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Sample records for binding affibody molecules

  1. N-terminal engineering of amyloid-β-binding Affibody molecules yields improved chemical synthesis and higher binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Joel; Wahlström, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Markova, Natalia; Ekblad, Caroline; Gräslund, Astrid; Abrahmsén, Lars; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson; Wärmländer, Sebastian KTS

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is believed to be a major factor in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Molecules binding with high affinity and selectivity to Aβ-peptides are important tools for investigating the aggregation process. An Aβ-binding Affibody molecule, ZAβ3, has earlier been selected by phage display and shown to bind Aβ(1–40) with nanomolar affinity and to inhibit Aβ-peptide aggregation. In this study, we create truncated functional versions of the ZAβ3 Affibody molecule better suited for chemical synthesis production. Engineered Affibody molecules of different length were produced by solid phase peptide synthesis and allowed to form covalently linked homodimers by S-S-bridges. The N-terminally truncated Affibody molecules ZAβ3(12–58), ZAβ3(15–58), and ZAβ3(18–58) were produced in considerably higher synthetic yield than the corresponding full-length molecule ZAβ3(1–58). Circular dichroism spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor analysis showed that the shortest Affibody molecule, ZAβ3(18–58), exhibited complete loss of binding to the Aβ(1–40)-peptide, while the ZAβ3(12–58) and ZAβ3(15–58) Affibody molecules both displayed approximately one order of magnitude higher binding affinity to the Aβ(1–40)-peptide compared to the full-length Affibody molecule. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that the structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the truncated Affibody dimers is very similar to the previously published solution structure of the Aβ(1–40)-peptide in complex with the full-length ZAβ3 Affibody molecule. This indicates that the N-terminally truncated Affibody molecules ZAβ3(12–58) and ZAβ3(15–58) are highly promising for further engineering and future use as binding agents to monomeric Aβ(1–40). PMID:20886513

  2. Phage display selection of Affibody molecules with specific binding to the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Nordberg, E; Höidén-Guthenberg, I; Brismar, H; Adams, G P; Nilsson, F Y; Carlsson, J; Ståhl, S

    2007-04-01

    Affibody molecules specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been selected by phage display technology from a combinatorial protein library based on the 58-residue, protein A-derived Z domain. EGFR is overexpressed in various malignancies and is frequently associated with poor patient prognosis, and the information provided by targeting this receptor could facilitate both patient diagnostics and treatment. Three selected Affibody variants were shown to selectively bind to the extracellular domain of EGFR (EGFR-ECD). Kinetic biosensor analysis revealed that the three monomeric Affibody molecules bound with similar affinity, ranging from 130 to 185 nM. Head-to-tail dimers of the Affibody molecules were compared for their binding to recombinant EGFR-ECD in biosensor analysis and in human epithelial cancer A431 cells. Although the dimeric Affibody variants were found to bind in a range of 25-50 nM affinities in biosensor analysis, they were found to be low nanomolar binders in the cellular assays. Competition assays using radiolabeled Affibody dimers confirmed specific EGFR-binding and demonstrated that the three Affibody molecules competed for the same epitope. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the selected Affibody dimers were initially binding to EGFR at the cell surface of A431, and confocal microscopy analysis showed that the Affibody dimers could thereafter be internalized. The potential use of the described Affibody molecules as targeting agents for radionuclide based imaging applications in various carcinomas is discussed. PMID:17452435

  3. Engineering and characterization of a bispecific HER2 x EGFR-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Lindström, Sara; Ekerljung, Lina; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Carlsson, Jörgen; Brismar, Hjalmar; Gedda, Lars; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    HER2 (human epidermal-growth-factor receptor-2; ErbB2) and EGFR (epidermal-growth-factor receptor) are overexpressed in various forms of cancer, and the co-expression of both HER2 and EGFR has been reported in a number of studies. The simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR has been discussed as a strategy with which to potentially increase efficiency and selectivity in molecular imaging and therapy of certain cancers. In an effort to generate a molecule capable of bispecifically targeting HER2 and EGFR, a gene fragment encoding a bivalent HER2-binding affibody molecule was genetically fused in-frame with a bivalent EGFR-binding affibody molecule via a (G4S)3 [(Gly4-Ser)3]-encoding gene fragment. The encoded 30 kDa affibody construct (ZHER2)2-(G4S)3-(ZEGFR)2, with potential for bs (bispecific) binding to HER2 and EGFR, was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in terms of its binding capabilities. The retained ability to bind HER2 and EGFR separately was demonstrated using both biosensor technology and flow-cytometric analysis, the latter using HER2- and EGFR-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, simultaneous binding to HER2 and EGFR was demonstrated in: (i) a sandwich format employing real-time biospecific interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound immobilized EGFR and soluble HER2; (ii) immunofluorescence microscopy, where the bs affibody molecule bound EGFR-overexpressing cells and soluble HER2; and (iii) a cell-cell interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound HER2-overexpressing SKBR-3 cells and EGFR-overexpressing A-431 cells. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported bs affinity protein with potential ability for the simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR. The potential future use of this and similar constructs, capable of bs targeting of receptors to increase the efficacy and selectivity in imaging and therapy, is discussed. PMID:19492986

  4. Effects of an EGFR-binding affibody molecule on intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Ekerljung, L; Sahlberg, S H; Carlsson, J; Lennartsson, J; Glimelius, B

    2010-04-01

    Effects on intracellular signaling were studied in cells treated with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 that targets the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is overexpressed in many types of cancers and plays a fundamental role in cell signaling and it is of interest to find targeting agents capable of blocking the receptor. The clinically approved antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) and the natural ligand EGF were included as reference molecules. Two EGFR-rich cell lines, A-431 and U-343, were exposed to the three targeting agents and lysed. The cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with the receptors, or directly separated by SDS-Page. Autophosphorylation of the receptors and phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins Erk and Akt, were evaluated by Western blotting. Although the three different agents compete for the same binding site on EGFR, they influenced the signaling differently. The affibody molecule did not induce autophosphorylation of EGFR or any other receptor in the EGFR-family but, in spite of this, induced phosphorylation of Erk in both cell lines and Akt in the A-431 cells. Thus, the results suggest that the signaling pattern induced by (ZEGFR:955)2 is only partly similar to that induced by cetuximab. This makes the affibody molecule a potentially interesting alternative to cetuximab for EGFR-targeted therapy since it might give different therapy-related effects on tumor cells and different side effects on normal tissues. PMID:20198342

  5. Biodistribution of 211At labeled HER-2 binding affibody molecules in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Almqvist, Ylva; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Wilbur, D Scott; Carlsson, Jörgen

    2007-05-01

    The size of affibody molecules makes them suitable as targeting agents for targeted radiotherapy with the alpha-emitter 211At, since their biokinetic properties match the short physical half-live of 211At. In this study, the potential for this approach was investigated in vivo. Two different HER-2 binding affibody molecules were radiolabeled with 211At using both the linker PAB (N-succinimidyl-para-astatobenzoate) and a decaborate-based linker, and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice was investigated. The influence of L-lysine and Na-thiocyanate on the 211At uptake in normal tissues was also studied. Based on the biokinetic information obtained, the absorbed dose was calculated for different organs. Compared with a previous biodistribution with 125I, the 211At biodistribution using the PAB linker showed higher uptake in lungs, stomach, thyroid and salivary glands, indicating release of free 211At. When the decaborate-based linker was used, the uptake in those organs was decreased, but instead, high uptake in kidneys and liver was found. The uptake, when using the PAB linker, could be significantly reduced in some organs by the use of L-lysine and/or Na-thiocyanate. In conclusion, affibody molecules have suitable blood-kinetics for targeted radionuclide therapy with 211At. However, the labeling chemistry affects the distribution in normal organs to a high degree and needs to be improved to allow clinical use. PMID:17390057

  6. Quantification of internalization of EGFR-binding Affibody molecules: Methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Göstring, Lovisa; Chew, Ming Tsuey; Orlova, Anna; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Wennborg, Anders; Carlsson, Jörgen; Frejd, Fredrik Y

    2010-04-01

    Tumor cell internalization of targeting agents is of interest, since internalization influences the local retention time of a radionuclide and thereby imaging quality in PET and SPECT and effects of radionuclide therapy. In cases where nuclear methods are not applicable at the cellular level, quantitative fluorescent techniques are useful as described in this article. Two fluorescence-based methods to study cellular internalization were applied: the CypHer and the Alexa488-quenching methods, both utilized in fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Two EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were analyzed in A431 cells: the monomer Z1907 and the dimer (Z1907)2. EGF, cetuximab and non-specific Affibody molecules were used as controls. For comparison, internalization of 111In-labeled Z1907 was studied with the acid wash internalization assay. The Cypher method is straightforward, but requires equal labeling of all compounds for accurate quantification. The Alexa488-quenching method is preferable since it is independent of the dye-to-protein ratio. According to this method, about 45% of EGF and 19-24% of the bound Affibody molecules and cetuximab were internalized within one hour. Similar results were seen with 111In-Z1907 in the acid wash method, while (Z1907)2 was not removed by acid and thus could not be studied this way. The fluorescence-based Alexa488-quenching method is well suited to quantitatively analyze internalization of targeting agents, also those that resist acid wash. The internalized fraction showed that both the monomeric and dimeric Affibody molecules are expected to give good uptake and thereby good retention of metallic radionuclides which will render good tumor to background values. PMID:20198317

  7. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  8. Cellular Effects of HER3-Specific Affibody Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John; Gedda, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have led to the recognition of the epidermal growth factor receptor HER3 as a key player in cancer, and consequently this receptor has gained increased interest as a target for cancer therapy. We have previously generated several Affibody molecules with subnanomolar affinity for the HER3 receptor. Here, we investigate the effects of two of these HER3-specific Affibody molecules, Z05416 and Z05417, on different HER3-overexpressing cancer cell lines. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the Affibody molecules were shown to bind to HER3 on three different cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor binding of the natural ligand heregulin (HRG) was blocked by addition of Affibody molecules. In addition, both molecules suppressed HRG-induced HER3 and HER2 phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells, as well as HER3 phosphorylation in constantly HER2-activated SKBR-3 cells. Importantly, Western blot analysis also revealed that HRG-induced downstream signalling through the Ras-MAPK pathway as well as the PI3K-Akt pathway was blocked by the Affibody molecules. Finally, in an in vitro proliferation assay, the two Affibody molecules demonstrated complete inhibition of HRG-induced cancer cell growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Z05416 and Z05417 exert an anti-proliferative effect on two breast cancer cell lines by inhibiting HRG-induced phosphorylation of HER3, suggesting that the Affibody molecules are promising candidates for future HER3-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22768204

  9. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  10. Update: affibody molecules for molecular imaging and therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Anna; Feldwisch, Joachim; Abrahmsén, Lars; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2007-10-01

    Affibody molecules are scaffold proteins, having a common frame of amino acids determining the overall fold or tertiary structure, but with each member characterized by a unique amino acid composition in an exposed binding surface determining binding specificity and affinity for a certain target. Affibody molecules represent a new class of affinity proteins based on a 58-amino acid residue protein domain, derived from one of the IgG binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. They combine small size ( approximately 6.5 kDa) with high affinity and specificity. Affibody molecules with nanomolar affinities were selected from an initial library (3 x 10(9) members) and, after affinity maturation, picomolar binders were obtained. The small size and simple structure of affibody molecules allow their production by chemical synthesis with homogeneous site-specific incorporation of moieties for further labeling using a wide range of labeling chemistries. The robustness and the refolding properties of affibody molecules make them amenable to labeling conditions that denature most proteins, including incubation at pH 11 at 60 degrees C for up to 60 minutes. Affibody molecules meet the requirements which are key for successful clinical use as imaging agents: high-affinity binding to the chosen target; short plasma half-life time; rapid renal clearance for nonbound drug substance and, high, continuously increasing tumor-to-organ ratios, resulting in high-contrast in vivo images shortly after injection of the diagnostic agent. PMID:17979560

  11. Engineering of a bispecific affibody molecule towards HER2 and HER3 by addition of an albumin-binding domain allows for affinity purification and in vivo half-life extension.

    PubMed

    Malm, Magdalena; Bass, Tarek; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Lord, Martin; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-09-01

    Emerging strategies in cancer biotherapy include the generation and application of bispecific antibodies, targeting two tumor-associated antigens for improved tumor selectivity and potency. Here, an alternative format for bispecific molecules was designed and investigated, in which two Affibody molecules were linked by an albumin-binding domain (ABD). Affibody molecules are small (6 kDa) affinity proteins and this new format allows for engineering of molecules with similar function as full-length bispecific antibodies, but in a dramatically smaller size (around eight-fold smaller). The ABD was intended to function both as a tag for affinity purification as well as for in vivo half-life extension in future preclinical and clinical investigations. Affinity-purified bispecific Affibody molecules, targeting HER2 and HER3, showed simultaneous binding to the three target proteins (HER2, HER3, and albumin) when investigated in biosensor assays. Moreover, simultaneous interactions with the receptors and albumin were demonstrated using flow cytometry on cancer cells. The bispecific Affibody molecules were also able to block ligand-induced phosphorylation of the HER receptors, indicating an anti-proliferative effect. We believe that this compact and flexible format has great potential for developing new potent bispecific affinity proteins in the future, as it combines the benefits of a small size (e.g. improved tissue penetration and reduced cost of goods) with a long circulatory half-life.

  12. The HER2-Binding Affibody Molecule (ZHER2∶342)2 Increases Radiosensitivity in SKBR-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ekerljung, Lina; Lennartsson, Johan; Gedda, Lars

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the HER2-specific affibody molecule (ZHER2∶342)2 inhibits proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Here, we continue to investigate its biological effects in vitro by studying receptor dimerization and clonogenic survival following irradiation. We found that (ZHER2∶342)2 sensitizes the HER2-overexpressing cell line SKBR-3 to ionizing radiation. The survival after exposure to (ZHER2∶342)2 and 8 Gy (S8Gy 0.006) was decreased by a factor four compared to the untreated (S8Gy 0.023). The low HER2-expressing cell line MCF-7 was more radiosensitive than SKBR-3 but did not respond to (ZHER2∶342)2. Treatment by (ZHER2∶342)2 strongly increased the levels of dimerized and phosphorylated HER2 even after 5 minutes of stimulation. The monomeric ZHER2∶342 does not seem to be able to induce receptor phosphorylation and dimerization or sensitize cells to irradiation. PMID:23166716

  13. Generation and evaluation of bispecific affibody molecules for simultaneous targeting of EGFR and HER2.

    PubMed

    Ekerljung, Lina; Wållberg, Helena; Sohrabian, Azita; Andersson, Karl; Friedman, Mikaela; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan; Gedda, Lars

    2012-09-19

    Coexpression of several ErbB receptors has been found in many cancers and has been linked with increased aggressiveness of tumors and a worse patient prognosis. This makes the simultaneous targeting of two surface receptors by using bispecific constructs an increasingly appreciated strategy. Here, we have generated six such bispecific targeting proteins, each comprising two monomeric affibody molecules with specific binding to either of the two human epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and HER2, respectively. The bispecific constructs were designed with (i) alternative positioning (N- or C-terminal) of the different affibody molecules, (ii) two alternative peptide linkers (Gly(4)Ser)(3) or (Ser(4)Gly)(3), and (iii) affibody molecules with different affinity (nanomolar or picomolar) for HER2. Using both Biacore technology and cell binding assays, it was demonstrated that all six constructs could bind simultaneously to both their target proteins. N-terminal positioning of the inherent monomeric affibody molecules was favorable to promote the binding to the respective target. Interestingly, bispecific constructs containing the novel (Ser(4)Gly)(3) linker displayed a higher affinity in cell binding, as compared to constructs containing the more conventional linker, (Gly(4)Ser)(3). It could further be concluded that bispecific constructs (but not the monomeric affibody molecules) induced dimer formation and phosphorylation of EGFR in SKBR3 cells, which express fairly high levels of both receptors. It was also investigated whether the bispecific binding would influence cell growth or sensitize cells for ionizing radiation, but no such effects were observed. PMID:22882002

  14. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both (125)I and (111)In. (111)In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe (111)In-/(125)I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. (111)In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of (111)In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe (111)In/(125)I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of (111)In/(125)I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of (111)In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys.

  15. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both 125I and 111In. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe 111In-/125I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe 111In/125I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of 111In/125I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of 111In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys. PMID:26722376

  16. Improved tumor-to-organ ratios of a novel 67Ga-human epidermal growth factor radionuclide conjugate with preadministered antiepidermal growth factor receptor affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Karl; Haylock, Anna-Karin; Velikyan, Irina; Spiegelberg, Diana; Kareem, Heewa; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Lundqvist, Hans; Nestor, Marika

    2011-10-01

    The overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is associated with poor prognosis. Targeted nuclear imaging of the EGFR expression could improve the diagnostics in patients with HNSCC. However, the high expression of EGFR in normal organs may conceal the tumor uptake and therefore limit the use. This study assesses the biodistribution of a novel human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) radionuclide conjugate after preinjection with anti-EGFR affibody molecules. hEGF was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and labeled with (67)Ga. The biodistribution of [(67)Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF in nude mice with EGFR-expressing xenografts was evaluated either alone or 45 minutes after preinjection with one of the anti-EGFR affibody molecules Z(EGFR:1907), (Z(EGFR:1907))(2), or (Z(EGFR:955))(2). The novel radioimmunoconjugate, [(67)Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF, demonstrated high stability in vitro and specific binding to hEGF in vitro and in vivo. Preinjection with anti-EGFR affibody molecules improved the tumor-to-organ ratio in the liver, salivary glands, and colon. Overall, the dimeric high-affinity affibody molecule (Z(EGFR:1907))(2) exhibited the best results. These findings show that preblocking with an anti-EGFR affibody molecule is a promising tool that could improve the outcome of radionuclide-based imaging of EGFR-expressing tumors. PMID:21834651

  17. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  18. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 (KD) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907, thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers.

  19. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) (K(D)) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907), thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers. PMID:20615009

  20. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    GAROUSI, JAVAD; ANDERSSON, KEN G.; MITRAN, BOGDAN; PICHL, MARIE-LOUISE; STÅHL, STEFAN; ORLOVA, ANNA; LÖFBLOM, JOHN; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide 89Zr. The 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160±60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6±0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7±0.6 at 24 h after injection. 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody 89Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR-expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  1. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Andersson, Ken G; Mitran, Bogdan; Pichl, Marie-Louise; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide (89)Zr. The (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160 ± 60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6 ± 0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7 ± 0.6 at 24 h after injection. (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody (89)Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR‑expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 8(9)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  2. In vivo and in vitro uptake of 111In, delivered with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2, in EGFR expressing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Orlova, A; Friedman, M; Tolmachev, V; Ståhl, S; Nilsson, F Y; Glimelius, B; Carlsson, J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is overexpressed in many carcinomas. Targeting this receptor with radionuclides is important for imaging and therapy applications in nuclear medicine. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo properties of a new high affinity EGFR binding affibody molecule, (ZEGFR:955)2, when conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA and labelled with 111In. The binding time patterns and retention studies were performed using cultured squamous carcinoma A431 cells that overexpress EGFR. In the in vivo studies, female BALB/c nu/nu mice carrying tumours from xenografted A431 cells were used. The in vitro studies showed EGFR specific binding, high uptake and good retention of 111In when delivered as [111In](ZEGFR:955)2. The retention after 72 h of incubation was 38.0+/-1.15% of the initial level. The biodistribution study showed a tumour specific 111In uptake of 3.8+/-1.4% of injected dose per gram tumour tissue 4 h post-injection. The tumour to blood ratio was 9.1 and the tumours could easily be visualized with a gamma camera at this time-point. 111In delivered with [111In](ZEGFR:955)2 gave an EGFR specific uptake and the results indicated that the (ZEGFR:955)2 affibody molecule is a candidate for radionuclide-based tumour imaging. Potential therapy applications are discussed. PMID:18357367

  3. Increasing the Net Negative Charge by Replacement of DOTA Chelator with DOTAGA Improves the Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Second-Generation Synthetic Affibody Molecules.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Norrström, Emily; Strand, Joanna; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy to enable patient stratification for targeted therapies is to monitor the target expression in a tumor by radionuclide molecular imaging. Affibody molecules (7 kDa) are nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a 25-fold smaller size than intact antibodies. They have shown an apparent potential as molecular imaging probes both in preclinical and clinical studies. Earlier, we found that hepatic uptake can be reduced by the incorporation of negatively charged purification tags at the N-terminus of Affibody molecules. We hypothesized that liver uptake might similarly be reduced by positioning the chelator at the N-terminus, where the chelator-radionuclide complex will provide negative charges. To test this hypothesis, a second generation synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:2891 Affibody molecule was synthesized and labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga using DOTAGA and DOTA chelators. The chelators were manually coupled to the N-terminus of ZHER2:2891 forming an amide bond. Labeling DOTAGA-ZHER2:2891 and DOTA-ZHER2:2891 with (68)Ga and (111)In resulted in stable radioconjugates. The tumor-targeting and biodistribution properties of the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled conjugates were compared in SKOV-3 tumor-bearing nude mice at 2 h postinjection. The HER2-specific binding of the radioconjugates was verified both in vitro and in vivo. Using the DOTAGA chelator gave significantly lower radioactivity in liver and blood for both radionuclides. The (111)In-labeled conjugates showed more rapid blood clearance than the (68)Ga-labeled conjugates. The most pronounced influence of the chelators was found when they were labeled with (68)Ga. The DOTAGA chelator gave significantly higher tumor-to-blood (61 ± 6 vs 23 ± 5, p < 0.05) and tumor-to-liver (10.4 ± 0.6 vs 4.5 ± 0.5, p < 0.05) ratios than the DOTA chelator. This study demonstrated that chelators may be used to alter the uptake of Affibody molecules, and most likely other scaffold-based imaging probes, for improvement

  4. 17AAG-induced internalisation of HER2-specific Affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    Göstring, Lovisa; Lindegren, Sture; Gedda, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The geldanamycin derivative 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is known to induce internalisation and degradation of the otherwise internalisation-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. In the present study, 17-AAG was used to increase internalisation of the HER2-specific Affibody molecule ABY-025. The cellular redistribution of halogen-labelled 211At-ABY-025 and radiometal-labelled 111In-ABY-025 following treatment with 17-AAG was studied. 17-AAG treatment of SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma and SKBR-3 human breast carcinoma cells to some extent shifted the localisation of 111In-ABY-025 from the cell surface to intracellular compartments in the two cell lines. ABY-025 labelled with the high-linear energy transfer α emitter 211At was also internalised to a higher degree; however, due to its physiological properties, this nuclide was excreted faster. The results indicate that 17-AAG may be used to facilitate cell-specific intracellular localisation of a suitable cytotoxic or radioactive agent coupled to ABY-025 in HER2-overexpressing cells.

  5. 17AAG-induced internalisation of HER2-specific Affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    Göstring, Lovisa; Lindegren, Sture; Gedda, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The geldanamycin derivative 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is known to induce internalisation and degradation of the otherwise internalisation-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. In the present study, 17-AAG was used to increase internalisation of the HER2-specific Affibody molecule ABY-025. The cellular redistribution of halogen-labelled 211At-ABY-025 and radiometal-labelled 111In-ABY-025 following treatment with 17-AAG was studied. 17-AAG treatment of SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma and SKBR-3 human breast carcinoma cells to some extent shifted the localisation of 111In-ABY-025 from the cell surface to intracellular compartments in the two cell lines. ABY-025 labelled with the high-linear energy transfer α emitter 211At was also internalised to a higher degree; however, due to its physiological properties, this nuclide was excreted faster. The results indicate that 17-AAG may be used to facilitate cell-specific intracellular localisation of a suitable cytotoxic or radioactive agent coupled to ABY-025 in HER2-overexpressing cells. PMID:27698830

  6. Targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing tumor cells with sterically stabilized affibody liposomes (SAL).

    PubMed

    Beuttler, Julia; Rothdiener, Miriam; Müller, Dafne; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Kontermann, Roland E

    2009-06-01

    Affibody molecules are small and stable antigen-binding molecules derived from the B domain of protein A. We applied a bivalent, high-affinity epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific affibody molecule for the generation of targeted PEGylated liposomes. These sterically stabilized affibody liposomes (SAL) were produced by chemical coupling of the cysteine-modified affibody molecule to maleimide-PEG(2000)-DSPE and subsequent insertion into PEGylated liposomes. These SAL showed strong and selective binding to EGFR-expressing tumor cell lines. Binding was dependent on the amount of inserted affibody molecule-lipid conjugates and could be blocked by soluble EGF. Approximately 30% of binding activity was still retained after 6 days of incubation in human plasma at 37 degrees C. Binding of SAL to cells led to efficient internalization of the liposomes. Using mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes, we observed for SAL, compared to untargeted liposomes, an enhanced cytotoxicity toward EGFR-expressing cells. In summary, we show that SAL can be easily prepared from affibody molecules and thus may be suitable for the development of carrier systems for targeted delivery of drugs. PMID:19435362

  7. In vivo imaging of xenograft tumors using an epidermal growth factor receptor-specific affibody molecule labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy; Little, Garrick; Chen, Huaxian; Olive, David Michael

    2010-02-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff) with a near-infrared (NIR) dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800) in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2)-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors. PMID:20126472

  8. Order of amino acids in C-terminal cysteine-containing peptide-based chelators influences cellular processing and biodistribution of 99mTc-labeled recombinant Affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Wållberg, Helena; Orlova, Anna; Rosestedt, Maria; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Affibody molecules constitute a novel class of molecular display selected affinity proteins based on non-immunoglobulin scaffold. Preclinical investigations and pilot clinical data have demonstrated that Affibody molecules provide high contrast imaging of tumor-associated molecular targets shortly after injection. The use of cysteine-containing peptide-based chelators at the C-terminus of recombinant Affibody molecules enabled site-specific labeling with the radionuclide 99mTc. Earlier studies have demonstrated that position, composition and the order of amino acids in peptide-based chelators influence labeling stability, cellular processing and biodistribution of Affibody molecules. To investigate the influence of the amino acid order, a series of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules, containing GSGC, GEGC and GKGC chelators have been prepared and characterized. The affinity to HER2, cellular processing of 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules and their biodistribution were investigated. These properties were compared with that of the previously studied 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules containing GGSC, GGEC and GGKC chelators. All variants displayed picomolar affinities to HER2. The substitution of a single amino acid in the chelator had an appreciable influence on the cellular processing of 99mTc. The biodistribution of all 99mTc-labeled Affibody molecules was in general comparable, with the main difference in uptake and retention of radioactivity in excretory organs. The hepatic accumulation of radioactivity was higher for the lysine-containing chelators and the renal retention of 99mTc was significantly affected by the amino acid composition of chelators. The order of amino acids influenced renal uptake of some conjugates at 1 h after injection, but the difference decreased at later time points. Such information can be helpful for the development of other scaffold protein-based imaging and therapeutic radiolabeled conjugates.

  9. Imaging agents for in vivo molecular profiling of disseminated prostate cancer--targeting EGFR receptors in prostate cancer: comparison of cellular processing of [111In]-labeled affibody molecule Z(EGFR:2377) and cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Jennie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna

    2011-04-01

    Expression of receptor tyrosine-kinase (RTK) EGFR is low in normal prostate, but increases in prostate cancer. This receptor is significantly up-regulated as tumors progress into higher grade, androgen-insensitive and metastatic lesions. The up-regulated receptors could serve as targets for novel selective anti-cancer drugs, e.g. antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Radionuclide imaging of RTK can facilitate patient stratification and monitoring of anti-RTK therapy of prostate cancer. The goal of the study was to evaluate binding and cellar processing of radiolabeled EGFR-targeting conjugates by prostate cancer cell lines. Receptor expression of EGFR was studied in three prostate cancer cell lines: DU145 (brain metastasis of PC, hormone insensitive), PC3 (bone metastasis of PC) and LNCaP (lymph node metastasis of PC, androgen and estrogen receptor positive). Uptake and internalization of anti-EGFR mAbs (cetuximab) and affibody molecule (Z2377) labeled with indium-111 was investigated. EGFR expression on prostate cancer cell lines was clearly demonstrated. Both labelled conjugates 111In-Z2377 and 111In-cetuximab bound to prostate cancer cells in the receptor mediated model. Expression levels were modest but correlate with degree of hormone independence. Internalization of Affibody molecules was relatively slow in all cell lines. Internalization of mAbs was more rapid. The level of EGFR expression in these cell lines is sufficient for in vivo molecular imaging. Slow internalization indicates possibility of the use of non-residualizing labels for affibody molecules. PMID:21253675

  10. Inhibiting HER3-Mediated Tumor Cell Growth with Affibody Molecules Engineered to Low Picomolar Affinity by Position-Directed Error-Prone PCR-Like Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Magdalena; Kronqvist, Nina; Lindberg, Hanna; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Bass, Tarek; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Varasteh, Zohreh; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2013-01-01

    The HER3 receptor is implicated in the progression of various cancers as well as in resistance to several currently used drugs, and is hence a potential target for development of new therapies. We have previously generated Affibody molecules that inhibit heregulin-induced signaling of the HER3 pathways. The aim of this study was to improve the affinity of the binders to hopefully increase receptor inhibition efficacy and enable a high receptor-mediated uptake in tumors. We explored a novel strategy for affinity maturation of Affibody molecules that is based on alanine scanning followed by design of library diversification to mimic the result from an error-prone PCR reaction, but with full control over mutated positions and thus less biases. Using bacterial surface display and flow-cytometric sorting of the maturation library, the affinity for HER3 was improved more than 30-fold down to 21 pM. The affinity is among the higher that has been reported for Affibody molecules and we believe that the maturation strategy should be generally applicable for improvement of affinity proteins. The new binders also demonstrated an improved thermal stability as well as complete refolding after denaturation. Moreover, inhibition of ligand-induced proliferation of HER3-positive breast cancer cells was improved more than two orders of magnitude compared to the previously best-performing clone. Radiolabeled Affibody molecules showed specific targeting of a number of HER3-positive cell lines in vitro as well as targeting of HER3 in in vivo mouse models and represent promising candidates for future development of targeted therapies and diagnostics. PMID:23675426

  11. Inhibiting HER3-mediated tumor cell growth with affibody molecules engineered to low picomolar affinity by position-directed error-prone PCR-like diversification.

    PubMed

    Malm, Magdalena; Kronqvist, Nina; Lindberg, Hanna; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Bass, Tarek; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Varasteh, Zohreh; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2013-01-01

    The HER3 receptor is implicated in the progression of various cancers as well as in resistance to several currently used drugs, and is hence a potential target for development of new therapies. We have previously generated Affibody molecules that inhibit heregulin-induced signaling of the HER3 pathways. The aim of this study was to improve the affinity of the binders to hopefully increase receptor inhibition efficacy and enable a high receptor-mediated uptake in tumors. We explored a novel strategy for affinity maturation of Affibody molecules that is based on alanine scanning followed by design of library diversification to mimic the result from an error-prone PCR reaction, but with full control over mutated positions and thus less biases. Using bacterial surface display and flow-cytometric sorting of the maturation library, the affinity for HER3 was improved more than 30-fold down to 21 pM. The affinity is among the higher that has been reported for Affibody molecules and we believe that the maturation strategy should be generally applicable for improvement of affinity proteins. The new binders also demonstrated an improved thermal stability as well as complete refolding after denaturation. Moreover, inhibition of ligand-induced proliferation of HER3-positive breast cancer cells was improved more than two orders of magnitude compared to the previously best-performing clone. Radiolabeled Affibody molecules showed specific targeting of a number of HER3-positive cell lines in vitro as well as targeting of HER3 in in vivo mouse models and represent promising candidates for future development of targeted therapies and diagnostics.

  12. Target-specific cytotoxic effects on HER2-expressing cells by the tripartite fusion toxin ZHER2:2891-ABD-PE38X8, including a targeting affibody molecule and a half-life extension domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Seijsing, Johan; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2015-08-01

    Development of cancer treatment regimens including immunotoxins is partly hampered by their immunogenicity. Recently, deimmunized versions of toxins have been described, potentially being better suited for translation to the clinic. In this study, a recombinant tripartite fusion toxin consisting of a deimmunized version of exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PE38) genetically fused to an affibody molecule specifically interacting with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and also an albumin binding domain (ABD) for half-life extension, has been produced and characterized in terms of functionality of the three moieties. Biosensor based assays showed that the fusion toxin was able to interact with human and mouse serum albumin, but not with bovine serum albumin and that it interacted with HER2 (KD=5 nM). Interestingly, a complex of the fusion toxin and human serum albumin also interacted with HER2 but with a somewhat weaker affinity (KD=12 nM). The IC50-values of the fusion toxin ranged from 6 to 300 pM on SKOV-3, SKBR-3 and A549 cells and was lower for cells with higher surface densities of HER2. The fusion toxin was found specific for HER2 as shown by blocking available HER2 receptors with free affibody molecule before subjecting the cells to the toxin. Analysis of contact time showed that 10 min was sufficient to kill 50% of the cells. In conclusion, all three regions of the fusion toxin were found to be functional.

  13. Position for site-specific attachment of a DOTA chelator to synthetic affibody molecules has a different influence on the targeting properties of 68Ga- compared to 111in-labeled conjugates.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Perols, Anna; Orlova, Anna; Selvaraju, Ram Kumar; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affibody molecules, small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins, are a promising class of probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. Radiolabeling of Affibody molecules with the positron-emitting nuclide 68Ga would permit the use of positron emission tomography (PET), providing better resolution, sensitivity, and quantification accuracy than single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:S1 Affibody molecule was conjugated with DOTA at the N-terminus, in the middle of helix 3, or at the C-terminus. The biodistribution of 68Ga- and 111In-labeled Affibody molecules was directly compared in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts. The position of the chelator strongly influenced the biodistribution of the tracers, and the influence was more pronounced for 68Ga-labeled Affibody molecules than for the 111In-labeled counterparts. The best 68Ga-labeled variant was 68Ga-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1, which provided a tumor uptake of 13 ± 1 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio of 39 ± 12 at 2 hours after injection. 111In-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1 and 111In-[DOTA-K58]-ZHER2:S1 were equally good at this time point, providing a tumor uptake of 15 to 16 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio in the range of 60 to 80. In conclusion, the selection of the best position for a chelator in Affibody molecules can be used for optimization of their imaging properties. This may be important for the development of Affibody-based and other protein-based imaging probes. PMID:25249017

  14. Efficient [(18)F]AlF Radiolabeling of ZHER3:8698 Affibody Molecule for Imaging of HER3 Positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Chiara; Allott, Louis; Martins, Carlos D; Vardon, Andrew; Ciobota, Daniela M; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Smith, Graham

    2016-08-17

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is overexpressed in several cancers, being linked to a more resistant phenotype and hence leading to poor patient prognosis. Imaging HER3 is challenging owing to the modest receptor number (<50000 receptors/cell) in overexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, to image HER3 in vivo, high target affinity PET probes need to be developed. This work describes two different [(18)F]AlF radiolabeling strategies of the ZHER3:8698 affibody molecule specifically targeting HER3. The one-pot radiolabeling of ZHER3:8698 performed at 100 °C and using 1,4,7-triazanonane-1,4,7-triacetate (NOTA) as chelator resulted in radiolabeled products with variable purity attributed to radioconjugate thermolysis. An alternative approach based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction between a novel tetrazine functionalized 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate (NODA) chelator and the trans-cyclooctene (TCO) functionalized affibody molecule was also investigated. This method enabled the radiolabeling of the protein at room temperature. The [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-ZHER3:8698 and [(18)F]AlF-NODA-ZHER3:8698 conjugates showed a specific uptake at 1 h after injection in high HER3-expressing MCF-7 tumors of 4.36 ± 0.92% ID/g and 4.96 ± 0.65% ID/g, respectively. The current results are encouraging for further investigation of [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-ZHER3:8698 as a HER3 imaging agent. PMID:27357023

  15. HER-2 Targeted Nanoparticle-Affibody Bioconjugates for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alexis, Frank; Basto, Pamela; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Zhang, Liangfang; Pridgen, Eric; Wang, Adrew Z.; Marein, Shawn L.; Westerhof, Katrina; Molnar, Linda K.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2010-01-01

    Affibodies are a class of polypeptide ligands that are potential candidates for cell- or tissue-specific targeting of drug-encapsulated controlled release polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). Here we report the development of drug delivery vehicles comprised of polymeric NPs that are surface modified with Affibody ligands that bind to the extracellular domain of the trans-membrane human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) for targeted delivery to cells which over express the HER-2 antigen. NPs lacking the anti-HER-2 Affibody did not show significant uptake by these cells. Using paclitaxel encapsulated NP-Affibody (1 wt% drug loading), we demonstrated increased cytotoxicity of these bioconjugates in SK-BR-3 and SKOV-3 cell lines. These targeted, drug encapsulated NPAffibody bioconjugates may be efficacious in treating HER-2 expressing carcinoma. PMID:19012296

  16. The effect of a dimeric Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:1907)2 targeting EGFR in combination with radiation in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara; Spiegelberg, Diana; Lennartsson, Johan; Nygren, Peter; Glimelius, Bengt; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer and is therefore an attractive target for treatment. (ZEGFR:1907)2 is a newly developed dimeric affibody molecule with high affinity to the extracellular part of EGFR. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of (ZEGFR:1907)2 in combination with external radiation and the possible inhibitory effects in the EGFR signalling pathways in the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT116. The effects were compared with an EGFR antibody (cetuximab) and the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib and sunitinib). These cell lines are genotypically different with respect to e.g. KRAS and BRAF mutational status, recently shown to be of clinical significance for therapeutic effects. Both cell lines express approximately 100,000-150,000 EGFRs per cell but differ in the radiation response (HCT116, SF2=0.28 and HT-29, SF2=0.70). Exposure to (ZEGFR:1907)2 produced a small, but significant, reduction in survival in HCT116 but did not affect HT-29 cells. Similar results were obtained after exposure to EGF and the EGFR antibody cetuximab. The EGFR tyrosine kinase targeting inhibitor erlotinib and the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib reduced survival in both cell lines. However, none of the drugs had any significant radiosensitizing effects in combination with radiation. Akt and Erk are central proteins in the EGFR downstream signalling and in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. The activation of Akt (Ser 473) and Erk (Thr202/Tyr204) by radiation was both dose- and time-dependent. However the activation of EGFR was not clearly affected by radiation. Neither (ZEGFR:1907)2 nor any of the other drugs were able to completely inactivate Akt or Erk. On the contrary, erlotinib stimulated Akt phosphorylation in both cell lines and in HCT116 cells Erk was activated. Overall the results illustrate the complexity in response to radiation and drugs in cells with differential

  17. Fluorogen activating protein-affibody probes: modular, no-wash measurement of epidermal growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Franke, Josef D; Ort, Stephan; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-01-21

    Fluorescence is essential for dynamic live cell imaging, and affinity reagents are required for quantification of endogenous proteins. Various fluorescent dyes can report on different aspects of biological trafficking, but must be independently conjugated to affinity reagents and characterized for specific biological readouts. Here we present the characterization of a new modular platform for small anti-EGFR affinity probes for studying rapid changes in receptor pools. A protein domain (FAP dL5**) that binds to malachite-green (MG) derivatives for fluorescence activation was expressed as a recombinant fusion to one or two copies of the compact EGFR binding affibody ZEGFR:1907. This is a recombinant and fluorogenic labeling reagent for native EGFR molecules. In vitro fluorescence assays demonstrated that the binding of these dyes to the FAP-affibody fusions produced thousand-fold fluorescence enhancements, with high binding affinity and fast association rates. Flow cytometry assays and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that these probes label endogenous EGFR on A431 cells without disruption of EGFR function, and low nanomolar surface Kd values were observed with the double-ZEGFR:1907 constructs. The application of light-harvesting fluorogens (dyedrons) significantly improved the detected fluorescence signal. Altering the order of addition of the ligand, probe, and dyes allowed differentiation between surface and endocytotic pools of receptors to reveal the rapid dynamics of endocytic trafficking. Therefore, FAP/affibody coupling provides a new approach to construct compact and modular affinity probes that label endogenous proteins on living cells and can be used for studying rapid changes in receptor pools involved in trafficking. PMID:25490520

  18. Fluorogen Activating Protein–Affibody Probes: Modular, No-Wash Measurement of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence is essential for dynamic live cell imaging, and affinity reagents are required for quantification of endogenous proteins. Various fluorescent dyes can report on different aspects of biological trafficking, but must be independently conjugated to affinity reagents and characterized for specific biological readouts. Here we present the characterization of a new modular platform for small anti-EGFR affinity probes for studying rapid changes in receptor pools. A protein domain (FAP dL5**) that binds to malachite-green (MG) derivatives for fluorescence activation was expressed as a recombinant fusion to one or two copies of the compact EGFR binding affibody ZEGFR:1907. This is a recombinant and fluorogenic labeling reagent for native EGFR molecules. In vitro fluorescence assays demonstrated that the binding of these dyes to the FAP–affibody fusions produced thousand-fold fluorescence enhancements, with high binding affinity and fast association rates. Flow cytometry assays and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that these probes label endogenous EGFR on A431 cells without disruption of EGFR function, and low nanomolar surface Kd values were observed with the double-ZEGFR:1907 constructs. The application of light-harvesting fluorogens (dyedrons) significantly improved the detected fluorescence signal. Altering the order of addition of the ligand, probe, and dyes allowed differentiation between surface and endocytotic pools of receptors to reveal the rapid dynamics of endocytic trafficking. Therefore, FAP/affibody coupling provides a new approach to construct compact and modular affinity probes that label endogenous proteins on living cells and can be used for studying rapid changes in receptor pools involved in trafficking. PMID:25490520

  19. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion. PMID:24066121

  20. Comparison of two site-specifically (18)F-labeled affibodies for PET imaging of EGFR positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho; Shen, Bin; Venturin, Gianina Teribele; Hu, Xiang; Rao, Jianghong; Chin, Frederick T; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules (64)Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with (64)Cu, (18)F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of (18)F labeled affibody probes (Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating ZEGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al(18)F to produce Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group (18)F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ((18)F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-ZEGFR:1907 to produce (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 or (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 demonstrated high in

  1. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  2. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding.

  3. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33  mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding. PMID:25652703

  4. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Robert W; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H; Sexton, Kristian J; Gunn, Jason R; Davis, Scott C; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding. PMID:25652703

  5. Programmable DNA-binding Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Meghan S.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant gene expression is responsible for a myriad of human diseases from infectious diseases to cancer. Precise regulation of these genes via specific interactions with the DNA double helix could pave the way for novel therapeutics. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are small molecules capable of binding to pre-determined DNA sequences up to 16 base pairs with affinity and specificity comparable to natural transcription factors. In the three decades since their development, great strides have been made relating to synthetic accessibility and improved sequence specificity and binding affinity. This perspective presents a brief history of early seminal developments in the field and highlights recent reports of the utility of polyamides as both genetic modulators and molecular probes. PMID:23665141

  6. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (p<0.05) reduction of the hepatic uptake of the affitoxin in a murine model. Fusion of the affitoxin with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) caused appreciable extension of the residence time in circulation and several-fold reduction of the renal uptake. The best variant, 111In-(HE)3-ZHER2-ABD-PE38X8, demonstrated receptor-specific accumulation in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts. In conclusion, a careful molecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties. PMID:27573289

  7. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (p<0.05) reduction of the hepatic uptake of the affitoxin in a murine model. Fusion of the affitoxin with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) caused appreciable extension of the residence time in circulation and several-fold reduction of the renal uptake. The best variant, 111In-(HE)3-ZHER2-ABD-PE38X8, demonstrated receptor-specific accumulation in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts. In conclusion, a careful molecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties.

  8. Prediction of binding to MHC class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Adams, H P; Koziol, J A

    1995-09-25

    The binding of antigenic peptide sequences to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is a prerequisite for stimulation of cytotoxic T cell responses. Neural networks are here used to predict the binding capacity of polypeptides to MHC class I molecules encoded by the gene HLA-A*0201. Given a large database of 552 nonamers and 486 decamers and their known binding capacities, the neural networks achieve a predictive hit rate of 0.78 for classifying peptides which might induce an immune response (good or intermediate binders) vs. those which cannot (weak or non-binders). The neural nets also depict specific motifs for different binding capacities. This approach is in principle applicable to all MHC class I and II molecules, given a suitable set of known binding capacities. The trained networks can then be used to perform a systematic search through all pathogen or tumor antigen protein sequences for potential cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes.

