ31 model yields considerably larger abundances resulting in larger heating rates and thermalization efficiencies and therefore predicts substantially brighter macronova transients. We find that the dynamic ejecta from NSNS models can reach peak K-band magnitudes in excess of  -15 while those from NSBH cases can reach beyond  -16. Similar values can be reached by some of our wind models. Several of our models (both wind and dynamic ejecta) yield properties that are similar to the transient that was observed in the aftermath of the short GRB 130603B. We further explore the expected macronova detection frequencies for current and future instruments such as VISTA, ZTF and LSST.

  5. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar-tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as ``Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein equations,'' appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, mixed black hole-neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter. In another, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity.

  6. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. N.

    2015-05-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO and eLISA will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present progress in the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar- tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as “direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations,” appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity. In another, mixed black hole- neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter.

  7. Radioactive powered transients from compact object mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the r-process elements remains the biggest unsolved question in our understanding of chemical evolution in the Milky Way. The most likely astrophysical sites for the formation of these nuclei involve dynamical events in the lives of neutron stars: the merger of a neutron star and another compact object. In these environments, nuclear physics plays a paramount role in determining both the evolution of the dense object itself and what nuclei are synthesized in material that is ejected from the system. When the radioactive nuclei produced in these events decay, they can heat material that is unbound during the merger and power optical or infrared transients. In this talk, I will discuss nucleosynthesis and matter ejection in neutron star mergers, with an eye toward electromagnetic observables associated with these events that may give us a direct window into the formation of the r-process elements.

  8. DOUBLE COMPACT OBJECTS. III. GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE DETECTION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; O’Shaughnessy, Richard; Mandel, Ilya; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Pannarale, Francesco

    2015-06-20

    The unprecedented range of second-generation gravitational-wave (GW) observatories calls for refining the predictions of potential sources and detection rates. The coalescence of double compact objects (DCOs)—i.e., neutron star–neutron star (NS–NS), black hole–neutron star (BH–NS), and black hole–black hole (BH–BH) binary systems—is the most promising source of GWs for these detectors. We compute detection rates of coalescing DCOs in second-generation GW detectors using the latest models for their cosmological evolution, and implementing inspiral-merger-ringdown gravitational waveform models in our signal-to-noise ratio calculations. We find that (1) the inclusion of the merger/ringdown portion of the signal does not significantly affect rates for NS–NS and BH–NS systems, but it boosts rates by a factor of ∼1.5 for BH–BH systems; (2) in almost all of our models BH–BH systems yield by far the largest rates, followed by NS–NS and BH–NS systems, respectively; and (3) a majority of the detectable BH–BH systems were formed in the early universe in low-metallicity environments. We make predictions for the distributions of detected binaries and discuss what the first GW detections will teach us about the astrophysics underlying binary formation and evolution.

  9. Regularization of the second-order gravitational perturbations produced by a compact object

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Eran

    2005-12-15

    The equations for the second-order gravitational perturbations produced by a compact object have highly singular source terms at the point particle limit. At this limit the standard retarded solutions to these equations are ill defined. Here we construct well defined and physically meaningful solutions to these equations. These solutions are important for practical calculations: the planned gravitational-wave detector LISA requires preparation of waveform templates for the expected gravitational waves. Construction of templates with desired accuracy for extreme mass-ratio binaries, in which a compact object inspirals towards a supermassive black hole, requires calculation of the second-order gravitational perturbations produced by the compact object.

  10. MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary aim of the MACHO Project is to test the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way is made up of objects like brown dwarfs or planets: these objects have come to be known as MACHOs, for MAssive Compact Halo Objects. The signature of these objects is the occasional amplification of the light from extragalactic stars by the gravitational lens effect. The amplification can be large, but events are extremely rare: it is necessary to monitor photometrically several million stars for a period of years in order to obtain a useful detection rate. For this purpose MACHO has a two channel system that employs eight CCDs, mounted on the 50 inch telescope at Mt. Stromlo. The high data rate (several GBytes per night) is accommodated by custom electronics and on-line data reduction. The Project has taken more than 27,000 images with this system since June 1992. Analysis of a subset of these data has yielded databases containing light curves in two colors for 8 million stars in the LMC and 10 million in the bulge of the Milky Way. A search for microlensing has turned up four candidates toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and 45 toward the Galactic Bulge. The web page for data provides links to MACHO Project data portals and various specialized interfaces for viewing or searching the data. (Specialized Interface)

  11. Complete waveform model for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; Kumar, Prayush; Agarwal, Bhanu; George, Daniel; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Haas, Roland; Ren, Wei; Chu, Tony; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2017-01-01

    We present a time domain waveform model that describes the inspiral, merger and ringdown of compact binary systems whose components are nonspinning, and which evolve on orbits with low to moderate eccentricity. The inspiral evolution is described using third-order post-Newtonian equations both for the equations of motion of the binary, and its far-zone radiation field. This latter component also includes instantaneous, tails and tails-of-tails contributions, and a contribution due to nonlinear memory. This framework reduces to the post-Newtonian approximant TaylorT4 at third post-Newtonian order in the zero-eccentricity limit. To improve phase accuracy, we also incorporate higher-order post-Newtonian corrections for the energy flux of quasicircular binaries and gravitational self-force corrections to the binding energy of compact binaries. This enhanced prescription for the inspiral evolution is combined with a fully analytical prescription for the merger-ringdown evolution constructed using a catalog of numerical relativity simulations. We show that this inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform model reproduces the effective-one-body model of Ref. [Y. Pan et al., Phys. Rev. D 89, 061501 (2014)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.061501] for quasicircular black hole binaries with mass ratios between 1 to 15 in the zero-eccentricity limit over a wide range of the parameter space under consideration. Using a set of eccentric numerical relativity simulations, not used during calibration, we show that our new eccentric model reproduces the true features of eccentric compact binary coalescence throughout merger. We use this model to show that the gravitational-wave transients GW150914 and GW151226 can be effectively recovered with template banks of quasicircular, spin-aligned waveforms if the eccentricity e0 of these systems when they enter the aLIGO band at a gravitational-wave frequency of 14 Hz satisfies e0GW 150914≤0.15 and e0GW 151226≤0.1 . We also find that varying the spin

  12. The status of general relativistic simulations of compact binary mergers as engines of short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios

    2017-05-01

    Black hole - neutron star (BHNS) and neutron star - neutron star (NSNS) binaries are perhaps the most popular progenitors for short-hard gamma ray bursts. After about two decades of numerical relativity simulations of binary compact objects we are beginning to understand the necessary ingredients for jets to emerge from these systems following merger. We report on the latest development of this field summarizing the results from state-of-the-art numerical relativity (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations of compact binary mergers as progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts.

  13. DISTINGUISHING COMPACT BINARY POPULATION SYNTHESIS MODELS USING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OBSERVATIONS OF COALESCING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Simon; Ohme, Frank; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The coalescence of compact binaries containing neutron stars or black holes is one of the most promising signals for advanced ground-based laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, with the first direct detections expected over the next few years. The rate of binary coalescences and the distribution of component masses is highly uncertain, and population synthesis models predict a wide range of plausible values. Poorly constrained parameters in population synthesis models correspond to poorly understood astrophysics at various stages in the evolution of massive binary stars, the progenitors of binary neutron star and binary black hole systems. These include effects such as supernova kick velocities, parameters governing the energetics of common envelope evolution and the strength of stellar winds. Observing multiple binary black hole systems through GWs will allow us to infer details of the astrophysical mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we simulate GW observations from a series of population synthesis models including the effects of known selection biases, measurement errors and cosmology. We compare the predictions arising from different models and show that we will be able to distinguish between them with observations (or the lack of them) from the early runs of the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. This will allow us to narrow down the large parameter space for binary evolution models.

  14. New Evidence for a Black Hole in the Compact Binary Cygnus X-3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-28

    favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate is ∼ 10M⊙ with the error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared...estimates constrains the compact object mass to lie between 4.2M and 14.4M . Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate is 10M with the...binary system, all the more so if the compact star is a black hole. Distance estimates to Cyg X-3 range from 7.2 to 9.3 kpc ; see details in Ling, Zhang

  15. A complete waveform model for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Daniel; Huerta, Eliu; Kumar, Prayush; Agarwal, Bhanu; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Pfeiffer, Harald; Chu, Tony; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel; Kidder, Lawrence; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela

    2017-01-01

    We present a time domain waveform model that describes the inspiral, merger and ringdown of compact binary systems whose components are non-spinning, and which evolve on orbits with low to moderate eccentricity. We show that this inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform model reproduces the effective-one-body model for black hole binaries with mass-ratios between 1 to 15 in the zero eccentricity limit over a wide range of the parameter space under consideration. We use this model to show that the gravitational wave transients GW150914 and GW151226 can be effectively recovered with template banks of quasicircular, spin-aligned waveforms if the eccentricity e0 of these systems when they enter the aLIGO band at a gravitational wave frequency of 14 Hz satisfies e0GW 150914 <= 0 . 15 and e0GW 151226 <= 0 . 1 .

  16. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Joss, P. C.; Webbink, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    A new theoretical treatment of the evolution of highly compact binary systems is presented. The evolution is calculated until almost the entire mass of the secondary has been transferred to the primary or lost from the system. It is assumed that gravitational radiation from the system is the cause of mass transfer. It is found that the structure of the mass-losing star can be approximated by an n = 3/2 polytrope, and as a result a relatively large number of different cases can be explored and some general conclusions drawn. An explanation is found for the existence of a cutoff in the orbital period distribution among the cataclysmic variables and light is shed upon the possible generic relationships among cataclysmic variables, the low-mass X-ray binaries, and the spectrally soft transient X-ray sources.

  17. The lack of large compact symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, `baby' (< 103 yr) and `young' (103-105 yr) radio galaxies have been found and classified, although their numbers are still small (tens). Also, they have many different names, depending on the type of survey and scientific context in which they were found: compact steep spectrum sources (CSS), giga-Hertz peaked spectrum sources (GPS) and compact-medium symmetric objects (C-MSO). The latter have the radio galaxy structure more obvious and correspond to the `babies' (CSOs; < 1 kpc) and `young' (MSOs; 1-15 kpc) radio galaxies. The log-size distribution of CSOs shows a sharp drop at 0.3 kpc. This trend continues through flat-spectrum MSOs (over the full 1-15 kpc size range). In order to find out if this lack of large CSOs and flat-spectrum MSOs is due to poor sampling (lack of surveys that probe efficiently the 0.3-15 kpc size range) and/or has physical meaning (e.g. if the lobes of CSOs expand as they grow and age, they might become CSSs, `disappearing' from the flat-spectrum MSO statistics), we have built a sample of 157 flat-spectrum radio sources with structure on ˜0.3-15 kpc scales. We are using new, archived and published data to produce and inspect hundreds of multi-frequency multi-instrument maps and models. We have already found 13 new secure CSO/MSOs. We expect to uncover ˜30-40 new CSOs and MSOs, most on the 0.3-15 kpc size range, when our project is complete.

  18. Recent developments in the tidal deformability of spinning compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    We review recent work on the theory of tidal deformability and the tidal Love numbers of a slowly spinning compact object within general relativity. Angular momentum introduces couplings between distortions of different parity and new classes of spin-induced, tidal Love numbers emerge. Due to spin-tidal effects, a rotating object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second-order in the spin. The tidal Love numbers depend strongly on the object’s internal structure. All tidal Love numbers of a Kerr black hole (BH) were proved to be exactly zero to first-order in the spin and also to second-order in the spin, at least in the axisymmetric case. For a binary system close to the merger, various components of the tidal field become relevant. Preliminary results suggest that spin-tidal couplings can introduce important corrections to the gravitational waveforms of spinning neutron star (NS) binaries approaching the merger.

  19. New Evidence for a Black Hole in the Compact Binary Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. Its known to consist of a massive. Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. Yet one of the most basic of pa.ranietern the mass of the compact object - is not known. Nor is it even clear whether its is a neutron star or a black hole. In this Paper we present our analysis of the broad-band high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship which has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than 4.2 solar mass thus clearly indicative of a black hole and as such resolving a longstanding issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a. range of recently published distance estimates constrains the compact object mass to lie between 4.2 solar mass and 14.4 solar mass. Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate is approx. l0 solar mass, with the. error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared-envelope evolutionary models of compact binaries. as well as establishing Cygnus X-3 as the first confirmed accretion-powered galactic gamma: ray source.

  20. NEW EVIDENCE FOR A BLACK HOLE IN THE COMPACT BINARY CYGNUS X-3

    SciTech Connect

    Shrader, Chris R.; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-07-20

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. It is known to consist of a massive, Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. However, one of the most basic of parameters-the mass of the compact object-is not known, nor is it even clear whether it is a neutron star or a black hole (BH). In this paper, we present our analysis of the broadband high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship that has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than 4.2 M{sub sun}, thus clearly indicative of a BH and as such, resolves a long-standing issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a range of recently published distance estimates constrain the compact object mass to lie between 4.2 M{sub sun} and 14.4 M{sub sun}. Our favored estimate, based on a 9.0 kpc distance estimate, is {approx}10 M{sub sun}, with an error margin of 3.2 solar masses. This result may thus pose challenges to shared-envelope evolutionary models of compact binaries, as well as establishing Cygnus X-3 as the first confirmed accretion-powered galactic gamma-ray source.

  1. Fast and accurate inference on gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rory; Field, Scott E.; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments, we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced-order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the computational cost of inference by removing redundant computations. In this paper, we construct the first reduced-order models of gravitational-wave signals that include the effects of spin precession, inspiral, merger, and ringdown in compact object binaries and that are valid for component masses describing binary neutron star, binary black hole, and mixed binary systems. This work utilizes the waveform model known as "IMRPhenomPv2." Our ROM enables the use of a fast reduced-order quadrature (ROQ) integration rule which allows us to approximate Bayesian probability density functions at a greatly reduced computational cost. We find that the ROQ rule can be used to speed-up inference by factors as high as 300 without introducing systematic bias. This corresponds to a reduction in computational time from around half a year to half a day for the longest duration and lowest mass signals. The ROM and ROQ rules are available with the main inference library of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, LALInference.

  2. Compact Binary Mergers as Multimessenger Sources of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    On the centennial anniversary of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we are on the verge of directly detecting one of its most remarkable predictions - gravitational waves (GWs). The inspiral and merger of compact binaries - binaries with black hole, neutron star or white dwarf companions - are among the most promising sources of GWs. Many of these sources are likely to generate observable electromagnetic (EM) and/or neutrino counterparts to the GWs, constituting a major advance in multimessenger astronomy. By way of illustration, we describe recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations in general relativity (GRMHD) that show how black hole-neutron star mergers can launch jets, lending support to the idea that such mergers could be the engines that power short-hard gamma-ray bursts. We also discuss other recent GRMHD simulations that show how an inspiraling, supermassive binary black hole in a galaxy core stirs and accretes magnetized plasma that orbits the holes in a circumbinary disk. This process can generate ``precursor'' and ``aftermath'' EM radiation with respect to the peak GW emission at merger. Computer-generated movies highlighting some of these simulations will be shown. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grant PHY-1300903 and NASA Grant NNX13AH44G at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  3. A massive pulsar in a compact relativistic binary.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, John; Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G

    2013-04-26

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict substantial deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 ± 0.04 solar mass (M⊙) pulsar in a 2.46-hour orbit with a 0.172 ± 0.003 M⊙ white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.

  4. Compact binary coalescence searches with low latency: why and how

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulos, Nickolas; Cannon, Kipp; Frei, Melissa; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew; Privitera, Stephen; Singer, Leo

    2011-04-01

    Low-latency gravitational-wave (GW) detection of a compact binary coalescence (CBC) will allow electromagnetic (EM) followups to observe earlier parts of the corresponding lightcurves, which are brighter, convey more information about the progenitor system, and allow a more confident association of GW and EM transients. Conventional matched filter banks, common in CBC searches, are computationally efficient, but incur a latency of many minutes. Searches with latencies of seconds and significantly increased throughput are achievable with techniques such as principal component analysis, to reduce the number of filtered templates, hierarchical detection with singular value decomposition by-products, and exploitation of the quasi-monochromatic structure of chirps to filter time-slices at different sample rates. We present an implementation of these ideas called LLOID, based on the LSC Algorithm Library and the GStreamer multimedia framework.

  5. Gravitational-wave signatures of exotic compact objects and of quantum corrections at the horizon scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Hopper, Seth; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Palenzuela, Carlos; Pani, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Gravitational waves from binary coalescences provide one of the cleanest signatures of the nature of compact objects. It has been recently argued that the postmerger ringdown waveform of exotic ultracompact objects is initially identical to that of a black hole, and that putative corrections at the horizon scale will appear as secondary pulses after the main burst of radiation. Here we extend this analysis in three important directions: (i) we show that this result applies to a large class of exotic compact objects with a photon sphere for generic orbits in the test-particle limit; (ii) we investigate the late-time ringdown in more detail, showing that it is universally characterized by a modulated and distorted train of "echoes"of the modes of vibration associated with the photon sphere; (iii) we study for the first time equal-mass, head-on collisions of two ultracompact boson stars and compare their gravitational-wave signal to that produced by a pair of black holes. If the initial objects are compact enough as to mimic a binary black-hole collision up to the merger, the final object exceeds the maximum mass for boson stars and collapses to a black hole. This suggests that—in some configurations—the coalescence of compact boson stars might be almost indistinguishable from that of black holes. On the other hand, generic configurations display peculiar signatures that can be searched for in gravitational-wave data as smoking guns of exotic compact objects.

  6. Sparse representations of gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Jonathan; Szilagyi, Bela; Galley, Chad R; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-07-11

    Many relevant applications in gravitational wave physics share a significant common problem: the seven-dimensional parameter space of gravitational waveforms from precessing compact binary inspirals and coalescences is large enough to prohibit covering the space of waveforms with sufficient density. We find that by using the reduced basis method together with a parametrization of waveforms based on their phase and precession, we can construct ultracompact yet high-accuracy representations of this large space. As a demonstration, we show that less than 100 judiciously chosen precessing inspiral waveforms are needed for 200 cycles, mass ratios from 1 to 10, and spin magnitudes ≤0.9. In fact, using only the first 10 reduced basis waveforms yields a maximum mismatch of 0.016 over the whole range of considered parameters. We test whether the parameters selected from the inspiral regime result in an accurate reduced basis when including merger and ringdown; we find that this is indeed the case in the context of a nonprecessing effective-one-body model. This evidence suggests that as few as ∼100 numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescences may accurately represent the seven-dimensional parameter space of precession waveforms for the considered ranges.

  7. Compact binaries in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Sandoval, Lilliana; Van Den Berg, Maureen; Heinke, Craig O.; Cohn, Haldan N.; Lugger, Phyllis M.; Freire, Paulo; Anderson, Jay; Cool, Adrienne; Grindlay, Jonanthan; Edmonds, Peter; Wijnands, Rudy; Ivanova, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The high stellar interaction rates in globular clusters are ideal for studying the formation and evolution of compact binary stars. For this purpose, we have carried out a study of the cataclysmic variables (CVs) and millisecond pulsar (MSP) companions in the non core collapsed globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We used near-ultraviolet and optical (including H-alpha) images of the cluster obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), in combination with Chandra X-ray data.From this study we obtained the deepest measurements of the cluster CV luminosity function. We found that this luminosity function is different from those of core collapsed clusters. This result will help understanding how the stellar interactions affect the creation and destruction of CVs. I will discuss our results with respect to the models of formation and evolution of CVs, focusing on the predicted number of these binaries and their radial distribution in the cluster.I will also present the discovery of 2 likely He white dwarf (WD) companions to MSPs in the same cluster, as well as the confirmation of 2 tentative identifications. This represents a significant contribution to the total number of optical counterparts known in Galactic globular clusters so far. Based on our UV photometry and He WD cooling models we derived the ages, the masses and the bolometric luminosities for all the He WD companions. I will discuss these results and their implications in the context of the standard MSP formation scenario.

  8. Parameter estimation of gravitational wave echoes from exotic compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Völkel, Sebastian H.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2017-09-01

    Relativistic ultracompact objects without an event horizon may be able to form in nature and merge as binary systems, mimicking the coalescence of ordinary black holes. The postmerger phase of such processes presents characteristic signatures, which appear as repeated pulses within the emitted gravitational waveform, i.e., echoes with variable amplitudes and frequencies. Future detections of these signals can shed new light on the existence of horizonless geometries and provide new information on the nature of gravity in a genuine strong-field regime. In this work we analyze phenomenological templates used to characterize echolike structures produced by exotic compact objects, and we investigate for the first time the ability of current and future interferometers to constrain their parameters. Using different models with an increasing level of accuracy, we determine the features that can be measured with the largest precision, and we span the parameter space to find the most favorable configurations to be detected. Our analysis shows that current detectors may already be able to extract all the parameters of the echoes with good accuracy, and that multiple interferometers can measure frequencies and damping factors of the signals at the level of percent.

  9. A solution to the problem of clustered objects compact partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnoy, D. V.; Pogrebnoy, Al V.; Deeva, O. V.; Petrukhina, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    The urgency of the study consists in the fact that an object arrangement topology of a distributed system is often nonuniform. Objects can be placed at different distances from each other, thus forming clusters. That is why solving the problem of compact partitioning into sets containing thousands of objects requires the most effective way to a better use of natural structuring of objects that form clusters. The aim of the study is the development of methods of compact partitioning of sets of objects presented as clusters. The research methods are based on applied theories of sets, theory of compact sets and compact partitions, and linear programming methods with Boolean variables. As a result, the paper offers the method necessary to analyze composition and content of clusters. It also evaluates cluster compactness, which results in the decision to include clusters into the sets of partitions. It addresses the problem of optimizing the rearrangement of objects between compact sets that form clusters, which is based on the criteria of maximizing the total compactness of sets. The problem is formulated in the class of objectives of linear programming methods with Boolean variables. It introduces the example of object rearrangement.

  10. Effective one body description of tidal effects in inspiralling compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro

    2010-04-15

    The late part of the gravitational wave signal of binary neutron-star (or black-hole-neutron-star) inspirals can in principle yield crucial information on the nuclear equation of state via its dependence on relativistic tidal parameters. In the hope of analytically describing the gravitational wave phasing during the late inspiral (essentially up to merger) we propose an extension of the effective one body (EOB) formalism which includes tidal effects. We compare the prediction of this tidal-EOB formalism to recently computed nonconformally flat quasiequilibrium circular sequences of binary neutron-star systems. Our analysis suggests the importance of higher-order (post-Newtonian) corrections to tidal effects, even beyond the first post-Newtonian order, and their tendency to significantly increase the 'effective tidal polarizability' of neutron stars. We propose to use the EOB description up to the moment where the tidally deformed compact objects formally enter 'into contact'. We compare the EOB predictions to some recently advocated, nonresummed, post-Newtonian based ('Taylor-T4') description of the phasing of inspiralling systems. This comparison shows the strong sensitivity of the late-inspiral phasing to the choice of the analytical model. A sufficiently accurate numerical-relativity - 'calibrated' EOB model might, however, give us a reliable analytical description of the late inspiral of compact binaries (and might also help in predicting the conditions necessary for the generation of short gamma-ray bursts).

  11. Third post-Newtonian gravitational waveforms for compact binary systems in general orbits: Instantaneous terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.

    2015-04-01

    We compute the instantaneous contributions to the spherical harmonic modes of gravitational waveforms from compact binary systems in general orbits up to the third post-Newtonian (PN) order. We further extend these results for compact binaries in quasielliptical orbits using the 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of the conserved dynamics of compact binaries in eccentric orbits. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian formalism, starting from the different mass and current-type multipole moments, we compute the spin-weighted spherical harmonic decomposition of the instantaneous part of the gravitational waveform. These are terms which are functions of the retarded time and do not depend on the history of the binary evolution. Together with the hereditary part, which depends on the binary's dynamical history, these waveforms form the basis for construction of accurate templates for the detection of gravitational wave signals from binaries moving in quasielliptical orbits.

  12. Octupolar invariants for compact binaries on quasicircular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Patrick; Kavanagh, Chris; Dolan, Sam R.; Ottewill, Adrian C.; Warburton, Niels; Wardell, Barry

    2015-12-01

    We extend the gravitational self-force methodology to identify and compute new O (μ ) tidal invariants for a compact body of mass μ on a quasicircular orbit about a black hole of mass M ≫μ . In the octupolar sector we find seven new degrees of freedom, made up of 3 +3 conservative/dissipative `electric' invariants and 3 +1 `magnetic' invariants, satisfying 1 +1 and 1 +0 trace conditions. We express the new invariants for equatorial circular orbits on Kerr spacetime in terms of the regularized metric perturbation and its derivatives; and we evaluate the expressions in the Schwarzschild case. We employ both Lorenz gauge and Regge-Wheeler gauge numerical codes, and the functional series method of Mano, Suzuki and Takasugi. We present (i) highly-accurate numerical data and (ii) high-order analytical post-Newtonian expansions. We demonstrate consistency between numerical and analytical results, and prior work. We explore the application of these invariants in effective one-body models and binary black hole initial-data formulations.

  13. The PyCBC search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Samantha A.; Nitz, Alexander H.; Harry, Ian W.; Biwer, Christopher M.; Brown, Duncan A.; Cabero, Miriam; Capano, Collin D.; Dal Canton, Tito; Dent, Thomas; Fairhurst, Stephen; Kehl, Marcel S.; Keppel, Drew; Krishnan, Badri; Lenon, Amber; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pekowsky, Larne P.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Saulson, Peter R.; West, Matthew; Willis, Joshua L.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the PyCBC search for gravitational waves from compact-object binary coalescences in advanced gravitational-wave detector data. The search was used in the first Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) observing run and unambiguously identified two black hole binary mergers, GW150914 and GW151226. At its core, the PyCBC search performs a matched-filter search for binary merger signals using a bank of gravitational-wave template waveforms. We provide a complete description of the search pipeline including the steps used to mitigate the effects of noise transients in the data, identify candidate events and measure their statistical significance. The analysis is able to measure false-alarm rates as low as one per million years, required for confident detection of signals. Using data from initial LIGO's sixth science run, we show that the new analysis reduces the background noise in the search, giving a 30 % increase in sensitive volume for binary neutron star systems over previous searches.

  14. Searching for Compact Binary Mergers with Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, Alexander` Harvey

    2017-06-01

    Several binary black hole mergers were discovered during Advanced LIGOs first observing run, and LIGO is currently well into its second observing run. We will discuss the state of the art in searching for merger signals in LIGO data, and how this will aid in the detection of binary neutron star, neutron-star black hole, and binary black hole mergers.

  15. Comprehensive nucleosynthesis analysis for ejecta of compact binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, O.; Bauswein, A.; Pulpillo, R. Ardevol; Goriely, S.; Janka, H.-T.

    2015-03-01

    We present the first comprehensive study of r-process element nucleosynthesis in the ejecta of compact binary mergers (CBMs) and their relic black hole (BH)-torus systems. The evolution of the BH-accretion tori is simulated for seconds with a Newtonian hydrodynamics code including viscosity effects, pseudo-Newtonian gravity for rotating BHs, and an energy-dependent two-moment closure scheme for the transport of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. The investigated cases are guided by relativistic double neutron star (NS-NS) and NS-BH merger models, producing ˜3-6 M⊙ BHs with rotation parameters of ABH ˜ 0.8 and tori of 0.03-0.3 M⊙. Our nucleosynthesis analysis includes the dynamical (prompt) ejecta expelled during the CBM phase and the neutrino and viscously driven outflows of the relic BH-torus systems. While typically ˜20-25 per cent of the initial accretion-torus mass are lost by viscously driven outflows, neutrino-powered winds contribute at most another ˜1 per cent, but neutrino heating enhances the viscous ejecta significantly. Since BH-torus ejecta possess a wide distribution of electron fractions (0.1-0.6) and entropies, they produce heavy elements from A ˜ 80 up to the actinides, with relative contributions of A ≳ 130 nuclei being subdominant and sensitively dependent on BH and torus masses and the exact treatment of shear viscosity. The combined ejecta of CBM and BH-torus phases can reproduce the solar abundances amazingly well for A ≳ 90. Varying contributions of the torus ejecta might account for observed variations of lighter elements with 40 ≤ Z ≤ 56 relative to heavier ones, and a considerable reduction of the prompt ejecta compared to the torus ejecta, e.g. in highly asymmetric NS-BH mergers, might explain the composition of heavy-element deficient stars.

  16. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSITING HOT COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Howell, Steve B.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoff; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; Jenkins, Jon; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Monet, David G.

    2010-04-20

    Kepler photometry has revealed two unusual transiting companions: one orbiting an early A-star and the other orbiting a late B-star. In both cases, the occultation of the companion is deeper than the transit. The occultation and transit with follow-up optical spectroscopy reveal a 9400 K early A-star, KOI-74 (KIC 6889235), with a companion in a 5.2 day orbit with a radius of 0.08 R {sub sun} and a 10,000 K late B-star KOI-81 (KIC 8823868) that has a companion in a 24 day orbit with a radius of 0.2 R {sub sun}. We infer a temperature of 12,250 K for KOI-74b and 13,500 K for KOI-81b. We present 43 days of high duty cycle, 30 minute cadence photometry, with models demonstrating the intriguing properties of these objects, and speculate on their nature.

  17. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Gu, Bao-Min; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    The future gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. However, if there exist extra dimensions and only GWs can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of GWs and electromagnetic waves (EMWs) are in general different. In this paper, we study null geodesics of GWs and EMWs in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time in the presence of the curvature of the universe. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of GW is longer than EMW within equal time. Taking the GW150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as an example, we study how the curvature k and the constant curvature radius l affect the horizon radii of GW and EMW in the de Sitter and Einstein-de Sitter models of the universe. This provides an alternative method for probing extra dimension through future GW observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts.

  18. Gravitational-wave phasing for low-eccentricity inspiralling compact binaries to 3PN order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Blake; Favata, Marc; Arun, K. G.; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2016-06-01

    Although gravitational radiation causes inspiralling compact binaries to circularize, a variety of astrophysical scenarios suggest that binaries might have small but non-negligible orbital eccentricities when they enter the low-frequency bands of ground- and space-based gravitational-wave detectors. If not accounted for, even a small orbital eccentricity can cause a potentially significant systematic error in the mass parameters of an inspiralling binary [M. Favata, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 101101 (2014)]. Gravitational-wave search templates typically rely on the quasicircular approximation, which provides relatively simple expressions for the gravitational-wave phase to 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order. Damour, Gopakumar, Iyer, and others have developed an elegant but complex quasi-Keplerian formalism for describing the post-Newtonian corrections to the orbits and waveforms of inspiralling binaries with any eccentricity. Here, we specialize the quasi-Keplerian formalism to binaries with low eccentricity. In this limit, the nonperiodic contribution to the gravitational-wave phasing can be expressed explicitly as simple functions of frequency or time, with little additional complexity beyond the well-known formulas for circular binaries. These eccentric phase corrections are computed to 3PN order and to leading order in the eccentricity for the standard PN approximants. For a variety of systems, these eccentricity corrections cause significant corrections to the number of gravitational-wave cycles that sweep through a detector's frequency band. This is evaluated using several measures, including a modification of the useful cycles. By comparing to numerical solutions valid for any eccentricity, we find that our analytic solutions are valid up to e0≲0.1 for comparable-mass systems, where e0 is the eccentricity when the source enters the detector band. We also evaluate the role of periodic terms that enter the phasing and discuss how they can be incorporated into some of

  19. Comparing object recognition from binary and bipolar edge features

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Pu, Tian; Peli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    Edges derived from abrupt luminance changes in images carry essential information for object recognition. Typical binary edge images (black edges on white background or white edges on black background) have been used to represent features (edges and cusps) in scenes. However, the polarity of cusps and edges may contain important depth information (depth from shading) which is lost in the binary edge representation. This depth information may be restored, to some degree, using bipolar edges. We compared recognition rates of 16 binary edge images, or bipolar features, by 26 subjects. Object recognition rates were higher with bipolar edges and the improvement was significant in scenes with complex backgrounds.

  20. Results of the GstLAL Search for Compact Binary Mergers in Advanced LIGO's First Observing Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Advanced LIGO's first observing period ended in January 2016. We discuss the GstLAL matched-filter search over this data set for gravitational waves from compact binary objects with total mass up to 100 solar masses. In particular, we discuss the recovery of the unambiguous gravitational wave signals GW150914 and GW151226, as well as the possible third signal LVT151012. Additionally, we discuss the constraints we can place on binary-neutron-star and neutron-star-black-hole system merger rates.

  1. Inspiralling compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits: The complete third post-Newtonian energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.; Qusailah, Moh'd S. S.

    2008-03-15

    The instantaneous contributions to the third post-Newtonian (3PN) gravitational wave luminosity from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in a quasi-elliptical orbit is computed using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism. The necessary inputs for this calculation include the 3PN accurate mass quadrupole moment for general orbits and the mass octupole and current quadrupole moments at 2PN. Using the recently obtained 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits, the flux is averaged over the binary's orbit. Supplementing this by the important hereditary contributions arising from tails, tails of tails, and tails-squared terms calculated in a previous paper, the complete 3PN energy flux is obtained. The final result presented in this paper would be needed for the construction of ready-to-use templates for binaries moving on noncircular orbits, a plausible class of sources not only for the space-based detectors like LISA but also for the ground-based ones.

  2. Gravitational waves from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Anna; Lang, Ryan; Will, Clifford

    2017-01-01

    Testing alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field gravitational-wave regime can be an important complement to solar-system tests. A leading alternative is the class of scalar-tensor theories; for binary systems of compact objects, equations of motion and the tensor waveform and energy flux have been derived through second post-Newtonian (2PN) order. However, because the scalar field in these theories admits dipole gravitational radiation, a calculation of the scalar contribution to the energy flux requires calculating the scalar field and the equations of motion to 3PN order. We report on progress toward completing this calculation and obtaining waveforms to 2PN order, suitable for gravitational-wave data analysis. Supported in part by the NSF PHY 13-06069 & 16-00188.

  3. The binary Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31.

    PubMed

    Veillet, Christian; Parker, Joel Wm; Griffin, Ian; Marsden, Brian; Doressoundiram, Alain; Buie, Marc; Tholen, David J; Connelley, Michael; Holman, Matthew J

    2002-04-18

    The recent discovery of a binary asteroid during a spacecraft fly-by generated keen interest, because the orbital parameters of binaries can provide measures of the masses, and mutual eclipses could allow us to determine individual sizes and bulk densities. Several binary near-Earth, main-belt and Trojan asteroids have subsequently been discovered. The Kuiper belt-the region of space extending from Neptune (at 30 astronomical units) to well over 100 AU and believed to be the source of new short-period comets-has become a fascinating new window onto the formation of our Solar System since the first member object, not counting Pluto, was discovered in 1992 (ref. 13). Here we report that the Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31 is binary with a highly eccentric orbit (eccentricity e approximately 0.8) and a long period (about 570 days), very different from the Pluto/Charon system, which was hitherto the only previously known binary in the Kuiper belt. Assuming a density in the range of 1 to 2 g cm-3, the albedo of the binary components is between 0.05 and 0.08, close to the value of 0.04 generally assumed for Kuiper-belt objects.

  4. Classification of compact binaries: an X-ray analog to the HR diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Raymond, John C.; Gopalan, Giri; Boroson, Bram Seth; Bornn, Luke

    2016-06-01

    X-ray binary systems (XRBs), when examined in an appropriate coordinate system derived from X-ray spectral and intensity information, appear to cluster based on their compact object type. We introduce such a coordinate system, in which two coordinates are hardness ratios and the third is a broadband X-ray intensity. In Gopalan, Vrtilek, & Bornn (2015) we developed a Bayesian statistical model that estimates the probability that an XRB contains a black hole, non-pulsing neutron star, or pulsing neutron star, depending on its location in our coordinate space. In particular, we utilized a latent variable model in which the latent variables follow a Gaussian process prior distribution. Here we expand our work to incorporate systems where the compact object is a white dwarf: cataclysmic variables (CVs). The fact that the CVs also fall into a location spatially distinct from the other XRB types supports the use of X-ray color-color-intensity diagrams as 3-dimensional analogs to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for normal stars.

  5. Classification of compact binaries: an X-ray analog to the HR diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Raymond, John C.; Gopalan, Giri; Boroson, Bram Seth; Bornn, Luke

    2016-06-01

    X-ray binary systems (XRBs), when examined in an appropriate coordinate system derived from X-ray spectral and intensity information, appear to cluster based on their compact object type. We introduce such a coordinate system, in which two coordinates are hardness ratios and the third is a broadband X-ray intensity. In Gopalan, Vrtilek, & Bornn (2015) we developed a Bayesian statistical model that estimates the probability that an XRB contains a black hole, non-pulsing neutron star, or pulsing neutron star, depending on its location in our coordinate space. In particular, we utilized a latent variable model in which the latent variables follow a Gaussian process prior distribution. Here we expand our work to incorporate systems where the compact object is a white dwarf: cataclysmic variables (CVs). The fact that the CVs also fall into a location spatially distinct from the other XRB types supports the use of X-ray color-color-intensity diagrams as 3-dimensional analogs to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for normal stars.

  6. Compact binary mergers as the origin of r-process elements in the Galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya; Prantzos, Nikos

    2014-05-02

    Compact binary mergers (of double neutron star and black hole-neutron star systems) are suggested to be the major site of the r-process elements in the Galaxy by recent hydrodynamical and nucleosynthesis studies. It has been pointed out, however, that estimated long lifetimes of compact binaries are in conflict with the presence of r-process-enhanced stars at the metallicity [Fe/H] ∼ −3. To resolve this problem, we examine the role of compact binary mergers in the early Galactic chemical evolution on the assumption that our Galactic halo was formed from merging sub-halos. The chemical evolutions are modeled for sub-halos with their total stellar masses between 10{sup 4}M{sub ⊙} and 2 × 10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙}. The lifetimes of compact binaries are assumed to be 100 Myr (95%) and 1 Myr (5%) according to recent binary population synthesis studies. We find that the r-process abundances (relative to iron; [r/Fe]) start increasing at [Fe/H] ≤ −3 if the star formation rates are smaller for less massive sub-halos. Our models also suggest that the star-to-star scatter of [r/Fe]'s observed in Galactic halo stars can be interpreted as a consequence of greater gas outflow rates for less massive sub-halos. In addition, the sub-solar [r/Fe]'s (observed as [Ba/Fe] ∼ −1.5 for [Fe/H] < −3) are explained by the contribution from the short-lived (∼ 1 Myr) binaries. Our result indicates, therefore, that compact binary mergers can be potentially the origin of the r-process elements throughout the Galactic history.

  7. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-12-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space ( eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binariesbinary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution — require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries — moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  8. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-01-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space (eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binaries - binary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution - require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries - moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  9. Accretion Effects on Disks Around Non-Magnetic Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Michele M.

    2013-02-01

    Accretion disks in compact binaries are thought to sometimes tilt and precess in the retrograde direction as indicated by modulations in light curves and/or signals. Using 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and a low mass transfer rate, Montgomery (2012) shows the disk in non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variables tilts naturally after enough time has passed. In that work, twice the fundamental negative superhump signal 2ν_ is associated with disk tilt around the line of nodes, gas stream overflow approximately twice per orbital period, and retrograde precession. In this work, we show that after enough additional time has passed in the same simulation, the 4ν_ harmonic appears. The decrease in the 2ν_ amplitude approximately equals the amplitude of the 4ν_ harmonic. We discuss the implications.

  10. Imaging Compact Supermassive Binary Black Holes with Very Long Baseline Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International Astronomical Union doi:10.1017/S174392130700511X Imaging compact supermassive binary black holes with Very Long Baseline Interferometry G. B. Taylor...University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA email: gbtaylor@unm.edu Abstract.We report on the discovery of a supermassive binary black - hole (SBBH) system in... Black hole physics – gravitational waves – galaxies: active – radio continuum: galaxies 1. Introduction Given that most galaxies harbor supermassive

  11. What Are the Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2002-04-01

    Recent Chandra observations of the compact central objects in supernova remnants have shown puzzling results that do not seem to be consistent with either black holes or neutron stars. (See e.g. Pavlov, Sanwal, Garmire and Zavlin, astro-ph-0112322.) In particular, the inferred effective emitting surface is too small to be the entire surface of a neutron star, but too bright to be a black hole. We discuss the possibility that these compact objects might be red holes instead of black holes or neutron stars. Red holes, which occur in alternate theories of gravity, naturally predict both the greater brightness of the emissions and the smaller effective size of the emitting surface from a collapsed object of the appropriate mass.

  12. Detectability of eccentric compact binary coalescences with advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, M.; Meyers, P.; Thrane, E.; Luo, J.; Christensen, N.

    2015-03-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. While most binaries are expected to possess circular orbits, some may be eccentric, for example, if they are formed through dynamical capture. Eccentric orbits can create difficulty for matched filtering searches due to the challenges of creating effective template banks to detect these signals. In previous work, we showed how seedless clustering can be used to detect low-mass (Mtotal≤10 M⊙) compact binary coalescences for both spinning and eccentric systems, assuming a circular post-Newtonian expansion. Here, we describe a parametrization that is designed to maximize sensitivity to low-eccentricity (0 ≤ɛ ≤0.6 ) systems, derived from the analytic equations. We show that this parametrization provides a robust and computationally efficient method for detecting eccentric low-mass compact binaries. Based on these results, we conclude that advanced detectors will have a chance of detecting eccentric binaries if optimistic models prove true. However, a null observation is unlikely to firmly rule out models of eccentric binary populations.

  13. Modeling and detecting gravitational waves from compact stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    In the next few years, the first detections of gravity- wave signals using Earth-based interferometric detectors will begin to provide precious new information about the structure, dynamics, and evolution of compact bodies, such as neutron stars and black holes, both isolated and in binary systems. The intrinsic weakness of gravity-wave signals requires a proactive approach to modeling the prospective sources and anticipating the shape of the signals that we seek to detect. Full-blown 3-D numerical simulations of the sources are playing and will play an important role in planning the gravity-wave data-analysis effort. This thesis explores the interplay between numerical source modeling and data analysis, looking closely at three case studies. (1)I evaluate the prospects for extracting equation-of-state information from neutron-star tidal disruption in neutron-star-black- hole binaries with LIGO-II, and I estimate that the observation of disrupting systems at distances that yield about one event per year should allow the determination of the neutron-star radius to about 15%, which compares favorably to the currently available electromagnetic determinations. (2)In collaboration with Lee Lindblom and Joel Tohline, I perform numerical simulations of the nonlinear dynamics of the r-mode instability in young, rapidly spinning neutron stars, and I find evidence that nonlinear couplings to other modes will not pose a significant limitation to the growth of the r-mode amplitude. (3)In collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Yanbei Chen, I study the problem of detecting gravity waves from solar-mass black-hole - black-hole binaries with LIGO-I, and I construct two families of detection templates that address the inadequacy of standard post-Newtonian theory to predict reliable waveforms for these systems.

  14. A stream-based offline search for detecting gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudill, Sarah; LIGO Scientific Collaboration Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present various methods used in the offline GstLAL matched filtering search. We discuss the extension of our search parameter space to cover gravitational waves from coalescence of binary neutron stars, neutron star-black holes, and binary black holes up to a total mass of 100 solar masses, and component spins aligned with the angular momentum. We also present the use of a multidimensional likelihood ratio ranking statistic and our techniques for background estimation. Finally, we discuss the role of this search as an independent LIGO detection pipeline for compact binary coalescence.

  15. A family of charged compact objects with anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Govender, M.

    2017-06-01

    Utilizing an ansatz developed by Maurya et al. we present a class of exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations describing a spherically symmetric compact object. A detailed physical analysis of these solutions in terms of stability, compactness and regularity indicates that these solutions may be used to model strange star candidates. In particular, we model the strange star candidate Her X-1 and show that our solution conforms to observational data to an excellent degree of accuracy. An interesting and novel phenomenon which arises in this model is the fact that the relative difference between the electromagnetic force and the force due to the pressure anisotropy changing sign within the stellar interior. This may be an additional mechanism required for stability against cracking of the stellar object.

  16. Gravitational effects of condensate dark matter on compact stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: fayinwang@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We study the gravitational effect of non-self-annihilating dark matter on compact stellar objects. The self-interaction of condensate dark matter can give high accretion rate of dark matter onto stars. Phase transition to condensation state takes place when the dark matter density exceeds the critical value. A compact degenerate dark matter core is developed and alter the structure and stability of the stellar objects. Condensate dark matter admixed neutron stars is studied through the two-fluid TOV equation. The existence of condensate dark matter deforms the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and lower their maximum baryonic masses and radii. The possible effects on the Gamma-ray Burst rate in high redshift are discussed.

  17. Gravitational microlensing of high-redshift supernovae by compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, K.P. )

    1991-06-01

    An analysis of the effect of microlensing by a cosmologically dominant density of compact objects is performed, using high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) as probes. The compact objects are modeled as a three-dimensional distribution of point masses, and Monte Carlo simulations are done to calculate the resulting amplification probability distributions for several column densities and cosmologies. By combining these distributions with the intrinsic SN Ia luminosity function and comparing with the results for a perfectly smooth universe, estimates are made of the number of supernovae that would need to be observed to confirm or rule out this lensing scenario. It is found that about 1000 SN Ia's with redshifts of z = 1 would be needed to perform this test, which is beyond what current searches can hope to accomplish. Observations of many fewer high-redshift supernovae, used merely as standard candles, appears a promising way of distinguishing between different cosmological models. 35 refs.

  18. Evidence for compact binary systems around Kepler red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, Isabel L.; Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Kuszlewicz, James S.; Yu, Jie; Beck, Paul G.; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael A.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Mathur, Savita; Stello, Dennis; White, Timothy R.

    2017-08-01

    We present an analysis of 168 oscillating red giants from NASA's Kepler mission that exhibit anomalous peaks in their Fourier amplitude spectra. These peaks result from ellipsoidal variations that are indicative of binary star systems, at frequencies such that the orbit of any stellar companion would be within the convective envelope of the red giant. Alternatively, the observed phenomenon may be due to a close binary orbiting a red giant in a triple system, or chance alignments of foreground or background binary systems contaminating the target pixel aperture. We identify 87 stars in the sample as chance alignments using a combination of pixel Fourier analysis and difference imaging. We find that in the remaining 81 cases, the anomalous peaks are indistinguishable from the target star to within 4 arcsec, suggesting a physical association. We examine a galaxia model of the Kepler field of view to estimate background star counts and find that it is highly unlikely that all targets can be explained by chance alignments. From this, we conclude that these stars may comprise a population of physically associated systems.

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION OF COALESCING COMPACT BINARIES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE: PROSPECTS FOR GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Zemp, Marcel; Diemand, Juerg; Mandel, Ilya

    2010-12-10

    Merging compact binaries are the most viable and best-studied candidates for gravitational-wave (GW) detection by the fully operational network of ground-based observatories. In anticipation of the first detections, the expected distribution of GW sources in the local universe is of considerable interest. Here we investigate the full phase-space distribution of coalescing compact binaries at z = 0 using dark matter simulations of structure formation. The fact that these binary systems acquire large barycentric velocities at birth ('kicks') results in merger site distributions that are more diffusely distributed with respect to their putative hosts, with mergers occurring out to distances of a few Mpc from the host halo. Redshift estimates based solely on the nearest galaxy in projection can, as a result, be inaccurate. On the other hand, large offsets from the host galaxy could aid the detection of faint optical counterparts and should be considered when designing strategies for follow-up observations. The degree of isotropy in the projected sky distributions of GW sources is found to be augmented with increasing kick velocity and to be severely enhanced if progenitor systems possess large kicks as inferred from the known population of pulsars and double compact binaries. Even in the absence of observed electromagnetic counterparts, the differences in sky distributions of binaries produced by disparate kick-velocity models could be discerned by GW observatories, within the expected accuracies and detection rates of advanced LIGO-in particular with the addition of more interferometers.

  20. Orbital period decay of compact black hole X-ray binaries: the influence of circumbinary disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Cong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Context. Recently, compact black hole X-ray binaries XTE J 1118+480 and A0620-00 have been reported to be experiencing a fast orbital period decay, which is two orders of magnitude higher than expected with gravitational wave radiation. Magnetic braking of an Ap/Bp star has been suggested to account for the period change when the surface magnetic field of the companion star Bs ≳ 104 G. However, our calculation indicates that anomalous magnetic braking cannot significantly contribute to the large orbital period decay rates observed in these two sources even if Bs ≳ 104 G. Aims: Observations have provided evidence that circumbinary disks around two compact black hole X-ray binaries may exist. Our analysis shows that, for some reasonable parameters, tidal torque between the circumbinary disk and the binary can efficiently extract the orbital angular momentum from the binary, and result in a large orbital period change rate. Methods: Based on the circumbinary disk model, we simulate the evolution of XTE J 1118+480 via a stellar evolution code. Results: Our computations are approximatively in agreement with the observed data (the masses of two components, donor star radius, orbital period, and orbital period derivative). Conclusions: The mass transfer rate and circumbinary disk mass are obviously far greater than the inferred values from observations. Therefore, it seems that the circumbinary disk is unlikely to be the main cause of the rapid orbital decay observed in some compact black hole X-ray binaries.

  1. Detection, classification, and tracking of compact objects in video imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotto, Mark J.; Nebrich, Mark A.

    2012-06-01

    A video data conditioner (VDC) for automated full-­motion video (FMV) detection, classification, and tracking is described. VDC extends our multi-­stage image data conditioner (IDC) to video. Key features include robust detection of compact objects in motion imagery, coarse classification of all detections, and tracking of fixed and moving objects. An implementation of the detection and tracking components of the VDC on an Apple iPhone is discussed. Preliminary tracking results of naval ships captured during the Phoenix Express 2009 Photo Exercise are presented.

  2. Some topics in the magnetohydrodynamics of accreting magnetic compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic compact objects (neutron stars or white dwarfs) are currently thought to be present in many accreting systems that are releasing large amounts of energy. The magnetic field of the compact star may interact strongly with the accretion flow and play an essential role in the physics of these systems. Some magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) problems that are likely to be relevant in building up self-consistent models of the interaction between the accreting plasma and the star's magnetosphere are addressed in this series of lectures. The basic principles of MHD are first introduced and some important MHD mechanisms (Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities; reconnection) are discussed, with particular reference to their role in allowing the infalling matter to penetrate the magnetosphere and mix with the field. The structure of a force-free magnetosphere and the possibility of quasistatic momentum and energy transfer between regions linked by field-aligned currents are then studied in some detail. Finally, the structure of axisymmetric accretion flows onto magnetic compact objects is considered.

  3. Some topics in the magnetohydrodynamics of accreting magnetic compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic compact objects (neutron stars or white dwarfs) are currently thought to be present in many accreting systems that are releasing large amounts of energy. The magnetic field of the compact star may interact strongly with the accretion flow and play an essential role in the physics of these systems. Some magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) problems that are likely to be relevant in building up self-consistent models of the interaction between the accreting plasma and the star's magnetosphere are addressed in this series of lectures. The basic principles of MHD are first introduced and some important MHD mechanisms (Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities; reconnection) are discussed, with particular reference to their role in allowing the infalling matter to penetrate the magnetosphere and mix with the field. The structure of a force-free magnetosphere and the possibility of quasistatic momentum and energy transfer between regions linked by field-aligned currents are then studied in some detail. Finally, the structure of axisymmetric accretion flows onto magnetic compact objects is considered.

  4. Searching for Substellar Objects around HW Vir-like Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.-Y.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhao, E.-G.; Liao, W.-P.; Liu, L.; He, J.-J.; Zola, S.

    2014-08-01

    HW Vir-like eclipsing binaries are a group of detached binary systems that consists a very hot subdwarf B (sdB) type primary and a fully convective M-type secondary with short period. They display very narrow eclipse profiles, which give highly precise eclipse times. By analyzing the constructed observed-calculated (O-C) diagram based on the sdB eclipsing timings, We found very small-amplitude orbital period variations due to the presence of potential substellar object tertiaries (exoplanets and brown dwarfs) can be detected. The discovery of circumbinary substellar objects orbiting HW Vir-like eclipsing binaries has very important implications for the formation of sdB stars and the fates of low-mass companion systems, etc. A search for the substellar objects around the HW Vir-like Binaries is one of the projects of our research group of Yunnan Observatories (YNO), which has been started from 2006. In this paper, we will present some new results on our three targets of this project, i.e. NSVS14256825, HS0705+6700 and NSVS07826147.

  5. Improving the sensitivity of searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Duncan

    The detection of gravitational waves from the coalescence of two compact objects has been brought to within touching distance by the construction and operation of a global network of laser-interferometer detectors. However, the amplitude of the radiation from these events is so low that direct detection will require the combined innovations of advanced interferometry and detector characterisation, along with powerful methods of extracting weak, but modelled, signals from the background detector noise. This work focuses on enhancing the probability of such detection through improved identification of noise artefacts in the instrumental data, and improved signal processing and extraction. We begin with a recap of the theory of gravitational waves as derived from Einstein's theory of gravity, and the mechanisms that allow propagation of this radiation away from a source. We also catalogue a number of promising astrophysical progenitors, with a focus on compact binary coalescences. We detail the interactions between gravitational waves and an observer, and describe the layout of the large-scale laser interferometers that have been built to enable direct detection. A description of the operation of these detectors during the last science run is given, focusing on their stability and sensitivity, isolating a number of key instrumental noise mechanisms and how they affected astrophysical searches over the data. Additionally, we illustrate a new method to improve the identification of seismic noise bursts, allowing their removal from search data, improving search sensitivity. The LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors operated as a network during the last joint science run. A summary is given of the analysis pipeline used to search for gravitational waves signals from compact binary coalescences using a coincidence-based method, including details of the results of that analysis. Details are also given of the pipeline used to search for gravitational waves associated

  6. Construction of the second-order gravitational perturbations produced by a compact object

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Eran

    2006-02-15

    Accurate calculation of the gradual inspiral motion in an extreme mass-ratio binary system, in which a compact object inspiral towards a supermassive black hole requires calculation of the interaction between the compact object and the gravitational perturbations that it induces. These metric perturbations satisfy linear partial differential equations on a curved background space-time induced by the supermassive black hole. At the point-particle limit the second-order perturbations equations have source terms that diverge as r{sup -4}, where r is the distance from the particle. This singular behavior renders the standard retarded solutions of these equations ill defined. Here we resolve this problem and construct well-defined and physically meaningful solutions to these equations. We recently presented an outline of this resolution [E. Rosenthal, Phys. Rev. D 72, 121503 (2005).]. Here we provide the full details of this analysis. These second-order solutions are important for practical calculations: the planned gravitational-wave detector LISA requires preparation of waveform templates for the potential gravitational waves. Construction of templates with desired accuracy for extreme mass-ratio binaries requires accurate calculation of the inspiral motion including the interaction with the second-order gravitational perturbations.

  7. Nucleosynthesis and neutrino physics in compact object mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surman, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The merger of two compact objects produces a range of environments suitable for interesting element synthesis, from cold or mildly heated prompt ejecta to hot winds influenced by the neutrino emission from the resulting accretion disk. The nuclei newly synthesized in these environments can power an electromagnetic transient via their radioactive decay and likely make key contributions to galactic chemical evolution. Here we will describe how new and anticipated advances in nuclear and neutrino physics are shaping our understanding of nucleosynthesis in this important astrophysical site. Supported in part by the Department of Energy under contract DE-SC0013039.

  8. Inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a new precessing convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2016-05-01

    It is customary to use a precessing convention, based on Newtonian orbital angular momentum L N, to model inspiral gravitational waves from generic spinning compact binaries. A key feature of such a precessing convention is its ability to remove all spin precession induced modulations from the orbital phase evolution. However, this convention usually employs a postNewtonian (PN) accurate precessional equation, appropriate for the PN accurate orbital angular momentum L, to evolve the L N-based precessing source frame. This motivated us to develop inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a precessing convention that explicitly use L to describe the binary orbits. Our approach introduces certain additional 3PN order terms in the orbital phase and frequency evolution equations with respect to the usual L N-based implementation of the precessing convention. The implications of these additional terms are explored by computing the match between inspiral waveforms that employ L and L N-based precessing conventions. We found that the match estimates are smaller than the optimal value, namely 0.97, for a non-negligible fraction of unequal mass spinning compact binaries.

  9. Tail effects in the third post-Newtonian gravitational wave energy flux of compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.; Qusailah, Moh'd S. S.

    2008-03-15

    The far-zone flux of energy contains hereditary (tail) contributions that depend on the entire past history of the source. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism, we propose and implement a semianalytical method in the frequency domain to compute these contributions from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits up to third post-Newtonian (3PN) order. The method explicitly uses the quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits at 1PN order and exploits the doubly periodic nature of the motion to average the 3PN fluxes over the binary's orbit. Together with the instantaneous (nontail) contributions evaluated in a companion paper, it provides crucial inputs for the construction of ready-to-use templates for compact binaries moving on quasi-elliptic orbits, an interesting class of sources for the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo, as well as space-based detectors like LISA.

  10. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2002-01-01

    The article reviews the current status of a theoretical approach to the problem of the emission of gravitational waves by isolated systems in the context of general relativity. Part A of the article deals with general post-Newtonian sources. The exterior field of the source is investigated by means of a combination of analytic post-Minkowskian and multipolar approximations. The physical observables in the far-zone of the source are described by a specific set of radiative multipole moments. By matching the exterior solution to the metric of the post-Newtonian source in the near-zone we obtain the explicit expressions of the source multipole moments. The relationships between the radiative and source moments involve many nonlinear multipole interactions, among them those associated with the tails (and tails-of-tails of gravitational waves. Part B of the article is devoted to the application to compact binary systems. We present the equations of binary motion, and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order beyond the Newtonian acceleration. The gravitational-wave energy flux, taking consistently into account the relativistic corrections in the binary moments as well as the various tail effects, is derived through 3.5PN order with respect to the quadrupole formalism. The binary's orbital phase, whose prior knowledge is crucial for searching and analyzing the signals from inspiralling compact binaries, is deduced from an energy balance argument.

  11. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the current status of a theoretical approach to the problem of the emission of gravitational waves by isolated systems in the context of general relativity. Part A of the article deals with general post-Newtonian sources. The exterior field of the source is investigated by means of a combination of analytic post-Minkowskian and multipolar approximations. The physical observables in the far-zone of the source are described by a specific set of radiative multipole moments. By matching the exterior solution to the metric of the post-Newtonian source in the near-zone we obtain the explicit expressions of the source multipole moments. The relationships between the radiative and source moments involve many nonlinear multipole interactions, among them those associated with the tails (and tails-of-tails) of gravitational waves. Part B of the article is devoted to the application to compact binary systems. We present the equations of binary motion, and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order beyond the Newtonian acceleration. The gravitational-wave energy flux, taking consistently into account the relativistic corrections in the binary moments as well as the various tail effects, is derived through 3.5PN order with respect to the quadrupole formalism. The binary's orbital phase, whose prior knowledge is crucial for searching and analyzing the signals from inspiralling compact binaries, is deduced from an energy balance argument.

  12. Searching for Spectroscopic Binaries within Transition Disk Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Saul A.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Llama, Joe

    2016-03-01

    Transition disks (TDs) are intermediate stage circumstellar disks characterized by an inner gap within the disk structure. To test whether these gaps may have been formed by closely orbiting, previously undetected stellar companions, we collected high-resolution optical spectra of 31 TD objects to search for spectroscopic binaries (SBs). Twenty-four of these objects are in Ophiuchus and seven are within the Coronet, Corona Australis, and Chameleon I star-forming regions. We measured radial velocities for multiple epochs, obtaining a median precision of 400 ms-1. We identified double-lined SB SSTc2d J163154.7-250324 in Ophiuchus, which we determined to be composed of a K7(±0.5) and a K9(±0.5) star, with orbital limits of a < 0.6 au and P < 150 days. This results in an SB fraction of {0.04}-0.03+0.12 in Ophiuchus, which is consistent with other spectroscopic surveys of non-TD objects in the region. This similarity suggests that TDs are not preferentially sculpted by the presence of close binaries and that planet formation around close binaries may take place over similar timescales to that around single stars. This paper is based on data gathered with the 6.5 m Clay Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Tidal invariants for compact binaries on quasicircular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Sam R.; Nolan, Patrick; Ottewill, Adrian C.; Warburton, Niels; Wardell, Barry

    2015-01-01

    We extend the gravitational self-force approach to encompass "self-interaction" tidal effects for a compact body of mass μ on a quasicircular orbit around a black hole of mass M ≫μ . Specifically, we define and calculate at O (μ ) (conservative) shifts in the eigenvalues of the electric- and magnetic-type tidal tensors, and a (dissipative) shift in a scalar product between their eigenbases. This approach yields four gauge-invariant functions, from which one may construct other tidal quantities such as the curvature scalars and the speciality index. First, we analyze the general case of a geodesic in a regular perturbed vacuum spacetime admitting a helical Killing vector and a reflection symmetry. Next, we specialize to focus on circular orbits in the equatorial plane of Kerr spacetime at O (μ ) . We present accurate numerical results for the Schwarzschild case for orbital radii up to the light ring, calculated via independent implementations in Lorenz and Regge-Wheeler gauges. We show that our results are consistent with leading-order post-Newtonian expansions, and demonstrate the existence of additional structure in the strong-field regime. We anticipate that our strong-field results will inform (e.g.) effective one-body models for the gravitational two-body problem that are invaluable in the ongoing search for gravitational waves.

  14. Tidal invariants for compact binaries on quasi-circular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Niels; Dolan, Sam; Nolan, Patrick; Ottewill, Adrian; Wardell, Barry

    2015-04-01

    We extend the gravitational self-force approach to encompass `self-interaction' tidal effects for a compact body of mass μ on a quasi-circular orbit around a black hole of mass M >> μ . Specifically, we define and calculate at O(μ) (conservative) shifts in the eigenvalues of the electric- and magnetic-type tidal tensors, and a (dissipative) shift in a scalar product between their eigenbases. This approach yields four gauge-invariant functions, from which one may construct other tidal quantities such as the curvature scalars and the speciality index. First, we analyze the general case of a geodesic in a regular perturbed vacuum spacetime admitting a helical Killing vector and a reflection symmetry. Next, we specialize to focus on circular orbits in the equatorial plane of Kerr spacetime at O(μ) . We present accurate numerical results for the Schwarzschild case for orbital radii up to the light-ring, calculated via independent implementations in Lorenz and Regge-Wheeler gauges. We show that our results are consistent with leading-order post-Newtonian expansions, and demonstrate the existence of additional structure in the strong-field regime. We anticipate that our strong-field results will inform (e.g.) effective one-body models for the gravitational two-body probl

  15. Is there a compact companion orbiting the late O-type binary star HD 164816?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepl, L.; Hambaryan, V. V.; Pribulla, T.; Tetzlaff, N.; Chini, R.; Neuhäuser, R.; Popov, S. B.; Stahl, O.; Walter, F. M.; Hohle, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength (X-ray, γ-ray, optical and radio) study of HD 164816, a late O-type X-ray detected spectroscopic binary. X-ray spectra are analysed and the X-ray photon arrival times are checked for pulsation. In addition, newly obtained optical spectroscopic monitoring data on HD 164816 are presented. They are complemented by available radio data from several large-scale surveys as well as the Fermi γ-ray data from its Large Area Telescope. We report the detection of a low energy excess in the X-ray spectrum that can be described by a simple absorbed blackbody model with a temperature of ˜50 eV as well as a 9.78 s pulsation of the X-ray source. The soft X-ray excess, the X-ray pulsation and the kinematical age would all be consistent with a compact object like a neutron star as companion to HD 164816. The size of the soft X-ray excess emitting area is consistent with a circular region with a radius of about 7 km, typical for neutron stars, while the emission measure (EM) of the remaining harder emission is typical for late O-type single or binary stars. If HD 164816 includes a neutron star born in a supernova, this supernova should have been very recent and should have given the system a kick, which is consistent with the observation that the star HD 164816 has a significantly different radial velocity than the cluster mean. In addition we confirm the binarity of HD 164816 itself by obtaining an orbital period of 3.82 d, projected masses m1sin3i = 2.355(69) M⊙, m2sin3i = 2.103(62) M⊙ apparently seen at low inclination angle, determined from high-resolution optical spectra.

  16. Compact binary merger rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo upper limits

    DOE PAGES

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; ...

    2016-03-03

    Here, we compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH–BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ~2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH–BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z sime 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (more » $$\\lt 150\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to $${M}_{{\\rm{tot,z}}}\\simeq 400\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$. (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH–BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS–NS, BH–NS, BH–BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH–BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.« less

  17. Compact binary merger rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo upper limits

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaugnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-03

    Here, we compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH–BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ~2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH–BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z sime 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars ($\\lt 150\\;{M}_{\\odot }$) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to ${M}_{{\\rm{tot,z}}}\\simeq 400\\;{M}_{\\odot }$. (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH–BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS–NS, BH–NS, BH–BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH–BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.

  18. Electromagnetic field and cylindrical compact objects in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of different fluid parameters particularly electromagnetic field and f(R) corrections on the evolution of cylindrical compact object. We have explored the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and dynamical equations. An expression for the mass function has been found in comparison with the Misner-Sharp formalism in modified gravity, after which different mass-radius diagrams are drawn. The coupled dynamical transport equation have been formulated to discuss the role of thermoinertial effects on the inertial mass density of the cylindrical relativistic interior. Finally, we have presented a framework, according to which all possible solutions of the metric f(R)-Maxwell field equations coupled with static fluid can be written through set of scalar functions. It is found that modified gravity induced by Lagrangians f(R) = αR2, f(R) = αR2 - βR and f(R)=α R^2-β R/1+γ R are likely to host more massive cylindrical compact objects with smaller radii as compared to general relativity.

  19. The near-infrared properties of compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Cynthia Suzanne

    , the light curve has a hump outside of primary eclipse which was modeled as flux from the secondary star when irradiated by a 0.2-0.3 Lsolar source. The light curve has a dip at φ = 0.5 which is consistent with an eclipse of the irradiated face of the secondary star by an opaque accretion disk. The accretion disk has a brightness temperature profile much flatter than the theoretical profile of a steady- state disk. The disk is asymmetric, with the front of the disk (the side facing the secondary star at mid-eclipse) hotter than the back. The bright spot, which appears in visible disk maps of SW Sex, is not seen in the NIR light curve. I also present H-band light curves of the X-ray binary system, A0620-00, and NIR spectra of two X-ray binaries, CI Cam, and the relativistic jet source, SS 433. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  20. Stability of anisotropic compact objects in f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, M. Zaeem-Ul-Haq; Yousaf, Z.; Hanif, Sonia

    2017-03-01

    We exhibit the dynamical instability of cylindrical compact object in the gravitational field of f(T) gravity, which is the simplest modification of teleparallel theory (TPT). We explore the field equations and conservation laws to provide the extra degrees of freedom governed by f(T) gravity. We investigate the behavior of small perturbations on geometric and material profile in the background of collapsing fluid configuration. The un/stable eras are studied under Newtonian (N) and post-Newtonian (pN) approximations. Our results show that the stiffness parameter has major role in determining the un/stable epochs of cylindrical object. The dark source terms of f(T) gravity lead to relatively more unstable configuration during its evolutionary process.

  1. A search for massive compact halo objects in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Cook, K.; Park, H.; Griest, K.; Stubbs, C.; Freeman, K.; Peterson, B.; Quinn, P.; Rogers, A.

    1991-04-01

    Massive compact halo objects such as brown dwarfs, Jupiters, and black holes are prime candidates to comprise the dark halo of our galaxy. Our group is currently involved in constructing a dedicated observing system at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia. We will use a refurbished 1.27 meter telescope and an innovative two-color CCD camera with 3.4 x 10 exp 7 pixels to monitor 10 exp 6 - 10 exp 7 stars in the Magellanic Clouds. During the first year of operation (1991-1992), we hope to detect (or rule out) objects in the mass range between 0.001 and 0.1 solar mass, and after five years, we hope to have covered the range 10 exp -6 solar mass - 10 exp 2 solar masses.

  2. The effect of compaction pressure for on properties of binary and ternary magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Masyitah Mt; Zuhailawati, Hussain

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of compaction pressure on the densification, and mechanical properties of binary and ternary Mg-based alloys that have potential to be used as biodegradable implant metals. The mixture of Mg-10wt%Zn and Mg-9wt%Zn-lwt%Mn alloy were mechanically alloyed (MA) in a planetary ball mill. The as-milled powder was consolidated by compacting the powder into 10mm diameter pellet with compaction pressure varied from 100-600MPa followed by sintering at 300°C for 1 hour. The effect of compaction pressure on microstructure was investigated by x-ray diffraction measurement (XRD) and optical microscope (OM) while densification of the sample determined by Archimedes density measurement. Mechanical properties of the sample was investigated by microhardness and compression test. The result show that a homogenous supersaturated solid solution of Mg-10wt%Zn and Mg-9wt%Zn-lwt%Mn was obtained after 2 hours of milling time. The density of the alloy was increased with increasing compaction pressure up to 400MPa before decrease with further increase of compaction pressure. Significant enhancement of hardness and compressive strength were observed in Mg-9wt%Zn-lwt%Mn alloy (72.9 Hv, 255MPa) compared to Mg-10wt%Zn alloy (66.9Hv, 245MPa). The ternary Mg-based alloy of Mg-9wt%Zn-lwt%Mn provide better mechanical properties than binary Mg-alloy of Mg-10wt%Zn. The compaction pressure of 400MPa was the optimum case for preparing such Mg-alloy and further increase of the pressure led to deterioration of mechanical properties of the alloy.

  3. TOWARD EARLY-WARNING DETECTION OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM COMPACT BINARY COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Kipp; Cariou, Romain; Chapman, Adrian; Fotopoulos, Nickolas; Privitera, Stephen; Searle, Antony; Singer, Leo; Weinstein, Alan; Crispin-Ortuzar, Mireia; Frei, Melissa; Hanna, Chad; Kara, Erin; Keppel, Drew; Liao, Laura

    2012-04-01

    Rapid detection of compact binary coalescence (CBC) with a network of advanced gravitational-wave detectors will offer a unique opportunity for multi-messenger astronomy. Prompt detection alerts for the astronomical community might make it possible to observe the onset of electromagnetic emission from CBC. We demonstrate a computationally practical filtering strategy that could produce early-warning triggers before gravitational radiation from the final merger has arrived at the detectors.

  4. Spin memory effect for compact binaries in the post-Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David A.

    2017-04-01

    The spin memory effect is a recently predicted relativistic phenomenon in asymptotically flat spacetimes that become nonradiative infinitely far in the past and future. Between these early and late times, the magnetic-parity part of the time integral of the gravitational-wave strain can undergo a nonzero change; this difference is the spin memory effect. Families of freely falling observers around an isolated source can measure this effect, in principle, and fluxes of angular momentum per unit solid angle (or changes in superspin charges) generate the effect. The spin memory effect had not been computed explicitly for astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, such as compact binaries. In this paper, we compute the spin memory in terms of a set of radiative multipole moments of the gravitational-wave strain. The result of this calculation allows us to establish the following results about the spin memory: (i) We find that the accumulation of the spin memory behaves in a qualitatively different way from that of the displacement memory effect for nonspinning, quasicircular compact binaries in the post-Newtonian approximation: the spin memory undergoes a large secular growth over the duration of the inspiral, whereas for the displacement effect this increase is small. (ii) The rate at which the spin memory grows is equivalent to a nonlinear, but nonoscillatory and nonhereditary effect in the gravitational waveform that had been previously calculated for nonspinning, quasicircular compact binaries. (iii) This rate of buildup of the spin memory could potentially be detected by future gravitational-wave detectors by carefully combining the measured waveforms from hundreds of gravitational-wave detections of compact binaries.

  5. Formation of millisecond pulsars with low-mass helium white dwarf companions in very compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Kun; Li, X.-D.

    2014-08-20

    Binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs) are thought to have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). If the mass transfer in LMXBs is driven by nuclear evolution of the donor star, the final orbital period is predicted to be well correlated with the mass of the white dwarf (WD), which is the degenerate He core of the donor. Here we show that this relation can be extended to very small WD mass (∼0.14-0.17 M {sub ☉}) and narrow orbital period (about a few hours), depending mainly on the metallicities of the donor stars. There is also discontinuity in the relation, which is due to the temporary contraction of the donor when the H-burning shell crosses the hydrogen discontinuity. BMSPs with low-mass He WD companions in very compact binaries can be accounted for if the progenitor binary experienced very late Case A mass transfer. The WD companion of PSR J1738+0333 is likely to evolve from a Pop II star. For PSR J0348+0432, to explain its extreme compact orbit in the Roche-lobe-decoupling phase, even lower metallicity (Z = 0.0001) is required.

  6. Hot Collionsal Plasma Emissions in the Ultra-compact Binary Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Marshall, Herman

    2016-07-01

    4U 1626-67 is an ultra-compact binary pulsar with a pulse period of 7.7 sec and an orbital period of 40 min. Its X-ray spectrum varies distinctively before and after torque reversal episodes. 4U 1626-67 is a peculiar ultra-compact binary in that it not only truncates its accretion disk at the magnetospheric radius, but also emits Ne and O Doppler X-ray lines, The nature of these lines have remained quite mysterious but we can now show that these lines originate from a coronal type plasma with temperatures up to 10 Million degrees located at the magnetospheric radius. The disk line fits constrain the source distance to about 5 kpc. We also observe consistent variations in the disk lines before and after torque reversal. The observed disk lines constrain the angle of inclination to 38 degrees, which is is significantly larger than previously assumed. We discuss these findings in the context of accreting X-ray binaries and binary pulsar properties.

  7. Rainbow scattering in the gravitational field of a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Sam R.; Stratton, Tom

    2017-06-01

    We study the elastic scattering of a planar wave in the curved spacetime of a compact object such as a neutron star, via a heuristic model: a scalar field impinging upon a spherically symmetric uniform density star of radius R and mass M . For R rc, there instead arises a stationary point in the deflection function which creates a caustic and rainbow scattering. As in nuclear rainbow scattering, there is an Airy-type oscillation on a Rutherford-like cross section, followed by a shadow zone. We show that, for R ˜3.5 G M /c2, the rainbow angle lies close to 180°, and thus there arises enhanced backscattering and glory. We explore possible implications for gravitational wave astronomy and dark matter models.

  8. Gravitational waves and the deformation of compact objects: Topics in relativistic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan Kieran

    In this dissertation, we present various theoretical investigations of sources of gravitational waves, relevant to interpreting the data from current and planned gravitational wave detectors; an idee fixe is the deformation of compact objects. We begin in the strong field, vacuum regime, with a construction of initial data for the numerical simulation of black hole binaries (specializing to the case of nonspinning holes in a quasicircular orbit). The data we construct contain more of the binary's expected physics than any other current data set. In particular, they contain both the binary's outgoing radiation and the expected tidal deformations of the holes. Such improved initial data will likely be necessary for simulations to achieve the accuracy required to supply advanced gravitational wave detectors with templates for parameter estimation. We end in the weak field, hydrodynamic regime with a calculation of the expected accuracy with which one can combine standard electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations of white dwarf binaries to measure the masses of the binary's components. In particular, we show that this measurement will not be contaminated by finite size effects for realistic sources observed by LISA, though such effects could be important for exceptional sources and/or advanced mHz gravitational wave detectors. In the middle, we make a detour into the messy and poorly constrained realm of the physics of neutron star interiors, calculating the shear modulus of hadron--quark mixed phase in hybrid stars. Here we include a rough treatment of charge screening, dimensional continuation of the lattice, and the contributions from changing the cell volume when shearing lowerdimensional lattices. We find that the last of these contributions is necessary to stabilize the lattice for those dimensions, where it makes a considerable contribution to the shear modulus. We then move back to sounder theoretical footing in making a general relativistic

  9. Object tracking on mobile devices using binary descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savakis, Andreas; Quraishi, Mohammad Faiz; Minnehan, Breton

    2015-03-01

    With the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, advanced applications are relying on computer vision techniques to provide novel experiences for users. Currently, few tracking approaches take into consideration the resource constraints on mobile devices. Designing efficient tracking algorithms and optimizing performance for mobile devices can result in better and more efficient tracking for applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper, we use binary descriptors, including Fast Retina Keypoint (FREAK), Oriented FAST and Rotated BRIEF (ORB), Binary Robust Independent Features (BRIEF), and Binary Robust Invariant Scalable Keypoints (BRISK) to obtain real time tracking performance on mobile devices. We consider both Google's Android and Apple's iOS operating systems to implement our tracking approach. The Android implementation is done using Android's Native Development Kit (NDK), which gives the performance benefits of using native code as well as access to legacy libraries. The iOS implementation was created using both the native Objective-C and the C++ programing languages. We also introduce simplified versions of the BRIEF and BRISK descriptors that improve processing speed without compromising tracking accuracy.

  10. Dark matter dynamical friction versus gravitational wave emission in the evolution of compact-star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, L. Gabriel; Rueda, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    The measured orbital period decay of relativistic compact-star binaries, with characteristic orbital periods ˜0.1 days , is explained with very high precision by the gravitational wave (GW) emission of an inspiraling binary in a vacuum predicted by general relativity. However, the binary gravitational binding energy is also affected by an usually neglected phenomenon, namely the dark matter dynamical friction (DMDF) produced by the interaction of the binary components with their respective DM gravitational wakes. Therefore, the inclusion of the DMDF might lead to a binary evolution which is different from a purely GW-driven one. The entity of this effect depends on the orbital period and on the local value of the DM density, hence on the position of the binary in the Galaxy. We evaluate the DMDF produced by three different DM profiles: the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, the nonsingular-isothermal-sphere (NSIS) and the Ruffini-Argüelles-Rueda (RAR) DM profile based on self-gravitating keV fermions. We first show that indeed, due to their Galactic position, the GW emission dominates over the DMDF in the Neutron star (NS)-NS, NS-(White Dwarf) WD and WD-WD binaries for which measurements of the orbital decay exist. Then, we evaluate the conditions (i.e. orbital period and Galactic location) under which the effect of DMDF on the binary evolution becomes comparable to, or overcomes, the one of the GW emission. We find that, for instance for 1.3 - 0.2 M⊙ NS-WD, 1.3 - 1.3 M⊙ NS-NS, and 0.25 - 0.50 M⊙ WD-WD, located at 0.1 kpc, this occurs at orbital periods around 20-30 days in a NFW profile while, in a RAR profile, it occurs at about 100 days. For closer distances to the Galactic center, the DMDF effect increases and the above critical orbital periods become interestingly shorter. Finally, we also analyze the system parameters (for all the DM profiles) for which DMDF leads to an orbital widening instead of orbital decay. All the above imply that a direct

  11. Super-spinning compact objects generated by thick accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-03-01

    If astrophysical black hole candidates are the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity, the value of their spin parameter must be subject to the theoretical bound |a{sub *}| ≤ 1. In this work, we consider the possibility that these objects are either non-Kerr black holes in an alternative theory of gravity or exotic compact objects in General Relativity. We study the accretion process when their accretion disk is geometrically thick with a simple version of the Polish doughnut model. The picture of the accretion process may be qualitatively different from the one around a Kerr black hole. The inner edge of the disk may not have the typical cusp on the equatorial plane any more, but there may be two cusps, respectively above and below the equatorial plane. We extend previous work on the evolution of the spin parameter and we estimate the maximum value of a{sub *} for the super-massive black hole candidates in galactic nuclei. Since measurements of the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs require η > 0.15, we infer the ''observational'' bound |a{sub *}|∼<1.3, which seems to be quite independent of the exact nature of these objects. Such a bound is only slightly weaker than |a{sub *}|∼<1.2 found in previous work for thin disks.

  12. The accretion flow in the ultra-compact binary ES Cet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeghs, D.

    Recently, three variable stars have been identified as likely accreting binary systems with ultra-short orbital periods. Optical and X-ray observations have revealed periodicities of 5-10 minutes, making them the closest binaries known as well as strong sources of gravitational wave emission. Such short-period accreting binaries form the cornerstone to our understanding of binary formation and evolution, in particular of the large double white dwarf population in our galaxy, a candidate progenitor population for Type Ia supernovae. We propose to obtain the first phase-resolved UV observations of the brightest of these three, ES Cet. With the FUSE observations, we will (i) determine the temperature of the primary and the composition of their donor stars, (ii) correlate the UV variability with other wavebands and determine if the periods are indeed orbital, (iii) look for dynamical signatures of direct-impact accretion that is expected to govern the survival rate of double white dwarfs. These UV observations are essential in order to unequivocally determine whether these are indeed the most compact binaries known.

  13. Accuracy in measuring the neutron star mass in gravitational wave parameter estimates for nonspinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2015-09-01

    In gravitational wave (GW) data analysis, the parameter estimate is performed to find the physical parameters of GW sources. The result of the parameter estimate is given by a posterior probability density function, and the measurement errors can be computed by using the Fisher matrix method. Using this method, we investigate the accuracy in estimates of neutron star (NS) masses ( M NS) for GWs emitted from merging compact binaries. As GW sources, we consider nonspinning binaries in which the primary component is assumed to be a NS and the companion is assumed to be a NS or a stellar-mass black hole (BH). Adopting GW signals with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) sensitivity, we calculate measurement errors (σ) of M NS. We find that the errors strongly depend on the mass ratio of the companion mass ( M com) to the NS mass ( M NS). For NS-NS binaries, the fractional errors (σ/ M NS) are larger than 10% only in the symmetric mass region. For BH-NS binaries, the fractional errors tend to decrease with increasing mass ratio ( M com/ M NS), and the measurement accuracies are better than those for NS-NS binaries. In this case, the errors are always smaller than ~ 3%.

  14. Detecting compact galactic binaries using a hybrid swarm-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffanais, Yann; Porter, Edward K.

    2016-03-01

    Compact binaries in our galaxy are expected to be one of the main sources of gravitational waves for the future eLISA mission. During the mission lifetime, many thousands of galactic binaries should be individually resolved. However, the identification of the sources and the extraction of the signal parameters in a noisy environment are real challenges for data analysis. So far, stochastic searches have proven to be the most successful for this problem. In this work, we present the first application of a swarm-based algorithm combining Particle Swarm Optimization and Differential Evolution. These algorithms have been shown to converge faster to global solutions on complicated likelihood surfaces than other stochastic methods. We first demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm for the case of a single binary in a 1-mHz search bandwidth. This interesting problem gave the algorithm plenty of opportunity to fail, as it can be easier to find a strong noise peak rather than the signal itself. After a successful detection of a fictitious low-frequency source, as well as the verification binary RXJ 0806.3 +1527 , we then applied the algorithm to the detection of multiple binaries, over different search bandwidths, in the cases of low and mild source confusion. In all cases, we show that we can successfully identify the sources and recover the true parameters within a 99% credible interval.

  15. Stellar structure and compact objects before 1940: Towards relativistic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2017-06-01

    Since the mid-1920s, different strands of research used stars as "physics laboratories" for investigating the nature of matter under extreme densities and pressures, impossible to realize on Earth. To trace this process this paper is following the evolution of the concept of a dense core in stars, which was important both for an understanding of stellar evolution and as a testing ground for the fast-evolving field of nuclear physics. In spite of the divide between physicists and astrophysicists, some key actors working in the cross-fertilized soil of overlapping but different scientific cultures formulated models and tentative theories that gradually evolved into more realistic and structured astrophysical objects. These investigations culminated in the first contact with general relativity in 1939, when J. Robert Oppenheimer and his students George Volkoff and Hartland Snyder systematically applied the theory to the dense core of a collapsing neutron star. This pioneering application of Einstein's theory to an astrophysical compact object can be regarded as a milestone in the path eventually leading to the emergence of relativistic astrophysics in the early 1960s.

  16. Hunting for Orphaned Central Compact Objects among Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Ng, C.-Y.; Ho, W. C. G.; Bogdanov, S.; Kaspi, V. M.; He, C.

    2015-08-01

    Central compact objects (CCOs) are a handful of young neutron stars found at the center of supernova remnants (SNRs). They show high thermal X-ray luminosities but no radio emission. Spin-down rate measurements of three CCOs with X-ray pulsations indicate surface dipole fields much weaker than those of typical young pulsars. To investigate if CCOs and known radio pulsars are objects at different evolutionary stages, we carried out a census of all weak-field (\\lt {10}11 G) isolated radio pulsars in the Galactic plane to search for CCO-like X-ray emission. None of the 12 candidates are detected at X-ray energies, with luminosity limits of {10}32-{10}34 erg s-1. We consider a scenario in which the weak surface fields of CCOs are due to a rapid accretion of supernova materials and show that as the buried field diffuses back to the surface, a CCO descendant is expected to leave the P-\\dot{P} parameter space of our candidates at a young age of a few ×10 kyr. Hence, the candidates are likely to just be old ordinary pulsars in this case. We suggest that further searches for orphaned CCOs, which are aged CCOs with parent SNRs that have dissipated, should include pulsars with stronger magnetic fields.

  17. Gravitational lens effects of a cosmological density of compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Amplification of quasar light by a cosmological density of compact objects causes significant effects on many quasars in magnitude-limited samples. For lens masses solar mass less than 100,000 solar mass the continuum would be amplified by a magnitude or more but the line emission would not. Examination of the UV selected sample of Marshall et al. (1983) gives limits to more than 90 percent statistical confidence of Omega(c) less than 0.1 for a mass between 200 and 100,000 solar mass, where Omega(c) is the mean density of objects of mass M relative to the closure density. Preliminary results from an X-ray selected sample may probe to more than 0.1 solar mass and give a value for Omega(c) of less than one. These limits indicate that the remnants of an early population of massive stars cannot make a cosmologically significant contribution to the mass density of the universe. On a separate topic, recent work on the enhanced surface density of quasars near galaxies due to lensing by stars in the galaxy halos is reviewed.

  18. Laboratory spectroscopy of silicon plasmas photoionized by mimic astrophysical compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, S.; Yamamoto, N.; Salzmann, D.; Wang, F.; Li, Y.; Dong, Q.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Rhee, Y.-J.; Lee, Y.-W.; Han, J.-M.; Kwon, D.-H.; Zhong, J.; Zhao, G.; Tanabe, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Nakabayashi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Nishimura, H.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.

    2009-12-01

    Photoionized plasmas are encountered in astrophysics wherever low-temperature gas/plasma is bathed in a strong radiation field. X-ray line emissions in the several kiloelectronvolts spectral range were observed from accreting clouds of binary systems, such as CYGNUS X-3 and VELA X-1, in which high-intensity x-ray continua from compact objects (neutron stars, black holes or white dwarfs) irradiate the cold and rarefied clouds. X-ray continuum-induced line emission accurately describes the accreting clouds, but experimental verification of this photoionized plasma model is scarce. Here we report the generation of photoionized plasmas in the laboratory under well-characterized conditions using a high-power laser. A blackbody radiator at a temperature of 500 eV, corresponding to a compact object, was created by means of a laser-driven implosion. The emerging x-rays irradiate a low-density (ne < 1020 cm-3) and low-temperature (Te < 30 eV) silicon plasma. Line emissions from lithium- and helium-like silicon ions were observed from a thermally cold silicon plasma in the 1.8-1.9 keV spectral region, far from equilibrium conditions. This result reveals the laboratory generation of a photoionizing plasma. Atomic kinetic calculations imply the importance of direct K-shell photoionization by incoming hard x-rays.

  19. GPU-accelerated low-latency real-time searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Du, Zhihui; Chung, Shin Kee; Hooper, Shaun; Blair, David; Wen, Linqing

    2012-12-01

    We present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated time-domain low-latency algorithm to search for gravitational waves (GWs) from coalescing binaries of compact objects based on the summed parallel infinite impulse response (SPIIR) filtering technique. The aim is to facilitate fast detection of GWs with a minimum delay to allow prompt electromagnetic follow-up observations. To maximize the GPU acceleration, we apply an efficient batched parallel computing model that significantly reduces the number of synchronizations in SPIIR and optimizes the usage of the memory and hardware resource. Our code is tested on the CUDA ‘Fermi’ architecture in a GTX 480 graphics card and its performance is compared with a single core of Intel Core i7 920 (2.67 GHz). A 58-fold speedup is achieved while giving results in close agreement with the CPU implementation. Our result indicates that it is possible to conduct a full search for GWs from compact binary coalescence in real time with only one desktop computer equipped with a Fermi GPU card for the initial LIGO detectors which in the past required more than 100 CPUs.

  20. Measuring the dimensionality of compact extra dimensions with inspiral gravitational waves from black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li-E.; Zhao, Shu Hong; Xu, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) were recently observed by the advanced LIGO detectors. Based on the perturbation analysis, for general Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions, we find a 1st-order post-Newtonian correction to the inspiral gravitational waveforms of black-hole binaries, that comes from the variations of the volume of the extra dimensions in near source zones. Such correction depends on a new parameter χ=\\frac{n}{2+n} with n the dimensionality of the extra space and it is irrelevant to the particular choice of the topology of the extra space. For the ideal case of a black-hole binary system following nearly circular orbital motion with almost equal or intermediate mass ratio, such higher-dimensional corrections to the chirping amplitude are worked out. Giving the power of tracing inspiral waves from coalescing massive BHBs with high signal-to-noise ratios, the planned space-borne antennas such as the eLISA and DECIGO may give us a measurement of the parameter χ in the near future and may serve us as new probes in the searching for the evidence of the hidden compact dimensions.

  1. Use of gravitational waves to probe the formation channels of compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Salvatore; Lynch, Ryan; Sturani, Riccardo; Graff, Philip

    2017-02-01

    With the discovery of the binary black hole coalescences GW150914 and GW151226, the era of gravitational-wave astrophysics has started. Gravitational-wave signals emitted by compact binary coalescences will be detected in large number by LIGO and Virgo in the coming months and years. Much about compact binaries is still uncertain, including some key details about their formation channels. The two scenarios which are typically considered, common envelope evolution and dynamical capture, result in different distributions for the orientation of the black hole spins. In particular, common envelope evolution is expected to be highly efficient in aligning spins with the orbital angular momentum. In this paper we simulate catalogs of gravitational-wave signals in which a given fraction of events comes from common envelope evolution, and has spins nearly aligned with the orbital angular momentum. We show how the fraction of aligned systems can be accurately estimated using Bayesian parameter estimation, with 1 σ uncertainties of the order of 10% after 100–200 sources are detected.

  2. Catalogue of cataclysmic binaries, low-mass X-ray binaries and related objects (Seventh edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2003-06-01

    The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, and stellar parameters of the components and other characteristc properties of 472 cataclysmic binaries, 71 low-mass X-ray binaries and 113 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition, the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 635 of the 656 objects, and a cross-reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 1 January 2003 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. All data can be accessed via the dedicated catalogue webpage at http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/RKcat/ and http://physics.open.ac.uk/RKcat/ and at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (30.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/404/301. We will update the information given on the catalogue webpage regularly, initially every six months.

  3. Thermo-Rotational Instability in Plasma Disks Around Compact Objects*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2008-04-01

    Differentially rotating plasma disks, around compact objects, that are imbedded in a ``seed'' magnetic field are shown to develop vertically localized ballooning modes that are driven by the combined radial gradient of the rotation frequency and the vertical gradients of the plasma density and temperature [1]. When the electron mean free path is shorter than the disk height and the (vertical) thermal conductivity can be neglected, the vertical particle flows produced by of these modes have the effect to drive the density and temperature profiles toward the ``adiabatic condition'' where ηT≡(dlnT/dz/(dlnn/dz)=2/3. Here T is the plasma temperature and n the particle density. The faster growth rates correspond to steeper temperature profiles (ηT>2/3) such as those produced by an internal (e.g. viscous) heating process. In the end, ballooning modes excited for various values of ηT can lead to the evolution of the disk into a different current carrying configuration such as a sequence of plasma rings[2].*Sponsored in part by the U.S. Department of Energy[1]B. Coppi, M.I.T. (LNS) Report HEP, 07/02, Cambridge, MA (2007), Invited Paper at the International Symposium on ``Momentum Transport in Jets, Disks and Laboratory Plasmas'', Alba, Piedmont, September 2007, to be published in Europhysical Letters (EPL, IOP)[2]B. Coppi andF. Rousseau, Ap. J., 641, 458, (2006)

  4. Dating COINS: Kinematic Ages for Compact Symmetric Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Gugliucci, N.

    2005-01-05

    We present multi-epoch VLBA observations of Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) from the COINS sample (CSOs Observed In the Northern Sky). These observations allow us to make estimates of, or place limits on, the kinematic ages for those sources with well-identified hot spots. This study significantly increases the number of CSOs with well-determined ages or limits. The age distribution is found to be sharply peaked under 500 years, suggesting that many CSOs die young, or are episodic in nature, and very few survive to evolve into FR II sources like Cygnus A. Jet components are found to have higher velocities than hot spots which is consistent with their movement down cleared channels. We also report on the first detections of significant polarization in two CSOs, J0000+4054 (2.1%) and J1826+1831 (8.8%). In both cases the polarized emission is found in jet components on the stronger side of the center of activity.

  5. Electromagnetic Powers Of Merging And Collapsing Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-09-01

    Understanding possible EM signatures of the merging and collapsing compact object is important for identifying possible sources of LIGO & LISA signals. We estimate the electromagnetic powers that can be produced as a precursor to the merger, as a prompt emission during the collapse of a NS and at the spin-down stage of the resulting Kerr BH. In particular, we find exact non-linear time-dependent structure of magnetospheres of spinning and collapsing NSs in Schwarzschild geometry. Based on this solution, we argue that the collapse of a NS into the BH happens smoothly, without natural formation of current sheets or other dissipative structures on the open field lines and, thus, does not allow the magnetic field to become disconnected from the star and escape to infinity. Thus, as long as an isolated Kerr BH can produce plasma and currents, it does not lose its open magnetic field lines, its magnetospheric structure evolved towards a split monopole and the BH spins down electromagnetically (the closed field lines get absorbed by the hole). The "no hair theorem", which assumes that the outside medium is a vacuum, is not applicable in this case: highly conducting plasma introduces a topological constraint forbidding the disconnection of the magnetic field lines from the BH. Eventually, a single random large scale spontaneous reconnection event will lead to magnetic field release, shutting down the BH engine forever.

  6. Phenomenology of amplitude-corrected post-Newtonian gravitational waveforms for compact binary inspiral: I. Signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeck, Chris; Sengupta, Anand S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the phenomenological consequences of amplitude-corrected post-Newtonian (PN) gravitational waveforms, as opposed to the more commonly used restricted PN waveforms, for the quasi-circular, adiabatic inspiral of compact binary objects. In the case of initial detectors it has been shown that the use of amplitude-corrected waveforms for detection templates would lead to significantly lower signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than those suggested by simulations based exclusively on restricted waveforms. We further elucidate the origin of the effect by an in-depth analytic treatment. The discussion is extended to advanced detectors, where new features emerge. Non-restricted waveforms are linear combinations of harmonics in the orbital phase, and in the frequency domain the kth harmonic is cut off at kfLSO, with fLSO the orbital frequency at the last stable orbit. As a result, with non-restricted templates it is possible to achieve sizeable signal-to-noise ratios in cases where the dominant harmonic (which is the one at twice the orbital phase) does not enter the detector's bandwidth. This will have important repercussions on the detection of binary inspirals involving intermediate-mass black holes. For sources at a distance of 100 Mpc, taking into account the higher harmonics will double the mass reach of Advanced LIGO, and that of EGO gets tripled. Conservative estimates indicate that the restricted waveforms underestimate detection rates for intermediate mass binary inspirals by at least a factor of 20.