  9. Molecular forces for the binding and condensation of DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xian-E; Yang, Jie

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the binding between a double-stranded DNA and bilayers of cationic lipids and zwitterionic lipids in low ionic-strength solutions. The binding of a DNA molecule to freshly cleaved mica surface in solution has also been measured. The binding of DNA molecules to cationic lipid bilayers has a minimal strength of approximately 45 pN. On zwitterionic lipid bilayers and mica surface, the minimal binding strength is approximately twice that value. The binding also has a dynamic nature, with only a certain percentage of recorded force curves containing the binding characteristics. Divalent Mg(2+) ions enhance the binding by increasing that percentage without any effect on the binding strength. We have also observed a long-range attraction between DNA molecules and cationic lipid bilayers with a strength much larger than the minimum force and a range well over 50 nm, possibly related to the driving force responsible for the two-dimensional condensation of DNA. PMID:11751322

  10. Affibody-mediated PET imaging of HER3 expression in malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Rosestedt, Maria; Andersson, Ken G.; Mitran, Bogdan; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Löfblom, John; Orlova, Anna; Ståhl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is involved in the progression of various cancers and in resistance to therapies targeting the HER family. In vivo imaging of HER3 expression would enable patient stratification for anti-HER3 immunotherapy. Key challenges with HER3-targeting are the relatively low expression in HER3-positive tumours and HER3 expression in normal tissues. The use of positron-emission tomography (PET) provides advantages of high resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy compared to SPECT. Affibody molecules, imaging probes based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold, provide high imaging contrast shortly after injection. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility of PET imaging of HER3 expression using 68Ga-labeled affibody molecules. The anti-HER3 affibody molecule HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was successfully labelled with 68Ga with high yield, purity and stability. The agent bound specifically to HER3-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At 3 h pi, uptake of 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was significantly higher in xenografts with high HER3 expression (BT474, BxPC-3) than in xenografts with low HER3 expression (A431). In xenografts with high expression, tumour-to-blood ratios were >20, tumour-to-muscle >15, and tumour-to-bone >7. HER3-positive xenografts were visualised using microPET 3 h pi. In conclusion, PET imaging of HER3 expression is feasible using 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA shortly after administration. PMID:26477646

  11. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  12. EGFR-directed Affibody for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery: time-dose analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Ana Luiza; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The key to fluorescence guided surgical oncology is the ability to create specific contrast between normal and glioma tissue. The blood brain barrier that limits the delivery of substances to the normal brain is broken in tumors, allowing accumulation of agents in the tumor interior. However, for a clinical success, imaging agents should be in the infiltrative edges to minimize the resection of normal brain while enable the removal of tumor. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of EGFR is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma and the injection of a fluorescent molecule targeted to these receptors would improve tumor contrast during fluorescence guided surgery. Affibody molecules have intentional medium affinity and high potential specificity, which are the desirable features of a good surgical imaging agent. The aim of this study was evaluate the brain/glioma uptake of ABY029 labeled with near-infrared dye IRDye800CW after intravenous injection. Rats were either inoculated with orthotopic implantations of U251 human glioma cell line or PBS (shams control) in the brain. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2-3 weeks before carrying out fluorescent tracer experiments. Fluorescent imaging of ex vivo brain slices from rats was acquired at different time points after infection of fluorescently labeled EGFR-specific affibody to verify which time provided maximal contrast tumor to normal brain. Although the tumor was most clearly visualized after 1h of IRDye800CW-labeled ABY029 injection, the tumor location could be identified from the background after 48h. These results suggest that the NIR-labeled affibody examined shows excellent potential to increase surgical visualization for confirmed EGFR positive tumors.

  13. Concentration profiles of actin-binding molecules in lamellipodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Motile cells form lamellipodia in the direction of motion, which are flat membrane protrusions containing an actin filament network. The network flows rearward relative to the leading edge of the lamellipodium due to actin polymerization at the front. Thus, actin binding molecules are subject to transport towards the rear of the cell in the bound state and diffuse freely in the unbound state. We analyze this reaction-diffusion-advection process with respect to the concentration profiles of these species and provide an analytic approximation for them. Network flow may cause a depletion zone of actin binding molecules close to the leading edge. The existence of such zone depends on the free molecule concentration in the cell body, on the ratio of the diffusion length to the distance bound molecules travel rearward with the flow before dissociating, and the ratio of the diffusion length to the width of the region with network flow and actin binding. Our calculations suggest the existence of depletion zones for the F-actin cross-linkers filamin and α-actinin in fish keratocytes (and other cell types), which is in line with the small elastic moduli of the F-actin network close to the leading edge found in measurements of the force motile cells are able to exert.

  14. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  15. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  16. Synthetic and natural consensus design for engineering charge within an affibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Case, Brett A; Hackel, Benjamin J

    2016-08-01

    Protein ligand charge can impact physiological delivery with charge reduction often benefiting performance. Yet neutralizing mutations can be detrimental to protein function. Herein, three approaches are evaluated to introduce charged-to-neutral mutations of three cations and three anions within an affibody engineered to bind epidermal growth factor receptor. These approaches-combinatorial library sorting or consensus design, based on natural homologs or library-sorted mutants-are used to identify mutations with favorable affinity, stability, and recombinant yield. Consensus design, based on 942 affibody homologs, yielded a mutant of modest function (Kd  = 11 ±4 nM, Tm  = 62°C, and yield = 4.0 ± 0.8 mg/L as compared to 5.3 ± 1.7 nM, 71°C, and 3.5 ± 0.3 mg/L for the parental affibody). Extension of consensus design to 10 additional mutants exhibited varied performance including a substantially improved mutant (Kd  = 6.9 ± 1.4 nM, Tm  = 71°C, and 12.7 ± 0.9 mg/L yield). Sorting a homolog-based combinatorial library of 7 × 10(5) mutants generated a distribution of mutants with lower stability and yield, but did identify one strongly binding variant (Kd  = 1.2 ± 0.3 nM, Tm  = 69°C, and 6.0 ± 0.4 mg/L yield). Synthetic consensus design, based on the amino acid distribution in functional library mutants, yielded higher affinities (P = 0.05) with comparable stabilities and yields. The best of four analyzed clones had Kd  = 1.7 ± 0.5 nM, Tm  = 68°C, and 7.0 ± 0.5 mg/L yield. While all three approaches were effective in creating targeted affibodies with six charged-to-neutral mutations, synthetic consensus design proved to be the most robust. Synthetic consensus design provides a valuable tool for ligand engineering, particularly in the context of charge manipulation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1628-1638. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  18. Molecular imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts with epidermal growth factor receptor targeted affibody probes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Xiaoyang; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Han; Hoppmann, Susan; Cao, Qizhen; Chua, Mei-Sze; So, Samuel K; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive and lethal cancer. It is typically asymptomatic at the early stage, with only 10%-20% of HCC patients being diagnosed early enough for appropriate surgical treatment. The delayed diagnosis of HCC is associated with limited treatment options and much lower survival rates. Therefore, the early and accurate detection of HCC is crucial to improve its currently dismal prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported to be involved in HCC tumorigenesis and to represent an attractive target for HCC imaging and therapy. In this study, an affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907, targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR, was used for the first time to assess its potential to detect HCC xenografts. By evaluating radio- or fluorescent-labeled Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 as a probe for positron emission tomography (PET) or optical imaging of HCC, subcutaneous EGFR-positive HCC xenografts were found to be successfully imaged by the PET probe. Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo. PMID:23710458

  19. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then used in various applications. These applications range from therapeutic uses to biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, the small molecular weights of these targets, including the drastic size difference between the target and the oligonucleotides, make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for their detection. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed. PMID:27242994

  20. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then used in various applications. These applications range from therapeutic uses to biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, the small molecular weights of these targets, including the drastic size difference between the target and the oligonucleotides, make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for their detection. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed. PMID:27242994

  1. Phosphate binding energy and catalysis by small and large molecules.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Janet R; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2008-04-01

    Catalysis is an important process in chemistry and enzymology. The rate acceleration for any catalyzed reaction is the difference between the activation barriers for the uncatalyzed (Delta G(HO)(#)) and catalyzed (Delta G(Me)(#)) reactions, which corresponds to the binding energy (Delta G(S)(#) = Delta G(Me)(#)-Delta G(HO)(#)) for transfer of the reaction transition state from solution to the catalyst. This transition state binding energy is a fundamental descriptor of catalyzed reactions, and its evaluation is necessary for an understanding of any and all catalytic processes. We have evaluated the transition state binding energies obtained from interactions between low molecular weight metal ion complexes or high molecular weight protein catalysts and the phosphate group of bound substrate. Work on catalysis by small molecules is exemplified by studies on the mechanism of action of Zn2(1)(H2O). A binding energy of Delta G(S)(#) = -9.6 kcal/mol was determined for Zn2(1)(H2O)-catalyzed cleavage of the RNA analogue HpPNP. The pH-rate profile for this cleavage reaction showed that there is optimal catalytic activity at high pH, where the catalyst is in the basic form [Zn2(1)(HO-)]. However, it was also shown that the active form of the catalyst is Zn2(1)(H2O) and that this recognizes the C2-oxygen-ionized substrate in the cleavage reaction. The active catalyst Zn2(1)(H2O) shows a high affinity for oxyphosphorane transition state dianions and a stable methyl phosphate transition state analogue, compared with the affinity for phosphate monoanion substrates. The transition state binding energies, Delta G(S)(#), for cleavage of HpPNP catalyzed by a variety of Zn2+ and Eu3+ metal ion complexes reflect the increase in the catalytic activity with increasing total positive charge at the catalyst. These values of Delta G(S)(#) are affected by interactions between the metal ion and its ligands, but these effects are small in comparison with Delta G(S)(#) observed for catalysis

  2. An affibody-adalimumab hybrid blocks combined IL-6 and TNF-triggered serum amyloid A secretion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feifan; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Akal, Anastassja; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik; Nygren, Per-Åke

    2014-01-01

    In inflammatory disease conditions, the regulation of the cytokine system is impaired, leading to tissue damages. Here, we used protein engineering to develop biologicals suitable for blocking a combination of inflammation driving cytokines by a single construct. From a set of interleukin (IL)-6-binding affibody molecules selected by phage display, five variants with a capability of blocking the interaction between complexes of soluble IL-6 receptor α (sIL-6Rα) and IL-6 and the co-receptor gp130 were identified. In cell assays designed to analyze any blocking capacity of the classical or the alternative (trans) signaling IL-6 pathways, one variant, ZIL-6_13 with an affinity (KD) for IL-6 of ∼500 pM, showed the best performance. To construct fusion proteins (“AffiMabs”) with dual cytokine specificities, ZIL-6_13 was fused to either the N- or C-terminus of both the heavy and light chains of the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibody adalimumab (Humira®). One AffiMab construct with ZIL-6_13 positioned at the N-terminus of the heavy chain, denoted ZIL-6_13-HCAda, was determined to be the most optimal, and it was subsequently evaluated in an acute Serum Amyloid A (SAA) model in mice. Administration of the AffiMab or adalimumab prior to challenge with a mix of IL-6 and TNF reduced the levels of serum SAA in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the highest dose (70 mg/kg body weight) of adalimumab only resulted in a 50% reduction of SAA-levels, whereas the corresponding dose of the ZIL-6_13-HCAda AffiMab with combined IL-6/TNF specificity, resulted in SAA levels below the detection limit. PMID:25484067

  3. Zooming into the binding groove of HLA molecules: which positions and which substitutions change peptide binding most?

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, Hanneke W M; Keşmir, Can

    2015-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. Almost all polymorphic residues are located in the peptide-binding groove, resulting in different peptide-binding preferences. Whether a single amino acid change can alter the peptide-binding repertoire of an HLA molecule has never been shown. To experimentally quantify the contribution of a single amino acid change to the peptide repertoire of even a single HLA molecule requires an immense number of HLA peptide-binding measurements. Therefore, we used an in silico method to study the effect of single mutations on the peptide repertoires. We predicted the peptide-binding repertoire of a large set of HLA molecules and used the overlap of the peptide-binding repertoires of each pair of HLA molecules that differ on a single position to measure how much single substitutions change the peptide binding. We found that the effect of a single substitution in the peptide-binding groove depends on the substituted position and the amino acids involved. The positions that alter peptide binding most are the most polymorphic ones, while those that are hardly variable among HLA molecules have the lowest effect on the peptide repertoire. Although expected, the relationship between functional divergence and polymorphism of HLA molecules has never been shown before. Additionally, we show that a single substitution in HLA-B molecules has more effect on the peptide-binding repertoire compared to that in HLA-A molecules. This provides an (alternative) explanation for the larger polymorphism of HLA-B molecules compared to HLA-A molecules.

  4. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozovsky, Sharon; Forstner, Martin B.; Sondermann, Holger; Groves, Jay T.

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  5. Design of stapled DNA-minor-groove-binding molecules with a mutable atom simulated annealing method.

    PubMed

    Walker, W L; Kopka, M L; Dickerson, R E; Goodsell, D S

    1997-11-01

    We report the design of optimal linker geometries for the synthesis of stapled DNA-minor-groove-binding molecules. Netropsin, distamycin, and lexitropsins bind side-by-side to mixed-sequence DNA and offer an opportunity for the design of sequence-reading molecules. Stapled molecules, with two molecules covalently linked side-by-side, provide entropic gains and restrain the position of one molecule relative to its neighbor. Using a free-atom simulated annealing technique combined with a discrete mutable atom definition, optimal lengths and atomic composition for covalent linkages are determined, and a novel hydrogen bond 'zipper' is proposed to phase two molecules accurately side-by-side.

  6. Identification of telomere-associated molecules by engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP)

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Asano, Yoshinori; Ohtsuka, Junko; Takada, Yoko; Saito, Kazunobu; Ohki, Rieko; Fujii, Hodaka

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of molecular interactions in specific genomic regions requires their isolation while retaining molecular interactions in vivo. Here, we report isolation of telomeres by engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) using a transcription activator-like (TAL) protein recognizing telomere repeats. Telomeres recognized by the tagged TAL protein were immunoprecipitated with an antibody against the tag and subjected to identification of telomere-binding molecules. enChIP-mass spectrometry (enChIP-MS) targeting telomeres identified known and novel telomere-binding proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000461. In addition, we showed that RNA associated with telomeres could be isolated by enChIP. Identified telomere-binding molecules may play important roles in telomere biology. enChIP using TAL proteins would be a useful tool for biochemical analysis of specific genomic regions of interest. PMID:24201379

  7. Identification of five different Patr class I molecules that bind HLA supertype peptides and definition of their peptide binding motifs.

    PubMed

    McKinney, D M; Erickson, A L; Walker, C M; Thimme, R; Chisari, F V; Sidney, J; Sette, A

    2000-10-15

    We have sequenced the Pan troglodytes class I (Patr) molecules from three common chimpanzees and expressed them as single molecules in a class I-deficient cell line. These lines were utilized to obtain purified class I molecules to define the peptide binding motifs associated with five different Patr molecules. Based on these experiments, as well as analysis of the predicted structure of the B and F polymorphic MHC pockets, we classified five Patr molecules (Patr-A*0101, Patr-B*0901, Patr-B*0701, Patr-A*0602, and Patr-B*1301) within previously defined supertype specificities associated with HLA class I molecules (HLA-A3, -B7, -A1, and -A24 supertypes). The overlap in the binding repertoire between specific HLA and Patr class I molecules was in the range of 33 to 92%, depending on the particular Patr molecule as assessed by the binding of HIV-, hepatitis B virus-, and hepatitis C virus-derived epitopes. Finally, live cell binding assays of nine chimpanzee-derived B cell lines demonstrated that HLA supertype peptides bound to Patr class I molecules with frequencies in the 20-50% range. PMID:11035079

  8. Identification of a small molecule [beta]-secretase inhibitor that binds without catalytic aspartate engagement

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Thomas G.; Hills, Ivory D.; Nomland, Ashley A.; de León, Pablo; Allison, Timothy; McGaughey, Georgia; Colussi, Dennis; Tugusheva, Katherine; Haugabook, Sharie J.; Espeseth, Amy S.; Zuck, Paul; Graham, Samuel L.; Stachel, Shawn J.

    2010-09-02

    A small molecule inhibitor of beta-secretase with a unique binding mode has been developed. Crystallographic determination of the enzyme-inhibitor complex shows the catalytic aspartate residues in the active site are not engaged in inhibitor binding. This unprecedented binding mode in the field of aspartyl protease inhibition is described.

  9. Affibody modified and radiolabeled gold-iron oxide hetero-nanostructures for tumor PET, optical and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Cheng, Kai; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Yuxin; Jiang, Han; Li, Jinbo; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Huimao; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    A highly monodispersed hetero-nanostructure with two different functional nanomaterials (gold (Au) and iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4,) IO)) within one structure was successfully developed as Affibody based trimodality nanoprobe (positron emission tomography, PET; optical imaging; and magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) for imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors. Unlike other regular nanostructures with a single component, the Au-IO hetero-nanostructures (Au-IONPs) with unique chemical and physical properties have capability to combine several imaging modalities together to provide complementary information. The IO component within hetero-nanostructures serve as a T(2) reporter for MRI; and gold component serve as both optical and PET reporters. Moreover, such hetero-nanoprobes could provide a robust nano-platform for surface-specific modification with both targeting molecules (anti-EGFR Affibody protein) and PET imaging reporters (radiometal (64)Cu chelators) in highly efficient and reliable manner. In vitro and in vivo study showed that the resultant nanoprobe provided high specificity, sensitivity, and excellent tumor contrast for both PET and MRI imaging in the human EGFR-expressing cells and tumors. Our study data also highlighted the EGFR targeting efficiency of hetero-nanoparticles and the feasibility for their further theranostic applications. PMID:23343632

  10. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  11. Selective inhibition of c-Myc/Max dimerization and DNA binding by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Anke; Sperl, Bianca; Hollis, Angela; Eick, Dirk; Berg, Thorsten

    2006-07-01

    bZip and bHLHZip protein family members comprise a large fraction of eukaryotic transcription factors and need to bind DNA in order to exert most of their fundamental biological roles. Their binding to DNA requires homo- or heterodimerization via alpha-helical domains, which generally do not contain obvious binding sites for small molecules. We have identified two small molecules, dubbed Mycro1 and Mycro2, which inhibit the protein-protein interactions between the bHLHZip proteins c-Myc and Max. Mycros are the first inhibitors of c-Myc/Max dimerization, which have been demonstrated to inhibit DNA binding of c-Myc with preference over other dimeric transcription factors in vitro. Mycros inhibit c-Myc-dependent proliferation, gene transcription, and oncogenic transformation in the low micromolar concentration range. Our data support the idea that dimeric transcription factors can be druggable even in the absence of obvious small-molecule binding pockets.

  12. Functionalization of exposed core fibers with multiligand binding molecules for fluorescence based ion sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Roman; Heng, Sabrina; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Abell, Andrew D.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-05-01

    The results of functionalizing exposed-core optical fiber with multiligand binding sensor molecules for ion detection is presented. We show that the capacity of the sensor molecules to bind multiple ligands is negated when the sensor molecules are covalently bound, making the method ineffective where multiligand binding fluoroionophores are needed. An alternate functionalization method using thin film polymer doped with multiligand binding fluoroionophores is shown, demonstrating the ability for ion detection in a case where multiligand binding is needed. This one step functionalizing process for optical fiber sensing applications does not require surface attachment functional groups and has the potential to be inline with fiber drawing so that long lengths of functionalized fiber can be fabricated.

  13. Fluorescent Affibody Peptide Penetration in Glioma Margin Is Superior to Full Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Kristian; Tichauer, Kenneth; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Object Fluorescence imaging has the potential to significantly improve neurosurgical resection of oncologic lesions through improved differentiation between normal and cancerous tissue at the tumor margins. In order to successfully mark glioma tissue a fluorescent tracer must have the ability to penetrate through the blood brain barrier (BBB) and provide delineation in the tumor periphery where heterogeneously intact BBB may exist. In this study it was hypothesized that, due to its smaller size, fluorescently labeled anti-EGFR Affibody protein (∼7 kDa) would provide a more clear delineation of the tumor margin than would fluorescently labeled cetuximab, a full antibody (∼150 kDa) to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Methods Cetuximab and anti-EGFR targeted Affibody were conjugated to two different fluorescent dyes (both emitting in the near-infrared) and injected intravenously into 6 athymic mice which were inoculated orthotopically with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing human U251 glioma cells. Each mouse was sacrificed at 1-h post injection, at which time brains were removed, snap frozen, sectioned and quantitatively analyzed for fluorescence distribution. Results Ex vivo analysis showed on average, nearly equal concentrations of cetuximab and Affibody within the tumor (on average Affibody made up 49±6% of injected protein), however, the cetuximab was more confined to the center of the tumor with Affibody showing significantly higher concentrations at the tumor periphery (on average Affibody made up 72±15% of injected protein in the outer 50 um of the tumor). Further ex vivo analysis of detection studies showed that the Affibody provided superior discrimination for differentiation of tumor from surrounding normal brain. Conclusions The present study indicates that fluorescently labeled anti-EGFR Affibody can provide significantly better delineation of tumor margins than a fluorescently labeled anti-EGFR antibody and shows considerable

  14. Binding of Solvent Molecules to a Protein Surface in Binary Mixtures Follows a Competitive Langmuir Model.

    PubMed

    Kulschewski, Tobias; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The binding of solvent molecules to a protein surface was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations of of Candida antarctica (C. antarctica) lipase B in binary mixtures of water, methanol, and toluene. Two models were analyzed: a competitive Langmuir model which assumes identical solvent binding sites with a different affinity toward water (KWat), methanol (KMet), and toluene (KTol) and a competitive Langmuir model with an additional interaction between free water and already bound water (KWatWat). The numbers of protein-bound molecules of both components of a binary mixture were determined for different compositions as a function of their thermodynamic activities in the bulk phase, and the binding constants were simultaneously fitted to the six binding curves (two components of three different mixtures). For both Langmuir models, the values of KWat, KMet, and KTol were highly correlated. The highest binding affinity was found for methanol, which was almost 4-fold higher than the binding affinities of water and toluene (KMet ≫ KWat ≈ KTol). Binding of water was dominated by the water-water interaction (KWatWat). Even for the three protein surface patches of highest water affinity, the binding affinity of methanol was 2-fold higher than water and 8-fold higher than toluene (KMet > KWat > KTol). The Langmuir model provides insights into the protein destabilizing mechanism of methanol which has a high binding affinity toward the protein surface. Thus, destabilizing solvents compete with intraprotein interactions and disrupt the tertiary structure. In contrast, benign solvents such as water or toluene have a low affinity toward the protein surface. Water is a special solvent: only few water molecules bind directly to the protein; most water molecules bind to already bound water molecules thus forming water patches. A quantitative mechanistic model of protein-solvent interactions that includes competition and miscibility of the components contributes a robust basis

  15. Knowledge-based annotation of small molecule binding sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of protein-small molecule interactions is vital for understanding protein function and for practical applications in drug discovery. To benefit from the rapidly increasing structural data, it is essential to improve the tools that enable large scale binding site prediction with greater emphasis on their biological validity. Results We have developed a new method for the annotation of protein-small molecule binding sites, using inference by homology, which allows us to extend annotation onto protein sequences without experimental data available. To ensure biological relevance of binding sites, our method clusters similar binding sites found in homologous protein structures based on their sequence and structure conservation. Binding sites which appear evolutionarily conserved among non-redundant sets of homologous proteins are given higher priority. After binding sites are clustered, position specific score matrices (PSSMs) are constructed from the corresponding binding site alignments. Together with other measures, the PSSMs are subsequently used to rank binding sites to assess how well they match the query and to better gauge their biological relevance. The method also facilitates a succinct and informative representation of observed and inferred binding sites from homologs with known three-dimensional structures, thereby providing the means to analyze conservation and diversity of binding modes. Furthermore, the chemical properties of small molecules bound to the inferred binding sites can be used as a starting point in small molecule virtual screening. The method was validated by comparison to other binding site prediction methods and to a collection of manually curated binding site annotations. We show that our method achieves a sensitivity of 72% at predicting biologically relevant binding sites and can accurately discriminate those sites that bind biological small molecules from non-biological ones. Conclusions A new algorithm has been

  16. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  17. Direct-reversible binding of small molecules to G protein βγ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, AMPB; Burroughs, Michael; Giralt, Ernest; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) composed of three subunits α, β, γ mediate activation of multiple intracellular signaling cascades initiated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Previously our laboratory identified small molecules that bind to Gβγ and interfere with or enhance binding of select effectors with Gβγ. To understand the molecular mechanisms of selectivity and assess binding of compounds to Gβγ, we used biophysical and biochemical approaches to directly monitor small molecule binding to Gβγ. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicated that multiple compounds bound directly to Gβγ with affinities in the high nanomolar to low micromolar range but with surprisingly slow on and off rate kinetics. While the koff was slow for most of the compounds in physiological buffers, they could be removed from Gβγ with mild chaotropic salts or mildly dissociating collision energy in a mass-spectrometer indicating that compound-Gβγ interactions were non-covalent. Finally, at concentrations used to observe maximal biological effects the stoichiometry of binding was 1:1. The results from this study show that small molecule modulation of Gβγ-effector interactions is by specific direct non-covalent and reversible binding of small molecules to Gβγ. This is highly relevant to development of Gβγ targeting as a therapeutic approach since reversible, direct binding is a prerequisite for drug development and important for specificity. PMID:21621014

  18. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  19. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  20. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely ‘paints’ entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  1. Analyzing ligand and small molecule binding activity of solubilized GPCRs using biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Dioszegi, Marianna; Myszka, David G

    2006-08-01

    We used Biacore technology to measure directly the binding of natural ligands and small molecules to the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Both G protein-coupled receptors were solubilized from whole cell pellets and captured on antibody surfaces for analysis. Our solubilization conditions maintained high-affinity binding of chemokines SDF-1alpha and RANTES to CXCR4 and CCR5, respectively. Surface density- and buffer-dependent binding responses, along with binding data for a selective ligand (RCP-168), further validated the biosensor assay. In addition, we showed that it is possible to collect high-quality binding responses for the archetypal small molecule inhibitors JM-2987 and TAK-779. Finally, using our biosensor-based method, we characterized the kinetics of 19 novel small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 and showed that their affinities correlated with values determined for the membrane-associated receptor. Together, the chemokine and small molecule binding data provide evidence that the solubilized receptors maintain native binding properties. These solubilized receptor preparations could be useful reagents for biophysical studies as well as for structural analysis.

  2. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  3. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  4. Monitoring dynamic binding of chromatin proteins in vivo by single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Davide; Ganguly, Sourav; McNally, James G

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy has been used for decades to quantify macromolecular dynamics occurring in specimens that are in direct contact with a coverslip. This has permitted in vitro analysis of single-molecule motion in various biochemically reconstituted systems as well as in vivo studies of single-molecule motion on cell membranes. More recently, thanks to improvements in fluorescent tags and microscopes, it has been possible to follow individual molecules inside thicker specimens such as the nucleus of living cells. This has enabled a detailed description of the live-cell binding of nuclear proteins to DNA. In this protocol we describe a method to quantify intranuclear binding using single-molecule tracking (SMT). PMID:23980004

  5. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  6. Free energy of binding of a small molecule to an amorphous polymer in a solvent.

    PubMed

    Chunsrivirot, Surasak; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-06-01

    Crystallization is a commonly used purification process in industrial practice. It usually begins with heterogeneous nucleation on a foreign surface. The complicated mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood, but we hypothesize that a possible correlation between binding affinity to a surface and nucleation enhancement might exist. Amorphous polymers have been used in controlling crystallization. However, to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to calculate the free energy of binding of a small molecule to an amorphous polymer in a solvent, and to characterize the binding sites/conformations of this system at a molecular level. We developed a two-step approach, first using Adsorption Locator to identify probable binding sites and molecular dynamics to screen for the best binding sites and then using the Blue-Moon Ensemble method to compute the free energy of binding. A system of ethylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and heavy water (D(2)O) was used for validation, since experimental data exists on a related system. Looking at four independently constructed surfaces, we found that ethylene glycol binds to an indentation on the surface or in a hole beneath the surface. We focused on the indentation binding sites because they are easily accessible and do not have large free energy barriers. The closest system for which experimental data on binding energetics exists is ethylene glycol on PVA in aqueous solutions/gels, and the magnitudes of the free energy of binding to the three best indentation binding sites are close to the experimental value, 0.4-3.7 kcal/mol higher. Our approach offers a way to compute the free energy of binding and characterize the binding sites/conformations, and is general enough to apply to other small molecule/amorphous polymer/solvent systems.

  7. Simple molecular model for the binding of antibiotic molecules to bacterial ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafé, Salvador; Ramírez, Patricio; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2003-10-01

    A molecular model aimed at explaining recent experimental data by Nestorovich et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 9789 (2002)] on the interaction of ampicillin molecules with the constriction zone in a channel of the general bacterial porin, OmpF (outer membrane protein F), is presented. The model extends T. L. Hill's theory for intermolecular interactions in a pair of binding sites [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 78, 3330 (1956)] by incorporating two binding ions and two pairs of interacting sites. The results provide new physical insights on the role of the complementary pattern of the charge distributions in the ampicillin molecule and the narrowest part of the channel pore. Charge matching of interacting sites facilitates drug binding. The dependence of the number of ampicillin binding events per second with the solution pH and salt concentration is explained qualitatively using a reduced number of fundamental concepts.

  8. Binding of phosphorylcholine by non-immunoglobulin molecules on mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, M A; Kohler, H; Levitt, D

    1983-07-01

    Phosphorylcholine (PC), a molecule found in the cell wall of most serotypes of pneumococcus, has been used extensively as a probe for the study of network interactions during immune responses. The frequency of B lymphocytes capable of interacting with PC has not been directly examined. We used immunofluorescence to study the binding of PC and monoclonal anti-TEPC15 anti-idiotopic antibodies to murine lymphocytes. In addition to identifying PC-specific Ig molecules, PC was bound by a non-Ig molecule on the surface of a relatively large subset of B cells; this non-Ig marker shared an idiotypic determinant with the PC-binding myeloma protein HOPC8 (H8). PC-bearing R36a pneumococci bind to a similar subset of lymphocytes. This binding is inhibited specifically by PC coupled to bovine serum albumin and also by a monoclonal anti-H8 antibody. We suggest that bacterial interaction with B cells through non-Ig molecules capable of binding a dominant antigen like PC may possess functional significance, possibly during the events that lead to antibody induction by these microorganisms.

  9. Quantitative nanoscopy of inhibitory synapses: counting gephyrin molecules and receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Specht, Christian G; Izeddin, Ignacio; Rodriguez, Pamela C; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Rostaing, Philippe; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime; Triller, Antoine

    2013-07-24

    The strength of synaptic transmission is controlled by the number and activity of neurotransmitter receptors. However, little is known about absolute numbers and densities of receptor and scaffold proteins and the stoichiometry of molecular interactions at synapses. Here, we conducted three-dimensional and quantitative nanoscopic imaging based on single-molecule detections to characterize the ultrastructure of inhibitory synapses and to count scaffold proteins and receptor binding sites. We observed a close correspondence between the spatial organization of gephyrin scaffolds and glycine receptors at spinal cord synapses. Endogenous gephyrin was clustered at densities of 5,000-10,000 molecules/μm(2). The stoichiometry between gephyrin molecules and receptor binding sites was approximately 1:1, consistent with a two-dimensional scaffold in which all gephyrin molecules can contribute to receptor binding. The competition of glycine and GABAA receptor complexes for synaptic binding sites highlights the potential of single-molecule imaging to quantify synaptic plasticity on the nanoscopic scale.

  10. Resolving dual binding conformations of cellulosome cohesin-dockerin complexes using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Schoeler, Constantin; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B; Bayer, Edward A; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Receptor-ligand pairs are ordinarily thought to interact through a lock and key mechanism, where a unique molecular conformation is formed upon binding. Contrary to this paradigm, cellulosomal cohesin-dockerin (Coh-Doc) pairs are believed to interact through redundant dual binding modes consisting of two distinct conformations. Here, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to study the unbinding of Coh:Doc complexes under force. We designed Doc mutations to knock out each binding mode, and compared their single-molecule unfolding patterns as they were dissociated from Coh using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. Although average bulk measurements were unable to resolve the differences in Doc binding modes due to the similarity of the interactions, with a single-molecule method we were able to discriminate the two modes based on distinct differences in their mechanical properties. We conclude that under native conditions wild-type Doc from Clostridium thermocellum exocellulase Cel48S populates both binding modes with similar probabilities. Given the vast number of Doc domains with predicteddual binding modes across multiple bacterial species, our approach opens up newpossibilities for understanding assembly and catalytic properties of a broadrange of multi-enzyme complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10319.001 PMID:26519733

  11. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    PubMed Central

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Background Molecules of the class II major histocompability complex (MHC-II) specifically bind and present exogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD4+ T helper cells. The extreme polymorphism of the MHC-II hampers the complete analysis of peptide binding. It is also a significant hurdle in the generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. Results We generated α and β MHC-II chain constructs, where the membrane-spanning regions were replaced by dimerization motifs, and the C-terminal of the β chains was fused to a biotinylation signal peptide (BSP) allowing for in vivo biotinylation. These chains were produced separately as inclusion bodies in E. coli , extracted into urea, and purified under denaturing and non-reducing conditions using conventional column chromatography. Subsequently, diluting the two chains into a folding reaction with appropriate peptide resulted in efficient peptide-MHC-II complex formation. Several different formats of peptide-binding assay were developed including a homogeneous, non-radioactive, high-throughput (HTS) binding assay. Binding isotherms were generated allowing the affinities of interaction to be determined. The affinities of the best binders were found to be in the low nanomolar range. Recombinant MHC-II molecules and accompanying HTS peptide-binding assay were successfully developed for nine different MHC-II molecules including the DPA1*0103/DPB1*0401 (DP401) and DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201, where both α and β chains are polymorphic, illustrating the advantages of producing the two chains separately. Conclusion We have successfully developed versatile MHC-II resources, which may assist in the generation of MHC class II -wide reagents, data, and tools. PMID:19416502

  12. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  13. Different regions of Rho determine Rho-selective binding of different classes of Rho target molecules.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Madaule, P; Ishizaki, T; Watanabe, G; Bito, H; Saito, Y; Hall, A; Narumiya, S

    1998-07-24

    Based on their Rho binding motifs several Rho target molecules can be classified into three groups; class I includes the protein kinase PKN, rhophilin, and rhotekin, class II includes the protein kinases, Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinases, ROCK-I and ROCK-II, and class III includes citron. Taking advantage of the selectivity in recognition by these targets between Rho and Rac, we examined the regions in Rho required for selective binding of each class of Rho target molecules. Yeast two-hybrid assays were performed using Rho/Rac chimeras and either rhophilin, ROCK-I, or citron. This study showed the existence of at least two distinct regions in Rho (amino acids 23-40 and 75-92) that are critical for the selective binding of these targets. The former was required for binding to citron, whereas the latter was necessary for binding to rhophilin. On the other hand, either region showed affinity to ROCK-I. This was further confirmed by ligand overlay assay using both recombinant ROCK-I and ROCK-II proteins. Consistently, Rho/Rac chimeras containing either region can induce stress fibers in transfected HeLa cells, and this induction is suppressed by treatment with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK kinases. These results suggest that the selective binding of different classes of Rho targets to Rho is determined by interaction between distinct Rho-binding motifs of the targets and different regions of Rho.

  14. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

  15. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S; Chong, Samantha Y; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M; Thallapally, Praveen K; Cooper, Andrew I

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation. PMID:25038731

  16. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation.

  17. Origins of concentration dependence of waiting times for single-molecule fluorescence binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Pearson, John E.

    2012-06-01

    Binary fluorescence time series obtained from single-molecule imaging experiments can be used to infer protein binding kinetics, in particular, association and dissociation rate constants from waiting time statistics of fluorescence intensity changes. In many cases, rate constants inferred from fluorescence time series exhibit nonintuitive dependence on ligand concentration. Here, we examine several possible mechanistic and technical origins that may induce ligand dependence of rate constants. Using aggregated Markov models, we show under the condition of detailed balance that non-fluorescent bindings and missed events due to transient interactions, instead of conformation fluctuations, may underly the dependence of waiting times and thus apparent rate constants on ligand concentrations. In general, waiting times are rational functions of ligand concentration. The shape of concentration dependence is qualitatively affected by the number of binding sites in the single molecule and is quantitatively tuned by model parameters. We also show that ligand dependence can be caused by non-equilibrium conditions which result in violations of detailed balance and require an energy source. As to a different but significant mechanism, we examine the effect of ambient buffers that can substantially reduce the effective concentration of ligands that interact with the single molecules. To demonstrate the effects by these mechanisms, we applied our results to analyze the concentration dependence in a single-molecule experiment EGFR binding to fluorophore-labeled adaptor protein Grb2 by Morimatsu et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 18013 (2007)], 10.1073/pnas.0701330104.

  18. Enhanced Dynamics of HIV gp120 Glycoprotein by Small Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Indira; LaLonde, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV cell entry and infection are driven by binding events to the CD4 and Chemokine receptors with associated conformational change of the viral glycoprotein, gp120. Scyllatoxin mini-protein CD4 mimetics and a small molecule inhibitor of CD4 binding, NBD-556, also effectively induce gp120 conformational change. In this study we examine the fluctuation profile of gp120 in context of CD4, a mini-protein mimetic and NBD-556 with the aim of understanding the effect of ligand binding on gp120 conformational dynamics. Analysis of Molecular Dynamics trajectories indicate that NBD-556 binding in the Phe 43 cavity enhances the overall mobility of gp120 especially in the outer-domain in comparison to CD4 or mini-protein bound complex. Interactions with the more flexible bridging sheet strengthen upon NBD-556 binding and may contribute to gp120 restructuring. The enhanced mobility of D368, E370 and I371 with NBD-556 bound in the Phe 43 cavity suggests that interactions with α3-helix in the outer-domain are not optimal, providing further insights into gp120-small molecule interactions that may impact small molecule designs. PMID:21488663

  19. Recombinant amyloid beta-peptide production by coexpression with an affibody ligand

    PubMed Central

    Macao, Bertil; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Sandberg, Anders; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Dobson, Christopher M; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    Background Oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The characterization of Aβ assemblies is essential for the elucidation of the mechanisms of Aβ neurotoxicity, but requires large quantities of pure peptide. Here we describe a novel approach to the recombinant production of Aβ. The method is based on the coexpression of the affibody protein ZAβ3, a selected affinity ligand derived from the Z domain three-helix bundle scaffold. ZAβ3 binds to the amyloidogenic central and C-terminal part of Aβ with nanomolar affinity and consequently inhibits aggregation. Results Coexpression of ZAβ3 affords the overexpression of both major Aβ isoforms, Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42), yielding 4 or 3 mg, respectively, of pure 15N-labeled peptide per liter of culture. The method does not rely on a protein-fusion or -tag and thus does not require a cleavage reaction. The purified peptides were characterized by NMR, circular dichroism, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography, and their aggregation propensities were assessed by thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy. The data coincide with those reported previously for monomeric, largely unstructured Aβ. ZAβ3 coexpression moreover permits the recombinant production of Aβ(1–42) carrying the Arctic (E22G) mutation, which causes early onset familial AD. Aβ(1–42)E22G is obtained in predominantly monomeric form and suitable, e.g., for NMR studies. Conclusion The coexpression of an engineered aggregation-inhibiting binding protein offers a novel route to the recombinant production of amyloidogenic Aβ peptides that can be advantageously employed to study the molecular basis of AD. The presented expression system is the first for which expression and purification of the aggregation-prone Arctic variant (E22G) of Aβ(1–42) is reported. PMID:18973685

  20. Limitations of Ab Initio Predictions of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Sette, Alessandro; Bourne, Philip E.; Lund, Ole; Ponomarenko, Julia; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    Successful predictions of peptide MHC binding typically require a large set of binding data for the specific MHC molecule that is examined. Structure based prediction methods promise to circumvent this requirement by evaluating the physical contacts a peptide can make with an MHC molecule based on the highly conserved 3D structure of peptide:MHC complexes. While several such methods have been described before, most are not publicly available and have not been independently tested for their performance. We here implemented and evaluated three prediction methods for MHC class II molecules: statistical potentials derived from the analysis of known protein structures; energetic evaluation of different peptide snapshots in a molecular dynamics simulation; and direct analysis of contacts made in known 3D structures of peptide:MHC complexes. These methods are ab initio in that they require structural data of the MHC molecule examined, but no specific peptide:MHC binding data. Moreover, these methods retain the ability to make predictions in a sufficiently short time scale to be useful in a real world application, such as screening a whole proteome for candidate binding peptides. A rigorous evaluation of each methods prediction performance showed that these are significantly better than random, but still substantially lower than the best performing sequence based class II prediction methods available. While the approaches presented here were developed independently, we have chosen to present our results together in order to support the notion that generating structure based predictions of peptide:MHC binding without using binding data is unlikely to give satisfactory results. PMID:20174654

  1. Extending half-life by indirect targeting of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) using a minimal albumin binding domain.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jan Terje; Pehrson, Rikard; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Daba, Muluneh Bekele; Abrahmsén, Lars; Ekblad, Caroline

    2011-02-18

    The therapeutic and diagnostic efficiency of engineered small proteins, peptides, and chemical drug candidates is hampered by short in vivo serum half-life. Thus, strategies to tailor their biodistribution and serum persistence are highly needed. An attractive approach is to take advantage of the exceptionally long circulation half-life of serum albumin or IgG, which is attributed to a pH-dependent interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) rescuing these proteins from intracellular degradation. Here, we present molecular evidence that a minimal albumin binding domain (ABD) derived from streptococcal protein G can be used for efficient half-life extension by indirect targeting of FcRn. We show that ABD, and ABD recombinantly fused to an Affibody molecule, in complex with albumin does not interfere with the strictly pH-dependent FcRn-albumin binding kinetics. The same result was obtained in the presence of IgG. An in vivo study performed in rat confirmed that the clinically relevant human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-targeting Affibody molecule fused to ABD has a similar half-life and biodistribution profile as serum albumin. The proof-of-concept described may be broadly applicable to extend the in vivo half-life of short lived biological or chemical drugs ultimately resulting in enhanced therapeutic or diagnostic efficiency, a more favorable dosing regimen, and improved patient compliance.

  2. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 binds to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, P; Diez, A; Mourad, W; Parsonnet, J; Geha, R S; Chatila, T

    1989-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a 22-kDa exotoxin produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus and implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. In common with other staphylococcal exotoxins, TSST-1 has diverse immunological effects. These include the induction of interleukin 2 receptor expression, interleukin 2 synthesis, proliferation of human T lymphocytes, and stimulation of interleukin 1 synthesis by human monocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate that TSST-1 binds with saturation kinetics and with a dissociation constant of 17-43 nM to a single class of binding sites on human mononuclear cells. There was a strong correlation between the number of TSST-1 binding sites and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, and interferon-gamma induced the expression of class II molecules as well as TSST-1 binding sites on human skin-derived fibroblasts. Monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR, but not to HLA-DP or HLA-DQ, strongly inhibited TSST-1 binding. Affinity chromatography of 125I-labeled cell membranes over TSST-1-agarose resulted in the recovery of two bands of 35 kDa and 31 kDa that comigrated, respectively, with the alpha and beta chains of HLA-DR and that could be immunoprecipitated with anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies. Binding of TSST-1 was demonstrated to HLA-DR and HLA-DQ L-cell transfectants. These results indicate that major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represent the major binding site for TSST-1 on human cells. Images PMID:2542966

  3. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  4. Sensitive NMR Approach for Determining the Binding Mode of Tightly Binding Ligand Molecules to Protein Targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Nitsche, Christoph; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Graham, Bim; Huber, Thomas; Klein, Christian D; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    Structure-guided drug design relies on detailed structural knowledge of protein-ligand complexes, but crystallization of cocomplexes is not always possible. Here we present a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to determine the binding mode of tightly binding lead compounds in complex with difficult target proteins. In contrast to established NMR methods, it does not depend on rapid exchange between bound and free ligand or on stable isotope labeling, relying instead on a tert-butyl group as a chemical label. tert-Butyl groups are found in numerous protein ligands and deliver an exceptionally narrow and tall (1)H NMR signal. We show that a tert-butyl group also produces outstandingly intense intra- and intermolecular NOESY cross-peaks. These enable measurements of pseudocontact shifts generated by lanthanide tags attached to the protein, which in turn allows positioning of the ligand on the protein. Once the ligand has been located, assignments of intermolecular NOEs become possible even without prior resonance assignments of protein side chains. The approach is demonstrated with the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease in complex with a high-affinity ligand containing a tert-butyl group. PMID:26974502

  5. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  6. Label-free detection of small-molecule binding to a GPCR in the membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Heym, Roland G; Hornberger, Wilfried B; Lakics, Viktor; Terstappen, Georg C

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of drug-target interaction kinetics is becoming increasingly important during the drug-discovery process to investigate selectivity of a drug and predict in vivo target occupancy. To date, it remains challenging to obtain kinetic information for interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and small-molecule ligands in a label-free manner. Often GPCRs need to be solubilized or even stabilized by mutations which can be difficult and is time consuming. In addition, it is often unclear if the native conformation of the receptors is sustained. In this study, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies have been used to detect ligand binding to the GPCR chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expressed in lipoparticles. We first evaluated different strategies to immobilize CXCR4-expressing lipoparticles. The highest small-molecule binding signal in SPR and SAW was achieved with a matrix-free carboxymethylated sensor chip coated with wheat germ agglutinin for lipoparticle capturing. Next, the binding kinetics of the anti-CXCR4 antibody 12G5 raised against a conformational epitope (k(on)=1.83×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=2.79×10(-4) s(-1)) and the small molecule AMD3100 (k(on)=5.46×10(5)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=1.01×10(-2)s(-1)) were assessed by SAW. Our kinetic and affinity data are consistent with previously published radioligand-binding experiments using cells and label-free experiments with solubilized CXCR4. This is the first study demonstrating label-free kinetic characterization of small-molecule binding to a GPCR in the membrane environment. The presented method holds the potential to greatly facilitate label-free assay development for GPRCs that can be expressed at high levels in lipoparticles.