  7. Evolution of the spin parameter of accreting compact objects with non-Kerr quadrupole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2011-05-01

    There is robust observational evidence supporting the existence of 5−20 M{sub s}un compact bodies in X-ray binary systems and of 10{sup 5}−10{sup 9} M{sub s}un bodies at the center of many galaxies. All these objects are commonly interpreted as black holes, even is there is no direct evidence that they have an event horizon. A fundamental limit for a black hole in 4-dimensional general relativity is the Kerr bound |a{sub *}| ≤ 1, where a{sub *} is the spin parameter. This is just the condition for the existence of the event horizon. The accretion process can spin a black hole up to a{sub *} ≈ 0.998 and some super-massive objects in galactic nuclei could be rapidly rotating black holes with spin parameter close to this limit. However, if these super-massive objects are not black holes, the Kerr bound does not hold and the accretion process can spin them up to a{sub *} > 1. In this paper, I consider compact bodies with non-Kerr quadrupole moment. I study the evolution of the spin parameter due to accretion and I find its equilibrium value. Future experiments like the gravitational wave detector LISA will be able to test if the super-massive objects at the center of galaxies are the black holes predicted by general relativity. If they are not black holes, some of them may be super-spinning objects with a{sub *} > 1.

  8. The PyCBC search for compact binary mergers in the second run of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Canton, Tito; PyCBC Team

    2017-01-01

    The PyCBC software implements a matched-filter search for gravitational-wave signals associated with mergers of compact binaries. During the first observing run of Advanced LIGO, it played a fundamental role in the discovery of the binary-black-hole merger signals GW150914, GW151226 and LVT151012. In preparation for Advanced LIGO's second run, PyCBC has been modified with the goal of increasing the sensitivity of the search, reducing its computational cost and expanding the explored parameter space. The ability to report signals with a latency of tens of seconds and to perform inference on the parameters of the detected signals has also been introduced. I will give an overview of PyCBC and present the new features and their impact.

  9. Study of statistical properties of hybrid statistic in coherent multidetector compact binary coalescences search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we revisit the coherent gravitational wave search problem of compact binary coalescences with multidetector network consisting of advanced interferometers like LIGO-Virgo. Based on the loss of the optimal multidetector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we construct a hybrid statistic as a best of maximum-likelihood-ratio (MLR) statistic tuned for face-on and face-off binaries. The statistical properties of the hybrid statistic is studied. The performance of this hybrid statistic is compared with that of the coherent MLR statistic for generic inclination angles. Owing to the single synthetic data stream, the hybrid statistic gives few false alarms compared to the multidetector MLR statistic and small fractional loss in the optimum SNR for a large range of binary inclinations. We demonstrate that, for a LIGO-Virgo network and binary inclination ɛ <7 0 ° and ɛ >11 0 ° , the hybrid statistic captures more than 98% of the network optimum matched filter SNR with a low false alarm rate. The Monte Carlo exercise with two distributions of incoming inclination angles—namely, U [cos ɛ ] and a more realistic distribution proposed by B. F. Schutz [Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 125023 (2011)]—are performed with the hybrid statistic and give approximately 5% and 7% higher detection probabilities, respectively, compared to the two stream multidetector MLR statistic for a fixed false alarm probability of 1 0-5.

  10. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric hydrodynamical Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Bondi-Hoyle accretion configurations occur as soon as a gravitating body is immersed in an ambient medium with a supersonic relative velocity. From wind-accreting X-ray binaries to runaway neutron stars, such a regime has been witnessed many times and is believed to account for shock formation, the properties of which can be only marginally derived analytically. In this paper, we present the first results of the numerical characterization of the stationary flow structure of Bondi-Hoyle accretion on to a compact object, from the large-scale accretion radius down to the vicinity of the compact body. For different Mach numbers, we study the associated bow shock. It turns out that those simulations confirm the analytical prediction by Foglizzo & Ruffert concerning the topology of the inner sonic surface with an adiabatic index of 5/3. They also enable us to derive the related mass accretion rates, the position and the temperature of the bow shock, as function of the flow parameters, along with the transverse density and temperature profiles in the wake.

  11. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-07-20

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

  12. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: Hexagonal template placement and its efficiency in detecting physical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cokelaer, T.

    2007-11-01

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from the ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the design of a template bank that covers the astrophysically pertinent parameter space. In an earlier paper, we described a template bank that is based on a square lattice. Although robust, we showed that the square placement is overefficient, with the implication that it is computationally more demanding than required. In this paper, we present a template bank based on an hexagonal lattice, which size is reduced by 40% with respect to the proposed square placement. We describe the practical aspects of the hexagonal template bank implementation, its size, and computational cost. We have also performed exhaustive simulations to characterize its efficiency and safeness. We show that the bank is adequate to search for a wide variety of binary systems (primordial black holes, neutron stars, and stellar-mass black holes) and in data from both current detectors (initial LIGO, Virgo and GEO600) as well as future detectors (advanced LIGO and EGO). Remarkably, although our template bank placement uses a metric arising from a particular template family, namely, stationary phase approximation, we show that it can be used successfully with other template families (e.g., Padé resummation and effective one-body approximation). This quality of being effective for different template families makes the proposed bank suitable for a search that would use several of them in parallel (e.g., in a binary black hole search). The hexagonal template bank described in this paper is currently used to search for nonspinning inspiralling compact binaries in data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  13. Development of accurate waveform models for eccentric compact binaries with numerical relativity simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Eliu; Agarwal, Bhanu; Chua, Alvin; George, Daniel; Haas, Roland; Hinder, Ian; Kumar, Prayush; Moore, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    We recently constructed an inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveform model to describe the dynamical evolution of compact binaries on eccentric orbits, and used this model to constrain the eccentricity with which the gravitational wave transients currently detected by LIGO could be effectively recovered with banks of quasi-circular templates. We now present the second generation of this model, which is calibrated using a large catalog of eccentric numerical relativity simulations. We discuss the new features of this model, and show that its enhance accuracy makes it a powerful tool to detect eccentric signals with LIGO.

  14. On the Validity of the Adiabatic Approximation in Compact Binary Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Ferrari, Valeria; Pannarale, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We use the post-Newtonian-Affine model to assess the validity of the adiabatic approximation in modeling tidal effects in the phase evolution of compact binary systems. We compute the dynamical evolution of the tidal tensor, which we estimate at the 2PN order, and of the quadrupole tensor, finding that their ratio, i.e. the tidal deformability, increases in the last phases of the inspiral. We derive the gravitational wave phase corrections due to this phenomenon and quantify how they affect gravitational wave detectability.

  15. Stability of coorbital objects around the Pluto-Charon binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarante Luiz, Andre; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2015-11-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary system is dynamical interesting with its unusual retinue of four small moons. The system is relatively full with few remaining stable locations for additional moons on uninclined, circular orbits; most of these are Trojan (Tadpole/Horseshoe) orbits (Pires et al. 2011; Porter and Stern 2015).In this work, we study the coorbital region of each moon with long time integrations taking into account the gravitational effects of the satellites Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra. We numerically simulate a sample of 10,000 test particles initially located randomly around each moon's orbit. All test particles start on nearly circular and uninclined orbits and are followed for 5,000 years. The results of our numerical simulations show stable coorbital objects - both Tadpoles and Horseshoes - for each of the small moons. Horseshoe orbits are most common at all moons, although Hydra also has a sizeable population of Tadpole orbits. We also find interesting cases where the orbits switch from L4 Tadpoles to Horseshoes and even to L5 Tadpoles. These transitioning orbits comprise less than 1% of coorbital objects at all moons, and are most common at Styx. We have also tested two different models for the system: i) Pluto and Charon as independent bodies. ii) A single central body with the combined mass of Pluto-Charon and an effective J2 coefficient. Preliminary results show only minor differences between the two models indicating that the binary does not have a strong effect on coorbital motion. We have also investigated eccentric and inclined orbits and will report on our findings.

  16. Recent achievements in the Hamiltonian treatment of the dynamics and motion of compact binaries in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Schäfer, Gerhard

    2014-01-14

    The current knowledge in the post-Newtonian (PN) dynamics and motion of non-spinning and spinning compact binaries will be presented based on the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner Hamiltonian approach to general relativity. The presentation will cover the binary dynamics with non-spinning components up to the 4PN order and for spinning binaries up to the next-to-next-to-leading order in the spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings. Radiation reaction will be treated for both non-spinning and spinning binaries. Explicit analytic expressions for the motion will be given, innermost stable circular orbits will be discussed.

  17. Conformally non-flat spacetime representing dense compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ksh. Newton; Bhar, Piyali; Rahaman, Farook; Pant, Neeraj; Rahaman, Mansur

    2017-06-01

    A new conformally non-flat interior spacetime embedded in five-dimensional (5D) pseudo Euclidean space is explored in this paper. We proceed our calculation with the assumption of spherically symmetric anisotropic matter distribution and Karmarkar condition (necessary condition for class one). This solution is free from geometrical singularity and well-behaved in all respects. We ansatz a new type of metric potential g11 and solve for the metric potential g00 via Karmarkar condition. Further, all the physical parameters are determined from Einstein’s field equations using the two metric potentials. All the constants of integration are determined using boundary conditions. Due to its conformally non-flat character, it can represent bounded configurations. Therefore, we have used it to model two compact stars Vela X-1 and Cyg X-2. Indeed, the obtained masses and radii of these two objects from our solution are well matched with those observed values given in [T. Gangopadhyay et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 431, 3216 (2013)] and [J. Casares et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 401, 2517 (2010)]. The equilibrium of the models is investigated from generalized TOV-equation. We have adopted [L. Herrera’s, Phys. Lett. A 165, 206 (1992)] method and static stability criterion of Harisson-Zeldovich-Novikov [B. K. Harrison et al., Gravitational Theory and Gravitational Collapse (University of Chicago Press, 1965); Ya. B. Zeldovich and I. D. Novikov, Relativistic Astrophysics, Vol. 1, Stars and Relativity (University of Chicago Press, 1971)] to analyze the stability of the models.

  18. Topics in the Detection of Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Shasvath Jagat

    Orbiting compact binaries - such as binary black holes, binary neutron stars and neutron star-black hole binaries - are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves observable by ground-based interferometric detectors. Despite numerous sophisticated engineering techniques, the gravitational wave signals will be buried deep within noise generated by various instrumental and environmental processes, and need to be extracted via a signal processing technique referred to as matched filtering. Matched filtering requires large banks of signal templates that are faithful representations of the true gravitational waveforms produced by astrophysical binaries. The accurate and efficient production of templates is thus crucial to the success of signal processing and data analysis. To that end, the dissertation presents a numerical technique that calibrates existing analytical (Post-Newtonian) waveforms, which are relatively inexpensive, to more accurate fiducial waveforms that are computationally expensive to generate. The resulting waveform family is significantly more accurate than the analytical waveforms, without incurring additional computational costs of production. Certain kinds of transient background noise artefacts, called "glitches'', can masquerade as gravitational wave signals for short durations and throw-off the matched-filter algorithm. Identifying glitches from true gravitational wave signals is a highly non-trivial exercise in data analysis which has been attempted with varying degrees of success. We present here a machine-learning based approach that exploits the various attributes of glitches and signals within detector data to provide a classification scheme that is a significant improvement over previous methods. The dissertation concludes by investigating the possibility of detecting a non-linear DC imprint, called the Christodoulou memory, produced in the arms of ground-based interferometers by the recently detected gravitational waves. The

  19. Evolution of Compact Binary Populations in Globular Clusters: A Boltzmann Study. II. Introducing Stochasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Ghosh, Pranab

    2008-06-01

    We continue the exploration that we began in Paper I of using the Boltzmann scheme to study the evolution of compact binary populations of globular clusters, introducing in this paper our method of handling the stochasticity inherent in the dynamical processes of binary formation, destruction, and hardening in globular clusters. We describe these stochastic processes as "Wiener processes," whereupon the Boltzmann equation becomes a stochastic partial differential equation, the solution of which involves the use of "Itō calculus" (this use being the first, to our knowledge, in this subject), in addition to ordinary calculus. As in Paper I, we focus on the evolution of (1) the number of X-ray binaries NXB in globular clusters and (2) the orbital period distribution of these binaries. We show that, although the details of the fluctuations in the above quantities differ from one "realization" to another of the stochastic processes, the general trends follow those found in the continuous-limit study of Paper I, and the average result over many such realizations is very close to the continuous-limit result. We investigate the dependence of NXB found by these calculations on two essential globular cluster properties, namely, the star-star and star-binary encounter rate parameters Γ and γ, for which we coined the name "Verbunt parameters" in Paper I. We compare our computed results with those from Chandra observations of Galactic globular clusters, showing that the expected scalings of NXB with the Verbunt parameters are in good agreement with those observed. We indicate additional features that can be incorporated into the scheme in the future, as well as how more elaborate problems can be tackled.

  20. Compact binary systems in scalar-tensor gravity. II. Tensor gravitational waves to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan N.

    2014-04-01

    We derive the tensor gravitational waveform generated by a binary of nonspinning compact objects (black holes or neutron stars) in a general class of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The waveform is accurate to second post-Newtonian order beyond the leading order quadrupole approximation. We use the direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations formalism, appropriately adapted to scalar-tensor theories, along with previous results for the equations of motion in these theories. The self-gravity of the compact objects is treated with an approach developed by Eardley. The scalar field causes deviations from the general relativistic waveform that depend only on a small number of parameters. Among the effects of the scalar field are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. One of these, a dipole-dipole coupling, produces a zero-frequency "gravitational-wave memory" equivalent to the Christodoulou memory of general relativity. In the special case of two black holes, the waveform reduces to the general relativistic waveform. For a mixed (black hole-neutron star) system, the waveform is identical to that of Einstein's theory to first post-Newtonian order, with deviations at higher order depending only on a single parameter. The behavior in these cases matches that found for the equations of motion.

  1. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. Hence, by the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays need not reflect the true variation of the mass supply rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale t_{{visc}} also to spread around a mean value. In high mass X-ray binaries, which are thought to be primarily wind-fed, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller and thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the low mass X-ray binaries which are primarily fed by Roche lobe overflow. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a detailed knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales, such as when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term All Sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift satellites by different methods to look for such smearing effects and to infer what these results can tell us about the viscous processes inside the respective disks. We employ three different methods to seek imprints of periodicity on the X-ray variation and found that in all the cases, the location of the peak in the power density spectra is consistent with the orbital frequencies. Interestingly, in high mass X-ray binaries the peaks are sharp with high rms values, consistent with a small Keplerian disk in a wind fed system. However, in low mass X-ray binaries with larger Keplerian disk component, the peaks are spreaded out with much lower rms values. X-ray reflections, or superhump phenomena which may also cause such X-ray modulations would not be affected by the size of

  2. Matched filtering of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries: Computational cost and template placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Benjamin J.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    1999-07-01

    We estimate the number of templates, computational power, and storage required for a one-step matched filtering search for gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries. Our estimates for the one-step search strategy should serve as benchmarks for the evaluation of more sophisticated strategies such as hierarchical searches. We use a discrete family of two-parameter wave form templates based on the second post-Newtonian approximation for binaries composed of nonspinning compact bodies in circular orbits. We present estimates for all of the large- and mid-scale interferometers now under construction: LIGO (three configurations), VIRGO, GEO600, and TAMA. To search for binaries with components more massive than mmin=0.2Msolar while losing no more than 10% of events due to coarseness of template spacing, the initial LIGO interferometers will require about 1.0×1011 flops (floating point operations per second) for data analysis to keep up with data acquisition. This is several times higher than estimated in previous work by Owen, in part because of the improved family of templates and in part because we use more realistic (higher) sampling rates. Enhanced LIGO, GEO600, and TAMA will require computational power similar to initial LIGO. Advanced LIGO will require 7.8×1011 flops, and VIRGO will require 4.8×1012 flops to take full advantage of its broad target noise spectrum. If the templates are stored rather than generated as needed, storage requirements range from 1.5×1011 real numbers for TAMA to 6.2×1014 for VIRGO. The computational power required scales roughly as m-8/3min and the storage as m-13/3min. Since these scalings are perturbed by the curvature of the parameter space at second post-Newtonian order, we also provide estimates for a search with mmin=1Msolar. Finally, we sketch and discuss an algorithm for placing the templates in the parameter space.

  3. Frequency-domain reduced order models for gravitational waves from aligned-spin compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pürrer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Black-hole binary coalescences are one of the most promising sources for the first detection of gravitational waves. Fast and accurate theoretical models of the gravitational radiation emitted from these coalescences are highly important for the detection and extraction of physical parameters. Spinning effective-one-body models for binaries with aligned-spins have been shown to be highly faithful, but are slow to generate and thus have not yet been used for parameter estimation (PE) studies. I provide a frequency-domain singular value decomposition-based surrogate reduced order model that is thousands of times faster for typical system masses and has a faithfulness mismatch of better than ˜0.1% with the original SEOBNRv1 model for advanced LIGO detectors. This model enables PE studies up to signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 20 and even up to 50 for total masses below 50 {{M}⊙ }. This paper discusses various choices for approximations and interpolation over the parameter space that can be made for reduced order models of spinning compact binaries, provides a detailed discussion of errors arising in the construction and assesses the fidelity of such models.

  4. Electromagnetic power of merging and collapsing compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    Understanding possible electromagnetic signatures of merging and collapsing compact objects is important for identifying possible sources of the LIGO signal. Electromagnetic emission can be produced as a precursor to the merger, as a prompt emission during the collapse of a neutron star and at the spin-down stage of the resulting Kerr-Newman black hole. For the neutron star-neutron star mergers, the precursor power scales as L≈BNS2GMNSRNS8/(Rorb7c), while for the neutron star-black hole mergers, it is (GM/(c2RNS))2 times smaller. We demonstrate that the time evolution of the axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields can be expressed in terms of the hyperbolic Grad-Shafranov equation, and we formulate the generalization of Ferraro’s law of isorotation to time-dependent angular velocity. We find an exact nonlinear time-dependent Michel-type (split-monopole) structure of magnetospheres driven by spinning and collapsing neutron stars in Schwarzschild geometry. Based on this solution, we argue that the collapse of a neutron star into a black hole happens smoothly, without the natural formation of current sheets or other dissipative structures on the open field lines; thus, it does not allow the magnetic field to become disconnected from the star and escape to infinity. Therefore, as long as an isolated Kerr black hole can produce plasma and currents, it does not lose its open magnetic field lines. Its magnetospheric structure evolves towards a split monopole, and the black hole spins down electromagnetically (the closed field lines get absorbed by the hole). The “no-hair theorem,” which assumes that the outside medium is a vacuum, is not applicable in this case: highly conducting plasma introduces a topological constraint forbidding the disconnection of the magnetic field lines from the black hole. Eventually, a single random large scale spontaneous reconnection event will lead to magnetic field release, shutting down the electromagnetic black hole engine forever

  5. EUV spectroscopy in astrophysics: The role of compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, K. S.; Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Barstow, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    depth limitations, the EUV is instead a gold mine of information bearing upon key issues in compact objects, but it is information that must be won through the triple combination of high-spectral resolution, large area, and application of advanced theory.

  6. Post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational-wave memory for quasicircular, inspiralling compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Favata, Marc

    2009-07-15

    The Christodoulou memory is a nonlinear contribution to the gravitational-wave field that is sourced by the gravitational-wave stress-energy tensor. For quasicircular, inspiralling binaries, the Christodoulou memory produces a growing, nonoscillatory change in the gravitational-wave 'plus' polarization, resulting in the permanent displacement of a pair of freely-falling test masses after the wave has passed. In addition to its nonoscillatory behavior, the Christodoulou memory is interesting because even though it originates from 2.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order multipole interactions, it affects the waveform at leading (Newtonian/quadrupole) order. The memory is also potentially detectable in binary black-hole mergers. While the oscillatory pieces of the gravitational-wave polarizations for quasicircular, inspiralling compact binaries have been computed to 3PN order, the memory contribution to the polarizations has only been calculated to leading order (the next-to-leading order 0.5PN term has previously been shown to vanish). Here the calculation of the memory for quasicircular, inspiralling binaries is extended to 3PN order. While the angular dependence of the memory remains qualitatively unchanged, the PN correction terms tend to reduce the memory's magnitude. Explicit expressions are given for the memory contributions to the plus polarization and the spin-weighted spherical-harmonic modes of the metric and curvature perturbations. Combined with the recent results of Blanchet et al.[Classical Quantum Gravity 25, 165003 (2008)], this completes the waveform polarizations to 3PN order. This paper also discusses: (i) the difficulties in extracting the memory from numerical relativity simulations, (ii) other nonoscillatory effects that enter the waveform polarizations at high PN orders, and (iii) issues concerning the observability of the memory in gravitational-wave detectors.

  7. Improving the efficiency of the detection of gravitational wave signals from inspiraling compact binaries: Chebyshev interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Dhurandhar, S.V.; Finn, L.S.

    2005-11-15

    Inspiraling compact-object binary systems are promising gravitational wave sources for ground and space-based detectors. The time-dependent signature of these sources is a well-characterized function of a relatively small number of parameters; thus, the favored analysis technique makes use of matched filtering and maximum likelihood methods. As the parameters that characterize the source model vary, so do the templates against which the detector data are compared in the matched filter. For small variations in the parameters, the filter responses are closely correlated. Current analysis methodology samples a bank of filters whose parameter values are chosen so that the correlation between successive samples from successive filters in the bank is 97%. Correspondingly, the additional information available with each successive template evaluation is, in a real sense, only 3% of that already provided by the nearby templates. The reason for such a dense coverage of parameter space is to minimize the chance that a real signal, near the detection threshold, will be missed by the parameter space sampling. Here we investigate the use of Chebyshev interpolation for reducing the number of templates that must be evaluated to obtain the same analysis sensitivity. Additionally, rather than focus on the 'loss' of signal-to-noise associated with the finite number of filters in the template bank, we evaluate the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) as a measure of the effectiveness of an analysis technique. The ROC relates the false alarm probability to the false dismissal probability of an analysis, which are the quantities that bear most directly on the effectiveness of an analysis scheme. As a demonstration, we compare the present 'dense sampling' analysis methodology with the 'interpolation' methodology using Chebyshev polynomials, restricted to one dimension of the multidimensional analysis problem by plotting the ROC curves. We find that the interpolated search can be

  8. Compaction, cratering and collision frequency on chondritic parent objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, M. G.; Beitz, E.; Blum, J.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the compaction of an asteroid with radius 100 km due to an impact with a small asteroid for impact velocities between 3 and 5 km s. The crater formed on the target surface as a result of such an impact is calculated. The number of impacts on the target with the distribution of small asteroids during the age of the Solar System is computed.

  9. Evolution of photon and particle spectra in compact, luminous objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilek, Jean A.; Caroff, Lawrence J.; Noerdlinger, Peter D.

    1988-01-01

    The physics of high energy photons and particles (especially electrons and positrons) in the compact, high-energy-density of galactic nuclei and quasars was investigated. A numerical code was developed which follows the nonlinear spectral evolution of a pair/photon plasma, due to two-body scattering and interaction process, in an unmagnetized system. The code was applied both to static plasmas and to relativistic expanding winds.

  10. Double Compact Objects. I. The Significance of the Common Envelope on Merger Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Berti, Emanuele; Bulik, Tomasz; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The last decade of observational and theoretical developments in stellar and binary evolution provides an opportunity to incorporate major improvements to the predictions from population synthesis models. We compute the Galactic merger rates for NS-NS, BH-NS, and BH-BH mergers with the StarTrack code. The most important revisions include updated wind mass-loss rates (allowing for stellar-mass black holes up to 80 M ⊙), a realistic treatment of the common envelope phase (a process that can affect merger rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude), and a qualitatively new neutron star/black hole mass distribution (consistent with the observed "mass gap"). Our findings include the following. (1) The binding energy of the envelope plays a pivotal role in determining whether a binary merges within a Hubble time. (2) Our description of natal kicks from supernovae plays an important role, especially for the formation of BH-BH systems. (3) The masses of BH-BH systems can be substantially increased in the case of low metallicities or weak winds. (4) Certain combinations of parameters underpredict the Galactic NS-NS merger rate and can be ruled out. (5) Models incorporating delayed supernovae do not agree with the observed NS/BH "mass gap," in accordance with our previous work. This is the first in a series of three papers. The second paper will study the merger rates of double compact objects as a function of redshift, star formation rate, and metallicity. In the third paper, we will present the detection rates for gravitational-wave observatories, using up-to-date signal waveforms and sensitivity curves.

  11. DOUBLE COMPACT OBJECTS. I. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE COMMON ENVELOPE ON MERGER RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Fryer, Christopher; Holz, Daniel E.; Berti, Emanuele; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The last decade of observational and theoretical developments in stellar and binary evolution provides an opportunity to incorporate major improvements to the predictions from population synthesis models. We compute the Galactic merger rates for NS-NS, BH-NS, and BH-BH mergers with the StarTrack code. The most important revisions include updated wind mass-loss rates (allowing for stellar-mass black holes up to 80 M {sub Sun }), a realistic treatment of the common envelope phase (a process that can affect merger rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude), and a qualitatively new neutron star/black hole mass distribution (consistent with the observed {sup m}ass gap{sup )}. Our findings include the following. (1) The binding energy of the envelope plays a pivotal role in determining whether a binary merges within a Hubble time. (2) Our description of natal kicks from supernovae plays an important role, especially for the formation of BH-BH systems. (3) The masses of BH-BH systems can be substantially increased in the case of low metallicities or weak winds. (4) Certain combinations of parameters underpredict the Galactic NS-NS merger rate and can be ruled out. (5) Models incorporating delayed supernovae do not agree with the observed NS/BH 'mass gap', in accordance with our previous work. This is the first in a series of three papers. The second paper will study the merger rates of double compact objects as a function of redshift, star formation rate, and metallicity. In the third paper, we will present the detection rates for gravitational-wave observatories, using up-to-date signal waveforms and sensitivity curves.

  12. UNDERSTANDING COMPACT OBJECT FORMATION AND NATAL KICKS. III. THE CASE OF CYGNUS X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-03-10

    In recent years, accurate observational constraints have become available for an increasing number of Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs). Together with proper-motion measurements, we could reconstruct the full evolutionary history of XRBs back to the time of compact object formation. In this paper, we present the first study of the persistent X-ray source Cygnus X-1 that takes into account all available observational constraints. Our analysis accounts for three evolutionary phases: orbital evolution and motion through the Galactic potential after the formation of a black hole (BH), and binary orbital dynamics at the time of core collapse. We find that the mass of the BH immediate progenitor is 15.0-20.0 M{sub Sun }, and at the time of core collapse, the BH has potentially received a small kick velocity of {<=}77 km s{sup -1} at 95% confidence. If the BH progenitor mass is less than {approx}17 M{sub Sun }, a non-zero natal kick velocity is required to explain the currently observed properties of Cygnus X-1. Since the BH has only accreted mass from its companion's stellar wind, the negligible amount of accreted mass does not explain the observationally inferred BH spin of a{sub *} > 0.95, and the origin of this extreme BH spin must be connected to the BH formation itself. Right after the BH formation, we find that the BH companion is a 19.8-22.6 M{sub Sun} main-sequence star, orbiting the BH at a period of 4.7-5.2 days. Furthermore, recent observations show that the BH companion is currently super-synchronized. This super-synchronism indicates that the strength of tides exerted on the BH companion should be weaker by a factor of at least two compared to the usually adopted strength.

  13. Low-latency analysis pipeline for compact binary coalescences in the advanced gravitational wave detector era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Buskulic, D.; Germain, V.; Guidi, G. M.; Marion, F.; Montani, M.; Mours, B.; Piergiovanni, F.; Wang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-band template analysis (MBTA) pipeline is a low-latency coincident analysis pipeline for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. MBTA runs with a low computational cost, and can identify candidate GW events online with a sub-minute latency. The low computational running cost of MBTA also makes it useful for data quality studies. Events detected by MBTA online can be used to alert astronomical partners for electromagnetic follow-up. We outline the current status of MBTA and give details of recent pipeline upgrades and validation tests that were performed in preparation for the first advanced detector observing period. The MBTA pipeline is ready for the outset of the advanced detector era and the exciting prospects it will bring.

  14. Coherent compact binary coalescence searches for external triggers with large sky-position errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Bose, Sukanta

    2011-04-01

    Short hard gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are conjectured to have compact binary coalescences (CBCs) as progenitors. Therefore, SGRBs provide external triggers for searching signals from CBCs in gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Whereas for many SGRBs the sky-position is determined by the electromagnetic detections with high accuracy, for some others it can be off by several degrees. Here we develop a method for coherently searching a patch of the sky, several degrees wide, for CBC signals in multiple baselines of GW detectors. We compare its performance in Gaussian noise with that of an all-sky (or "blind") search and a targeted search and show where it can perform better than the latter two.

  15. Dynamics of High-Order Spin-Orbit Couplings about Linear Momenta in Compact Binary Systems*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li; Wu, Xin; Mei, Li-Jie; Huang, Guo-Qing

    2017-09-01

    This paper relates to the post-Newtonian Hamiltonian dynamics of spinning compact binaries, consisting of the Newtonian Kepler problem and the leading, next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading order spin-orbit couplings as linear functions of spins and momenta. When this Hamiltonian form is transformed to a Lagrangian form, besides the terms corresponding to the same order terms in the Hamiltonian, several additional terms, third post-Newtonian (3PN), 4PN, 5PN, 6PN and 7PN order spin-spin coupling terms, yield in the Lagrangian. That means that the Hamiltonian is nonequivalent to the Lagrangian at the same PN order but is exactly equivalent to the full Lagrangian without any truncations. The full Lagrangian without the spin-spin couplings truncated is integrable and regular. Whereas it is non-integrable and becomes possibly chaotic when any one of the spin-spin terms is dropped. These results are also supported numerically.

  16. Onset of superradiant instabilities in rotating spacetimes of exotic compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-06-01

    Exotic compact objects, horizonless spacetimes with reflective properties, have intriguingly been suggested by some quantum-gravity models as alternatives to classical black-hole spacetimes. A remarkable feature of spinning horizonless compact objects with reflective boundary conditions is the existence of a discrete set of critical surface radii, { r c( ā; n)} n = 1 n = ∞ , which can support spatially regular static ( marginally-stable) scalar field configurations (here ā≡ J/ M 2 is the dimensionless angular momentum of the exotic compact object). Interestingly, the outermost critical radius r c max ≡ max n { r c( ā; n)} marks the boundary between stable and unstable exotic compact objects: spinning objects whose reflecting surfaces are situated in the region r c > r c max ( ā) are stable, whereas spinning objects whose reflecting surfaces are situated in the region r c < r c max ( ā) are superradiantly unstable to scalar perturbation modes. In the present paper we use analytical techniques in order to explore the physical properties of the critical (marginally-stable) spinning exotic compact objects. In particular, we derive a remarkably compact analytical formula for the discrete spectrum { r c max ( ā)} of critical radii which characterize the marginally-stable exotic compact objects. We explicitly demonstrate that the analytically derived resonance spectrum agrees remarkably well with numerical results that recently appeared in the physics literature.

  17. Hybrid geometric-random template-placement algorithm for gravitational wave searches from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Soumen; Sengupta, Anand S.; Thakor, Nilay

    2017-05-01

    Astrophysical compact binary systems consisting of neutron stars and black holes are an important class of gravitational wave (GW) sources for advanced LIGO detectors. Accurate theoretical waveform models from the inspiral, merger, and ringdown phases of such systems are used to filter detector data under the template-based matched-filtering paradigm. An efficient grid over the parameter space at a fixed minimal match has a direct impact on the overall time taken by these searches. We present a new hybrid geometric-random template placement algorithm for signals described by parameters of two masses and one spin magnitude. Such template banks could potentially be used in GW searches from binary neutron stars and neutron star-black hole systems. The template placement is robust and is able to automatically accommodate curvature and boundary effects with no fine-tuning. We also compare these banks against vanilla stochastic template banks and show that while both are equally efficient in the fitting-factor sense, the bank sizes are ˜25 % larger in the stochastic method. Further, we show that the generation of the proposed hybrid banks can be sped up by nearly an order of magnitude over the stochastic bank. Generic issues related to optimal implementation are discussed in detail. These improvements are expected to directly reduce the computational cost of gravitational wave searches.

  18. Hereditary effects in eccentric compact binary inspirals to third post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutrel, Nicholas; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-02-01

    While there has been much success in understanding the orbital dynamics and gravitational wave emission of eccentric compact binaries in the post-Newtonian formalism, some problems still remain. The largest of these concerns hereditary effects: non-linear phenomena related to the scattering off of the background curved spacetime (tails) and to the generation of gravitational waves by gravitational waves (memory). Currently, these hereditary effects are only known numerically for arbitrary eccentricity through infinite sums of Bessel functions, with closed-form, analytic results only available in the small eccentricity limit. We here calculate, for the first time, closed-form, analytic expressions for all hereditary effects to third post-Newtonian order in binaries with arbitrary eccentricity. For the tails, we first asymptotically expand all Bessel functions in high eccentricity and find a superasymptotic series for each enhancement factor, accurate to better than 10‑3 relative to post-Newtonian numerical calculations at all eccentricities. We further improve the small-eccentricity behavior of the superasymptotic series by generating hyperasymptotic expressions for each enhancement factor, typically accurate to better than 10‑8 at all eccentricities. For the memory, we discuss its computation within the context of an osculating approximation of the binary’s orbit and the difficulties that arise. Our closed-form analytic expressions for the hereditary fluxes allow us to numerically compute orbital phases that are identical to those found using an infinite sum of Bessel functions to double numerical precision.

  19. Deriving analytic solutions for compact binary inspirals without recourse to adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2017-05-01

    We utilize the dynamical renormalization group formalism to calculate the real space trajectory of a compact binary inspiral for long times via a systematic resummation of secularly growing terms. This method generates closed form solutions without orbit averaging, and the accuracy can be systematically improved. The expansion parameter is v5ν Ω (t -t0) where t0 is the initial time, t is the time elapsed, and Ω and v are the angular orbital frequency and initial speed, respectively. ν is the binary's symmetric mass ratio. We demonstrate how to apply the renormalization group method to resum solutions beyond leading order in two ways. First, we calculate the second-order corrections of the leading radiation reaction force, which involves highly nontrivial checks of the formalism (i.e., its renormalizability). Second, we show how to systematically include post-Newtonian corrections to the radiation reaction force. By avoiding orbit averaging, we gain predictive power and eliminate ambiguities in the initial conditions. Finally, we discuss how this methodology can be used to find analytic solutions to the spin equations of motion that are valid over long times.

  20. Compact Binary Inspiral and the Science Potential of Third-Generation Ground-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, Chris; Sengupta, Anand S.

    2008-09-01

    We consider EGO as a possible third-generation ground-based gravitational wave detector and evaluate its capabilities for the detection and interpretation of compact binary inspiral signals. We identify areas of astrophysics and cosmology where EGO would have qualitative advantages, using Advanced LIGO as a benchmark for comparison.

  1. Search for gravitational waves from low mass compact binary coalescence in 186 days of LIGO's fifth science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Behnke, B.; Benacquista, M.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Brunet, G.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Cardenas, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Daudert, B.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dueck, J.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Edgar, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Ely, G.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Faltas, Y.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Isogai, T.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, H.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonor, I.; Li, C.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McKenzie, K.; Mehmet, M.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moreno, G.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Muhammad, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Dell, J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perraca, A.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Punken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raics, Z.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Scanlan, M.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stein, A.; Stein, L. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Ugolini, D.; Ulmen, J.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Veltkamp, C.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, R. L.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2009-08-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries, of total mass between 2 and 35M⊙, using LIGO observations between November 14, 2006 and May 18, 2007. No gravitational-wave signals were detected. We report upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence as a function of total mass. The LIGO cumulative 90%-confidence rate upper limits of the binary coalescence of neutron stars, black holes and black hole-neutron star systems are 1.4×10-2, 7.3×10-4 and 3.6×10-3yr-1L10-1, respectively, where L10 is 1010 times the blue solar luminosity.

  2. Compact objects at the heart of outflows in large and small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Paul Harrison

    2013-12-01

    This thesis focuses on studying and assessing high-energy feedback generated by both stellar mass and supermassive compact objects. From these two perspectives, I help bridge the gap in understanding how jets and winds can transform their much larger environments in thousands to millions of years, astronomically short timescales. I have acquired X-ray and optical data that aim to elucidate the role these objects play in powering parsec-scale shockwaves in the ISM and in driving kiloparsec-scale outflows in galaxies. I present Chandra X-ray imaging, Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and WIYN Hydra multi-object optical spectroscopic observations. The data reveal the morphologies of the systems and constrain on a range of interesting parameters: power, outflow velocity, density, accretion efficiency, and timescale. My analysis provides perspective on the importance of black holes, both large and small, and neutron stars for driving outflows into the interstellar and intergalactic medium. On kiloparsec scales, I explore the nature of what appear to be merging or recently merging post-starburst galaxies with very high-velocity winds. This work is part of a multiwavelength effort to characterize the niche these galaxies fill in the larger scheme of galaxy evolution. My focus is on the accretion activity of the coalescing supermassive black holes in their cores. This work leads us to compare the relative importance of a massive starburst to the supermassive black holes in the cores of the galaxies. On parsec scales, I present case studies of two prominent microquasars, Galactic X-ray binaries with jets, Circinus X-1 and Cygnus X-1. In the case of Circinus X-1, I present very deep follow-up observations of parsec-scale shock plumes driven by a powerful, bipolar jet. In the case of Cygnus X-1, I present follow-up observations to probe a recently discovered outflow near the binary. I calculate robust, physically motivated limits on the total power needed to drive the outflows

  3. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madau, Piero; Fragos, Tassos

    2017-05-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior to and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z ≲ 4. Together with an updated empirical determination of the cosmic history of star formation, recent modeling of the stellar mass-metallicity relation, and a scheme for absorption by the IGM that accounts for the presence of ionized H ii bubbles during the epoch of reionization, our detailed calculations provide refined predictions of the X-ray volume emissivity and filtered radiation background from “normal” galaxies at z ≳ 6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. Because of the energy dependence of photoabsorption, soft X-ray photons are produced by local sources, while more energetic radiation arrives unattenuated from larger cosmological volumes. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct He i photoionizations are the main source of IGM heating, and the temperature of the largely neutral medium in between H ii cavities increases above the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) only at z ≲ 10, when the volume filling factor of H ii bubbles is already ≳0.1. Therefore, in this scenario, it is only at relatively late epochs that neutral intergalactic hydrogen

  4. Hierarchical Search Strategy for Detecting Gravitational waves from Inspiraling Compact Binaries with Multiple Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seader, Shawn; Bose, Sukanta

    2004-05-01

    Perhaps the most promising gravitational-wave source for detection with Earth-based interferometers is the compact binary system, such as a binary neutron star. For these sources, the inspiral waveform is well-known in the sensitive frequency band of the interferometers. This allows one to match-filter the output of the interferometer with many different templates of the pre-calculated waveforms. While operating, each interferometer takes strain data at a rate of several gigabytes per day. Matched filtering the outputs from multiple detectors, such as in a multi-detector coherent search, becomes very demanding computationally not only due to the enormous amount of data, but also due to the size of the parameter space that is accessible to a network of detectors. Indeed, the non-spinning binary waveform depends on a total of nine parameters, namely, the luminosity distance to the source, the time of arrival, the initial phase, the orbital inclination, the polarization angle, the two sky-position angles, and the two binary masses. Fortunately, it is possible to maximize a network's matched-filter output analytically over the first five parameters. Thus, a GW astronomer need search numerically only over a four-dimensional parameter space for a signal in the data. A "brute force" implementation of such a search is still not practicable. A promising strategy to make the search computationally viable is to perform it in multiple relatively inexpensive steps, i.e., implement it hierarchically. In a two-step hierarchical search, the data is filtered first with a bank of templates that are spaced coarsely on the parameter space. If any of these templates find a signal at or above a pre-set threshold on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), then that part of the data is filtered a second time with a more finely spaced bank of templates, centered around the filter that recorded the high SNR in the first, coarse bank. In this work we show how by setting the detection thresholds and

  5. The fate of fallback matter around newly Born compact objects

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, Rosalba; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Cantiello, Matteo

    2014-02-01

    The presence of fallback disks around young neutron stars (NSs) has been invoked over the years to explain a large variety of phenomena. Here we perform a numerical investigation of the formation of such disks during a supernova (SN) explosion, considering both NS and black hole (BH) remnants. Using the public code MESA, we compute the angular momentum distribution of the pre-SN material, for stars with initial masses M in the range 13-40 M {sub ☉}, initial surface rotational velocities v {sub surf} between 25% and 75% of the critical velocity, and for metallicities Z of 1%, 10%, and 100% of the solar value. These pre-SN models are exploded with energies E varying between 10{sup 50}-3 × 10{sup 52} erg, and the amount of fallback material is computed. We find that, if magnetic torques play an important role in angular momentum transport, then fallback disks around NSs, even for low-metallicity main-sequence stars, are not an outcome of SN explosions. Formation of such disks around young NSs can only happen under the condition of negligible magnetic torques and a fine-tuned explosion energy. For those stars that leave behind BH remnants, disk formation is ubiquitous if magnetic fields do not play a strong role; however, unlike the NS case, even with strong magnetic coupling in the interior, a disk can form in a large region of the Z, M, v {sub surf}, E parameter space. Together with the compact, hyperaccreting fallback disks widely discussed in the literature, we identify regions in the above parameter space that lead to extended, long-lived disks around BHs. We find that the physical conditions in these disks may be conducive to planet formation, hence leading to the possible existence of planets orbiting BHs.

  6. Performance of particle swarm optimization on the fully-coherent all-sky search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerathunga, Thilina S.; Mohanty, Soumya D.

    2017-06-01

    Fully coherent all-sky search for gravitational wave (GW) signals from the coalescence of compact object binaries is a computationally expensive task. Approximations, such as semicoherent coincidence searches, are currently used to circumvent the computational barrier with a concomitant loss in sensitivity. We explore the effectiveness of particle swarm optimization (PSO) in addressing this problem. Our results, using a simulated network of detectors with initial LIGO design sensitivities and a realistic signal strength, show that PSO can successfully deliver a fully coherent all-sky search with <1 /10 the number of likelihood evaluations needed for a grid-based search.

  7. Search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence in LIGO and Virgo data from S5 and VSR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballinger, T.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belletoile, A.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; de Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Ely, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh–Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Mak, C.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Pardi, S.; Pareja, M.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Tseng, K.; Turner, L.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report the results of the first search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence using data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo detectors. Five months of data were collected during the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory’s S5 and Virgo’s VSR1 science runs. The search focused on signals from binary mergers with a total mass between 2 and 35M⊙. No gravitational waves are identified. The cumulative 90%-confidence upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence are calculated for nonspinning binary neutron stars, black hole-neutron star systems, and binary black holes to be 8.7×10-3yr-1L10-1, 2.2×10-3yr-1L10-1, and 4.4×10-4yr-1L10-1, respectively, where L10 is 1010 times the blue solar luminosity. These upper limits are compared with astrophysical expectations.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Predictions for the rates of compact binary coalescences observable by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, K.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Blomberg, A.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J. P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mackowski, J. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Mak, C.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Pardi, S.; Pareja, M.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabaste, O.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rogstad, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Trummer, J.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the initial and advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 Myr-1 per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 Myr-1 MWEG-1 to 1000 Myr-1 MWEG-1 (Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 601 L179; Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 614 L137 (erratum)). We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial LIGO-Virgo interferometers, with a plausible range between 2 × 10-4 and 0.2 per year. The likely binary neutron-star detection rate for the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network increases to 40 events per year, with a range between 0.4 and 400 per year.

  9. Search for Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO and Virgo Data from S5 and VSR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of the first search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence using data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. Five months of data were collected during the concurrent S5 (UGO) and VSRI (Virgo) science runs. The search focused on signals from binary mergers with a total mass between 2 and 35 Solar Mass. No gravitational waves are identified. The cumulative 90%-confidence upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence are calculated for non-spinning binary neutron stars, black hole-neutron star systems, and binary black holes to be 8.7 x 10(exp -3) / yr-1/L(sub 10) 2.2 x 10-3 yr-1L101, and 4.4 x 10(exp -4)3) / yr-1/L(sub 10) respectively, where L (sub 10) is 10(exp 10) times the blue solar luminosity. These upper limits are compared with astrophysical expectations.

  10. Compact and extended objects from self-interacting phantom fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Makhmudov, Arislan; Urazalina, Ainur; Singleton, Douglas; Scott, John

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate localized and extended objects for gravitating, self-interacting phantom fields. The phantom fields come from two scalar fields with a "wrong-sign" (negative) kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian. This study covers several solutions supported by these phantom fields: phantom balls, traversable wormholes, phantom cosmic strings, and "phantom" domain walls. These four systems are solved numerically, and we try to draw out general, interesting features in each case.

  11. Extremely red compact radio sources - The empty field objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C. A.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Wootten, H. A.; Pravdo, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation of 10 microns has been detected from 1413+135, one of the very red objects discovered by Rieke, Lebofsky, and Kinman (1979) at near-infrared wavelengths. The spectrum of this object flattens at wavelengths longer than 2.2 microns. Upper limits are also given for the 10-micron emission from 2255+14, 0026+34, and 0406+121. Photometry between 1.25 and 2.2 microns confirms the variability of 1413+135, 2255+41, and 0406+121. Five percent resolution spectra of 1413+135 and 0406+121 between 1.5 and 2.4 microns show no emission or absorption lines. The spectral data rule out the possibility that 1413+135 is a quasar with normal line strengths and a redshift less than 1.3 and greater than 4. The lack of features of the 1.5-2.4-micron spectra, the rapid variability, and the overall shape of the radio, infrared, and X-ray energy distributions are consistent with a BL Lac nature for these objects.

  12. Exploring X-Ray Binary Populations in Compact Group Galaxies with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkić, L.; Desjardins, T. D.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We obtain total galaxy X-ray luminosities, LX, originating from individually detected point sources in a sample of 47 galaxies in 15 compact groups of galaxies (CGs). For the great majority of our galaxies, we find that the detected point sources most likely are local to their associated galaxy, and are thus extragalactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) or nuclear active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For spiral and irregular galaxies, we find that, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are either within the ±1σ scatter of the Mineo et al. LX-star formation rate (SFR) correlation or have higher LX than predicted by this correlation for their SFR. We discuss how these “excesses” may be due to low metallicities and high interaction levels. For elliptical and S0 galaxies, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are consistent with the Boroson et al. LX-stellar mass correlation for low-mass XRBs, with larger scatter, likely due to residual effects such as AGN activity or hot gas. Assuming non-nuclear sources are low- or high-mass XRBs, we use appropriate XRB luminosity functions to estimate the probability that stochastic effects can lead to such extreme LX values. We find that, although stochastic effects do not in general appear to be important, for some galaxies there is a significant probability that high LX values can be observed due to strong XRB variability.

  13. On the validity of the adiabatic approximation in compact binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pannarale, Francesco; Ferrari, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Using a semianalytical approach recently developed to model the tidal deformations of neutron stars in inspiralling compact binaries, we study the dynamical evolution of the tidal tensor, which we explicitly derive at second post-Newtonian order, and of the quadrupole tensor. Since we do not assume a priori that the quadrupole tensor is proportional to the tidal tensor, i.e., the so-called “adiabatic approximation,” our approach enables us to establish to which extent such approximation is reliable. We find that the ratio between the quadrupole and tidal tensors (i.e., the Love number) increases as the inspiral progresses, but this phenomenon only marginally affects the emitted gravitational waveform. We estimate the frequency range in which the tidal component of the gravitational signal is well described using the Stationary phase approximation at next-to-leading post-Newtonian order, comparing different contributions to the tidal phase. We also derive a semianalytical expression for the Love number, which reproduces within a few percentage points the results obtained so far by numerical integrations of the relativistic equations of stellar perturbations.

  14. Fokker action of nonspinning compact binaries at the fourth post-Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Laura; Blanchet, Luc; Bohé, Alejandro; Faye, Guillaume; Marsat, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    The Fokker action governing the motion of compact binary systems without spins is derived in harmonic coordinates at the fourth post-Newtonian approximation (4PN) of general relativity. Dimensional regularization is used for treating the local ultraviolet (UV) divergences associated with point particles, followed by a renormalization of the poles into a redefinition of the trajectories of the point masses. Effects at the 4PN order associated with wave tails propagating at infinity are included consistently at the level of the action. A finite part procedure based on analytic continuation deals with the infrared (IR) divergencies at spatial infinity, which are shown to be fully consistent with the presence of near-zone tails. Our end result at 4PN order is Lorentz invariant and has the correct self-force limit for the energy of circular orbits. However, we find that it differs from the recently published result derived within the ADM Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity [T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.064058]. More work is needed to understand this discrepancy.

  15. A Compact Binary Merger Model for the Short, Hard GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-06-15

    The first X-ray afterglow for a short ({approx}30ms), hard {gamma}-ray burst was detected by Swift on 9 May 2005 (GRB 050509b). No optical or radio counterpart was identified in follow-up observations. The tentative association of the GRB with a nearby giant elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.2248 would imply the progenitor had traveled several tens of kpc from its point of origin, in agreement with expectations linking these events to the final merger of compact binaries driven by gravitational wave emission. We model the dynamical merger of such a system and the time-dependent evolution of the accretion tori thus created. The resulting energetics, variability, and expected durations are consistent with GRB 050509b originating from the tidal disruption of a neutron star by a stellar mass black hole, or of the merger of two neutron stars followed by prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. We discuss how the available {gamma}-ray and X-ray data provides a probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the surrounding medium.

  16. Exploring X-Ray Binary Populations in Compact Group Galaxies With Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E..; Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkic, L.; Desjardins, T. D.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We obtain total galaxy X-ray luminosities, LX, originating from individually detected point sources in a sample of 47 galaxies in 15 compact groups of galaxies (CGs). For the great majority of our galaxies, we find that the detected point sources most likely are local to their associated galaxy, and are thus extragalactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) or nuclear active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For spiral and irregular galaxies, we find that, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are either within the +/-1s scatter of the Mineo et al. LX-star formation rate (SFR) correlation or have higher LX than predicted by this correlation for their SFR. We discuss how these "excesses" may be due to low metallicities and high interaction levels. For elliptical and S0 galaxies, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are consistent with the Boroson et al. LX-stellar mass correlation for low-mass XRBs, with larger scatter, likely due to residual effects such as AGN activity or hot gas. Assuming non-nuclear sources are low- or high-mass XRBs, we use appropriate XRB luminosity functions to estimate the probability that stochastic effects can lead to such extreme LX values. We find that, although stochastic effects do not in general appear to be important, for some galaxies there is a significant probability that high LX values can be observed due to strong XRB variability.

  17. Exploring X-Ray Binary Populations in Compact Group Galaxies With Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E..; Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkic, L.; Desjardins, T. D.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We obtain total galaxy X-ray luminosities, LX, originating from individually detected point sources in a sample of 47 galaxies in 15 compact groups of galaxies (CGs). For the great majority of our galaxies, we find that the detected point sources most likely are local to their associated galaxy, and are thus extragalactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) or nuclear active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For spiral and irregular galaxies, we find that, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are either within the +/-1s scatter of the Mineo et al. LX-star formation rate (SFR) correlation or have higher LX than predicted by this correlation for their SFR. We discuss how these "excesses" may be due to low metallicities and high interaction levels. For elliptical and S0 galaxies, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are consistent with the Boroson et al. LX-stellar mass correlation for low-mass XRBs, with larger scatter, likely due to residual effects such as AGN activity or hot gas. Assuming non-nuclear sources are low- or high-mass XRBs, we use appropriate XRB luminosity functions to estimate the probability that stochastic effects can lead to such extreme LX values. We find that, although stochastic effects do not in general appear to be important, for some galaxies there is a significant probability that high LX values can be observed due to strong XRB variability.

  18. Explicit Symplectic-like Integrators with Midpoint Permutations for Spinning Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Wu, Xin; Huang, Guoqing; Liu, Fuyao

    2017-01-01

    We refine the recently developed fourth-order extended phase space explicit symplectic-like methods for inseparable Hamiltonians using Yoshida’s triple product combined with a midpoint permuted map. The midpoint between the original variables and their corresponding extended variables at every integration step is readjusted as the initial values of the original variables and their corresponding extended ones at the next step integration. The triple-product construction is apparently superior to the composition of two triple products in computational efficiency. Above all, the new midpoint permutations are more effective in restraining the equality of the original variables and their corresponding extended ones at each integration step than the existing sequent permutations of momenta and coordinates. As a result, our new construction shares the benefit of implicit symplectic integrators in the conservation of the second post-Newtonian Hamiltonian of spinning compact binaries. Especially for the chaotic case, it can work well, but the existing sequent permuted algorithm cannot. When dissipative effects from the gravitational radiation reaction are included, the new symplectic-like method has a secular drift in the energy error of the dissipative system for the orbits that are regular in the absence of radiation, as an implicit symplectic integrator does. In spite of this, it is superior to the same-order implicit symplectic integrator in accuracy and efficiency. The new method is particularly useful in discussing the long-term evolution of inseparable Hamiltonian problems.

  19. Magnetar-like Activity from the Central Compact Object in the SNR RCW103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, N.; Borghese, A.; Esposito, P.; Coti Zelati, F.; Bachetti, M.; Israel, G. L.; De Luca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The 6.67 hr periodicity and the variable X-ray flux of the central compact object (CCO) at the center of the supernova remnant RCW 103, named 1E 161348-5055, have been always difficult to interpret within the standard scenarios of an isolated neutron star (NS) or a binary system. On 2016 June 22, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift detected a magnetar-like short X-ray burst from the direction of 1E 161348-5055, also coincident with a large long-term X-ray outburst. Here, we report on Chandra, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, and Swift (BAT and XRT) observations of this peculiar source during its 2016 outburst peak. In particular, we study the properties of this magnetar-like burst, we discover a hard X-ray tail in the CCO spectrum during outburst, and we study its long-term outburst history (from 1999 to 2016 July). We find the emission properties of 1E 161348-5055 consistent with it being a magnetar. However, in this scenario, the 6.67 hr periodicity can only be interpreted as the rotation period of this strongly magnetized NS, which therefore represents the slowest pulsar ever detected, by orders of magnitude. We briefly discuss the viable slow-down scenarios, favoring a picture involving a period of fall-back accretion after the supernova explosion, similarly to what is invoked (although in a different regime) to explain the “anti-magnetar” scenario for other CCOs.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cataclysmic Binaries, LMXBs, and related objects (Ritter+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2005-03-01

    Cataclysmic Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. The secondary is not necessarily unevolved, it may even be a highly evolved star as for example in the case of the AM CVn-type stars. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of either a neutron star or a black hole primary, and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. Related Objects are detached binaries consisting of either a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and of a low-mass secondary. The secondary may also be a highly evolved star. The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, stellar parameters of the components and other characteristic properties of 599 cataclysmic binaries, 81 low-mass X-ray binaries and 147 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 796 of the 827 objects, and a cross- reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 30 June 2005 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. Updated information will be provided regularly, currently every six months. Old editions include catalogue (5th edition), (6th edition) and (7th edition). (10 data files).

  1. A RAY-TRACING ALGORITHM FOR SPINNING COMPACT OBJECT SPACETIMES WITH ARBITRARY QUADRUPOLE MOMENTS. I. QUASI-KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Johannsen, Tim

    2012-01-20

    We describe a new numerical algorithm for ray tracing in the external spacetimes of spinning compact objects characterized by arbitrary quadrupole moments. Such spacetimes describe non-Kerr vacuum solutions that can be used to test the no-hair theorem in conjunction with observations of accreting black holes. They are also appropriate for neutron stars with spin frequencies in the {approx_equal} 300-600 Hz range, which are typical of the bursting sources in low-mass X-ray binaries. We use our algorithm to show that allowing for the quadrupole moment of the spacetime to take arbitrary values leads to observable effects in the profiles of relativistic broadened fluorescent iron lines from geometrically thin accretion disks.

  2. Effect of squeezing on parameter estimation of gravitational waves emitted by compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Ryan; Vitale, Salvatore; Barsotti, Lisa; Dwyer, Sheila; Evans, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    The LIGO gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin collecting data in 2015, with Virgo following shortly after. These detectors are expected to reach design sensitivity before the end of the decade, and yield the first direct detection of GWs before then. The use of squeezing has been proposed as a way to reduce the quantum noise without increasing the laser power, and has been successfully tested at one of the LIGO sites and at GEO in Germany. When used in Advanced LIGO without a filter cavity, the squeezer improves the performances of detectors above ˜100 Hz , at the cost of a higher noise floor in the low-frequency regime. Frequency-dependent squeezing, on the other hand, will lower the noise floor throughout the entire band. Squeezing technology will have a twofold impact: it will change the number of expected detections and it will impact the quality of parameter estimation for the detected signals. In this work we consider three different GW detector networks, each utilizing a different type of squeezer—all corresponding to plausible implementations. Using LALInference, a powerful Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm, we study how each of these networks estimates the parameters of GW signals emitted by compact binary systems, and compare the results with a baseline advanced LIGO-Virgo network. We find that, even in its simplest implementation, squeezing has a large positive impact: the sky error area of detected signals will shrink by ˜30 % on average, increasing the chances of finding an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW detection. Similarly, we find that the measurability of tidal deformability parameters for neutron stars in binaries increases by ˜30 % , which could aid in determining the equation of state of neutron stars. The degradation in the measurement of the chirp mass, as a result of the higher low-frequency noise, is shown to be negligible when compared to systematic errors. Implementations of a quantum squeezer coupled with a

  3. Ruling out chaos in comparable mass compact binary systems with one body spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Huang, Guoqing

    2015-09-01

    Levin (2006, Phys. Rev. D, 74, 124027) has given two contrary claims on the chaotic behaviour of a system in which only one body of comparable mass binaries spins and spin effects are restricted to the leading order spin-orbit couplings. Chaos in one set of second post-Newtonian (2PN) harmonic coordinate Lagrangian equations of motion was allowed via the fractal basin boundary method. However, in another set of 2PN Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) Hamiltonian equations of motion no chaos was confirmed with the aid of parametric solutions. Is there chaos for conservative PN Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches to the dynamics of comparable mass binaries when only one object spins? This is still an open question. A paper on canonical, conjugate spin variables (Wu and Xie, 2010, Phys. Rev. D, 81, 084045) has directly shown that these Hamiltonian approaches are integrable and non-chaotic regardless of PN orders and spin effects. In this sense, what we are required to answer is only the question of whether the Lagrangian approaches allow chaos. As recently confirmed by Wu et al. (2015, Phys. Rev. D, 91, 024042), in ADM coordinates, any one of these Lagrangian approaches at a certain order generally has an analytical mathematical equivalent Hamiltonian at an infinite order from an analytical point of view or at a certain high enough finite order from a numerical point of view. The Hamiltonian is completely canonical and has four integrals of the total energy and total angular momentum in an eight-dimensional phase space, and therefore it is typically integrable. We use this to show the absence of chaos in the Lagrangian. On the other hand, we use the method of fast Lyapunov exponents to revisit the 2PN harmonic coordinate Lagrangian dynamics with the leading-order spin-orbit coupling of one body spinning. It is found that the fractal method is not sufficient to support chaos in unstable merging binaries, even if the radiation reaction is turned off. In summary, neither the

  4. Wide-field tracking of moving objects with a compact multi-object dispersed fixed-delay interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Wan, Xiaoke; Myers, Derek; Powell, Scott

    2012-09-01

    We present a new concept for a Doppler imaging remote sensing instrument to track moving objects within a wide field of view using a compact multi-object Dispersed Fixed-Delay Interferometer (DFDI). The instrument is a combination of a Michelson type interferometer with a fixed optical delay and a medium resolution spectrograph. This takes advantage of the strength of the DFDI approach over the traditional cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph approach for high radial velocity (RV) precision measurements: multi-object capability, high throughput and a compact design. The combination of a fiber integral field unit (IFU) with a DFDI instrument allows simultaneous sampling of all of the objects within the observing field of view (FOV) to provide differential RV measurements of moving objects over background objects. Due to the three dimensional nature of the IFU spectroscopy the object location and spectral features can be simultaneously acquired. With the addition of RV signals to the measurements, this approach allows precise extraction of trajectories and spectral properties of moving objects (such as space debris and near Earth Objects (NEOs)) through sequential monitoring of moving objects. Measurement results from moving objects in a lab as well as moving cars in a field using this innovative approach are reported.

  5. ACCELERATING COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS IN TRIPLE SYSTEMS WITH THE KOZAI RESONANCE: A MECHANISM FOR 'PROMPT' TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE, GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND OTHER EXOTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2011-11-10

    White dwarf-white dwarf (WD-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers may produce Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), respectively. A general problem is how to produce binaries with semi-major axes small enough to merge in significantly less than the Hubble time (t{sub H}), and thus accommodate the observation that these events closely follow episodes of star formation. I explore the possibility that such systems are not binaries at all, but actually coeval, or dynamical formed, triple systems. The tertiary induces Kozai oscillations in the inner binary, driving it to high eccentricity, and reducing its gravitational wave (GW) merger timescale. This effect significantly increases the allowed range of binary period P such that the merger time is t{sub merge} < t{sub H}. In principle, Chandrasekhar-mass binaries with P {approx} 300 days can merge in {approx}< t{sub H} if they contain a prograde solar-mass tertiary at high enough inclination. For retrograde tertiaries, the maximum P such that t{sub merge} {approx}< t{sub H} is yet larger. In contrast, P {approx}< 0.3 days is required in the absence of a tertiary. I discuss implications of these findings for the production of transients formed via compact object binary mergers. Based on the statistics of solar-type binaries, I argue that many such binaries should be in triple systems affected by the Kozai resonance. If true, expectations for the mHz GW signal from individual sources, the diffuse background, and the foreground for GW experiments like LISA are modified. This work motivates future studies of triples systems of A, B, and O stars, and new types of searches for WD-WD binaries in triple systems.

  6. Mass bounds for compact spherically symmetric objects in generalized gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, Piyabut; Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2016-09-01

    We derive upper and lower bounds on the mass-radius ratio of stable compact objects in extended gravity theories, in which modifications of the gravitational dynamics via-á-vis standard general relativity are described by an effective contribution to the matter energy-momentum tensor. Our results include the possibility of a variable coupling between the matter sector and the gravitational field and are valid for a large class of generalized gravity models. The generalized continuity and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations are expressed in terms of the effective mass, density, and pressure, given by the bare values plus additional contributions from the total energy-momentum tensor, and general theoretical limits for the maximum and minimum mass-radius ratios are explicitly obtained. As applications of the formalism developed herein, we consider compact bosonic objects, described by scalar-tensor gravitational theories with self-interacting scalar field potentials, and charged compact objects, respectively. For Higgs-type models, we find that these bounds can be expressed in terms of the value of the potential at the surface of the compact object. Minimizing the energy with respect to the radius, we obtain explicit upper and lower bounds on the mass, which admits a Chandrasekhar-type representation. For charged compact objects, we consider the effects of the Poincaré stresses on the equilibrium structure and obtain bounds on the radial and tangential stresses. As a possible astrophysical test of our results, we obtain the general bound on the gravitational redshift for compact objects in extended gravity theories and explicitly compute the redshift restrictions for objects with nonzero effective surface pressure. General implications of minimum mass bounds for the gravitational stability of fundamental particles and for the existence of holographic duality between bulk and boundary degrees of freedom are also considered.

  7. Stationary bound-state scalar configurations supported by rapidly-spinning exotic compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-07-01

    Some quantum-gravity theories suggest that the absorbing horizon of a classical black hole should be replaced by a reflective surface which is located a microscopic distance above the would-be classical horizon. Instead of an absorbing black hole, the resulting horizonless spacetime describes a reflective exotic compact object. Motivated by this intriguing prediction, in the present paper we explore the physical properties of exotic compact objects which are linearly coupled to stationary bound-state massive scalar field configurations. In particular, solving the Klein-Gordon wave equation for a stationary scalar field of proper mass μ and spheroidal harmonic indices (l , m) in the background of a rapidly-rotating exotic compact object of mass M and angular momentum J = Ma, we derive a compact analytical formula for the discrete radii {rc (μ , l , m , M , a ; n) } of the exotic compact objects which can support the stationary bound-state massive scalar field configurations. We confirm our analytical results by direct numerical computations.

  8. Derivation of local-in-time fourth post-Newtonian ADM Hamiltonian for spinless compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaranowski, Piotr; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives full details of the computation within the canonical formalism of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner of the local-in-time part of the fourth post-Newtonian, i.e. of power eight in one over speed of light, conservative Hamiltonian of spinless compact binary systems. The Hamiltonian depends only on the bodies' positions and momenta. Dirac delta distributions are taken as source functions. Their full control is furnished by dimensional continuation, by means of which the occurring ultraviolet (UV) divergences are uniquely regularized. The applied near-zone expansion of the time-symmetric Green function leads to infrared (IR) divergences. Their analytic regularization results in one single ambiguity parameter. Unique fixation of it was successfully performed in T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014) through far-zone matching. Technically as well as conceptually (backscatter binding energy), the level of the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics is reached. In a first run a computation of all terms is performed in three-dimensional space using analytic Riesz-Hadamard regularization techniques. Then divergences are treated locally (i.e., around particles' positions for UV and in the vicinity of spatial infinity for IR divergences) by means of combined dimensional and analytic regularization. Various evolved analytic expressions are presented for the first time. The breakdown of the Leibniz rule for distributional derivatives is addressed as well as the in general nondistributive law when regularizing value of products of functions evaluated at their singular point.

  9. Dynamical tides in compact white dwarf binaries: helium core white dwarfs, tidal heating and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim; Lai, Dong

    2013-03-01

    Tidal dissipation in compact white dwarf (WD) binary systems significantly influences the physical conditions (such as surface temperature and rotation rate) of the WDs prior to mass transfer or merger. In these systems, the dominant tidal effects involve the excitation of gravity waves and their dissipation in the outer envelope of the star. We calculate the amplitude of tidally excited gravity waves in low-mass (0.3 M⊙) helium (He) core WDs as a function of the tidal forcing frequency ω. Like carbon-oxygen (CO) WDs studied in our previous paper, we find that the dimensionless tidal torque F(ω) (inversely proportional to the effective tidal quality factor) depends on ω in an erratic way. On average, F(ω) scales approximately as ω6, and is several orders of magnitude smaller for He WDs than for CO WDs. We find that tidal torques can begin to synchronize the WD rotation when the orbital period is less than about an hour, although a nearly constant asynchronization is maintained even at small periods. We examine where the tidally excited gravity waves experience non-linear breaking or resonant absorption at a critical layer, allowing us to estimate the location and magnitude of tidal heating in the WD envelope. We then incorporate tidal heating in the MESA stellar evolution code, calculating the physical conditions of the WD as a function of orbital period for different WD models. We find that tidal heating makes a significant contribution to the WD luminosity for short-period (˜10 min) systems such as SDSS J0651+2844. We also find that for WDs containing a hydrogen envelope, tidal heating can trigger runaway hydrogen shell burning, leading to a nova-like event before the onset of mass transfer.

  10. EXPLORING X-RAY BINARY POPULATIONS IN COMPACT GROUP GALAXIES WITH CHANDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Desjardins, T. D.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We obtain total galaxy X-ray luminosities, L{sub X}, originating from individually detected point sources in a sample of 47 galaxies in 15 compact groups of galaxies (CGs). For the great majority of our galaxies, we find that the detected point sources most likely are local to their associated galaxy, and are thus extragalactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) or nuclear active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For spiral and irregular galaxies, we find that, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are either within the ±1σ scatter of the Mineo et al. L{sub X}–star formation rate (SFR) correlation or have higher L{sub X} than predicted by this correlation for their SFR. We discuss how these “excesses” may be due to low metallicities and high interaction levels. For elliptical and S0 galaxies, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are consistent with the Boroson et al. L{sub X}–stellar mass correlation for low-mass XRBs, with larger scatter, likely due to residual effects such as AGN activity or hot gas. Assuming non-nuclear sources are low- or high-mass XRBs, we use appropriate XRB luminosity functions to estimate the probability that stochastic effects can lead to such extreme L{sub X} values. We find that, although stochastic effects do not in general appear to be important, for some galaxies there is a significant probability that high L{sub X} values can be observed due to strong XRB variability.

  11. Astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics with compact binary coalescence and the Einstein Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeck, C.

    2014-03-01

    The second-generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction are expected to make their first detections within this decade. This will firmly establish gravitational wave physics as an empirical science, and will open up a new era in astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics. Already with the first detections, we will be able to, among other things, establish the nature of short-hard gamma ray bursts, definitively confirm the existence of black holes, measure the Hubble constant in a completely independent way, and for the first time gain access to the genuinely strong-field dynamics of gravity. Hence, it is time to consider the longer-term future of this new field. The Einstein Telescope (ET) is a concrete conceptual proposal for a third-generation gravitational wave observatory, which will be ~ 10 times more sensitive in strain than the second-generation detectors. This will give access to sources at cosmological distances, with a correspondingly higher detection rate. We have given an overview of the science case for ET, with a focus on what can be learned from signals emitted by coalescing compact binaries. Third-generation observatories will allow us to map the coalescence rate out to redshifts z ~ 3, determine the mass functions of neutron stars and black holes, and perform precision measurements of the neutron star equation of state. ET will enable us to study the large-scale structure and evolution of the Universe without recourse to a cosmic distance ladder. Finally, we have discussed how it will allow for high-precision measurements of strong-field, dynamical gravity.

  12. GR-AMRVAC code applications: accretion onto compact objects, boson stars versus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; Grandclément, P.; Casse, F.; Vincent, F. H.; Straub, O.; Dauvergne, F.

    2016-08-01

    In the close vicinity of a compact object strong gravity imprints its signature onto matter. Systems that contain at least one compact object are observed to exhibit extreme physical properties and typically emit highly energetic radiation. The nature of the compact objects that produce the strongest gravitational fields is to date not settled. General relativistic numerical simulations of fluid dynamics around black holes, neutron stars, and other compact objects such as boson stars (BSs) may give invaluable insights into this fundamental question. In order to study the behavior of fluid in the strong gravity regime of an arbitrary compact object we develop a new general relativistic hydrodynamics code. To this end we extend the existing versatile adaptive mesh refinement code MPI-AMRVAC into a general relativistic hydrodynamics framework and adapt it for the use of numerically given spacetime metrics. In the present article we study accretion flows in the vicinity of various types of BSs whose numerical metrics are calculated by the KADATH spectral solver library. We design specific tests to check the reliability of any code intending to study BSs and compare the solutions with those obtained in the context of Schwarzschild black holes. We perform the first ever general relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of gas accretion by a BS. The behavior of matter at small distances from the center of a BS differs notably from the black hole case. In particular we demonstrate that in the context of Bondi spherical accretion the mass accretion rate onto non-rotating BSs remains constant whereas it increases for Schwarzschild black holes. We also address the scenario of non-spherical accretion onto BSs and show that this may trigger mass ejection from the interior of the BS. This striking feature opens the door to forthcoming investigations regarding accretion-ejection flows around such types of compact objects.

  13. High-ionization accretion signatures in compact binary candidates from SOAR Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. S.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Cieslinski, D.; Jablonski, F.; Silva, K. M. G.; Almeida, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The increasing number of synoptic surveys made by small robotic telescopes, like the photometric Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS - Drake et al., 2009, ApJ, 696, 870), represents a unique opportunity for the discovery of new variable objects and also to improve the samples of many classes of variables. Our goal in this work was the discovery of new polars, a subclass of magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs) with no accretion disk, and Close Binary Supersoft X-ray Sources (CBSS), strong candidates to Type Ia Supernova progenitors. Both are rare objects and probe interesting accretion scenarios. Finding spectral features associated to high-ionization mass accretion constrains the CBSS or magnetic CV nature for the candidates, expanding the hitherto small samples of these classes (specially CBSS) and allowing for detailed observational follow-up. We used the Goodman Spectrograph on SOAR 4.1 m Telescope to search for signatures of high-ionization mass accretion, as He II 468,6 nm emission line and inverted Balmer decrement, on 39 variable objects selected mostly from CRTS. In this sample we found 14 strong candidates to mCVs, 1 Nova in the final stages of eruption, 14 candidates to Dwarf Novae, 5 extragalactic sources (AGN), 1 object previously identified as a Black Hole Nova, 3 objects with pure absorption spectral features and 1 unidentified object with low S/N ratio. The mCVs candidates found in this work will be studied using time-resolved spectroscopic, polarimetric, and photometric observations in a follow-up project.

  14. An accurate geometric distance to the compact binary SS Cygni vindicates accretion disc theory.

    PubMed

    Miller-Jones, J C A; Sivakoff, G R; Knigge, C; Körding, E G; Templeton, M; Waagen, E O

    2013-05-24

    Dwarf novae are white dwarfs accreting matter from a nearby red dwarf companion. Their regular outbursts are explained by a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disc, described by the disc instability model that has since been successfully extended to other accreting systems. However, the prototypical dwarf nova, SS Cygni, presents a major challenge to our understanding of accretion disc theory. At the distance of 159 ± 12 parsecs measured by the Hubble Space Telescope, it is too luminous to be undergoing the observed regular outbursts. Using very long baseline interferometric radio observations, we report an accurate, model-independent distance to SS Cygni that places the source substantially closer at 114 ± 2 parsecs. This reconciles the source behavior with our understanding of accretion disc theory in accreting compact objects.

  15. The BlackGEM Array: Searching for Gravitational Wave Source Counterparts to Study Ultra-Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, S.; Groot, P.; Nelemans, G.; Klein-Wolt, M.

    2015-07-01

    The rates and physics of ultra-compact binaries consisting of neutron stars and black holes are poorly known, mostly due to the lack of a good sample to study such systems. In two years from now, the LIGO and Virgo interferometers are expected to be able to directly detect the gravitational waves (GW) emitted by such binaries when they merge, opening up a completely new window on the sky to study ultra-compact binaries. The combination of a GW detection with electromagnetic observations would be especially powerful to characterize the systems and the merger events. Unfortunately, however, the electromagnetic counterparts will be hard to find. The sky localization of the GW detections will be rather poor, with typical error boxes spanning ˜100 square degrees, and the optical sources are expected to be faint (˜22nd magnitude) and not long lasting (˜1 day). In this contribution we discuss the possibilities of finding the electromagnetic counterparts of these binaries, thereby paying particular attention to the dedicated BlackGEM array of optical telescopes that will be deployed at the ESO site in La Silla (Chile) in 2015 and 2016. In the first phase, the array will consist of four 60-cm telescopes with a field of view of 2.7 square degrees each. Apart from going after GW triggers, the array will also perform a deep southern sky survey in Sloan u, g, r, i, and z filters, down to 23rd magnitude in the g band, and a survey to characterize the transient and variable sky on timescales of hours and days. The latter will be a valuable resource to search for variable stars across the sky, including eclipsing, reflecting, and beaming binary stars.

  16. The Equations of Motion of Compact Binaries in the Neighborhood of Supermassive Black Hole

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsievich, Alexander; Bobrik, Alexey

    2010-03-24

    By the use of Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann method, the equations of motion of a binary star system in the field of a supermassive black hole are derived. In spite of the fact that the motion of a binary system as a whole can be relativistic or even ultra-relativistic with respect to the supermassive black hole, it is shown, that under the assumption of non-relativistic relative motion of the stars in binary system, the motion of the binary system as a whole satisfies the Mathisson-Papapetrou equations with additional terms depending on quadrupole moments. Exemplary case of ultrarelativistic motion of a binary neutron star in the vicinity of non-rotating black hole is considered. It it shown that the motion of binary's center of mass may considerably differ from geodesic motion.

  17. Short-lived 244Pu points to compact binary mergers as sites for heavy r-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Piran, Tsvi; Paul, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The origin of heavy elements produced through rapid neutron capture (`r-process’) by seed nuclei is one of the current nucleosynthesis mysteries. Core collapse supernovae (cc-SNe; ref. ) and compact binary mergers are considered as possible sites. The first produces small amounts of material at a high event rate whereas the latter produces large amounts in rare events. Radioactive elements with the right lifetime can break the degeneracy between high-rate/low-yield and low-rate/high-yield scenarios. Among radioactive elements, most interesting is 244Pu (half-life of 81 million years), for which both the current accumulation of live 244Pu particles accreted via interstellar particles in the Earth’s deep-sea floor and the Early Solar System (ESS) abundances have been measured. Interestingly, the estimated 244Pu abundance in the current interstellar medium inferred from deep-sea measurements is significantly lower than that corresponding to the ESS measurements. Here we show that both the current and ESS abundances of 244Pu are naturally explained within the low-rate/high-yield scenario. The inferred event rate remarkably agrees with compact binary merger rates estimated from Galactic neutron star binaries and from short gamma-ray bursts. Furthermore, the ejected mass of r-process elements per event agrees with both theoretical and observational macronova/kilonova estimates.

  18. Gravitational radiation from compact binary systems: Gravitational waveforms and energy loss to second post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    1996-10-01

    We derive the gravitational waveform and gravitational-wave energy flux generated by a binary star system of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), accurate through second post-Newtonian order (O[(v/c)4]=O[(Gm/rc2)2]) beyond the lowest-order quadrupole approximation. We cast the Einstein equations into the form of a flat-spacetime wave equation together with a harmonic gauge condition, and solve it formally as a retarded integral over the past null cone of the chosen field point. The part of this integral that involves the matter sources and the near-zone gravitational field is evaluated in terms of multipole moments using standard techniques; the remainder of the retarded integral, extending over the radiation zone, is evaluated in a novel way. The result is a manifestly convergent and finite procedure for calculating gravitational radiation to arbitrary orders in a post-Newtonian expansion. Through second post-Newtonian order, the radiation is also shown to propagate toward the observer along true null rays of the asymptotically Schwarzschild spacetime, despite having been derived using flat-spacetime wave equations. The method cures defects that plagued previous ``brute-force'' slow-motion approaches to the generation of gravitational radiation, and yields results that agree perfectly with those recently obtained by a mixed post-Minkowskian post-Newtonian method. We display explicit formulas for the gravitational waveform and the energy flux for two-body systems, both in arbitrary orbits and in circular orbits. In an appendix, we extend the formalism to bodies with finite spatial extent, and derive the spin corrections to the waveform and energy loss.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cataclysmic Binaries, LMXBs, and related objects (Ritter+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2008-07-01

    Cataclysmic Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. The secondary is not necessarily unevolved, it may even be a highly evolved star as for example in the case of the AM CVn-type stars. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of either a neutron star or a black hole primary, and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. Related Objects are detached binaries consisting of either a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and of a low-mass secondary. The secondary may also be a highly evolved star. The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, stellar parameters of the components and other characteristic properties of 731 cataclysmic binaries, 90 low-mass X-ray binaries and 190 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 981 of the 1011 objects, and a cross- reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 30 June 2008 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. Updated information will be provided regularly, currently every six months. Old editions include catalogue (5th edition), (6th edition) and (7th edition); the successive versions of the 7th edition are available in dedicated subdirectories. (11 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cataclysmic Binaries, LMXBs, and related objects (Ritter+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2009-09-01

    Cataclysmic Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. The secondary is not necessarily unevolved, it may even be a highly evolved star as for example in the case of the AM CVn-type stars. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of either a neutron star or a black hole primary, and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. Related Objects are detached binaries consisting of either a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and of a low-mass secondary. The secondary may also be a highly evolved star. The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, stellar parameters of the components and other characteristic properties of 731 cataclysmic binaries, 90 low-mass X-ray binaries and 190 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 981 of the 1011 objects, and a cross- reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 30 June 2008 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. Updated information will be provided regularly, currently every six months. Old editions include catalogue (5th edition), (6th edition) and (7th edition); the successive versions of the 7th edition are available in dedicated subdirectories. (11 data files).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cataclysmic Binaries, LMXBs, and related objects (Ritter+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2010-11-01

    Cataclysmic Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. The secondary is not necessarily unevolved, it may even be a highly evolved star as for example in the case of the AM CVn-type stars. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of either a neutron star or a black hole primary, and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. Related Objects are detached binaries consisting of either a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and of a low-mass secondary. The secondary may also be a highly evolved star. The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, and stellar parameters of the components and other characteristic properties of 880 cataclysmic binaries, 98 low-mass X-ray binaries and 319 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 1259 of the 1297 objects, and a cross- reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 1 July 2010 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. Updated information will be provided regularly, currently every six months. Old editions include catalogue (5th edition), (6th edition) and (7th edition); the successive versions of the 7th edition are available in dedicated subdirectories (v7.00 tp v7.13) (11 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cataclysmic Binaries, LMXBs, and related objects (Ritter+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, H.; Kolb, U.

    2006-02-01

    Cataclysmic Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. The secondary is not necessarily unevolved, it may even be a highly evolved star as for example in the case of the AM CVn-type stars. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries are semi-detached binaries consisting of either a neutron star or a black hole primary, and a low-mass secondary which is filling its critical Roche lobe. Related Objects are detached binaries consisting of either a white dwarf or a white dwarf precursor primary and of a low-mass secondary. The secondary may also be a highly evolved star. The catalogue lists coordinates, apparent magnitudes, orbital parameters, stellar parameters of the components and other characteristic properties of 700 cataclysmic binaries, 90 low-mass X-ray binaries and 186 related objects with known or suspected orbital periods together with a comprehensive selection of the relevant recent literature. In addition the catalogue contains a list of references to published finding charts for 923 of the 976 objects, and a cross- reference list of alias object designations. Literature published before 30 December 2007 has, as far as possible, been taken into account. Updated information will be provided regularly, currently every six months. Old editions include catalogue (5th edition), (6th edition) and (7th edition); the successive versions of the 7th edition are available in dedicated subdirectories. (11 data files).

  3. Search for Gravitational Waves from Low Mass Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO's Sixth Science Run and Virgo's Science Runs 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries using LIGO and Virgo observations between July 7, 2009, and October 20. 2010. We searched for signals from binaries with total mass between 2 and 25 Stellar Mass; this includes binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a black hole and neutron star. The detectors were sensitive to systems up to 40 Mpc distant for binary neutron stars, and further for higher mass systems. No gravitational-wave signals were detected. We report upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence as a function of total mass. including the results from previous LIGO and Virgo observations. The cumulative 90% confidence rate upper limits of the binary coalescence of binary neutron star, neutron star-black hole, and binary black hole systems are 1.3 x 10(exp -4), 3.1 x 10(exp -5), and 6.4 x 10(exp -6)/cu Mpc/yr, respectively. These upper limits are up to a factor 1.4 lower than previously derived limits. We also report on results from a blind injection challenge.

  4. Search for gravitational waves from low mass compact binary coalescence in LIGO's sixth science run and Virgo's science runs 2 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Paolo Emilio, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; DiGuglielmo, J.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Farr, W.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Geng, R.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, N.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, T.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardt, A.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, P. J.; Kinsey, M.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. M.; Leindecker, N.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menendez, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nawrodt, R.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Ryll, H.; Sainathan, P.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Samblowski, A.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Tucker, E.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zadroźny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-04-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries using LIGO and Virgo observations between July 7, 2009, and October 20, 2010. We searched for signals from binaries with total mass between 2 and 25M⊙; this includes binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a black hole and neutron star. The detectors were sensitive to systems up to 40 Mpc distant for binary neutron stars, and further for higher mass systems. No gravitational-wave signals were detected. We report upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence as a function of total mass, including the results from previous LIGO and Virgo observations. The cumulative 90% confidence rate upper limits of the binary coalescence of binary neutron star, neutron star-black hole, and binary black hole systems are 1.3×10-4, 3.1×10-5, and 6.4×10-6Mpc-3yr-1, respectively. These upper limits are up to a factor 1.4 lower than previously derived limits. We also report on results from a blind injection challenge.

  5. Search for Gravitational Waves from Low Mass Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO's Sixth Science Run and Virgo's Science Runs 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries using LIGO and Virgo observations between July 7, 2009, and October 20. 2010. We searched for signals from binaries with total mass between 2 and 25 Stellar Mass; this includes binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a black hole and neutron star. The detectors were sensitive to systems up to 40 Mpc distant for binary neutron stars, and further for higher mass systems. No gravitational-wave signals were detected. We report upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence as a function of total mass. including the results from previous LIGO and Virgo observations. The cumulative 90% confidence rate upper limits of the binary coalescence of binary neutron star, neutron star-black hole, and binary black hole systems are 1.3 x 10(exp -4), 3.1 x 10(exp -5), and 6.4 x 10(exp -6)/cu Mpc/yr, respectively. These upper limits are up to a factor 1.4 lower than previously derived limits. We also report on results from a blind injection challenge.

  6. Binary neutron stars with generic spin, eccentricity, mass ratio, and compactness: Quasi-equilibrium sequences and first evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Moldenhauer, Niclas; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Markakis, Charalampos M.; Brügmann, Bernd; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Information about the last stages of a binary neutron star inspiral and the final merger can be extracted from quasiequilibrium configurations and dynamical evolutions. In this article, we construct quasiequilibrium configurations for different spins, eccentricities, mass ratios, compactnesses, and equations of state. For this purpose we employ the sgrid code, which allows us to construct such data in previously inaccessible regions of the parameter space. In particular, we consider spinning neutron stars in isolation and in binary systems; we incorporate new methods to produce highly eccentric and eccentricity-reduced data; we present the possibility of computing data for significantly unequal-mass binaries with mass ratios q ≃2 ; and we create equal-mass binaries with individual compactness up to C ≃0.23 . As a proof of principle, we explore the dynamical evolution of three new configurations. First, we simulate a q =2.06 mass ratio which is the highest mass ratio for a binary neutron star evolved in numerical relativity to date. We find that mass transfer from the companion star sets in a few revolutions before merger and a rest mass of ˜10-2M⊙ is transferred between the two stars. This amount of mass accretion corresponds to ˜1051 ergs of accretion energy. This configuration also ejects a large amount of material during merger (˜7.6 ×1 0-2M⊙), imparting a substantial kick to the remnant neutron star. Second, we simulate the first merger of a precessing binary neutron star. We present the dominant modes of the gravitational waves for the precessing simulation, where a clear imprint of the precession is visible in the (2,1) mode. Finally, we quantify the effect of an eccentricity-reduction procedure on the gravitational waveform. The procedure improves the waveform quality and should be employed in future precision studies. However, one also needs to reduce other errors in the waveforms, notably truncation errors, in order for the improvement due to

  7. Casimir potential of a compact object enclosed by a spherical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, Saad; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-11-15

    We study the electromagnetic Casimir interaction of a compact object contained inside a closed cavity of another compact object. We express the interaction energy in terms of the objects' scattering matrices and translation matrices that relate the coordinate systems appropriate to each object. When the enclosing object is an otherwise empty metallic spherical shell, much larger than the internal object, and the two are sufficiently separated, the Casimir force can be expressed in terms of the static electric and magnetic multipole polarizabilities of the internal object, which is analogous to the Casimir-Polder result. Although it is not a simple power law, the dependence of the force on the separation of the object from the containing sphere is a universal function of its displacement from the center of the sphere, independent of other details of the object's electromagnetic response. Furthermore, we compute the exact Casimir force between two metallic spheres contained one inside the other at arbitrary separations. Finally, we combine our results with earlier work on the Casimir force between two spheres to obtain data on the leading-order correction to the proximity force approximation for two metallic spheres both outside and within one another.

  8. Optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of compact objects in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    In the past three years, a new era of study of globular clusters has begun with multiwavelength observations from the current generation of astronomical telescopes in space. We review the recent results obtained from our studies of compact binaries and x-ray sources in globulars with ROSAT and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as well as our balloon-borne hard x-ray telescope EXITE (Energetic X-ray Imaging Telescope Experiment) and ground-based observations (CTIO). With ROSAT, we have obtained the most sensitive high resolution soft x-ray images of clusters which show multiple low luminosity sources in cluster cores that are likely indicative of the long-sought population of cataclysmic variables (CVs). We have obtained deep H-alpha images of two clusters with HST and found CV candiates for 3 of the ROSAT sources in the core of NGC 6397. New CTIO imaging and spectroscopy of two 'dim source' fields in omega-Cen are also described. With EXITE we carried out the first hard x-ray imaging observations of the cluster 47 Tuc; such studies can ultimately limit the populations of millisecond pulsars and pulsar emission mechanisms. A long ROSAT exposure on 47 Tuc also shows probable cluster diffuse emission, possibly due to hot gas from ablating millisecond pulsars. Multiwavelength studies of globular clusters may provide new constraints on problems as diverse as the origin of CVs and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and the origin of hot gas in globulars.

  9. Central Compact Objects in Kes 79 and RCW 103 as `Hidden' Magnetars with Crustal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, S. B.; Kaurov, A. A.; Kaminker, A. D.

    2015-05-01

    We propose that observations of `hidden' magnetars in central compact objects can be used to probe crustal activity of neutron stars with large internal magnetic fields. Estimates based on calculations by Perna & Pons, Pons & Rea and Kaminker et al. suggest that central compact objects, which are proposed to be `hidden' magnetars, must demonstrate flux variations on the time scale of months-years. However, the most prominent candidate for the `hidden' magnetars - CXO J1852.6+0040 in Kes 79 - shows constant (within error bars) flux. This can be interpreted by lower variable crustal activity than in typical magnetars. Alternatively, CXO J1852.6+0040 can be in a high state of variable activity during the whole period of observations. Then we consider the source 1E161348 - 5055 in RCW103 as another candidate. Employing a simple 2D-modelling we argue that properties of the source can be explained by the crustal activity of the magnetar type. Thus, this object may be supplemented for the three known candidates for the `hidden' magnetars among central compact objects discussed in literature.

  10. Evolution and modelling of compacted binary mixture porosity. Application to pharmaceutical tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masteau, J.-C.; Thomas, G.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this work consists in following physical property variations in relation with geometrical textural parameters during pharmaceutical component compaction. Models are developed to explain porosity variations of granular media submitted to increasing uniaxial pressure. These models are based on reaction mechanisms analogous to these presented in quasi chemical descriptions. Vacancy annihilation occurring when pressure increases is studied in two cases (with or without internal grain porosity). Reaction mechanisms describing different granular rearrangement phenomena are proposed. The behaviour of pure compounds as well as that of binary mixtures are studied from a theoretical point of view, and the model results proposed in this case are compared with the ones derived from experiments. In particular mixtures of one excipient, lactose, and one active principle, ketoprofen, are analysed in order to estimate porosity evolution of such mixtures, and determine mixture effects on tablet properties. The prediction limits which could be done by mixture models giving an expected behaviour starting from pure components only are discussed. Des modèles sont présentés pour décrire les variations de propriétés physiques, dépendant de paramètres texturaux, pendant la compression de produits pharmaceutiques purs ou mélangés. Ils permettent d'expliquer les variations de porosité du milieu granulaire soumis à l'augmentation d'une pression uniaxiale dans une matrice. Ces modèles sont fondés sur des mécanismes de réactions analogues à celles utilisées en quasi-chimie. La disparition des lacunes, lorsque la pression augmente, est étudiée pour deux types de systèmes granulaires (avec ou sans porosité interne). Des mécanismes réactionnels décrivant les différents phénomènes de réarrangements granulaires sont présentés. Le comportement de produits purs et de mélanges binaires de poudres pures est étudié d'un point de vue théorique, et les r

  11. Formalism for testing theories of gravity using lensing by compact objects. II. Probing post-post-Newtonian metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, Charles R.; Petters, A.O.

    2006-02-15

    We study gravitational lensing by compact objects in gravity theories that can be written in a post-post-Newtonian (PPN) framework: i.e., the metric is static and spherically symmetric, and can be written as a Taylor series in m /r, where m is the gravitational radius of the compact object. Working invariantly, we compute corrections to standard weak-deflection lensing observables at first and second order in the perturbation parameter {epsilon}={theta}/{theta}{sub E}, where {theta} is the angular gravitational radius and {theta}{sub E} is the angular Einstein ring radius of the lens. We show that the first-order corrections to the total magnification and centroid position vanish universally for gravity theories that can be written in the PPN framework. This arises from some surprising, fundamental relations among the lensing observables in PPN gravity models. We derive these relations for the image positions, magnifications, and time delays. A deep consequence is that any violation of the universal relations would signal the need for a gravity model outside the PPN framework (provided that some basic assumptions hold). In practical terms, the relations will guide observational programs to test general relativity, modified gravity theories, and possibly the cosmic censorship conjecture. We use the new relations to identify lensing observables that are accessible to current or near-future technology, and to find combinations of observables that are most useful for probing the spacetime metric. We give explicit applications to the galactic black hole, microlensing, and the binary pulsar J0737-3039.

  12. Gravitational Lensing of Rays through the Levitating Atmospheres of Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic rays travel on curved paths under the influence of gravity. When a dispersive optical medium is included, these trajectories are frequency-dependent. In this work we consider the behaviour of rays when a spherically symmetric, luminous compact object described by the Schwarzschild metric is surrounded by an optically thin shell of plasma supported by radiation pressure. Such levitating atmospheres occupy a position of stable radial equilibrium, where radiative flux and gravitational effects are balanced. Using general relativity and an inhomogeneous plasma we find the existence of a stable circular orbit within the atmospheric shell for low-frequency rays. We explore families of bound orbits that exist between the shell and the compact object, and identify sets of novel periodic orbits. Finally, we examine conditions necessary for the trapping and escape of low-frequency radiation.

  13. A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George F.; Frampton, Paul H.

    2016-11-01

    The failure to find evidence for elementary particles that could serve as the constituents of dark matter brings to mind suggestions that dark matter might consist of massive compact objects (MACHOs). In particular, it has recently been argued that MACHOs with masses > 15Msolar may have been prolifically produced at the onset of the big bang. Although a variety of astrophysical signatures for primordial MACHOs with masses in this range have been discussed in the literature, we favor a strategy that uses the potential for magnification of stars outside our galaxy due to gravitational microlensing of these stars by MACHOs in the halo of our galaxy. We point out that the effect of the motion of the Earth on the shape of the micro-lensing brightening curves provides a promising approach to testing over the course of next several years the hypothesis that dark matter consists of massive compact objects.

  14. Using electromagnetic observations to aid gravitational-wave parameter estimation of compact binaries observed with LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; van der Sluys, M.; Nelemans, G.

    2012-08-01

    We present a first-stage study of the effect of using knowledge from electromagnetic (EM) observations in the gravitational wave (GW) data analysis of Galactic binaries that are predicted to be observed by the new Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) in the low-frequency range, 10-4 Hz < f < 1 Hz. In particular, we examine the extent to which the accuracy of GW parameter estimation improves if we use available information from EM data. We do this by investigating whether correlations exist between the GW parameters that describe these binaries and whether some of these parameters are also available from EM observations. We used verification binaries, which are known as the guaranteed sources for eLISA and will test the functioning of the instrument. We find that of the seven parameters that characterise such a binary, only a few are correlated. The most useful result is the strong correlation between amplitude and inclination, which can be used to constrain the parameter uncertainty in amplitude by making use of the constraint of inclination from EM measurements. The improvement can be up to a factor of ~6.5, but depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the source data. Moreover, we find that this strong correlation depends on the inclination. For mildly face-on binaries (ι ≲ 45°), EM data on inclination can improve the estimate of the GW amplitude by a significant factor. However, for edge-on binaries (ι ~ 90°), the inclination can be determined accurately from GW data alone, thus GW data can be used to select systems that will likely be eclipsing binaries for EM follow-up.