  7. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mann, Gregory W; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO2-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data. PMID:27155622

  8. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-09-24

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing.

  9. Effects of water molecules on binding kinetics of peptide receptor on a piezoelectric microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui Kim, Sang; Kyoung Yoo, Yong; Chae, Myung-Sic; Yoon Kang, Ji; Song Kim, Tae; Seon Hwang, Kyo; Hoon Lee, Jeong

    2012-12-01

    The use of highly selective reversible peptide receptors is essential for cantilever-based electronic nose systems. Here, we present the effects of water molecules on the binding kinetics of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) molecules with DNT selective peptide receptors linked with a tri(ethylene glycol)-based (TEG) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in a gas phase in a piezoelectric microcantilever sensor. We observed 1.5-times faster reaction kinetics in wet conditions compared with dry conditions. In a dissociation step, distinctive differences in the recovery time were observed in wet conditions, which could be attributed to water retention efficiency of TEG-linkers for the conformation of biomolecules.

  10. Distinct effect of xenobiotics on the metal-binding properties of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Natalia; Kovalchuk, Mikhail; Stepina, Nina; Gaynutdinov, Radmir; Chukhrai, Elena; Yurieva, Eleonora

    2015-07-01

    The X-ray standing-wave method was applied to study the elemental composition and molecular organization of ordered protein films of alkaline phosphatase exposed to different xenobiotics (drug compounds, lead). Binding of metal ions from triply distilled water to protein molecules has been experimentally observed. Definite differences in the arrangement of impurity metal ions in the films have been established. The considerable enhancement of protein-metal interactions is attributed to partial rearrangement of the protein native structure, induced by xenobiotics.

  11. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74.

  12. Calreticulin is a microbial-binding molecule with phagocytosis-enhancing capacity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Xu, Na; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-09-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein mainly involved in directing proper conformation of proteins and controlling calcium level. Accumulating data also show that CRT is emerging as an immune-relevant molecule. In this study, we demonstrated that the CRT gene from the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum, named Bjcrt, consisted of a signal peptide, three domains (N-, P-, C-domains) and an ER retrieval signal sequence (KDEL), which appears to be the ancient form of vertebrate CRTs, and Bjcrt was expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with the most abundant expression in the notochord. We also demonstrated for the first time that the recombinant BjCRT (rBjCRT) was able to bind the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, both BjCRT as well as human recombinant calreticulin were able to promote the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by sea bass macrophages. These results indicate that CRT is a microbial-binding molecule and possesses an ability to enhance phagocytosis, a novel function assigned to CRT, reenforcing the notion that CRT is an immune-relevant molecule associated with host immune responses.

  13. Calreticulin is a microbial-binding molecule with phagocytosis-enhancing capacity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Xu, Na; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-09-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein mainly involved in directing proper conformation of proteins and controlling calcium level. Accumulating data also show that CRT is emerging as an immune-relevant molecule. In this study, we demonstrated that the CRT gene from the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum, named Bjcrt, consisted of a signal peptide, three domains (N-, P-, C-domains) and an ER retrieval signal sequence (KDEL), which appears to be the ancient form of vertebrate CRTs, and Bjcrt was expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with the most abundant expression in the notochord. We also demonstrated for the first time that the recombinant BjCRT (rBjCRT) was able to bind the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, both BjCRT as well as human recombinant calreticulin were able to promote the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by sea bass macrophages. These results indicate that CRT is a microbial-binding molecule and possesses an ability to enhance phagocytosis, a novel function assigned to CRT, reenforcing the notion that CRT is an immune-relevant molecule associated with host immune responses. PMID:23791863

  14. The consequences of translational and rotational entropy lost by small molecules on binding to proteins.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher W; Verdonk, Marcel L

    2002-10-01

    When a small molecule binds to a protein, it loses a significant amount of rigid body translational and rotational entropy. Estimates of the associated energy barrier vary widely in the literature yet accurate estimates are important in the interpretation of results from fragment-based drug discovery techniques. This paper describes an analysis that allows the estimation of the rigid body entropy barrier from the increase in binding affinities that results when two fragments of known affinity and known binding mode are joined together. The paper reviews the relatively rare number of examples where good quality data is available. From the analysis of this data, we estimate that the barrier to binding, due to the loss of rigid-body entropy, is 15-20 kJ/mol, i.e. around 3 orders of magnitude in affinity at 298 K. This large barrier explains why it is comparatively rare to observe multiple fragments binding to non-overlapping adjacent sites in enzymes. The barrier is also consistent with medicinal chemistry experience where small changes in the critical binding regions of ligands are often poorly tolerated by enzymes. PMID:12650591

  15. Quantitative Transcription Factor Binding Kinetics at the Single-Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufang; Guo, Ling; Golding, Ido; Cox, Edward C.; Ong, N.P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the binding interaction between the bacteriophage λ-repressor CI and its target DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Large stepwise changes in the intensity of the red fluorescent protein fused to CI were observed as it associated with and dissociated from individually labeled single-molecule DNA targets. The stochastic association and dissociation were characterized by Poisson statistics. Dark and bright intervals were measured for thousands of individual events. The exponential distribution of the intervals allowed direct determination of the association and dissociation rate constants (ka and kd, respectively). We resolved in detail how ka and kd varied as a function of three control parameters: the DNA length L, the CI dimer concentration, and the binding affinity. Our results show that although interactions with nonoperator DNA sequences are observable, CI binding to the operator site is not dependent on the length of flanking nonoperator DNA. PMID:19167308

  16. Selection and Characterization of Small Molecules That Bind the HIV-1 Frameshift Site RNA

    PubMed Central

    Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 requires a −1 translational frameshift to properly synthesize the viral enzymes required for replication. The frameshift mechanism is dependent upon two RNA elements, a seven-nucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) and a downstream RNA structure. Frameshifting occurs with a frequency of ~5%, and increasing or decreasing this frequency may result in a decrease in viral replication. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput screen designed to find small molecules that bind to the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA. Out of 34,500 compounds screened, 202 were identified as positive hits. We show that one of these compounds, doxorubicin, binds the HIV-1 RNA with low micromolar affinity (Kd = 2.8 μM). This binding was confirmed and localized to the RNA using NMR. Further analysis revealed that this compound increased the RNA stability by approximately 5 °C and decreased translational frameshifting by 28% (±14%), as measured in vitro. PMID:19673541

  17. Three-dimensional model of a selective theophylline-binding RNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Oprea, T.I.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.

    1995-07-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) model for an RNA molecule that selectively binds theophylline but not caffeine. This RNA, which was found using SELEX [Jenison, R.D., et al., Science (1994) 263:1425] is 10,000 times more specific for theophylline (Kd=320 nM) than for caffeine (Kd=3.5 mM), although the two ligands are identical except for a methyl group substituted at N7 (present only in caffeine). The binding affinity for ten xanthine-based ligands was used to derive a Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) model (R{sup 2} = 0.93 for 3 components, with cross-validated R{sup 2} of 0.73), using the SYBYL and GOLPE programs. A pharmacophoric map was generated to locate steric and electrostatic interactions between theophylline and the RNA binding site. This information was used to identify putative functional groups of the binding pocket and to generate distance constraints. Based on a model for the secondary structure (Jenison et al., idem), the 3D structure of this RNA was then generated using the following method: each helical region of the RNA molecule was treated as a rigid body; single-stranded loops with specific end-to-end distances were generated. The structures of RNA-xanthine complexes were studied using a modified Monte Carlo algorithm. The detailed structure of an RNA-ligand complex model, as well as possible explanations for the theophylline selectivity will be discussed.

  18. Measuring p53 Binding to Single DNA Molecules in a Nanofluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelsky, Amber; Gonzalez, Nicholas, Jr.; Gal, Susannah; Levy, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Protein-DNA binding is central to several important cellular processes, for instance, the transfer of genetic information into proteins. The p53 protein plays a central role in regulating several major cell cycle pathways, in part by binding to well-characterized DNA sequences in the promoters of specific genes. Recent studies show that the most common mutation to the protein occurs in the region responsible for its binding to DNA. We have fabricated slit-like nanofluidic devices that allow us to trap and stretch single molecules of DNA containing a known recognition sequence of p53. We use fluorescent microscopy to observe the diffusion of a single p53 protein as it searches for its DNA recognition site. We measure the reaction rates of binding to selected DNA sequences as well as the one-dimensional, non-sequence specific diffusion of p53 along a stretched DNA molecule as a function of salt concentration. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion attempts to explain how proteins seem able to find their DNA target sequences much more quickly than would be expected from three-dimensional diffusion alone. We compare the observed search mechanism used by normal and mutated p53 from cancer cells to predictions based on this theory.

  19. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  20. Crystal structures of bovine odorant-binding protein in complex with odorant molecules.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Florence; Ramoni, Roberto; Spinelli, Silvia; Grolli, Stefano; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2004-10-01

    The structure of bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP) revealed a striking feature of a dimer formed by domain swapping [Tegoni, M., Ramoni, R., Bignetti, E., Spinelli, S. & Cambillau, C. (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol.3, 863-867; Bianchet, M.A., Bains, G., Pelosi, P., Pevsner, J., Snyder, S.H., Monaco, H.L. & Amzel, L.M. (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol.3, 934-939] and the presence of a naturally occuring ligand [Ramoni, R., Vincent, F., Grolli, S., Conti, V., Malosse, C., Boyer, F.D., Nagnan-Le Meillour, P., Spinelli, S., Cambillau, C. & Tegoni, M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem.276, 7150-7155]. These features led us to investigate the binding of odorant molecules with bOBP in solution and in the crystal. The behavior of odorant molecules in bOBP resembles that observed with porcine OBP (pOBP), although the latter is monomeric and devoid of ligand when purified. The odorant molecules presented K(d) values with bOBP in the micromolar range. Most of the X-ray structures revealed that odorant molecules interact with a common set of residues forming the cavity wall and do not exhibit specific interactions. Depending on the ligand and on the monomer (A or B), a single residue--Phe89--presents alternate conformations and might control cross-talking between the subunits. Crystal data on both pOBP and bOBP, in contrast with binding and spectroscopic studies on rat OBP in solution, reveal an absence of significant conformational changes involving protein loops or backbone. Thus, the role of OBP in signal triggering remains unresolved.

  1. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    PubMed Central

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickaël; Sauer, Jørgen; Sullivan, John T.; Maolanon, Nicolai; Vinther, Maria; Lorentzen, Andrea; Madsen, Esben B.; Jensen, Knud J.; Roepstorff, Peter; Thirup, Søren; Ronson, Clive W.; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides called Nod factors function as primary rhizobial signal molecules triggering legumes to develop new plant organs: root nodules that host the bacteria as nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 5 (NFR5) and Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1) bind Nod factor directly at high-affinity binding sites. Both receptor proteins were posttranslationally processed when expressed as fusion proteins and extracted from purified membrane fractions of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis thaliana. The N-terminal signal peptides were cleaved, and NFR1 protein retained its in vitro kinase activity. Processing of NFR5 protein was characterized by determining the N-glycosylation patterns of the ectodomain. Two different glycan structures with identical composition, Man3XylFucGlcNAc4, were identified by mass spectrometry and located at amino acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor–ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The Kd values obtained for Nod factor binding were in the nanomolar range and comparable to the concentration range sufficient for biological activity. Structure-dependent ligand specificity was shown by using chitin oligosaccharides. Taken together, our results suggest that ligand recognition through direct ligand binding is a key step in the receptor-mediated activation mechanism leading to root nodule development in legumes. PMID:22859506

  2. Single molecule study of non-specific binding kinetics of LacI in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Caccianini, Laura; Normanno, Davide; Izeddin, Ignacio; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Many key cellular processes are controlled by the association of DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) to specific sites. The kinetics of the search process leading to the binding of DBPs to their target locus are largely determined by transient interactions with non-cognate DNA. Using single-molecule microscopy, we studied the dynamics and non-specific binding to DNA of the Lac repressor (LacI) in the environment of mammalian nuclei. We measured the distribution of the LacI-DNA binding times at non-cognate sites and determined the mean residence time to be τ(1D) = 182 ms. This non-specific interaction time, measured in the context of an exogenous system such as that of human U2OS cells, is remarkably different compared to that reported for the LacI in its native environment in E. coli (<5 ms). Such a striking difference (more than 30 fold) suggests that the genome, its organization, and the nuclear environment of mammalian cells play important roles on the dynamics of DBPs and their non-specific DNA interactions. Furthermore, we found that the distribution of off-target binding times follows a power law, similar to what was reported for TetR in U2OS cells. We argue that a possible molecular origin of such a power law distribution of residence times is the large variability of non-cognate sequences found in the mammalian nucleus by the diffusing DBPs. PMID:26387491

  3. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27388036

  5. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  6. Ankyrin-binding activity of nervous system cell adhesion molecules expressed in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Q; Bennett, V

    1993-01-01

    A family of ankyrin-binding glycoproteins have been identified in adult rat brain that include alternatively spliced products of the same pre-mRNA. A composite sequence of ankyrin-binding glycoprotein (ABGP) shares 72% amino acid sequence identity with chicken neurofascin, a membrane-spanning neural cell adhesion molecule in the Ig super-family expressed in embryonic brain. ABGP polypeptides and ankyrin associate as pure proteins in a 1:1 molar stoichiometry at a site located in the predicted cytoplasmic domain. ABGP polypeptides are expressed late in postnatal development to approximately the same levels as ankyrin, and comprise a significant fraction of brain membrane proteins. Immunofluorescence studies have shown that ABGP polypeptides are co-localized with ankyrinB. Major differences in developmental expression have been reported for neurofascin in embryos compared with the late postnatal expression of ABGP, suggesting that ABGP and neurofascin represent products of gene duplication events that have subsequently evolved in parallel with distinct roles. Predicted cytoplasmic domains of rat ABGP and chicken neurofascin are nearly identical to each other and closely related to a group of nervous system cell adhesion molecules with variable extracellular domains, including L1, Nr-CAM and Ng-CAM of vertebrates, and neuroglian of Drosophila. A hypothesis to be evaluated is that ankyrin-binding activity is shared by all of these proteins.

  7. Effective tight-binding models for excitons in branched conjugated molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Malinin, Sergey V; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2013-08-14

    Effective tight-binding models have been introduced to describe vertical electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules. The excited-state electronic structure is characterized by quantum particles (excitons) that reside on an irregular lattice (graph) that reflects the molecular structure. The methodology allows for the exciton spectra and energy-dependent exciton scattering matrices to be described in terms of a small number of lattice parameters which can be obtained from quantum-chemical computations using the exciton scattering approach as a tool. We illustrate the tight-binding model approach using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock computations in phenylacetylene oligomers. The on-site energies and hopping constants have been identified from the exciton dispersion and scattering matrices. In particular, resonant, as well as bound states, are reproduced for a symmetric quadruple branching center. The capability of the tight-binding model approach to describe the exciton-phonon coupling and energetic disorder in large branched conjugated molecules is briefly discussed. PMID:23947845

  8. Proteomic analysis of egg white heparin-binding proteins: towards the identification of natural antibacterial molecules

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Harichaux, Grégoire; Chessé, Magali; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Nys, Yves; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chicken egg resists most environmental microbes suggesting that it potentially contains efficient antimicrobial molecules. Considering that some heparin-binding proteins in mammals are antibacterial, we investigated the presence and the antimicrobial activity of heparin-binding proteins from chicken egg white. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins recovered after heparin-affinity chromatography, revealed 20 proteins, including known antimicrobial proteins (avidin, lysozyme, TENP, ovalbumin-related protein X and avian bêta-defensin 11). The antibacterial activity of three new egg candidates (vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1, beta-microseminoprotein-like (LOC101750704) and pleiotrophin) was demonstrated against Listeria monocytogenes and/or Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. We showed that all these molecules share the property to inhibit bacterial growth through their heparin-binding domains. However, vitelline membrane outer layer 1 has additional specific structural features that can contribute to its antimicrobial potential. Moreover, we identified potential supplementary effectors of innate immunity including mucin 5B, E-selectin ligand 1, whey acidic protein 3, peptidyl prolyl isomerase B and retinoic acid receptor responder protein 2. These data support the concept of using heparin affinity combined to mass spectrometry to obtain an overview of the various effectors of innate immunity composing biological milieus, and to identify novel antimicrobial candidates of interest in the race for alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:27294500

  9. Proteomic analysis of egg white heparin-binding proteins: towards the identification of natural antibacterial molecules.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Harichaux, Grégoire; Chessé, Magali; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Nys, Yves; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chicken egg resists most environmental microbes suggesting that it potentially contains efficient antimicrobial molecules. Considering that some heparin-binding proteins in mammals are antibacterial, we investigated the presence and the antimicrobial activity of heparin-binding proteins from chicken egg white. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins recovered after heparin-affinity chromatography, revealed 20 proteins, including known antimicrobial proteins (avidin, lysozyme, TENP, ovalbumin-related protein X and avian bêta-defensin 11). The antibacterial activity of three new egg candidates (vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1, beta-microseminoprotein-like (LOC101750704) and pleiotrophin) was demonstrated against Listeria monocytogenes and/or Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. We showed that all these molecules share the property to inhibit bacterial growth through their heparin-binding domains. However, vitelline membrane outer layer 1 has additional specific structural features that can contribute to its antimicrobial potential. Moreover, we identified potential supplementary effectors of innate immunity including mucin 5B, E-selectin ligand 1, whey acidic protein 3, peptidyl prolyl isomerase B and retinoic acid receptor responder protein 2. These data support the concept of using heparin affinity combined to mass spectrometry to obtain an overview of the various effectors of innate immunity composing biological milieus, and to identify novel antimicrobial candidates of interest in the race for alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:27294500

  10. Engineering nanostructures by binding single molecules to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, J Joseph; Stranks, Samuel D; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Nicholas, Robin J

    2014-12-23

    Organic and hybrid organic-inorganic systems are promising candidates for low cost photovoltaics. Recently, perovskite-based systems have been attracting a large amount of research attention, where the highest performing devices employ a small molecule (2,2',7,7'-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene) (Spiro-OMeTAD) hole transporter. Here, we demonstrate the production of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/single molecule nanostructures using a simple solution processing technique for effective and strong binding of Spiro-OMeTAD to individual polymer-wrapped SWNTs. These small molecules bind very strongly, which causes both large mechanical strain of the nanotubes and also improves the separation of individual SWNTs, thus improving the nanotube photoluminescence quantum efficiency by 1 order of magnitude compared to simple polymer-nanotube nanohybrids. Using absorption and photoluminescence measurements, we show that there is a dramatic variation in the electronic properties of the polymer-NT nanocomposites due to the band alignment formed with Spiro-OMeTAD. These self-assembled nanocomposites offer the potential for integration into high performance optoelectronic such as photovoltaic cells and light emission devices.

  11. Diatomic molecules and metallic adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption - A single binding-energy relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Potential-energy relations involving a few parameters in simple analytic forms have been found to represent well the energetics of a wide variety of diatomic molecules. However, such two-atom potential functions are not appropriate for metals. It is well known that, in the case of metals, there exist strong volume-dependent forces which can never be expressed as pairwise interactions. The present investigation has the objective to show that, in spite of the observation concerning metals, a single binding-energy relation can be found which accurately describes diatomic molecules as well as adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption on metals. This universality reveals a commonality between the molecular and metallic bond.

  12. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin. PMID:27010485

  13. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  14. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  15. Small-animal PET imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumor with a 64Cu labeled affibody protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-19

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has become an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Affibody proteins against EGFR have been reported, and thus, we were interested in evaluating their potential for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR positive cancer. An Affibody analogue (Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907)) binding to EGFR was made through conventional solid phase peptide synthesis. The purified protein was site-specifically coupled with the 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-aceticacid-10-maleimidethylacetamide (maleimido-mono-amide-DOTA) to produce the bioconjugate, DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907). (64)Cu labeled probe (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) displayed a moderate specific activity (5-8 MBq/nmol, 22-35 microCi/microg). Cell uptake assays by pre-incubating without or with 300 times excess unlabeled Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) showed high EGFR-specific uptake (20% applied activity at 0.5 h) in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cancer cells. The affinity (K(D)) of (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) as tested by cell saturation analysis was 20 nM. The serum stability test showed excellent stability of the probe with >95% intact after 4 h of incubation in mouse serum. In vivo small-animal PET imaging showed fast tumor targeting, high tumor accumulation (approximately 10% ID/g at 1 h p.i.), and good tumor-to-normal tissue contrast of (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) spiked with a wide dose range of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907). Bio-distribution studies further demonstrated that the probe had high tumor, blood, liver, and kidney uptakes, while blood radioactivity concentration dropped dramatically at increased spiking doses. Co-injection of the probe with 500 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) for blocking significantly reduced the tumor uptake. Thus, (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) showed potential as a high tumor contrast EGFR PET imaging reagent. The probe spiked with 50 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) improved tumor imaging contrast which may have important clinical applications. PMID:20402512

  16. A Novel Peptide Binding Prediction Approach for HLA-DR Molecule Based on Sequence and Structural Information.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Zhao, Yilei; Pan, Gaofeng; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecule plays a key role in immunology, and the molecule binding reaction with peptide is an important prerequisite for T cell immunity induced. MHC II molecules do not have conserved residues, so they appear as open grooves. As a consequence, this will increase the difficulty in predicting MHC II molecules binding peptides. In this paper, we aim to propose a novel prediction method for MHC II molecules binding peptides. First, we calculate sequence similarity and structural similarity between different MHC II molecules. Then, we reorder pseudosequences according to descending similarity values and use a weight calculation formula to calculate new pocket profiles. Finally, we use three scoring functions to predict binding cores and evaluate the accuracy of prediction to judge performance of each scoring function. In the experiment, we set a parameter α in the weight formula. By changing α value, we can observe different performances of each scoring function. We compare our method with the best function to some popular prediction methods and ultimately find that our method outperforms them in identifying binding cores of HLA-DR molecules. PMID:27340658

  17. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  18. Assaying the binding strength of G-quadruplex ligands using single-molecule TPM experiments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Wei; Chu, Jen-Fei; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fang, Hung-Chih; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-15

    G-quadruplexes are stable secondary structures formed by Hoogsteen base pairing of guanine-rich single-stranded DNA sequences in the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)). Folded G-quadruplex (G4) structures in human telomeres have been proposed as a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we used single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments to assay the binding strength of possible G4 ligands. We found that individual single-stranded DNA molecules containing the human telomeric sequence d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] fluctuated between the folded and the unfolded states in a 10 mM Na(+) solution at 37 °C. The durations of folded and unfolded states were single-exponentially distributed, and in return the folding and unfolding rate constants were 1.68 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.03 (s(-1)), respectively. In the presence of G4 ligands, such as TMPyP4, DODCI, BMVC, and BMVPA, the unfolding rate constant decreased appreciably. In addition, combining the Cu(2+)-induced G4 unfolding and TPM assay, we showed that BMVC and TMPyP4 are better G4 stabilizers than DODCI. The capability of monitoring the fluctuation between the folded and the unfolded state of G4 DNA in real time allows the determination of both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in a single measurement and offers a simple way to assay binding strength under various conditions.

  19. Two and three-body interatomic dispersion energy contributions to binding in molecules and solids.

    SciTech Connect

    von Lilienfeld-Toal, Otto Anatole; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2010-03-01

    We present numerical estimates of the leading two- and three-body dispersion energy terms in van der Waals interactions for a broad variety of molecules and solids. The calculations are based on London and Axilrod-Teller-Muto expressions where the required interatomic dispersion energy coefficients, C{sub 6} and C{sub 9}, are computed 'on the fly' from the electron density. Inter- and intramolecular energy contributions are obtained using the Tang-Toennies (TT) damping function for short interatomic distances. The TT range parameters are equally extracted on the fly from the electron density using their linear relationship to van der Waals radii. This relationship is empiricially determined for all the combinations of He-Xe rare gas dimers, as well as for the He and Ar trimers. The investigated systems include the S22 database of noncovalent interactions, Ar, benzene and ice crystals, bilayer graphene, C{sub 60} dimer, a peptide (Ala{sub 10}), an intercalated drug-DNA model [ellipticine-d(CG){sub 2}], 42 DNA base pairs, a protein (DHFR, 2616 atoms), double stranded DNA (1905 atoms), and 12 molecular crystal polymorphs from crystal structure prediction blind test studies. The two- and three-body interatomic dispersion energies are found to contribute significantly to binding and cohesive energies, for bilayer graphene the latter reaches 50% of experimentally derived binding energy. These results suggest that interatomic three-body dispersion potentials should be accounted for in atomistic simulations when modeling bulky molecules or condensed phase systems.

  20. Two- and three-body interatomic dispersion energy contributions to binding in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2010-06-01

    We present numerical estimates of the leading two- and three-body dispersion energy terms in van der Waals interactions for a broad variety of molecules and solids. The calculations are based on London and Axilrod-Teller-Muto expressions where the required interatomic dispersion energy coefficients, C6 and C9, are computed "on the fly" from the electron density. Inter- and intramolecular energy contributions are obtained using the Tang-Toennies (TT) damping function for short interatomic distances. The TT range parameters are equally extracted on the fly from the electron density using their linear relationship to van der Waals radii. This relationship is empiricially determined for all the combinations of He-Xe rare gas dimers, as well as for the He and Ar trimers. The investigated systems include the S22 database of noncovalent interactions, Ar, benzene and ice crystals, bilayer graphene, C60 dimer, a peptide (Ala10), an intercalated drug-DNA model [ellipticine-d(CG)2], 42 DNA base pairs, a protein (DHFR, 2616 atoms), double stranded DNA (1905 atoms), and 12 molecular crystal polymorphs from crystal structure prediction blind test studies. The two- and three-body interatomic dispersion energies are found to contribute significantly to binding and cohesive energies, for bilayer graphene the latter reaches 50% of experimentally derived binding energy. These results suggest that interatomic three-body dispersion potentials should be accounted for in atomistic simulations when modeling bulky molecules or condensed phase systems.

  1. Two and three-body interatomic dispersion energy contributions to binding in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lilienfeld, Anatole; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2010-03-01

    Numerical estimates of the leading two and three body dispersion energy terms in van der Waals (vdW) interactions are presented for a broad variety of molecules and solids. The calculations employ London and Axilrod-Teller-Muto expressions damped at short interatomic distances, where the required interatomic dispersion energy coefficients, C6 and C9, are computed from first-principles. The investigated systems include the S22 database of non-covalent interactions, benzene and ice crystals, bilayer graphene, fullerene dimer, a poly peptide (Ala10), an intercalated drug-DNA model (Ellipticine-d(CG)2), 42 DNA base pairs, a protein (DHFR, 2616 atoms), double stranded DNA (1905 atoms), and molecular crystals from a crystal structure blind test. We find that the 2 and 3-body interatomic dispersion energies contribute significantly to binding and cohesive energies, for some systems they can reach up to 50% of experimental estimates of absolute binding. Our results suggest that interatomic 3-body dispersion potentials should be accounted for in atomistic simulations when modeling bulky molecules or condensed phase systems.

  2. Combining solvent thermodynamic profiles with functionality maps of the Hsp90 binding site to predict the displacement of water molecules.

    PubMed

    Haider, Kamran; Huggins, David J

    2013-10-28

    Intermolecular interactions in the aqueous phase must compete with the interactions between the two binding partners and their solvating water molecules. In biological systems, water molecules in protein binding sites cluster at well-defined hydration sites and can form strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with backbone and side-chain atoms. Displacement of such water molecules is only favorable when the ligand can form strong compensating hydrogen bonds. Conversely, water molecules in hydrophobic regions of protein binding sites make only weak interactions, and the requirements for favorable displacement are less stringent. The propensity of water molecules for displacement can be identified using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory (IFST), a statistical mechanical method that decomposes the solvation free energy of a solute into the contributions from different spatial regions and identifies potential binding hotspots. In this study, we employed IFST to study the displacement of water molecules from the ATP binding site of Hsp90, using a test set of 103 ligands. The predicted contribution of a hydration site to the hydration free energy was found to correlate well with the observed displacement. Additionally, we investigated if this correlation could be improved by using the energetic scores of favorable probe groups binding at the location of hydration sites, derived from a multiple copy simultaneous search (MCSS) method. The probe binding scores were not highly predictive of the observed displacement and did not improve the predictivity when used in combination with IFST-based hydration free energies. The results show that IFST alone can be used to reliably predict the observed displacement of water molecules in Hsp90. However, MCSS can augment IFST calculations by suggesting which functional groups should be used to replace highly displaceable water molecules. Such an approach could be very useful in improving the hit-to-lead process for new drug targets.

  3. Crystal Structure of an Engineered LRRTM2 Synaptic Adhesion Molecule and a Model for Neurexin Binding.

    PubMed

    Paatero, Anja; Rosti, Katja; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Sele, Celeste; Brunello, Cecilia; Kysenius, Kai; Singha, Prosanta; Jokinen, Ville; Huttunen, Henri; Kajander, Tommi

    2016-02-16

    Synaptic adhesion molecules are key components in development of the brain, and in the formation of neuronal circuits, as they are central in the assembly and maturation of chemical synapses. Several families of neuronal adhesion molecules have been identified such as the neuronal cell adhesion molecules, neurexins and neuroligins, and in particular recently several leucine-rich repeat proteins, e.g., Netrin G-ligands, SLITRKs, and LRRTMs. The LRRTMs form a family of four proteins. They have been implicated in excitatory glutamatergic synapse function and were specifically characterized as ligands for neurexins in excitatory synapse formation and maintenance. In addition, LRRTM3 and LRRTM4 have been found to be ligands for heparan sulfate proteoglycans, including glypican. We report here the crystal structure of a thermostabilized mouse LRRTM2, with a Tm 30 °C higher than that of the wild-type protein. We localized the neurexin binding site to the concave surface based on protein engineering, sequence conservation, and prior information about the interaction of the ligand with neurexins, which allowed us to propose a tentative model for the LRRTM-neurexin interaction complex. We also determined affinities of the thermostabilized LRRTM2 and wild-type LRRTM1 and LRRTM2 for neurexin-β1 with and without Ca(2+). Cell culture studies and binding experiments show that the engineered protein is functional and capable of forming synapselike contacts. The structural and functional data presented here provide the first structure of an LRRTM protein and allow us to propose a model for the molecular mechanism of LRRTM function in the synaptic adhesion.

  4. Discovery of Small-Molecule Nonfluorescent Inhibitors of Fluorogen-Fluorogen Activating Protein Binding Pair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Stauffer, Shaun R; Stanfield, Robyn L; Tapia, Phillip H; Ursu, Oleg; Fisher, Gregory W; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Evangelisti, Annette; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Carter, Mark B; Bologa, Cristian; Gouveia, Kristine; Poslusney, Mike; Waggoner, Alan S; Lindsley, Craig W; Jarvik, Jonathan W; Sklar, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    A new class of biosensors, fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), has been successfully used to track receptor trafficking in live cells. Unlike the traditional fluorescent proteins (FPs), FAPs do not fluoresce unless bound to their specific small-molecule fluorogens, and thus FAP-based assays are highly sensitive. Application of the FAP-based assay for protein trafficking in high-throughput flow cytometry resulted in the discovery of a new class of compounds that interferes with the binding between fluorogens and FAP, thus blocking the fluorescence signal. These compounds are high-affinity, nonfluorescent analogs of fluorogens with little or no toxicity to the tested cells and no apparent interference with the normal function of FAP-tagged receptors. The most potent compound among these, N,4-dimethyl-N-(2-oxo-2-(4-(pyridin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)benzenesulfonamide (ML342), has been investigated in detail. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that ML342 competes with the fluorogen, sulfonated thiazole orange coupled to diethylene glycol diamine (TO1-2p), for the same binding site on a FAP, AM2.2. Kinetic analysis shows that the FAP-fluorogen interaction is more complex than a homogeneous one-site binding process, with multiple conformational states of the fluorogen and/or the FAP, and possible dimerization of the FAP moiety involved in the process.

  5. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  6. Measurement of Small Molecule Binding Kinetics on a Protein Microarray by Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on a quantitative study of small molecule binding kinetics on protein microarrays with plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscopy (P-EIM). P-EIM measures electrical impedance optically with high spatial resolution by converting a surface charge change to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image intensity change, and the signal is not scaled to the mass of the analyte. Using P-EIM, we measured binding kinetics and affinity between small molecule drugs (imatinib and SB202190) and their target proteins (kinases Abl1 and p38-α). The measured affinity values are consistent with reported values measured by an indirect competitive binding assay. We also found that SB202190 has weak bindings to ABL1 with KD > 10 μM, which is not reported in the literature. Furthermore, we found that P-EIM is less prone to nonspecific binding, a long-standing issue in SPR. Our results show that P-EIM is a novel method for high-throughput measurement of small molecule binding kinetics and affinity, which is critical to the understanding of small molecules in biological systems and discovery of small molecule drugs. PMID:25153794

  7. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-01-01

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing. PMID:26404236

  8. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  9. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 binding residues in intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) and the integrin binding surface in the ICAM subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Casasnovas, José M.; Pieroni, Cristiana; Springer, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) revealed significant differences in the presentation of the critical acidic residue important for integrin binding between I and non-I-domain integrin ligands. Based on this crystal structure, we mutagenized ICAM-2 to localize the binding site for the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The integrin binding site runs diagonally across the GFC β-sheet and includes residues on the CD edge of the β-sandwich. The site is oblong and runs along a flat ridge on the upper half of domain 1, which is proposed to dock to a groove in the I domain of LFA-1, with the critical Glu-37 residue ligating the Mg2+ in the I domain. Previous mutagenesis of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3, interpreted in light of the recently determined ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 structures, suggests similar binding sites. By contrast, major differences are seen with vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which binds α4 integrins that lack an I domain. The binding site on VCAM-1 includes the lower portion of domain 1 and the upper part of domain 2, whereas the LFA-1 binding site on ICAM is confined to the upper part of domain 1. PMID:10077629

  10. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 binding residues in intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) and the integrin binding surface in the ICAM subfamily.

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, J M; Pieroni, C; Springer, T A

    1999-03-16

    The crystal structure of intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) revealed significant differences in the presentation of the critical acidic residue important for integrin binding between I and non-I-domain integrin ligands. Based on this crystal structure, we mutagenized ICAM-2 to localize the binding site for the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The integrin binding site runs diagonally across the GFC beta-sheet and includes residues on the CD edge of the beta-sandwich. The site is oblong and runs along a flat ridge on the upper half of domain 1, which is proposed to dock to a groove in the I domain of LFA-1, with the critical Glu-37 residue ligating the Mg2+ in the I domain. Previous mutagenesis of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3, interpreted in light of the recently determined ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 structures, suggests similar binding sites. By contrast, major differences are seen with vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which binds alpha4 integrins that lack an I domain. The binding site on VCAM-1 includes the lower portion of domain 1 and the upper part of domain 2, whereas the LFA-1 binding site on ICAM is confined to the upper part of domain 1. PMID:10077629

  11. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  12. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  13. Genome-wide characterization of the binding repertoire of small molecule drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division

    2003-07-01

    Most, if not all, drugs interact with multiple proteins. One or more of these interactions are responsible for carrying out the primary therapeutic effects of the drug. Others are involved in the transport or metabolic processing of the drug or in the mediation of side effects. Still others may be responsible for activities that correspond to alternate therapeutic applications. The potential clinical impact of a drug and its cost of development are affected by the sum of all these interactions. The drug development process includes the identification and characterisation of a drug's clinically relevant interactions. This characterisation is presently accomplished by a combination of experimental laboratory techniques and clinical trials, with increasing numbers of patient participants. Efficient methods for the identification of all the molecular targets of a drug prior to clinical trials could greatly expedite the drug development process. Combinatorial peptide and cDNA phage display have the potential for achieving a complete characterisation of the binding repertoire of a small molecule. This paper will discuss the current state of phage display technology, as applied to the identification of novel receptors for small molecules, using a successful application with the drug Taxoltrade mark as an example of the technical and theoretical benefits and pitfalls of this method.

  14. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    DeVetter, Brent M; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-21

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min(-1). This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes. PMID:25905515

  15. Computational and functional analyses of a small-molecule binding site in ROMK.

    PubMed

    Swale, Daniel R; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Husni, Afeef S; Nguyen, Thuy T; Meiler, Jens; Denton, Jerod S

    2015-03-10

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, or Kir1.1, encoded by KCNJ1) critically regulates renal tubule electrolyte and water transport and hence blood volume and pressure. The discovery of loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ1 underlying renal salt and water wasting and lower blood pressure has sparked interest in developing new classes of antihypertensive diuretics targeting ROMK. The recent development of nanomolar-affinity small-molecule inhibitors of ROMK creates opportunities for exploring the chemical and physical basis of ligand-channel interactions required for selective ROMK inhibition. We previously reported that the bis-nitro-phenyl ROMK inhibitor VU591 exhibits voltage-dependent knock-off at hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting that the binding site is located within the ion-conduction pore. In this study, comparative molecular modeling and in silico ligand docking were used to interrogate the full-length ROMK pore for energetically favorable VU591 binding sites. Cluster analysis of 2498 low-energy poses resulting from 9900 Monte Carlo docking trajectories on each of 10 conformationally distinct ROMK comparative homology models identified two putative binding sites in the transmembrane pore that were subsequently tested for a role in VU591-dependent inhibition using site-directed mutagenesis and patch-clamp electrophysiology. Introduction of mutations into the lower site had no effect on the sensitivity of the channel to VU591. In contrast, mutations of Val(168) or Asn(171) in the upper site, which are unique to ROMK within the Kir channel family, led to a dramatic reduction in VU591 sensitivity. This study highlights the utility of computational modeling for defining ligand-ROMK interactions and proposes a mechanism for inhibition of ROMK. PMID:25762321

  16. Computational and Functional Analyses of a Small-Molecule Binding Site in ROMK

    PubMed Central

    Swale, Daniel R.; Sheehan, Jonathan H.; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Husni, Afeef S.; Nguyen, Thuy T.; Meiler, Jens; Denton, Jerod S.

    2015-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, or Kir1.1, encoded by KCNJ1) critically regulates renal tubule electrolyte and water transport and hence blood volume and pressure. The discovery of loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ1 underlying renal salt and water wasting and lower blood pressure has sparked interest in developing new classes of antihypertensive diuretics targeting ROMK. The recent development of nanomolar-affinity small-molecule inhibitors of ROMK creates opportunities for exploring the chemical and physical basis of ligand-channel interactions required for selective ROMK inhibition. We previously reported that the bis-nitro-phenyl ROMK inhibitor VU591 exhibits voltage-dependent knock-off at hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting that the binding site is located within the ion-conduction pore. In this study, comparative molecular modeling and in silico ligand docking were used to interrogate the full-length ROMK pore for energetically favorable VU591 binding sites. Cluster analysis of 2498 low-energy poses resulting from 9900 Monte Carlo docking trajectories on each of 10 conformationally distinct ROMK comparative homology models identified two putative binding sites in the transmembrane pore that were subsequently tested for a role in VU591-dependent inhibition using site-directed mutagenesis and patch-clamp electrophysiology. Introduction of mutations into the lower site had no effect on the sensitivity of the channel to VU591. In contrast, mutations of Val168 or Asn171 in the upper site, which are unique to ROMK within the Kir channel family, led to a dramatic reduction in VU591 sensitivity. This study highlights the utility of computational modeling for defining ligand-ROMK interactions and proposes a mechanism for inhibition of ROMK. PMID:25762321

  17. A Systematic Investigation of Differential Effects of Cell Culture Substrates on the Extent of Artifacts in Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C.; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.; Needham, Sarah R.; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Clarke, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required. PMID:23049831

  18. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L; Needham, Sarah R; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required. PMID:23049831

  19. Potentiometric sensors doped with biomolecules as a new approach to small molecule/biomolecule binding kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Daems, D; De Wael, K; Vissenberg, K; Van Camp, G; Nagels, L

    2014-04-15

    The most successful binding kinetics analysis systems at this moment include surface plasmon resonance (SPR), quartz microcrystal balance (QMB) and surface acoustic wave (SAW). Although these are powerful methods, they generally are complex, expensive and require the use of monolayers. Here, we report on potentiometric sensors as an inexpensive and simple alternative to do binding kinetics analysis between small molecules in solution and biomolecules (covalently) attached in a biopolymer sensor coating layer. As an example, dopamine and an anti-dopamine aptamer were used as the small molecule and the biomolecule respectively. Binding between both follows a Langmuir adsorption type model and creates a surface potential. The system operates in Flow Injection Analysis mode (FIA). Besides being an interesting new binding kinetics tool, the approach allows systematic design of potentiometric biosensors (in the present study a dopamine sensor), and gives new insights into the functioning of ion-selective electrodes (ISE's).

  20. Dual binding of an antibody and a small molecule increases the stability of TERRA G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Yangyuoru, Philip M; Di Antonio, Marco; Ghimire, Chiran; Biffi, Giulia; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Mao, Hanbin

    2015-01-12

    In investigating the binding interactions between the human telomeric RNA (TERRA) G-quadruplex (GQ) and its ligands, it was found that the small molecule carboxypyridostatin (cPDS) and the GQ-selective antibody BG4 simultaneously bind the TERRA GQ. We previously showed that the overall binding affinity of BG4 for RNA GQs is not significantly affected in the presence of cPDS. However, single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments revealed a population (48%) with substantially increased mechanical and thermodynamic stability. Force-jump kinetic investigations suggested competitive binding of cPDS and BG4 to the TERRA GQ. Following this, the two bound ligands slowly rearrange, thereby leading to the minor population with increased stability. Given the relevance of G-quadruplexes in the regulation of biological processes, we anticipate that the unprecedented conformational rearrangement observed in the TERRA-GQ-ligand complex may inspire new strategies for the selective stabilization of G-quadruplexes in cells.

  1. The influence of intramolecular sulfur-lone pair interactions on small-molecule drug design and receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Hudson, B M; Nguyen, E; Tantillo, D J

    2016-04-28

    Sulfur-lone pair interactions are important conformational control elements in sulfur-containing heterocycles that abound in pharmaceuticals, natural products, agrochemicals, polymers and other important classes of organic molecules. Nonetheless, the role of intramolecular sulfur-lone pair interactions in the binding of small molecules to receptors is often overlooked. Here we analyze the magnitudes and origins of these interactions for a variety of biologically relevant small molecules using quantum chemical and automated docking calculations. In most cases examined in this study, the lowest energy conformation of the small molecule displays a sulfur-lone pair close contact. However, docking studies, both published and new, often predict that conformations without sulfur-lone pair contacts have the best binding affinity for their respective receptors. This is a serious problem. Since many of these predicted bound conformations are not actually energetically accessible, pursuing design (e.g., drug design) around these binding modes necessarily will lead, serendipity aside, to dead end designs. Our results constitute a caution that one best not neglect these interactions when predicting the binding affinities of potential ligands (drugs or not) for hosts (enzymes, receptors, DNA, RNA, synthetic hosts). Moreover, a better understanding and awareness of sulfur-lone pair interactions should facilitate the rational modulation of host-guest interactions involving sulfur-containing molecules. PMID:27049933

  2. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  3. The binding energies of one and two water molecules to the first transition-row metal positive ions. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosi, Marzio; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of H2O's binding energy to transition-metal ions proceeds from the D(2h) structure and bends the two water molecules out of plane. The molecule is constrained to have C(2v) symmetry, so that each water molecule and metal ion lies on a plane. The ground states are bent only for Mn(H2O)2(+) and Zn(H2O)2(+), where only 4s4p hybridization is energetically favorable; 4s4p hybridization reduces repulsion.