  15. Compositions of Binary Near-Earth Objects: Implications for the Internal Structure of Their Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, P. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; Hardersen, P. S.; Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Landis, R. R.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: Approximately 1/6th of all the near-Earth objects (NEOs) observed to date are binaries. Since NEO dynamical lifetimes are relatively short ( 10*6-10*7 years), an active mechanism must be forming new NEO pairs. Proposed formation mechanisms invoke close flybys of the Earth (or Venus) and involve either tidal disruption, or rotational spin-up and disruption. In either scenario, parent NEO bodies were either composed of physically weak materials (e.g., strengths similar to CI or CM chondrites) or were gravitationally bound rubble piles with little or no internal strength. Observational Constraints: If binary NEOs are generated primarily by disaggregation of km-scale NEO parent bodies during close planetary flybys, then the two models of parent body weakness predict different compositional patterns for the formation of NEO binaries. If NEO binaries form primarily from physically weak materials, they should be dominantly similar to CM- or CI-type materials. If these binaries form primarily from disruption of strengthless rubble piles, then there shouldn't be any particular compositional preference. Near-infrared spectra of several NEO binaries have been collected, including 1998 ST27, 2003 YT1, and (66063) 1998 RO1. The first binary NEO studied (1998 ST27) was identified as a CM-type assemblage. However, subsequently 2003 YT1 was identified as an HED assemblage, and 1998 RO1 appears to be a moderately metamorphosed L-chondrite. Conclusions: The CM-type composition of 1998 ST27 supports the suggestion that binary NEOs can be generated from physically weak materials. However, HED and L5-like assemblages are not physically weak materials. Thus the current compositional characterizations of binary NEOs suggest that most of the NEO parent bodies were gravitationally bound rubble piles, and not simply just weak carbonaceous materials. Acknowledgments: Portions of this work were supported by the NAS/NRC Resident Research Associateship program, NASA Near

  16. SUBARU AND GEMINI OBSERVATIONS OF SS 433: NEW CONSTRAINT ON THE MASS OF THE COMPACT OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, K.; Ueda, Y.; Fabrika, S.; Barsukova, E. A.; Sholukhova, O.; Medvedev, A.; Goranskij, V. P.

    2010-02-01

    We present results of optical spectroscopic observations of the mass donor star in SS 433 with Subaru and Gemini, with an aim to best constrain the mass of the compact object. Subaru/Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph observations were performed on four nights of 2007 October 6-8 and 10, covering the orbital phase of phi = 0.96 - 0.26. We first calculate the cross-correlation function (CCF) of these spectra with that of the reference star HD 9233 in the wavelength range of 4740-4840 A. This region is selected to avoid 'strong' absorption lines accompanied with contaminating emission components, which most probably originate from the surroundings of the donor star, such as the wind and gas stream. The same analysis is applied to archive data of Gemini/GMOS taken at phi = 0.84 - 0.30 by Hillwig and Gies. From the Subaru and Gemini CCF results, the amplitude of the radial velocity curve of the donor star is determined to be 58.3 +- 3.8 km s{sup -1} with a systemic velocity of 59.2 +- 2.5 km s{sup -1}. Together with the radial velocity curve of the compact object, we derive the mass of the donor star and compact object to be M{sub O} = 12.4 +- 1.9 M{sub sun} and M{sub X} = 4.3 +- 0.6 M{sub sun}, respectively. We conclude, however, that these values should be taken as upper limits. From the analysis of the averaged absorption line profiles of strong lines (mostly ions) and weak lines (mostly neutrals) observed with Subaru, we find evidence for heating effects from the compact object. Using a simple model, we find that the true radial velocity amplitude of the donor star could be as low as 40 +- 5 km s{sup -1} in order to produce the observed absorption-line profiles. Taking into account the heating of the donor star may lower the derived masses to M{sub O} = 10.4{sup +2.3}{sub -1.9} M{sub sun} and M{sub X} = 2.5{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} M{sub sun}. Our final constraint, 1.9 M{sub sun} <=M{sub X}<= 4.9 M{sub sun}, indicates that the compact object in SS 433 is most likely a

  17. Obtaining mass parameters of compact objects from redshifts and blueshifts emitted by geodesic particles around them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, Ricardo; Valdez-Alvarado, Susana; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2016-12-01

    The mass parameters of compact objects such as boson stars, Schwarzschild, Reissner-Nordström, and Kerr black holes are computed in terms of the measurable redshift-blueshift (zred , zblue ) of photons emitted by particles moving along circular geodesics around these objects and the radius of their orbits. We find bounds for the values of (zred , zblue ) that may be observed. For the case of the Kerr black hole, recent observational estimates of Sgr A* mass and rotation parameter are employed to determine the corresponding values of these red-blue shifts.

  18. Numerical simulations of axisymmetric Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2015-12-01

    Compact bodies which are not at rest compare to an homogeneous ambient environment are believed to undergo Bondi-Hoyle axisymmetric accretion as soon as their relative velocity reaches supersonic levels. Contrary to its spherical counterpart, B-H accretion presents flow structures difficult to analytically derive, hence the need for numerical investigations. The broad dynamics at stake when a tiny compact object engulfs surrounding material at a much larger scale has made numerical consistency a polemical issue as it has prevented both scales to be grasped for reasonable wind velocities. We designed a numerical setup which reconciliates the requirement for finite size accretor with steady states properties of the Bondi-Hoyle flow independent of the size of the inner boundary. The robustness of this setup is evaluated accordingly to predictions concerning the mass accretion rate evolution with the Mach number at infinity and the topology of the sonic surface as determined by te{Foglizzo1996}. It provides an estimation of the mass accretion rates and thus, of the expected X-ray luminosity for an idealized B-H configuration which might not be too far off for isolated compact objects like runaway neutron stars or hyper-luminous X-ray sources.

  19. Comparing object recognition from binary and bipolar edge images for visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Pu, Tian; Peli, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Visual prostheses require an effective representation method due to the limited display condition which has only 2 or 3 levels of grayscale in low resolution. Edges derived from abrupt luminance changes in images carry essential information for object recognition. Typical binary (black and white) edge images have been used to represent features to convey essential information. However, in scenes with a complex cluttered background, the recognition rate of the binary edge images by human observers is limited and additional information is required. The polarity of edges and cusps (black or white features on a gray background) carries important additional information; the polarity may provide shape from shading information missing in the binary edge image. This depth information may be restored by using bipolar edges. We compared object recognition rates from 16 binary edge images and bipolar edge images by 26 subjects to determine the possible impact of bipolar filtering in visual prostheses with 3 or more levels of grayscale. Recognition rates were higher with bipolar edge images and the improvement was significant in scenes with complex backgrounds. The results also suggest that erroneous shape from shading interpretation of bipolar edges resulting from pigment rather than boundaries of shape may confound the recognition.

  20. Comparing object recognition from binary and bipolar edge images for visual prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Pu, Tian; Peli, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Visual prostheses require an effective representation method due to the limited display condition which has only 2 or 3 levels of grayscale in low resolution. Edges derived from abrupt luminance changes in images carry essential information for object recognition. Typical binary (black and white) edge images have been used to represent features to convey essential information. However, in scenes with a complex cluttered background, the recognition rate of the binary edge images by human observers is limited and additional information is required. The polarity of edges and cusps (black or white features on a gray background) carries important additional information; the polarity may provide shape from shading information missing in the binary edge image. This depth information may be restored by using bipolar edges. We compared object recognition rates from 16 binary edge images and bipolar edge images by 26 subjects to determine the possible impact of bipolar filtering in visual prostheses with 3 or more levels of grayscale. Recognition rates were higher with bipolar edge images and the improvement was significant in scenes with complex backgrounds. The results also suggest that erroneous shape from shading interpretation of bipolar edges resulting from pigment rather than boundaries of shape may confound the recognition.

  1. Properties of long gamma-ray bursts from massive compact binaries.

    PubMed

    Church, Ross P; Levan, Andrew J; Davies, Melvyn B; Kim, Chunglee

    2013-06-13

    We consider the implications of a model for long-duration gamma-ray bursts in which the progenitor is spun up in a close binary by tidal interactions with a massive black-hole companion. We investigate a sample of such binaries produced by a binary population synthesis, and show that the model predicts several common features in the accretion on to the newly formed black hole. In all cases, the accretion rate declines as approximately t(-5/3) until a break at a time of order 10(4) s. The accretion rate declines steeply thereafter. Subsequently, there is flaring activity, with the flare peaking between 10(4) and 10(5) s, the peak time being correlated with the flare energy. We show that these times are set by the semi-major axis of the binary, and hence the process of tidal spin-up; furthermore, they are consistent with flares seen in the X-ray light curves of some long gamma-ray bursts.

  2. Tidal deformability of compact boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennett, Noah; Steinhoff, Jan; Hinderer, Tanja; Buonanno, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves can be used to probe the structure of compact objects in coalescing binary systems. This structure enters the pre-merger waveform through tidal interactions between the two bodies, characterized by each object's tidal deformability. We investigate whether these effects can differentiate binary black holes from systems containing compact boson stars. We compute the tidal deformability for various boson star models, including ultracompact non-topological solitonic solutions.

  3. First law of compact binary mechanics with gravitational-wave tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc; Le Tiec, Alexandre

    2017-08-01

    We derive the first law of binary point-particle mechanics for generic bound (i.e. eccentric) orbits at the fourth post-Newtonian (4PN) order, accounting for the non-locality in time of the dynamics due to the occurence of a gravitational-wave tail effect at that order. Using this first law, we show how the periastron advance of the binary system can be related to the averaged redshift of one of the two bodies for a slightly non-circular orbit, in the limit where the eccentricity vanishes. Combining this expression with existing analytical self-force results for the averaged redshift, we recover the known 4PN expression for the circular-orbit periastron advance, to linear order in the mass ratio.

  4. Bayesian inference on compact binary inspiral gravitational radiation signals in interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röver, Christian; Meyer, Renate; Christensen, Nelson

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a description of a Bayesian analysis framework for use with interferometric gravitational radiation data in search of binary neutron star inspiral signals. Five parameters are investigated, and the information extracted from the data is illustrated and quantified. The posterior integration is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Implementation details include the use of importance resampling for improved convergence and informative priors reflecting the conditions expected for realistic measurements. An example is presented from an application using realistic, albeit fictitious, data. We expect that these parameter estimation techniques will prove useful at the end of a binary inspiral detection pipeline for interferometric detectors like LIGO or Virgo.

  5. General relativistic simulations of compact binary mergers as engines for short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios

    2017-04-01

    Black hole—neutron star (BHNS) and neutron star—neutron star (NSNS) binaries are among the favored candidates for the progenitors of the black hole—disk systems that may be the engines powering short-hard gamma ray bursts. After almost two decades of simulations of binary NSNSs and BHNSs in full general relativity we are now beginning to understand the ingredients that may be necessary for these systems to launch incipient jets. Here, we review our current understanding, and summarize the surprises and lessons learned from state-of-the-art (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations in full general relativity of BHNS and NSNS mergers as jet engines for short-hard gamma-ray bursts. We also propose a new approach to probing the nuclear equation of state by virtue of multimessenger observations.

  6. An X-ray View of the Zoo of Compact Objects and Associated Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse explosions of massive stars leave behind some of the most exotic compact objects in the Universe. These include: rotation-powered pulsars like the Crab, powering pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) observed across the electromagnetic spectrum; highly magnetized neutron stars ("magnetars") shining or bursting at high-energies; and X-ray emitting “Central Compact Objects” (CCOs) with intrinsic properties and emission mechanism that remain largely unknown. I will highlight this observed diversity of compact stellar remnants from an X-ray perspective, and address the connection between their properties and those of their hosting supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular I will highlight topics related to their formation and evolution, including: 1) which supernovae make magnetars and the shell-less PWNe?, 2) what can we learn from the apparent age discrepancy between SNRs and their associated pulsars? I will conclude with prospects for observations of SNRs with the upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray mission. The unprecedented spectral resolution on board of ASTRO-H’s micro-calorimeter will particularly open a new discovery window for supernova progenitors' science.

  7. HIDES spectroscopy of bright detached eclipsing binaries from the Kepler field - I. Single-lined objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Sybilski, P.; Ratajczak, M.; Maehara, H.; Konacki, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of our spectroscopic observations of nine detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, that only show one set of spectral lines. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from the high-resolution spectra obtained with the HIgh-Dispersion Echelle Spectrograph (HIDES) instrument, attached to the 1.88-m telescope at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and from the public Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment archive. In our sample, we found five single-lined binaries, with one component dominating the spectrum. The orbital and light-curve solutions were found for four of them, and compared with isochrones, in order to estimate absolute physical parameters and evolutionary status of the components. For the fifth case, we only update the orbital parameters, and estimate the properties of the unseen star. Two other systems show orbital motion with a period known from the eclipse timing variations (ETVs). For these we obtained parameters of outer orbits, by translating the ETVs to RVs of the centre of mass of the eclipsing binary, and combining with the RVs of the outer star. Of the two remaining ones, one is most likely a blend of a faint background DEB with a bright foreground star, which lines we see in the spectra, and the last case is possibly a quadruple bearing a sub-stellar mass object. Where possible, we compare our results with literature, especially with results from asteroseismology. We also report possible detections of solar-like oscillations in our RVs.

  8. Electromagnetic chirp of a compact binary black hole: A phase template for the gravitational wave inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiman, Zoltán

    2017-07-01

    The gravitational waves (GWs) from a binary black hole (BBH) with masses 104≲M ≲107 M⊙ can be detected with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) once their orbital frequency exceeds 10-4- 10-5 Hz . The binary separation at this stage is a =O (100 )Rg (gravitational radius), and the orbital speed is v /c =O (0.1 ). We argue that at this stage, the binary will be producing bright electromagnetic (EM) radiation via gas bound to the individual BHs. Both BHs will have their own photospheres in x-ray and possibly also in optical bands. Relativistic Doppler modulations and lensing effects will inevitably imprint periodic variability in the EM light curve, tracking the phase of the orbital motion, and serving as a template for the GW inspiral waveform. Advanced localization of the source by LISA weeks to months prior to merger will enable a measurement of this EM chirp by wide-field x-ray or optical instruments. A comparison of the phases of the GW and EM chirp signals will help break degeneracies between system parameters, and probe a fractional difference Δ v in the propagation speed of photons and gravitons as low as Δ v /c ≈10-17.

  9. Analysis framework for the prompt discovery of compact binary mergers in gravitational-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messick, Cody; Blackburn, Kent; Brady, Patrick; Brockill, Patrick; Cannon, Kipp; Cariou, Romain; Caudill, Sarah; Chamberlin, Sydney J.; Creighton, Jolien D. E.; Everett, Ryan; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew; Lang, Ryan N.; Li, Tjonnie G. F.; Meacher, Duncan; Nielsen, Alex; Pankow, Chris; Privitera, Stephen; Qi, Hong; Sachdev, Surabhi; Sadeghian, Laleh; Singer, Leo; Thomas, E. Gareth; Wade, Leslie; Wade, Madeline; Weinstein, Alan; Wiesner, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    We describe a stream-based analysis pipeline to detect gravitational waves from the merger of binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and neutron-star-black-hole binaries within ˜1 min of the arrival of the merger signal at Earth. Such low-latency detection is crucial for the prompt response by electromagnetic facilities in order to observe any fading electromagnetic counterparts that might be produced by mergers involving at least one neutron star. Even for systems expected not to produce counterparts, low-latency analysis of the data is useful for deciding when not to point telescopes, and as feedback to observatory operations. Analysts using this pipeline were the first to identify GW151226, the second gravitational-wave event ever detected. The pipeline also operates in an offline mode, in which it incorporates more refined information about data quality and employs acausal methods that are inapplicable to the online mode. The pipeline's offline mode was used in the detection of the first two gravitational-wave events, GW150914 and GW151226, as well as the identification of a third candidate, LVT151012.

  10. Reconstructing the Sky Location of Gravitational-Wave Detected Compact Binary Systems: Methodology for Testing and Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidney, T.; Aylott, B.; Christensen, N.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Feroz, F.; Gair, J.; Grover, K.; Graff, P.; Hanna, C.; Kalogera, V.; Mandel, I.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Pitkin, M.; Price, L.; Raymond, V.; Roever, C.; Singer, L.; vanderSluys, M.; Smith, R. J. E.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Vitale, S.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of reconstructing the sky position of compact binary coalescences detected via gravitational waves is a central one for future observations with the ground-based network of gravitational-wave laser interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Different techniques for sky localization have been independently developed. They can be divided in two broad categories: fully coherent Bayesian techniques, which are high latency and aimed at in-depth studies of all the parameters of a source, including sky position, and "triangulation-based" techniques, which exploit the data products from the search stage of the analysis to provide an almost real-time approximation of the posterior probability density function of the sky location of a detection candidate. These techniques have previously been applied to data collected during the last science runs of gravitational-wave detectors operating in the so-called initial configuration. Here, we develop and analyze methods for assessing the self consistency of parameter estimation methods and carrying out fair comparisons between different algorithms, addressing issues of efficiency and optimality. These methods are general, and can be applied to parameter estimation problems other than sky localization. We apply these methods to two existing sky localization techniques representing the two above-mentioned categories, using a set of simulated inspiralonly signals from compact binary systems with a total mass of equal to or less than 20M solar mass and nonspinning components. We compare the relative advantages and costs of the two techniques and show that sky location uncertainties are on average a factor approx. equals 20 smaller for fully coherent techniques than for the specific variant of the triangulation-based technique used during the last science runs, at the expense of a factor approx. equals 1000 longer processing time.

  11. A Survey of Upper Limits on the X-ray Luminosity of a Compact Object in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Anthony Glenn; Herbst, Ashley; Tripathi, Akshat; Thongkham, Paul; Mathews, Robert; Cooper, Eric; Clark, Nina; Carino, Alexandria; Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook

    2017-06-01

    A core-collapse supernova explosion of a massive star (M > 8 Msun) leaves behind a compact stellar object (a neutron star or a black hole). However, there are a large number of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds, in which a compact object has not been detected. Based on the archival Chandra data, we select a large sample of such SNRs, excluding Type Ia SNRs, and place upper limits on the X-ray luminosity for the embedded compact object.

  12. Head-on infall of two compact objects: Third post-Newtonian energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Iyer, Bala R.

    2010-11-15

    Head-on infall of two compact objects with arbitrary mass ratio is investigated using the multipolar post-Minkowskian approximation method. At the third post-Newtonian order the energy flux, in addition to the instantaneous contributions, also includes hereditary contributions consisting of the gravitational-wave tails, tails-of-tails, and the tail-squared terms. The results are given both for infall from infinity and also for infall from a finite distance. These analytical expressions should be useful for the comparison with the high accuracy numerical relativity results within the limit in which post-Newtonian approximations are valid.

  13. Manifestations of dynamo driven large-scale magnetic field in accretion disks of compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chagelishvili, G. D.; Chanishvili, R. G.; Lominadze, J. G.; Sokhadze, Z. A.

    1991-01-01

    A turbulent dynamo nonlinear theory of turbulence was developed that shows that in the compact objects of accretion disks, the generated large-scale magnetic field (when the generation takes place) has a practically toroidal configuration. Its energy density can be much higher than turbulent pulsations energy density, and it becomes comparable with the thermal energy density of the medium. On this basis, the manifestations to which the large-scale magnetic field can lead at the accretion onto black holes and gravimagnetic rotators, respectively, are presented.

  14. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  15. A central compact object in Kes 79: the hypercritical regime and neutrino expectation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, C. G.; Fraija, N.

    2016-11-01

    We present magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a strong accretion on to magnetized proto-neutron stars for the Kesteven 79 (Kes 79) scenario. The supernova remnant Kes 79, observed with the Chandra ACIS-I instrument during approximately 8.3 h, is located in the constellation Aquila at a distance of 7.1 kpc in the galactic plane. It is a galactic and a very young object with an estimate age of 6 kyr. The Chandra image has revealed, for the first time, a point-like source at the centre of the remnant. The Kes 79 compact remnant belongs to a special class of objects, the so-called central compact objects (CCOs), which exhibits no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. In this work, we show that the submergence of the magnetic field during the hypercritical phase can explain such behaviour for Kes 79 and others CCOs. The simulations of such regime were carried out with the adaptive-mesh-refinement code FLASH in two spatial dimensions, including radiative loss by neutrinos and an adequate equation of state for such regime. From the simulations, we estimate that the number of thermal neutrinos expected on the Hyper-Kamiokande Experiment is 733 ± 364. In addition, we compute the flavour ratio on Earth for a progenitor model.

  16. Possibility of determining cosmological parameters from measurements of gravitational waves emitted by coalescing, compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Dragoljub

    1993-11-01

    We explore the feasibility of using LIGO and/or VIRGO gravitational-wave measurements of coalescing, neutron-star-neutron-star (NS-NS) binaries and black-hole-neutron-star (BH-NS) binaries at cosmological distances to determine the cosmological parameters of our Universe. From the observed gravitational waveforms one can infer, as direct observables, the luminosity distance D of the source and the binary's two ``redshifted masses,'' M'1≡M1(1+z) and M'2≡M2(1+z), where Mi are the actual masses and z≡Δλ/λ is the binary's cosmological redshift. Assuming that the NS mass spectrum is sharply peaked about 1.4Msolar, as binary pulsar and x-ray source observations suggest, the redshift can be estimated as z=M'NS/1.4Msolar-1. The actual distance-redshift relation D(z) for our Universe is strongly dependent on its cosmological parameters [the Hubble constant H0, or h0≡H0/100 km s-1Mpc-1, the mean mass density ρm, or density parameter Ω0≡(8π/3H20)ρm, and the cosmological constant, Λ, or λ0≡Λ/(3H20)], so by a statistical study of (necessarily noisy) measurements of D and z for a large number of binaries, one can deduce the cosmological parameters. The various noise sources that will plague such a cosmological study are discussed and estimated, and the accuracies of the inferred parameters are determined as functions of the detectors' noise characteristics, the number of binaries observed, and the neutron-star mass spectrum. The dominant source of error is the detectors' intrinsic noise, though stochastic gravitational lensing of the waves by intervening matter might significantly influence the inferred cosmological constant λ0, when the detectors reach ``advanced'' stages of development. The estimated errors of parameters inferred from BH-NS measurements can be described by the following rough analytic fits: Δh0/h0~=0.02(N/h0)(τR)-1/2 (for N/h0<~2), where N is the detector's noise level (strain/Hz) in units of the ``advanced LIGO'' noise level, R is the

  17. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Cosmic Collisions Online - Compact Binary Mergers, Gravitational Waves and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Hans A. Bethe elucidated our understanding of the fundamental forces of Nature by exploring and explaining countless phenomena occurring in nuclear laboratories and in stars. With the dawn of gravitational wave astronomy we now can probe compact binary mergers - Nature's cosmic collision experiments - to deepen our understanding, especially where strong-field gravitation is involved. In addition to gravitational waves, some mergers are likely to generate observable electromagnetic and/or neutrino radiation, heralding a new era of multimessenger astronomy. Robust numerical algorithms now allow us to simulate these events in full general relativity on supercomputers. We will describe some recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations that show how binary black hole-neutron star and neutron star-neutron star mergers can launch jets, lending support to the idea that such mergers could be the engines that power short gamma-ray bursts. We will also show how the magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars to spinning black holes immersed in magnetized accretion disks can launch jets as well, reinforcing the belief that such ``collapsars'' are the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts. Computer-generated movies highlighting some of these simulations will be shown. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grants 1300903 and 1602536 and NASA Grant NNX13AH44G.

  18. Acoustics of marine sediment under compaction: binary grain-size model and viscoelastic extension of Biot's theory.

    PubMed

    Leurer, Klaus C; Brown, Colin

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a model of acoustic wave propagation in unconsolidated marine sediment, including compaction, using a concept of a simplified sediment structure, modeled as a binary grain-size sphere pack. Compressional- and shear-wave velocities and attenuation follow from a combination of Biot's model, used as the general framework, and two viscoelastic extensions resulting in complex grain and frame moduli, respectively. An effective-grain model accounts for the viscoelasticity arising from local fluid flow in expandable clay minerals in clay-bearing sediments. A viscoelastic-contact model describes local fluid flow at the grain contacts. Porosity, density, and the structural Biot parameters (permeability, pore size, structure factor) as a function of pressure follow from the binary model, so that the remaining input parameters to the acoustic model consist solely of the mass fractions and the known mechanical properties of each constituent (e.g., carbonates, sand, clay, and expandable clay) of the sediment, effective pressure, or depth, and the environmental parameters (water depth, salinity, temperature). Velocity and attenuation as a function of pressure from the model are in good agreement with data on coarse- and fine-grained unconsolidated marine sediments.

  19. Analysis of objects in binary images. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Desiree M.

    1991-01-01

    Digital image processing techniques are typically used to produce improved digital images through the application of successive enhancement techniques to a given image or to generate quantitative data about the objects within that image. In support of and to assist researchers in a wide range of disciplines, e.g., interferometry, heavy rain effects on aerodynamics, and structure recognition research, it is often desirable to count objects in an image and compute their geometric properties. Therefore, an image analysis application package, focusing on a subset of image analysis techniques used for object recognition in binary images, was developed. This report describes the techniques and algorithms utilized in three main phases of the application and are categorized as: image segmentation, object recognition, and quantitative analysis. Appendices provide supplemental formulas for the algorithms employed as well as examples and results from the various image segmentation techniques and the object recognition algorithm implemented.

  20. Estimation and effects of the mass outflow from shock compressed flow around compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    1999-11-01

    Outflows are common in many astrophysical systems which contain black holes and neutron stars. Difference between stellar outflows and outflows from these systems is that the outflows in these systems have to form out of the inflowing material only. The inflowing material can form a hot and dense cloud surrounding the compact object, either because of a centrifugal barrier, or a denser barrier due to pair plasma or pre-heating effects. This barrier behaves like a stellar surface as far as the mass loss is concerned. We estimate the outflow rate from the regions of shock compressed flow. The outflow rate is directly related to the compression ratio of the gas at the shocks. These estimated rates roughly match the rates in real observations as well as those obtained from numerical experiments. In special geometries, where the solid angle of the outflow is higher, the disk evacuation takes place creating quiescence states. Outflows are shown to be important in deciding the spectral states and Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPO) of observed X-rays coming out of compact objects.

  1. Time evolution of accreting magnetofluid around a compact object-Newtonian analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Fahimeh; Shaghaghian, Mahboobeh; Pazhouhesh, Reza

    2015-07-01

    Time evolution of a thick disc with finite conductivity around a nonrotating compact object is presented. Along with the Maxwell equations and the Ohm's law, the Newtonian limit of the relativistic fluid equations governing the motion of a finitely conducting plasma is derived. The magnetofluid is considered to possess only the poloidal components of the electromagnetic field. Moreover, the shear viscous stress is neglected, as well as the self-gravity of the disc. In order to solve the equations, we have used a self-similar solution. The main features of this solution are as follows. The azimuthal velocity is somewhat increased from the Keplerian value in the equator plane to the super-Keplerian values at the surface of disc. Moreover, the radial velocity is obtained proportional to the meridional velocity. Magnetofluid does not have any nonzero component of the current density. Subsequently, the electromagnetic force is vanished and does not play any role in the force balance. While the pressure gradient maintains the disc structure in latitudinal direction, magnetofluid has no accretion on the central compact object. Analogously to the parameter α in the standard model, our calculations contain one parameter η0 which specifies the size of the electrical resistivity.

  2. ChaMPlane Survey of Compact Binaries from the Galactic Bulge to Anticenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Hong, J.; van den Berg, M.; Laycock, S.; Zhao, P.; Koenig, X.

    2006-09-01

    The Chandra Multiwavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey of the low luminosity point source population of the Galaxy has surveyed some 122 ACIS fields in the Galactic plane (b <11o) of which 85 are in the extended Bulge (| l | < 30o) and nearly 40 fields have multiple observations. Initial results on the first 13 Anticenter fields provided upper limits on the space density of CVs discovered with Chandra (Grindlay et al 2005) and reported both the X-ray (Hong et al 2005) and optical (Zhao et al 2005) processing; our initial IR photometry of the Galactic Center field (Laycock et al 2005) constrained most of these sources to be CVs or LMXBs. Here we summarize new results from a forthcoming suite of papers: numerous CV candidates have been discovered in the central Bulge fields; and candidate quiescent LMXBs or RSCVn binaries and a very large sample of coronal sources and active binaries identified spectroscopically in the unreddened foreground. The obscured central Bulge population of (predominantly) CVs, qLMXBs and luminous ABs has been mapped by X-ray spectral type (from quantile analysis) and temporal variability. Combined with our unobscured "Windows" pointings (see van den Berg et al) and the lower NH Anticenter fields, ChaMPlane is providing the first high resolution view of low luminosity sources and the nature of the Galactic Ridge.

  3. Early Detection and Localization of Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Linqing; Chu, Qi

    2013-09-01

    With the first detection of gravitational waves expected in the next decade, increasing efforts are made toward the electromagnetic follow-up observations of gravitational wave events. In this paper, I discuss the prospect of real-time detection and source localization for gravitational waves from neutron star-neutron star binary or neutron star-black hole binary coalescences before their merger. I show that several low-latency search pipelines are already under intensive development with the aim to provide real-time detections of these events. There will also be fast responding and/or wide-field electromagnetic telescopes available to help catch the electromagnetic or particle flashes possibly occurring during or immediately after their merger. It has been shown that a few coalescence events per year can be detected by advanced LIGO-VIRGO detector network tens of seconds before their merger. However, most of these events will have poor sky direction localization for the existing gravitational-wave detector network, making it extremely challenging for follow up observations by astronomical telescopes aiming at catching events around the merger time. A larger detector network including the planned detectors in Japan and in India will play an important role in improving the angular resolution and making prompt follow up observations much more realistic. A new detector at the Southern Hemisphere AIGO will further contribute significantly to this aspect.

  4. Can percolation model describe the evolution of mechanical properties of compacts of binary systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evesque, Pierre; Busignies, Virginie; Porion, Patrice; Leclerc, Bernard; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    In pharmaceutical field, the percolation theory is used to describe the change of tablet's properties with the relative density. It defines critical tablet densities from which the mechanical properties start to change. The exponent in the law is expected to be universal for a mechanical property and numerical values are proposed in the literature. In this work, the percolation model was applied to the tensile strength and the reduced modulus of elasticity of three compacted pharmaceutical excipients. This work showed that the exponent seems not universal and that the model must be used carefully.

  5. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF MAXI J1659-152: A COMPACT BINARY WITH A BLACK HOLE ACCRETOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kennea, J. A.; Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P. A.; Curran, P. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-07-20

    We report on the detection and follow-up high-cadence monitoring observations of MAXI J1659-152, a bright Galactic X-ray binary transient with a likely black hole accretor, by Swift over a 27 day period after its initial outburst detection. MAXI J1659-152 was discovered almost simultaneously by Swift and the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image on 2010 September 25, and was monitored intensively from the early stages of the outburst through the rise to a brightness of {approx}0.5 Crab by the Swift X-ray, UV/Optical, and the hard X-ray Burst Alert Telescopes. We present temporal and spectral analysis of the Swift observations. The broadband light curves show variability characteristic of black hole candidate transients. We present the evolution of thermal and non-thermal components of the 0.5-150 keV combined X-ray spectra during the outburst. MAXI J1659-152 displays accretion state changes typically associated with black hole binaries, transitioning from its initial detection in the hard state, to the steep power-law state, followed by a slow evolution toward the thermal state, signified by an increasingly dominant thermal component associated with the accretion disk, although this state change did not complete before Swift observations ended. We observe an anti-correlation between the increasing temperature and decreasing radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk, suggesting that the inner edge of the accretion disk infalls toward the black hole as the disk temperature increases. We observed significant evolution in the absorption column during the initial rise of the outburst, with the absorption almost doubling, suggestive of the presence of an evolving wind from the accretion disk. We detect quasi-periodic oscillations that evolve with the outburst, as well as irregular shaped dips that recur with a period of 2.42 {+-} 0.09 hr, strongly suggesting an orbital period that would make MAXI J1659-152 the shortest period black hole binary yet known.

  6. VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF 10 COMPACT SYMMETRIC OBJECT CANDIDATES: EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF HOT SPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    An Tao; Wu Fang; Hong Xiaoyu; Wang Weihua; Chen Xi; Yang Jun; Taylor, Gregory B.; Baan, Willem A.; Liu Xiang; Wang Min; Hao Longfei; Cui Lang E-mail: an@astron.nl

    2012-01-01

    Observations of 10 Compact Symmetric Object (CSO) candidates have been made with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 8.4 GHz in 2005 and with a combined Chinese and European Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array at 8.4 GHz in 2009. The 2009 observations incorporate for the first time the two new Chinese telescopes at Miyun and Kunming for international astrophysical observations. The observational data, in combination with archival VLBA data from previous epochs, have been used to derive the proper motions of the VLBI components. Because of the long time baseline of {approx}16 years of the VLBI data sets, the expansion velocities of the hot spots can be measured at an accuracy as high as {approx}1.3 {mu}as yr{sup -1}. Six of the ten sources are identified as CSOs with a typical double or triple morphology on the basis of both spectral index maps and their mirror symmetry of proper motions of the terminal hot spots. The compact double source J1324+4048 is also identified as a CSO candidate. Among the three remaining sources, J1756+5748 and J2312+3847 are identified as core-jet sources with proper motions of their jet components relating to systemic source expansion. The third source J0017+5312 is likely also a core-jet source, but a robust detection of a core is needed for an unambiguous identification. The kinematic ages of the CSOs derived from proper motions range from 300 to 2500 years. The kinematic age distribution of the CSOs confirm an overabundance of compact young CSOs with ages less than 500 years. CSOs with known kinematic ages may be used to study the dynamical evolution of extragalactic radio sources at early stages.

  7. Tidal interaction in compact binaries: A post-Newtonian affine framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, V.; Gualtieri, L.; Maselli, A.

    2012-02-01

    We develop a semianalytical approach, based on the post-Newtonian expansion and on the affine approximation, to model the tidal deformation of neutron stars in the coalescence of black hole-neutron star or neutron star-neutron star binaries. Our equations describe, in a unified framework, both the system orbital evolution, and the neutron star deformations. These are driven by the tidal tensor, which we expand at 1/c3 post-Newtonian order, including spin terms. We test the theoretical framework by simulating black hole-neutron star coalescence up to the onset of mass shedding, which we determine by comparing the shape of the star with the Roche lobe. We validate our approach by comparing our results with those of fully relativistic, numerical simulations.

  8. Light scalar field constraints from gravitational-wave observations of compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Horbatsch, Michael; Alsing, Justin

    2012-06-01

    Scalar-tensor theories are among the simplest extensions of general relativity. In theories with light scalars, deviations from Einstein’s theory of gravity are determined by the scalar mass ms and by a Brans-Dicke-like coupling parameter ωBD. We show that gravitational-wave observations of nonspinning neutron star-black hole binary inspirals can be used to set lower bounds on ωBD and upper bounds on the combination ms/ωBD. We estimate via a Fisher matrix analysis that individual observations with signal-to-noise ratio ρ would yield (ms/ωBD)(ρ/10)≲10-15, 10-16, and 10-19eV for Advanced LIGO, ET, and eLISA, respectively. A statistical combination of multiple observations may further improve these bounds.

  9. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers Detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Nissanke, S.; Hallinan, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2016-11-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron-generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produce radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produce γ-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan-radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of weeks. Based on the derived light curves, we suggest an optimized survey at 1.4 GHz with five epochs separated by a logarithmic time interval. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts of simulated GW-merger events to be detected by advanced LIGO and Virgo by current and future radio facilities. The detectable distances for these GW merger events could be as high as 1 Gpc. Around 20%-60% of the long-lasting radio remnants will be detectable in the case of the moderate kinetic energy of 3\\cdot {10}50 erg and a circum-merger density of 0.1 {{cm}}-3 or larger, while 5%-20% of the orphan-radio afterglows with kinetic energy of 1048 erg will be detectable. The detection likelihood increases if one focuses on the well-localizable GW events. We discuss the background noise due to radio fluxes of host galaxies and false positives arising from extragalactic radio transients and variable active galactic nuclei, and we show that the quiet radio transient sky is of great advantage when searching for the radio counterparts.

  10. The Palomar Transient Factory Orion Project: Eclipsing Binaries and Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Boden, Andrew F.; von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, Steve B.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; Ramírez, Solange V.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; Mattingly, Sean; Surace, Jason A.

    2011-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3fdg5 × 2fdg3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 ± 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known (CVSO 35) and

  11. THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY ORION PROJECT: ECLIPSING BINARIES AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; RamIrez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, Steve B.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2011-08-15

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3.{sup 0}5 x 2.{sup 0}3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 {+-} 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known

  12. On the Nature of the Compact Object in SS 433. Observational Evidence of X-Ray Photon Index Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray spectral properties observed from black hole , candidate (BHC) binary SS 433. We have analyzed Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) data from this source, coordinated with Green Bank Interferometer/RATAN-600. We show that SS 433 undergoes a X-ray spectral transition from the low hard state (LHS) to the intermediate state (IS). We show that the X-ray broad-band energy spectra during all spectral states are well fit by a sum of so called "Bulk Motion Comptonization (BMC) component" and by two (broad and narrow) Gaussians for the continuum and line emissions respectively. In addition to these spectral model components we also find a strong feature that we identify as a" blackbody-like (BB)" component which color temperature is in the range of 4-5 keV in 24 IS spectra during the radio outburst decay in SS 433. Our observational results on the "high temperature BB" bump leads us to suggest the presence of gravitationally redshifted annihilation line emission in this source. In fact this spectral feature has been recently reproduced in Monte Carlo simulations by Laurent and Titarchuk. We have also established the photon index saturation at about 2.3 in index vs mass accretion correlation. This index-mass accretion correlation allows us to evaluate the low limit of black hole (BH) mass of compact object in SS 433, M(sub bh) approximately > 2 solar masses, using the scaling method using BHC GX 339-4 as a reference source. Our estimate of the BH mass in SS 433 is consistent with recent BH mass measurement using the radial-velocity measurements of the binary system by Hillwig & Gies who find that M(sub x)( = (4.3 +/- 0.8) solar masses. This is the smallest BH mass found up to now among all BH sources. Moreover, the index saturation effect versus mass accretion rate revealed in SS 433, like in a number of other BH candidates, is the strong observational evidence for the presence of a BH in SS 433.

  13. A Kuiper Belt Pair? Artist's Concept of 2014 MU69 as a Binary Object

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-03

    This is one artist's concept of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69, the next flyby target for NASA's New Horizons mission. This binary concept is based on telescope observations made at Patagonia, Argentina, on July 17, 2017, when MU69 passed in front of a star. New Horizons scientists theorize that it could be a single body with a large chunk taken out of it, or two bodies that are close together or even touching. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21867

  14. Towards mitigating the effect of sine-Gaussian noise transients on searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sukanta; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Anuradha; Lundgren, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational wave signals were recently detected directly by LIGO from the coalescences of two stellar mass black hole pairs. These detections have strengthened our long held belief that compact binary coalescences (CBCs) are the most promising gravitational wave detection prospects accessible to ground-based interferometric detectors. For detecting CBC signals, it is of vital importance to characterize and identify non-Gaussian and nonstationary noise in these detectors. In this work, we model two important classes of transient artifacts that contribute to this noise and adversely affect the detector sensitivity to CBC signals. One of them is the sine-Gaussian "glitch," characterized by a central frequency f0 and a quality factor Q and the other is the chirping sine-Gaussian glitch, which is characterized by f0, Q as well as a chirp parameter. We study the response that a bank of compact binary inspiral templates has to these two families of glitches when they are used to match filter data containing any of these glitches. Two important characteristics of this response are the distributions of the signal-to-noise ratio and the time lag (i.e., how long after the occurrence of a glitch the signal-to-noise ratio of a trigger arises from its matched filtering by a template peaks) of individual templates. We show how these distributions differ from those when the detector data has a real CBC signal instead of a glitch. We argue that these distinctions can be utilized to develop useful signal-artifact discriminators that add negligibly to the computational cost of a CBC search. Specifically, we show how the central frequency of a glitch can be used to set adaptive time windows around it so that any template trigger occurring in that window can be quarantined for further vetting of its supposed astrophysical nature. Second, we recommend focusing efforts on reducing the incidence of glitches with low central-frequency values because they create CBC triggers with the

  15. Support vector machine as a binary classifier for automated object detection in remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardaya, P. D.

    2014-02-01

    In the present paper, author proposes the application of Support Vector Machine (SVM) for the analysis of satellite imagery. One of the advantages of SVM is that, with limited training data, it may generate comparable or even better results than the other methods. The SVM algorithm is used for automated object detection and characterization. Specifically, the SVM is applied in its basic nature as a binary classifier where it classifies two classes namely, object and background. The algorithm aims at effectively detecting an object from its background with the minimum training data. The synthetic image containing noises is used for algorithm testing. Furthermore, it is implemented to perform remote sensing image analysis such as identification of Island vegetation, water body, and oil spill from the satellite imagery. It is indicated that SVM provides the fast and accurate analysis with the acceptable result.

  16. Role of tilted congruence and f (R ) gravity on regular compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bamba, Kazuharu; Bhatti, M. Zaeem-ul-Haq

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to check the impact of observer and Palatini f (R ) terms in the formulations of inhomogeneity factors of spherical relativistic systems. We consider the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi dynamical model as a compact object and studied its evolution with both tilted and nontilted observers. We performed our analysis for particular cases of fluid distribution in tilted frame and found some energy density irregularity variables. We found that these variables are drastically different from those observed by a nontilted observer. The conformal flat dust and perfect matter contents are homogeneous as long as they impregnate vacuum core. However, this restriction is relaxed, when the complexity in the fluid description is increased. The radial fluid velocity due to tilted congruences and Palatini f (R ) curvature terms tends to produce hindrances in the appearance of energy-density inhomogeneities in the initially regular spherical stellar populations.

  17. Nuclear gamma rays from compact objects. [nuclear interactions around neutron stars and black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Accreting compact objects may be important gamma ray line sources and may explain recent observations of celestial gamma-ray line emission from a transient source in the direction of the galactic anti-center, from the galactic center, and possibly from the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The identification of the lines from the transient source requires a strong redshift. Such a redshift permits the identification of these lines with the most intense nuclear emission lines expected in nature, positron annihilation, and neutron capture on hydrogen and iron. Their production as a result of nuclear interactions in accreting gas around a neutron star is proposed. The gamma-ray line emission from the galactic center and possibly Centaurus A appears to have a surprisingly high luminosity, amounting to perhaps as much as 10% of the total luminosity of these sources. Such high gamma-ray line emission efficiencies could result from nuclear interactions in accreting gas around a massive black hole.

  18. Probing Strongly-Scattered Compact Objects Using Ultra-High-Resolution Techniques in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael Douglas

    This dissertation explores fundamental limits in radio astronomy and develops techniques that utilize the scintillation of compact objects to probe detailed properties of their emission regions and of the scattering material. I develop a statistical framework for observations with spectral resolution at or near the Nyquist limit, suitable for describing the observed statistics of strongly-scattered sources. I demonstrate that these statistics can effectively isolate the signature of an extended emission region, requiring no assumptions about the nature or distribution of the scattering material. Then, using observations of the Vela pulsar at 760 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope, I thereby achieve a spatial resolution of 4 km at the pulsar. Finally, I explore the signature of refractive scintillation on the interferometric visibility measured on long baselines, and I derive optimal correlation estimators for quantized data.

  19. Microarcsecond astrometric observatory Theia: from dark matter to compact objects and nearby earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien; Léger, Alain; Anglada Escudé, Guillem; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Spolyar, Douglas; Labadie, Lucas; Shao, Mike; Holl, Berry; Goullioud, Renaud; Crouzier, Antoine; Boehm, Céline; Krone-Martins, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Theia is a logical successor to Gaia, as a focused, very high precision astrometry mission which addresses two key science objectives of the ESA Cosmic Vision program: the nature of dark matter and the search for habitable planets. Theia addresses a number of other science cases strongly synergistic with ongoing/planned missions, such as the nature of compact objects, motions of stars in young stellar clusters, follow-up of Gaia objects of interest. Theia s "point and stare" operational mode will enable us to answer some of the most profound questions that the results of the Gaias survey will ask. Extremely-high-precision astrometry at 1-μas level can only be reached from space. The Theia spacecraft, which will carry a 0.8-m telescope, is foreseen to operate at L2 for 3,5 years. The preliminary Theia mission assessment allowed us to identify a safe and robust mission architecture that demonstrates the mission feasibility within the Soyuz ST launch envelope and a small M-class mission cost cap. We present here these features of the mission that has been submitted to the last ESA M4 call in January 2015.

  20. TRANSITS AND LENSING BY COMPACT OBJECTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD: DISRUPTED STARS ORBITING BLUE STRAGGLERS

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2011-05-15

    Kepler's first major discoveries are two hot (T > 10,000 K) small-radius objects orbiting stars in its field. A viable hypothesis is that these are the cores of stars that have each been eroded or disrupted by a companion star. The companion, which is the star monitored today, is likely to have gained mass from its now-defunct partner and can be considered to be a blue straggler. KOI-81 is almost certainly the product of stable mass transfer; KOI-74 may be as well, or it may be the first clear example of a blue straggler created through three-body interactions. We show that mass-transfer binaries are common enough that Kepler should discover {approx}1000 white dwarfs orbiting main-sequence stars. Most of these, like KOI-74 and KOI-81, will be discovered through transits, but many will be discovered through a combination of gravitational lensing and transits, while lensing will dominate for a subset. In fact, some events caused by white dwarfs will have the appearance of 'anti-transits' - i.e., short-lived enhancements in the amount of light received from the monitored star. Lensing and other mass-measurement methods provide a way to distinguish white dwarf binaries from planetary systems. This is important for the success of Kepler's primary mission, in light of the fact that white dwarf radii are similar to the radii of terrestrial planets, and that some white dwarfs will have orbital periods that place them in the habitable zones of their stellar companions. By identifying transiting and/or lensing white dwarfs, Kepler will conduct pioneering studies of white dwarfs and of the end states of mass transfer. It may also identify orbiting neutron stars or black holes. The calculations inspired by the discovery of KOI-74 and KOI-81 have implications for ground-based wide-field surveys as well as for future space-based surveys.

  1. Transits and Lensing by Compact Objects in the Kepler Field: Disrupted Stars Orbiting Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.

    2011-05-01

    Kepler's first major discoveries are two hot (T > 10,000 K) small-radius objects orbiting stars in its field. A viable hypothesis is that these are the cores of stars that have each been eroded or disrupted by a companion star. The companion, which is the star monitored today, is likely to have gained mass from its now-defunct partner and can be considered to be a blue straggler. KOI-81 is almost certainly the product of stable mass transfer; KOI-74 may be as well, or it may be the first clear example of a blue straggler created through three-body interactions. We show that mass-transfer binaries are common enough that Kepler should discover ~1000 white dwarfs orbiting main-sequence stars. Most of these, like KOI-74 and KOI-81, will be discovered through transits, but many will be discovered through a combination of gravitational lensing and transits, while lensing will dominate for a subset. In fact, some events caused by white dwarfs will have the appearance of "anti-transits"—i.e., short-lived enhancements in the amount of light received from the monitored star. Lensing and other mass-measurement methods provide a way to distinguish white dwarf binaries from planetary systems. This is important for the success of Kepler's primary mission, in light of the fact that white dwarf radii are similar to the radii of terrestrial planets, and that some white dwarfs will have orbital periods that place them in the habitable zones of their stellar companions. By identifying transiting and/or lensing white dwarfs, Kepler will conduct pioneering studies of white dwarfs and of the end states of mass transfer. It may also identify orbiting neutron stars or black holes. The calculations inspired by the discovery of KOI-74 and KOI-81 have implications for ground-based wide-field surveys as well as for future space-based surveys.

  2. [Objective assessment of facial paralysis using local binary pattern in infrared thermography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xulong; Hong, Wenxue; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Zhenying

    2013-02-01

    Facial paralysis is a frequently-occurring disease, which causes the loss of the voluntary muscles on one side of the face due to the damages the facial nerve and results in an inability to close the eye and leads to dropping of the angle of the mouth. There have been few objective methods to quantitatively diagnose it and assess this disease for clinically treating the patients so far. The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Facial paralysis usually causes an alteration of the temperature distribution of body with the disease. This paper presents the use of the histogram distance of bilateral local binary pattern (LBP) in the facial infrared thermography to measure the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution for objective assessing the severity of facial paralysis. Using this new method, we performed a controlled trial to assess the facial nerve function of the healthy subjects and the patients with Bell's palsy respectively. The results showed that the mean sensitivity and specificity of this method are 0.86 and 0.89 respectively. The correlation coefficient between the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution and the severity of facial paralysis is an average of 0.657. Therefore, the histogram distance of local binary pattern in the facial infrared thermography is an efficient clinical indicator with respect to the diagnosis and assessment of facial paralysis.

  3. COMPACT STELLAR BINARY ASSEMBLY IN THE FIRST NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS AND r-PROCESS SYNTHESIS IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; MacLeod, Morgan; Trenti, Michele; Roberts, Luke F.; Lee, William H.; Saladino-Rosas, Martha I.

    2015-04-01

    Investigations of elemental abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP-r) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-process material in CEMP-r stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP-r stars.

  4. Energy and periastron advance of compact binaries on circular orbits at the fourth post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Laura; Blanchet, Luc; Bohé, Alejandro; Faye, Guillaume; Marsat, Sylvain

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we revisit and complete our preceding work on the Fokker Lagrangian describing the dynamics of compact binary systems at the fourth post-Newtonian (4PN) order in harmonic coordinates. We clarify the impact of the nonlocal character of the Fokker Lagrangian or the associated Hamiltonian on both the conserved energy and the relativistic periastron precession for circular orbits. We show that the nonlocality of the action, due to the presence of the tail effect at the 4PN order, gives rise to an extra contribution to the conserved integral of energy with respect to the Hamiltonian computed on shell, which was not taken into account in our previous work. We also provide a direct derivation of the periastron advance by taking carefully into account this nonlocality. We then argue that the infrared (IR) divergences in the calculation of the gravitational part of the action are problematic, which motivates us to introduce a second ambiguity parameter, in addition to the one already assumed previously. After fixing these two ambiguity parameters by requiring that the conserved energy and the relativistic periastron precession for circular orbits be in agreement with numerical and analytical gravitational self-force calculations, valid in the limiting case of small mass ratio, we find that our resulting Lagrangian is physically equivalent to the one obtained in the ADM Hamiltonian approach.

  5. Three-dimensional trace measurements for fast-moving objects using binary-encoded fringe projection techniques.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Hung; Kuo, Cho-Yo; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-08-20

    A fringe projection technique to trace the shape of a fast-moving object is proposed. A binary-encoded fringe pattern is illuminated by a strobe lamp and then projected onto the moving object at a sequence of time. Phases of the projected fringes obtained from the sequent measurements are extracted by the Fourier transform method. Unwrapping is then performed with reference to the binary-encoded fringe pattern. Even though the inspected object is colorful, fringe orders can be identified. A stream of profiles is therefore retrieved from the sequent unwrapped phases. This makes it possible to analyze physical properties of the dynamic objects. Advantages of the binary-encoded fringe pattern for phase unwrapping also include (1) reliable performance for colorful objects, spatially isolated objects, and surfaces with large depth discontinuities; (2) unwrapped errors only confined in a local area; and (3) low computation cost.

  6. Escape and trapping of low-frequency gravitationally lensed rays by compact objects within plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We consider the gravitational lensing of rays emitted by a compact object (CO) within a distribution of plasma with power-law density ∝r-h. For the simplest case of a cloud of spherically symmetric cold non-magnetized plasma, the diverging effect of the plasma and the converging effect of gravitational lensing compete with one another. When h < 2, the plasma effect dominates over the vacuum Schwarzschild curvature, potentially shifting the radius of the unstable circular photon orbit outside the surface of the CO. When this occurs, we define two relatively narrow radio frequency bands in which plasma effects are particularly significant. Rays in the escape window have ω0 < ω ≤ ω+ and are free to propagate to infinity from the CO surface. To a distant observer, the visible portion of the CO surface appears to shrink as the observed frequency is reduced, and vanishes entirely at ω0, in excess of the plasma frequency at the CO surface. We define the anomalous propagation window for frequencies ω- < ω ≤ ω0. Rays emitted from the CO surface within this frequency range are dominated by optical effects from the plasma and curve back to the surface of the CO, effectively cloaking the star from distant observers. We conclude with a study of neutron star (NS) compactness ratios for a variety of nuclear matter equations of state (EoS). For h = 1, NSs generated from stiff EoS should display significant frequency dependence in the EW, and lower values of h with softer EoS can also show these effects.

  7. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of 1E1743.1-2843: Indications of a Neutron Star LMXB Nature of the Compact Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the persistent X-ray source 1E1743.1-2843, located in the Galactic Center region. The source was observed between 2012 September and October by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, providing almost simultaneous observations in the hard and soft X-ray bands. The high X-ray luminosity points to the presence of an accreting compact object. We analyze the possibilities of this accreting compact object being either a neutron star (NS) or a black hole, and conclude that the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum from 0.3 to 40 keV fits a blackbody spectrum with kT approximately 1.8 keV emitted from a hot spot or an equatorial strip on an NS surface. This spectrum is thermally Comptonized by electrons with kTe approximately 4.6 keV. Accepting this NS hypothesis, we probe the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) nature of the source. While the lack of Type-I bursts can be explained in the LMXB scenario, the absence of pulsations in the 2 MHz-49 Hz frequency range, the lack of eclipses and of an IR companion, and the lack of a Kaline from neutral or moderately ionized iron strongly disfavor interpreting this source as a HMXB. We therefore conclude that 1E1743.1-2843 is most likely an NS-LMXB located beyond the Galactic Center. There is weak statistical evidence for a soft X-ray excess which may indicate thermal emission from an accretion disk. However, the disk normalization remains unconstrained due to the high hydrogen column density (N(sub H) approximately 1.6 x 10(exp 23) cm(exp -2)).

  8. Short-Term Spectral Variability in the Binary FS CMa-Type Object MWC 728

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharikov, S. V.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of a long-term spectroscopic monitoring of the FS CM-type object MWC 728. We found that it is a binary system with a B5 ve (T1,eff = 14000±1000 K) primary and a G8 III (T2,eff ˜ 5000 K) secondary. Absorption lines of the cool star show regular variations with a semi-amplitude of ˜20 km s-1 and a period of 27.5 days. The system mass function is 2.3×10-2 M⊙, and its orbital plane is ˜ 13-15° tilted from the plane of the sky. The hot star has a projected rotational velocity of ˜110 km s-1 which implies a nearly breakup rotation at the equator. We detected strong variations of the Balmer and He I emission-line profiles on timescales from days to years. This points out to a variable stellar wind of the hot star in addition to the presence of a circum-primary gaseous disk. The strength of the absorption-line spectrum along with the optical and near-IR continuum suggest that the hot star contributes ˜60% of the V-band flux, the disk contributes ˜30%, and the cool star ˜10%.The binary system parameters, along with the interstellar extinction, suggest a distance of ˜1 kpc, that the cool star radius (˜8 R⊙) is smaller than its Roche lobe, and that the companions' mass ratio is q ˜0.5. Overall, the observed spectral variability and the presence of a strong IR-excess are in agreement with a model of a close binary system that has undergone a non-conservative mass-transfer.

  9. Strong gravitational lensing by a Konoplya-Zhidenko rotating non-Kerr compact object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shangyun; Chen, Songbai; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-11-01

    Konoplya and Zhidenko have proposed recently a rotating non-Kerr black hole metric beyond General Relativity and make an estimate for the possible deviations from the Kerr solution with the data of GW 150914. We here study the strong gravitational lensing in such a rotating non-Kerr spacetime with an extra deformation parameter. We find that the condition of existence of horizons is not inconsistent with that of the marginally circular photon orbit. Moreover, the deflection angle of the light ray near the weakly naked singularity covered by the marginally circular orbit diverges logarithmically in the strong-field limit. In the case of the completely naked singularity, the deflection angle near the singularity tends to a certain finite value, whose sign depends on the rotation parameter and the deformation parameter. These properties of strong gravitational lensing are different from those in the Johannsen-Psaltis rotating non-Kerr spacetime and in the Janis-Newman-Winicour spacetime. Modeling the supermassive central object of the Milk Way Galaxy as a Konoplya-Zhidenko rotating non-Kerr compact object, we estimated the numerical values of observables for the strong gravitational lensing including the time delay between two relativistic images.

  10. A hot compact dust disk around a massive young stellar object.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Stefan; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Menten, Karl M; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Meilland, Anthony; Perraut, Karine; Petrov, Romain; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie; Schilke, Peter; Testi, Leonardo

    2010-07-15

    Circumstellar disks are an essential ingredient of the formation of low-mass stars. It is unclear, however, whether the accretion-disk paradigm can also account for the formation of stars more massive than about 10 solar masses, in which strong radiation pressure might halt mass infall. Massive stars may form by stellar merging, although more recent theoretical investigations suggest that the radiative-pressure limit may be overcome by considering more complex, non-spherical infall geometries. Clear observational evidence, such as the detection of compact dusty disks around massive young stellar objects, is needed to identify unambiguously the formation mode of the most massive stars. Here we report near-infrared interferometric observations that spatially resolve the astronomical-unit-scale distribution of hot material around a high-mass ( approximately 20 solar masses) young stellar object. The image shows an elongated structure with a size of approximately 13 x 19 astronomical units, consistent with a disk seen at an inclination angle of approximately 45 degrees . Using geometric and detailed physical models, we found a radial temperature gradient in the disk, with a dust-free region less than 9.5 astronomical units from the star, qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the disks observed in low-mass star formation. Perpendicular to the disk plane we observed a molecular outflow and two bow shocks, indicating that a bipolar outflow emanates from the inner regions of the system.

  11. Cancer microarray data feature selection using multi-objective binary particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Annavarapu, Chandra Sekhara Rao; Dara, Suresh; Banka, Haider

    2016-01-01

    Cancer investigations in microarray data play a major role in cancer analysis and the treatment. Cancer microarray data consists of complex gene expressed patterns of cancer. In this article, a Multi-Objective Binary Particle Swarm Optimization (MOBPSO) algorithm is proposed for analyzing cancer gene expression data. Due to its high dimensionality, a fast heuristic based pre-processing technique is employed to reduce some of the crude domain features from the initial feature set. Since these pre-processed and reduced features are still high dimensional, the proposed MOBPSO algorithm is used for finding further feature subsets. The objective functions are suitably modeled by optimizing two conflicting objectives i.e., cardinality of feature subsets and distinctive capability of those selected subsets. As these two objective functions are conflicting in nature, they are more suitable for multi-objective modeling. The experiments are carried out on benchmark gene expression datasets, i.e., Colon, Lymphoma and Leukaemia available in literature. The performance of the selected feature subsets with their classification accuracy and validated using 10 fold cross validation techniques. A detailed comparative study is also made to show the betterment or competitiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  12. 1RXS J180408.9-342058: An ultra compact X-ray binary candidate with a transient jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present a detailed near-infrared/optical/UV study of the transient low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 performed during its 2015 outburst, which is aimed at determining the nature of its companion star. Methods: We obtained three optical spectra (R ~ 1000) at the 2.1 m San Pedro Mártir Observatory telescope (México). We performed optical and NIR photometric observations with both the REM telescope and the New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla. We obtained optical and UV observations from the Swift archive. Finally, we performed optical polarimetry of the source using the EFOSC2 instrument mounted on the NTT. Results: The optical spectrum of the source is almost featureless since the hydrogen and He I emissions lines, typically observed in LMXBs, are not detected. Similarly, carbon and oxygen lines are not observed either. We marginally detect the He II 4686 Å emission line, suggesting the presence of helium in the accretion disc. No significant optical polarisation level was observed. Conclusions: The lack of hydrogen and He I emission lines in the spectrum implies that the companion is likely not a main-sequence star. Driven by the tentative detection of the He II 4686 Å emission line, we suggest that the system could harbour a helium white dwarf. If this is the case, 1RXS J180408.9-342058 would be an ultra-compact X-ray binary. By combining an estimate of the mass accretion rate together with evolutionary tracks for a He white dwarf, we obtain a tentative orbital period of ~40 min. We also built the NIR-optical-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source at two different epochs. One SED was gathered when the source was in the soft X-ray state and this SED is consistent with the presence of a single thermal component. The second SED, obtained when the source was in the hard X-ray state, shows a thermal component along with a tail in the NIR, which likely indicates the presence of a (transient) jet. Based on observations made with

  13. Hunting for Buried Treasure: Prospecting for a Population of Compact Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; DeWitt, C.; Gosling, A. J.; Blundell, K.; Blum, R.; Olsen, K.; Sarajedini, A.

    2010-03-01

    I describe the observational campaign we have undertaken to determine the nature of the faint discrete X-ray source population discovered in the Galactic Center (GC). Data obtained to date includes a deep Chandra survey; deep, high resolution IR imaging from VLT/ISAAC, CTIO/ISPI, and the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey; and IR spectroscopy from VLT/ISAAC and IRTF/SpeX. Astrometric cross-correlation of our ISAAC imaging with the revised X-ray source position catalogs from Muno et al. (2003, 2006) results in a statistically significant excess in the number of candidate IR counterparts to the 130 X-ray sources encompassed within our 26 ISAAC fields. Cross-correlation of our ISPI imaging of the central 17' square around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 Chandra sources, with the X-ray catalog reveals 2214 candidate IR counterparts. We explore the likelihood of these astrometric matches being actual physical counterparts and find that, statistically, 443+/-56 are likely to be true counterparts. We categorize these matches by X-ray and IR characteristics (hardness, colour, magnitude). After statistical analysis, we find that by selecting carefully from the subset of X-ray hard, highly reddened candidate matches, we can identify 91 IR sources which have a 45% probability of being true physical counterparts. In both the ISAAC and ISPI data we find an over-abundance of relatively unextinguished, bright, blue candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources as compared to the IR field star population. It is likely that these matches are dominated by local, massive X-ray active stars. We will use the multi-object IR spectrograph FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South to perform a spectroscopic survey of the identified candidate counterparts, to search for emission line signatures which are a hallmark of accreting binaries. By determining the nature of these X-ray sources, this FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey will have a dramatic impact on our knowledge of the Galactic accreting binary

  14. Characterization of enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors and studies of numeric simulations for compact-binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekowsky, Larne

    Gravitational waves are a consequence of the general theory of relativity. Direct detection of such waves will provide a wealth of information about physics, astronomy, and cosmology. A worldwide effort is currently underway to make the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The global network of detectors includes the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which recently completed its sixth science run. A particularly promising source of gravitational waves is a binary system consisting of two neutron stars and/or black holes. As the objects orbit each other they emit gravitational radiation, lose energy, and spiral inwards. This produces a characteristic "chirp" signal for which we can search in the LIGO data. Currently this is done using matched-filter techniques, which correlate the detector data against analytic models of the emitted gravitational waves. Several choices must be made in constructing a search for signals from such binary coalescences. Any discrepancy between the signals and the models used will reduce the effectiveness of the matched filter. However, the analytic models are based on approximations which are not valid through the entire evolution of the binary. In recent years numerical relativity has had impressive success in simulating the final phases of the coalescence of binary black holes. While numerical relativity is too computationally expensive to use directly in the search, this progress has made it possible to perform realistic tests of the LIGO searches. The results of such tests can be used to improve the efficiency of searches. Conversely, noise in the LIGO and Virgo detectors can reduce the efficiency. This must be addressed by characterizing the quality of the data from the detectors, and removing from the analysis times that will be detrimental to the search. In this thesis we utilize recent results from numerical relativity to study both the degree to which analytic models match realistic waveforms

  15. Observations of Mutual Eclipses by the Binary Kuiper Belt Object Manwe-Thorondor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Benecchi, Susan D.; Grundy, William M.; Thirouin, Audrey; Verbiscer, Anne J.

    2016-10-01

    The binary Kuiper Belt Object (385446) Manwe-Thorondor (aka 2003 QW111) is currently undergoing mutual events whereby the two ~100-km bodies alternately eclipse and occult each other as seen from Earth [1]. Such events are extremely rare among KBOs (Pluto-Charon and Sila-Nunam being notable exceptions). For Manwe-Thorondor, the events occur over ~0.5-d periods 4 to 5 times per year until the end of 2019. Here we report the results of observations to be made with the Soar 4m telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile on 2016 Aug 25 and 26 UT, covering one of the deepest predicted eclipses. We use these observations to constrain the rotational variability of the two bodies, determine their physical properties (size, shape, albedo, density), and set limits on the presence of any prominent surface features.[1] Grundy, W. et al. 2012, Icarus, 220, 74

  16. HUBBLE HUNTS DOWN BINARY OBJECTS AT FRINGE OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope snapped pictures of a double system of icy bodies in the Kuiper Belt. This composite picture shows the apparent orbit of one member of the pair. In reality, the objects, called 1998 WW31, revolve around a common center of gravity, like a pair of waltzing skaters. This picture shows the motion of one member of the duo [the six faint blobs] relative to the other [the large white blob]. The blue oval represents the orbital path. Astronomers assembled this picture from six separate exposures, taken from July to September 2001, December 2001, and January to February 2002. Astronomers used the Hubble telescope to study the orbit of this binary system. They then used that information to determine other characteristics of the duo, such as their total mass, and their orbital period (the time it takes them to orbit each other). Credit: NASA and C. Veillet (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope)

  17. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  18. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  19. On the diversity of compact objects within supernova remnants - II. Energy-loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2017-02-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are commonly attributed to the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This emission mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori, typically causing a discrepancy between the characteristic age and the associated supernova remnant (SNR) age. We focus on neutron stars with `anomalous' magnetic fields that have established SNR associations and known ages. Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are usually described in terms of the magnetar model that posits a large magnetic field established by dynamo action. The high magnetic field pulsars (HBPs) have extremely large magnetic fields just above quantum electrodynamics scale (but below that of the AXPs and SGRs), and central compact objects (CCOs) may have buried fields that will emerge in the future as nascent magnetars. In the first part of this series, we examined magnetic field growth as a method of uniting the CCOs with HBPs and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) through evolution. In this work, we constrain the characteristic age of these neutron stars using the related SNR age for a variety of energy-loss mechanisms and allowing for arbitrary initial spin periods. In addition to the SNR age, we also use the observed braking indices and X-ray luminosities to constrain the models.

  20. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF DISRUPTED RECYCLED PULSARS: NO REFUGE FOR ORPHANED CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Allen, B.; Knispel, B.

    2013-08-20

    We present a Chandra X-ray survey of the disrupted recycled pulsars (DRPs), isolated radio pulsars with P > 20 ms and B{sub s} < 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} G. These observations were motivated as a search for the immediate descendants of the Almost-Equal-To 10 central compact objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants (SNRs), 3 of which have similar timing and magnetic properties as the DRPs, but are bright, thermal X-ray sources consistent with minimal neutron star (NS) cooling curves. Since none of the DPRs were detected in this survey, there is no evidence that they are ''orphaned'' CCOs, NSs whose SNRs has dissipated. Upper limits on their thermal X-ray luminosities are in the range of log L{sub x} [erg s{sup -1}] = 31.8-32.8, which implies cooling ages >10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr, roughly 10 times the ages of the Almost-Equal-To 10 known CCOs in a similar volume of the Galaxy. The order of a hundred CCO descendants that could be detected by this method are thus either intrinsically radio quiet or occupy a different region of (P, B{sub s} ) parameter space from the DRPs. This motivates a new X-ray search for orphaned CCOs among radio pulsars with larger B-fields, which could verify the theory that their fields are buried by the fall-back of supernova ejecta, but quickly regrow to join the normal pulsar population.

  1. Evidence for Recent Resurfacing of the Binary Kuiper Belt Object 1997 CS29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Schaefer, B.; Schaefer, M.; Tourtellotte, S.

    2009-09-01

    At solar phase angles less than 0.1 deg, some icy bodies exhibit an extraordinary opposition surge, suddenly brightening by 50% at near zero phase. Verbiscer et al [1] observed this phenomena for the icy Galilean satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea and suggest the surge results from the light-scattering properties of freshly resurfaced icy regoliths. Buratti et al [2] and Earle et al [3] observed a similarly sharp opposition surge on Neptune's icy satellite Triton, which is known to have active cryovolcanoes. Here we examine the solar phase curves of 9 Trans-Neptunian Objects that we have measured at phase angles smaller than 0.1 deg (Rabinowitz et al [4], Schaefer et al [5]), including previously unpublished observations 1997 CS29 and 2005 UJ438. This sample includes hot and cold classical Kuiper-Belt objects, Plutinos, Centaurs, and three binary TNOs. Of all these targets, only 1997 CS29 has a sharp surge at near zero phase, and a nearly flat phase curve at large angles. Since this target is also a binary with an unusually large and close companion [6], we suggest that both 1997 CS29 and its companion have been resurfaced by each other's impact ejecta via the mechanism proposed by Stern [7], with fresh surface material producing the opposition spike. [1] Verbiscer, A., et al. 2007, Science, 315, 815; [2] Buratti, B. et al. 2007, Workshop on Ices, Oceans, and Fire: Satellites of the Outer Solar System, Boulder Colorado; [3] Earle, D., et al. 2008, BAAS, 40, 480; [4] Rabinowitz, D. et al. 2007, AJ, 133, 26; [5] Schaefer, B., et al. 2009, AJ, 137, 129; [6] Stephens, D. & Knoll, K. 2006, AJ, 131,1142;[7] Stern, S. A. 2009, Icarus, 199, 571.

  2. WHAT IS ON TAP? THE ROLE OF SPIN IN COMPACT OBJECTS AND RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Walton, Dominic J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Nandra, Kirpaul

    2013-07-10

    We examine the role of spin in launching jets from compact objects across the mass scale. Our work includes 3 different Seyfert samples with a total of 37 unique Seyferts, as well as 11 stellar-mass black holes, and 13 neutron stars. We find that when the Seyfert reflection lines are modeled with simple Gaussian line features (a crude proxy for inner disk radius and therefore spin), only a slight inverse correlation is found between the Doppler-corrected radio luminosity at 5 GHz (a proxy for jet power) and line width. When the Seyfert reflection features are fit with more relativistically blurred disk reflection models that measure spin, there is a tentative positive correlation between the Doppler-corrected radio luminosity and the spin measurement. Further, when we include stellar-mass black holes in the sample, to examine the effects across the mass scale, we find a slightly stronger correlation with radio luminosity per unit mass and spin, at a marginal significance (2.3{sigma} confidence level). Finally, when we include neutron stars, in order to probe lower spin values, we find a positive correlation (3.3{sigma} confidence level) between radio luminosity per unit mass and spin. Although tentative, these results suggest that spin may have a role in determining the jet luminosity. In addition, we find a slightly more significant correlation (4.4{sigma} and 4.1{sigma} confidence level, respectively) between radio luminosity per bolometric luminosity and spin, as well as radio luminosity corrected for the fundamental plane (i.e., log ({nu}L{sub R}/L{sub Bol}{sup 0.67}/M{sub BH}{sup 0.78})) and spin, using our entire sample of black holes and neutrons stars. Again, although tentative, these relations point to the possibility that the mass accretion rate, i.e., bolometric luminosity, is also important in determining the jet luminosity, in addition to spin. Our analysis suggests that mass accretion rate and disk or coronal magnetic field strength may be the

  3. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Grover, Katherine; Mandel, Ilya; Vecchio, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity (GR). Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER (test infrastructure for general relativity), have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from GR can be detected, Cornish et al (2011 Phys. Rev. D 84 062003) and Vallisneri (2012 Phys. Rev. D 86 082001) recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a GR gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrized by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signal and the fitting factor (FF) between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within GR. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula against an exact numerical calculation of the Bayes factor using the lalinference library. We find that, using frequency-domain waveforms, the approximate scheme predicts exact results with good accuracy, providing the correct scaling with the SNR at a FF value of 0.992 and the correct scaling with the FF at a SNR of 20, down to a FF of ˜ 0.9. We extend the framework for the approximate calculation of the Bayes factor, which significantly increases its range of validity, at least to FFs of ˜ 0.7 or higher.

  4. The Compact Central Object in Cassiopeia A: A Neutron Star with Hot Polar Caps or a Black Hole?

    PubMed

    Pavlov; Zavlin; Aschenbach; Trümper; Sanwal

    2000-03-01

    The central pointlike X-ray source of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant was discovered in the Chandra first light observation and found later in the archival ROSAT and Einstein images. The analysis of these data does not show statistically significant variability of the source. Because of the small number of photons detected, different spectral models can fit the observed spectrum. The power-law fit yields the photon index gamma=2.6-4.1, and luminosity L(0.1-5.0 keV&parr0;=&parl0;2-60&parr0;x1034 ergs s-1 for d=3.4 kpc. The power-law index is higher, and the luminosity lower, than those observed from very young pulsars. One can fit the spectrum equally well with a blackbody model with T=6-8 MK, R=0.2-0.5 km, and Lbol=&parl0;1.4-1.9&parr0;x1033 ergs s-1. The inferred radii are too small, and the temperatures too high, for the radiation to be interpreted as emitted from the whole surface of a uniformly heated neutron star. Fits with the neutron star atmosphere models increase the radius and reduce the temperature, but these parameters are still substantially different from those expected for a young neutron star. One cannot exclude, however, the possibility that the observed emission originates from hot spots on a cooler neutron star surface. An upper limit on the (gravitationally redshifted) surface temperature is Tinfinitys<1.9-2.3 MK, depending on the chemical composition of the surface and the star's radius. Among several possible interpretations, we favor a model of a strongly magnetized neutron star with magnetically confined hydrogen or helium polar caps (Tinfinitypc approximately 2.8 MK, Rpc approximately 1 km) on a cooler iron surface (Tinfinitys approximately 1.7 MK). Such temperatures are consistent with the standard models of neutron star cooling. Alternatively, the observed radiation may be interpreted as emitted by a compact object (more likely, a black hole) accreting from a residual disk or from a late-type dwarf in a close binary.

  5. Physical Characterization of the Binary Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object 2001 QT297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osip, David J.; Kern, S. D.; Elliot, J. L.

    2003-06-01

    Following our discovery of 2001 QT297 as the second known binary Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object (EKBO) in October of 2001 [IAUC 7733], we have carried out additional high spatial resolution ground based imaging in October and November of 2001 and July, August, and September of 2002. Using the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Magellan Instant Camera (MagIC) on the Baade and Clay 6.5 m telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, we have obtained accurate astrometric and photometric measurements in the Sloan r', i', and g' filters. Superb seeing conditions and PSF fitting allow an accurate determination of the binary component separation and position angle over time as well as a detailed study of color and temporal variability of the individual components. Here we present a physical characterization of the individual components of 2001 QT297 based on these astrometric, color and variability measurements. We find the primary to exhibit colors about 0.3 magnitudes redder than solar with no evidence for variability. The secondary component, however, exhibits strong variability (~0.6 magnitudes) with a best fit period of 4.7526 +/- 0.0007 h for a single peak lightcurve or 9.505 +/- 0.001 h for a dual peaked lightcurve. The colors measured for the secondary also suggest variability. Based on a preliminary orbit fit for the pair using observations spanning a one year arc, we are able to estimate a system mass of ~ 3.2 × 1018 kg and provide constraints to the surface albedo of 9-14% for assumed densities between 1 and 2 g/cm3.

  6. Formalism for testing theories of gravity using lensing by compact objects: Static, spherically symmetric case

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, Charles R.; Petters, A.O.

    2005-11-15

    We are developing a general, unified, and rigorous analytical framework for using gravitational lensing by compact objects to test different theories of gravity beyond the weak-deflection limit. In this paper we present the formalism for computing corrections to lensing observables for static, spherically symmetric gravity theories in which the corrections to the weak-deflection limit can be expanded as a Taylor series in one parameter, namely, the gravitational radius of the lens object. We take care to derive coordinate-independent expressions and compute quantities that are directly observable. We compute series expansions for the observables that are accurate to second order in the ratio {epsilon}={theta} /{theta}{sub E} of the angle subtended by the lens's gravitational radius to the weak-deflection Einstein radius, which scales with mass as {epsilon}{proportional_to}M {sup 1/2}. The positions, magnifications, and time delays of the individual images have corrections at both first and second order in {epsilon}, as does the differential time delay between the two images. Interestingly, we find that the first-order corrections to the total magnification and centroid position vanish in all gravity theories that agree with general relativity in the weak-deflection limit, but they can remain nonzero in modified theories that disagree with general relativity in the weak-deflection limit. For the Reissner-Nordstroem metric and a related metric from heterotic string theory, our formalism reveals an intriguing connection between lensing observables and the condition for having a naked singularity, which could provide an observational method for testing the existence of such objects. We apply our formalism to the galactic black hole and predict that the corrections to the image positions are at the level of 10 {mu}arc s (microarcseconds), while the correction to the time delay is a few hundredths of a second. These corrections would be measurable today if a pulsar were

  7. New constraints on the cooling of the central compact object in CAS A

    SciTech Connect

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Suleimanov, V.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2013-12-20

    To examine the previously claimed fast cooling of the Central Compact Object (CCO) in the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR), we analyzed two Chandra observations of this CCO, taken in a setup minimizing instrumental spectral distortions. We fit the two CCO X-ray spectra from 2006 and 2012 with hydrogen and carbon neutron star atmosphere models. The temperature and flux changes in the 5.5 yr between the two epochs depend on the adopted constraints on the fitting parameters and the uncertainties of the effective area calibrations. If we allow a change of the equivalent emitting region size, R {sub Em}, the effective temperature remains essentially the same. If R {sub Em} is held constant, the best-fit temperature change is negative, but its statistical significance ranges from 0.8σ to 2.5σ, depending on the model. If we assume that the optical depth of the ACIS filter contaminant in 2012 was ±10% different from its default calibration value, the significance of the temperature drop becomes 0.8σ-3.1σ, for the carbon atmospheres with constant R {sub Em}. Thus, we do not see a statistically significant temperature drop in our data, but the involved uncertainties are too large to firmly exclude the previously reported fast cooling. Our analysis indicate a decrease of 4%-6% (1.9σ-2.9σ significance) for the absorbed flux in the energy range 0.6-6 keV between 2006 and 2012, most prominent in the ≈1.4-1.8 keV energy range. It could be caused by unaccounted changes of the detector response or contributions from unresolved SNR material along the line of sight to the CCO.

  8. KINETIC THEORY OF EQUILIBRIUM AXISYMMETRIC COLLISIONLESS PLASMAS IN OFF-EQUATORIAL TORI AROUND COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-11-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modeling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion disks. However, accretion disk coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can also be determined in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than a fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic, multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution function are constructed, which are expressed in terms of generalized Maxwellian functions characterized by isotropic temperature and non-uniform fluid fields. The conditions for the existence of off-equatorial tori are investigated. It is proved that these levitating systems are admitted under general conditions when both gravitational and magnetic fields contribute to shaping the spatial profiles of equilibrium plasma fluid fields. Then, specifically, kinetic effects carried by the equilibrium solution are explicitly provided and identified here with diamagnetic energy-correction and electrostatic contributions. It is shown that these kinetic terms characterize the plasma equation of state by introducing non-vanishing deviations from the assumption of thermal pressure.

  9. Kinetic Theory of Equilibrium Axisymmetric Collisionless Plasmas in Off-equatorial Tori around Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-11-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modeling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion disks. However, accretion disk coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can also be determined in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than a fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic, multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution function are constructed, which are expressed in terms of generalized Maxwellian functions characterized by isotropic temperature and non-uniform fluid fields. The conditions for the existence of off-equatorial tori are investigated. It is proved that these levitating systems are admitted under general conditions when both gravitational and magnetic fields contribute to shaping the spatial profiles of equilibrium plasma fluid fields. Then, specifically, kinetic effects carried by the equilibrium solution are explicitly provided and identified here with diamagnetic energy-correction and electrostatic contributions. It is shown that these kinetic terms characterize the plasma equation of state by introducing non-vanishing deviations from the assumption of thermal pressure.

  10. Kilonova light curves from the disc wind outflows of compact object mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Fernández, Rodrigo; Metzger, Brian D.

    2015-06-01

    We study the radioactively powered transients produced by accretion disc winds following a compact object merger. Based on the outflows found in two-dimensional hydrodynamical disc models, we use wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic light curves and spectra. We show that resulting kilonova transients generally produce both optical and infrared emission, with the brightness and colour carrying information about the merger physics. In those regions of the wind subject to high neutrino irradiation, r-process nucleosynthesis may halt before producing high-opacity, complex ions (the lanthanides). The kilonova light curves thus typically has two distinct components: a brief (˜2 d) blue optical transient produced in the outer lanthanide-free ejecta, and a longer (˜10 d) infrared transient produced in the inner, lanthanide line-blanketed region. Mergers producing a longer lived neutron star, or a more rapidly spinning black hole, have stronger neutrino irradiation, generate more lanthanide-free ejecta and are optically brighter and bluer. At least some optical emission is produced in all disc wind models, which should enhance the detectability of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources. However, the presence of even a small amount (10-4 M⊙) of overlying, neutron-rich dynamical ejecta will act as a `lanthanide-curtain', obscuring the optical wind emission from certain viewing angles. Because the disc outflows have moderate velocities (˜10 000 km s-1), numerous resolved line features are discernible in the spectra, distinguishing disc winds from fast-moving dynamical ejecta, and offering a potential diagnostic of the detailed composition of freshly produced r-process material.

  11. What is on Tap? The Role of Spin in Compact Objects and Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Gültekin, Kayhan; Walton, Dominic J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Nandra, Kirpaul

    2013-07-01

    We examine the role of spin in launching jets from compact objects across the mass scale. Our work includes 3 different Seyfert samples with a total of 37 unique Seyferts, as well as 11 stellar-mass black holes, and 13 neutron stars. We find that when the Seyfert reflection lines are modeled with simple Gaussian line features (a crude proxy for inner disk radius and therefore spin), only a slight inverse correlation is found between the Doppler-corrected radio luminosity at 5 GHz (a proxy for jet power) and line width. When the Seyfert reflection features are fit with more relativistically blurred disk reflection models that measure spin, there is a tentative positive correlation between the Doppler-corrected radio luminosity and the spin measurement. Further, when we include stellar-mass black holes in the sample, to examine the effects across the mass scale, we find a slightly stronger correlation with radio luminosity per unit mass and spin, at a marginal significance (2.3σ confidence level). Finally, when we include neutron stars, in order to probe lower spin values, we find a positive correlation (3.3σ confidence level) between radio luminosity per unit mass and spin. Although tentative, these results suggest that spin may have a role in determining the jet luminosity. In addition, we find a slightly more significant correlation (4.4σ and 4.1σ confidence level, respectively) between radio luminosity per bolometric luminosity and spin, as well as radio luminosity corrected for the fundamental plane (i.e., log (\

  12. A DEDICATED CHANDRA ACIS OBSERVATION OF THE CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECT IN THE CASSIOPEIA A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, G. G.; Luna, G. J. M. E-mail: gluna@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-09-20

    We present results of a recent Chandra X-ray Observatory observation of the central compact object (CCO) in the supernova remnant (SNR) Cassiopeia A. This observation was carried out in an instrumental configuration that combines a high spatial resolution with a minimum spectral distortion, and it allowed us to search for pulsations with periods longer than {approx}0.68 s. We found no evidence of extended emission associated with the CCO, nor statistically significant pulsations (the 3{sigma} upper limit on pulsed fraction is about 16%). The fits of the CCO spectrum with the power-law model yield a large photon index, {Gamma} {approx} 5, and a hydrogen column density larger than that obtained from the SNR spectra. The fits with the blackbody model are statistically unacceptable. Better fits are provided by hydrogen neutron star atmosphere models, with the best-fit effective temperature kT{sup {infinity}}{sub eff} {approx} 0.2 keV, but they require a small star's radius, R = 4-5.5 km, and a low mass, M {approx}< 0.8 M{sub sun}. A neutron star cannot have so small radius and mass, but the observed emission might emerge from an atmosphere of a strange quark star. More likely, the CCO could be a neutron star with a nonuniform surface temperature and a low surface magnetic field (the so-called anti-magnetar), similar to three other CCOs for which upper limits on period derivative have been established. The bolometric luminosity, L{sup {infinity}}{sub bol} {approx} 6 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}, estimated from the fits with the hydrogen atmosphere models is consistent with the standard neutron star cooling for the CCO age of 330 yr. The origin of the surface temperature's nonuniformity remains to be understood; it might be caused by anisotropic heat conduction in the neutron star crust with very strong toroidal magnetic fields.

  13. Stability of coorbital objects around the Pluto-Charon binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarante, A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary system is dynamical interesting with its retinue of four small moons. The system is relatively full with few remaining stable locations evenly-spaced for additional moons on uninclined, circular orbits; most of these are Trojan (Tadpole/Horseshoe) orbits (Pires et al. 2011; Porter and Stern 2015). In this work, we study the coorbital region of each moon with long time integrations taking into account the gravitational effects of the satellites Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra. We numerically simulate a sample of 10,000 test particles initially located randomly around each moon's orbit (Figure). All test particles start on nearly circular and uninclined orbits and are followed for 5000 years. The results of our numerical simulations show stable coorbital objects - both Tadpoles and Horseshoes - for each of the small moons (Table). Horseshoe orbits are most common at all moons, although Hydra also has a sizeable population of Tadpole orbits. We also find interesting cases where the orbits switch from L4 Tadpoles to Horseshoes and even to L5 Tadpoles. These transitioning orbits comprise less than 1% of coorbital objects at all moons, and are most common at Styx. We have also investigated eccentric and inclined orbits and will report on our findings.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet tomography using a compact laser-plasma source for 3D reconstruction of low density objects.

    PubMed

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Węgrzyński, Łukasz; Zápražný, Zdenko; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fok, Tomasz; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Miroslaw; Korytár, Dusan; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2014-02-01

    A tomographic method for three-dimensional reconstruction of low density objects is presented and discussed. The experiment was performed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region using a desktop system for enhanced optical contrast and employing a compact laser-plasma EUV source, based on a double stream gas puff target. The system allows for volume reconstruction of transient gaseous objects, in this case gas jets, providing additional information for further characterization and optimization. Experimental details and reconstruction results are shown.

  15. HALO RETENTION AND EVOLUTION OF COALESCING COMPACT BINARIES IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF STRUCTURE FORMATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zemp, Marcel; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Diemand, Juerg E-mail: enrico@ucolick.or

    2009-11-10

    Merging compact binaries are the one source of gravitational radiation so far identified. Because short-period systems that will merge in less than a Hubble time have already been observed as binary pulsars, they are important both as gravitational wave sources for observatories such as LIGO, but also as progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The fact that these systems must have large systemic velocities implies that by the time they merge, they will be far from their formation site. The locations of merging sites depend sensitively on the gravitational potential of the galaxy host, which until now has been assumed to be static. Here we refine such calculations to incorporate the temporal evolution of the host's gravitational potential as well as that of its nearby neighbors using cosmological simulations of structure formation. This results in merger site distributions that are more diffusively distributed with respect to their putative hosts, with locations extending out to distances of a few Mpc for lighter halos. The degree of mixing between neighboring compact binary populations computed in this way is severely enhanced in environments with a high number density of galaxies. We find that SGRB redshift estimates based solely on the nearest galaxy in projection can be very inaccurate, if progenitor systems inhere large systematic kicks at birth.

  16. Polarimetric and spectroscopic optical observations of the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; Mainetti, D.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Russell, D. M.; Shahbaz, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present a polarimetric and spectroscopic study of the persistent ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 aimed at searching for the emission of a relativistic particle jet and at unveiling the orbital period Porb of the system. Methods: We obtained r-band polarimetric observations with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) equipped with the PAOLO polarimeter and with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with the ALFOSC instrument, covering ~2 h and ~0.5 h observations, respectively. We carried out low resolution spectroscopy of the system using the ESO Very Large Telescope equipped with FORS1 for ~1.5 h (16 spectra covering the range 4300-8000 Å). Results: The polarimetric analysis performed starting from the TNG dataset revealed a polarisation degree in the r-band of 3% ± 1%. From the NOT dataset, due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio, we could obtain only a 3σ upper limit of 3.4%. From the joining of a spectroscopic and photometric analysis, through the study of the equivalent width variations of the CII 7240 Å line and the r-band light curve, we could find a hint of a ~45 min periodicity. Conclusions: A polarisation degree P of ~3% in the r-band is consistent with the emission of a relativistic particle jet, which is supposed to emit intrinsically linearly polarised synchrotron radiation. Since no variations of P with time have been detected, and the accretion disc of the system does not contain ionised hydrogen, scattering by free electrons in the accretion disc has been rejected. The period of ~45 min obtained through the analysis of the system light curve and of the equivalent width variations of the selected spectral line is probably linked to the presence of a hot spot or a superhump in the accretion disc, and lead to an orbital period ≳1 h for the binary system. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto

  17. Searching for gravitational-waves from compact binary coalescences while dealing with challenges of real data and simulated waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanga, Waduthanthree Thilina

    Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts the existence of gravitational waves (GWs). Direct detection of GWs will provide enormous amount of new information about physics, astronomy and cosmology. Scientists around the world are currently working towards the first direct detection of GWs. The global network of ground-based GW detectors are currently preparing for their first advanced detector Science runs. In this thesis we focus on detection of GWs from compact binary coalescence (CBC) systems. Ability to accurately model CBC GW waveforms makes them the most promising source for the first direct detection of GWs. In this thesis we try to address several challenges associated with detecting CBC signals buried in ground-based GW detector data for past and future searches. Data analysis techniques we employ to detect GW signals assume detector noise is Gaussian and stationary. However, in reality, detector data is neither Gaussian nor stationary. To estimate the performance loss due to these features, we compare the efficiencies of detecting CBC signals in simulated Gaussian and real data. Additionally, we also demonstrate the effectiveness of multi-detector signal based consistency tests such ad null-stream. Despite, non-Gaussian and non-stationary features of real detector data, with effective data quality studies and signal-based vetoes we can approach the performance of Gaussian and stationary data. As we are moving towards advanced detector era, it is important to be prepared for future CBC searches. In this thesis we investigate the performances of non-spinning binary black hole (BBH) searches in simulated Gaussian using advanced detector noise curves predicted for 2015--2016. In the same study, we analyze the GW detection probabilities of latest pN-NR hybrid waveforms submitted to second version of Numerical Injection Analysis (NINJA-2) project. The main motivation for this study is to understand the ability to detect realistic BBH signals of

  18. A blind hierarchical coherent search for gravitational-wave signals from coalescing compact binaries in a network of interferometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sukanta; Dayanga, Thilina; Ghosh, Shaon; Talukder, Dipongkar

    2011-07-01

    We describe a hierarchical data analysis pipeline for coherently searching for gravitational-wave signals from non-spinning compact binary coalescences (CBCs) in the data of multiple earth-based detectors. This search assumes no prior information on the sky position of the source or the time of occurrence of its transient signals and, hence, is termed 'blind'. The pipeline computes the coherent network search statistic that is optimal in stationary, Gaussian noise. More importantly, it allows for the computation of a suite of alternative multi-detector coherent search statistics and signal-based discriminators that can improve the performance of CBC searches in real data, which can be both non-stationary and non-Gaussian. Also, unlike the coincident multi-detector search statistics that have been employed so far, the coherent statistics are different in the sense that they check for the consistency of the signal amplitudes and phases in the different detectors with their different orientations and with the signal arrival times in them. Since the computation of coherent statistics entails searching in the sky, it is more expensive than that of the coincident statistics that do not require it. To reduce computational costs, the first stage of the hierarchical pipeline constructs coincidences of triggers from the multiple interferometers, by requiring their proximity in time and component masses. The second stage follows up on these coincident triggers by computing the coherent statistics. Here, we compare the performances of this hierarchical pipeline with and without the second (or coherent) stage in Gaussian noise. Although introducing hierarchy can be expected to cause some degradation in the detection efficiency compared to that of a single-stage coherent pipeline, nevertheless it improves the computational speed of the search considerably. The two main results of this work are as follows: (1) the performance of the hierarchical coherent pipeline on Gaussian data

  19. Quark Phase Transition in Compact Objects and Multimessenger Astronomy: Neutrino Signals, Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.; Vlasyuk, V. V.; Petkov, V. B.

    2016-06-01

    The International Workshop on Quark Phase Transition in Compact Objects and Multimessenger Astronomy: Neutrino Signals, Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts (October, 7-14, 2015) was dedicated to Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) Phase Transitions and observational signals of these transitions related to formation of compact astrophysical objects. The aim of this workshop was to bring together researchers working on the problems of behavior of matter under critical conditions achievable in such astrophysical objects as "strange" or "hybrid" stars and in laboratories at heavy-ion collisions to discuss fundamental issues and recent developments. Topics included both observations (radio, optical and X-ray astronomy, gamma ray bursts, gravitational waves, neutrino detection, heavy-ion collisions, etc.) and theory (supernova simulations, proto-neutron and neutron stars, equation of state of dense matter, neutron star cooling, unstable modes, nucleosynthesis, explosive transitions, quark-gluon plasma).

  20. A Low Density for Binary Kuiper Belt Object (26308) 1998 SM165

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, John R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Noll, K. S.

    2006-09-01

    The densities of Kuiper Belt objects provide valuable clues to their composition, internal structure, and origin. To extend our limited knowledge of KBO densities, we have been attempting to obtain radiometric diameters for binary KBOs, which have masses determined from the satellite orbits, using the MIPS mid-IR imager on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Due to higher than expected KBO albedos, and MIPS's lower than expected 70 µm sensitivity, our 2006 campaign concentrated on long exposures on a single target, (26308) 1998 SM165, one of the brightest and warmest known KBO binaries. 7.5 hour integration times at both 24 and 70 µm yielded monochromatic fluxes of 0.11 ± 0.01 mJy at 23.7 microns and 6.1 ± 1.1 mJy at 71.4 microns. From these we derive a relatively model-independent diameter of 287 ± 36 km for the primary and 96 ± 12 km for the satellite, assuming similar albedos. The derived V geometric albedo (using HV = 6.13, Romanishin and Tegler 2006 Icarus 179 523) is 0.07 ± 0.02. The system mass from HST (Margot et al. 2004, DPS 36, 08.03) then yields a system density of 0.51 +0.29 -0.14 g cm-3, comparable to that for KBO (47171) 1999 TC36 (Stansberry et al. 2006, Ap. J. 643, 556). This density is also comparable to that of the similarly-sized planetary satellites Amalthea (D=200 km, ρ=0.86) and Hyperion (D=250 km, ρ=0.6), but much lower than the density of Phoebe (D=200 km, ρ=1.63), and suggests both high porosity and a dominantly water ice composition for this KBO, despite its low albedo and red color. Supporting visible-wavelength lightcurve observations obtained at Lowell Observatory also yielded a revised rotation rate of 8.40 ± 0.05 hours for 1998 SM165.

  1. A Circumbinary Disk Scenario for the Negative Orbital-period Derivative of the Ultra-compact X-Ray Binary 4U 1820-303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Long; Chen, Wen-Cong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-03-01

    It is generally thought that an ultra-compact X-ray Binary is composed of a neutron star and a helium white dwarf donor star. As one of the most compact binaries, 4U 1820-303 in globular cluster NGC 6624 was predicted to have an orbital period of \\dot{P}/P∼ 1.1× {10}-7 yr‑1 if the mass transfer is fully driven by gravitational radiation. However, recent analysis of 16 year data from Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and other historical records has yielded a negative orbital-period derivative in the past 35 years. In this work, we propose an evolutionary circumbinary (CB) disk model to account for this anomalous orbital-period derivative. 4U 1820-30 is known to undergo superburst events caused by runaway thermal nuclear burning on the neutron star. We assume that, for a small fraction of the superbursts, part of the ejected material may form a CB disk around the binary. If the recurrence time of such superbursts is ∼10,000 year and ∼10% of the ejected mass feeds a CB disk, the abrupt angular-momentum loss causes a temporary orbital shrink, and the donor’s radius and its Roche lobe radius do not keep in step. Driven by mass transfer and angular-momentum loss, the binary would adjust its orbital parameters to recover a new stable stage. Based on theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, we find that the required feed mass at the CB disk is approximately ∼10‑8 M ⊙.

  2. Understanding Compact Object Formation and Natal Kicks. IV. The Case of IC 10 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Ansari, Asna; Fragos, Tassos; Glebbeek, Evert; Kalogera, Vassiliki; McClintock, Jeffrey

    2014-08-01

    The extragalactic X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has attracted attention as it is possibly the host of the most massive stellar-mass black-hole (BH) known to date. Here we consider all available observational constraints and construct its evolutionary history up to the instant just before the formation of the BH. Our analysis accounts for the simplest possible history, which includes three evolutionary phases: binary orbital dynamics at core collapse, common envelope (CE) evolution, and evolution of the BH-helium star binary progenitor of the observed system. We derive the complete set of constraints on the progenitor system at various evolutionary stages. Specifically, right before the core collapse event, we find the mass of the BH immediate progenitor to be >~ 31 M ⊙ (at 95% of confidence, same hereafter). The magnitude of the natal kick imparted to the BH is constrained to be <~ 130 km s-1. Furthermore, we find that the "enthalpy" formalism recently suggested by Ivanova & Chaichenets is able to explain the existence of IC 10 X-1 without the need to invoke unreasonably high CE efficiencies. With this physically motivated formalism, we find that the CE efficiency required to explain the system is in the range of ~= 0.6-1.