  4. Phenylphthalazines as small-molecule inhibitors of urea transporter UT-B and their binding model

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jian-hua; Li, Min; Tou, Weng-Ieong; Lei, Tian-luo; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Bao-xue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Urea transporters (UT) are a family of transmembrane proteins that specifically transport urea. UT inhibitors exert diuretic activity without affecting electrolyte balance. The purpose of this study was to discover novel UT inhibitors and determine the inhibition mechanism. Methods: The primary screening urea transporter B (UT-B) inhibitory activity was conducted in a collection of 10 000 diverse small molecules using mouse erythrocyte lysis assay. After discovering a hit with a core structure of 1-phenylamino-4-phenylphthalazin, the UT-B inhibitory activity of 160 analogs were examined with a stopped-flow light scattering assay and their structure-activity relationship (SAR) was analyzed. The inhibition mechanism was further investigated using in silico assays. Results: A phenylphthalazine compound PU1424, chemically named 5-(4-((4-methoxyphenyl) amino) phthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylbenzene sulfonamide, showed potent UT-B inhibition activity, inhibited human and mouse UT-B-mediated urea transport with IC50 value of 0.02 and 0.69 μmol/L, respectively, and exerted 100% UT-B inhibition at higher concentrations. The compound PU1424 did not affect membrane urea transport in mouse erythrocytes lacking UT-B. Structure-activity analysis revealed that the analogs with methoxyl group at R4 and sulfonic amide at R2 position exhibited the highest potency inhibition activity on UT-B. Furthermore, in silico assays validated that the R4 and R2 positions of the analogs bound to the UT-B binding pocket and exerted inhibition activity on UT-B. Conclusion: The compound PU1424 is a novel inhibitor of both human and mouse UT-B with IC50 at submicromolar ranges. Its binding site is located at the So site of the UT-B structure. PMID:27238209

  5. Geometrically centered region: a "wet" model of protein binding hot spots not excluding water molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jinyan

    2010-12-01

    A protein interface can be as "wet" as a protein surface in terms of the number of immobilized water molecules. This important water information has not been explicitly taken by computational methods to model and identify protein binding hot spots, overlooking the water role in forming interface hydrogen bonds and in filing cavities. Hot spot residues are usually clustered at the core of the protein binding interfaces. However, traditional machine learning methods often identify the hot spot residues individually, breaking the cooperativity of the energetic contribution. Our idea in this work is to explore the role of immobilized water and meanwhile to capture two essential properties of hot spots: the compactness in contact and the far distance from bulk solvent. Our model is named geometrically centered region (GCR). The detection of GCRs is based on novel tripartite graphs, and atom burial levels which are a concept more intuitive than SASA. Applying to a data set containing 355 mutations, we achieved an F measure of 0.6414 when ΔΔG ≥ 1.0 kcal/mol was used to define hot spots. This performance is better than Robetta, a benchmark method in the field. We found that all but only one of the GCRs contain water to a certain degree, and most of the outstanding hot spot residues have water-mediated contacts. If the water is excluded, the burial level values are poorly related to the ΔΔG, and the model loses its performance remarkably. We also presented a definition for the O-ring of a GCR as the set of immediate neighbors of the residues in the GCR. Comparative analysis between the O-rings and GCRs reveals that the newly defined O-ring is indeed energetically less important than the GCR hot spot, confirming a long-standing hypothesis. PMID:20818601

  6. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  7. Coxsackievirus A21 binds to decay-accelerating factor but requires intercellular adhesion molecule 1 for cell entry.

    PubMed Central

    Shafren, D R; Dorahy, D J; Ingham, R A; Burns, G F; Barry, R D

    1997-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that many viruses employ multiple receptor molecules in their cell entry mechanisms. The human enterovirus coxsackievirus A21 (CAV21) has been reported to bind to the N-terminal domain of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and undergo limited replication in ICAM-1-expressing murine L cells. In this study, we show that in addition to binding to ICAM-1, CAV21 binds to the first short consensus repeat (SCR) of decay-accelerating factor (DAF). Dual antibody blockade using both anti-ICAM-1 (domain 1) and anti-DAF (SCR1) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is required to completely abolish binding and replication of high-titered CAV21. However, the binding of CAV21 to DAF, unlike that to ICAM-1, does not initiate a productive cell infection. The capacity of an anti-DAF (SCR3) MAb to block CAV21 infection but not binding, coupled with immunoprecipitation data from chemical cross-linking studies, indicates that DAF and ICAM-1 are closely associated on the cell surface. It is therefore suggested that DAF may function as a low-affinity attachment receptor either enhancing viral presentation or providing a viral sequestration site for subsequent high-affinity binding to ICAM-1. PMID:9151867

  8. High-affinity binding of short peptides to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by anchor combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, J; Belunis, C; Bolin, D; Papadopoulos, J; Walsky, R; Higelin, J; Danho, W; Sinigaglia, F; Nagy, Z A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified four anchor positions in HLA-DRB1*0101-binding peptides, and three anchors involved in peptide binding to DRB1*0401 and DRB1*1101 molecules, by screening of an M13 peptide display library (approximately 20 million independent nonapeptides) for DR-binding activity. In this study, high stringency screening of the M13 library for DRB1*0401 binding has resulted in identification of three further anchor positions. Taken together, a peptide-binding motif has been obtained, in which six of seven positions show enrichment of certain residues. We have demonstrated an additive effect of anchors in two different ways: (i) the addition of more anchors is shown to compensate for progressive truncation of designer peptides; (ii) the incorporation of an increasing number of anchors into 6- or 7-residue-long designer peptides is shown to result in a gradual increase of binding affinity to the level of 13-residue-long high-affinity epitopes. The anchor at relative position 1 seems to be obligatory, in that its substitution abrogates binding completely, whereas the elimination of other anchors results only in partial loss of binding affinity. The spacing between anchors is critical, since their effect is lost by shifting them one position toward the N or C terminus. The information born out of this study has been successfully used to identify DR-binding sequences from natural proteins. PMID:8183931

  9. RNA targeting by small molecule alkaloids: Studies on the binding of berberine and palmatine to polyribonucleotides and comparison to ethidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2008-03-01

    The binding affinity, energetics and conformational aspects of the interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids berberine and palmatine to four single stranded polyribonucleotides polyguanylic acid [poly(G)], polyinosinic acid [poly(I)], polycytidylic acid [poly(C)] and polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] were studied by absorption, fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy and compared with ethidium. Berberine, palmatine and ethidium binds strongly with poly(G) and poly(I) with affinity in the order 10 5 M -1 while their binding to poly(C) and poly(U) were very weak or practically nil. The same conclusions have also emerged from isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The binding of all the three compounds to poly(C) and poly(I) was exothermic and favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. Conformational change in the polymer associated with the binding was observed in poly(I) with all the three molecules and poly(U) with ethidium but not in poly(G) and poly(C) revealing differences in the orientation of the bound molecules in the hitherto different helical organization of these polymers. These fundamental results may be useful and serve as database for the development of futuristic RNA based small molecule therapeutics.

  10. A Remote Arene-Binding Site on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Revealed by Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Andrew X.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Barinka, Cyril; Michel, Julien; Cocleaza, Alexandra; Jorgensen, William L.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Spiegel, David A.

    2010-09-27

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase overexpressed in many forms of prostate cancer. Our laboratory has recently disclosed a class of small molecules, called ARM-Ps (antibody-recruiting molecule targeting prostate cancer) that are capable of enhancing antibody-mediated immune recognition of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, during the course of these studies, we found ARM-Ps to exhibit extraordinarily high potencies toward PSMA, compared to previously reported inhibitors. Here, we report in-depth biochemical, crystallographic, and computational investigations which elucidate the origin of the observed affinity enhancement. These studies reveal a previously unreported arene-binding site on PSMA, which we believe participates in an aromatic stacking interaction with ARMs. Although this site is composed of only a few amino acid residues, it drastically enhances small molecule binding affinity. These results provide critical insights into the design of PSMA-targeted small molecules for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment; more broadly, the presence of similar arene-binding sites throughout the proteome could prove widely enabling in the optimization of small molecule-protein interactions.

  11. Distinct sites on the G-actin molecule bind group-specific component and deoxyribonuclease I.

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt-Clermont, P J; Galbraith, R M; Emerson, D L; Marsot, F; Nel, A E; Arnaud, P

    1985-01-01

    Addition of group-specific component (Gc) to G-actin with or without deoxyribonuclease I (DNAase) led to formation of binary complexes (Gc-G-actin) and ternary complexes (Gc-G-actin-DNAase) respectively. The electrophoretic mobility of ternary complexes, as shown by crossed and rocket immunoelectrophoresis, was slower than that of binary complexes, although both were faster than native Gc. In gradient polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, such complexes could again be resolved, apparently on the basis of relative molecular size: Gc-G-actin-DNAase (Mr approx. 131000), Gc-G-actin (Mr approx. 98000) and Gc (Mr approx. 56000). In contrast, the pI of ternary complex was indistinguishable by isoelectric focusing from that of binary complex, even though both were clearly more acidic than native Gc. The affinity of Gc for G-actin (affinity constant, Ka, 1.9 X 10(8) M-1) was not significantly altered by additional interaction with DNAase (Ka, 1.5 X 10(8)M-1), and both binary and ternary complexes still bound 25-hydroxycholecalciferol. In addition, the inhibitory effect of G-actin on DNAase activity was not discernibly affected by interaction with Gc. These results demonstrate that the various molecular forms of Gc can be distinguished by physicochemical parameters, and that Gc and DNAase bind to distinct sites on G-actin and can interact both independently and contemporaneously with this molecule. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:4040363

  12. Structural and functional characterization of full-length heparin-binding growth associated molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, B S; Marshak, D R; Burgess, W H

    1992-01-01

    Heparin-binding growth-associated molecule (HB-GAM) was purified from adult bovine brain and chicken heart. The yield of HB-GAM is increased by 5- to 10-fold when 250 mM NaCl is added to the homogenization buffer, indicating that HB-GAM may exist as a complex with an insoluble component of the tissue. The complete amino acid sequence of the brain-derived HB-GAM was established by automated Edman degradation of the intact protein and chemically or enzymatically derived fragments. The mass of bovine HB-GAM as determined by plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry is 15,291 mass units, which compares favorably with the calculated mass of 15,289 based on the amino acid sequence. Therefore, HB-GAM has not undergone any major post-translational modifications other than cleavage of the signal peptide. These results indicate that previous amino acid sequence analysis of this protein was carried out using truncated HB-GAM. Full-length HB-GAM is not a mitogen for Balb/3T3 clone A31, Balb MK, NRK, or human umbilical vein endothelial cells. HB-GAM does, however, have adhesive properties and neurite extension activity for chick embryo cerebral cortical derived neurons when presented to these cells as a substrate. HB-GAM had little neurite extension activity when presented as a soluble factor. Images PMID:1550956

  13. The murine cytomegalovirus immunoevasin gp40 binds MHC class I molecules to retain them in the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Janßen, Linda; Ramnarayan, Venkat Raman; Aboelmagd, Mohamed; Iliopoulou, Maro; Hein, Zeynep; Majoul, Irina; Fritzsche, Susanne; Halenius, Anne; Springer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of the murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) gp40 (m152) protein, murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules do not reach the cell surface but are retained in an early compartment of the secretory pathway. We find that gp40 does not impair the folding or high-affinity peptide binding of the class I molecules but binds to them, leading to their retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and the cis-Golgi, most likely by retrieval from the cis-Golgi to the ER. We identify a sequence in gp40 that is required for both its own retention in the early secretory pathway and for that of class I molecules.

  14. Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis is associated with HLA-DR molecules that bind a Borrelia burgdorferi peptide

    PubMed Central

    Steere, Allen C.; Klitz, William; Drouin, Elise E.; Falk, Ben A.; Kwok, William W.; Nepom, Gerald T.; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann

    2006-01-01

    An association has previously been shown between antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, the human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)–DR4 molecule, and T cell recognition of an epitope of Borrelia burgdorferi outer-surface protein A (OspA163–175). We studied the frequencies of HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes in 121 patients with antibiotic-refractory or antibiotic-responsive Lyme arthritis and correlated these frequencies with in vitro binding of the OspA163–175 peptide to 14 DRB molecules. Among the 121 patients, the frequencies of HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes were similar to those in control subjects. However, when stratified by antibiotic response, the frequencies of DRB1 alleles in the 71 patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis differed significantly from those in the 50 antibiotic-responsive patients (log likelihood test, P = 0.006; exact test, P = 0.008; effect size, Wn = 0.38). 7 of the 14 DRB molecules (DRB1*0401, 0101, 0404, 0405, DRB5*0101, DRB1*0402, and 0102) showed strong to weak binding of OspA163–175, whereas the other seven showed negligible or no binding of the peptide. Altogether, 79% of the antibiotic-refractory patients had at least one of the seven known OspA peptide–binding DR molecules compared with 46% of the antibiotic-responsive patients (odds ratio = 4.4; P < 0.001). We conclude that binding of a single spirochetal peptide to certain DRB molecules is a marker for antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and might play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:16585267

  15. Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis is associated with HLA-DR molecules that bind a Borrelia burgdorferi peptide.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Klitz, William; Drouin, Elise E; Falk, Ben A; Kwok, William W; Nepom, Gerald T; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann

    2006-04-17

    An association has previously been shown between antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, the human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4 molecule, and T cell recognition of an epitope of Borrelia burgdorferi outer-surface protein A (OspA163-175). We studied the frequencies of HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes in 121 patients with antibiotic-refractory or antibiotic-responsive Lyme arthritis and correlated these frequencies with in vitro binding of the OspA163-175 peptide to 14 DRB molecules. Among the 121 patients, the frequencies of HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes were similar to those in control subjects. However, when stratified by antibiotic response, the frequencies of DRB1 alleles in the 71 patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis differed significantly from those in the 50 antibiotic-responsive patients (log likelihood test, P = 0.006; exact test, P = 0.008; effect size, Wn = 0.38). 7 of the 14 DRB molecules (DRB1*0401, 0101, 0404, 0405, DRB5*0101, DRB1*0402, and 0102) showed strong to weak binding of OspA163-175, whereas the other seven showed negligible or no binding of the peptide. Altogether, 79% of the antibiotic-refractory patients had at least one of the seven known OspA peptide-binding DR molecules compared with 46% of the antibiotic-responsive patients (odds ratio = 4.4; P < 0.001). We conclude that binding of a single spirochetal peptide to certain DRB molecules is a marker for antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis and might play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  16. Heterotypic binding between neuronal membrane vesicles and glial cells is mediated by a specific cell adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    By means of a multistage quantitative assay, we have identified a new kind of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on neuronal cells of the chick embryo that is involved in their adhesion to glial cells. The assay used to identify the binding component (which we name neuron-glia CAM or Ng-CAM) was designed to distinguish between homotypic binding (e.g., neuron to neuron) and heterotypic binding (e.g., neuron to glia). This distinction was essential because a single neuron might simultaneously carry different CAMs separately mediating each of these interactions. The adhesion of neuronal cells to glial cells in vitro was previously found to be inhibited by Fab' fragments prepared from antisera against neuronal membranes but not by Fab' fragments against N-CAM, the neural cell adhesion molecule. This suggested that neuron-glia adhesion is mediated by specific cell surface molecules different from previously isolated CAMs . To verify that this was the case, neuronal membrane vesicles were labeled internally with 6-carboxyfluorescein and externally with 125I-labeled antibodies to N-CAM to block their homotypic binding. Labeled vesicles bound to glial cells but not to fibroblasts during a 30-min incubation period. The specific binding of the neuronal vesicles to glial cells was measured by fluorescence microscopy and gamma spectroscopy of the 125I label. Binding increased with increasing concentrations of both glial cells and neuronal vesicles. Fab' fragments prepared from anti-neuronal membrane sera that inhibited binding between neurons and glial cells were also found to inhibit neuronal vesicle binding to glial cells. The inhibitory activity of the Fab' fragments was depleted by preincubation with neuronal cells but not with glial cells. Trypsin treatment of neuronal membrane vesicles released material that neutralized Fab' fragment inhibition; after chromatography, neutralizing activity was enriched 50- fold. This fraction was injected into mice to produce monoclonal

  17. Interactions of DNA binding proteins with G-Quadruplex structures at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sujay

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences can form non-canonical secondary structures, known as G-quadruplex (GQ). Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated formation of these structures in telomeric and non-telomeric regions of the genome. Telomeric GQs protect the chromosome ends whereas non-telomeric GQs either act as road blocks or recognition sites for DNA metabolic machinery. These observations suggest the significance of these structures in regulation of different metabolic processes, such as replication and repair. GQs are typically thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding Watson-Crick base pairing formed by G-rich and C-rich strands, making protein activity a crucial factor for their destabilization. Inside the cell, GQs interact with different proteins and their enzymatic activity is the determining factor for their stability. We studied interactions of several proteins with GQs to understand the underlying principles of protein-GQ interactions using single-molecule FRET and other biophysical techniques. Replication Protein-A (RPA), a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is known to posses GQ unfolding activity. First, we compared the thermal stability of three potentially GQ-forming DNA sequences (PQS) to their stability against RPA-mediated unfolding. One of these sequences is the human telomeric repeat and the other two, located in the promoter region of tyrosine hydroxylase gene, are highly heterogeneous sequences that better represent PQS in the genome. The thermal stability of these structures do not necessarily correlate with their stability against protein-mediated unfolding. We conclude that thermal stability is not necessarily an adequate criterion for predicting the physiological viability of GQ structures. To determine the critical structural factors that influence protein-GQ interactions we studied two groups of GQ structures that have systematically varying loop lengths and number of G-tetrad layers. We

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Zhang, Hua; Anderson, Marc O.; Saadoun, Samira; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of spinal cord and optic nerve caused by pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against astrocyte aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We developed a high-throughput screen to identify blockers of NMO-IgG binding to human AQP4 using a human recombinant monoclonal NMO-IgG and transfected Fisher rat thyroid cells stably expressing human M23-AQP4. Screening of ∼60,000 compounds yielded the antiviral arbidol, the flavonoid tamarixetin, and several plant-derived berbamine alkaloids, each of which blocked NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 without affecting AQP4 expression, array assembly, or water permeability. The compounds inhibited NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 in NMO patient sera and blocked NMO-IgG-dependent complement- and cell-mediated cytotoxicity with IC50 down to ∼5 μM. Docking computations identified putative sites of blocker binding at the extracellular surface of AQP4. The blockers did not affect complement-dependent cytotoxicity caused by anti-GD3 antibody binding to ganglioside GD3. The blockers reduced by >80% the severity of NMO lesions in an ex vivo spinal cord slice culture model of NMO and in mice in vivo. Our results provide proof of concept for a small-molecule blocker strategy to reduce NMO pathology. Small-molecule blockers may also be useful for other autoimmune diseases caused by binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to defined targets.—Tradtrantip, L., Zhang, H., Anderson, M. O., Saadoun, S., Phuan, P.-W., Papadopoulos, M. C., Bennett, J. L., Verkman, A. S. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica. PMID:22319008

  19. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  20. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  1. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  2. Rapid dynamics of general transcription factor TFIIB binding during preinitiation complex assembly revealed by single-molecule analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengjian; English, Brian P.; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Kazane, Stephanie A.; Hu, Wenxin; Tsai, Albert; Inouye, Carla; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob; Schultz, Peter G.; Lavis, Luke D.; Revyakin, Andrey; Tjian, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of protein-encoding genes in eukaryotic cells requires the coordinated action of multiple general transcription factors (GTFs) and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). A “step-wise” preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly model has been suggested based on conventional ensemble biochemical measurements, in which protein factors bind stably to the promoter DNA sequentially to build a functional PIC. However, recent dynamic measurements in live cells suggest that transcription factors mostly interact with chromatin DNA rather transiently. To gain a clearer dynamic picture of PIC assembly, we established an integrated in vitro single-molecule transcription platform reconstituted from highly purified human transcription factors and complemented it by live-cell imaging. Here we performed real-time measurements of the hierarchal promoter-specific binding of TFIID, TFIIA, and TFIIB. Surprisingly, we found that while promoter binding of TFIID and TFIIA is stable, promoter binding by TFIIB is highly transient and dynamic (with an average residence time of 1.5 sec). Stable TFIIB–promoter association and progression beyond this apparent PIC assembly checkpoint control occurs only in the presence of Pol II–TFIIF. This transient-to-stable transition of TFIIB-binding dynamics has gone undetected previously and underscores the advantages of single-molecule assays for revealing the dynamic nature of complex biological reactions. PMID:27798851

  3. Identification of Small Molecule-binding Proteins in a Native Cellular Environment by Live-cell Photoaffinity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Head, Sarah A; Liu, Jun O

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the molecular target(s) of small molecules is a challenging but necessary step towards understanding their mechanism of action. While several target identification methods have been developed and used to successfully elucidate the binding proteins of a variety of small molecules, these techniques have drawbacks that make them unsuitable for detecting certain types of small molecule-target interactions. In particular, non-covalent interactions that depend on native cellular conditions, such as those of membrane proteins whose structures may be perturbed upon cell lysis, are often not amenable to affinity-based target identification methods. Here, we demonstrate a method wherein a probe containing a photolabile group is used to covalently crosslink to the small molecule binding protein within the environment of the live cell, allowing the detection and isolation of the target protein without the need for maintenance of the interaction after cell lysis. This technique is a valuable tool for studying biologically interesting small molecules with unknown mechanisms, both in the context of basic biology as well as drug discovery. PMID:27684515

  4. C1q binding to dengue virus decreases levels of infection and inflammatory molecules transcription in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P; Soares de Melo, Klecia M; Smith, Amanda P; Krishna, Neel K; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M; Evans, Jared D; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2014-01-22

    Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to dengue virus envelope protein and to whole dengue virus serotype 2. Incubation of dengue virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses.

  5. Small Molecule Binding, Docking, and Characterization of the Interaction between Pth1 and Peptidyl-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hames, Mary C; McFeeters, Hana; Holloway, W Blake; Stanley, Christopher B; Urban, Volker S; McFeeters, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial Pth1 is essential for viability. Pth1 cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and nucleotide of peptidyl-tRNA generated from aborted translation, expression of mini-genes, and short ORFs. We have determined the shape of the Pth1:peptidyl-tRNA complex using small angle neutron scattering. Binding of piperonylpiperazine, a small molecule constituent of a combinatorial synthetic library common to most compounds with inhibitory activity, was mapped to Pth1 via NMR spectroscopy. We also report computational docking results, modeling piperonylpiperazine binding based on chemical shift perturbation mapping. Overall these studies promote Pth1 as a novel antibiotic target, contributing to understanding how Pth1 interacts with its substrate, advancing the current model for cleavage, and demonstrating feasibility of small molecule inhibition.

  6. Respiratory complexes III and IV can each bind two molecules of cytochrome c at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Guerra-Castellano, Alejandra; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2015-02-13

    The transient interactions of respiratory cytochrome c with complexes III and IV is herein investigated by using heterologous proteins, namely human cytochrome c, the soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1 and bovine cytochrome c oxidase. The binding molecular mechanisms of the resulting cross-complexes have been analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. Our data reveal that the two cytochrome c-involving adducts possess a 2:1 stoichiometry - that is, two cytochrome c molecules per adduct - at low ionic strength. We conclude that such extra binding sites at the surfaces of complexes III and IV can facilitate the turnover and sliding of cytochrome c molecules and, therefore, the electron transfer within respiratory supercomplexes.

  7. Snyder-Robinson Syndrome: Rescuing the Disease-Causing Effect of G56S mutant by Small Molecule Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Martiny, Virginie; Lagorce, David; Alexov, Emil; Miteva, Maria; Clemson University Team; Université Paris Diderot Team

    2013-03-01

    Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked mental retardation disorder, which is caused by defects in a particular gene coding for the spermine synthase (SMS) protein. Among the missense mutations known to be disease-causing is the G56S, which is positioned at the interface of the SMS homo-dimer. Previous computational and experimental investigations have shown that G56S mutation destabilizes the homo-dimer and thus greatly reduces the SMS enzymatic activity. In this study, we explore the possibility of mitigating the effect of G56S mutation by binding small molecules to suitable pockets around the mutation site. It is done by combined efforts of molecular dynamics simulations and in silico screening. The binding of selected molecules was calculated to fully compensate the effect of the mutation and rescue the wild type dimer affinity. This work was supported by NIH, NLM grant. No. 1R03LM009748

  8. Respiratory complexes III and IV can each bind two molecules of cytochrome c at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Guerra-Castellano, Alejandra; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2015-02-13

    The transient interactions of respiratory cytochrome c with complexes III and IV is herein investigated by using heterologous proteins, namely human cytochrome c, the soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1 and bovine cytochrome c oxidase. The binding molecular mechanisms of the resulting cross-complexes have been analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. Our data reveal that the two cytochrome c-involving adducts possess a 2:1 stoichiometry - that is, two cytochrome c molecules per adduct - at low ionic strength. We conclude that such extra binding sites at the surfaces of complexes III and IV can facilitate the turnover and sliding of cytochrome c molecules and, therefore, the electron transfer within respiratory supercomplexes. PMID:25595453

  9. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  10. Identification of OprF as a Complement Component C3 Binding Acceptor Molecule on the Surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Meenu; Ressler, Adam; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile opportunistic pathogen that can cause devastating persistent infections. Complement is a highly conserved pathway of the innate immune system, and its role in the first line of defense against pathogens is widely appreciated. One of the earliest events in the complement cascade is the conversion of C3 to C3a and C3b, the latter typically binds to one or more acceptor molecules on the pathogen surface. We previously demonstrated that complement C3b binding acceptors exist on the P. aeruginosa surface. In the current study, we utilized either C3 polyclonal or C3b monoclonal antibodies in a far-Western technique followed by mass spectroscopy to identify the C3b acceptor molecule(s) on the P. aeruginosa surface. Our data provide evidence that OprF (an outer membrane porin, highly conserved in the Pseudomonadaceae) binds C3b. An oprF-deficient P. aeruginosa strain exhibits reduced C3 deposition compared to the wild type. We observed reduced internalization of oprF-deficient bacteria by neutrophils after opsonization compared with wild-type P. aeruginosa. Heterologous expression of OprF significantly enhanced C3b binding and increased serum-mediated bactericidal effects in complement-susceptible Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the predicted secondary structure of the C-terminal, surface-exposed region of OprF has high structural identity to the OmpA domain of several other Gram-negative bacteria, one of which is known to bind C3b. Therefore, these findings provide new insights into the biology of complement interactions with P. aeruginosa and other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25964476

  11. Molecular Probing of the HPV-16 E6 Protein Alpha Helix Binding Groove with Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, Anne; Petrov, Dino P.; Bartolowits, Matthew; DeSmet, Marsha; Davisson, V. Jo; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2016-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) HPV E6 protein has emerged as a central oncoprotein in HPV-associated cancers in which sustained expression is required for tumor progression. A majority of the E6 protein interactions within the human proteome use an alpha-helix groove interface for binding. The UBE3A/E6AP HECT domain ubiquitin ligase binds E6 at this helix-groove interface. This enables formation of a trimeric complex with p53, resulting in destruction of this tumor suppressor. While recent x-ray crystal structures are useful, examples of small molecule probes that can modulate protein interactions at this interface are limited. To develop insights useful for potential structure-based design of ligands for HPV E6, a series of 2,6-disubstituted benzopyranones were prepared and tested as competitive antagonists of E6-E6AP helix-groove interactions. These small molecule probes were used in both binding and functional assays to evaluate recognition features of the E6 protein. Evidence for an ionic functional group interaction within the helix groove was implicated by the structure-activity among the highest affinity ligands. The molecular topographies of these protein-ligand interactions were evaluated by comparing the binding and activities of single amino acid E6 mutants with the results of molecular dynamic simulations. A group of arginine residues that form a rim-cap over the E6 helix groove offer compensatory roles in binding and recognition of the small molecule probes. The flexibility and impact on the overall helix-groove shape dictated by these residues offer new insights for structure-based targeting of HPV E6. PMID:26915086

  12. Comparison of Ensemble and Single Molecule Methods for Particle Characterization and Binding Analysis of a PEGylated Single-Domain Antibody.

    PubMed

    Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Obenauer-Kutner, Linda; Kaur, Parminder; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Tamura, James; Jaffe, Neil; O'Mara, Brian W; Lindsay, Stuart; Doyle, Michael; Bryson, James

    2015-12-01

    Domain antibodies (dAbs) are single immunoglobulin domains that form the smallest functional unit of an antibody. This study investigates the behavior of these small proteins when covalently attached to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety that is necessary for extending the half-life of a dAb. The effect of the 40 kDa PEG on hydrodynamic properties, particle behavior, and receptor binding of the dAb has been compared by both ensemble solution and surface methods [light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface Plasmon resonance (SPR)] and single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods (topography, recognition imaging, and force microscopy). The large PEG dominates the properties of the dAb-PEG conjugate such as a hydrodynamic radius that corresponds to a globular protein over four times its size and a much reduced association rate. We have used AFM single-molecule studies to determine the mechanism of PEG-dependent reductions in the effectiveness of the dAb observed by SPR kinetic studies. Recognition imaging showed that all of the PEGylated dAb molecules are active, suggesting that some may transiently become inactive if PEG sterically blocks binding. This helps explain the disconnect between the SPR, determined kinetically, and the force microscopy and ITC results that demonstrated that PEG does not change the binding energy. PMID:26343417

  13. Comparison of Ensemble and Single Molecule Methods for Particle Characterization and Binding Analysis of a PEGylated Single-Domain Antibody.

    PubMed

    Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Obenauer-Kutner, Linda; Kaur, Parminder; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Tamura, James; Jaffe, Neil; O'Mara, Brian W; Lindsay, Stuart; Doyle, Michael; Bryson, James

    2015-12-01

    Domain antibodies (dAbs) are single immunoglobulin domains that form the smallest functional unit of an antibody. This study investigates the behavior of these small proteins when covalently attached to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety that is necessary for extending the half-life of a dAb. The effect of the 40 kDa PEG on hydrodynamic properties, particle behavior, and receptor binding of the dAb has been compared by both ensemble solution and surface methods [light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface Plasmon resonance (SPR)] and single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods (topography, recognition imaging, and force microscopy). The large PEG dominates the properties of the dAb-PEG conjugate such as a hydrodynamic radius that corresponds to a globular protein over four times its size and a much reduced association rate. We have used AFM single-molecule studies to determine the mechanism of PEG-dependent reductions in the effectiveness of the dAb observed by SPR kinetic studies. Recognition imaging showed that all of the PEGylated dAb molecules are active, suggesting that some may transiently become inactive if PEG sterically blocks binding. This helps explain the disconnect between the SPR, determined kinetically, and the force microscopy and ITC results that demonstrated that PEG does not change the binding energy.

  14. Multivariate Analysis of Side Effects of Drug Molecules Based on Knowledge of Protein Bindings and ProteinProtein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Funatsu, Kimito

    2014-12-01

    Here, we examined the relationships between 969 side effects associated with 658 drugs and their 1368 human protein targets using our hybrid approaches. Firstly, L-shaped PLS (LPLS) was used to construct a multivariate model of side effects and protein bindings of drug molecules. LPLS is an extension of standard PLS regression, where, in addition to the response matrix Y and the regressor matrix X, an extra data matrix Z is constructed that summarizes the background information of X. X and Y are matrices comprising drugs-target proteins, and drugs-side effects, respectively. The Z matrix is the proteinprotein interaction data. From the loading plot of Y, we could identify two remarkable side effects (urinary incontinence and increased salivation) From the corresponding loading plot of X, the responsible protein targets causing each side effect could be estimated (sodium channels and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors). The loading plot of the Z matrix indicated that the GABA receptors interact with each other and they heavily influence the side effect of increased salivation. Secondly, Bayesian classifier methods were separately applied to the cases of the two side effects. That is, the Bayesian classifier method was used to classify drug molecules as binding or not binding to the responsible protein targets associated with each side effect. Using atom-coloring techniques, it was possible to estimate which fragments on the drug molecule might cause the specific side effects. This information is valuable for drug design to avoid specific side effects.

  15. Measurement of the binding energy of ultracold 87Rb133Cs molecules using an offset-free optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molony, Peter K.; Kumar, Avinash; Gregory, Philip D.; Kliese, Russell; Puppe, Thomas; Le Sueur, C. Ruth; Aldegunde, Jesus; Hutson, Jeremy M.; Cornish, Simon L.

    2016-08-01

    We report the binding energy of 87Rb133Cs molecules in their rovibrational ground state measured using an offset-free optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation technology. We create molecules in the absolute ground state using stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) with a transfer efficiency of 88%. By measuring the absolute frequencies of our STIRAP lasers, we find the energy-level difference from an initial weakly bound Feshbach state to the rovibrational ground state with a resolution of ˜5 kHz over an energy-level difference of more than 114 T Hz ; this lets us discern the hyperfine splitting of the ground state. Combined with theoretical models of the Feshbach-state binding energies and ground-state hyperfine structure, we determine a zero-field binding energy of h ×114 268 135.24 (4 )(3 )M Hz . To our knowledge, this is the most accurate determination to date of the dissociation energy of a molecule.

  16. Kinetic characterization of small DNA-binding molecules interacting with a DNA strand on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hajime; Funasaki, Mariko; Okahata, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative studies of the binding of various DNA-binding antibiotics with dsDNA are useful for drug design, not only for effective antibiotics, but also for antitumor drugs. We studied the binding kinetics, association and dissociation rate constants, and association constants (kon, koff, and Ka, respectively) of intercalators and groove binders, including various antibiotics, to double-stranded DNA (dA30·dT30 and dG30·dC30) immobilized on a highly sensitive 27 MHz quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) in aqueous solution. Although a simple ethidium bromide intercalator bound to both dA30·dT30 and dG30·dC30, antibiotics that are side-binding intercalators, such as daunomycin, aclacinomycin A, and actinomycin D, with sugar or peptide moieties on the intercalator parts selectively bound to dG30·dC30 with high Ka and small koff values. Nogalamycin, a dumbbell-shaped penetrating intercalator, showed low kon and koff values owing to slow duplex unwinding during the penetration process. Groove binders (Hoechst 33258, distamycin A, and mithramycin) had high Ka values owing to the high kon values. Kinetic parameters depended largely on molecular shapes and DNA-binding molecule binding modes.

  17. Using the binding site to control the magnetic and spintronic properties of a single magnetic molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Gill, Tobias G.; Sharp, John; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2015-03-01

    Many proposals outline the use of single magnetic molecules in new applications in information technology and spintronics, with the intention of creating new devices based on phenomena that only manifest at the atomic scale. To create these devices it will be necessary to engineer the required properties, whether through controlling the molecule's chemical makeup or its interaction with the external surroundings. The latter may involve using interactions with the supporting substrate surface, which have been shown to not only modify the molecule properties but also create effects such as chirality. Here we utilize the surface interaction to modify the properties of FePc on copper nitride, a thin insulator, above bulk Cu(001). Using scanning tunneling microscopy we show that the interaction with the surface is defined by the binding site of the central Fe atom in the molecule. By performing elastic and inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and comparing the results to DFT modeling, we explore how coupling to the surface can be used to control the molecular orbitals and the accessibility of the spin excitations. This demonstrates the importance of controlling molecule-substrate coupling down to the atomic scale for the development of single molecule devices.

  18. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  19. Single-molecule imaging of Hedgehog pathway protein Smoothened in primary cilia reveals binding events regulated by Patched1

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Weiss, Lucien E.; Yoon, Joshua; Roth, Theodore L.; Su, YouRong S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Scott, Matthew P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of the signaling protein Smoothened (Smo) in the membrane of primary cilia is an essential step in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, yet the molecular mechanisms of Smo movement and localization are poorly understood. Using ultrasensitive single-molecule tracking with high spatial/temporal precision (30 nm/10 ms), we discovered that binding events disrupt the primarily diffusive movement of Smo in cilia at an array of sites near the base. The affinity of Smo for these binding sites was modulated by the Hh pathway activation state. Activation, by either a ligand or genetic loss of the negatively acting Hh receptor Patched-1 (Ptch), reduced the affinity and frequency of Smo binding at the base. Our findings quantify activation-dependent changes in Smo dynamics in cilia and highlight a previously unknown step in Hh pathway activation. PMID:26100903

  20. Lectin-deficient calnexin is capable of binding class I histocompatibility molecules in vivo and preventing their degradation.

    PubMed

    Leach, Michael R; Williams, David B

    2004-03-01

    Calnexin is a membrane-bound lectin of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that binds transiently to newly synthesized glycoproteins. By interacting with oligosaccharides of the form Glc(1)Man(9)GlcNAc(2), calnexin enhances the folding of glycoprotein substrates, retains misfolded variants in the ER, and in some cases participates in their degradation. Calnexin has also been shown to bind polypeptides in vivo that do not possess a glycan of this form and to function in vitro as a molecular chaperone for nonglycosylated proteins. To test the relative importance of the lectin site compared with the polypeptide-binding site, we have generated six calnexin mutants defective in oligosaccharide binding using site-directed mutagenesis. Expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusions, these mutants were still capable of binding ERp57, a thiol oxidoreductase, and preventing the aggregation of a nonglycosylated substrate, citrate synthase. They were, however, unable to bind Glc(1) Man(9)GlcNAc(2) oligosaccharide and were compromised in preventing the aggregation of the monoglucosylated substrate jack bean alpha-mannosidase. Two of these mutants were then engineered into full-length calnexin for heterologous expression in Drosophila cells along with the murine class I histocompatibility molecules K(b) and D(b) as model glycoproteins. In this system, lectin site-defective calnexin was able to replace wild type calnexin in forming a complex with K(b) and D(b) heavy chains and preventing their degradation. Thus, at least for class I molecules, the lectin site of calnexin is dispensable for some of its chaperone functions. PMID:14699098

  1. A comparative study of affibody, panitumumab, and EGF for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of EGFR- and EGFRvIII-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy L; Cheung, Lael; Rosenthal, Eben L; Olive, D Michael

    2014-02-01

    Aberrant overexpression and/or activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers. EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) is a common in-frame deletion mutant, which lacks a large part of the extracellular portion (exons 2-7), including components of the ligand-binding domain. Although EGFR has been extensively studied as a molecular imaging target, information about EGFRvIII-targeted molecular imaging is lacking. In this study, the EGFR-specific affibody, therapeutic antibody panitumumab, and ligand EGF were labeled with IRDye 800CW (Ex/Em: 774/789 nm), yielding Aff800, Pan800, and EGF800, respectively. The binding affinities of the labeled agents were compared in cell-based assays using a rat glioma cell line F98 parental (F98-p) lacking EGFR expression, and 2 F98-derived transgenic cell lines expressing EGFR or EGFRvIII (designated as F98-EGFR and F98-vIII, respectively). Results showed that all agents could bind to F98-EGFR, with Pan800 having the highest binding affinity, followed by Aff800 and EGF800. Pan800 and Aff800, but not EGF800, also bound to F98-vIII. In vivo animal imaging demonstrated that compared with F98-p tumors, F98-EGFR tumors generated higher signals with all three agents. However, in the case of F98-vIII, only Pan800 and Aff800 signals were higher. Analysis of tissue lysates showed that a large portion of Pan800 was degraded into small fragments in F98-EGFR and F98-vIII tumors, possibly due to proteolytic digestion after its specific binding and internalization. In conclusion, Pan800 and Aff800 could be used as imaging agents for both wild-type EGFR and EGFRvIII, whereas EGF800 only targets wild-type EGFR. PMID:24100437

  2. Quantifying the Entropy of Binding for Water Molecules in Protein Cavities by Computing Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein structural analysis demonstrates that water molecules are commonly found in the internal cavities of proteins. Analysis of experimental data on the entropies of inorganic crystals suggests that the entropic cost of transferring such a water molecule to a protein cavity will not typically be greater than 7.0 cal/mol/K per water molecule, corresponding to a contribution of approximately +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In this study, we employ the statistical mechanical method of inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory to quantify the enthalpic and entropic contributions of individual water molecules in 19 protein cavities across five different proteins. We utilize information theory to develop a rigorous estimate of the total two-particle entropy, yielding a complete framework to calculate hydration free energies. We show that predictions from inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory are in excellent agreement with predictions from free energy perturbation (FEP) and that these predictions are consistent with experimental estimates. However, the results suggest that water molecules in protein cavities containing charged residues may be subject to entropy changes that contribute more than +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In all cases, these unfavorable entropy changes are predicted to be dominated by highly favorable enthalpy changes. These findings are relevant to the study of bridging water molecules at protein-protein interfaces as well as in complexes with cognate ligands and small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:25692597

  3. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  4. Five HLA-DP Molecules Frequently Expressed in the Worldwide Human Population Share a Common HLA Supertypic Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Steen, Amiyah; Moore, Carrie; Ngo, Sandy; Chung, Jolan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Compared with DR and DQ, knowledge of the binding repertoires and specificities of HLA-DP alleles is somewhat limited. However, a growing body of literature has indicated the importance of DP-restricted responses in the context of cancer, allergy, and infectious disease. In the current study, we developed high-throughput binding assays for the five most common HLA-DPB1 alleles in the general worldwide population. Using these assays on a comprehensive panel of single-substitution analogs and large peptide libraries, we derived novel detailed binding motifs for DPB1*0101 and DPB1*0501. We also derived more detailed quantitative motifs for DPB1*0201, DPB1*0401, and DPB1*0402, which were previously characterized on the basis of sets of eluted ligands and/or limited sets of substituted peptides. Unexpectedly, all five DP molecules, originally selected only on the basis of their frequency in human populations, were found to share largely overlapping peptide motifs. Testing panels of known DP epitopes and a panel of peptides spanning a set of Phleum pratense Ags revealed that these molecules also share largely overlapping peptide-binding repertoires. This demonstrates that a previously hypothesized DP supertype extends far beyond what was originally envisioned and includes at least three additional very common DP specificities. Taken together, these DP supertype molecules are found in >90% of the human population. Thus, these findings have important implications for epitope-identification studies and monitoring of human class II-restricted immune responses. PMID:20139279

  5. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  6. Basic fibroblast growth factor binds to subendothelial extracellular matrix and is released by heparitinase and heparin-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, P.; Doctrow, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Svahn, C.M.; Folkman, J.; Vlodavsky, I. )

    1989-02-21

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits specific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cultured endothelial cells. Binding was saturable as a function both of time and of concentration of {sup 125}I-bFGF. Scatchard analysis of FGF binding revealed the presence of about 1.5 x 10{sup 12} binding sites/mm{sup 2} ECM with an apparent k{sub D} of 610 nM. FGF binds to heparan sulfate (HS) in ECM as evidenced by (i) inhibition of binding in the presence of heparin or HS at 0.1-1 {mu}g/mL, but not by chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or hyaluronic acid at 10 {mu}g/mL, (ii) lack of binding to ECM pretreated with heparitinase, but not with chondroitinase ABC, and (iii) rapid release of up to 90% of ECM-bound FGF by exposure to heparin, HS, or heparitinase, but not to chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, or chondroitinase ABC. Oligosaccharides derived from depolymerized heparin, and as small as the tetrasaccharide, released the ECM-bound FGF, but there was little or no release of FGF by modified nonanticoagulant heparins such as totally desulfated heparin, N-desulfated heparin, and N-acetylated heparin. FGF released from ECM was biologically active, as indicated by its stimulation of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained in studies on release of endogenous FGF-like mitogenic activity from Descement's membranes of bovine corneas. It is suggested that ECM storage and release of bFGF provide a novel mechanism for regulation of capillary blood vessel growth. Whereas ECM-bound FGF may be prevented from acting on endothelial cells, its displacement by heparin-like molecules and/or HS-degrading enzymes may elicit a neovascular response.

  7. Binding Energy of Molecules on Water Ice: Laboratory Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Acharyya, Kinsuk; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2016-07-01

    We measured the binding energy of N2, CO, O2, CH4, and CO2 on non-porous (compact) amorphous solid water (np-ASW), of N2 and CO on porous ASW, and of NH3 on crystalline water ice. We were able to measure binding energies down to a fraction of 1% of a layer, thus making these measurements more appropriate for astrochemistry than the existing values. We found that CO2 forms clusters on the np-ASW surface even at very low coverages. The binding energies of N2, CO, O2, and CH4 decrease with coverage in the submonolayer regime. Their values at the low coverage limit are much higher than what is commonly used in gas-grain models. An empirical formula was used to describe the coverage dependence of the binding energies. We used the newly determined binding energy distributions in a simulation of gas-grain chemistry for cold cloud and hot-core models. We found that owing to the higher value of binding energy in the submonolayer regime, a fraction of all these ices remains for much longer and up to higher temperatures on the grain surface compared to the single value energies currently used in the astrochemical models.