  3. Understanding compact object formation and natal kicks. IV. The case of IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Ansari, Asna; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey; Glebbeek, Evert E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ansari@ldeo.columbia.edu

    2014-08-01

    The extragalactic X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has attracted attention as it is possibly the host of the most massive stellar-mass black-hole (BH) known to date. Here we consider all available observational constraints and construct its evolutionary history up to the instant just before the formation of the BH. Our analysis accounts for the simplest possible history, which includes three evolutionary phases: binary orbital dynamics at core collapse, common envelope (CE) evolution, and evolution of the BH-helium star binary progenitor of the observed system. We derive the complete set of constraints on the progenitor system at various evolutionary stages. Specifically, right before the core collapse event, we find the mass of the BH immediate progenitor to be ≳ 31 M{sub ☉} (at 95% of confidence, same hereafter). The magnitude of the natal kick imparted to the BH is constrained to be ≲ 130 km s{sup –1}. Furthermore, we find that the 'enthalpy' formalism recently suggested by Ivanova and Chaichenets is able to explain the existence of IC 10 X-1 without the need to invoke unreasonably high CE efficiencies. With this physically motivated formalism, we find that the CE efficiency required to explain the system is in the range of ≅ 0.6-1.

  4. To the horizon and beyond: Weak lensing of the CMB and binary inspirals into horizonless objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael

    This thesis examines two predictions of general relativity: weak lensing and gravitational waves. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is gravitationally lensed by the large-scale structure between the observer and the last- scattering surface. This weak lensing induces non-Gaussian correlations that can be used to construct estimators for the deflection field. The error and bias of these estimators are derived and used to analyze the viability of lensing reconstruction for future CMB experiments. Weak lensing also affects the one-point probability distribution function of the CMB. The skewness and kurtosis induced by lensing and the Sunayev- Zel'dovich (SZ) effect are calculated as functions of the angular smoothing scale of the map. While these functions offer the advantage of easy computability, only the skewness from lensing-SZ correlations can potentially be detected, even in the limit of the largest amplitude fluctuations allowed by observation. Lensing estimators are also essential to constrain inflation, the favored explanation for large-scale isotropy and the origin of primordial perturbations. B-mode polarization is considered to be a "smoking-gun" signature of inflation, and lensing estimators can be used to recover primordial B-modes from lensing-induced contamination. The ability of future CMB experiments to constrain inflation is assessed as functions of survey size and instrumental sensitivity. A final application of lensing estimators is to constrain a possible cutoff in primordial density perturbations on near-horizon scales. The paucity of independent modes on such scales limits the statistical certainty of such a constraint. Measurements of the deflection field can be used to constrain at the 3s level the existence of a cutoff large enough to account for current CMB observations. A final chapter of this thesis considers an independent topic: the gravitational-wave (GW) signature of a binary inspiral into a horizonless object. If the supermassive

  5. Anti-magnetars: Revealing the Pulsar Properties of Central Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, Eric

    This proposal is to fund the analysis of large data sets that we were awarded in XMM- Newton AO9 to search for the pulsation periods and measure the spin-down rates of Central Compact Objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants (SNRs). These observations include a Large Program (350 ks) to search for the pulsar in Cas A, and a multi-epoch timing program (200 ks total) to measure the spin-down rate and dipole magnetic field strength of the newly discovered 0.112 s PSR J0821-4300 in Puppis A. These observations are motivated by growing evidence that the class of CCOs, which are detected only in X-rays and are the least conspicuous of young neutron stars, are characterized by weak dipole magnetic fields and relatively long initial spin periods. As such, they may comprise a large fraction of neutron star births. From upper limits that we established on their spin-down rates, as well as one measurement of P-dot in a CCO, we developed the "anti-magnetar" model, which describes CCOs as pulsars with even weaker magnetic fields (B_s = 1.e10-1.e11 G) than ordinary young pulsars. The approved observations will provide strong confirmation of this model if the expected slow spin-down rate of PSR J0821-4300 is measured, and if similar spin properties are discovered from the Cas A CCO. The remaining mystery of CCOs is what maintains their small, hot regions of surface thermal X-ray emission. Spin-down power is insufficient; otherwise, only the effects of strong (B_s > 1.e13 G) magnetic fields are thought able to enforce nonuniform surface temperature, in apparent contradiction to the anti-magnetar hypothesis. We will apply a detailed ray-tracing code to model the energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra of PSR J0821-430 and other CCOs in order to determine the geometry of their surface hot spots with respect to the rotation axis and viewing direction. Evidence for cyclotron resonance lines in the spectra will also be modeled as a function of rotation phase, which will

  6. A STATE TRANSITION OF THE LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARY IN THE LOW-METALLICITY BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXY I Zw 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaret, Philip; Feng Hua

    2013-06-10

    We present a measurement of the X-ray spectrum of the luminous X-ray binary in I Zw 18, the blue compact dwarf galaxy with the lowest known metallicity. We find the highest flux yet observed, corresponding to an intrinsic luminosity near 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} establishing it as an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX). The energy spectrum is dominated by disk emission with a weak or absent Compton component and there is no significant timing noise; both are indicative of the thermal state of stellar-mass black hole X-ray binaries and inconsistent with the Compton-dominated state typical of most ULX spectra. A previous measurement of the X-ray spectrum shows a harder spectrum that is well described by a power law. Thus, the binary appears to exhibit spectral states similar to those observed from stellar-mass black hole binaries. If the hard state occurs in the range of luminosities found for the hard state in stellar-mass black hole binaries, then the black hole mass must be at least 85 M{sub Sun }. Spectral fitting of the thermal state shows that disk luminosities for which thin disk models are expected to be valid are produced only for relatively high disk inclinations, {approx}> 60 Degree-Sign , and rapid black hole spins. We find a{sub *} > 0.98 and M > 154 M{sub Sun} for a disk inclination of 60 Degree-Sign . Higher inclinations produce higher masses and somewhat lower spins.

  7. The Compact Central Object in the RX J0852.0-4622 Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, George G.; Sanwal, Divas; Kızıltan, Bülent; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2001-10-01

    The central region of the recently discovered supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 was observed with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer detector aboard the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We found only one relatively bright source, about 4' north of the SNR center, with a flux of ~2×10-12 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-10 keV band. The position of this pointlike source, CXOU J085201.4-461753, rules out its association with the two bright stars in the field, HD 76060 and Wray 16-30. Observations of the field with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 0.9 m telescope show a star (R~17, B~19) at about 2.4" from the nominal X-ray position. We consider association of this star with the X-ray source unlikely and estimate a limiting magnitude of the optical counterpart as B>=22.5 and R>=21.0. Based on the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio, we argue that the X-ray source is likely the compact remnant of the supernova explosion that created the RX J0852.0-4622 SNR. The observed X-ray spectrum of the source is softer than spectra of magnetospheric radiation of rotation-powered pulsars, but it is harder than spectra of cooling neutron stars emitting thermal radiation from the entire surface, similar to the central compact source of the Cas A SNR. We suggest that CXOU J085201.4-461753 belongs to the growing family of radio-quiet compact central sources, presumably neutron stars, recently discovered in a number of SNRs.

  8. Quasiperiodic Oscillations in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Klis, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The term quasiperiodic oscillation (QPO) is used in high-energy astrophysics for any type of non-periodic variability that is constrained to a relatively narrow range of variability frequencies. X-RAY BINARIES are systems in which a `compact object', either a BLACK HOLE or a NEUTRON STAR, orbits a normal star and captures matter from it. The matter spirals down to the compact object and heats up ...

  9. HIDES spectroscopy of bright detached eclipsing binaries from the Kepler field - II. Double- and triple-lined objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Sybilski, P.; Maehara, H.; Ratajczak, M.; Konacki, M.; Pawłaszek, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of our spectroscopic observations of eight detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from high-resolution spectra obtained with the HIgh-Dispersion Echelle Spectrograph (HIDES) spectrograph, attached to the 1.88-m telescope of the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and were used to characterize the targets in combination with the Kepler light curves. For each binary, we obtained a full set of orbital and physical parameters, reaching precision below 3 per cent in masses and radii for five pairs. By comparing our results with theoretical models, we assess the distance, age and evolutionary status of the researched objects. We also study eclipse timing variations of selected objects, and identify a new system with a γDor pulsator. Two systems are triples, and show lines coming from three components. In one case, the motion of the outer star and the perturbation in the RVs of the inner binary are clearly visible and periodical, which allows us to directly calculate the mass of the third star and inclination of the outer orbit. In the second case, we only see a clear motion of the tertiary and investigate two scenarios: that it is a linear trend coming from the orbital motion around the inner binary and that it is caused by a planetary mass companion. When possible, we also compare our results with the literature, and conclude that only by combining photometry with RVs, it is possible to obtain correct physical parameters of both components of a DEB.

  10. Lightman-Eardley instabilities and accretion disk thickening. [for compact astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    After reviewing the role of Compton scattering in accretion disks around black holes, it is discussed whether Lightman-Eardley (LE) secular instabilities can trigger and maintain Pringle-Rees (PR) thermal instabilities. The radiative-transfer-equation and equation-of-state criteria for LE stability in alpha-viscosity-law disk models and dynamic viscosity criteria for more general situations is derived. On the basis of these considerations the LE instability is insufficient for inducing PR instabilities and hot thick inner regions important in accretion-disk models of compact hard X-ray sources. The density thinning due to radial velocity gradients in the accretion flow is suggested as a more likely and satisfactory mechanism.

  11. Lightman-Eardley instabilities and accretion disk thickening. [for compact astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    After reviewing the role of Compton scattering in accretion disks around black holes, it is discussed whether Lightman-Eardley (LE) secular instabilities can trigger and maintain Pringle-Rees (PR) thermal instabilities. The radiative-transfer-equation and equation-of-state criteria for LE stability in alpha-viscosity-law disk models and dynamic viscosity criteria for more general situations is derived. On the basis of these considerations the LE instability is insufficient for inducing PR instabilities and hot thick inner regions important in accretion-disk models of compact hard X-ray sources. The density thinning due to radial velocity gradients in the accretion flow is suggested as a more likely and satisfactory mechanism.

  12. Topics of LIGO physics: Template banks for the inspiral of precessing, compact binaries, and design of the signal-recycling cavity for advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi

    This thesis deals with the detection of gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of precessing, compact binaries using interferometric gravitational- wave detectors (e.g., LIGO), and the design of the signal-recycling cavity for Advanced LIGO (the second generation LIGO). The detection of complicated signals from the inspiral of precessing binaries using the standard matched filter technique requires a computational cost far exceeding what is available with current technology. Alessandra Buonanno, Yanbei Chen, and Michele Vallisneri (BCV) proposed the use of detection template families (DTFs)---phenomenological templates capable of mimicking inspiral waveforms while having simpler functional forms. In Chapter 2 (in collaboration with BCV, and Hideyuki Tagoshi), a BCV2 DTF suggested by BCV is studied. We show a good signal-matching performance of this DTF, propose a template-placement strategy, and estimate that the computational cost required by this DTF is feasible. We also propose a BCV2P DTF to estimate binary parameters. In Chapters 3 and 4 (in collaboration with BCV), I investigate a physical template family (PTF) suggested by BCV. This PTF uses the most accurate known waveforms for inspiraling, precessing binaries with one spinning component, formulated using a new precessing convention to reduce computational cost. PTF has the obvious advantages of a perfect signal snatching, a lower false-alarm rate, and direct estimates of binary parameters. We show how this PTF can be used to detect inspiral waveforms from general precessing binaries. The second part of this thesis concerns a potential problem in the current design of the signal-recycling cavity (SRC) for Advanced LIGO: The SRC is nearly degenerate. In Chapter 5, I show with a numerical simulation that if the current design is used, there will be a serious constraint on the magnitude of mirror deformations, in order to keep the reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio below a few percent. This

  13. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Benacquista, Matthew J; Downing, Jonathan M B

    2013-01-01

    Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10(4)-10(6) stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  14. INTEGRAL Observations of the Ultra-compact X-ray Binary 4U 1543-624 in Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Ludlam, R. M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Kuulkers, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Bozzo, E.

    2017-09-01

    4U 1543-624 is an X-ray binary that typically emits at a steady but low X-ray flux. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of millisecond variability, nor Type-1 X-ray bursts, nor other clear hallmarks of a neutron star primary in 4U 1543-624.

  15. New constraints on macroscopic compact objects as dark matter candidates from gravitational lensing of type Ia supernovae.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, R Benton; Silk, Joseph

    2007-02-16

    We use the distribution, and particularly the skewness, of high redshift type Ia supernovae brightnesses relative to the low redshift sample to constrain the density of macroscopic compact objects (MCOs) in the Universe. The supernova data favor dark matter made of microscopic particles (such as the lightest supersymmetric partner) over MCOs with masses between 10(-2)Mo and 10(10)Mo at 89% confidence. Future data will greatly improve this limit. Combined with other constraints, MCOs larger than one-tenth the mass of Earth (approximately 10(-7)Mo) can be eliminated as the sole constituent of dark matter.

  16. New Constraints on Macroscopic Compact Objects as Dark Matter Candidates from Gravitational Lensing of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, R. Benton; Silk, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    We use the distribution, and particularly the skewness, of high redshift type Ia supernovae brightnesses relative to the low redshift sample to constrain the density of macroscopic compact objects (MCOs) in the Universe. The supernova data favor dark matter made of microscopic particles (such as the lightest supersymmetric partner) over MCOs with masses between 10-2M⊙ and 1010M⊙ at 89% confidence. Future data will greatly improve this limit. Combined with other constraints, MCOs larger than one-tenth the mass of Earth (˜10-7M⊙) can be eliminated as the sole constituent of dark matter.

  17. Multi-baseline signal consistency tests in searches for gravitational-wave signals in LIGO and Virgo detectors from compact binary coalescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanga, Thilina; Bose, Sukanta

    2011-04-01

    The non-Gaussian and non-stationary nature of real data is known to hurt the performance of gravitational wave signal searches. Incorporating signal-based discriminators that exploit the differences between the time-frequency structure of signals and noise artifacts has been shown to improve their performance for modeled sources. However, the power of these discriminators varies across the signal parameter space. Here we study how the performance of the null-stream statistic for detecting compact binary coalescence signals in a multi-baseline network varies as a function of the sky. We report results on simulated Gaussian data with LIGO sensitivities, with and without signal injections. We compare them with those expected theoretically. These results serve as benchmarks for subsequent studies in real data, and can help in formulating data-analysis strategies for reducing the gap in performance of search pipelines in real and Gaussian data.

  18. TRANSITION FROM REGULAR TO CHAOTIC CIRCULATION IN MAGNETIZED CORONAE NEAR COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopacek, O.; Karas, V.; Kovar, J.; StuchlIk, Z.

    2010-10-20

    Accretion onto black holes and compact stars brings material in a zone of strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. We study dynamical properties of motion of electrically charged particles forming a highly diluted medium (a corona) in the regime of strong gravity and large-scale (ordered) magnetic field. We start our work from a system that allows regular motion, then we focus on the onset of chaos. To this end, we investigate the case of a rotating black hole immersed in a weak, asymptotically uniform magnetic field. We also consider a magnetic star, approximated by the Schwarzschild metric and a test magnetic field of a rotating dipole. These are two model examples of systems permitting energetically bound, off-equatorial motion of matter confined to the halo lobes that encircle the central body. Our approach allows us to address the question of whether the spin parameter of the black hole plays any major role in determining the degree of the chaoticness. To characterize the motion, we construct the recurrence plots (RPs) and we compare them with Poincare surfaces of section. We describe the RPs in terms of the recurrence quantification analysis, which allows us to identify the transition between different dynamical regimes. We demonstrate that this new technique is able to detect the chaos onset very efficiently and provide its quantitative measure. The chaos typically occurs when the conserved energy is raised to a sufficiently high level that allows the particles to traverse the equatorial plane. We find that the role of the black hole spin in setting the chaos is more complicated than initially thought.

  19. Radiography with cosmic-ray and compact accelerator muons; Exploring inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms

    PubMed Central

    NAGAMINE, Kanetada

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons (CRM) arriving from the sky on the surface of the earth are now known to be used as radiography purposes to explore the inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms, ranging in thickness from meter to kilometers scale, such as volcanic mountains, blast furnaces, nuclear reactors etc. At the same time, by using muons produced by compact accelerators (CAM), advanced radiography can be realized for objects with a thickness in the sub-millimeter to meter range, with additional exploration capability such as element identification and bio-chemical analysis. In the present report, principles, methods and specific research examples of CRM transmission radiography are summarized after which, principles, methods and perspective views of the future CAM radiography are described. PMID:27725469

  20. Radiography with cosmic-ray and compact accelerator muons; Exploring inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons (CRM) arriving from the sky on the surface of the earth are now known to be used as radiography purposes to explore the inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms, ranging in thickness from meter to kilometers scale, such as volcanic mountains, blast furnaces, nuclear reactors etc. At the same time, by using muons produced by compact accelerators (CAM), advanced radiography can be realized for objects with a thickness in the sub-millimeter to meter range, with additional exploration capability such as element identification and bio-chemical analysis. In the present report, principles, methods and specific research examples of CRM transmission radiography are summarized after which, principles, methods and perspective views of the future CAM radiography are described.

  1. TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agathos, M.; Del Pozzo, W.; Li, T. G. F.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Veitch, J.; Vitale, S.

    2014-04-01

    The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general relativity (GR) for the first time. We have developed a data analysis pipeline called TIGER (test infrastructure for general relativity), which uses signals from compact binary coalescences to perform a model-independent test of GR. In this paper we focus on signals from coalescing binary neutron stars, for which sufficiently accurate waveform models are already available which can be generated fast enough on a computer that they can be used in Bayesian inference. By performing numerical experiments in stationary, Gaussian noise, we show that for such systems, TIGER is robust against a number of unmodeled fundamental, astrophysical, and instrumental effects, such as differences between waveform approximants, a limited number of post-Newtonian phase contributions being known, the effects of neutron star tidal deformability on the orbital motion, neutron star spins, and instrumental calibration errors.

  2. Stable Levitation and Alignment of Compact Objects by Casimir Spring Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Zaheer, Saad

    2010-02-19

    We investigate a stable Casimir force configuration consisting of an object contained inside a spherical or spheroidal cavity filled with a dielectric medium. The spring constant for displacements from the center of the cavity and the dependence of the energy on the relative orientations of the inner object and the cavity walls are computed. We find that the stability of the force equilibrium--unlike the direction of the torque--can be predicted based on the sign of the force between two slabs of the same material.

  3. Exploring a New Population of Compact Objects: X-ray and IR Observations of the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Gosling, Andrew J.; Eikenberry, Stephen E.; Muno, Michael P.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Mikles, Valerie J.; Dewitt, Curtis

    2008-10-01

    I describe the IR and X-ray observational campaign we have undertaken for the purpose of determining the nature of the faint discrete X-ray source population discovered by Chandra in the Galactic Center (GC). Data obtained for this project includes a deep Chandra survey of the Galactic Bulge; deep, high resolution IR imaging from VLT/ISAAC, CTIO/ISPI, and the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) and IR spectroscopy from VLT/ISAAC and IRTF/SpeX. By cross-correlating the GC X-ray imaging from Chandra with our IR surveys, we identify candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources via astrometry. Using a detailed IR extinction map, we are deriving magnitudes and colors for all the candidates. Having thus established a target list, we will use the multi-object IR spectrograph FLAMINGOS-2 on Gemini-South to carry out a spectroscopic survey of the candidate counterparts, to search for emission line signatures which are a hallmark of accreting binaries. By determining the nature of these X-ray sources, this FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey will have a dramatic impact on our knowledge of the Galactic accreting binary population.

  4. In search of a signature of binary Kuiper Belt Objects in the Pluto-Charon crater population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, Amanda Marie; Parker, Alex; Singer, Kelsi N.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Weaver, Harold A.; New Horizons Geology, Geophysics and Imaging Science Theme Team

    2016-10-01

    In July 2015, New Horizons flew by Pluto and Charon, allowing mapping of the encounter hemisphere at high enough resolution to produce crater counts from the surfaces of the pair. We investigate the distribution of craters in search of a signature of binary impactors. The Kuiper Belt -- especially the cold classical region -- has a large fraction of binary objects, many of which are close-in, equal-mass binaries. We will present results on how the distribution of craters seen on Pluto and Charon compares to a random distribution of single body impactors on the surfaces of each. Examining the surfaces of Pluto and Charon proves challenging due to resurfacing, and the presence of tectonic and other geographic features. For example, the informally-named Cthulhu region is among the oldest on Pluto, yet it abuts a craterless region millions of years young. On Charon, chastmata divide the surface into regions informally named Vulcan Planum and Oz terra. In our statistics, we pay careful attention to the boundaries of where craters may appear, and the dependence of our results on crater size. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  5. Reconstruction of binary geological images using analytical edge and object models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahifard, Mohammad J.; Ahmadi, Sadegh

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction of fields using partial measurements is of vital importance in different applications in geosciences. Solving such an ill-posed problem requires a well-chosen model. In recent years, training images (TI) are widely employed as strong prior models for solving these problems. However, in the absence of enough evidence it is difficult to find an adequate TI which is capable of describing the field behavior properly. In this paper a very simple and general model is introduced which is applicable to a fairly wide range of binary images without any modifications. The model is motivated by the fact that nearly all binary images are composed of simple linear edges in micro-scale. The analytic essence of this model allows us to formulate the template matching problem as a convex optimization problem having efficient and fast solutions. The model has the potential to incorporate the qualitative and quantitative information provided by geologists. The image reconstruction problem is also formulated as an optimization problem and solved using an iterative greedy approach. The proposed method is capable of recovering the image unknown values with accuracies about 90% given samples representing as few as 2% of the original image.

  6. Hydrodynamic, Atomic Kinetic, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer Models of the X-ray Spectra of Compact Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2008-02-08

    We describe the results of an effort, funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, to model, using FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamic simulations, XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC atomic data, and Monte Carlo radiation transport, the radiatively-driven photoionized wind and accretion flow of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this final report, we describe the purpose, approach, and technical accomplishments of this effort, including maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of the X-ray emission lines of the well-studied HMXB Vela X-1.

  7. MACHO 96-LMC-2: Lensing of a Binary Source in the Large Magellanic Cloud and Constraints on the Lensing Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.; Nelson, C. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Popowski, P.; Pratt, M. R.; Quinn, P. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sutherland, W.; Tomaney, A. B.; Vandehei, T.; Welch, D.

    2001-05-01

    We present photometry and analysis of the microlensing alert MACHO 96-LMC-2 (event LMC-14 in an earlier paper). This event was initially detected by the MACHO Alert System and subsequently monitored by the Global Microlensing Alert Network (GMAN). The ~3% photometry provided by the GMAN follow-up effort reveals a periodic modulation in the light curve. We attribute this to binarity of the lensed source. Microlensing fits to a rotating binary source magnified by a single lens converge on two minima, separated by Δχ2~1. The most significant fit X1 predicts a primary which contributes ~100% of the light, a dark secondary, and an orbital period (T) of ~9.2 days. The second fit X2 yields a binary source with two stars of roughly equal mass and luminosity and T=21.2 days. Observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)18 resolve stellar neighbors which contribute to the MACHO object's baseline brightness. The actual lensed object appears to lie on the upper LMC main sequence. We estimate the mass of the primary component of the binary system, M~2 Msolar. This helps to determine the physical size of the orbiting system and allows a measurement of the lens proper motion. For the preferred model X1, we explore the range of dark companions by assuming 0.1 Msolar and 1.4 Msolar objects in models X1a and X1b, respectively. We find lens velocities projected to the LMC in these models of vX1a=18.3+/-3.1 km s-1 and vX1b=188+/-32 km s-1. In both these cases, a likelihood analysis suggests an LMC lens is preferred over a Galactic halo lens, although only marginally so in model X1b. We also find vX2=39.6+/-6.1 km s-1, where the likelihood for the lens location is strongly dominated by the LMC disk. In all cases, the lens mass is consistent with that of an M dwarf. Additional spectra of the lensed source system are necessary to further constrain and/or refine the derived properties of the lensing object. The LMC self-lensing rate contributed by 96-LMC-2 is consistent with

  8. Binary Black Holes from Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The recent detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of compact object astrophysics. But to fully utilize this new window into the universe, we must compare these observations to detailed models of binary black hole formation throughout cosmic time. In this talk, I will review our current understanding of cluster dynamics, describing how binary black holes can be formed through gravitational interactions in dense stellar environments, such as globular clusters and galactic nuclei. I will review the properties and merger rates of binary black holes from the dynamical formation channel. Finally, I will describe how the spins of a binary black hole are determined by its formation history, and how we can use this to discriminate between dynamically-formed binaries and those formed from isolated evolution in galactic fields.

  9. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  10. Planets or Pretense?: The Search for Substellar Objects around Post Common Envelope Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Adam; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Parsons, Steven; Caceres, Claudio; Canovas, Hector

    2015-12-01

    Many believe post-common envelope binary systems (PCEBs), consisting of a white dwarf and a close main-sequence companion, host a unique class of planetary system. Given the well known age and history of the host binary stars, these systems have the potential to provide new insights into the evolution of planetary systems. However, the existence of the planets should be treated with some skepticism as their presence has so far been inferred only by the indirect method of eclipse timing variations. This method has proved somewhat flawed, as many of the claimed planetary systems have been found dynamically unstable, and others have dramatically failed when confronted with more recent high-precision times. It is therefore of the utmost importance that complementary observations be performed to test the planetary hypothesis, and we have recently performed two such pioneering observations:1. We use SPHERE on the VLT to image the PCEB V471 Tau. A circumbinary companion to this PCEB has been predicted for more than 30 years with eclipse timings, but only recently has a direct detection become technically possible.2. We use ALMA to search for dusty material around the young PCEB NN Ser. The planetary model for NN Ser is one of the most convincing, and these planets would likely be present alongside considerable dusty material, now detectable thanks to the sensitivity of ALMA.I will present the results of these two important observations and discuss their far-reaching implications for the existence and charactistics of planetary systems around PCEBs.

  11. Towards a formalism for mapping the spacetimes of massive compact objects: Bumpy black holes and their orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Nathan A.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2004-06-01

    Astronomical observations have established that extremely compact, massive objects are common in the Universe. It is generally accepted that these objects are, in all likelihood, black holes. As observational technology has improved, it has become possible to test this hypothesis in ever greater detail. In particular, it is or will be possible to measure the properties of orbits deep in the strong field of a black hole candidate (using x-ray timing or future gravitational-wave measurements) and to test whether they have the characteristics of black hole orbits in general relativity. Past work has shown that, in principle, such measurements can be used to map the spacetime of a massive compact object, testing in particular whether the object’s multipolar structure satisfies the rather strict constraints imposed by the black hole hypothesis. Performing such a test in practice requires that we be able to compare against objects with the “wrong” multipole structure. In this paper, we present tools for constructing the spacetimes of bumpy black holes: objects that are almost black holes, but that have some multipoles with the wrong value. In this first analysis, we focus on objects with no angular momentum. Generalization to bumpy Kerr black holes should be straightforward, albeit labor intensive. Our construction has two particularly desirable properties. First, the spacetimes which we present are good deep into the strong field of the object—we do not use a “large r” expansion (except to make contact with weak field intuition). Second, our spacetimes reduce to the exact black hole spacetimes of general relativity in a natural way, by dialing the “bumpiness” of the black hole to zero. We propose that bumpy black holes can be used as the foundation for a null experiment: if black hole candidates are indeed the black holes of general relativity, their bumpiness should be zero. By comparing the properties of orbits in a bumpy spacetime with those measured

  12. Compact OAM microscope for edge enhancement of biomedical and object samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozali, Richard; Nguyen, Thien-An; Bendau, Ethan; Alfano, Robert R.

    2017-09-01

    The production of orbital angular momentum (OAM) by using a q-plate, which functions as an electrically tunable spatial frequency filter, provides a simple and efficient method of edge contrast in biological and medical sample imaging for histological evaluation of tissue, smears, and PAP smears. An instrument producing OAM, such as a q-plate, situated at the Fourier plane of a 4f lens system, similar to the use of a high-pass spatial filter, allows the passage of high spatial frequencies and enables the production of an image with highly illuminated edges contrasted against a dark background for both opaque and transparent objects. Compared with ordinary spiral phase plates and spatial light modulators, the q-plate has the added advantage of electric control and tunability.

  13. Topics of LIGO physics: Quantum noise in advanced interferometers and template banks for compact-binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanbei

    2003-12-01

    This thesis deals with the planning for advanced interferometeric gravitational-wave detectors, as well as the detection of inspiral waves using first-generation interferometers. In Chapters 2 4 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno), the signal recycling interferometer proposed for LIGO-II is studied in the two-photon formalism. This study reveals the optical spring effect, which allows the interferometer to beat the standard quantum limit, while in the same time introduces a dynamical instability. A classical control system is designed to suppress this instability. In Chapter 5 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Nergis Mavalvala), the quantum noise in heterodyne readout schemes for advanced interferometers is studied. In Chapter 6 (in collaboration with Patricia Purdue), a QND Speed-Meter interferometer with Michelson topology is proposed, analyzed and shown to be a promising candidate for third-generation interferometers (LIGO-III or EURO). This design requires adding a kilometer-scale cavity into the interferometer. In Chapter 7, Sagnac interferometers are analyzed and shown to exhibit a similar broadband QND performance without the need of additional cavity—as expected since these interferometers are sensitive only to time-dependent mirror displacement, and are automatic speed meters. In Chapter 8 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Michele Vallisneri), the Post-Newtonian (PN) breakdown at late-stage inspirals of non-spinning binary black holes (with 5 M⊙ < m1, m2 < 20 M⊙ ) is studied. We propose the use of Detection Template Families (DTFs)—extensions of ordinary PN templates that can mimic all different PN waveforms and hence are plausible to catch the real waveform, yet do not provide straightforward parameter estimation. In Chapter 9 (in collaboration with Alessandra Buonanno and Michele Vallisneri), binaries carrying spins are studied using an adiabatic PN model. Based on features of the precession dynamics, we

  14. A large spectroscopic sample of L and T dwarfs from UKIDSS LAS: peculiar objects, binaries, and space density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, F.; Jones, H. R. A.; Day-Jones, A. C.; Pinfield, D. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Burningham, B.; Zhang, Z. H.; Smart, R. L.; Gomes, J. I.; Smith, L.

    2015-06-01

    We present the spectroscopic analysis of a large sample of late-M, L, and T dwarfs from the United Kingdom Deep Infrared Sky Survey. Using the YJHK photometry from the Large Area Survey and the red-optical photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we selected a sample of 262 brown dwarf candidates and we have followed-up 196 of them using the echelle spectrograph X-shooter on the Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage (0.30-2.48 μm) and moderate resolution (R ˜ 5000-9000) of X-shooter allowed us to identify peculiar objects including 22 blue L dwarfs, 2 blue T dwarfs, and 2 low-gravity M dwarfs. Using a spectral indices-based technique, we identified 27 unresolved binary candidates, for which we have determined the spectral type of the potential components via spectral deconvolution. The spectra allowed us to measure the equivalent width of the prominent absorption features and to compare them to atmospheric models. Cross-correlating the spectra with a radial velocity standard, we measured the radial velocity of our targets, and we determined the distribution of the sample, which is centred at -1.7 ± 1.2 km s-1 with a dispersion of 31.5 km s-1. Using our results, we estimated the space density of field brown dwarfs and compared it with the results of numerical simulations. Depending on the binary fraction, we found that there are (0.85 ± 0.55) × 10-3 to (1.00 ± 0.64) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the L4-L6.5 range, (0.73 ± 0.47) × 10-3 to (0.85 ± 0.55) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the L7-T0.5 range, and (0.74 ± 0.48) × 10-3 to (0.88 ± 0.56) × 10-3 objects per cubic parsec in the T1-T4.5 range. We notice that there seems to be an excess of objects in the L-T transition with respect to the late-T dwarfs, a discrepancy that could be explained assuming a higher binary fraction than expected for the L-T transition, or that objects in the high-mass end and low-mass end of this regime form in different environments, i.e. following

  15. AN ULTRA-LOW-MASS AND SMALL-RADIUS COMPACT OBJECT IN 4U 1746-37?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhaosheng; Qu, Zhijie; Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin; Chen, Li; Qu, Jinlu

    2015-01-01

    Photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts have already been used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars. RXTE observed three PRE bursts in 4U 1746-37, all with low touchdown fluxes. We discuss here the possibility of a low-mass neutron star in 4U 1746-37 because the Eddington luminosity depends on stellar mass. With typical values of hydrogen mass fraction and color correction factor, a Monte Carlo simulation was applied to constrain the mass and radius of a neutron star in 4U 1746-37. 4U 1746-37 has a high inclination angle. Two geometric effects, the reflection of the far-side accretion disk and the obscuration of the near-side accretion disk, have also been included in the mass and radius constraints of 4U 1746-37. If the reflection of the far-side accretion disk is accounted for, a low-mass compact object (mass of 0.41 ± 0.14 M {sub ☉} and radius of 8.73 ± 1.54 km at 68% confidence) exists in 4U 1746-37. If another effect operated, 4U 1746-37 may contain an ultra-low-mass and small-radius object (M = 0.21 ± 0.06 M {sub ☉}, R = 6.26 ± 0.99 km at 68% confidence). Combining all possibilities, the mass of 4U 1746-37 is 0.41{sub −0.30}{sup +0.70} M{sub ⊙} at 99.7% confidence. For such low-mass neutron stars, it could be reproduced by a self-bound compact star, i.e., a quark star or quark-cluster star.

  16. The compact far infrared emission from the young stellar object IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, Harold M.; Evans, N. J., III; Lester, D. F.; Mundy, L. G.; Harvey, P. M.; Campbell, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    High resolution far IR observations at 50 and 100 microns were made of the young stellar object (YSO), IRAS 16293-2422. The observations are part of a systematic high resolution study of nearby YSO's. The purpose is to obtain resolution in the far IR comparable to that at other wavelengths. Until recently, the high resolution that has been available in the far IR has been from either IRAS (angular resolution of approx 4 min) or the KAO using standard FIR photometry (approx 35 sec). With scanning techniques, it is possible to obtain 10 sec resolution on bright sources. Such a resolution is necessary to better determine the physical conditions of the YSO, and to compare with model of star formation. In order to better constrain the models for the source, the YSO was observed at both 50 and 100 microns on several flights in 1988 April from the KAO. Estimates are presented of the size both along the major and minor axis of the disk, as well as estimates of the dust temperature and 100 micron opacity for the YSO.

  17. Theoretical Study of Compact Objects: Pulsars, Thermally Emitting Neutron Stars and Magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    This proposal focuses on understanding the various observational manifestations of magnetized neutron stars (NSs), including pulsars, radio-quiet thermally emitting NSs and magnetars. This is motivated by the recent and ongoing observational progress in the study of isolated NSs, made possible by space telescopes such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, and the prospect of near-future observations by NASA's Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission (to be launched in 2014). Recent observations have raised a number of puzzles/questions that beg for theoretical understanding and modeling. The proposed research projects are grouped into two parts: (1) Theoretical modeling of surface (or near surface) X-ray emission from magnetized NSs, including the study of the physics of electron/ion cyclotron lines, radiative transfer during magnetar bursts, dense plasma refractive effect, partially ionized atmospheres, and calculations of X-ray polarization signatures of isolated and accreting magnetic NSs, in anticipation of their detections by GEMS. (2) Theoretical study and observational constraint on the internal structure and evolution of magnetic fields in young neutron stars in supernova remnants. The proposed research will improve our understanding of different populations of NSs and their underlying physical processes (including the extreme physics of strong-field quantum electrodynamics) and enhance the scientific return from the current and future NASA astrophysics missions. It is relevant to NASA's objective, ``Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe''.

  18. Radio emission from binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, George A.

    1986-01-01

    Radio emission from binary star systems; characteristics of the binary systems inferred from the radio observations; and the reasons for the activity are reviewed. Binary stars with two main sequence stars, with one normal star and a white dwarf, and those containing a neutron star or a black hole are described. Energy may be directly available as matter falls into the potential well of a compact object. Electromagnetic induction effects may occur due to relative motions of magnetic fields and matter. By enforcing rapid rotation, binaries can induce strong dynamo action and hence generate free energy in the form of intense, complex, evolving magnetic fields. Whatever the source of energy, the observations at radio and X-ray wavelengths demonstrate that electrons are accelerated to high energies (mildly relativistic and, ultrarelativistic). Observed or inferred radio brightness temperatures range up to 10 to the 15th power K or more, implying coherent emission for sources brighter than 10 billion K.

  19. FIRST-based survey of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. II. MERLIN and VLA observations of medium-sized symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Marecki, A.; Thomasson, P.; Spencer, R. E.

    2005-09-01

    A new sample of candidate Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources that are much weaker than the CSS source prototypes has been selected from the VLA FIRST catalogue. MERLIN "snapshot" observations of the sources at 5 GHz indicate that six of them have an FR II-like morphology, but are not edge-brightened as is normal for Medium-sized Symmetric Objects (MSOs) and FR IIs. Further observations of these six sources with the VLA at 4.9 GHz and MERLIN at 1.7 GHz, as well as subsequent full-track observations with MERLIN at 5 GHz of what appeared to be the two sources of greatest interest are presented. The results are discussed with reference to the established evolutionary model of CSS sources being young but in which not all of them evolve to become old objects with extended radio structures. A lack of stable fuelling in some of them may result in an early transition to a so-called coasting phase so that they fade away instead of growing to become large-scale objects. It is possible that one of the six sources (1542+323) could be labelled as a prematurely "dying" MSO or a "fader".

  20. Formalism for testing theories of gravity using lensing by compact objects. III. Braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, Charles R.; Petters, A.O.

    2006-05-15

    Braneworld gravity is a model that endows physical space with an extra dimension. In the type II Randall-Sundrum braneworld gravity model, the extra dimension modifies the spacetime geometry around black holes, and changes predictions for the formation and survival of primordial black holes. We develop a comprehensive analytical formalism for far-field black hole lensing in this model, using invariant quantities to compute all the geometric optics lensing observables: bending angle, image position, magnification, centroid, and time delay. We then make the first analysis of wave optics in braneworld lensing, working in the semiclassical limit. Through quantitative examples we show that wave optics offers the only realistic way to observe braneworld effects in black hole lensing. We point out that if primordial braneworld black holes exist, have mass M , and contribute a fraction f{sub bh} of the dark matter, then roughly {approx}3x10{sup 5}xf{sub bh}(M /10{sup -18}M{sub {center_dot}}){sup -1} of them lie within our Solar System. These objects, which we call 'attolenses', would produce interference fringes in the energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts at energies E{approx}100(M /10{sup -18}M{sub {center_dot}}){sup -1} MeV (which will soon be accessible with the GLAST satellite). Primordial braneworld black holes spread throughout the Universe could produce similar interference effects. If they contribute a fraction {omega} of the total energy density, the probability that gamma-ray bursts are 'attolensed' is at least {approx}0.1{omega} . If observed, attolensing interference fringes would yield a simple upper limit on M . Detection of a primordial black hole with M < or approx. 10{sup -19}M{sub {center_dot}} would challenge general relativity and favor the braneworld model. Further work on lensing tests of braneworld gravity must proceed into the physical optics regime, which awaits a description of the full spacetime geometry around braneworld black holes.

  1. First CCD Photometry of the Interacting Binary AF Geminorum: Evidence for a Gravitationally Bound Third Object?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhas, Bernard J.; Reed, Phillip A.; Chambliss, Carlson R.

    2013-07-01

    AF Geminorum (AF Gem) is an unusual Algol-type eclipsing binary star system in that the primary eclipse is a transit of the cooler, more evolved secondary star in front of the main sequence primary star. Our observations of AF Gem were made using the 0.61-meter Ritchey-Chrétien telescope at the Kutztown University Observatory (Kutztown, Pennsylvania) over 9 nights from 28 Nov 2012 to 6 Feb 2013. A total of 5350 data images were obtained of AF Gem during this time, and the results of our photometry suggest evidence for a third light source which may be gravitationally bound to the system. We present the first CCD photometric study in BVRI for this system, resolve the third light source from our photometry, provide a consistent orbital solution using the Wilson-Devinney code, and present a detailed ephemeris analysis. With an orbital period of 1.24 days, an overall decreasing ephemeris, and a possible third body in the system, AF Gem certainly warrants future photometric and spectroscopic observations.

  2. FIRST-based survey of compact steep spectrum sources. III. MERLIN and VLBI observations of subarcsecond-scale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecki, A.; Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Spencer, R. E.

    2006-04-01

    Context: .According to a generally accepted paradigm, small intrinsic sizes of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources are a direct consequence of their youth, but in later stages of their evolution they are believed to become large-scale sources. However, this notion was established mainly for strong CSS sources.Aims.In this series of papers we test this paradigm on 60 weaker objects selected from the VLA FIRST survey. They have 5-GHz flux densities in the range 150 < S5 GHz < 550 mJy and steep spectra in the range 0.365 ≤ ν ≤ 5 GHz. The present paper is focused on sources that fulfill the above criteria and have angular sizes in the range ~0.2 arcsec -1 arcsec.Methods.Observations of 19 such sources were obtained using MERLIN in "snapshot" mode at 5 GHz. They are presented along with 1.7-GHz VLBA and 5-GHz EVN follow-up snapshot observations made for the majority of them. For one of the sources in this subsample, 1123+340, a full-track 5-GHz EVN observation was also carried out.Results.This study provides an important element to the standard theory of CSS sources, namely that in a number of them the activity of their host galaxies probably switched off quite recently and their further growth has been stopped because of that. In the case of 1123+340, the relic of a compact "dead source" is particularly well preserved by the presence of intracluster medium of the putative cluster of galaxies surrounding it.Conclusions.The observed overabundance of compact sources can readily be explained in the framework of the scenario of "premature" cessation of the activity of the host galaxy nucleus. It could also explain the relatively low radio flux densities of many such sources and, in a few cases, their peculiar, asymmetric morphologies. We propose a new interpretation of such asymmetries based on the light-travel time argument.

  3. Spectroscopic observations of V443 Herculis - A symbiotic binary with a low mass white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrzycka, Danuta; Kenyon, Scott J.; Mikolajewska, Joanna

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and existing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary V443 Herculis. This binary system consists of a normal M5 giant and a hot compact star. These two objects have comparable luminosities: about 1500 solar for the M5 giant and about 1000 solar for the compact star. We identify three nebular regions in this binary: a small, highly ionized volume surrounding the hot component, a modestly ionized shell close to the red giant photosphere, and a less dense region of intermediate ionization encompassing both binary components. The system parameters for V443 Her suggest the hot component currently declines from a symbiotic nova eruption.

  4. Phase retrieval in 4f optical system: background compensation and sparse regularization of object with binary amplitude.

    PubMed

    Migukin, Artem; Agour, Mostafa; Katkovnik, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Generally, wave field reconstructions obtained by phase-retrieval algorithms are noisy, blurred, and corrupted by various artifacts such as irregular waves, spots, etc. These distortions, arising due to many factors, such as nonidealities of the optical system (misalignment, focusing errors), dust on optical elements, reflections, and vibration, are hard to localize and specify. It is assumed that there is a cumulative disturbance called "background," which describes mentioned distortions in the coherent imaging system manifested at the sensor plane. Here we propose a novel iterative phase-retrieval algorithm compensating for these distortions in the optical system. An estimate of this background is obtained via special calibration experiments, and then it is used for the object reconstruction. The algorithm is based on the maximum likelihood approach targeting on the optimal object reconstruction from noisy data and imaging enhancement using a priori information on the object amplitude. In this work we demonstrate the compensation of the distortions of the optical trace for a complex-valued object with a binary amplitude. The developed algorithm results in state-of-the-art filtering, and sharp reconstruction imaging of the object amplitude can be achieved.

  5. Study of a new central compact object: The neutron star in the supernova remnant G15.9+0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Sasaki, M.; Santangelo, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present our study of the central point source CXOU J181852.0-150213 in the young Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G15.9+0.2 based on the recent ~90 ks Chandra observations. The point source was discovered in 2005 in shorter Chandra observations and was hypothesized to be a neutron star associated with the SNR. Our X-ray spectral analysis strongly supports the hypothesis of a thermally emitting neutron star associated with G15.9+0.2. We conclude that the object belongs to the class of young cooling low-magnetized neutron stars referred to as central compact objects (CCOs). We modeled the spectrum of the neutron star with a blackbody spectral function and with our hydrogen and carbon neutron star atmosphere models, assuming that the radiation is uniformly emitted by the entire stellar surface. Under this assumption, only the carbon atmosphere models yield a distance that is compatible with a source located in the Galaxy. In this respect, CXOU J181852.0-150213 is similar to two other well-studied CCOs, the neutron stars in Cas A and in HESS J1731-347, for which carbon atmosphere models were used to reconcile their emission with the known or estimated distances.

  6. AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A.; O'Brien, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Gallo, E.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  7. An Evolving Compact Jet in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary Maxi J1836-194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; O'Brien, K.; Soria, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Homan, J.; Altanirano, D.; Curran, P. A.; Rupen, M. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Dhawan, V.; Fender, R. P.; Gallo, E.; Gandhi, P.; Heinz, S.; Koerding, E. G.; Krimm, H. A.; Maitra, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from approx 10(exp 11) to approx 4 × 10(exp 13) Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  8. An Evolving Compact Jet in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary MAXI J1836-194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; O'Brien, K.; Soria, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Homan, J.; Altamirano, D.; Curran, P. A.; Rupen, M. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Dhawan, V.; Fender, R. P.; Gallo, E.; Gandhi, P.; Heinz, S.; Körding, E. G.; Krimm, H. A.; Maitra, D.; Migliari, S.; Remillard, R. A.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shahbaz, T.; Tudose, V.

    2013-05-01

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from ~1011 to ~4 × 1013 Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO Program IDs 087.D-0914 and 089.D-0970.

  9. ON THE DYNAMICS OF ULTRA COMPACT X-RAY BINARIES: 4U 1850-087, 4U 0513-40, AND M15 X-2

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Snezana; Murray, Norman

    2015-01-10

    In this work, we extend our dynamical study of ultra compact X-ray binaries (UCXB) 4U 1820-30 from Prodan and Murray to three more UCXBs in globular clusters: 4U 1850-087, 4U 0513-40, and M15 X-2. These three UCXBs have orbital periods ≲ 20 minutes. Two of them, 4U 1850-087 and 4U 0513-40, have suspected luminosity variations of the order of ∼1 yr. There is insufficient observational data to make any statements regarding the long periodicity in the light curve of M15 X-2 at this point. The properties of these three systems are quite similar to 4U 1820-30, which prompt us to model their dynamics in the same manner. As in the case of 4U 1820-30, we interpret the suspected long periods as the period of small oscillations around a stable fixed point in the Kozai resonance. We provide a lower limit on the tidal dissipation factor Q, which is in agreement with results obtained for the case of 4U 1820-30.

  10. Swift/BAT Detects Increase in Hard X-ray Emission from the Ultra-compact X-ray Binary 4U 1543-624

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlam, Renee; Miller, Jon M.; Miller-Jones, James; Reynolds, Mark

    2017-08-01

    The Swift/BAT detected an increase in hard X-ray emission (15-50 keV) coming from the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 1543-624 around 2017 August 9. The MAXI daily monitoring also shows a gradual increase in 2.0-20.0 keV X-ray intensity as of 2017 August 19. Swift/XRT ToO monitoring of the source was triggered and shows an increase in unabsorbed flux to 1.06E-9 ergs/cm2/s in the 0.3-10.0 keV energy band as of 2017 August 26. ATCA performed ToO observations for approximately 4 hours in the 5.5 GHz and 9.0 GHz bands while the antennas were in the 1.5A array configuration from 11:25-16:09 UTC on 2017 August 23. The source was not detected in either band.