  8. Fighting Cholera One-on-One: The Development and Efficacy of Multivalent Cholera-Toxin-Binding Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zuilhof, Han

    2016-02-16

    A series of diseases, ranging from cholera via travelers' diarrhea to hamburger disease, are caused by bacterially produced toxic proteins. In particular, a toxic protein unit is brought into the host cell upon binding to specific membrane-bound oligosaccharides on the host cell membrane. For example, the protein that causes cholera, cholera toxin (CT), has five identical, symmetrically placed binding pockets (B proteins), on top of which the toxic A protein resides. A promising strategy to counteract the devastating biological effects of this AB5 protein involves the development of inhibitors that can act as mimics of membrane-bound GM1 molecules, i.e., that can bind CT strongly and selectively. To reach this goal, two features are essential: First of all, the inhibitor should display oligosaccharides that resemble as much as possible the naturally occurring cell-surface pentasaccharide onto which CT normally binds, the so-called GM1 sugar (the oligosaccharide part of which is then labeled GM1os). Second, the inhibitor should be able to bind CT via multivalent interactions so as to bind CT as strongly as possible to allow for a real competition with the cell-membrane-bound GM1 molecules. In this Account, we present elements of the path that leads to strong CT inhibition by outlining the roles of multivalency and the development and use of GM1 mimics. First, multivalency effects were investigated using "sugar-coated" platforms, ranging from dendritic structures with up to eight oligosaccharides to platforms that mimicked the fivefold symmetry of CT itself. The latter goal was reached either via synthetic scaffolds like corannulene or calix[5]arene or via the development of a neolectin CT mimic that itself carries five GM1os groups. Second, the effect of the nature of the oligosaccharide appended to this platform was investigated via the use of oligosaccharides of increasing complexity, from galactose and lactose to the tetrasaccharide GM2os and eventually to GM1os

  9. Prediction of small-molecule binding to cytochrome P450 3A4: flexible docking combined with multidimensional QSAR.

    PubMed

    Lill, Markus A; Dobler, Max; Vedani, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    The inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by small molecules is a major mechanism associated with undesired drug-drug interactions, which are responsible for a substantial number of late-stage failures in the pharmaceutical drug-development process. For a quantitative prediction of associated pharmacokinetic parameters, a computational model was developed that allows prediction of the inhibitory potential of 48 structurally diverse molecules. Based on the experimental structure of CYP3A4, possible binding modes were first sampled by using automated docking (Yeti software) taking protein flexibility into account. The results are consistent with both X-ray crystallographic data and data from metabolic studies. Next, an ensemble of energetically favorable orientations was composed into a 4D dataset for use as input for a multidimensional QSAR technique (Raptor software). A dual-shell binding-site model that allows an explicit induced fit was then generated by using hydrophobicity scoring and hydrogen-bond propensity. The simulation reached a cross-validated r2 value of 0.825 and a predictive r2 value of 0.659. On average, the predicted binding affinity of the training ligands deviates by a factor of 2.7 from the experiment; those of the test set deviate by a factor of 3.8 in Ki.

  10. Small molecule inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) binding to pleckstrin homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Benchun; Skidan, Igor; Yang, Jinsheng; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Long, Kai; Brazell, Tres; Durugkar, Kulbhushan A.; Maki, Jenny; Ramana, C. V.; Schaffhausen, Brian; Wagner, Gerhard; Torchilin, Vladimir; Yuan, Junying; Degterev, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    The PI3-kinase (PI3K) pathway regulates many cellular processes, especially cell metabolism, cell survival, and apoptosis. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), the product of PI3K activity and a key signaling molecule, acts by recruiting pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing proteins to cell membranes. Here, we describe a new structural class of nonphosphoinositide small molecule antagonists (PITenins, PITs) of PIP3–PH domain interactions (IC50 ranges from 13.4 to 31 μM in PIP3/Akt PH domain binding assay). PITs inhibit interactions of a number of PIP3-binding PH domains, including those of Akt and PDK1, without affecting several PIP2-selective PH domains. As a result, PITs suppress the PI3K-PDK1-Akt pathway and trigger metabolic stress and apoptosis. A PIT-1 analog displayed significant antitumor activity in vivo, including inhibition of tumor growth and induction of apoptosis. Overall, our studies demonstrate the feasibility of developing specific small molecule antagonists of PIP3 signaling. PMID:21041639

  11. Performance of the TPSS Functional on Predicting Core Level Binding Energies of Main Group Elements Containing Molecules: A Good Choice for Molecules Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pueyo Bellafont, Noèlia; Viñes, Francesc; Illas, Francesc

    2016-01-12

    Here we explored the performance of Hartree-Fock (HF), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functionals in predicting core level 1s binding energies (BEs) and BE shifts (ΔBEs) for a large set of 68 molecules containing a wide variety of functional groups for main group elements B → F and considering up to 185 core levels. A statistical analysis comparing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments shows that BEs estimations are very accurate, TPSS exhibiting the best performance. Considering ΔBEs, the three methods yield very similar and excellent results, with mean absolute deviations of ∼0.25 eV. When considering relativistic effects, BEs deviations drop approaching experimental values. So, the largest mean percentage deviation is of 0.25% only. Linear trends among experimental and estimated values have been found, gaining offsets with respect to ideality. By adding relativistic effects to offsets, HF and TPSS methods underestimate experimental values by solely 0.11 and 0.05 eV, respectively, well within XPS chemical precision. TPSS is posed as an excellent choice for the characterization, by XPS, of molecules on metal solid substrates, given its suitability in describing metal substrates bonds and atomic and/or molecular orbitals.

  12. Dissecting EB1-microtubule interactions from every direction: using single-molecule visualization and static and dynamic binding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    EB1 is an important microtubule associating protein (MAP) that acts as a master coordinator of protein activity at the growing plus-end of the microtubule. We can recapitulate the plus-end binding behavior of EB1 along the entire length of a static microtubule using microtubules polymerized in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs GMPCPP and GTP γS instead of GTP. Through the use of single-molecule TIRF imaging we find that EB1 is highly dynamic (with a sub-second characteristic binding lifetime) and continuously diffusive while bound to the microtubule. We measure the diffusion coefficient, D, through linear fitting to mean-squared displacement of individually labeled proteins, and the binding lifetime, τ, by fitting a single exponential decay to the probability distribution of trajectory lifetimes. In agreement with measurements of other diffusive MAPs, we find that D increases and τ decreases with increasing ionic strength. We also find that D is sensitive to the choice of GTP analog: EB1 proteins bound to GTP γS polymerized microtubules have a D half of that found with GMPCPP polymerized microtubules. To compare these single-molecule measurements to the bulk binding behavior of EB1, we use TIRF imaging to measure the intensity of microtubules coated with EB1-GFP as a function of EB1 concentration. We find that EB1 binding is cooperative and both the quantity of EB1 bound and the dissociation constant are sensitive to GTP analog and ionic concentration. The correlation between binding affinity and D and the cooperative nature of EB1-microtubule binding leads to a decrease in D with increasing EB1 concentration. Interestingly, we also find an increase in τ at high EB1 concentrations, consistent with attractive EB1-microtubule interactions driving the cooperativity. To further understand the nature of the cooperativity we estimate the interaction energy by measuring the association and dissociation rates (kon and koff respectively) at different

  13. Localization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin-binding molecules in gypsy moth larval gut sections using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Valaitis, Algimantas P

    2011-10-01

    The microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces Cry toxins, proteins that bind to the brush border membranes of gut epithelial cells of insects that ingest it, disrupting the integrity of the membranes, and leading to cell lysis and insect death. In gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, two toxin-binding molecules for the Cry1A class of Bt toxins have been identified: an aminopeptidase N (APN-1) and a 270kDa anionic glycoconjugate (BTR-270). Studies have shown that APN-1 has a relatively weak affinity and a very narrow specificity to Cry1Ac, the only Cry1A toxin that it binds. In contrast, BTR-270 binds all toxins that are active against L. dispar larvae, and the affinities for these toxins to BTR-270 correlate positively with their respective toxicities. In this study, an immunohistochemical approach was coupled with fluorescence microscopy to localize APN-1 and BTR-270 in paraffin embedded midgut sections of L. dispar larvae. The distribution of cadherin and alkaline phosphatase in the gut tissue was also examined. A strong reaction indicative of polyanionic material was detected with alcian blue staining over the entire epithelial brush border, suggesting the presence of acidic glycoconjugates in the microvillar matrix. The Cry1A toxin-binding sites were confined to the apical surface of the gut epithelial cells with intense labeling of the apical tips of the microvilli. APN-1, BTR-270, and alkaline phosphatase were found to be present exclusively along the brush border microvilli along the entire gut epithelium. In contrast, cadherin, detected only in older gypsy moth larvae, was present both in the apical brush border and in the basement membrane anchoring the midgut epithelial cells. The topographical relationship between the Bt Cry toxin-binding molecules BTR-270 and APN-1 and the Cry1A toxin-binding sites that were confined to the apical brush border of the midgut cells is consistent with findings implicating their involvement in the mechanism of the

  14. Equilibrium and dynamic design principles for binding molecules engineered for reagentless biosensors.

    PubMed

    de Picciotto, Seymour; Imperiali, Barbara; Griffith, Linda G; Wittrup, K Dane

    2014-09-01

    Reagentless biosensors rely on the interaction of a binding partner and its target to generate a change in fluorescent signal using an environment-sensitive fluorophore or Förster resonance energy transfer. Binding affinity can exert a significant influence on both the equilibrium and the dynamic response characteristics of such a biosensor. We here develop a kinetic model for the dynamic performance of a reagentless biosensor. Using a sinusoidal signal for ligand concentration, our findings suggest that it is optimal to use a binding moiety whose equilibrium dissociation constant matches that of the average predicted input signal, while maximizing both the association rate constant and the dissociation rate constant at the necessary ratio to create the desired equilibrium constant. Although practical limitations constrain the attainment of these objectives, the derivation of these design principles provides guidance for improved reagentless biosensor performance and metrics for quality standards in the development of biosensors. These concepts are broadly relevant to reagentless biosensor modalities.

  15. Neuronal cell adhesion molecule contactin/F11 binds to tenascin via its immunoglobulin-like domains

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between neurons and extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in neuronal pattern formation. The prominent role played by the extracellular matrix protein tenascin/cytotactin in the development of the nervous system, tied to its abundance, led us to speculate that brain may contain yet unidentified tenascin receptors. Here we show that the neuronal cell adhesion molecule contactin/F11, a member of the immunoglobulin(Ig)-superfamily, is a cell surface ligand for tenascin in the nervous system. Through affinity chromatography of membrane glycoproteins from chick brain on tenascin-Sepharose, we isolated a major cell surface ligand of 135 kD which we identified as contactin/F11 by NH2-terminal sequencing. The binding specificity between contactin/F11 and tenascin was demonstrated in solid-phase assays. Binding of immunopurified 125I-labeled contactin/F11 to immobilized tenascin is completely inhibited by the addition of soluble tenascin or contactin/F11, but not by fibronectin. When the fractionated isoforms of tenascin were used as substrates, contactin/F11 bound preferentially to the 190-kD isoform. This isoform differs in having no alternatively spliced fibronectin type III domains. Our results imply that the introduction of these additional domains in some way disrupts the contactin/F11 binding site on tenascin. To localize the binding site on contactin/F11, proteolytic fragments were generated and characterized by NH2-terminal sequencing. The smallest contactin/F11 fragment which binds tenascin is 45 kD and also begins with the contactin/F11 NH2-terminal sequence. This implies that contactin/F11 binds to tenascin through a site within the first three Ig-domains. PMID:1382076

  16. Comparative analysis of 10 small molecules binding to carbonic anhydrase II by different investigators using Biacore technology.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Leavitt, Stephanie; Bynum, Maggie A; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Wilton, Rosemarie; Qiu, Huawei; Steukers, Mieke; Wang, Siming; Bindu, Lakshman; Phogat, Sanjay; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ryan, Thomas E; Pudlak, Victoria A; Matusiewicz, Katarzyna; Michelson, Klaus M; Nowakowski, Agnes; Pham-Baginski, Anh; Brooks, Jonathan; Tieman, Bryan C; Bruce, Barry D; Vaughn, Michael; Baksh, Michael; Cho, Yun Hee; Wit, Mieke De; Smets, Alexandra; Vandersmissen, Johan; Michiels, Lieve; Myszka, David G

    2006-12-01

    In this benchmark study, 26 investigators were asked to characterize the kinetics and affinities of 10 sulfonamide inhibitors binding to the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II using Biacore optical biosensors. A majority of the participants collected data that could be fit to a 1:1 interaction model, but a subset of the data sets obtained from some instruments were of poor quality. The experimental errors in the k(a), k(d), and K(D) parameters determined for each of the compounds averaged 34, 24, and 37%, respectively. As expected, the greatest variation in the reported constants was observed for compounds with exceptionally weak affinity and/or fast association rates. The binding constants determined using the biosensor correlated well with solution-based titration calorimetry measurements. The results of this study provide insight into the challenges, as well as the level of experimental variation, that one would expect to observe when using Biacore technology for small molecule analyses.

  17. Probing force-induced unfolding intermediates of a single staphylococcal nuclease molecule and the effect of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Takaaki Murayama, Yoshihiro; Katano, Atsuto; Maki, Kosuke; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Sano, Masaki

    2008-10-31

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have given experimental access to unfolding intermediates of proteins that are inaccessible in conventional experiments. A detailed characterization of the intermediates is a challenging problem that provides new possibilities for directly probing the energy landscape of proteins. We investigated single-molecule mechanical unfolding of a small globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), using atomic force microscopy. The unfolding trajectories of the protein displayed sub-molecular and stochastic behavior with typical lengths corresponding to the size of the unfolded substructures. Our results support the view that the single protein unfolds along multiple pathways as suggested in recent theoretical studies. Moreover, we found the drastic change, caused by the ligand and inhibitor bindings, in the mechanical unfolding dynamics.

  18. Structure and thermodynamics of effector molecule binding to the nitrogen signal transduction PII protein GlnZ from Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Truan, Daphné; Bjelić, Saša; Li, Xiao-Dan; Winkler, Fritz K

    2014-07-29

    The trimeric PII signal transduction proteins regulate the function of a variety of target proteins predominantly involved in nitrogen metabolism. ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) are key effector molecules influencing PII binding to targets. Studies of PII proteins have established that the 20-residue T-loop plays a central role in effector sensing and target binding. However, the specific effects of effector binding on T-loop conformation have remained poorly documented. We present eight crystal structures of the Azospirillum brasilense PII protein GlnZ, six of which are cocrystallized and liganded with ADP or ATP. We find that interaction with the diphosphate moiety of bound ADP constrains the N-terminal part of the T-loop in a characteristic way that is maintained in ADP-promoted complexes with target proteins. In contrast, the interactions with the triphosphate moiety in ATP complexes are much more variable and no single predominant interaction mode is apparent except for the ternary MgATP/2-OG complex. These conclusions can be extended to most investigated PII proteins of the GlnB/GlnK subfamily. Unlike reported for other PII proteins, microcalorimetry reveals no cooperativity between the three binding sites of GlnZ trimers for any of the three effectors under carefully controlled experimental conditions.

  19. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26174365

  20. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  2. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Pot1 Binding to Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Croy, Johnny E.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of S. pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ~20,000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with submicromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red, was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. ITC and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption. PMID:22978652

  3. A small molecule inhibitor of Pot1 binding to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Croy, Johnny E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-10-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of the regulation of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ∼20 000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with sub-micromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red (CR), was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption.

  4. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration.

  5. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration. PMID:8223869

  6. Nonequivalence of alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites in the native nicotinic receptor molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Tang, F.; Walgrave, S.; Gallagher, W. )

    1990-01-30

    In the native, membrane-bound form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AcChR) the two sites for the cholinergic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT) have different binding properties. One site has high affinity, and the M-AcChR/alpha-BGT complexes thus formed dissociate very slowly, similar to the complexes formed with detergent-solubilized AcChR (S-AcChR). The second site has much lower affinity (KD approximately 59 +/- 35 nM) and forms quickly reversible complexes. The nondenaturing detergent Triton X-100 is known to solubilize the AcChR in a form unable, upon binding of cholinergic ligands, to open the ion channel and to become desensitized. Solubilization of the AcChR in Triton X-100 affects the binding properties of this second site and converts it to a high-affinity, slowly reversible site. Prolonged incubation of M-AcChR at 4 degrees C converts the low-affinity site to a high-affinity site similar to those observed in the presence of Triton X-100. Although the two sites have similar properties when the AcChR is solubilized in Triton X-100, their nonequivalence can be demonstrated by the effect on alpha-BGT binding of concanavalin A, which strongly reduces the association rate of one site only. The Bmax of alpha-BGT to either Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR is not affected by the presence of concanavalin A. Occupancy of the high-affinity, slowly reversible site in M-AcChR inhibits the Triton X-100 induced conversion to irreversibility of the second site. At difference with alpha-BGT, the long alpha-neurotoxin from Naja naja siamensis venom (alpha-NTX) binds with high affinity and in a very slowly reversible fashion to two sites in the M-AcChR. We confirm here that Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR binds in a very slowly reversible fashion the same amount of alpha-NTX.

  7. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  8. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  9. Efficient Computation of Small-Molecule Configurational Binding Entropy and Free Energy Changes by Ensemble Enumeration.

    PubMed

    Silver, Nathaniel W; King, Bracken M; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Cao, Hong; Ali, Akbar; Kiran Kumar Reddy, G S; Rana, Tariq M; Schiffer, Celia A; Tidor, Bruce

    2013-11-12

    Here we present a novel, end-point method using the dead-end-elimination and A* algorithms to efficiently and accurately calculate the change in free energy, enthalpy, and configurational entropy of binding for ligand-receptor association reactions. We apply the new approach to the binding of a series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protease inhibitors to examine the effect ensemble reranking has on relative accuracy as well as to evaluate the role of the absolute and relative ligand configurational entropy losses upon binding in affinity differences for structurally related inhibitors. Our results suggest that most thermodynamic parameters can be estimated using only a small fraction of the full configurational space, and we see significant improvement in relative accuracy when using an ensemble versus single-conformer approach to ligand ranking. We also find that using approximate metrics based on the single-conformation enthalpy differences between the global minimum energy configuration in the bound as well as unbound states also correlates well with experiment. Using a novel, additive entropy expansion based on conditional mutual information, we also analyze the source of ligand configurational entropy loss upon binding in terms of both uncoupled per degree of freedom losses as well as changes in coupling between inhibitor degrees of freedom. We estimate entropic free energy losses of approximately +24 kcal/mol, 12 kcal/mol of which stems from loss of translational and rotational entropy. Coupling effects contribute only a small fraction to the overall entropy change (1-2 kcal/mol) but suggest differences in how inhibitor dihedral angles couple to each other in the bound versus unbound states. The importance of accounting for flexibility in drug optimization and design is also discussed.

  10. Efficient Computation of Small-Molecule Configurational Binding Entropy and Free Energy Changes by Ensemble Enumeration.

    PubMed

    Silver, Nathaniel W; King, Bracken M; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Cao, Hong; Ali, Akbar; Kiran Kumar Reddy, G S; Rana, Tariq M; Schiffer, Celia A; Tidor, Bruce

    2013-11-12

    Here we present a novel, end-point method using the dead-end-elimination and A* algorithms to efficiently and accurately calculate the change in free energy, enthalpy, and configurational entropy of binding for ligand-receptor association reactions. We apply the new approach to the binding of a series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protease inhibitors to examine the effect ensemble reranking has on relative accuracy as well as to evaluate the role of the absolute and relative ligand configurational entropy losses upon binding in affinity differences for structurally related inhibitors. Our results suggest that most thermodynamic parameters can be estimated using only a small fraction of the full configurational space, and we see significant improvement in relative accuracy when using an ensemble versus single-conformer approach to ligand ranking. We also find that using approximate metrics based on the single-conformation enthalpy differences between the global minimum energy configuration in the bound as well as unbound states also correlates well with experiment. Using a novel, additive entropy expansion based on conditional mutual information, we also analyze the source of ligand configurational entropy loss upon binding in terms of both uncoupled per degree of freedom losses as well as changes in coupling between inhibitor degrees of freedom. We estimate entropic free energy losses of approximately +24 kcal/mol, 12 kcal/mol of which stems from loss of translational and rotational entropy. Coupling effects contribute only a small fraction to the overall entropy change (1-2 kcal/mol) but suggest differences in how inhibitor dihedral angles couple to each other in the bound versus unbound states. The importance of accounting for flexibility in drug optimization and design is also discussed. PMID:24250277

  11. Efficient Computation of Small-Molecule Configurational Binding Entropy and Free Energy Changes by Ensemble Enumeration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a novel, end-point method using the dead-end-elimination and A* algorithms to efficiently and accurately calculate the change in free energy, enthalpy, and configurational entropy of binding for ligand–receptor association reactions. We apply the new approach to the binding of a series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protease inhibitors to examine the effect ensemble reranking has on relative accuracy as well as to evaluate the role of the absolute and relative ligand configurational entropy losses upon binding in affinity differences for structurally related inhibitors. Our results suggest that most thermodynamic parameters can be estimated using only a small fraction of the full configurational space, and we see significant improvement in relative accuracy when using an ensemble versus single-conformer approach to ligand ranking. We also find that using approximate metrics based on the single-conformation enthalpy differences between the global minimum energy configuration in the bound as well as unbound states also correlates well with experiment. Using a novel, additive entropy expansion based on conditional mutual information, we also analyze the source of ligand configurational entropy loss upon binding in terms of both uncoupled per degree of freedom losses as well as changes in coupling between inhibitor degrees of freedom. We estimate entropic free energy losses of approximately +24 kcal/mol, 12 kcal/mol of which stems from loss of translational and rotational entropy. Coupling effects contribute only a small fraction to the overall entropy change (1–2 kcal/mol) but suggest differences in how inhibitor dihedral angles couple to each other in the bound versus unbound states. The importance of accounting for flexibility in drug optimization and design is also discussed. PMID:24250277

  12. Pocketome: an encyclopedia of small-molecule binding sites in 4D.

    PubMed

    Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The importance of binding site plasticity in protein-ligand interactions is well-recognized, and so are the difficulties in predicting the nature and the degree of this plasticity by computational means. To assist in understanding the flexible protein-ligand interactions, we constructed the Pocketome, an encyclopedia of about one thousand experimentally solved conformational ensembles of druggable binding sites in proteins, grouped by location and consistent chain/cofactor composition. The multiplicity of pockets within the ensembles adds an extra, fourth dimension to the Pocketome entry data. Within each ensemble, the pockets were carefully classified by the degree of their pairwise similarity and compatibility with different ligands. The core of the Pocketome is derived regularly and automatically from the current releases of the Protein Data Bank and the Uniprot Knowledgebase; this core is complemented by entries built from manually provided seed ligand locations. The Pocketome website (www.pocketome.org) allows searching for the sites of interest, analysis of conformational clusters, important residues, binding compatibility matrices and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web browser plugin. The Pocketome collection can be used to build multi-conformational docking and 3D activity models as well as to design cross-docking and virtual ligand screening benchmarks.

  13. Pocketome: an encyclopedia of small-molecule binding sites in 4D

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The importance of binding site plasticity in protein–ligand interactions is well-recognized, and so are the difficulties in predicting the nature and the degree of this plasticity by computational means. To assist in understanding the flexible protein–ligand interactions, we constructed the Pocketome, an encyclopedia of about one thousand experimentally solved conformational ensembles of druggable binding sites in proteins, grouped by location and consistent chain/cofactor composition. The multiplicity of pockets within the ensembles adds an extra, fourth dimension to the Pocketome entry data. Within each ensemble, the pockets were carefully classified by the degree of their pairwise similarity and compatibility with different ligands. The core of the Pocketome is derived regularly and automatically from the current releases of the Protein Data Bank and the Uniprot Knowledgebase; this core is complemented by entries built from manually provided seed ligand locations. The Pocketome website (www.pocketome.org) allows searching for the sites of interest, analysis of conformational clusters, important residues, binding compatibility matrices and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web browser plugin. The Pocketome collection can be used to build multi-conformational docking and 3D activity models as well as to design cross-docking and virtual ligand screening benchmarks. PMID:22080553

  14. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jongsik; Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination. - Graphical abstract: This study details the synthesis and the formation mechanism of Zn-MOF adsorbent site-isolating TiH{sub 3} that can potentially capture H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-binding mechanism. - Highlights: • OH-functionalized Zn-MOF was employed as a reactive template to site-isolate TiH{sub 3}. • This MOF was post-synthetically modified using a tetracyclohexyl titanium (IV). • This intermediate was hydrogenolyzed to change ligand from cyclohexyl to hydride. • Formation mechanism of TiH{sub 3} was investigated via two control GC–MS experiments. • Final Zn-MOF potentially site-isolating TiH{sub 3} species was used as a H{sub 2} adsorbent.

  15. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  16. Binding site identification and role of permanent water molecule of PIM-3 kinase: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Gul, Sana; Usmani, Saman; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-11-01

    The kinome is a protein kinase complement of the human genome, categorized as serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. These kinases catalyze phosphorylation reaction by using ATP as phosphoryl donor. Proviral Integration Site for Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (PIM) kinase encodes serine/threonine protein kinases that recognized as proto-oncogene, responsible for rapid growth of cancerous cells. It is implicated in cell survival and function via cell cycle progression and its metabolism. PIM-3, sub-member of PIM kinases is a proto-oncogene, its overexpression inhibits apoptosis, and results in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. PIM-3 is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop its specific inhibitors is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure by any experimental technique. In silico techniques generally facilitate scientist to explore hidden structural features in order to improve drug discovery. In the present study, homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation techniques were utilized to explore the structure and dynamics of PIM-3 kinase. Induction of water molecules during molecular docking simulation explored differences in the hinge region between PIM-1 and PIM-3 kinases that may be responsible for specificity. Furthermore, role of water molecules in the active site was also explored via radial distribution function (RDF) after a 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Generated RDF plots exhibited the importance of water for inhibitor binding through their bridging capability that links the ligand with binding site residues.

  17. Binding site identification and role of permanent water molecule of PIM-3 kinase: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Gul, Sana; Usmani, Saman; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-11-01

    The kinome is a protein kinase complement of the human genome, categorized as serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. These kinases catalyze phosphorylation reaction by using ATP as phosphoryl donor. Proviral Integration Site for Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (PIM) kinase encodes serine/threonine protein kinases that recognized as proto-oncogene, responsible for rapid growth of cancerous cells. It is implicated in cell survival and function via cell cycle progression and its metabolism. PIM-3, sub-member of PIM kinases is a proto-oncogene, its overexpression inhibits apoptosis, and results in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. PIM-3 is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop its specific inhibitors is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure by any experimental technique. In silico techniques generally facilitate scientist to explore hidden structural features in order to improve drug discovery. In the present study, homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation techniques were utilized to explore the structure and dynamics of PIM-3 kinase. Induction of water molecules during molecular docking simulation explored differences in the hinge region between PIM-1 and PIM-3 kinases that may be responsible for specificity. Furthermore, role of water molecules in the active site was also explored via radial distribution function (RDF) after a 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Generated RDF plots exhibited the importance of water for inhibitor binding through their bridging capability that links the ligand with binding site residues. PMID:26529487

  18. Role of ICAM-1 polymorphisms (G241R, K469E) in mediating its single-molecule binding ability: Atomic force microscopy measurements on living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Rui; Yi, Shaoqiong; Zhang, Xuejie; Liu, Huiliang; Fang, Xiaohong

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • We evaluated both single molecule binding ability and expression level of 4 ICAM-1 mutations. • AFM was used to measure single-molecule binding ability on living cells. • The SNP of ICAM-1 may induce changes in expressions rather than single-molecule binding ability. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis (As) is characterized by chronic inflammation and is a major cause of human mortality. ICAM-1-mediated adhesion of leukocytes in vessel walls plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), G241R and K469E, are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases. SNP induced changes in ICAM-1 function rely not only on the expression level but also on the single-molecule binding ability which may be affected by single molecule conformation variations such as protein splicing and folding. Previous studies have shown associations between G241R/K469E polymorphisms and ICAM-1 gene expression. Nevertheless, few studies have been done that focus on the single-molecule forces of the above SNPs and their ligands. In the current study, we evaluated both single molecule binding ability and expression level of 4 ICAM-1 mutations – GK (G241/K469), GE (G241/E469), RK (R241/K469) and RE (R241/E469). No difference in adhesion ability was observed via cell adhesion assay or atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement when comparing the GK, GE, RK, or RE genotypes of ICAM-1 to each other. On the other hand, flow cytometry suggested that there was significantly higher expression of GE genotype of ICAM-1 on transfected CHO cells. Thus, we concluded that genetic susceptibility to diseases related to ICAM-1 polymorphisms, G241R or K469E, might be due to the different expressions of ICAM-1 variants rather than to the single-molecule binding ability of ICAM-1.

  19. The structure of the antigen-binding groove of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules determines specific selection of self-peptides.

    PubMed Central

    van Bleek, G M; Nathenson, S G

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the effect of diversity in the antigen-binding groove of the Kb, Db, Kbm1, and Kbm8 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the set of self-peptides they present on the cell surface, by using a procedure we recently developed in our laboratory to isolate endogenously processed peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. We found that such naturally processed peptides are 7-10 amino acids long. A major motif of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at positions three and five was found for peptides binding to Kb. The availability of Kb mutant molecules Kbm1 and Kbm8, each with localized clustered changes in the antigen-binding cleft, allowed us to probe the effect of such small alterations on peptide selection. We found that such changes in different regions in the antigen-binding groove exert an absolute effect by changing subsets of self-peptides bound to these MHC molecules. In the Kbm1 mutant, the binding of the characteristic major set of Kb-associated peptides with tyrosine at position three or both positions three and five is abrogated, although this MHC molecule still binds peptides with tyrosine at position seven; the latter peptides also bind to Kb. Kbm8 shares the major Tyr-3, Tyr-5 peptide set that binds to Kb but does not bind the peptides with tyrosine at position seven. Thus differences in binding selectivity in Kbm1 and Kbm8 appear to be the major determinant for the observed alterations in in vivo immune responses. PMID:1763019

  20. Identification of a Fragment-like Small Molecule Ligand for the Methyl-lysine Binding Protein, 53BP1

    PubMed Central

    Perfetti, Michael T.; Baughma, Brandi M.; Dickson, Bradley M.; Mu, Yunxiang; Cui, Gaofeng; Mader, Pavel; Dong, Aiping; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Rothbart, Scott B.; Strahl, Brian D.; Brown, Peter J.; Janzen, William P.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Mer, Georges; McBride, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of the role of chromatin regulators in the initiation, development, and suppression of cancer and other devastating diseases is critical, as they are integral players in regulating DNA integrity and gene expression. Developing small molecule inhibitors for this target class with cellular activity is a crucial step toward elucidating their specific functions. We specifically targeted the DNA damage response protein, 53BP1, which uses its tandem tudor domain to recognize histone H4 dimethylated on lysine 20 (H4K20me2), a modification induced by double-strand DNA breaks. Through a cross-screening approach we identified UNC2170 (1) as a micromolar ligand of 53BP1, which demonstrates at least 17-fold selectivity for 53BP1 as compared to other methyl-lysine (Kme) binding proteins tested. Structural studies revealed that the tert-butyl amine of UNC2170 anchors the compound in the methyl-lysine (Kme) binding pocket of 53BP1, making it competitive with endogenous Kme substrates. X-ray crystallography also demonstrated that UNC2170 binds at the interface of two tudor domains of a 53BP1 dimer. Importantly, this compound functions as a 53BP1 antagonist in cellular lysates and shows cellular activity by suppressing class switch recombination, a process which requires a functional 53BP1 tudor domain. These results demonstrate that UNC2170 is a functionally active, fragment-like ligand for 53BP1. PMID:25590533

  1. Identification of small-molecule binding pockets in the soluble monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Maximillian; Simone, Alfonso De; Schenk, Dale; Toth, Gergely; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of intrinsically disordered peptides and proteins is associated with a wide range of highly debilitating neurological and systemic disorders. In this work we explored the potential of a structure-based drug discovery procedure to target one such system, the soluble monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide. We utilised for this purpose a set of structures of the Aβ42 peptide selected from clusters of conformations within an ensemble generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using these structures we carried out fragment mapping calculations to identify binding ‘hot spots’ on the monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide. This procedure provided a set of hot spots with ligand efficiencies comparable to those observed for structured proteins, and that are clustered into binding pockets. We verified that such pockets exhibit a propensity to bind small molecules known to interact with the Aβ42 peptide. Taken together these results provide an initial indication that fragment-based drug discovery may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases associated with the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23883055

  2. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  3. Single-molecule imaging reveals the mechanism of Exo1 regulation by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Fade; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wold, Marc S.; Miller, Kyle M.; Paull, Tanya T.

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) is a 5′→3′ exonuclease and 5′-flap endonuclease that plays a critical role in multiple eukaryotic DNA repair pathways. Exo1 processing at DNA nicks and double-strand breaks creates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, which are rapidly bound by replication protein A (RPA) and other single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging and quantitative cell biology approaches to reveal the interplay between Exo1 and SSBs. Both human and yeast Exo1 are processive nucleases on their own. RPA rapidly strips Exo1 from DNA, and this activity is dependent on at least three RPA-encoded single-stranded DNA binding domains. Furthermore, we show that ablation of RPA in human cells increases Exo1 recruitment to damage sites. In contrast, the sensor of single-stranded DNA complex 1—a recently identified human SSB that promotes DNA resection during homologous recombination—supports processive resection by Exo1. Although RPA rapidly turns over Exo1, multiple cycles of nuclease rebinding at the same DNA site can still support limited DNA processing. These results reveal the role of single-stranded DNA binding proteins in controlling Exo1-catalyzed resection with implications for how Exo1 is regulated during DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26884156

  4. Critical binding and electron scattering by symmetric-top polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W. R.

    2014-10-28

    Quantum treatments of electron interactions with polar symmetric-top rotor molecules show features not present in the treatment of the linear-polar-rotor model. For symmetric tops possessing non-zero angular momentum about the symmetry axis, a new critical dipole can be defined that guarantees an infinite set of dipole-bound states independent of the values of the components of the inertial tensor. Additionally, for this same class, the scattering cross section diverges for all nonzero values of dipole moments and inertial moments, similar to solutions for the fixed linear dipole. Additional predictions are presented for electron affinities and rotational resonances of these systems.

  5. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  6. A 90-Kilodalton Endothelial Cell Molecule Mediating Lymphocyte Binding in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    1992-09-01

    Interactions between leukocyte surface receptors and their ligands on vascular endothelial cells control lymphocyte traffic between the blood and various lymphoid organs, as well as extravasation of leukocytes into sites of inflammation. A heretofore undescribed 90-kilodalton human endothelial cell adhesion molecule (VAP-1) defined by a monoclonal antibody 1B2 is described. The expression pattern, molecular mass, functional properties, and an amino-terminal amino acid sequence define VAP-1 as an endothelial ligand for lymphocytes. VAP-1 helps to elucidate the complex heterotypic cell interactions that direct tissue-selective lymphocyte migration in man.

  7. FRET Enabled Real Time Detection of RNA-Small Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yun; Dix, Andrew V.; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    A robust analysis and discovery platform for antibiotics targeting the bacterial rRNA A-site has been developed by incorporating a new emissive U surrogate into the RNA and labeling the aminoglycosides with an appropriate fluorescence acceptor. Specifically, a 5-methoxyquinazoline-2,4(1H,3H)-dione-based emissive uracil analogue was identified to be an ideal donor for 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid. This donor/acceptor pair displays a critical Förster radius (R0) of 27 Å, a value suitable for an A-site-aminoglycoside assembly. Titrating the coumarin labeled aminoglycosides into the emissive A-site construct, labeled at position U1406, shows a decrease in donor emission (at 395 nm) and concurrent increase of the acceptor emission (at 473 nm). Titration curves, obtained by fitting the donor’s emission quenching or the augmentation of the acceptor’s sensitized emission, faithfully generate EC50 values. Titration of unlabeled ligands into the preformed FRET complex showed a continuous increase of the donor emission, with a concurrent decrease of the acceptor emission, yielding valuable data regarding competitive displacement of aminoglycosides by A-site binders. Detection of antibiotic binding is therefore not dependent on changes in the environment of a single fluorophore, but rather on the responsive interaction between two chromophores acting as a FRET pair, facilitating the determination of direct binding and competitive displacement events with FRET accuracy. PMID:19908830

  8. Affibody-mediated retention of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the secretory compartments leads to inhibition of phosphorylation in the kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Erik; Lundberg, Emma; Friedman, Mikaela; Rigamonti, Nicolò; Klausing, Sandra; Nygren, Per-Ake; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with various cancer-related processes and motivates the search for strategies that can selectively block EGFR signalling. In this study, functional knockdown of EGFR was achieved through expression of an affibody construct, (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL, with high affinity for EGFR and extended with the amino acids KDEL to make it resident in the secretory compartments. Expression of (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL resulted in 80% reduction ofthe cell surface level of EGFR, and fluorescent staining for EGFR and the (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL construct showed overlapping intracellular localisation. Immunocapture of EGFR from cell lysates showed that an intracellular complex between EGFR and the affibody construct had been formed, further indicating aspecific interaction between the affibody construct and EGFR. Surface depletion of EGFR led to a dramatic decrease in the amount of kinase domain phosphorylated EGFR, coincident with a significant decrease in the proliferation rate. PMID:19552886

  9. New hopes from old drugs: revisiting DNA-binding small molecules as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Gurova, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Most of the anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs that are broadly and successfully used today are DNA-damaging agents. Targeting of DNA has been proven to cause relatively potent and selective destruction of tumor cells. However, the clinical potential of DNA-damaging agents is limited by the adverse side effects and increased risk of secondary cancers that are consequences of the agents' genotoxicity. In this review, we present evidence that those agents capable of targeting DNA without inducing DNA damage would not be limited in these ways, and may be as potent as DNA-damaging agents in the killing of tumor cells. We use as an example literature data and our own research of the well-known antimalarial drug quinacrine, which binds to DNA without inducing DNA damage, yet modulates a number of cellular pathways that impact tumor cell survival. PMID:20001804

  10. [Calculation of mobility and entropy of the binding of molecules by crystals].

    PubMed

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Finkelstein, A V

    2016-01-01

    A simple method for evaluating a range of molecular movements in crystals has been developed. This estimate is needed to calculate the entropy of binding, in particular in protein-ligand complexes. The estimate is based on experimental data concerning the enthalpy of sublimation and saturated vapor pressure obtained for 15 organic crystals with melting temperatures of 25-80°С. For this set, we calculated the values of the average range and the corresponding average amplitude of molecular movements in crystals that constituted 0.75 ± 0.14 Å and 0.18 ± 0.03 Å, respectively. The entropy of sublimation calculated based on the average range of molecular movements in crystals was well consistent with the experimental data. PMID:27414791

  11. More powerful virus inhibitors from structure-based analysis of HEV71 capsid-binding molecules

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, John A. B.; Kelly, James; Ren, Jingshan; Grimes, Jonathan; Puerstinger, Gerhard; Stonehouse, Nicola; Walter, Thomas S.; Hu, Zhongyu; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuemei; Peng, Wei; Rowlands, David; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (HEV71) epidemics amongst children and infants result mainly in mild symptoms, however, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, infection can be fatal. At present no therapies are available. We have used structural analysis of the complete virus to guide the design of HEV71 inhibitors. Analysis of complexes with four 3-(-4-pyridyl)-2-imidazolidinone derivatives with varying anti-HEV71 activities, pinpointed key structure-activity correlates. We then identified additional potentially beneficial substitutions, developed methods to reliably triage compounds by quantum mechanics-enhanced ligand docking, and synthesized two candidates. Structural analysis and in vitro assays confirmed the predicted binding modes and their ability to block viral infection. One ligand (IC50 = 25 pM) is an order of magnitude more potent than the best previously reported inhibitor, and is also more soluble. Our approach may be useful in the design of effective drugs for enterovirus infections. PMID:24509833

  12. [Calculation of mobility and entropy of the binding of molecules by crystals].

    PubMed

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Finkelstein, A V

    2016-01-01

    A simple method for evaluating a range of molecular movements in crystals has been developed. This estimate is needed to calculate the entropy of binding, in particular in protein-ligand complexes. The estimate is based on experimental data concerning the enthalpy of sublimation and saturated vapor pressure obtained for 15 organic crystals with melting temperatures of 25-80°С. For this set, we calculated the values of the average range and the corresponding average amplitude of molecular movements in crystals that constituted 0.75 ± 0.14 Å and 0.18 ± 0.03 Å, respectively. The entropy of sublimation calculated based on the average range of molecular movements in crystals was well consistent with the experimental data.

  13. Probing Binding and Cellular Activity of Pyrrolidinone and Piperidinone Small Molecules Targeting the Urokinase Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Timmy; Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Li, Liwei; Knabe, William Eric; Wang, Fang; Oh, Kyungsoo; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a cell-surface protein that is part of an intricate web of transient and tight protein interactions that promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Here we evaluate the binding and biological activity of a new class of pyrrolidinone (3) and piperidinone (4) compounds, along with derivatives of previously-identified pyrazole (1) and propylamine (2) compounds. Competition assays revealed that the compounds displaced a fluorescently-labeled peptide (AE147-FAM) with inhibition constant Ki ranging from 6 to 63 μM. Structure-based computational pharmacophore analysis followed by extensive explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations suggested pyrazole-based 1a and piperidinone-based 4 adopt different binding modes, despite their similar two-dimensional structures. In cells, compounds 1b and 1f showed significant inhibition of breast MDA-MB-231 and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell proliferation, but 4b exhibited no cytotoxicity even at concentrations of 100 μM. 1f impaired MDA-MB-231 invasion, adhesion, and migration in a concentration-dependent manner, while 4b inhibited only invasion. 1f inhibited gelatinase (MMP-9) activity in a concentration-dependent manner, while 4b showed no effect suggesting different mechanisms for inhibition of cell invasion. Signaling studies further highlighted these differences, showing that pyrazole compounds completely inhibited ERK phosphorylation and impaired HIF1α and NF-κB signaling, while pyrrolidinone and piperidinone (3 and 4b) had no effect. Annexin V staining suggested that the effect of pyrazole-based 1f on proliferation was due to cell killing through an apoptotic mechanism. PMID:24115356

  14. Activation of protein phosphatase 1 by a small molecule designed to bind to the enzyme's regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Tappan, Erin; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2008-02-01

    The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine-threonine phosphatase that participates ubiquitously in cellular signaling, is controlled by a wide variety of regulatory proteins that interact with PP1 at an allosteric regulatory site that recognizes a "loose" consensus sequence (usually designated as RVXF) found in all such regulatory proteins. Peptides containing the regulatory consensus sequence have been found to recapitulate the binding and PP1 activity modulation of the regulatory proteins, suggesting that it might be possible to design small-molecule surrogates that activate PP1 rather than inhibiting it. This prospect constitutes a largely unexplored way of controlling signaling pathways that could be functionally complementary to the much more extensively explored stratagem of kinase inhibition. Based on these principles, we have designed a microcystin analog that activates PP1. PMID:18291321

  15. Relationship between ST8SIA2, polysialic acid and its binding molecules, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chihiro; Hane, Masaya; Kitajima, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia, PSA) is a unique and functionally important glycan, particularly in vertebrate brains. It is involved in higher brain functions such as learning, memory, and social behaviors. Recently, an association between several genetic variations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ST8SIA2/STX, one of two polysialyltransferase genes in vertebrates, and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), was reported based on candidate gene approaches and genome-wide studies among normal and mental disorder patients. It is of critical importance to determine if the reported mutations and SNPs in ST8SIA2 lead to impairments of the structure and function of polySia, which is the final product of ST8SIA2. To date, however, only a few such forward-directed studies have been conducted. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying polySia-involved brain functions remain unknown, although polySia was shown to have an anti-adhesive effect. In this report, we review the relationships between psychiatric disorders and polySia and/or ST8SIA2, and describe a new function of polySia as a regulator of neurologically active molecules, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dopamine, which are deeply involved in psychiatric disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc.