  11. A Large-Particle Monte Carlo Code for Simulating Non-Linear High-Energy Processes Near Compact Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Svensson, Roland; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1995-01-01

    High-energy radiation processes in compact cosmic objects are often expected to have a strongly non-linear behavior. Such behavior is shown, for example, by electron-positron pair cascades and the time evolution of relativistic proton distributions in dense radiation fields. Three independent techniques have been developed to simulate these non-linear problems: the kinetic equation approach; the phase-space density (PSD) Monte Carlo method; and the large-particle (LP) Monte Carlo method. In this paper, we present the latest version of the LP method and compare it with the other methods. The efficiency of the method in treating geometrically complex problems is illustrated by showing results of simulations of 1D, 2D and 3D systems. The method is shown to be powerful enough to treat non-spherical geometries, including such effects as bulk motion of the background plasma, reflection of radiation from cold matter, and anisotropic distributions of radiating particles. It can therefore be applied to simulate high-energy processes in such astrophysical systems as accretion discs with coronae, relativistic jets, pulsar magnetospheres and gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Use of Binary Partition Tree and energy minimization for object-based classification of urban land cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Bijker, Wietske; Stein, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Two main challenges are faced when classifying urban land cover from very high resolution satellite images: obtaining an optimal image segmentation and distinguishing buildings from other man-made objects. For optimal segmentation, this work proposes a hierarchical representation of an image by means of a Binary Partition Tree (BPT) and an unsupervised evaluation of image segmentations by energy minimization. For building extraction, we apply fuzzy sets to create a fuzzy landscape of shadows which in turn involves a two-step procedure. The first step is a preliminarily image classification at a fine segmentation level to generate vegetation and shadow information. The second step models the directional relationship between building and shadow objects to extract building information at the optimal segmentation level. We conducted the experiments on two datasets of Pléiades images from Wuhan City, China. To demonstrate its performance, the proposed classification is compared at the optimal segmentation level with Maximum Likelihood Classification and Support Vector Machine classification. The results show that the proposed classification produced the highest overall accuracies and kappa coefficients, and the smallest over-classification and under-classification geometric errors. We conclude first that integrating BPT with energy minimization offers an effective means for image segmentation. Second, we conclude that the directional relationship between building and shadow objects represented by a fuzzy landscape is important for building extraction.

  13. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  14. Discovery of a 105-ms X-ray Pulsar in Kesteven-79: On the Nature of Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Seward, F. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of 105-ms X-ray pulsations from the compact central object (CCO) in the supernova remnant \\snr\\ using data acquired with the {\\it Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission). Using two observations of the pulsar taken 6-days apart we derive an upper limit on its spin-down rate of $\\dot P < 9 \\times 10"{-14}$-s-${-l)$,a nd find no evidence for binary orbital motion. The implied energy loss rate is $\\dot E < 3 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-s$A{-1)$, polar magnetic field strength is $B-{\\rm p) < 3 \\times 10A{12)$-G, and spin-down age is $\\tau > 18.5$-kyr. The latter exceeds the remnant's estimated age, suggesting that the pulsar was born spinning near its current period. The X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ is best characterized as a blackbody of temperature $kT {BB) =, 0.43\\pm0.02$ keV, radius $R-{BB) \\approx 1.3$-km, and $I{\\rm bol) = 5.2 \\times 10A{33)$ ergs-sSA{-1)$ at $d = 7.1$-kpc. The sinusoidal light curve is modulated with a pulsed fraction of $>45\\%$, suggestive of a small hot spot on the surface of the rotating neutron star. The lack of a discernible pulsar wind nebula is consistent with an interpretation of \\psr\\ as a rotation-powered pulsar whose spin-down luminosity falls below the empirical threshold for generating bright wind nebulae, $\\dot E-{\\rm c) = 4 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-sSA{-I)$. The age discrepancy suggests that its $\\dot E$ has always been below $\\dot E c$, perhaps a distinguishing property of the CCOs. Alternatively, the X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ suggests a low-luminosity AXP, but the weak inferred $B-{\\rm p)$ field is incompatible with a magnetar theory of its X-ray luminosity. The ordinary spin parameters discovered from \\psr\\ highlight the inability of existing theories to explain the high luminosities and temperatures of CCO thermal X-ray spectra.

  15. The Influence of Orbital Resonances on the Water Transport to Objects in the Circumprimary Habitable Zone of Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, David; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Maindl, Thomas I.; Ragossnig, Florian; Schäfer, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the role of secular and mean motion resonances on the water transport from a belt of icy asteroids onto planets or embryos orbiting inside the circumprimary habitable zone (HZ) of a binary star system. In addition, the host-star has an accompanying gas giant planet. For a comparison, we perform two case studies where a secular resonance (SR) is located either inside the HZ close to 1.0 au (causing eccentric motion of a planet or embryos therein) or in the asteroid belt, beyond the snow line. In the latter case, a higher flux of icy objects moving toward the HZ is expected. Collisions between asteroids and objects in the HZ are treated analytically. Our purely dynamical study shows that the SR in the HZ boosts the water transport however, collisions can occur at very high impact speeds. In this paper, we treat for the first time, realistic collisions using a GPU 3D-SPH code to assess the water loss in the projectile. Including the water loss into the dynamical results, we get more realistic values for the water mass fraction of the asteroid during an impact. We highlight that collisions occurring at high velocities greatly reduce the water content of the projectile and thus the amount of water transported to planets or embryos orbiting inside the HZ. Moreover, we discuss other effects that could modify our results, namely the asteroid’s surface rate recession due to ice sublimation and the atmospheric drag contribution on the asteroids’ mass loss.

  16. Binary Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary was the first trans-neptunian binary to be identified in 1978. Pluto-Charon is a true binary with both components orbiting a barycenter located between them. The Pluto system is also the first, and to date only, known binary with a satellite system consisting of four small satellites in near-resonant orbits around the common center of mass. Seven other Plutinos, objects in 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune, have orbital companions including 2004 KB19 reported here for the first time. Compared to the Cold Classical population, the Plutinos differ in the frequency of binaries, the relative sizes of the components, and their inclination distribution. These differences point to distinct dynamical histories and binary formation processes encountered by Plutinos.

  17. Radioactivity and Thermalization in the Ejecta of Compact Object Mergers and Their Impact on Kilonova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel; Wu, Meng-Ru; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    One promising electromagnetic signature of compact object mergers are kilonovae: approximately isotropic radioactively powered transients that peak days to weeks post-merger. Key uncertainties in kilonova modeling include the emission profiles of the radioactive decay products—non-thermal β -particles, α -particles, fission fragments, and γ -rays—and the efficiency with which their kinetic energy is absorbed by the ejecta. The radioactive energy emitted, along with its thermalization efficiency, sets the luminosity budget and is therefore crucial for predicting kilonova light curves. We outline uncertainties in the radioactivity, describe the processes by which the decay products transfer energy to the ejecta, and calculate time-dependent thermalization efficiencies for each particle type. We determine the net thermalization efficiency and explore its dependence on r-process yields—in particular, the production of α -decaying translead nuclei—and on ejecta mass, velocity, and magnetic fields. We incorporate our results into detailed radiation transport simulations, and calculate updated kilonova light curve predictions. Thermalization effects reduce kilonova luminosities by a factor of roughly 2 at peak, and by an order of magnitude at later times (15 days or more after explosion). We present analytic fits to time-dependent thermalization efficiencies, which can be used to improve light curve models. We revisit the putative kilonova that accompanied gamma-ray burst 130603B, and estimate the mass ejected in that event. We find later time kilonova light curves can be significantly impacted by α -decay from translead isotopes; data at these times may therefore be diagnostic of ejecta abundances.

  18. Parsec-scale H I absorption structure in a low-redshift galaxy seen against a compact symmetric object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, A. D.; Zwaan, M. A.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Péroux, C.; Liske, J.

    2016-11-01

    We present global VLBI observations of the 21-cm transition of atomic hydrogen seen in absorption against the radio source J0855+5751. The foreground absorber (SDSS J085519.05+575140.7) is a dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026. As the background source is heavily resolved by VLBI, the data allow us to map the properties of the foreground H I gas with a spatial resolution of 2 pc. The absorbing gas corresponds to a single coherent structure with an extent >35 pc, but we also detect significant and coherent variations, including a change in the H I optical depth by a factor of 5 across a distance of ≲ 6 pc. The large size of the structure provides support for the Heiles & Troland model of the interstellar medium, as well as its applicability to external galaxies. The large variations in H I optical depth also suggest that caution should be applied when interpreting TS measurements from radio-detected DLAs. In addition, the distorted appearance of the background radio source is indicative of a strong jet-cloud interaction in its host galaxy. We have measured its redshift (z = 0.541 86) using optical spectroscopy on the William Herschel Telescope and this confirms that J0855+5751 is an FR II radio source with a physical extent of <1 kpc and supports the previous identification of this source as a compact symmetric object. These sources often show absorption associated with the host galaxy and we suggest that both H I and OH should be searched for in J0855+5751.

  19. NON-THERMAL RADIATION FROM COLLISIONS OF COMPACT OBJECTS WITH INTERMEDIATE-SCALE JETS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, W.; Banasiński, P.

    2015-07-10

    Massive black holes in active galaxies are immersed in huge concentrations of late-type stars in the galactic bulges and also early-type massive stars in the nuclear stellar clusters, which are additionally surrounded by quasi-spherical halos on a scale of several kpc that contain from a few hundred up to several thousand globular clusters (GCs). It is expected that significant numbers of red giant stars, massive stars, and also GCs can move through the jet expelled from the central engine of the active galaxy. We consider collisions of stars from the galactic bulge, nuclear cluster, and GCs with the jet plasma. As a result of such collisions, multiple shocks are expected to appear in the jet around these compact objects. Therefore, the plasma in the kpc-scale jet can be significantly disturbed. We show that particles can be accelerated on these shocks up to multi-TeV energies. TeV leptons emit synchrotron radiation, extending up to X-ray energies, and also comptonize radiation produced in a stellar cluster and also the microwave background radiation to TeV γ-ray energies. We show that such non-thermal radiation is likely to be detectable from the intermediate-scale jets of nearby active galaxies for a reasonable number of stars and GCs immersed within the jet. As an example, we calculate the expected non-thermal emission in X-ray and gamma-ray energies from the nearby radio galaxy Cen A, from which steady gamma-ray emission with a complex spectrum has recently been reported by Fermi and the HESS Observatories.

  20. Soft X-Ray Extended Emissions of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts as Electromagnetic Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers: Possible Origin and Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ~1050-51 erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ~100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ~0.1 M ⊙ around BHs formed after the mergers and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to >~ 1052 erg can be extracted with an observed timescale of >~ 30(1 + z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of α < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ~ 10-(2-4) M ⊙, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ~ 10-2 M ⊙, possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ~ 10-4 M ⊙, possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ˜ 6 yr-1 (Δ Ω softEE/4π) (R}GW/40 yr-1) for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ~0.°1 angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like the Wide-Field MAXI. Here, ΔΩsoftEE is the beaming factor of the soft EEs and R}GW is the NS-NS merger rate detectable by the advanced LIGO, the advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

  1. EFFECTS OF ROTATIONALLY INDUCED MIXING IN COMPACT BINARY SYSTEMS WITH LOW-MASS SECONDARIES AND IN SINGLE SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Robinson, Edward L.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-08-20

    Many population synthesis and stellar evolution studies have addressed the evolution of close binary systems in which the primary is a compact remnant and the secondary is filling its Roche lobe, thus triggering mass transfer. Although tidal locking is expected in such systems, most studies have neglected the rotationally induced mixing that may occur. Here we study the possible effects of mixing in mass-losing stars for a range of secondary star masses and metallicities. We find that tidal locking can induce rotational mixing prior to contact and thus affect the evolution of the secondary star if the effects of the Spruit-Tayler dynamo are included both for angular momentum and chemical transport. Once contact is made, the effect of mass transfer tends to be more rapid than the evolutionary timescale, so the effects of mixing are no longer directly important, but the mass-transfer strips matter to inner layers that may have been affected by the mixing. These effects are enhanced for secondaries of 1-1.2 M{sub Sun} and for lower metallicities. We discuss the possible implications for the paucity of carbon in the secondaries of the cataclysmic variable SS Cyg and the black hole candidate XTE J1118+480 and for the progenitor evolution of Type Ia supernovae. We also address the issue of the origin of blue straggler stars in globular and open clusters. We find that for models that include rotation consistent with that observed for some blue straggler stars, evolution is chemically homogeneous. This leads to tracks in the H-R diagram that are brighter and bluer than the non-rotating main-sequence turn-off point. Rotational mixing could thus be one of the factors that contribute to the formation of blue stragglers.

  2. The End of Accretion: The X-Ray Binary/Millisecond Pulsar Transition Object PSR J1023+0038

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Millisecond radio pulsars (MSRPs), those spinning hundreds of times per second, have long been understood to be old pulsars that have been spun up by the accretion of matter from a companion in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase. Yet the details of this transformation, particularly the end of the accretion process and the birth of a radio pulsar, remain mysterious. I will describe the discovery and detailed study of the first object known to transition between MSRP and LMXB states, PSR J1023+0038. By dint of a multiwavelength campaign of observations in the RMSP state, we are able to measure all the key system parameters and show the existence of an X-ray shock close to the pulsar-facing side of the companion. Since the discovery of PSR J1023+0038, two more objects (XSS J12270-4859 and M28I) have been found to make the same transition, and the study of these transitioning objects has become an active field of research. Most interestingly, PSR J1023+0038 has transitioned back into an LMXB state, with an active accretion disk and a puzzling increase in gamma-ray flux. Our detailed picture of the system allows us to test models of accretion against the phenomena we observe in PSR J1023+0038, and in fact these observations challenge current models: in spite of the low luminosity of the system (and low inferred accretion rate) some material is penetrating the centrifugal barrier and falling on the neutron-star surface. Key evidence for explaining this puzzling behaviour will come when PSR J1023+0038 returns to an MSRP state and we are able to compare pulsar timing models from after the LMXB state with those we obtained in this work.

  3. Massive compact halo objects viewed from a cosmological perspective: contribution to the baryonic mass density of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Freese, Katherine; Graff, David S.

    1998-09-01

    We estimate the contribution of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) and their stellar progenitors to the mass density of the Universe. If the MACHOs that have been detected reside in the halo of our Galaxy, then a simple extrapolation of the Galactic population (out to 50 kpc) of MACHOs to cosmic scales gives a cosmic density ϱMACHO=(1-5)×10 9hM⊙Mpc -3, which in terms of the critical density corresponds to Ω MACHO = (0.0036-0.017)h -1. Should the MACHO halo extend out to much further than 50 kpc, then Ω MACHO would only be larger. Such a mass density is comparable to the cosmic baryon density implied by Big Bang nucleosynthesis. If we take the central values of the estimates, then MACHOs dominate the baryonic content of the Universe today, with Ω MACHO/Ω B˜0.7 h . However, the cumulative uncertainties in the density determinations only require that Ω MACHO/Ω B ≥ 1/6hf gal', where the fraction of galaxies that contain MACHOs fgal>;0.17 and h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s -1 Mpc -1. Our best estimate for Ω MACHO is hard to reconcile with the current best estimates of the baryonic content of the intergalactic medium indicated by measurements of the Lyman-α forest; however, measurements of Ω Lyα are at present uncertain, so that such a comparison may be premature. If the MACHOs are white dwarfs resulting from a single burst of star formation (without recycling), then their main sequence progenitors would have been at least twice more massive: Ω ∗ = (0.007-0.034)h -1. Thus, far too much gaseous baryonic material would remain in the Galaxy unless there is a Galactic wind to eject it. Indeed a MACHO population of white dwarfs and the gas ejected from their main sequence progenitors accounts for a significant fraction of all baryons. This fact must be taken into account when attempting to dilute the chemical by-products of such a large population of intermediate mass stars. We stress the difficulty of reconciling the MACHO mass budget

  4. Parametric derivation of the observable relativistic periastron advance for binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königsdörffer, Christian; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2006-02-01

    We compute the dimensionless relativistic periastron advance parameter k, which is measurable from the timing of relativistic binary pulsars. We present a new (general) method and employ for the computation the recently derived Keplerian-type parametric solution to the post-Newtonian (PN) accurate conservative dynamics of spinning compact binaries moving in eccentric orbits. The parametric solution and hence the parameter k are applicable for the cases of simple precession, namely, case (i), the binary consists of equal-mass compact objects, having two arbitrary spins, and case (ii), the binary consists of compact objects of arbitrary mass, where only one of them is spinning with an arbitrary spin. Our expression, for the cases considered, is in agreement with a more general formula for the 2PN accurate k, relevant for the relativistic double pulsar PSR J0737-3039, derived by Damour and Schäfer many years ago, using a different procedure.

  5. Very old and very young compact objects: X-ray studies of galactic globular clusters and recent core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, David Aaron

    2003-09-01

    This thesis comprises the results of two distinct areas of research, namely, X-ray studies of Galactic globular clusters and X-ray studies of recent core collapse supernovae. My analyses of the Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 6440 revealed as many low- luminosity X-ray sources as was in the entire census of globular cluster sources with the previous best X-ray imaging instrument, Röntgensatellit. In the observation of NGC 6752, I detect 6 X-ray sources within the 10''.5 core radius and 13 more within the 115' half-mass radius down to a limiting luminosity of Lx ≈ 1030 ergs s -1 for cluster sources. Based on a reanalysis of archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, I make 12 optical identifications and one radio identification. Based on X- ray and optical properties of the identifications, I find 10 likely cataclysmic variables (CVs), 1 3 likely RS CVn or BY Dra systems, and 1 or 2 possible background objects. Of the 7 sources for which no optical identifications were made, one was detected in the archival radio data, and another was found to be a millisecond pulsar. Of the remaining sources, I expect that ˜2 4 are background objects and that the rest are either CVs or millisecond pulsars whose radio emission has not been detected. These and other Chandra results on globular clusters indicate that the dozens of CVs per cluster expected by theoretical arguments are being found. Based upon X-ray luminosities and colors, I conclude that there are 4 5 likely quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and that most of the other sources are cataclysmic variables. I compare these results to Chandra results from other globular clusters and find the X-ray luminosity functions differ among the clusters. Observations of the Type II-P (plateau) Supernova (SN) 1999em and Type IIn (narrow emission line) SN 1998S have enabled estimation of the profile of the SN ejecta, the structure of the

  6. Soft X-ray extended emissions of short gamma-ray bursts as electromagnetic counterparts of compact binary mergers: possible origin and detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takashi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ∼10{sup 50-51} erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ∼100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ∼0.1 M {sub ☉} around BHs formed after the mergers and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to ≳ 10{sup 52} erg can be extracted with an observed timescale of ≳ 30(1 + z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of α < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ∼ 10{sup –(2-4)} M {sub ☉}, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ∼ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}, possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ∼ 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}, possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ∼6 yr{sup −1} (ΔΩ{sub softEE}/4π) (R{sub GW}/40 yr{sup −1}) for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ∼0.°1 angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like the Wide-Field MAXI. Here, ΔΩ{sub softEE} is the beaming factor of the soft EEs and R{sub GW} is the NS-NS merger rate detectable by the advanced LIGO, the advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

  7. Formation and Evolution of X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragkos, Anastasios

    X-ray binaries - mass-transferring binary stellar systems with compact object accretors - are unique astrophysical laboratories. They carry information about many complex physical processes such as star formation, compact object formation, and evolution of interacting binaries. My thesis work involves the study of the formation and evolution of Galactic and extra-galacticX-ray binaries using both detailed and realistic simulation tools, and population synthesis techniques. I applied an innovative analysis method that allows the reconstruction of the full evolutionary history of known black hole X-ray binaries back to the time of compact object formation. This analysis takes into account all the available observationally determined properties of a system, and models in detail four of its evolutionary evolutionary phases: mass transfer through the ongoing X-ray phase, tidal evolution before the onset of Roche-lobe overflow, motion through the Galactic potential after the formation of the black hole, and binary orbital dynamics at the time of core collapse. Motivated by deep extra-galactic Chandra survey observations, I worked on population synthesis models of low-mass X-ray binaries in the two elliptical galaxies NGC3379 and NGC4278. These simulations were targeted at understanding the origin of the shape and normalization of the observed X-ray luminosity functions. In a follow up study, I proposed a physically motivated prescription for the modeling of transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary properties, such as duty cycle, outburst duration and recurrence time. This prescription enabled the direct comparison of transient low-mass X-ray binary population synthesis models to the Chandra X-ray survey of the two ellipticals NGC3379 and NGC4278. Finally, I worked on population synthesismodels of black holeX-ray binaries in the MilkyWay. This work was motivated by recent developments in observational techniques for the measurement of black hole spin magnitudes in

  8. Circinus X-1: a Laboratory for Studying the Accretion Phenomenon in Compact Binary X-Ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson-Saba, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the binary X-ray source Circinus X-1 provide samples of a range of spectral and temporal behavior whose variety is thought to reflect a broad continuum of accretion conditions in an eccentric binary system. The data support an identification of three or more X-ray spectral components, probably associated with distinct emission regions.

  9. Life and Death of Binaries Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, J. G.

    2002-09-01

    On any astronomical timescale, binaries near the Galactic Center are strongly affected by interactions with their environment. We shall consider these processes. The high density of stars and possibly WIMPS (weakly interacting, massive particles) cause interactions that change the semimajor axes and eccentricities of the binaries. Interactions with more massive stars may, through exchange collisions, lead to a progressive increase in the masses of the binary components. Some binaries are destroyed through the coalescence of their components due to the high eccentricity that they attain. Others will be destroyed by encounters with energetic intruders that are capable of dissociating the binaries. The binaries that most easily surivive in this hostile environment have small semimajor axes and only white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole components,as such objects have little chance of coalescence under normal circumstances. These compact objects are also massive enough compared to the mass of the average star near the Galactic center that there is much less danger of their binary being disrupted in an encounter. Even binaries with compact companions have short lifetimes if their semimajor axes are less than 2 A.U. because they are forced into coalescence by the emission of gravitational radiation. The tidal field of the central black hole will distrupt binaries that pass close enough to it. If WIMPS make up any sizeable fraction of the mass density at the Galactic Center, they will cause a steady contraction of the semimajor axes of the binaries that may be measurable if one binary component is a pulsar.

  10. OBSERVATIONAL UPPER BOUND ON THE COSMIC ABUNDANCES OF NEGATIVE-MASS COMPACT OBJECTS AND ELLIS WORMHOLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Asada, Hideki

    2013-05-01

    The latest result in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) has set the first cosmological constraints on negative-mass compact objects and Ellis wormholes. There are no multiple images lensed by the above two exotic objects for {approx}50, 000 distant quasars in the SQLS data. Therefore, an upper bound is put on the cosmic abundances of these lenses. The number density of negative-mass compact objects is n < 10{sup -8}(10{sup -4}) h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} at the mass scale |M| > 10{sup 15}(10{sup 12}) M{sub Sun }, which corresponds to the cosmological density parameter |{Omega}| < 10{sup -4} at the galaxy and cluster mass range |M| = 10{sup 12-15} M{sub Sun }. The number density of the Ellis wormhole is n < 10{sup -4} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} for a range of the throat radius a = 10-10{sup 4} pc, which is much smaller than the Einstein ring radius.

  11. Constraining Accreting Binary Populations in Normal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret; Hornschemeier, A.; Basu-Zych, A.; Fragos, T.; Jenkins, L.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission from accreting binary systems (X-ray binaries) uniquely probe the binary phase of stellar evolution and the formation of compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. A detailed understanding of X-ray binary systems is needed to provide physical insight into the formation and evolution of the stars involved, as well as the demographics of interesting binary remnants, such as millisecond pulsars and gravitational wave sources. Our program makes wide use of Chandra observations and complementary multiwavelength data sets (through, e.g., the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey [SINGS] and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey [GOODS]), as well as super-computing facilities, to provide: (1) improved calibrations for correlations between X-ray binary emission and physical properties (e.g., star-formation rate and stellar mass) for galaxies in the local Universe; (2) new physical constraints on accreting binary processes (e.g., common-envelope phase and mass transfer) through the fitting of X-ray binary synthesis models to observed local galaxy X-ray binary luminosity functions; (3) observational and model constraints on the X-ray evolution of normal galaxies over the last 90% of cosmic history (since z 4) from the Chandra Deep Field surveys and accreting binary synthesis models; and (4) predictions for deeper observations from forthcoming generations of X-ray telesopes (e.g., IXO, WFXT, and Gen-X) to provide a science driver for these missions. In this talk, we highlight the details of our program and discuss recent results.

  12. A Deep NuSTAR Survey of M31: Compact object types in our Nearest Neighbor Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Venters, Tonia M.; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Vulic, Neven

    2017-08-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace young and old stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation rate and star formation history/stellar mass. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the E>10 keV (hard X-ray) emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. We have observed M31 in 4 NuSTAR fields for a total exposure of 1.4 Ms, covering the young stellar population in a swath of the disk (within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey) and older populations in the bulge. We detected more than 100 sources in the 4-25 keV band, where hard band (12-25 keV) emission has allowed us to discriminate between black holes and neutron stars in different accretion states. The luminosity function of the hard band detected sources are compared to Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL-derived luminosity functions of the Milky Way population, which reveals an excess of luminous sources in M31 when correcting for star formation rate and stellar mass.

  13. A compact small-beam XRF instrument for in-situ analysis of objects of historical and/or artistic value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittiglio, G.; Janssens, K.; Vekemans, B.; Adams, F.; Oost, A.

    1999-11-01

    The analytical characteristics, possibilities and limitations of a compact and easily transportable small-beam XRF instrument are described. The instrument consists of a compact, mini-focus Mo X-ray tube that is collimated to produce a sub-mm beam and a peltier-cooled PIN diode detector. Relative MDLs in highly scattering matrices are situated in the 10-100-ppm range; for metallic matrices featuring strong matrix lines, the MDLs of the instrument are approximately a factor 2 higher. Since only a small irradiation area is required, a simple micro-polishing technique that may be performed in situ in combination with the measurements is shown to be effective for the determination of the bulk composition of corroded bronze objects. As an example, a series of Egyptian bronze objects date from XXII nd Egyptian Dynasty (ca. 1090 BC) to the Roman era (30 BC to 640 AD) was analyzed in order to contribute to the very limited database on Cu-alloy compositions from this period.

  14. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Esposito, Paolo; Crawford III, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Freire, Paulo

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  15. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  16. Applications of Indirect Imaging Techniques in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaftis, E. T.

    A review is given on aspects of indirect imaging techniques in X-ray binaries which are used as diagnostics tools for probing the X-ray dominated accretion disc physics. These techniques utilize observed properties such as the emission line profile variability, the time delays between simultaneous optical/X-ray light curves, the light curves of eclipsing systems and the pulsed emission from the compact object in order to reconstruct the accretion disc's line emissivity (Doppler tomography), the irradiated disc and heated secondary (echo mapping), the outer disc structure (modified eclipse mapping) and the accreting regions onto the compact object, respectively.

  17. The low-mass X-ray binary LMC X-2

    SciTech Connect

    Crampton, D.; Hutchings, J.B.; Cowley, A.P.; Schmidtke, P.C.; Thompson, I.B. Arizona State Univ., Tempe Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-06-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric observations of LMC X-2 reveal the source to be an X-ray binary with a relatively long orbital period, probably 12.5 days. It appears to be a partially eclipsing system. It is one of a small subclass of low-mass X-ray binaries with longer orbital periods and higher X-ray luminosity than average, which contain a compact object accreting material from an evolving giant companion. 26 refs.

  18. An Improved Catalog of Halo Wide Binary Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé & Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio & Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ~ a -1 (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  19. An improved catalog of halo wide binary candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé and Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio and Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ∼ a {sup –1} (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  20. Using electromagnetic observations to aid gravitational-wave parameter estimation of compact binaries observed with LISA. II. The effect of knowing the sky position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S.; Nelemans, G.; van der Sluys, M.

    2013-05-01

    In this follow-up paper, we continue our study of the effect of using knowledge from electromagnetic observations in the gravitational wave (GW) data analysis of Galactic binaries that are predicted to be observed by the new Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) in the low-frequency range, 10-4 Hz < f < 1 Hz. In the first paper, we have shown that the strong correlation between amplitude and inclination can be used for mildly inclined binaries to improve the uncertainty in amplitude, and that this correlation depends on the inclination of the system. In this paper we investigate the overall effect of the other orientation parameters, namely the sky position and the polarisation angle. We find that after the inclination, the ecliptic latitude of the source has the strongest effect in determining the GW parameter uncertainties. We ascertain that the strong correlation we found previously only depends on the inclination of the source and not on the other orientation parameters. We find that knowing the sky position of the source from electromagnetic data can reduce the GW parameter uncertainty up to a factor of ~2, depending on the inclination and the ecliptic latitude of the system. Knowing the sky position and inclination can reduce the uncertainty in amplitude by a factor larger than 40. We also find that unphysical errors in the inclinations, which we found when using the Fisher matrix, can affect the corresponding uncertainties in the amplitudes, which need to be corrected.

  1. Particle acceleration in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Cygnus X-3 massive binary system is one of the powerful sources of radio and X-ray emission consisting of an accreting compact object, probably a black hole, with a Wolf-Rayet star companion. Based on the detections of ultra high energy gamma-rays by Kiel and Havera Park, Cygnus X-3 has been proposed to be one of the most powerful sources of charged cosmic ray particles in the Galaxy. The results of long-term observations of the Cyg X-3 binary at energies 800 GeV-85 TeV detected by SHALON in 1995 are presented with images, integral spectra and spectral energy distribution. The identification of source with Cygnus X-3 detected by SHALON was secured by the detection of its 4.8 hour orbital period in TeV gamma-rays. During the whole observation period of Cyg X-3 with SHALON significant flux increases were detected at energies above 0.8 TeV. These TeV flux increases are correlated with flaring activity at a lower energy range of X-ray and/or at observations of Fermi LAT as well as with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The variability of very high-energy gamma-radiation and correlation of radiation activity in the wide energy range can provide essential information on particle mechanism production up to very high energies. Whereas, modulation of very high energy emission connected to the orbital motion of the binary system, provides an understanding of the emission processes, nature and location of particle acceleration.

  2. Very Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olling, Robert; Shaya, E.

    2011-01-01

    We develop Bayesian statistical methods for discovering and assigning probabilities to physical stellar companions. The probabilities depend on similarities in "corrected" proper motion, parallax, and the phase-space density of field stars. Very wide binaries with separations over 10,000 AU have recently been predicted to form during the dissolution process of low-mass star clusters. In this case, these wide systems would still carry information about the density and size of the star cluster in which they formed. Alternatively, Galactic tides and weak interactions with passing stars peel off stars from such very wide binaries in less than 1/2 of a Hubble time. In the past, these systems have been used to rule in/out MACHOs or less compact dark (matter) objects. Ours is the first all-sky survey to locate escaped companions that are still drifting along with each other, long after their binary bond has been broken. We test stars for companionship up to an apparent separation of 8 parsec: 10 to 100 times wider than previous searches. Among Hipparcos stars within 100 pc, we find about 260 systems with separations between 0.01 and 1 pc, and another 190 with separation from 1 to 8 parsec. We find a number of previously unnoticed naked-eye companions, among which: Capella & 50 Per; Alioth, Megrez & Alcor; gamma & tau Cen; phi Eri & eta Hor; 62 & 63 Cnc; gamma & tau Per; zeta & delta Hya; beta01, beta02 & beta03 Tuc; 44 & 58 Oph and pi & rho Cep. At least 15 of our candidates are exoplanet host stars.

  3. Multi-frequency Optical-depth Maps And The Case For Free-free Absorption In Two Compact Symmetric Objects: 1321+410 And 0026+346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Thomas M.; Marr, J. M.; Read, J. W.; Taylor, G. B.

    2011-01-01

    We obtained VLBI observations at six frequencies of two Compact Symmetric Objects, 1321+410 and 0026+346. By comparing the lower frequency maps with spectral extrapolations of the higher frequency maps, we produced maps of the optical depth as a function of frequency. The optical-depth maps of 1321+410 are strikingly uniform, consistent with a foreground screen of absorbing gas; the optical depths as a function of frequency are consistent with free-free absorption; and no net polarization was detected. We conclude that the case for free-free absorption in 1321+410 is strong. The optical-depth maps of 0026+346 exhibit structure but the morphology does not correlate with that in the intensity maps, in conflict with that expected in the case of synchrotron self-absorption. No net polarization was detected. The frequency dependence of the optical depths does not fit well to a simple free-free absorption model, but this does not take into account possible structure in the absorbing gas on smaller scales. We conclude that free-free absorption by a thin amount of gas with structure on the scale of our maps and smaller is possible in 0026+346, although no definitive conclusion can be made. A compact feature between the lobes in 0026+346 has an inverted spectrum even at the highest frequencies, suggesting that this component is synchrotron self-absorbed. We infer this to be the location of the core. We estimate an upper limit to the magnetic field in the core of 50 Gauss at a radius of 1 pc. This research was supported by an award from the Research Corporation, a NASA NY Space Grant, and a Booth-Ferris Research Fellowship. The VLBA is operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  4. Rotational properties of hypermassive neutron stars from binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Takami, Kentaro; Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Font, José A.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Determining the differential-rotation law of compact stellar objects produced in binary neutron stars mergers or core-collapse supernovae is an old problem in relativistic astrophysics. Addressing this problem is important because it impacts directly on the maximum mass these objects can attain and, hence, on the threshold to black-hole formation under realistic conditions. Using the results from a large number of numerical simulations in full general relativity of binary neutron star mergers described with various equations of state and masses, we study the rotational properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron stars. We find that the angular-velocity distribution shows only a modest dependence on the equation of state, thus exhibiting the traits of "quasiuniversality" found in other aspects of compact stars, both isolated and in binary systems. The distributions are characterized by an almost uniformly rotating core and a "disk." Such a configuration is significantly different from the j -constant differential-rotation law that is commonly adopted in equilibrium models of differentially rotating stars. Furthermore, the rest-mass contained in such a disk can be quite large, ranging from ≃0.03 M⊙ in the case of high-mass binaries with stiff equations of state, up to ≃0.2 M⊙ for low-mass binaries with soft equations of state. We comment on the astrophysical implications of our findings and on the long-term evolutionary scenarios that can be conjectured on the basis of our simulations.

  5. Dynamics of compact object mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauswein, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Advanced LIGO's first detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from merging black holes has opened a new window to the Universe. The observation of neutron-star (NS) mergers is imminent and promises far-reaching implications. We will describe the dynamics of NS mergers focusing on the postmerger dynamics. In particular, we will point out the implications for matter ejection from these events. Neutron-rich outflows from NS mergers are invoked to explain the still mysterious origin of heavy elements which are formed through the rapid neutron-capture process. The nuclear decays in these ejecta power electromagnetic counterparts which are potentially observable. We will describe the properties of these transients within a multi-messenger picture including in particular information that can be revealed from simultaneous GW detections.

  6. Electromagnetic jets from compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that at least some astrophysical jets are initially electromagnetic in origin is examined. Subsequent pick-up of ionization would convert such electromagnetic jets into hydrodynamic jets. In such a model, relativistic outflow is formed into highly collimated beams simply through the interaction with the surrounding medium. Forming jets under such general circumstances is encouraging in view of the range of scales that appear to be involved. The overall properties of such jets are largely determined by a single dimensionless parameter: the characteristic electrostatic potential drop rewritten as a particle Lorentz factor. Consequently, the determination of any one observable, such as the total power output, also determines the particle energy scale, the electromagnetic field strengths, etc.

  7. Stacking Analysis of Binary Systems with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbois, Chad; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Detecting binary systems at TeV energies is an important problem because only a handful of such systems are currently known. The nature of such systems is typically thought to be composed of a compact object and a massive star. The TeV emission from these systems does not obviously correspond to emission in GeV or X-ray, where many binary systems have previously been found. This study focuses on a stacking method to detect TeV emission from LS 5039, a known TeV binary, to test its efficacy in HAWC data. Stacking is a widely employed method for increasing signal to noise ratio in optical astronomy, but has never been attempted previously with HAWC. HAWC is an ideal instrument to search for TeV binaries, because of its wide field of view and high uptime. Applying this method to the entire sky may allow HAWC to detect binary sources of very short or very long periods not sensitive to current analyses. NSF, DOE, Los Alamos, Michigan Tech, CONACyt, UNAM, BUAP.

  8. Search for Binary Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Grundy, W. M.; Ryan, E. L.; Benecchi, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have reexamined 41 Trojan asteroids observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to search for unresolved binaries. We have identified one candidate binary with a separation of 53 milliarcsec, about the width of the diffraction limited point-spread function (PSF). Sub-resolution-element detection of binaries is possible with HST because of the high signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the stability of the PSF. Identification and confirmation of binary Trojans is important because a Trojan Tour is one of five possible New Frontiers missions. A binary could constitute a potentially high value target because of the opportunity to study two objects and to test models of the primordial nature of binaries. The potential to derive mass-based physical information from the binary orbit could yield more clues to the origin of Trojans.

  9. Modeling the X-rays from the central compact object PSR J1852+0040 in Kesteven 79: Evidence for a strongly magnetized neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-08-01

    I present modeling of the X-ray pulsations from the central compact object (CCO) PSR J1852+0040 in the Galactic supernova remnant Kesteven 79. In the context of thermal surface radiation from a rotating neutron star (NS), a conventional polar cap model can reproduce the broad, large-amplitude X-ray pulse only with a 'pencil plus fan' beam emission pattern, which is characteristic of ≳ 10{sup 12} G NS atmospheres, much greater than the ∼10{sup 10} G external dipole field inferred from the pulsar spin-down rate. This discrepancy can be explained by an axially displaced dipole. For other beaming patterns, it is necessary to invoke high-aspect-ratio emitting regions that are greatly longitudinally elongated, possibly due to an extremely offset dipole. For all assumed emission models, the existence of strong internal magnetic fields (≳ 10{sup 14} G) that preferentially channel internal heat to only a portion of the exterior is required to account for the implied high-temperature contrast across the stellar surface. This lends further observational evidence in support of the 'hidden' strong magnetic field scenario, in which CCOs possess submerged magnetic fields that are substantially stronger than the external dipole field, presumably due to burial by fallback of supernova ejecta. I also conduct phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and find no evidence for prominent spin-phase-dependent absorption features that could be produced by cyclotron absorption/scattering.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Binary Systems with Matter Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah

    2011-04-01

    With the advent of gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and LISA, a revolution in astronomy and relativistic astrophysics is about to begin. Compact objects---black holes (BHs), neutron stars (NSs), and white dwarfs (WDs)---in binary systems are among the most promising sources of gravitational radiation detectable by these interferometers. In addition, merging compact object binaries with matter companions may also emit a detectable electromagnetic counterpart, leading to an exciting possibility: a simultaneous detection of both gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. Such a detection could lead to breakthroughs in our understanding of matter under extreme conditions, as there are currently many competing ideas about how this matter should behave. Determining the correct one will require careful modeling of the gravitational and electromagnetic waves these systems emit through the late- inspiral, merger, and post-merger stages. During these stages, the effects of high-velocity, strong-field gravitation become paramount, and accurate modeling requires large-scale, fully general relativistic simulations. I will review some of the latest results from fully general relativistic simulations of compact object binaries with matter companions, including NSNSs, BHNSs, and WDNSs. These simulations examine the effects of mass ratio, BH spin, equations of state, and magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms and possible electromagnetic counterparts. Future work will focus on producing longer gravitational waveforms, incorporating more physics, and inventing new algorithms to efficiently handle the disparate length and timescales.

  11. Optical Constants of the Methane-Nitrogen BinaryIce System: Implications for Methane-Dominated Transneptunian Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapa, Silvia; Grundy, William M.; Tegler, Stephen C.; Bergonio, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Pluto, Eris, and Makemake, unlike most Transneptunian objects (TNOs) with water-ice rich or featureless surfaces (Barucci et al., 2008), display infrared spectra dominated by methane ice (Brown, 2008). These three TNOs are often compared with Neptune's large satellite Triton, since its spectrum is similarly dominated by methane ice and it is thought to have formed similarly to Pluto, Eris, and Makemake, prior to its capture into a retrograde orbit around Neptune. In addition to methane ice, nitrogen ice has been directly detected on Pluto and Triton via the 2.148 micron absorption band (Cruikshank et al., 1984; Owen et al., 1993).Thermodynamic equilibrium dictates that if methane and nitrogen ices are both present, for most of the range of possible nitrogen/methane relative abundances, two distinct phases must coexist at temperatures relevant to the surfaces of these icy dwarf planets (Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, 1983; Lunine and Stevenson, 1985): methane ice saturated with nitrogen and nitrogen ice saturated with methane.We present infrared absorption coefficient spectra in the wavelength range 0.8 - 2.5 micron of methane diluted in nitrogen and nitrogen diluted in methane at temperatures between 40 and 90 K and at different mixing ratios, allowing a proper model to be constructed for any TNO where the methane/nitrogen ratio falls between the two solubility limits such that both phases are present.

  12. Photometric and Polarimetric Observations of Be/X-Ray and Be/Gamma-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Y.; Akitaya, H.; Ebisuda, N.; Itoh, R.; Kanda, Y.; Kawabata, M.; Kawaguchi, K.; Mori, K.; Nakaoka, T.; Ohashi, Y.; Takaki, K.; Ueno, I.; Ui, T.; Urano, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2016-11-01

    Be/X-ray and Be/γ-ray binaries are systems comprised of a Be star and a compact object. In these systems, the Be disk plays an important role in their high-energy activities through the interaction with the compact object. Because of highly eccentric orbits, the interaction depends on the orbital phase in Be/X and Be/γ-ray binaries. Such interaction affects the Be disk structure, causing photometric and polarimetric variabilities. In order to search for photometric and polatimetric variability in Be/X-ray and Be/γ-ray binaries, we have monitored several systems with the polarimeter attached to Hiroshima 1.5m Kanata telescope, Japan. Our two-year monitor finds that some programmed systems show photometric variations and a few systems show polatimatric variabilities.

  13. The Effects of Common Envelope and Tidal Evolution On the Properties of X-ray Binaries, CVs and SN Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Maxwell C.; Di Stefano, R.

    2011-09-01

    Population synthesis studies provide an excellent testbed for determining the consequences and significance of certain binary processes that lead to accretion onto a compact object. We investigated the recent observational constraints of the common envelope (CE) efficiency parameter with particular regard to the dependence on the mass ratio of the binary. In our population synthesis calculations, we also implemented binary tidal interactions prior to Roche lobe overflow, such as tidal capture of and spin up by the companion, synchronization, and enhanced equatorial mass loss of the giant that can significantly alter the evolution of the system. Finally, we analyzed these binary interactions in the context of nuclear burning on white dwarfs, accreting X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, progenitors of Type Ia supernovae, and other high energy binary phenomena.

  14. Compact torus

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of the compact torus approach is to provide toroidal magnetic-field configurations that are based primarily on plasma currents and can be freed from closely surrounding mechanical structures. Some familiar examples are the current-carrying plasma rings of reversed-field theta pinches and relativistic-electron smoke ring experiments. The spheromak concept adds an internal toroidal magnetic field component, in order to enhance MHD stability. In recent experiments, three different approaches have been used to generate spheromak plasmas: (1) the reversed-field theta pinch; (2) the coaxial plasma gun; (3) a new quasi-static method, based on the initial formation of a toroidal plasma sleeve around a mechanical ring that generates poloidal and toroidal fluxes, followed by field-line reconnection to form a detached spheromak plasma. The theoretical and experimental MHD stability results for the spheromak configuration are found to have common features.

  15. Estimation of Mass of Compact Object in H 1743-322 from 2010 and 2011 Outbursts using TCAF Solution and Spectral Index-QPO Frequency Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, Aslam Ali; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak; Mondal, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    The well-known black hole candidate (BHC) H 1743-322 exhibited temporal and spectral variabilities during several outbursts. The variation of the accretion rates and flow geometry that change on a daily basis during each of the outbursts can be very well understood using the recent implementation of the two-component advective flow solution of the viscous transonic flow equations as an additive table model in XSPEC. This has dramatically improved our understanding of accretion flow dynamics. Most interestingly, the solution allows us to treat the mass of the BHC as a free parameter and its mass could be estimated from spectral fits. In this paper, we fitted the data of two successive outbursts of H 1743-322 in 2010 and 2011 and studied the evolution of accretion flow parameters, such as two-component (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian) accretion rates, shock location (i.e., size of the Compton cloud), etc. We assume that the model normalization remains the same across the states in both these outbursts. We used this to estimate the mass of the black hole and found that it comes out in the range of 9.25{--}12.86 {M}⊙ . For the sake of comparison, we also estimated mass using the Photon index versus Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency correlation method, which turns out to be 11.65+/- 0.67 {M}⊙ using GRO J1655-40 as a reference source. Combining these two estimates, the most probable mass of the compact object becomes {11.21}-1.96+1.65 {M}⊙ .

  16. The neutron star in HESS J1731-347: Central compact objects as laboratories to study the equation of state of superdense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Pühlhofer, G.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Santangelo, A.; Werner, K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Central compact objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants are isolated thermally emitting neutron stars (NSs). They are most probably characterized by a magnetic field strength that is roughly two orders of magnitude lower than that of most of the radio and accreting pulsars. The thermal emission of CCOs can be modeled to obtain constraints on the physical parameters of the star such as its mass, radius, effective temperature, and chemical composition. Aims: The CCO in HESS J1731-347 is one of the brightest objects in this class. Starting from 2007, it was observed several times with different X-ray satellites. Here we present our analysis of two new XMM-Newton observations of the source performed in 2013 which increase the total exposure time of the data available for spectral analysis by a factor of about five compared to the analyses presented before. Methods: We use our numerical spectral models for carbon and hydrogen atmospheres to fit the spectrum of the CCO. From our fits, we derive constraints on the physical parameters of the emitting star such as its mass, radius, distance, and effective temperature. We also use the new data to derive new upper limits on the source pulsations and to confirm the absence of a long-term flux and spectral variability. Results: The analysis shows that atmosphere models are clearly preferred by the fit over the blackbody spectral function. Under the assumption that the X-ray emission is uniformly produced by the entire star surface (supported by the lack of pulsations), hydrogen atmosphere models lead to uncomfortably large distances of the CCO, above 7-8 kpc. On the other hand, the carbon atmosphere model formally excludes distances above 5-6 kpc and is compatible with the source located in the Scutum-Crux (~3 kpc) or Norma-Cygnus (~4.5 kpc) Galactic spiral arm. We provide and discuss the corresponding confidence contours in the NS mass-radius plane. The measured effective temperature indicates that the NS is

  17. Period Evolution of Double White Dwarf Binaries Under the Influence of Gravitational Wave Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kylee; Benacquista, Matt; Belczynski, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects, such as Double White Dwarf (DWD) binaries, are the most populous producers of gravitational waves (GW) at low frequencies. The gravitational radiation (GR) emitted from the Galactic DWD binary population will create an unresolvable signal known as the confusion noise-limit (CNL) in the space-based evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA). It is predicted that many thousand DWD binary signals will rise above the CNL and create resolvable GW signals. In previous work, Heather Johnson, from the University of Texas-Austin, produced ~61 million DWD systems using the binary population features in the StarTrack population synthesis code created by Chris Belczynski. We have created an evolutionary code that continues the period evolution of the DWD binaries under the effects of GR. Our present model only accounts for detached binary systems, but we are working on incorporating more features. Current period evolution models often extrapolate data based on smaller binary populations, however our model will utilize ~61 million binary systems in order to avoid inaccuracies.We then use two standard cylindrical density distributions to populate a galaxy with the evolved systems. We also discuss correlations between the progenitor binaries and the eLISA sources.

  18. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  19. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  20. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  1. Classifying X-Ray Binaries: A Probabilistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Giri; Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Bornn, Luke

    2015-08-01

    In X-ray binary star systems con