  16. Relationship between ST8SIA2, polysialic acid and its binding molecules, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chihiro; Hane, Masaya; Kitajima, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia, PSA) is a unique and functionally important glycan, particularly in vertebrate brains. It is involved in higher brain functions such as learning, memory, and social behaviors. Recently, an association between several genetic variations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ST8SIA2/STX, one of two polysialyltransferase genes in vertebrates, and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), was reported based on candidate gene approaches and genome-wide studies among normal and mental disorder patients. It is of critical importance to determine if the reported mutations and SNPs in ST8SIA2 lead to impairments of the structure and function of polySia, which is the final product of ST8SIA2. To date, however, only a few such forward-directed studies have been conducted. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying polySia-involved brain functions remain unknown, although polySia was shown to have an anti-adhesive effect. In this report, we review the relationships between psychiatric disorders and polySia and/or ST8SIA2, and describe a new function of polySia as a regulator of neurologically active molecules, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dopamine, which are deeply involved in psychiatric disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc. PMID:27105834

  17. High-throughput sequencing for the identification of binding molecules from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Buller, Fabian; Steiner, Martina; Scheuermann, Jörg; Mannocci, Luca; Nissen, Ina; Kohler, Manuel; Beisel, Christian; Neri, Dario

    2010-07-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries are large collections of small organic molecules, individually coupled to DNA fragments that serve as amplifiable identification bar codes. The isolation of specific binders requires a quantitative analysis of the distribution of DNA fragments in the library before and after capture on an immobilized target protein of interest. Here, we show how Illumina sequencing can be applied to the analysis of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, yielding over 10 million DNA sequence tags per flow-lane. The technology can be used in a multiplex format, allowing the encoding and subsequent sequencing of multiple selections in the same experiment. The sequence distributions in DNA-encoded chemical library selections were found to be similar to the ones obtained using 454 technology, thus reinforcing the concept that DNA sequencing is an appropriate avenue for the decoding of library selections. The large number of sequences obtained with the Illumina method now enables the study of very large DNA-encoded chemical libraries (>500,000 compounds) and reduces decoding costs.

  18. Targeting Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Cells with a Quadruplex-binding Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratnam, Mekala; Beltran, Monica; Galesa, Katja; Haider, Shozeb M.; Reszka, Anthony P.; Cuenca, Francisco; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Neidle, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are driven by activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Clinical treatment with imatinib targets the kinase domain of KIT, but tumour regrowth occurs as a result of the development of resistant mutations in the kinase active site. An alternative small-molecule approach to GIST therapy is described, in which the KIT gene is directly targeted, and thus kinase resistance may be circumvented. A naphthalene dimiide derivative has been used to demonstrate the concept of dual quadruplex targeting. This compound strongly stabilises both telomeric quadruplex DNA and quadruplex sites in the KIT promoter in vitro. It is shown here that the compound is a potent inducer of growth arrest in a patient-derived GIST cell line at a concentration (ca 1μM) that also results in effective inhibition of telomerase activity and almost complete suppression of KIT mRNA and KIT protein expression. Molecular modelling studies with a telomeric quadruplex have been used to rationalise aspects of the experimental quadruplex melting data. PMID:19469547

  19. Optical Imaging of Ovarian Cancer Using HER-2 Affibody Conjugated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Minati; Zielinski, Rafal; Lyakhov, Ilya; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT), Ultrasound (US), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have been the mainstay of clinical imaging regimens for the detection of ovarian cancer. However, without tumor specific contrast enhancement, these imaging modalities lack specificity and sensitivity in the detection of small primary and disseminated tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Herein, we illustrate a fairly new near infrared (NIR) optical imaging approach developed in our laboratory for the noninvasive detection of ovarian tumors using a HER-2 targeted nanoparticle-based imaging agent in an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer. We used multimodal imaging approaches to detect the disease accurately and rapidly by utilizing a single imaging agent, NIR dye-labeled HER-2 affibody conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles. This agent targets HER-2 receptors, which are overexpressed in ovarian tumors. This chapter outlines materials and methods for the: (1) production of HER-2 targeted nanoparticles; (2) establishment of an orthotopic human ovarian cancer xenograft model; (3) monitoring of tumor growth by bioluminescence imaging; (4) administration of targeted nanoparticles followed by NIR optical imaging for the detection of orthotopic ovarian cancers with targeted accumulation of the nanoparticle imaging probes. PMID:25308269

  20. Increased Autoreactivity of the Complement-Activating Molecule Mannan-Binding Lectin in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Ruseva, Marieta Milkova; Malik, Talat Habib; Hoffmann-Petersen, Ingeborg Torp; Pickering, Matthew Caleb; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure despite intensive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Identification of new drug targets is therefore of paramount importance. The complement system is emerging as a potential new target. The lectin pathway of the complement system, initiated by the carbohydrate-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL), is linked to poor kidney prognosis in diabetes. We hypothesized that MBL activates complement upon binding within the diabetic glomerulus. Methods. We investigated this by comparing complement deposition and activation in kidneys from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and healthy control mice. Results. After 20 weeks of diabetes, glomerular deposition of MBL was significantly increased. Diabetic animals had 2.0-fold higher (95% CI 1.6–2.5) immunofluorescence intensity from anti-MBL antibodies compared with controls (P < 0.001). Diabetes and control groups did not differ in glomerular immunofluorescence intensity obtained by antibodies against complement factors C4, C3, and C9. However, the circulating complement activation product C3a was increased in diabetes as compared to control mice (P = 0.04). Conclusion. 20 weeks of diabetes increased MBL autoreactivity in the kidney and circulating C3a concentration. Together with previous findings, these results indicate direct effects of MBL within the kidney in diabetes. PMID:26977416

  1. The protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPRZ and PTPRG bind to distinct members of the contactin family of neural recognition molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain, Samuel; Watkins, Dara J.

    2010-04-05

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ) are expressed primarily in the nervous system and mediate cell adhesion and signaling events during development. We report here the crystal structures of the carbonic anhydrase-like domains of PTPRZ and PTPRG and show that these domains interact directly with the second and third immunoglobulin repeats of the members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural recognition molecules. Interestingly, these receptors exhibit distinct specificities: PTPRZ binds only to CNTN1, whereas PTPRG interacts with CNTN3, 4, 5, and 6. Furthermore, we present crystal structures of the four N-terminal immunoglobulin repeats of mouse CNTN4 both alone and in complex with the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of mouse PTPRG. In these structures, the N-terminal region of CNTN4 adopts a horseshoe-like conformation found also in CNTN2 and most likely in all CNTNs. This restrained conformation of the second and third immunoglobulin domains creates a binding site that is conserved among CNTN3, 4, 5, and 6. This site contacts a discrete region of PTPRG composed primarily of an extended {beta}-hairpin loop found in both PTPRG and PTPRZ. Overall, these findings implicate PTPRG, PTPRZ and CNTNs as a group of receptors and ligands involved in the manifold recognition events that underlie the construction of neural networks.

  2. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  3. Microplate-Based Assay for Identifying Small Molecules That Bind a Specific Intersubunit Interface within the Assembled HIV-1 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Halambage, Upul D.; Wong, Jason P.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of >30 effective drugs for managing HIV-1 infection, no current therapy is curative, and long-term management is challenging owing to the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants. Identification of drugs against novel HIV-1 targets would expand the current treatment options and help to control resistance. The highly conserved HIV-1 capsid protein represents an attractive target because of its multiple roles in replication of the virus. However, the low antiviral potencies of the reported HIV-1 capsid–targeting inhibitors render them unattractive for therapeutic development. To facilitate the identification of more-potent HIV-1 capsid inhibitors, we developed a scintillation proximity assay to screen for small molecules that target a biologically active and specific intersubunit interface in the HIV-1 capsid. The assay, which is based on competitive displacement of a known capsid-binding small-molecule inhibitor, exhibited a signal-to-noise ratio of >9 and a Z factor of >0.8. In a pilot screen of a chemical library containing 2,400 druglike compounds, we obtained a hit rate of 1.8%. This assay has properties that are suitable for screening large compound libraries to identify novel HIV-1 capsid ligands with antiviral activity. PMID:26077250

  4. Early events of fertilization in sea urchin eggs are sensitive to actin-binding organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jong T; Limatola, Nunzia; Vasilev, Filip; Santella, Luigia

    2014-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that many aspects of the intracellular Ca(2+) increase in fertilized eggs of starfish are significantly influenced by the state of the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, the actin cytoskeleton appeared to play comprehensive roles in modulating cortical granules exocytosis and sperm entry during the early phase of fertilization. In the present communication, we have extended our work to sea urchin which is believed to have bifurcated from the common ancestor in the phylogenetic tree some 500 million years ago. To corroborate our earlier findings in starfish, we have tested how the early events of fertilization in sea urchin eggs are influenced by four different actin-binding drugs that promote either depolymerization or stabilization of actin filaments. We found that all the actin drugs commonly blocked sperm entry in high doses and significantly reduced the speed of the Ca(2+) wave. At low doses, however, cytochalasin B and phalloidin increased the rate of polyspermy. Overall, certain aspects of Ca(2+) signaling in these eggs were in line with the morphological changes induced by the actin drugs. That is, the time interval between the cortical flash and the first Ca(2+) spot at the sperm interaction site (the latent period) was significantly prolonged in the eggs pretreated with cytochalasin B or latrunculin A, whereas the Ca(2+) decay kinetics after the peak was specifically attenuated in the eggs pretreated with jasplakinolide or phalloidin. In addition, the sperm interacting with the eggs pretreated with actin drugs often generated multiple Ca(2+) waves, but tended to fail to enter the egg. Thus, our results indicated that generation of massive Ca(2+) waves is neither indicative of sperm entry nor sufficient for cortical granules exocytosis in the inseminated sea urchin eggs, whereas the structure and functionality of the actin cytoskeleton are the major determining factors in the two processes.

  5. Predictive Models for Halogen-bond Basicity of Binding Sites of Polyfunctional Molecules.

    PubMed

    Glavatskikh, Marta; Madzhidov, Timur; Solov'ev, Vitaly; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    Halogen bonding (XB) strength assesses the ability of an electron-enriched group to be involved in complexes with polarizable electrophilic halogenated or diatomic halogen molecules. Here, we report QSPR models of XB of particular relevance for an efficient screening of large sets of compounds. The basicity is described by pKBI2 , the decimal logarithm of the experimental 1 : 1 (B : I2 ) complexation constant K of organic compounds (B) with diiodine (I2 ) as a reference halogen-bond donor in alkanes at 298 K. Modeling involved ISIDA fragment descriptors, using SVM and MLR methods on a set of 598 organic compounds. Developed models were then challenged to make predictions for an external test set of 11 polyfunctional compounds for which unambiguous assignment of the measured effective complexation constant to specific groups out of the putative acceptor sites is not granted. At this stage, developed models were used to predict pKBI2 of all putative acceptor sites, followed by an estimation of the predicted effective complexation constant using the ChemEqui program. The best consensus models perform well both in cross-validation (root mean squared error RMSE=0.39-0.47 logKBI2 units) and external predictions (RMSE=0.49). The SVM models are implemented on our website (http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html) together with the estimation of their applicability domain and an automatic detection of potential halogen-bond acceptor atoms. PMID:27491792

  6. A small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the HIV-1 envelope and inhibits CD4 receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Fang; Blair, Wade; Wang, Tao; Spicer, Timothy; Guo, Qi; Zhou, Nannan; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, H.-G. Heidi; Rose, Ronald; Yamanaka, Gregory; Robinson, Brett; Li, Chang-Ben; Fridell, Robert; Deminie, Carol; Demers, Gwendeline; Yang, Zheng; Zadjura, Lisa; Meanwell, Nicholas; Colonno, Richard

    2003-01-01

    BMS-378806 is a recently discovered small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entrance to cells. The compound exhibits potent inhibitory activity against a panel of R5-(virus using the CCR5 coreceptor), X4-(virus using the CXCR4 coreceptor), and R5/X4 HIV-1 laboratory and clinical isolates of the B subtype (median EC50 of 0.04 μM) in culture assays. BMS-378806 is selective for HIV-1 and inactive against HIV-2, SIV and a panel of other viruses, and exhibits no significant cytotoxicity in the 14 cell types tested (concentration for 50% reduction of cell growth, >225 μM). Mechanism of action studies demonstrated that BMS-378806 binds to gp120 and inhibits the interactions of the HIV-1 envelope protein to cellular CD4 receptors. Further confirmation that BMS-378806 targets the envelope in infected cells was obtained through the isolation of resistant variants and the mapping of resistance substitutions to the HIV-1 envelope. In particular, two substitutions, M426L and M475I, are situated in the CD4 binding pocket of gp120. Recombinant HIV-1 carrying these two substitutions demonstrated significantly reduced susceptibility to compound inhibition. BMS-378806 displays many favorable pharmacological traits, such as low protein binding, minimal human serum effect on anti-HIV-1 potency, good oral bioavailability in animal species, and a clean safety profile in initial animal toxicology studies. Together, the data show that BMS-378806 is a representative of a new class of HIV inhibitors that has the potential to become a valued addition to our current armamentarium of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:12930892

  7. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions of AgTiO2 nanoparticles with lysozyme and its influence on the binding of lysozyme with drug molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, R.; Rameshkumar, A.; Sivasudha, T.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of lysozyme with AgTiO2 nanoparticles was analyzed by using absorption, fluorescence, time resolved and synchronous fluorescence measurements. In the presence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity of lysozyme was decreased. Static type of binding was confirmed through lifetime and ground state absorption measurements. From the fluorescence quenching data, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.5 × 104 M-1 and 1.03, respectively. From the synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, tryptophan residue in lysozyme was found to have interaction with the nanoparticles. Further, the influence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles on the binding strength of lysozyme with a drug molecule was analyzed through fluorescence quenching methods. The presence of nanoparticles decreases the binding capability of drug with protein. Overall, the observed results will provide basic insights on the utilization of nanoparticles in drug delivery applications.

  8. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions of AgTiO2 nanoparticles with lysozyme and its influence on the binding of lysozyme with drug molecule.

    PubMed

    Revathi, R; Rameshkumar, A; Sivasudha, T

    2016-01-01

    Binding of lysozyme with AgTiO2 nanoparticles was analyzed by using absorption, fluorescence, time resolved and synchronous fluorescence measurements. In the presence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity of lysozyme was decreased. Static type of binding was confirmed through lifetime and ground state absorption measurements. From the fluorescence quenching data, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.5×10(4)M(-1) and 1.03, respectively. From the synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, tryptophan residue in lysozyme was found to have interaction with the nanoparticles. Further, the influence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles on the binding strength of lysozyme with a drug molecule was analyzed through fluorescence quenching methods. The presence of nanoparticles decreases the binding capability of drug with protein. Overall, the observed results will provide basic insights on the utilization of nanoparticles in drug delivery applications.

  9. Affibody-functionalized gold-silica nanoparticles for Raman molecular imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Miao, Zheng; Zavaleta, Cristina; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-03-01

    The affibody functionalization of fluorescent surface-enhanced Raman scattering gold-silica nanoparticles as multimodal contrast agents for molecular imaging specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is reported. This nanoparticle bioconjugate reports EGFR-positive A431 tumors with a signal nearly 35-fold higher than EGFR-negative MDA-435S tumors. The low-level EGFR expression in adjacent healthy tissue is 7-fold lower than in the positive tumors. Validation via competitive inhibition reduces the signal by a factor of six, and independent measurement of EGFR via flow cytometry correlates at R(2) = 0.92. PMID:21302357

  10. Affibody-Functionalized Gold–Silica Nanoparticles for Raman Molecular Imaging of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Miao, Zheng; Zavaleta, Cristina; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2012-01-01

    The affibody functionalization of fluorescent surface-enhanced Raman scattering gold–silica nanoparticles as multimodal contrast agents for molecular imaging specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is reported. This nanoparticle bioconjugate reports EGFR-positive A431 tumors with a signal nearly 35-fold higher than EGFR-negative MDA-435S tumors. The low-level EGFR expression in adjacent healthy tissue is 7-fold lower than in the positive tumors. Validation via competitive inhibition reduces the signal by a factor of six, and independent measurement of EGFR via flow cytometry correlates at R2 = 0.92. PMID:21302357

  11. Hydration properties of ligands and drugs in protein binding sites: tightly-bound, bridging water molecules and their effects and consequences on molecular design strategies.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T

    2013-06-24

    Some water molecules in binding sites are important for intermolecular interactions and stability. The way binding site explicit water molecules are dealt with affects the diversity and nature of designed ligand chemical structures and properties. The strategies commonly employed frequently assume that a gain in binding affinity will be achieved by their targeting or neglect. However, in the present work, 2332 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of hydrated and nonhydrated, drug and nondrug compounds in biomolecular complexes with reported Ki or Kd show that compounds that use tightly bound, bridging water molecules are as potent as those that do not. The distribution of their energies, physicochemical properties, and ligand efficiency indices were compared for statistical significance, and the results were confirmed using 2000 permutation runs. Ligand cases were also split into agonists and antagonists, and crystal structure pairs with differing tightly bound water molecules were also compared. In addition, agonists and antagonists that use tightly bound water bridges are smaller, less lipophilic, and less planar; have deeper ligand efficiency indices; and in general, possess better physicochemical properties for further development. Therefore, tightly bound, bridging water molecules may in some cases be replaced and targeted as a strategy, though sometimes keeping them as bridges may be better from a pharmacodynamic perspective. The results suggest general indications on tightly hydrated and nontightly hydrated compounds in binding sites and practical considerations to adopt a strategy in drug and molecular design when faced with this special type of water molecules. There are also benefits of lower log P and better developability for tightly hydrated compounds, while stronger potency is not always required or beneficial. The hydrated binding site may be one of the many structure conformations available to the receptor, and different ligands will have a

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation at a site highly conserved in the L1 family of cell adhesion molecules abolishes ankyrin binding and increases lateral mobility of neurofascin.

    PubMed

    Garver, T D; Ren, Q; Tuvia, S; Bennett, V

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents evidence that a member of the L1 family of ankyrin-binding cell adhesion molecules is a substrate for protein tyrosine kinase(s) and phosphatase(s), identifies the highly conserved FIGQY tyrosine in the cytoplasmic domain as the principal site of phosphorylation, and demonstrates that phosphorylation of the FIGQY tyrosine abolishes ankyrin-binding activity. Neurofascin expressed in neuroblastoma cells is subject to tyrosine phosphorylation after activation of tyrosine kinases by NGF or bFGF or inactivation of tyrosine phosphatases with vanadate or dephostatin. Furthermore, both neurofascin and the related molecule Nr-CAM are tyrosine phosphorylated in a developmentally regulated pattern in rat brain. The FIGQY sequence is present in the cytoplasmic domains of all members of the L1 family of neural cell adhesion molecules. Phosphorylation of the FIGQY tyrosine abolishes ankyrin binding, as determined by coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous ankyrin and in vitro ankyrin-binding assays. Measurements of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching demonstrate that phosphorylation of the FIGQY tyrosine also increases lateral mobility of neurofascin expressed in neuroblastoma cells to the same extent as removal of the cytoplasmic domain. Ankyrin binding, therefore, appears to regulate the dynamic behavior of neurofascin and is the target for regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation in response to external signals. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation at the FIGQY site represents a highly conserved mechanism, used by the entire class of L1-related cell adhesion molecules, for regulation of ankyrin-dependent connections to the spectrin skeleton.

  13. The role of water molecules in the binding of class I and II peptides to the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Camara-Artigas, Ana; Ortiz-Salmeron, Emilia; Andujar-Sánchez, Montserrrat; Bacarizo, Julio; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of proline-rich motifs with SH3 domains are present in signal transduction and other important cell processes. Analysis of structural and thermodynamic data suggest a relevant role of water molecules in these protein-protein interactions. To determine whether or not the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase shows the same behaviour, the crystal structures of its complexes with two high-affinity synthetic peptides, VSL12 and APP12, which are class I and II peptides, respectively, have been solved. In the class I complexes two water molecules were found at the binding interface that were not present in the class II complexes. The structures suggest a role of these water molecules in facilitating conformational changes in the SH3 domain to allow the binding of the class I or II peptides. In the third binding pocket these changes modify the cation-π and salt-bridge interactions that determine the affinity of the binding. Comparison of the water molecules involved in the binding of the peptides with previous reported hydration spots suggests a different pattern for the SH3 domains of the Src tyrosine kinase family. PMID:27599862

  14. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  15. Thiazole orange as the fluorescent intercalator in a high resolution fid assay for determining DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Tse, W C

    2001-09-01

    The viability of using thiazole orange as an alternative to ethidium bromide in a fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay is explored by profiling the DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity of netropsin. Utilizing a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all possible four base-pair sequences, the method provides a high resolution profile of the DNA binding properties of small molecules in a high throughput format.

  16. S fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bind to primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells but do not induce expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, B; Placzek, M; Doehn, C; Hacker, J; Schmidt, G; Wasenauer, G; Daha, M R; van der Woude, F J; Sack, K

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported an increase of expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 by renal carcinoma cells in response to S fimbriae of Escherichia coli. Now we demonstrate that E. coli expressing S and P fimbriae strongly binds to human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, in primary and simian virus 40-transfected renal tubular epithelial cells S fimbriae do not enhance the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1. PMID:7622256

  17. Isolation of Specific Genomic Regions and Identification of Their Associated Molecules by Engineered DNA-Binding Molecule-Mediated Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (enChIP) Using the CRISPR System and TAL Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hodaka; Fujita, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of genome functions requires identification of molecules (proteins, RNAs, genomic regions, etc.) bound to specific genomic regions of interest in vivo. To perform biochemical and molecular biological analysis of specific genomic regions, we developed engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) to purify genomic regions of interest. In enChIP, specific genomic regions are tagged for biochemical purification using engineered DNA-binding molecules, such as transcription activator-like (TAL) proteins and a catalytically inactive form of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system. enChIP is a comprehensive approach that emphasizes non-biased search using next-generation sequencing (NGS), microarrays, mass spectrometry (MS), and other methods. Moreover, this approach is not restricted to cultured cell lines and can be easily extended to organisms. In this review, we discuss applications of enChIP to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying genome functions. PMID:26370991

  18. Isolation of Specific Genomic Regions and Identification of Their Associated Molecules by Engineered DNA-Binding Molecule-Mediated Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (enChIP) Using the CRISPR System and TAL Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hodaka; Fujita, Toshitsugu

    2015-09-09

    Comprehensive understanding of genome functions requires identification of molecules (proteins, RNAs, genomic regions, etc.) bound to specific genomic regions of interest in vivo. To perform biochemical and molecular biological analysis of specific genomic regions, we developed engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) to purify genomic regions of interest. In enChIP, specific genomic regions are tagged for biochemical purification using engineered DNA-binding molecules, such as transcription activator-like (TAL) proteins and a catalytically inactive form of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system. enChIP is a comprehensive approach that emphasizes non-biased search using next-generation sequencing (NGS), microarrays, mass spectrometry (MS), and other methods. Moreover, this approach is not restricted to cultured cell lines and can be easily extended to organisms. In this review, we discuss applications of enChIP to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying genome functions.

  19. Evidence for a conformational change in a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule occurring in the same pH range where antigen binding is enhanced

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Many class II histocompatibility complex molecules bind antigenic peptides optimally at low pH, consistent with their exposure to antigen in acidic endosomal compartments. While it has been suggested that a partially unfolded state serves as an intermediate involved in peptide binding, very little evidence for such a state has been obtained. In this report, we show that the murine class II molecule IE becomes increasingly less stable to sodium dodecyl sulfate-induced dissociation since the pH is decreased in the same range that enhances antigenic peptide binding. Furthermore, at mildly acidic pH levels, IEk binds the fluorescent dye 1-anilino-naphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), a probe for exposed nonpolar sites in proteins, suggesting that protonation produces a molten globule-like state. The association of IEk with a single high-affinity peptide had only a small effect in these two assays, indicating that the changes that occur are distal to the peptide-binding groove. Circular dichroism analysis shows that a pH shift from neutral to mildly acidic pH causes subtle changes in the environment of aromatic residues but does not grossly disrupt the secondary structure of IEk. We propose a model in which perturbations in interdomain contacts outside the peptide-binding domain of IEk occur at acidic pH, producing a partially unfolded state that facilitates optimal antigen binding. PMID:8551214

  20. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. PMID:27406562

  1. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  2. Label-free optical detection of small-molecule compound microarrays immobilized on solid support using macromolecular scaffolds and subsequent protein binding reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S.; Landry, J. P.; Fei, Y. Y.; Zhu, X. D.; Luo, J. T.; Wang, X. B.; Lam, K. S.

    2009-02-01

    Small-molecule microarrays composed of tens of thousands of distinct synthetic molecules, natural products, and their combinations/modifications provide a high-throughput platform for studying protein-ligand interactions. Immobilization of small molecule compounds on solid supports remains a challenge as widely varied small molecules generally lack unique chemical groups that readily react with singly or even multiply functionalized solid support. We explored two strategies for immobilizing small molecule compounds on epoxy-functionalized glass surface using primary-aminecontaining macromolecular scaffolds: bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amine-modified poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA). Small molecules with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) groups were conjugated to BSA or amine-modified PVA. Small-molecule-BSA conjugates and small-molecule-PVA conjugates were subsequently immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides through amine-epoxy reactions. Using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) scanning microscope as a label-free detector, we performed a comparative study of the effectiveness of BSA and PVA as macromolecular scaffolds for anchoring small molecule compounds in terms of conjugation efficiency, surface immobilization efficiency, effect of the scaffold on end-point and kinetics of subsequent binding reactions with protein probes.

  3. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  4. High-Throughput Screening based Identification of Small Molecule Antagonists of Integrin CD11b/CD18 Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Maiguel, Dony; Brown, Brock T.; Suyama, Eigo; Barth, Constantinos J.; Hedrick, Michael; Vasile, Stefan; Sergienko, Eduard; Schürer, Stephan; Gupta, Vineet

    2010-01-01

    Binding of leukocyte specific integrin CD11b/CD18 to its physiologic ligands is important for the development of normal immune response in vivo. Integrin CD11b/CD18 is also a key cellular effector of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, small molecules selectively inhibiting the function of integrin CD11b/CD18 are currently lacking. We used a newly described cell-based high throughput screening assay to identify a number of highly potent antagonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 from chemical libraries containing >100,000 unique compounds. Computational analyses suggest that the identified compounds cluster into several different chemical classes. A number of the newly identified compounds blocked adhesion of wild-type mouse neutrophils to CD11b/CD18 ligand fibrinogen. Mapping the most active compounds against chemical fingerprints of known antagonists of related integrin CD11a/CD18 shows little structural similarity, suggesting that the newly identified compounds are novel and unique. PMID:20188705

  5. Forces and Dynamics of Glucose and Inhibitor Binding to Sodium Glucose Co-transporter SGLT1 Studied by Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Neundlinger, Isabel; Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Wildling, Linda; Rankl, Christian; Wang, Lai-Xi; Gruber, Hermann J.; Kinne, Rolf K. H.; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy was employed to investigate the dynamics of the sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT1) upon substrate and inhibitor binding on the single molecule level. CHO cells stably expressing rbSGLT1 were probed by using atomic force microscopy tips carrying either thioglucose, 2′-aminoethyl β-d-glucopyranoside, or aminophlorizin. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains of different length and varying end groups were used as tether. Experiments were performed at 10, 25 and 37 °C to address different conformational states of SGLT1. Unbinding forces between ligands and SGLT1 were recorded at different loading rates by changing the retraction velocity, yielding binding probability, width of energy barrier of the binding pocket, and the kinetic off rate constant of the binding reaction. With increasing temperature, width of energy barrier and average life time increased for the interaction of SGLT1 with thioglucose (coupled via acrylamide to a long PEG) but decreased for aminophlorizin binding. The former indicates that in the membrane-bound SGLT1 the pathway to sugar translocation involves several steps with different temperature sensitivity. The latter suggests that also the aglucon binding sites for transport inhibitors have specific, temperature-sensitive conformations. PMID:24962566

  6. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  7. Roles of the six peptide-binding pockets of the HLA-A2 molecule in allorecognition by human cytotoxic T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Matsui, M; Hioe, C E; Frelinger, J A

    1993-01-15

    To evaluate the contribution of the major histocompatibility complex class I pockets to the binding of self-peptides recognized by alloreactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) clones, we have constructed an extensive library of HLA-A2 mutants with different amino acid substitutions in each of the six pockets. When these mutants were tested in cytotoxicity assays with a panel of HLA-A2-specific alloreactive CTL clones, each CTL clone showed a unique pattern of reactivity, implying the different contributions of each pocket to binding individual peptides. We noted that the majority of the mutants in pocket B significantly affect recognition by the CTL clones. Unexpectedly, the mutations influencing allorecognition are found in all other pockets as well. Overall, this study demonstrates that each of the six peptide-binding pockets plays an important and distinct role in binding of self-peptides required for recognition of the HLA-A2 molecule by alloreactive CTLs. PMID:7678462

  8. The optimal binding sites of CH 4 and CO 2 molecules on the metal-organic framework MOF-5: ONIOM calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianwanit, Atchara; Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Vongachariya, Arthit; Selphusit, Nattaya; Ploymeerusmee, Tanawut; Remsungnen, Tawun; Nuntasri, Duangamol; Fritzsche, Siegfried; Hannongbua, Supot

    2008-06-01

    Optimal binding sites and its corresponding binding energies between MOF-5 clusters and small guest molecules, CH 4 and CO 2, were investigated using the ONIOM method with different levels of quantum chemical calculations. The clusters were validated using three different sizes of the MOF-5 clusters, SINGLE, DOUBLE and TRIPLE consisting of (Zn 4O) 2(COOCH 3) 10(COO) 2C 6H 4, (Zn 4O) 3(COOCH 3) 14(COO) 4(C 6H 4) 2 and (Zn 4O) 4(COOCH 3) 18(COO) 6(C 6H 4) 3 units, respectively. Guest molecules were assigned to lie in the configurations parallel ( ∥) and perpendicular ( ⊥) to linker (LINK) and corner (CORN) domains of the clusters. The ONIOM(MP2/6-31G ∗∗:HF/6-31G ∗∗) with the corrections due to the basis set superposition errors was found to be the optimal choice for the investigation of these systems. Strong effects of cluster size were found for the CO 2/MOF-5 complexes, i.e., the SINGLE cluster is sufficient to represent interactions with CH 4, but the interaction with CO 2 requires the TRIPLE model. The optimal binding sites of guest molecules as well as their orientations in the cavity of the MOF-5 are CORN ⊥ for both CH 4 and CO 2 with the corresponding binding energies of -3.64 and -9.27 kJ/mol, respectively.

  9. Dissecting the Influence of Protein Flexibility on the Location and Thermodynamic Profile of Explicit Water Molecules in Protein-Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-13

    Explicit water molecules in the binding site of proteins play a crucial role for protein-ligand association. Recent advances in computer-aided drug discovery methodology allow for an accurate prediction of the localized position and thermodynamic profile of water molecules (i.e., hydration sites) in the binding site. The underlying calculations are based on MD simulations of explicit water molecules in a restrained protein structure. However, the ligand-binding process is typically associated with protein conformational change that influences the position and thermodynamic properties of the hydration site. In this manuscript, we present the developments of two methods to incorporate the influence of protein conformational change on hydration sites either by following the conformational transition step-by-step (method I) or to match the hydration sites of the two transition end states using local coordinate systems (method II). Using these methods, we highlight the difference in the estimated protein desolvation free energy with and without inclusion of protein flexibility. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explicitly studies the influence of protein conformational change on the position and thermodynamic profiles of water molecules and provides methodology to incorporate protein flexibility into the estimation of the desolvation free energy. PMID:27494046

  10. Dissecting the Influence of Protein Flexibility on the Location and Thermodynamic Profile of Explicit Water Molecules in Protein-Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-13

    Explicit water molecules in the binding site of proteins play a crucial role for protein-ligand association. Recent advances in computer-aided drug discovery methodology allow for an accurate prediction of the localized position and thermodynamic profile of water molecules (i.e., hydration sites) in the binding site. The underlying calculations are based on MD simulations of explicit water molecules in a restrained protein structure. However, the ligand-binding process is typically associated with protein conformational change that influences the position and thermodynamic properties of the hydration site. In this manuscript, we present the developments of two methods to incorporate the influence of protein conformational change on hydration sites either by following the conformational transition step-by-step (method I) or to match the hydration sites of the two transition end states using local coordinate systems (method II). Using these methods, we highlight the difference in the estimated protein desolvation free energy with and without inclusion of protein flexibility. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explicitly studies the influence of protein conformational change on the position and thermodynamic profiles of water molecules and provides methodology to incorporate protein flexibility into the estimation of the desolvation free energy.

  11. Structure-activity studies on the fluorescent indicator in a displacement assay for the screening of small molecules binding to RNA.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Shiori; Im, Seongwang; Zhang, Jinhua; Hagihara, Masaki; Murata, Asako; Harada, Yasue; Fukuzumi, Takeo; Wazaki, Takahiro; Sasaoka, Shin-ichi; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2012-08-01

    A series of xanthone and thioxanthone derivatives with aminoalkoxy substituents were synthesized as fluorescent indicators for a displacement assay in the study of small-molecule-RNA interactions. The RNA-binding properties of these molecules were investigated in terms of the improved binding selectivity to the loop region in the RNA secondary structure relative to 2,7-bis(2-aminoethoxy)xanthone (X2S) by fluorimetric titration and displacement assay. An 11-mer double-stranded RNA and a hairpin RNA mimicking the stem loop IIB of Rev response element (RRE) RNA of HIV-1 mRNA were used. The X2S derivatives with longer aminoalkyl substituents showed a higher affinity to the double-stranded RNA than the parent molecule. Introduction of a methyl group on the aminoethoxy moiety of X2S effectively modulated the selectivity to the RNA secondary structure. Methyl group substitution at the C1' position suppressed the binding to the loop regions. Substitution with two methyl groups on the amino nitrogen atom resulted in reducing the affinity to the double-stranded region by a factor of 40%. The effect of methyl substitution on the amino nitrogen atom was also observed for a thioxanthone derivative. Titration experiments, however, suggested that thioxanthone derivatives showed a more prominent tendency of multiple binding to RNA than xanthone derivatives. The selectivity index calculated from the affinity to the double-stranded and loop regions suggested that the N,N-dimethyl derivative of X2S would be suitable for the screening of small molecules binding to RRE.

  12. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding.

    PubMed

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H; Frimurer, Thomas M; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-07-29

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr(184) (Cys + 1) and Tyr(187) (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr(187) in TMIV (Phe(171)) and TMV (Trp(194)). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr(187) This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. PMID:27226537

  13. Demonstration of specific binding of heparin to Plasmodium falciparum-infected vs. non-infected red blood cells by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force ranging between 28 and 46 pN depending on the loading rate. No significant binding of heparin to non-infected RBCs has been observed in control experiments. This work represents the first approach to quantitatively evaluate GAG-pRBC molecular interactions at the individual molecule level.Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force

  14. New measurements of the sticking coefficient and binding energy of molecules on non-porous amorphous solid water in the submonolayer regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Acharyya, Kinsuk; Emtiaz, S. M.; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    Sticking and adsorption of molecules on dust grains are two important processes in gas-grain interactions. We accurately measured both the sticking coefficient and the binding energy of several key molecules on the surface of amorphous solid water as a function of coverage.A time-resolved scattering technique was used to measure sticking coefficient of H2, D2, N2, O2, CO, CH4, and CO2 on non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW) in the low coverage limit over a wide range of surface temperatures. We found that the time-resolved scattering technique is advantageous over the conventional King-Wells method that underestimates the sticking coefficient. Based on the measured values we suggest a useful general formula of the sticking coefficient as a function of grain temperature and molecule-surface binding energy.We measured the binding energy of N2, CO, O2, CH4, and CO2 on np-ASW, and of N2 and CO on porous amorphous solid water (p-ASW). We were able to measure binding energies down to a fraction of 1% of a layer, thus making these measurements more appropriate for astrochemistry than the existing values. We found that CO2 forms clusters on np-ASW surface even at very low coverage; this may help in explaining the segregation of CO2 in ices. The binding energies of N2, CO, O2, and CH4 on np-ASW decrease with coverage in the submonolayer regime. Their values in the low coverage limit are much higher than what is commonly used in gas-grain models. An empirical formula was used to describe the coverage dependence of the binding energies. We used the newly determined binding energy distributions in a simulation of gas-grain chemistry for cold dense clouds and hot core models. We found that owing to the higher value of desorption energy in the sub-monlayer regime a fraction of all these ices stays much longer and to higher temperature on the grain surface compared to the case using single value energies as currently done in astrochemical models.This work was supported in

  15. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif.

  16. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M.; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif. PMID:26399241

  17. Binding dynamics of a monomeric SSB protein to DNA: a single-molecule multi-process approach

    PubMed Central

    Morten, Michael J.; Peregrina, Jose R.; Figueira-Gonzalez, Maria; Ackermann, Katrin; Bode, Bela E.; White, Malcolm F.; Penedo, J. Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs) are ubiquitous across all organisms and are characterized by the presence of an OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide/oligopeptide) binding motif to recognize single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Despite their critical role in genome maintenance, our knowledge about SSB function is limited to proteins containing multiple OB-domains and little is known about single OB-folds interacting with ssDNA. Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (SsoSSB) contains a single OB-fold and being the simplest representative of the SSB-family may serve as a model to understand fundamental aspects of SSB:DNA interactions. Here, we introduce a novel approach based on the competition between Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) and quenching to dissect SsoSSB binding dynamics at single-monomer resolution. We demonstrate that SsoSSB follows a monomer-by-monomer binding mechanism that involves a positive-cooperativity component between adjacent monomers. We found that SsoSSB dynamic behaviour is closer to that of Replication Protein A than to Escherichia coli SSB; a feature that might be inherited from the structural analogies of their DNA-binding domains. We hypothesize that SsoSSB has developed a balance between high-density binding and a highly dynamic interaction with ssDNA to ensure efficient protection of the genome but still allow access to ssDNA during vital cellular processes. PMID:26578575

  18. Mechanism for attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators by small molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Wilkinson, Steven P; Grove, Anne

    2009-07-31

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family control gene expression in a variety of metabolic processes in bacteria and archaea. Hypothetical uricase regulator (HucR), which belongs to the ligand-responsive branch of the MarR family, regulates uricase expression in Deinococcus radiodurans by binding a shared promoter region between uricase and HucR genes. We show here that HucR responds only to urate and, to a lesser extent, to xanthine by attenuated DNA binding, compared to other intermediates of purine degradation. Using molecular-dynamics-guided mutational analysis, we identified the ligand-binding site in HucR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and intrinsic Trp fluorescence have identified W20 from the N-terminal helix and R80 from helix 3, which serves as a scaffold for the DNA recognition helix, as being essential for ligand binding. Using structural data combined with in silico and in vitro analyses, we propose a mechanism for the attenuation of DNA binding in which a conformational change initiated by charge repulsion due to a bound ligand propagates to DNA recognition helices. This mechanism may apply generally to MarR homologs that bind anionic phenolic ligands. PMID:19501097

  19. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  20. MHC class I molecules with Superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Mathew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S J; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2010-04-01

    CD8(+) CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of both TCR and CD8 coreceptor to a single ligand (peptide MHCI [pMHCI]). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers Ag specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to Ag. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. In this study, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by approximately 15-fold results in nonspecific, cognate Ag-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with superenhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTLs in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL Ag specificity.

  1. A small molecule probe induces a conformation in HIV TAR RNA capable of binding drug-like fragments

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Amy; Begley, Darren W.; Lau, Carmen; Varani, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 TAR/Tat interaction is a potentially valuable target for treating HIV infection, but efforts to develop TAR-binding antiviral drugs have not yet yielded a successful candidate for clinical development. In this work, we describe a novel approach towards screening fragments against RNA that uses a chemical probe to target the Tat binding region of TAR. This probe fulfills two critical roles in the screen: by locking the RNA into a conformation capable of binding other fragments, it simultaneously allows the identification of proximal binding fragments by ligand-based NMR. Using this approach, we have discovered six novel TAR-binding fragments, three of which were docked relative to the probe/RNA structure using experimental NMR restraints. The consistent orientations of functional groups in our data-driven docked structures and common electrostatic properties across all fragment leads reveal a surprising level of selectivity by our fragment-sized screening hits. These models further suggest linking strategies for the development of higher affinity lead compounds for the inhibition of the TAR/Tat interaction. PMID:21763501

  2. Structure and DNA-binding properties of the Bacillus subtilis SpoIIIE DNA translocase revealed by single-molecule and electron microscopies

    PubMed Central

    Cattoni, Diego I.; Thakur, Shreyasi; Godefroy, Cedric; Le Gall, Antoine; Lai-Kee-Him, Josephine; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bron, Patrick; Nöllmann, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    SpoIIIE/FtsK are a family of ring-shaped, membrane-anchored, ATP-fuelled motors required to segregate DNA across bacterial membranes. This process is directional and requires that SpoIIIE/FtsK recognize highly skewed octameric sequences (SRS/KOPS for SpoIIIE/FtsK) distributed along the chromosome. Two models have been proposed to explain the mechanism by which SpoIIIE/FtsK interact with DNA. The loading model proposes that SpoIIIE/FtsK oligomerize exclusively on SpoIIIE recognition sequence/orienting polar sequences (SRS/KOPS) to accomplish directional DNA translocation, whereas the target search and activation mechanism proposes that pre-assembled SpoIIIE/FtsK hexamers bind to non-specific DNA, reach SRS/KOPS by diffusion/3d hopping and activate at SRS/KOPS. Here, we employ single-molecule total internal reflection imaging, atomic force and electron microscopies and ensemble biochemical methods to test these predictions and obtain further insight into the SpoIIIE–DNA mechanism of interaction. First, we find that SpoIIIE binds DNA as a homo-hexamer with neither ATP binding nor hydrolysis affecting the binding mechanism or affinity. Second, we show that hexameric SpoIIIE directly binds to double-stranded DNA without requiring the presence of SRS or free DNA ends. Finally, we find that SpoIIIE hexamers can show open and closed conformations in solution, with open-ring conformations most likely resembling a state poised to load to non-specific, double-stranded DNA. These results suggest how SpoIIIE and related ring-shaped motors may be split open to bind topologically closed DNA. PMID:24297254

  3. Additive method for the prediction of protein-peptide binding affinity. Application to the MHC class I molecule HLA-A*0201.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for prediction of binding affinities between proteins and peptides. We exemplify the method through its application to binding predictions of peptides with affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-A*0201. The method is named "additive" because it is based on the assumption that the binding affinity of a peptide could be presented as a sum of the contributions of the amino acids at each position and the interactions between them. The amino acid contributions and the contributions of the interactions between adjacent side chains and every second side chain were derived using a partial least squares (PLS) statistical methodology using a training set of 420 experimental IC50 values. The predictive power of the method was assessed using rigorous cross-validation and using an independent test set of 89 peptides. The mean value of the residuals between the experimental and predicted pIC50 values was 0.508 for this test set. The additive method was implemented in a program for rapid T-cell epitope search. It is universal and can be applied to any peptide-protein interaction where binding data is known. PMID:12645903

  4. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-07-20

    Redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal-oxygen intermediates. Herein we report the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn(2+) ion in (TMC)Fe(III) -(O2 )-Zn(CF3 SO3 )2 (1-Zn(2+) ) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn(2+) ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn(2+) . This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn(2+) in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn(2+) , whereas 1-Zn(2+) coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)Fe(III) -(O2 )-Zn(CF3 SO3 )2 -(OH2 )2 [1-Zn(2+) -(OH2 )2 ], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn(2+) was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)-oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn(2+) -(OH2 )2 . The present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal-oxygen intermediates. PMID:26096281

  5. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-07-20

    Redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal-oxygen intermediates. Herein we report the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn(2+) ion in (TMC)Fe(III) -(O2 )-Zn(CF3 SO3 )2 (1-Zn(2+) ) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn(2+) ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn(2+) . This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn(2+) in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn(2+) , whereas 1-Zn(2+) coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)Fe(III) -(O2 )-Zn(CF3 SO3 )2 -(OH2 )2 [1-Zn(2+) -(OH2 )2 ], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn(2+) was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)-oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn(2+) -(OH2 )2 . The present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal-oxygen intermediates.

  6. Single-molecule binding of CD44 to fibrin versus P-selectin predicts their distinct shear-dependent interactions in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Phrabha S.; Alves, Christina S.; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    P-selectin and fibrin(ogen) have pivotal roles in the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. CD44 variant isoforms, CD44v, have been identified as the major functional P-selectin ligands and fibrin receptors on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. The molecular recognition of CD44v by fibrin mediates firm adhesion at low shear, whereas CD44v–P-selectin binding supports transient rolling interactions at elevated shear stresses and low site densities of P-selectin. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to provide a molecular interpretation for these two distinct adhesion events. The CD44v–P-selectin bond has a longer unstressed equilibrium lifetime, a lower reactive compliance and a higher tensile strength relative to the CD44v–fibrin bond. These intrinsic differences confer the ability to the CD44v–P-selectin pair to mediate binding at higher shear stresses. Increasing the duration of receptor–ligand contact (2–200 milliseconds) did not affect the micromechanical properties of the CD44v–P-selectin bond, but it increased the tensile strength and the depth of the free energy barrier of the CD44v–fibrin bond and decreased its reactive compliance. This bond strengthening at longer interaction times might explain why CD44v binding to immobilized fibrin occurs at low shear. Single-molecule characterization of receptor–ligand binding can predict the shear-dependent adhesive interactions between cells and substrates observed both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21558419

  7. CD23 molecule acts as a galactose-binding lectin in the cell aggregation of EBV-transformed human B-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kijimoto-Ochiai, S; Uede, T

    1995-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell lines, L-KT9 and DH3 cells express CD23 antigen, and grow in a mixture of single and aggregated cells. The CD23 molecule has high amino acid sequence homology with C-type lectin and recently we have shown that the solubilized CD23 molecule can really interact with galactose residues on glycoproteins. In this study, therefore, we tested whether CD23 antigen on the cell surface really acts as a galactose-binding lectin in the aggregation of these cells. The EBV-transformed cells (L-KT9) were separated into an aggregated-cell-rich fraction and a single-cell-rich fraction. Aggregated cells disaggregated after removal of galactose by beta-galactosidase treatment, whereas single cells made large aggregation on sialidase treatment, and this aggregation was inhibited in the presence of asialo-fetuin. On the other hand, naturally aggregated cells become single cells with anti-CD23 monoclonal antibody (mAB) as well as the soluble form of CD23, but not with anti-CD21 mAB. In addition, L-KT9 and DH3 cells bound to asialo-fetuin-coupled Sepharose (ASF-Sepharose) and this binding was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment of cells with anti-CD23, but not with anti-CD21 or other anti-adhesion molecules. From these results, we conclude that the naturally aggregated state of EBV-transformed cells occurs mainly through the interaction of CD23 as a lectin molecule and galactose residues as its ligand.

  8. Ankyrin-binding proteins related to nervous system cell adhesion molecules: candidates to provide transmembrane and intercellular connections in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Q; McLaughlin, T; Bennett, V

    1993-04-01

    A major class of ankyrin-binding glycoproteins have been identified in adult rat brain of 186, 155, and 140 kD that are alternatively spliced products of the same pre-mRNA. Characterization of cDNAs demonstrated that ankyrin-binding glycoproteins (ABGPs) share 72% amino acid sequence identity with chicken neurofascin, a membrane-spanning neural cell adhesion molecule in the Ig super-family expressed in embryonic brain. ABGP polypeptides have the following features consistent with a role as ankyrin-binding proteins in vitro and in vivo: (a) ABGPs and ankyrin associate as pure proteins in a 1:1 molar stoichiometry; (b) the ankyrin-binding site is located in the COOH-terminal 21 kD of ABGP186 which contains the predicted cytoplasmic domain; (c) ABGP186 is expressed at approximately the same levels as ankyrin (15 pmoles/milligram of membrane protein); and (d) ABGP polypeptides are co-expressed with the adult form of ankyrinB late in postnatal development and are colocalized with ankyrinB by immunofluorescence. Similarity in amino acid sequence and conservation of sites of alternative splicing indicate that genes encoding ABGPs and neurofascin share a common ancestor. However, the major differences in developmental expression reported for neurofascin in embryos versus the late postnatal expression of ABGPs suggest that ABGPs and neurofascin represent products of gene duplication events that have subsequently evolved in parallel with distinct roles. The predicted cytoplasmic domains of rat ABGPs and chicken neurofascin are nearly identical to each other and closely related to a group of nervous system cell adhesion molecules with variable extracellular domains, which includes L1, Nr-CAM, and Ng-CAM of vertebrates, and neuroglian of Drosophila. The ankyrin-binding site of rat ABGPs is localized to the C-terminal 200 residues which encompass the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting the hypothesis that ability to associate with ankyrin may be a shared feature of neurofascin and

  9. RecA binding to a single double-stranded DNA molecule: A possible role of DNA conformational fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein–DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson–Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein–DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA–protein interactions. PMID:9770480

  10. RecA binding to a single double-stranded DNA molecule: a possible role of DNA conformational fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Leger, J F; Robert, J; Bourdieu, L; Chatenay, D; Marko, J F

    1998-10-13

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  11. RecA Binding to a Single Double-Stranded DNA Molecule: A Possible Role of DNA Conformational Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-10-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  12. Targeting zinc finger domains with small molecules: solution structure and binding studies of the RanBP2-type zinc finger of RBM5

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Biancamaria; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The RNA Binding Motif protein 5 (RBM5), also known as Luca15 or H37, is a component of prespliceosomal complexes, that regulates the alternative splicing of several mRNAs, such as Fas and caspase-2. The rbm5 gene is located at the 2p21.3 chromosomal region, which is strongly associated with lung cancer and many other cancers. Both increased and decreased levels of RBM5 can play a role in tumor progression. In particular, down-regulation of rbm5 is involved in lung cancer and other cancers upon Ras activation, and, also, represents a molecular signature associated with metastasis in various solid tumors. On the other hand, up-regulation of rbm5 occurs in breast and ovarian cancer. Moreover, RBM5 was also found to be involved in the early stage of the HIV-1 viral cycle, representing a potential target for the treatment of the HIV-1 infection. While the molecular basis for RNA recognition and ubiquitin interaction have been structurally characterized, small molecules binding this ZF domain that may contribute to characterize their activity and to develop potential therapeutic agents have not been yet reported. Via an NMR screening of a fragment library we identified several binders and the complex of the most promising one, named compound 1, with the RBM5 ZF1 was structurally characterized in solution. Interestingly, the binding mechanism reveals that compound 1 occupies the RNA binding pocket and is therefore able to compete with the RNA to bind RBM5 RanBP2-type ZF domain, as indicated by NMR studies. PMID:22162216

  13. Selective binding of chiral molecules of cinchona alkaloid by beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins and organoselenium-bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Li, Li; Zhang, Heng-Yi; Fan, Zhi; Guan, Xu-Dong

    2003-02-01

    The inclusion complexation behavior of chiral members of cinchona alkaloid with beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins (1 and 2) and 6,6(')-trimethylenediseleno-bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin) (3) was assessed by means of fluorescence and 2D-NMR spectroscopy. The spectrofluorometric titrations have been performed in aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.20) at 25.0 degrees C to determine the stability constants of the inclusion complexation of 1-3 with guest molecules (i.e., cinchonine, cinchonidine, quinine, and quinidine) in order to quantitatively investigate the molecular selective binding ability. The stability constants of the resulting complexes of 2 with guest molecules are larger than that of 1. As a result of cooperative binding, the stability constants of inclusion complexation of dimeric beta-cyclodextrin 3 with cinchonidine and cinchonine are higher than that of parent 1 by factor of 4.5 and 2.4, respectively. These results are discussed from the viewpoint of the size-fit and geometric complementary relationship between the host and guest.

  14. Small molecule enoxacin is a cancer-specific growth inhibitor that acts by enhancing TAR RNA-binding protein 2-mediated microRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Melo, Sonia; Villanueva, Alberto; Moutinho, Catia; Davalos, Veronica; Spizzo, Riccardo; Ivan, Cristina; Rossi, Simona; Setien, Fernando; Casanovas, Oriol; Simo-Riudalbas, Laia; Carmona, Javier; Carrere, Jordi; Vidal, August; Aytes, Alvaro; Puertas, Sara; Ropero, Santiago; Kalluri, Raghu; Croce, Carlo M; Calin, George A; Esteller, Manel

    2011-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are critical for many cellular pathways. The disruption of miRNAs and their processing machineries also contributes to the development of human tumors. A common scenario for miRNA expression in carcinogenesis is emerging that shows that impaired miRNA production and/or down-regulation of these transcripts occurs in many neoplasms. Several of these lost miRNAs have tumor-suppressor features, so strategies to restore their expression globally in malignancies would be a welcome addition to the current therapeutic arsenal against cancer. Herein, we show that the small molecule enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone used as an antibacterial compound, enhances the production of miRNAs with tumor suppressor functions by binding to the miRNA biosynthesis protein TAR RNA-binding protein 2 (TRBP). The use of enoxacin in human cell cultures and xenografted, orthotopic, and metastatic mouse models reveals a TRBP-dependent and cancer-specific growth-inhibitory effect of the drug. These results highlight the key role of disrupted miRNA expression patterns in tumorigenesis, and suggest a unique strategy for restoring the distorted microRNAome of cancer cells to a more physiological setting.

  15. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes.

  16. Both common and specialty mushrooms inhibit adhesion molecule expression and in vitro binding of monocytes to human aortic endothelial cells in a pro-inflammatory environment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in the United States as well as globally. Epidemiological studies show that regular fruit and vegetable consumption reduces CVD risk, in part, due to antioxidant activity and immunomodulation since oxidative stress and inflammation are features of atherogenesis. Accumulating evidence also shows that dietary fungi, viz., mushrooms, can protect against chronic disease by altering inflammatory environments such as those associated with CVD although most research has focused on specialty mushrooms. In this study, we tested the ability of both common and specialty mushrooms to inhibit cellular processes associated with CVD. Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated overnight with control media with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) vehicle (1% v/v) or containing DMSO extracts of whole dehydrated mushrooms (0.1 mg/mL), which included Agaricus bisporus (white button and crimini), Lentinula edodes (shiitake), Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster), and Grifola frondosa (maitake). Monolayers were subsequently washed and incubated with medium alone or containing the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β (5 ng/mL) for 6 h to upregulate pro-atherosclerotic adhesion molecules (AM). AM expression was assayed by ELISA and binding of U937 human monocytes pre-loaded with fluorescent dye was determined. Results White button mushrooms consistently reduced (p < 0.05) VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin-1 expression, whereas other test mushrooms significantly modulated AM expression singly, collectively, or combinatorially. All mushrooms, however, significantly reduced binding of monocytes to both quiescent and cytokine-stimulated monolayers. Conclusion These data provide evidence that dietary mushrooms can inhibit cellular processes such as adhesion molecule expression and ultimate binding of monocytes to the endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions, which are associated with CVD. As a result, these findings support

  17. Amino acid substitution at peptide-binding pockets of HLA class I molecules increases risk of severe acute GVHD and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Haagenson, Michael; Spellman, Stephen R.; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Bitan, Menachem; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Gandhi, Manish; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Maiers, Martin; Marino, Susana R.; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Palmer, Jeanne; Prasad, Vinod K.; Reddy, Vijay; Ringden, Olle; Saber, Wael; Santarone, Stella; Schultz, Kirk R.; Setterholm, Michelle; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Turner, E. Victoria; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    HLA disparity has a negative impact on the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied the independent impact of amino acid substitution (AAS) at peptide-binding positions 9, 99, 116, and 156, and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor binding position 77 of HLA-A, B, or C, on the risks for grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, treatment-related mortality (TRM), relapse, and overall survival. In multivariate analysis, a mismatch at HLA-C position 116 was associated with increased risk for severe acute GVHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15-1.82, P = .0016). Mismatch at HLA-C position 99 was associated with increased transplant-related mortality (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.1-1.69, P = .0038). Mismatch at HLA-B position 9 was associated with increased chronic GVHD (HR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.36-3.82, P = .0018). No AAS were significantly associated with outcome at HLA-A. Specific AAS pair combinations with a frequency >30 were tested for association with HCT outcomes. Cysteine to tyrosine substitution at position 99 of HLA-C was associated with increased TRM (HR = 1.78, 95% = CI 1.27-2.51, P = .0009). These results demonstrate that donor-recipient mismatch for certain peptide-binding residues of the HLA class I molecule is associated with increased risk for acute and chronic GVHD and death. PMID:23982174

  18. Mutation analysis of the short cytoplasmic domain of the cell-cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1 identifies residues that orchestrate actin binding and lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Charng-Jui; Kirshner, Julia; Sherman, Mark A; Hu, Weidong; Nguyen, Tung; Shively, John E

    2007-02-23

    CEACAM1-4S (carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1, with 4 ectodomains and a short, 12-14 amino acid cytoplasmic domain) mediates lumen formation via an apoptotic and cytoskeletal reorganization mechanism when mammary epithelial cells are grown in a three-dimensional model of mammary morphogenesis. We show by quantitative yeast two-hybrid, BIAcore, NMR HSQC and STD, and confocal analyses that amino acids phenylalanine (Phe(454)) and lysine (Lys(456)) are key residues that interact with actin orchestrating the cytoskeletal reorganization. A CEACAM1 membrane model based on vitamin D-binding protein that predicts an interaction of Phe(454) at subdomain 3 of actin was supported by inhibition of binding of actin to vitamin D-binding protein by the cytoplasmic domain peptide. We also show that residues Thr(457) and/or Ser(459) are phosphorylated in CEACAM1-transfected cells grown in three-dimensional culture and that mutation analysis of these residues (T457A/S459A) or F454A blocks lumen formation. These studies demonstrate that a short cytoplasmic domain membrane receptor can directly mediate substantial intracellular signaling.

  19. Fate of methanol molecule sandwiched between hydrogen-terminated diamond-like carbon films by tribochemical reactions: tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Sato, Seiichiro; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Shimazaki, Tomomi; Adachi, Koshi; Martin, Jean-Michel; Kubo, Momoji

    2012-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to diamond-like carbon (DLC) as a solid-state lubricant, because it exhibits high resistance to wear, low friction and low abrasion. Experimentally it is reported that gas environments are very important for improving the tribological characteristics of DLC films. Recently one of the authors in the present paper, J.-M. Martin, experimentally observed that the low friction of DLC films is realized under alcohol environments. In the present paper, we aim to clarify the low-friction mechanism of the DLC films under methanol environments by using our tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method. We constructed the simulation model in which one methanol molecule is sandwiched between two hydrogen-terminated DLC films. Then, we performed sliding simulations of the DLC films. We observed the chemical reaction of the methanol molecule under sliding conditions. The methanol molecule decomposed and then OH-termination of the DLC was realized and the CH3 species was incorporated into the DLC film. We already reported that the OH-terminated DLC film is very effective to achieve good low-friction properties under high pressure conditions, compared to H-terminated DLC films. Here, we suggest that methanol environments are very effective to realize the OH-termination of DLC films which leads to the good low-friction properties. PMID:23285626

  20. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA) binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Liu, Song; Kim, Kwang-Min; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn) for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA), a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 μg/mL (250 μM). Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia. PMID:25709405

  1. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras.

  2. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)–Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-01-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. Herein we report the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. The present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. PMID:26096281

  3. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.

  4. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinatingmore » two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.« less

  5. Molecular composition of the node of Ranvier: identification of ankyrin- binding cell adhesion molecules neurofascin (mucin+/third FNIII domain- ) and NrCAM at nodal axon segments

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Neurofascin, NrCAM, L1, and NgCAM are a family of Ig/FNIII cell adhesion molecules that share ankyrin-binding activity in their cytoplasmic domains, and are candidates to form membrane-spanning complexes with members of the ankyrin family of spectrin-binding proteins in a variety of cellular contexts in the nervous system. Specialized forms of ankyrin, 270 kD and/or 480 kD ankyrinG are components of the membrane undercoat of axons at the node of Ranvier. This paper focuses on definition of the isoforms of ankyrin-binding cell adhesion molecules localized with ankyrinG at the nodal axon segment. The exon usage of two major forms of neurofascin was determined by isolation of full-length cDNAs and used to prepare isoform-specific antibodies. An isoform of neurofascin containing a mucin-like domain and lacking the third FNIII domain was concentrated at axon initial segments and colocalized at nodes of Ranvier with ankyrinG and the voltage-dependent sodium channel. An alternative form of neurofascin lacking the mucin-like domain and containing the third FNIII domain was present in unmyelinated axons. The antibody initially raised against neurofascin was used to screen a rat brain cDNA expression library. In addition to neurofascin, this screen yielded a clone with 80% sequence identity to NrCAM from chicken. The sequences of two full-length cDNAs are presented. NrCAM is most closely related to neurofascin among the other members of the L1/neurofascin/NgCAM family, with over 70% identity between cytoplasmic domains. NrCAM, visualized with antibodies specific for the ecto-domain, also was found to be coexpressed with neurofascin at nodes of Ranvier and at axon initial segments. This is the first characterization of defined neuronal cell adhesion molecules localized to axonal membranes at the node of Ranvier of myelinated axons. PMID:8947556

  6. Homotropic effects in aspartate transcarbamoylase. What happens when the enzyme binds a single molecule of the bisubstrate analog N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate?

    PubMed

    Foote, J; Schachman, H K

    1985-11-01

    The active sites of aspartate transcarbamoylase from Escherichia coli were titrated by measuring the decrease in the enzyme-catalyzed arsenolysis of N-carbamoyl-L-aspartate caused by the addition of the tight-binding inhibitor, N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. Because the enzyme is a poor catalyst for this non-physiological reaction, high concentrations are required for the assays (more than 1000-fold the dissociation constant of the reversibly bound inhibitor) and, therefore, virtually all of the bisubstrate analog is bound. From the endpoint of the titration, 5.7 active sites were calculated, in excellent agreement with the number, six, based on the structure of the enzyme. Simple inhibition was observed only when the molar ratio of inhibitor to enzyme exceeded five; under these conditions, as shown in earlier physical chemical studies, the R-conformational state of the enzyme is the sole or predominant species. At low ratios of inhibitor to enzyme, the addition of inhibitor caused an increase in activity which is attributable to the conversion of the enzyme from the low-activity T-state to the much more active R-state. Comparison of the linear increase in activity as a function of inhibitor concentration at the low molar ratio (0.01, i.e. 1 inhibitor/600 active sites) with the activity lost at the high ratio provided a direct value for the mean number of active sites converted from the T-state to the R-state as a result of the binding of one bisubstrate analog to an enzyme molecule. This number was four with Mg X ATP or carbamoyl phosphate present and 4.7 for the enzyme in the presence of Mg X PPi, values approaching or identical to the theoretical maximum, 4.7, for a concerted transition with all of the active sites of the molecule changing from the T- to R-state upon the formation of a binary complex of hexameric enzyme with a single inhibitor. With the enzyme in the absence of effectors or with Mg X CTP present, the titrations showed that an average of two and

  7. [Assessment of Binding Properties of Actinomycin and Its Derivatives with DNA Molecule Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation Method].

    PubMed

    Volokh, O I; Bozdaganyan, M E; Shaitan, K V

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation method was used to assess an influence of actinomycins (antibiotics used in chemotherapy for treatment of some oncology diseases) on DNA fragment elasticity. Also the efficiency of binding of actinomycin to DNA fragment was estimated. Energetic contributions of different substitutions of hydroxyl and amino-group to the phenoxazine ring of actinomycin were studied to analyze dynamic behavior and stability of antibiotic-DNA fragment complexes. Young modulus values were calculated for structures: DNA/DNA-actinomycin/DNA-7-hydroxyactinomycin/DNA-7-aminoactinomycin. Free energy calculations were performed for the formation of actinomycin- and two actinomycin analogues-DNA fragment complexes. Our results suggest that the inserted substitutions stabilize the structure of a DNA fragment via the formation of additional hydrogen bonds.

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of CD4-gp120 binding based on virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Elban, Mark A.; Courter, Joel R.; Sugawara, Akihiro; Soeta, Takahiro; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D.; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Smith, Amos B.

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight compound JRC-II-191 inhibits infection of HIV-1 by blocking the binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and is therefore an important lead in the development of a potent viral entry inhibitor. Reported here is the use of two orthogonal screening methods, GOLD docking and ROCS shape-based similarity searching, to identify amine-building blocks that, when conjugated to the core scaffold, yield novel analogues that maintain similar affinity for gp120. Use of this computational approach to expand SAR produced analogues of equal inhibitory activity but with diverse capacity to enhance viral infection. The novel analogues provide additional lead scaffolds for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that employ protein-ligand interactions in the vestibule of gp120 Phe 43 cavity. PMID:21169023

  9. The binding energies of one and two water molecules to the first transition-row metal positive ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosi, Marzio; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The bonding of water to the transition metal positive ions is electrostatic in origin. The electrostatic bonding is enhanced by a variety of mechanisms: mixing in 4p character, 4s-3d hybridization, and 4s promotion into the compact 3d orbital. The importance of these effects varies between the different metal ions due to changes in the separation of the metal ion atomic states. Furthermore, the change in the metal-water repulsion when a second water is added also changes the relative importance of the different metal asymptotes. The second water binding energy varies from being 11 kcal/mol smaller than the first for Mn(+) to 3 kcal/mol larger for V(+) and Fe(+).

  10. Spectroscopic investigation of the binding interactions of a membrane potential molecule in various supramolecular confined environments: contrasting behavior of surfactant molecules in relocation or release of the probe between nanocarriers and DNA surface.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surajit; Banik, Debasis; Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-12-01

    The fluorescence and optical properties of membrane potential probes are widely used to measure cellular transmembrane potentials. Hemicyanine dyes are also able to bind to membranes. The spectral properties of these molecules depend upon the charge shift from the donor moiety to the acceptor moiety. Changes in their spectral properties, i.e. absorption and emission maxima or intensities, are helpful in characterizing model membranes, microheterogeneous media, etc. In this article, we have demonstrated the binding interaction of a membrane potential probe, 1-ethyl-2-(4-(p-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium perchlorate (LDS 698), with various supramolecular confined environments. The larger dipole moment in the ground state compared to the excited state is a unique feature of hemicyanine dyes. Due to this unique feature, red shifts in the absorption maxima are observed in hydrophobic environments, compared with bulk solvent. On addition of surfactants and CT DNA to an aqueous solution containing LDS 698, significant increase in the emission intensity along with the quantum yield and lifetime indicate partition of the probe molecules into organized assemblies. In the case of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-water system, due to interactions between the cationic LDS 698 and the anionic dodecyl sulfate moiety, the fluorescence intensity at ∼666 nm decreases and an additional peak at ∼590 nm appears at premicellar concentration (∼0.20 mM-4.50 mM). But at ∼5.50 mM SDS concentration, the absorbance in the higher wavelength region increases again, indicating encapsulation of the probe in micellar aggregates. This observation indicates that the premicellar aggregation behavior of SDS can also be judged by observing the changes in the UV-vis and fluorescence spectral patterns. The temperature dependent study also indicates that non-radiative deactivation of the dye molecules is highly restricted in the DNA micro-environment, compared with micelles

  11. Single-molecule analysis reveals human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) dimerizes on DNA via multiple kinetic intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ghodke, Harshad; Wang, Hong; Hsieh, Ching L.; Woldemeskel, Selamawit; Watkins, Simon C.; Rapić-Otrin, Vesna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2014-01-01

    How human DNA repair proteins survey the genome for UV-induced photoproducts remains a poorly understood aspect of the initial damage recognition step in nucleotide excision repair (NER). To understand this process, we performed single-molecule experiments, which revealed that the human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) performs a 3D search mechanism and displays a remarkable heterogeneity in the kinetics of damage recognition. Our results indicate that UV-DDB examines sites on DNA in discrete steps before forming long-lived, nonmotile UV-DDB dimers (DDB1-DDB2)2 at sites of damage. Analysis of the rates of dissociation for the transient binding molecules on both undamaged and damaged DNA show multiple dwell times over three orders of magnitude: 0.3–0.8, 8.1, and 113–126 s. These intermediate states are believed to represent discrete UV-DDB conformers on the trajectory to stable damage detection. DNA damage promoted the formation of highly stable dimers lasting for at least 15 min. The xeroderma pigmentosum group E (XP-E) causing K244E mutant of DDB2 found in patient XP82TO, supported UV-DDB dimerization but was found to slide on DNA and failed to stably engage lesions. These findings provide molecular insight into the loss of damage discrimination observed in this XP-E patient. This study proposes that UV-DDB recognizes lesions via multiple kinetic intermediates, through a conformational proofreading mechanism. PMID:24760829

  12. Cross-strand binding of TFAM to a single mtDNA molecule forms the mitochondrial nucleoid.

    PubMed

    Kukat, Christian; Davies, Karen M; Wurm, Christian A; Spåhr, Henrik; Bonekamp, Nina A; Kühl, Inge; Joos, Friederike; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Park, Chan Bae; Posse, Viktor; Falkenberg, Maria; Jakobs, Stefan; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packaged by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) into mitochondrial nucleoids that are of key importance in controlling the transmission and expression of mtDNA. Nucleoid ultrastructure is poorly defined, and therefore we used a combination of biochemistry, superresolution microscopy, and electron microscopy to show that mitochondrial nucleoids have an irregular ellipsoidal shape and typically contain a single copy of mtDNA. Rotary shadowing electron microscopy revealed that nucleoid formation in vitro is a multistep process initiated by TFAM aggregation and cross-strand binding. Superresolution microscopy of cultivated cells showed that increased mtDNA copy number increases nucleoid numbers without altering their sizes. Electron cryo-tomography visualized nucleoids at high resolution in isolated mammalian mitochondria and confirmed the sizes observed by superresolution microscopy of cell lines. We conclude that the fundamental organizational unit of the mitochondrial nucleoid is a single copy of mtDNA compacted by TFAM, and we suggest a packaging mechanism.

  13. Influence of Ionic Liquids on Thermodynamics of Small Molecule-DNA Interaction: The Binding of Ethidium Bromide to Calf Thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arpit; Ekka, Mary Krishna; Maiti, Souvik

    2016-03-17

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are salts with poor ionic coordination, resultantly remaining in liquid state below 100 °C and some may retain liquid state even at room temperature. ILs are known to provide a conducive environment for many biological enzymatic reactions, but their interaction with biomacromolecules are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigate the effect of various ionic liquids on DNA-small molecule interaction using calf thymus DNA (ctDNA)-ethidium bromide (EB) as a model system. The effect of various ionic liquids on these interactions is studied by an array of techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), UV melting, fluorescence exclusion and isothermal titration calorimetry. Interestingly, we observed that presence of IL increased the stability of ctDNA without altering its structure. The binding affinities Kbs for EB binding to ctDNA in the presence of 300 mM ILs are about half order of magnitude smaller than the Kbs in absence of ILs and correspond to a less favorable free energy. We noted that, when adjusted to corresponding buffer condition, the unfavorable shift in ΔG of ctDNA-EB interaction is attributed to decreased entropy in the case of ILs, whereas the same effect by NaCl was due to increased enthalpy. PMID:26907668

  14. Structure-Based Small Molecule Modulation of a Pre-Amyloid State: Pharmacological Enhancement of IAPP Membrane-Binding and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Abhinav; Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Miranker, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is a peptide hormone whose pathological self-assembly is a hallmark of the progression of type II diabetes. IAPP–membrane interactions catalyze its higher-order self-assembly and also underlie its toxic effects toward cells. While there is great interest in developing small molecule reagents capable of altering the structure and behavior of oligomeric, membrane-bound IAPP, the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of this ensemble makes it recalcitrant to traditional approaches. Here, we build on recent insights into the nature of membrane-bound states and develop a combined computational and experimental strategy to address this problem. The generalized structural approach efficiently identified diverse compounds from large commercial libraries with previously unrecognized activities toward the gain-of-function behaviors of IAPP. The use of appropriate computational prescreening reduced the experimental burden by orders of magnitude relative to unbiased high-throughput screening. We found that rationally targeting experimentally derived models of membrane-bound dimers identified several compounds that demonstrate the remarkable ability to enhance IAPP–membrane binding and one compound that enhances IAPP-mediated cytotoxicity. Taken together, these findings imply that membrane binding per se is insufficient to generate cytotoxicity; instead, enhanced sampling of rare states within the membrane-bound ensemble may potentiate IAPP’s toxic effects. PMID:25966003

  15. Human L-ficolin, a recognition molecule of the lectin activation pathway of complement, activates complement by binding to pneumolysin, the major toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Youssif M; Kenawy, Hany I; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B; Andrew, Peter W; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q(-/-) mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum.

  16. Scorpionate-type coordination in MFU-4l metal-organic frameworks: small-molecule binding and activation upon the thermally activated formation of open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Grzywa, Maciej; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Postsynthetic metal and ligand exchange is a versatile approach towards functionalized MFU-4l frameworks. Upon thermal treatment of MFU-4l formates, coordinatively strongly unsaturated metal centers, such as zinc(II) hydride or copper(I) species, are generated selectively. Cu(I)-MFU-4l prepared in this way was stable under ambient conditions and showed fully reversible chemisorption of small molecules, such as O2, N2, and H2, with corresponding isosteric heats of adsorption of 53, 42, and 32 kJ mol(-1), respectively, as determined by gas-sorption measurements and confirmed by DFT calculations. Moreover, Cu(I)-MFU-4l formed stable complexes with C2H4 and CO. These complexes were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. The demonstrated hydride transfer to electrophiles and strong binding of small gas molecules suggests these novel, yet robust, metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites as promising catalytic materials comprising earth-abundant metal elements.

  17. Binding of higher alcohols onto Mn(12) single-molecule magnets (SMMs): access to the highest barrier Mn(12) SMM.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Redler, Gage; Data, Saiti; Abboud, Khalil A; Hill, Stephen; Christou, George

    2010-02-15

    Two new members of the Mn(12) family of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CCH(2)Bu(t))(16)(Bu(t)OH)(H(2)O)(3)].2Bu(t)OH (3.2Bu(t)OH) and [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CCH(2)Bu(t))(16)(C(5)H(11)OH)(4)] (4) (C(5)H(11)OH is 1-pentanol), are reported. They were synthesized from [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CMe)(16)(H(2)O)(4)].2MeCO(2)H.4H(2)O (1) by carboxylate substitution and crystallization from the appropriate alcohol-containing solvent. Complexes 3 and 4 are new members of the recently established [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CCH(2)Bu(t))(16)(solv)(4)] (solv = H(2)O, alcohols) family of SMMs. Only one bulky Bu(t)OH can be accommodated into 3, and even this causes significant distortion of the [Mn(12)O(12)] core. Variable-temperature, solid-state alternating current (AC) magnetization studies were carried out on complexes 3 and 4, and they established that both possess an S = 10 ground state spin and are SMMs. However, the magnetic behavior of the two compounds was found to be significantly different, with 4 showing out-of-phase AC peaks at higher temperatures than 3. High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) studies were carried out on single crystals of 3.2Bu(t)OH and 4, and these revealed that the axial zero-field splitting constant, D, is very different for the two compounds. Furthermore, it was established that 4 is the Mn(12) SMM with the highest kinetic barrier (U(eff)) to date. The results reveal alcohol substitution as an additional and convenient means to affect the magnetization relaxation barrier of the Mn(12) SMMs without major change to the ligation or oxidation state.

  18. Structure-function study of the amino-terminal stretch of the catalase subunit molecule in oligomerization, heme binding, and activity expression.

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Kinoshita, H; Maeda, S-I; Zou, W; Tanaka, A

    2003-06-01

    Analysis of the protein structure of bovine liver catalase suggested that the N-terminal region containing two alpha-helices may function as a linker binding to another subunit. The number of amino-acid residues in catalase from the n-alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis (CTC) is the lowest of any eukaryotic catalase molecule hitherto investigated, and only one helix, corresponding to the helix alpha2 in bovine liver catalase, is estimated to be present in the same region. In the present study, N-terminal-deleted mutants of CTC were characterized to evaluate the role of the alpha-helix structure in the N-terminal region. CTCDelta1-4 and CTCDelta1-24, whose N-terminal regions were shortened by four and 24 amino-acid residues, respectively, showed an 80% decrease in specific activity compared to wild-type CTC in spite of containing the same amount of heme as in the wild-type. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions revealed that the mutants contained large amounts of oligomeric forms with molecular masses less than 220 kDa (tetramer assembly). Although the smaller oligomers were found to be bound with heme, only the tetramer exhibited catalase activity in activity staining on nondenaturing gel. CTCDelta1-49, a mutant with deletion of the N-terminal 49 amino-acid residues which contain the conserved helix alpha2, showed no catalase activity and no heme binding. However, the CD spectrum profiles of CTCDelta1-49, CTCDelta1-4, and CTCDelta1-24 indicated that these mutant subunits could attain secondary conformations similar to that of wild-type CTC, regardless of their binding with heme. From these results, it was concluded that the N-terminal stretch of catalase is significant for complete assembly into active tetramer and that the conserved helix alpha2, although it has little effect on the formation of the subunit secondary structure, is indispensable not only in assembling tetramer but also in binding heme. PMID:12764563

  19. Binding of the repressor complex REST-mSIN3b by small molecules restores neuronal gene transcription in Huntington's disease models.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Paola; Zuccato, Chiara; Gaudenzi, Germano; Ieraci, Alessandro; Camnasio, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Mutti, Cesare; Cotelli, Franco; Contini, Alessandro; Cattaneo, Elena

    2013-10-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is a hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD) and one cause of this dysregulation is enhanced activity of the REST-mSIN3a-mSIN3b-CoREST-HDAC repressor complex, which silences transcription through REST binding to the RE1/NRSE silencer. Normally, huntingtin (HTT) prevents this binding, allowing expressing of REST target genes. Here, we aimed to identify HTT mimetics that disrupt REST complex formation in HD. From a structure-based virtual screening of 7 million molecules, we selected 94 compounds predicted to interfere with REST complex formation by targeting the PAH1 domain of mSIN3b. Primary screening using DiaNRSELuc8 cells revealed two classes of compounds causing a greater than two-fold increase in luciferase. In particular, quinolone-like compound 91 (C91) at a non-toxic nanomolar concentration reduced mSIN3b nuclear entry and occupancy at the RE1/NRSE within the Bdnf locus, and restored brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in HD cells. The mRNA levels of other RE1/NRSE-regulated genes were similarly increased while non-REST-regulated genes were unaffected. C91 stimulated REST-regulated gene expression in HTT-knockdown Zebrafish and increased BDNF mRNA in the presence of mutant HTT. Thus, a combination of virtual screening and biological approaches can lead to compounds reducing REST complex formation, which may be useful in HD and in other pathological conditions. PMID:23800350

  20. Predicting promiscuous antigenic T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mymA operon proteins binding to MHC Class I and Class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Saraav, Iti; Pandey, Kirti; Sharma, Monika; Singh, Swati; Dutta, Prasun; Bhardwaj, Anshu; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-10-01

    Limited efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine has raised the need to explore other immunogenic candidates to develop an effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play a critical role in host immunity to Mtb. Infection of macrophages with Mtb results in upregulation of mymA operon genes thereby suggesting their importance as immune targets. In the present study, after exclusion of self-peptides mymA operon proteins of Mtb were analyzed in silico for the presence of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I and Class II binding peptides using Bioinformatics and molecular analysis section, NetMHC 3.4, ProPred and Immune epitope database software. Out of 56 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 41 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic for MHC Class I. In MHC Class II, out of 336 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 142 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic. The comparative bioinformatics analysis of mymA operon proteins found Rv3083 to be the best vaccine candidate. Molecular docking was performed with the most antigenic peptides of Rv3083 (LASGAASVV with alleles HLA-B51:01, HAATSGTLI with HLA-A02, IVTATGLNI and EKIHYGLKVNTA with HLA-DRB1_01:01) to study the structural basis for recognition of peptides by various HLA molecules. The software binding prediction was validated by the obtained molecular docking score of peptide-HLA complex. These peptides can be further investigated for their immunological relevance in patients of tuberculosis using major histocompatibility complex tetramer approach. PMID:27389362

  1. Breast cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for intercellular adhesion molecule 1-mediated binding to the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Abhishek; Friedrichs, Jens; Bonin, Malte von; Bejestani, Elham Peshali; Werner, Carsten; Wobus, Manja; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Adhesion-based cellular interactions involved in breast cancer metastasis to the bone marrow remain elusive. We identified that breast cancer cells directly compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for retention in the bone marrow microenvironment. To this end, we established two models of competitive cell adhesion-simultaneous and sequential-to study a potential competition for homing to the niche and displacement of the endogenous HSPCs upon invasion by tumor cells. In both models, breast cancer cells but not non-tumorigenic cells competitively reduced adhesion of HSPCs to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a tumor cell number-dependent manner. Higher adhesive force between breast cancer cells and MSCs, as compared with HSPCs, assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy could partially account for tumor cell mediated reduction in HSPC adhesion to MSCs. Genetic inactivation and blockade studies revealed that homophilic interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expressed on tumor cells and MSCs, respectively, regulate the competition between tumor cells and HSPCs for binding to MSCs. Moreover, tumor cell-secreted soluble ICAM-1(sICAM-1) also impaired HSPC adhesion via blocking CD18-ICAM-1 binding between HSPCs and MSCs. Xenotransplantation studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice revealed reduction of human HSPCs in the bone marrow via metastatic breast cancer cells. These findings point to a direct competitive interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and HSPCs within the bone marrow micro environment. This interaction might also have implications on niche-based tumor support. Therefore, targeting this cross talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:27207667

  2. Proton-bound dimers of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules: Substituent effects on the structures and binding energies of homodimers of diazine, triazine, and fluoropyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attah, Isaac K.; Platt, Sean P.; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; El-Shall, M. S.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.

    2014-03-01

    The bonding energies of proton-bound homodimers BH+B were measured by ion mobility equilibrium studies and calculated at the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G** level, for a series of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules (B) with electron-withdrawing in-ring N and on-ring F substituents. The binding energies (ΔH°dissoc) of the proton-bound dimers (BH+B) vary significantly, from 29.7 to 18.1 kcal/mol, decreasing linearly with decreasing the proton affinity of the monomer (B). This trend differs significantly from the constant binding energies of most homodimers of other organic nitrogen and oxygen bases. The experimentally measured ΔH°dissoc for (1,3-diazine)2H+, i.e., (pyrimidine)2H+ and (3-F-pyridine)2H+ are 22.7 and 23.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The measured ΔH°dissoc for the pyrimidine.+(3-F-pyridine) radical cation dimer (19.2 kcal/mol) is signifcantly lower than that of the proton-bound homodimers of pyrimidine and 3-F-pyridine, reflecting the stronger interaction in the ionic H-bond of the protonated dimers. The calculated binding energies for (1,2-diazine)2H+, (pyridine)2H+, (2-F-pyridine)2H+, (3-F-pyridine)2H+, (2,6-di-F-pyridine)2H+, (4-F-pyridine)2H+, (1,3-diazine)2H+, (1,4-diazine)2H+, (1,3,5-triazine)2H+, and (pentafluoropyridine)2H+ are 29.7, 24.9, 24.8, 23.3, 23.2, 23.0, 22.4, 21.9, 19.3, and 18.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The electron-withdrawing substituents form internal dipoles whose electrostatic interactions contribute to both the decreased proton affinities of (B) and the decreased binding energies of the protonated dimers BH+B. The bonding energies also vary with rotation about the hydrogen bond, and they decrease in rotamers where the internal dipoles of the components are aligned efficiently for inter-ring repulsion. For compounds substituted at the 3 or 4 (meta or para) positions, the lowest energy rotamers are T-shaped with the planes of the two rings rotated by 90° about the hydrogen bond, while the planar rotamers are weakened by repulsion between the

  3. Investigating the impacts of DNA binding mode and sequence on thermodynamic quantities and water exchange values for two small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Rachael M; Buxton, Katherine E; Glazier, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    Doxorubicin and nogalamycin are antitumor antibiotics that interact with DNA via intercalation and threading mechanisms, respectively. Because the importance of water, particularly its impact on entropy changes, has been established in other biological processes, we investigated the role of water in these two drug-DNA binding events. We used the osmotic stress method to calculate the number of water molecules exchanged (Δnwater), and isothermal titration calorimetry to measure Kbinding, ΔH, and ΔS for two synthetic DNAs, poly(dA·dT) and poly(dG·dC), and calf thymus DNA (CT DNA). For nogalamycin, Δnwater<0 for CT DNA and poly(dG·dC). For doxorubicin, Δnwater>0 for CT DNA and Δnwater<0 for poly(dG·dC). For poly(dA·dT), Δnwater~0 with both drugs. Net enthalpy changes were always negative, but net entropy changes depended on the drug. The effect of water exchange on the overall sign of entropy change appears to be smaller than other contributions.

  4. Investigating the impacts of DNA binding mode and sequence on thermodynamic quantities and water exchange values for two small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Rachael M; Buxton, Katherine E; Glazier, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    Doxorubicin and nogalamycin are antitumor antibiotics that interact with DNA via intercalation and threading mechanisms, respectively. Because the importance of water, particularly its impact on entropy changes, has been established in other biological processes, we investigated the role of water in these two drug-DNA binding events. We used the osmotic stress method to calculate the number of water molecules exchanged (Δnwater), and isothermal titration calorimetry to measure Kbinding, ΔH, and ΔS for two synthetic DNAs, poly(dA·dT) and poly(dG·dC), and calf thymus DNA (CT DNA). For nogalamycin, Δnwater<0 for CT DNA and poly(dG·dC). For doxorubicin, Δnwater>0 for CT DNA and Δnwater<0 for poly(dG·dC). For poly(dA·dT), Δnwater~0 with both drugs. Net enthalpy changes were always negative, but net entropy changes depended on the drug. The effect of water exchange on the overall sign of entropy change appears to be smaller than other contributions. PMID:27322498

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 in cutaneous histiocytic proliferative, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Pierezan, F; Mansell, J; Ambrus, A; Rodrigues Hoffmann, A

    2014-11-01

    Ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) has been used widely as a marker for microglial cells and, recently, was also recognized as a 'pan-macrophage marker', as it is expressed by all subpopulations of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. To determine the specificity of Iba1 as an immunohistochemical marker for canine and feline histiocytic proliferative, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders of the skin, we evaluated its expression in two types of histiocytic tumours, two non-neoplastic histiocytic proliferative conditions, one case of granulomatous dermatitis and four non-histiocytic tumours. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in all cases of canine cutaneous histiocytoma (9/9), reactive histiocytosis (9/9), histiocytic sarcomas (5/5), feline progressive dendritic cell histiocytosis (3/3) and macrophages in cutaneous mycobacteriosis (7/7) showed strong cytoplasmic expression of Iba1. Neoplastic cells of melanomas (10/10), lymphomas (7/7), mast cell tumours (7/7) and plasmacytomas (4/4) did not express Iba1. Iba1 is therefore a useful marker of cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in canine and feline inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic conditions and can be used to identify these cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues. Iba1 is not able to differentiate between macrophages and dendritic antigen presenting cells and expression does not allow classification of these histiocytic disorders. PMID:25172051

  6. Ubiquitin is a versatile scaffold protein for the generation of molecules with de novo binding and advantageous drug-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Job, Florian; Settele, Florian; Lorey, Susan; Rundfeldt, Chris; Baumann, Lars; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Haupts, Ulrich; Lilie, Hauke; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In the search for effective therapeutic strategies, protein-based biologicals are under intense development. While monoclonal antibodies represent the majority of these drugs, other innovative approaches are exploring the use of scaffold proteins for the creation of binding molecules with tailor-made properties. Ubiquitin is especially suited for this strategy due to several key characteristics. Ubiquitin is a natural serum protein, 100% conserved across the mammalian class and possesses high thermal, structural and proteolytic stability. Because of its small size and lack of posttranslational modifications, it can be easily produced in Escherichia coli. In this work we provide evidence that ubiquitin is safe as tested experimentally in vivo. In contrast to previously published results, we show that, in our hands, ubiquitin does not act as a functional ligand of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Cellular assays based on different signaling pathways of the receptor were conducted with the natural agonist SDF-1 as a benchmark. In none of the assays could a response to ubiquitin treatment be elicited. Furthermore, intravenous application to mice at high concentrations did not induce any detectable effect on cytokine levels or hematological parameters. PMID:26258013

  7. The Effects of Endogenous Non-Peptide Molecule Isatin and Hydrogen Peroxide on Proteomic Profiling of Rat Brain Amyloid-β Binding Proteins: Relevance to Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Alexei E.; Buneeva, Olga A.; Kopylov, Arthur T.; Gnedenko, Oksana V.; Medvedeva, Marina V.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Ivanov, Alexis S.; Zgoda, Victor G.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid-β peptide is considered as a key player in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although good evidence exists that amyloid-β accumulates inside cells, intracellular brain amyloid-binding proteins remain poorly characterized. Proteomic profiling of rat brain homogenates, performed in this study, resulted in identification of 89 individual intracellular amyloid-binding proteins, and approximately 25% of them were proteins that we had previously identified as specifically binding to isatin, an endogenous neuroprotector molecule. A significant proportion of the amyloid-binding proteins (more than 30%) are differentially expressed or altered/oxidatively modified in AD patients. Incubation of brain homogenates with 70 µM hydrogen peroxide significantly influenced the profile of amyloid-β binding proteins and 0.1 mM isatin decreased the number of identified amyloid-β binding proteins both in control and hydrogen peroxide treated brain homogenates. The effects of hydrogen peroxide and isatin have been confirmed in optical biosensor experiments with purified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, one of the known crucial amyloid-β binding proteins (also identified in this study). Data obtained suggest that isatin protects crucial intracellular protein targets against amyloid binding, and possibly favors intracellular degradation of this protein via preventing formation of amyloid-β oligomers described in the literature for some isatin derivatives. PMID:25551598

  8. Differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) on human mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y-H; Xu, L-X; Zhang, J-J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M-H; Wang, H-Y

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) were polymeric and deglycosylated. The current study was to investigate the binding characteristics of monomeric and polymeric normal human IgA1 on mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules. The normal human IgA1 was desialylated and degalactosylated with specific enzymes, respectively. The monomeric IgA1 (mIgA1) and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) were separated by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. The binding capacities of the mIgA1 and pIgA1 to primary human mesangial cells (HMC) were evaluated by classical radioligand assay. Both the native mIgA1 and pIgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. The maximal binding capacity of the native pIgA1 were significantly higher than that of the native mIgA1 (P < 0.05). However, the affinity of the native mIgA1 was almost 100 times higher than that of the native pIgA1. After deglycosylation, binding of the two deglycosylated mIgA1 to HMC could not be detected. However, the maximal binding capacities of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 to HMC were increased significantly compared with that of native pIgA1. The affinity of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 was similar to that of native pIgA1 (P > 0.05). The current study suggests differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric IgA1 on mesangial cells. Glycosylation of IgA1 molecules could significantly affect the binding of IgA1 on HMC.

  9. Differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) on human mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y-H; Xu, L-X; Zhang, J-J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M-H; Wang, H-Y

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) were polymeric and deglycosylated. The current study was to investigate the binding characteristics of monomeric and polymeric normal human IgA1 on mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules. The normal human IgA1 was desialylated and degalactosylated with specific enzymes, respectively. The monomeric IgA1 (mIgA1) and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) were separated by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. The binding capacities of the mIgA1 and pIgA1 to primary human mesangial cells (HMC) were evaluated by classical radioligand assay. Both the native mIgA1 and pIgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. The maximal binding capacity of the native pIgA1 were significantly higher than that of the native mIgA1 (P < 0·05). However, the affinity of the native mIgA1 was almost 100 times higher than that of the native pIgA1. After deglycosylation, binding of the two deglycosylated mIgA1 to HMC could not be detected. However, the maximal binding capacities of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 to HMC were increased significantly compared with that of native pIgA1. The affinity of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 was similar to that of native pIgA1 (P > 0·05). The current study suggests differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric IgA1 on mesangial cells. Glycosylation of IgA1 molecules could significantly affect the binding of IgA1 on HMC. PMID:17386074

  10. Characterization of Molecules Binding to the 70K N-terminal Region of Fibronectin by IFAST Purification Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Harami, S. Farshid; Annis, Douglas S.; Ma, Wenjiang; Berry, Scott M.; Coughlin, Emma E.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Maurer, Lisa M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Mosher, Deane F.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large glycoprotein present in plasma and extracellular matrix and is important for many processes. Within Fn the 70kDa N-terminal region (70k-Fn) is involved in cell-mediated Fn assembly, a process that contributes to embryogenesis, development, and platelet thrombus formation. In addition, major human pathogens including Staphlycoccus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, bind the 70k-Fn region by a novel form of protein-protein interaction called β-zipper formation, facilitating bacterial spread and colonization. Knowledge of blood plasma and platelet proteins that interact with 70k-Fn by β-zipper formation is incomplete. In the current study, we aimed to characterize these proteins through affinity purification. For this affinity purification, we used a novel purification technique termed immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST). The foundation of this technology is immiscible phase filtration, using a magnet to draw paramagnetic particle (PMP)-bound analyte through an immiscible barrier (oil or organic solvent) that separates an aqueous sample from an aqueous eluting buffer. The immiscible barrier functions to remove unbound proteins via exclusion rather than dilutive washing used in traditional isolation methods. We identified 31 interactors from plasma, of which only seven were previously known to interact with Fn. Furthermore, five proteins were identified to interact with 70k-Fn from platelet lysate, of which one was previously known. These results demonstrate that IFAST offers advantages for proteomic studies of interacting molecules in that the technique requires small sample volumes, can be done with high enough throughput to sample multiple interaction conditions, and is amenable to exploratory mass spectrometric and confirmatory immuno-blotting read-outs. PMID:23750785

  11. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Lam, Chan V; Leysen, Seppe F R; Meijer, Femke A; van Scheppingen, Daphne S; de Vries, Rens M J M; Carlile, Graeme W; Milroy, Lech G; Thomas, David Y; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein-protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3-CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics. PMID:26888287

  12. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Lam, Chan V; Leysen, Seppe F R; Meijer, Femke A; van Scheppingen, Daphne S; de Vries, Rens M J M; Carlile, Graeme W; Milroy, Lech G; Thomas, David Y; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein-protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3-CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics.

  13. Average sequential water molecule binding enthalpies of M(H2O)(19-124)2+ (M = Co, Fe, Mn, and Cu) measured with ultraviolet photodissociation at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Donald, William A; Leib, Ryan D; Demireva, Maria; Negru, Bogdan; Neumark, Daniel M; Williams, Evan R

    2011-01-13

    The average sequential water molecule binding enthalpies to large water clusters (between 19 and 124 water molecules) containing divalent ions were obtained by measuring the average number of water molecules lost upon absorption of an UV photon (193 or 248 nm) and using a statistical model to account for the energy released into translations, rotations, and vibrations of the products. These values agree well with the trend established by more conventional methods for obtaining sequential binding enthalpies to much smaller hydrated divalent ions. The average binding enthalpies decrease to a value of ~10.4 kcal/mol for n > ~40 and are insensitive to the ion identity at large cluster size. This value is close to that of the bulk heat of vaporization of water (10.6 kcal/mol) and indicates that the structure of water in these clusters may more closely resemble that of bulk liquid water than ice, owing either to a freezing point depression or rapid evaporative cooling and kinetic trapping of the initial liquid droplet. A discrete implementation of the Thomson equation using parameters for liquid water at 0 °C generally fits the trend in these data but provides values that are ~0.5 kcal/mol too low. PMID:21142113

  14. Interaction of lafutidine in binding to human serum albumin in gastric ulcer therapy: STD-NMR, WaterLOGSY-NMR, NMR relaxation times, Tr-NOESY, molecule docking, and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqin; Huang, Yanmei; He, Jiawei; Li, Shanshan; Tang, Bin; Li, Hui

    2016-09-15

    In this study, lafutidine (LAF) was used as a model compound to investigate the binding mechanism between antiulcer drugs and human serum albumin (HSA) through various techniques, including STD-NMR, WaterLOGSY-NMR, (1)H NMR relaxation times, tr-NOESY, molecule docking calculation, FT-IR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. The analyses of STD-NMR, which derived relative STD (%) intensities, and WaterLOGSY-NMR, determined that LAF bound to HSA. In particular, the pyridyl group of LAF was in close contact with HSA binding pocket, whereas furyl group had a secondary binding. Competitive STD-NMR and WaterLOGSY-NMR experiments, with warifarin and ibuprofen as site-selective probes, indicated that LAF preferentially bound to site II in the hydrophobic subdomains IIIA of HSA. The bound conformation of LAF at the HSA binding site was further elucidated by transferred NOE effect (tr-NOESY) experiment. Relaxation experiments provided quantitative information about the relationship between the affinity and structure of LAF. The molecule docking simulations conducted with AutoDock and the restraints derived from STD results led to three-dimensional models that were consistent with the NMR spectroscopic data. The presence of hydrophobic forces and hydrogen interactions was also determined. Additionally, FT-IR and CD spectroscopies showed that LAF induced secondary structure changes of HSA.

  15. Identification of a Hydrophobic Cleft in the LytTR Domain of AgrA as a Locus for Small Molecule Interactions that Inhibit DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Paul G.; Bezar, Ian F.; Sidote, David J.; Stock, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    The AgrA transcription factor regulates the quorum-sensing response in Staphylococcus aureus, controlling the production of hemolysins and other virulence factors. AgrA binds to DNA via its C-terminal LytTR domain, a domain not found in humans but common in many pathogenic bacteria, making it a potential target for antimicrobial development. We have determined the crystal structure of the apo AgrA LytTR domain and screened a library of 500 fragment compounds to find inhibitors of AgrA DNA-binding activity. Using NMR, the binding site for five compounds has been mapped to a common locus at the C-terminal end of the LytTR domain, a site known to be important for DNA-binding activity. Three of these compounds inhibit AgrA DNA binding. These results provide the first evidence that LytTR domains can be targeted by small organic compounds. PMID:23181972

  16. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Stevers, Loes M.; Lam, Chan V.; Leysen, Seppe F. R.; Meijer, Femke A.; van Scheppingen, Daphne S.; de Vries, Rens M. J. M.; Carlile, Graeme W.; Milroy, Lech G.; Thomas, David Y.; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein–protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3–CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics. PMID:26888287

  17. Predicting the binding free energy of the inclusion process of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and small molecules by means of the MM/3D-RISM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Masatake; Hirata, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    A protocol to calculate the binding free energy of a host–guest system is proposed based on the MM/3D-RISM method, taking cyclodextrin derivatives and their ligands as model systems. The protocol involves the procedure to identify the most probable binding mode (MPBM) of receptors and ligands by means of the umbrella sampling method. The binding free energies calculated by the MM/3D-RISM method for the complexes of the seven ligands with the MPBM of the cyclodextrin, and with the fluctuated structures around it, are in agreement with the corresponding experimental data in a semi-quantitative manner. It suggests that the protocol proposed here is promising for predicting the binding affinity of a small ligand to a relatively rigid receptor such as cyclodextrin.

  18. Binding of small interfering RNA molecules is crucial for RNA interference suppressor activity of rice hoja blanca virus NS3 in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemmes, Hans; Kaaij, Lucas; Lohuis, Dick; Prins, Marcel; Goldbach, Rob; Schnettler, Esther

    2009-07-01

    The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus represents a viral suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) that sequesters small interfering (si)RNAs in vitro. To determine whether this siRNA binding property is the critical determinant for the suppressor activity of NS3, NS3 was altered by alanine point mutations and the resulting mutant proteins were tested for both siRNA binding ability and RNAi suppressor activity in plants. Alanine substitutions of lysine residues at positions 173-175 resulted in mutant proteins that lost both their affinity for siRNAs and their RNAi suppressor activity in planta. This indicates that siRNA binding of NS3 is indeed essential for the suppressor function of NS3 and that residues at positions 173-175 are involved in the siRNA binding and suppressor activities. PMID:19282433

  19. Binding Study of T7 Gene 2.5 Protein to Single- and Double--Stranded DNA from Single Molecule Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Leila; Marintcheva, Boriana; Richardson, Charles C.; Williams, Mark C.

    2006-03-01

    Bacteriophage T7 gene 2.5 protein binds preferentially to single-stranded DNA. This property is essential for its role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. We present the first quantitative study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium DNA helix destabilization in the presence of gp2.5 and a deletion mutant lacking 26 C-terminal amino acids that binds with higher affinity to ssDNA (gp2.5-delta26C). Our measured force-extension curves of lambda-DNA in the presence of these proteins suggest strong cooperative binding. By measuring the DNA melting force as a function of time and pulling rate, we obtained binding site size and the association constants of these proteins to ssDNA and dsDNA, over a range of salt and protein concentrations. The results are used to characterize the electrostatic interactions that determine the DNA-protein binding in each case.

  20. Selective Inhibition of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) via Disruption of a Metal Binding Network by an Allosteric Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gejing; Shen, Junqing; Yin, Ming; McManus, Jessica; Mathieu, Magali; Gee, Patricia; He, Timothy; Shi, Chaomei; Bedel, Olivier; McLean, Larry R.; Le-Strat, Frank; Zhang, Ying; Marquette, Jean-Pierre; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bailin; Rak, Alexey; Hoffmann, Dietmar; Rooney, Eamonn; Vassort, Aurelie; Englaro, Walter; Li, Yi; Patel, Vinod; Adrian, Francisco; Gross, Stefan; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Cheng, Hong; Licht, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) confer a neomorphic enzymatic activity: the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid, which is proposed to act as an oncogenic metabolite by inducing hypermethylation of histones and DNA. Although selective inhibitors of mutant IDH1 and IDH2 have been identified and are currently under investigation as potential cancer therapeutics, the mechanistic basis for their selectivity is not yet well understood. A high throughput screen for selective inhibitors of IDH1 bearing the oncogenic mutation R132H identified compound 1, a bis-imidazole phenol that inhibits d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid production in cells. We investigated the mode of inhibition of compound 1 and a previously published IDH1 mutant inhibitor with a different chemical scaffold. Steady-state kinetics and biophysical studies show that both of these compounds selectively inhibit mutant IDH1 by binding to an allosteric site and that inhibition is competitive with respect to Mg2+. A crystal structure of compound 1 complexed with R132H IDH1 indicates that the inhibitor binds at the dimer interface and makes direct contact with a residue involved in binding of the catalytically essential divalent cation. These results show that targeting a divalent cation binding residue can enable selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 and suggest that differences in magnesium binding between wild-type and mutant enzymes may contribute to the inhibitors' selectivity for the mutant enzyme. PMID:25391653

  1. Contributions of tryptophan 24 and glutamate 30 to binding long-lived water molecules in the ternary complex of human dihydrofolate reductase with methotrexate and NADPH studied by site-directed mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meiering, E M; Li, H; Delcamp, T J; Freisheim, J H; Wagner, G

    1995-03-24

    Previous NMR studies on the ternary complex of human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) with methotrexate (MTX) and NADPH detected six long-lived bound water molecules. Two of the water molecules, WatA and WatB, stabilize the structure of the protein while the other four, WatC, WatD, WatE and WatF, are involved in substrate binding and specificity. WatE may also act as a proton shuttle during catalysis. Here, the contributions of individual residues to the binding of these water molecules are investigated by performing NMR experiments on ternary complexes of mutant enzymes, W24F, E30A and E30Q. W24 and E30 are conserved residues that form hydrogen bonds with WatE in crystal structures of DHFR. Nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) are detected between WatE and the protein in all the mutant complexes, hence WatE still has a long lifetime bound to the complex when one of its hydrogen-bonding partners is deleted or altered by mutagenesis. The NOEs for WatE are much weaker, however, in the mutants than in wild-type. The NOEs for the other water molecules in and near the active site, WatA, WatC, WatD and WatF, also tend to be weaker in the mutant complexes. Little or no change is apparent in the NOEs for WatB, which is located outside the active site, farthest from the mutated residues. The decreased NOE intensities for the bound water molecules could be caused by changes in the positions and/or lifetimes of the water molecules. Chemical shift and NOE data indicate that the mutants have structures very similar to that of wild-type hDHFR, with possible conformational changes occurring only near the mutated residues. Based on the lack of structural change in the protein and evidence for increased structural fluctuations in the active sites of the mutant enzymes, it is likely that the NOE changes are caused, at least in part, by decreases in the lifetimes of the bound water molecules.

  2. The role of charge and multiple faces of the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer in binding to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules: support for a bivalent model.

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, P A; Leahy, D J; Mennone, J; Kavathas, P B

    1994-01-01

    The CD8 dimer interacts with the alpha 3 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules through two immunoglobulin variable-like domains. In this study a crystal structure-informed mutational analysis has been performed to identify amino acids in the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer that are likely to be involved in binding to class I. Several key residues are situated on the top face of the dimer within loops analogous to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin. In addition, other important amino acids are located in the A and B beta-strands on the sides of the dimer. The potential involvement of amino acids on both the top and the side faces of the molecule is consistent with a bivalent model for the interaction between a single CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer and two class I molecules and may have important implications for signal transduction in class I-expressing cells. This study also demonstrates a role for the positive surface potential of CD8 in class I binding and complements previous work demonstrating the importance of a negatively charged loop on the alpha 3 domain of class I for CD8 alpha/alpha-class I interaction. We propose a model whereby residues located on the CDR-like loops of the CD8 homodimer interact with the alpha 3 domain of MHC class I while amino acids on the side of the molecule containing the A and B beta-strands contact the alpha 2 domain of class I. Images PMID:8127870

  3. Hydrogen-Bonded Water Molecules in the M2 Channel of the Influenza A Virus Guide the Binding Preferences of Ammonium-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gianti, Eleonora; Carnevale, Vincenzo; DeGrado, William F.; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The tetrameric M2 proton channel of influenza A virus is an integral membrane protein responsible for the acidification of the viral interior. Drugs such as amantadine target the transmembrane region of wild type M2 by acting as pore blockers. However, a number of mutations affecting this domain confer drug resistance, prompting the need for alternative inhibitors. The availability of high-resolution structures of drug-bound M2, paired with computational investigations, revealed that inhibitors can bind at different sites, and provided useful insights in understanding the principles governing proton conduction. Here, we investigated by computation the energetic and geometric factors determining the relative stability of pore blockers at individual sites of different M2 strains. We found that local free energy minima along the translocation pathway of positively charged chemical species correspond to experimentally determined binding sites of inhibitors. Then, by examining the structure of water clusters hydrating each site, as well as of those displaced by binding of hydrophobic scaffolds, we predicted the binding preferences of M2 ligands. This information can be used to guide the identification of novel classes of inhibitors. PMID:25353315

  4. The binding of monoclonal antibodies to cell-surface molecules. A quantitative analysis with immunoglobulin G against two alloantigenic determinants of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2.

    PubMed Central

    Ways, J P; Parham, P

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal IgG1 (immunoglobulin G1) PA2.1 and MA2.1 antibodies recognize polymorphic sites of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2. They are distinguishable because MA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-B17, whereas PA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-A28. The affinities of PA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-A28 are similar and relatively low (1.9 X 10(7) M-1). The affinities of MA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-B17 are similar and high (1.2 X 10(9) M-1). The difference in affinity is due to the rates of dissociation, which give half-times of dissociation of 290 min for MA2.1-Fab and 4 min for PA2.1-Fab. For both Fab, equilibrium measurements and kinetic determinations gave consistent estimates for affinity. When PA2.1-F(ab)2 or IgG is incubated with cells it reaches equilibrium within 3 h, with most molecules bound bivalently to the cell. Under similar conditions, MA2.1-F(ab)2 does not reach equilibrium and a significant proportion of molecules bound with one and two sites are found. For the lower-affinity antibody (PA2.1), estimates of the binding constants for one- and two-site interactions could be made. By simple Scatchard analysis the avidity of F(ab)2 or IgG is 1.3 X 10(9) M-1, giving an enhancement factor of 68 between bivalent and univalent binding. This is a measure of the equilibrium constant for the interchange between bivalent and univalent binding. Analysis of the results with more realistic models indicates that the actual value is larger (10(3)-10(4) M-1) than 68 M-1. The avidities of F(ab)2 and IgG for HLA-A2 are identical, showing the Fc does not interfere with bivalent binding to cells. PMID:6197968

  5. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  6. Artificial mutations and natural variations in the CD46 molecules from human and monkey cells define regions important for measles virus binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, E C; Dörig, R E; Sarangi, F; Marcil, A; Iorio, C; Richardson, C D

    1997-01-01

    CD46 was previously shown to be a primate-specific receptor for the Edmonston strain of measles virus. This receptor consists of four short consensus regions (SCR1 to SCR4) which normally function in complement regulation. Measles virus has recently been shown to interact with SCR1 and SCR2. In this study, receptors on different types of monkey erythrocytes were employed as "natural mutant proteins" to further define the virus binding regions of CD46. Erythrocytes from African green monkeys and rhesus macaques hemagglutinate in the presence of measles virus, while baboon erythrocytes were the least efficient of the Old World monkey cells used in these assays. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the SCR2 domain of baboon CD46 contained an Arg-to-Gln mutation at amino acid position 103 which accounted for reduced hemagglutination activity. Surprisingly, none of the New World monkey erythrocytes hemagglutinated in the presence of virus. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the lymphocytes of these New World monkeys and analysis of their erythrocytes with SCR1-specific polyclonal antibodies indicated that the SCR1 domain was deleted in these cells. Additional experiments, which used 35 different site-specific mutations inserted into CD46, were performed to complement the preceding studies. The effects of these artificial mutations were documented with a convenient binding assay using insect cells expressing the measles virus hemagglutinin. Mutations which mimicked the change found in baboon CD46 or another which deleted the SCR2 glycosylation site reduced binding substantially. Another mutation which altered GluArg to AlaAla at positions 58 and 59, totally abolished binding. Finally, the epitopes for two monoclonal antibodies which inhibit measles virus attachment were mapped to the same regions implicated by mutagenesis. PMID:9223509

  7. Azurin as a protein scaffold for a low-coordinate non-heme iron site with a small-molecule binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Matthew P.; Retegan, Marius; Bill, Eckhard; Payne, Thomas M.; Shafaat, Hannah S.; Peña, Salvador; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Ensign, Amy A.; Crane, Brian R.; Neese, Frank; Holland, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    The apo-protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin binds iron(II) to give a 1:1 complex, which has been characterized by electronic absorption, Mössbauer, and NMR spectroscopies, as well as X-ray crystallography and quantum-chemical computations. Despite potential competition by water and other coordinating residues, iron(II) binds tightly to the low-coordinate site. The iron(II) complex does not react with chemical redox agents to undergo oxidation or reduction. Spectroscopically-calibrated quantum-chemical computations show that the complex has high-spin iron(II) in a pseudotetrahedral coordination environment, which features interactions with side chains of two histidines and a cysteine, as well as the C=O of Gly45. In the 5A1 ground state, the dz2 orbital is doubly occupied. Mutation of Met121 to Ala leaves the metal site in a similar environment, but creates a pocket for reversible binding of small anions to the iron(II) center. Specifically, azide forms a high-spin iron(II) complex and cyanide forms a low-spin iron(II) complex. PMID:23167247

  8. A sequence-specific DNA binding small molecule triggers the release of immunogenic signals and phagocytosis in a model of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, JeenJoo S; Dervan, Peter B

    2015-11-01

    Means to cause an immunogenic cell death could lead to significant insight into how cancer escapes immune control. In this study, we screened a library of five pyrrole-imidazole polyamides coding for different DNA sequences in a model of B-cell lymphoma for the upregulation of surface calreticulin, a pro-phagocytosis signal implicated in immunogenic cell death. We found that hairpin polyamide 1 triggers the release of the damage-associated molecular patterns calreticulin, ATP and HMGB1 in a slow necrotic-type cell death. Consistent with this signaling, we observed an increase in the rate of phagocytosis by macrophages after the cancer cells were exposed to polyamide 1. The DNA sequence preference of polyamide 1 is 5'-WGGGTW-3' (where W = A/T), indicated by the pairing rules and confirmed by the Bind-n-Seq method. The close correspondence of this sequence with the telomere-repeat sequence suggests a potential mechanism of action through ligand binding at the telomere. This study reveals a chemical means to trigger an inflammatory necrotic cell death in cancer cells. PMID:26537405

  9. A sequence-specific DNA binding small molecule triggers the release of immunogenic signals and phagocytosis in a model of B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, JeenJoo S.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Means to cause an immunogenic cell death could lead to significant insight into how cancer escapes immune control. In this study, we screened a library of five pyrrole–imidazole polyamides coding for different DNA sequences in a model of B-cell lymphoma for the upregulation of surface calreticulin, a pro-phagocytosis signal implicated in immunogenic cell death. We found that hairpin polyamide 1 triggers the release of the damage-associated molecular patterns calreticulin, ATP and HMGB1 in a slow necrotic-type cell death. Consistent with this signaling, we observed an increase in the rate of phagocytosis by macrophages after the cancer cells were exposed to polyamide 1. The DNA sequence preference of polyamide 1 is 5′-WGGGTW-3′ (where W = A/T), indicated by the pairing rules and confirmed by the Bind-n-Seq method. The close correspondence of this sequence with the telomere-repeat sequence suggests a potential mechanism of action through ligand binding at the telomere. This study reveals a chemical means to trigger an inflammatory necrotic cell death in cancer cells. PMID:26537405

  10. Cholesterol-binding molecules MLN64 and ORP1L mark distinct late endosomes with transporters ABCA3 and NPC1[S

    PubMed Central

    van der Kant, Rik; Zondervan, Ilse; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential lipid in eukaryotic cells and is present in membranes of all intracellular compartments. A major source for cellular cholesterol is internalized lipoprotein particles that are transported toward acidic late endosomes (LE) and lysosomes. Here the lipoprotein particles are hydrolyzed, and free cholesterol is redistributed to other organelles. The LE can contain over half of the cellular cholesterol and, as a major sorting station, can contain many cholesterol-binding proteins from the ABCA, STARD, and ORP families. Here, we show that metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64, STARD3) and oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 1L (ORP1L) define two subpopulations of LE. MLN64 is present on a LE containing the cholesterol transporter ABCA3, whereas ORP1L localizes to another population of LE containing Niemann Pick type C1 (NPC1), a cholesterol exporter. Endocytosed cargo passes through MLN64/ABCA3-positive compartments before it reaches ORP1L/NPC1-positive LE. The MLN64/ABCA3 compartments cycle between LE and plasma membrane and frequently contact “later” ORP1L/NPC1-containing LE. We propose two stages of cholesterol handling in late endosomal compartments: first, cholesterol enters MLN64/ABCA3-positive compartments from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane, and later, cholesterol enters ORP1L/NPC1 endosomes that mediate cholesterol export to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:23709693

  11. Linking ultracold polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Avdeenkov, A V; Bohn, John L

    2003-01-31

    We predict that pairs of polar molecules can be weakly bound together in an ultracold environment, provided that a dc electric field is present. The field that links the molecules together also strongly influences the basic properties of the resulting dimer, such as its binding energy and predissociation lifetime. Because of their long-range character, these dimers will be useful in disentangling cold collision dynamics of polar molecules. As an example, we estimate the microwave photoassociation yield for OH-OH cold collisions.

  12. Microgravity and Signaling Molecules in Rat Osteoblasts: Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor, and Small GTP-Binding Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumel, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Morita, Sadao; Katano, Hisako; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Ohya, Keiichi; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2005-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured for 4 and 5 days aboard Space Shuttle and solubilized on board. The mRNA levels of the post-receptor signaling molecules were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The G-protein alpha subunit G(alpha)q mRNA levels were elevated 3-fold by microgravity. G(alpha)q stimulates PLC(beta), and then PKC. PKC(delta) and PKC(theta) mRNA levels were increased 2- to 5-fold by microgravity The mRNA levels of SOS and Ras GRF were increased 4 to 5-fold by microgravity, while Ras GAP was not altered. Spaceflight-induced bone loss might be attributed to microgravity modulation of the signaling pathway in osteoblasts.

  13. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunmin; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Yim, Kendrick; Rivas, Candy; Alarcon, Sylvia; Schwartz, Harvey; Khamit-Kush, Kofi; Scroggins, Bradley T.; Beebe, Kristin; Trepel, Jane B.; Neckers, Len

    2015-01-01

    The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states. PMID:26517842

  14. Direct binding to antigen-coated beads refines the specificity and cross-reactivity of four monoclonal antibodies that recognize polymorphic epitopes of HLA class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Hugo G; Parham, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies with specificity for HLA class I determinants of HLA were originally characterized using serological assays in which the targets were cells expressing 3-6 HLA class I variants. Because of this complexity, the specificities of the antibodies were defined indirectly by correlation. Here we use a direct binding assay, in which the targets are synthetic beads coated with one of 111 HLA class I variants, representing the full range of HLA-A, -B and -C variation. We studied one monoclonal antibody with monomorphic specificity (W6/32) and four with polymorphic specificity (MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1) and compared the results with those obtained previously. W6/32 reacted with all HLA class I variants. MA2.1 exhibits high specificity for HLA-A*02, -B*57 and -B*58, but also exhibited cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11 and -B*15:16. At low concentration (1μg/ml) PA2.1 and BB7.2 were both specific for HLA-A*02 and -A*69, and at high concentration (50μg/ml) exhibited significant cross-reactions with HLA-A*68, -A*23, and -A*24. BB7.1 exhibits specificity for HLA-B*07 and -B*42, as previously described, but reacts equally well with HLA-B*81, a rare allotype defined some 16 years after the description of BB7.1. The results obtained with cell-based and bead-based assays are consistent and, in combination with amino acid sequence comparison, increase understanding of the polymorphic epitopes recognized by the MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1 antibodies. Comparison of two overlapping but distinctive bead sets from two sources gave similar results, but the overall levels of binding were significantly different. Several weaker reactions were observed with only one of the bead sets. PMID:23510417

  15. Oral administration of a small molecule targeted to block proNGF binding to p75 promotes myelin sparing and functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tep, Chhavy; Lim, Tae Hee; Ko, Pyung On; Getahun, Sami; Ryu, Jae Cheon; Goettl, Virginia M; Massa, Stephen M; Basso, Michele; Longo, Frank M; Yoon, Sung Ok

    2013-01-01

    The lack of effective therapies for spinal cord injury points to the need for identifying novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we report that a small molecule, LM11A-31, developed to block proNGF-p75 interaction and p75-mediated cell death crosses the blood-brain barrier efficiently when delivered orally. Administered starting 4 h postinjury, LM11A-31 promotes functional recovery without causing any toxicity or increased pain in a mouse model of spinal contusion injury. In both weight-bearing open-field tests and nonweight-bearing swim tests, LM11A-31 was effective in improving motor function and coordination. Such functional improvement correlated with a >50% increase in the number of surviving oligodendrocytes and myelinated axons. We also demonstrate that LM11A-31 indeed inhibits proNGF-p75 interaction in vivo, thereby curtailing the JNK3-mediated apoptotic cascade. These results thus highlight p75 as a novel therapeutic target for an orally delivered treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:23303920

  16. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA.

  17. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA. PMID:25882520

  18. A density functional tight binding/force field approach to the interaction of molecules with rare gas clusters: Application to (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Iftner, Christophe; Simon, Aude; Korchagina, Kseniia; Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2014-01-21

    We propose in the present paper a SCC-DFTB/FF (Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional based Tight Binding/Force-Field) scheme adapted to the investigation of molecules trapped in rare gas environments. With respect to usual FF descriptions, the model involves the interaction of quantum electrons in a molecule with rare gas atoms in an anisotropic scheme. It includes polarization and dispersion contributions and can be used for both neutral and charged species. Parameters for this model are determined for hydrocarbon-argon complexes and the model is validated for small hydrocarbons. With the future aim of studying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Ar matrices, extensive benchmark calculations are performed on (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters against DFT and CCSD(T) calculations for the smaller sizes, and more generally against other experimental and theoretical data. Results on the structures and energetics (isomer ordering and energy separation, cohesion energy per Ar atom) are presented in detail for n = 1–8, 13, 20, 27, and 30, for both neutrals and cations. We confirm that the clustering of Ar atoms leads to a monotonous decrease of the ionization potential of benzene for n ⩽ 20, in line with previous experimental and FF data.

  19. Role of receptor-binding activity of the viral hemagglutinin molecule in the presentation of influenza virus antigens to helper T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenlohr, L C; Gerhard, W; Hackett, C J

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of antigen required to stimulate influenza virus-specific helper T cells was observed to be dependent upon the antigenic form bearing the relevant determinant: intact, nonreplicative virus was needed only in picomolar amounts, while denatured proteins, protein fragments, or synthetic peptides were required in micromolar concentrations for a threshold level of stimulation. Antigenic efficiency of intact virus was found to result from the attachment of virus to sialic acid residues on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell since spikeless viral particles lacking the hemagglutinin molecule were much less efficient antigens for helper T cells and continuous presence of hemagglutination-inhibiting antihemagglutinin antibodies reduced efficiency of stimulation by intact virus approximately 100-fold for both hemagglutinin and internal virion proteins. Influenza virus associated rapidly with antigen-presenting cells; less than 10 min at 20 degrees C was sufficient to introduce virus for a maximal level of T-cell stimulation. This rapid attachment was blocked by antibodies to the hemagglutinin or by pretreatment of the antigen-presenting cells with neuraminidase to remove the cellular virus receptor. Following viral adsorption by antigen-presenting cells, a lag period of 30 min at 37 degrees C was required for the expression of helper T-cell determinants. One early event identified was the movement of the virus to a neuraminidase-insensitive compartment, which can occur at 10 degrees C, but which was not equivalent to expression of helper T-cell determinants. Preincubation of cells with virus at 10 degrees C for 4 h reduced the lag period of helper T-cell determinant expression to 15 min when these cells were shifted to 37 degrees C, suggesting that transition of the virus to a neuraminidase-resistant state is a required step in presentation of T-cell antigenic determinants. PMID:2952806

  20. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) recognizes a novel ligand, Mac-2-binding protein, characteristically expressed on human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Motohiro; Ma, Bruce Yong; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Kawabe, Keiko; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Hodohara, Keiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2011-06-24

    Dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is a type II transmembrane C-type lectin expressed on DCs such as myeloid DCs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). Recently, we have reported that DC-SIGN interacts with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressed on colorectal carcinoma cells. CEA is one of the most widely used tumor markers for gastrointestinal cancers such as colorectal cancer. On the other hand, other groups have reported that the level of Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP) increases in patients with pancreatic, breast, and lung cancers, virus infections such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we first identified Mac-2BP expressed on several colorectal carcinoma cell lines as a novel DC-SIGN ligand through affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. Interestingly, we found that DC-SIGN selectively recognizes Mac-2BP derived from some colorectal carcinomas but not from the other ones. Furthermore, we found that the α1-3,4-fucose moieties of Le glycans expressed on DC-SIGN-binding Mac-2BP were important for recognition. DC-SIGN-dependent cellular interactions between immature MoDCs and colorectal carcinoma cells significantly inhibited MoDC functional maturation, suggesting that Mac-2BP may provide a tolerogenic microenvironment for colorectal carcinoma cells through DC-SIGN-dependent recognition. Importantly, Mac-2BP was detected as a predominant DC-SIGN ligand expressed on some primary colorectal cancer tissues from certain parts of patients in comparison with CEA from other parts, suggesting that DC-SIGN-binding Mac-2BP bearing tumor-associated Le glycans may become a novel potential colorectal cancer biomarker for some patients instead of CEA.

  1. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  2. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antaris, Alexander L.; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K.; Alamparambil, Zita R.; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (~90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)--a clinically approved NIR-I dye--in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ~4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  3. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging.

    PubMed

    Antaris, Alexander L; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K; Alamparambil, Zita R; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (∼90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)-a clinically approved NIR-I dye-in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ∼4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery. PMID:26595119

  4. Proteochemometric modelling coupled to in silico target prediction: an integrated approach for the simultaneous prediction of polypharmacology and binding affinity/potency of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; Cortés-Ciriano, Isidro; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Bender, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    targets and the potency on plasmodial DHFR for the GSK TCAMS dataset, which comprises 13,533 compounds displaying strong anti-malarial activity. 534 of those compounds were identified as DHFR inhibitors by the target prediction algorithm, while the PCM algorithm identified 25 compounds, and 23 compounds (predicted pIC50 > 7) were identified by both methods. Overall, this integrated approach simultaneously provides target and potency/affinity predictions for small molecules. Graphical abstractProteochemometric modelling coupled to in silico target prediction.

  5. Transfer of noncovalent chiral information along an optically inactive helical peptide chain: allosteric control of asymmetry of the C-terminal site by external molecule that binds to the N-terminal site.

    PubMed

    Ousaka, Naoki; Inai, Yoshihito

    2009-02-20

    This study aims at demonstrating end-to-end transfer of noncovalent chiral information along a peptide chain. The domino-type induction of helical sense is proven by using achiral peptides 1-m of bis-chromophoric sequence with different chain lengths: H-(Aib-Delta(Z)Phe)(m)-(Aib-Delta(Z)Bip)(2)-Aib-OCH(3) [m = 2, 4, and 6; Aib = alpha-aminoisobutyric acid; Delta(Z)Phe = (Z)-alpha,beta-didehydrophenylalanine; Delta(Z)Bip = (Z)-beta-(4,4'-biphenyl)-alpha,beta-didehydroalanine]. They all showed the tendency to adopt a 3(10)-helix. Whereas peptide 1-m originally shows no circular dichroism (CD) signals, marked CD signals were induced at around 270-320 nm based on both the beta-aryl didehydroresidues by chiral Boc-proline (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl). The observed CD spectra were interpreted on the basis of the exciton chirality method and theoretical CD simulation of several helical conformations that were energy-minimized. The experimental and theoretical CD analysis reveals that Boc-l-proline induces the preference for a right-handed helicity in the whole chain of 1-m. Such noncovalent chiral induction was not observed in the corresponding N-terminally protected 1-m. Obviously, helicity induction in 1-m originates from the binding of Boc-proline to the N-terminal site. In the 17-mer (1-6), the information of helix sense reaches the 16th residue from the N-terminus. We have monitored precise transfer of noncovalent chiral stimulus along a helical peptide chain. The present study also proposes a primitive allosteric model of a single protein-mimicking backbone. Here chiral molecule binding the N-terminal site of 1-6 controls the chiroptical signals and helical sense of the C-terminal site about 30 A away.

  6. Interaction of the carbon monoxide-releasing molecule Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: in situ measurements of carbon monoxide binding by integrating cavity dual-beam spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Rana, Namrata; McLean, Samantha; Mann, Brian E; Poole, Robert K

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas that binds to haems, but also plays critical signalling and cytoprotective roles in mammalian systems; despite problems associated with systemic delivery by inhalation of the gas, it may be employed therapeutically. CO delivered to cells and tissues by CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) has beneficial and toxic effects not mimicked by CO gas; CO-RMs are also attractive candidates as novel antimicrobial agents. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans. Recent studies have implicated haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the protein that catalyses the degradation of haem into biliverdin, free iron and CO, in the host immune response to Salmonella infection. In several studies, CO administration via CO-RMs elicited many of the protective roles of HO-1 induction and so we investigated the effects of a well-characterized water-soluble CO-RM, Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3), on Salmonella. CORM-3 exhibits toxic effects at concentrations significantly lower than those reported to cause toxicity to RAW 264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated here, through oxyhaemoglobin assays, that CORM-3 did not release CO spontaneously in phosphate buffer, buffered minimal medium or very rich medium. CORM-3 was, however, accumulated to high levels intracellularly (as shown by inductively coupled plasma MS) and released CO inside cells. Using growing Salmonella cultures without prior concentration, we showed for the first time that sensitive dual-beam integrating cavity absorption spectrophotometry can detect directly the CO released from CORM-3 binding in real-time to haems of the bacterial electron transport chain. The toxic effects of CO-RMs suggested potential applications as adjuvants to antibiotics in antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25085864

  7. Interaction of the carbon monoxide-releasing molecule Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: in situ measurements of carbon monoxide binding by integrating cavity dual-beam spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Rana, Namrata; McLean, Samantha; Mann, Brian E; Poole, Robert K

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas that binds to haems, but also plays critical signalling and cytoprotective roles in mammalian systems; despite problems associated with systemic delivery by inhalation of the gas, it may be employed therapeutically. CO delivered to cells and tissues by CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) has beneficial and toxic effects not mimicked by CO gas; CO-RMs are also attractive candidates as novel antimicrobial agents. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans. Recent studies have implicated haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the protein that catalyses the degradation of haem into biliverdin, free iron and CO, in the host immune response to Salmonella infection. In several studies, CO administration via CO-RMs elicited many of the protective roles of HO-1 induction and so we investigated the effects of a well-characterized water-soluble CO-RM, Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3), on Salmonella. CORM-3 exhibits toxic effects at concentrations significantly lower than those reported to cause toxicity to RAW 264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated here, through oxyhaemoglobin assays, that CORM-3 did not release CO spontaneously in phosphate buffer, buffered minimal medium or very rich medium. CORM-3 was, however, accumulated to high levels intracellularly (as shown by inductively coupled plasma MS) and released CO inside cells. Using growing Salmonella cultures without prior concentration, we showed for the first time that sensitive dual-beam integrating cavity absorption spectrophotometry can detect directly the CO released from CORM-3 binding in real-time to haems of the bacterial electron transport chain. The toxic effects of CO-RMs suggested potential applications as adjuvants to antibiotics in antimicrobial therapy.

  8. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  9. Functional epitope analysis of the human CD4 molecule: antibodies that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression bind to the immunoglobulin CDR3-like region of CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Hirn, M; Carrière, D; Devaux, C

    1995-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13B8-2, specific for the immunoglobulin (Ig) complementary determining region 3 (CDR3)-like region of the CD4 molecule, inhibits viral transcription in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CEM cells and HIV type 1 (HIV-1) promoter activity. Here, we have studied the capacity of several MAb specific for the D1 domain of CD4, including anti-CDR2-like (Leu-3a and ST4) and anti-CDR3-like (13B8-2 and ST40) MAb, and for the D2 domain of CD4 (BL4) to inhibit both provirus transcription in HIV-1LAI-infected CEM cells and transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in transiently transfected CEM cells. We found that HIV-1 promoter activity and provirus transcription are inhibited only by MAb that bind to the CDR3-like region in domain 1 of CD4. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Fab fragment of an anti-CDR3-like region-specific anti-CD4 MAb is a powerful inhibitor of HIV-1 promoter activity. These results have implications for understanding the role of the CDR3-like region in CD4 T-cell signaling, which controls provirus transcription. PMID:7474106

  10. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  11. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  12. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  13. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  14. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  15. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  16. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  17. Cell-substrate interactions during sea urchin gastrulation: migrating primary mesenchyme cells interact with and align extracellular matrix fibers that contain ECM3, a molecule with NG2-like and multiple calcium-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Hodor, P G; Illies, M R; Broadley, S; Ettensohn, C A

    2000-06-01

    The migratory primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) of the sea urchin embryo are a model experimental system for the analysis of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Although the behavior of PMCs during gastrulation has been analyzed in considerable detail, it has proven difficult to identify specific substrate molecules with which these cells interact. Here, using a new monoclonal antibody (2.5C4) generated by an in vitro immunization procedure, we show that migrating PMCs interact with a distinct class of ECM fiber. The 2.5C4-positive fibers are distributed in a vegetal (high) to animal (low) gradient on the basal surface of the ectoderm. Three observations indicate that PMC filopodia interact directly with the fibers: (1) During gastrulation, 2.5C4-positive fibers gradually become oriented in a prominent circumferential belt that corresponds precisely to the position of the subequatorial PMC ring. (2) This fiber pattern is blocked by microsurgical removal of PMCs but is restored if PMCs are reintroduced into the embryo. (3) Examination of immunostained embryo whole mounts by confocal microscopy reveals a striking association between PMC filopodial roots and foci of fiber bundling. Double-immunostaining experiments using 2.5C4 and antibodies against previously identified matrix constituents show that the protein ECM3 is a component of the fibers. We have determined the complete amino acid sequence of ECM3 and find that this large protein (3103 amino acids) consists of an N-terminal domain similar to the mammalian chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein NG2, a central region composed of five tandem repeats of a domain contained within the regulatory Ca2+-binding loop of Na+-Ca2+ exchange proteins, and a C-terminal region with no homology to known proteins. The general structure of ECM3 is similar in several respects to that of a sponge protein, MAFp4. MAFp4 is a major component of aggregation factor, an ECM complex that mediates the calcium

  18. 'Escentric' molecules.

    PubMed

    Schön, Geza

    2008-06-01

    Can a fragrance be revolutionary? In this commentary, the creation of two unusual, extravagant fine fragrances, 'escentric01' and 'molecule01', is described. In response to the fantasy components found in release notes of many recent perfume launches, both center around a single real fragrance raw material, the transparent woody aroma chemical 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The perfume 'escentric01' contains 65% of it, accompanied by Trisamber (3), red pepper, lime oil, incense and musks, while 'molecule01' consists exclusively of 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The elegant woody note lives here its own eccentric life--the revolution starts.

  19. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  20. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  1. The folate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Corrocher, R; Olivieri, O; Pacor, M L

    1991-01-01

    Folates are essential molecules for cell life and, not surprisingly, their transport in biological fluids and their transfer to cells are finely regulated. Folate binding proteins play a major role in this regulation. This paper will review our knowledge on these proteins and examine the most recent advances in this field. PMID:1820987

  2. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  3. Walking molecules.

    PubMed

    von Delius, Max; Leigh, David A

    2011-07-01

    Movement is intrinsic to life. Biologists have established that most forms of directed nanoscopic, microscopic and, ultimately, macroscopic movements are powered by molecular motors from the dynein, myosin and kinesin superfamilies. These motor proteins literally walk, step by step, along polymeric filaments, carrying out essential tasks such as organelle transport. In the last few years biological molecular walkers have inspired the development of artificial systems that mimic aspects of their dynamics. Several DNA-based molecular walkers have been synthesised and shown to walk directionally along a track upon sequential addition of appropriate chemical fuels. In other studies, autonomous operation--i.e. DNA-walker migration that continues as long as a complex DNA fuel is present--has been demonstrated and sophisticated tasks performed, such as moving gold nanoparticles from place-to-place and assistance in sequential chemical synthesis. Small-molecule systems, an order of magnitude smaller in each dimension and 1000× smaller in molecular weight than biological motor proteins or the walker systems constructed from DNA, have also been designed and operated such that molecular fragments can be progressively transported directionally along short molecular tracks. The small-molecule systems can be powered by light or chemical fuels. In this critical review the biological motor proteins from the kinesin, myosin and dynein families are analysed as systems from which the designers of synthetic systems can learn, ratchet concepts for transporting Brownian substrates are discussed as the mechanisms by which molecular motors need to operate, and the progress made with synthetic DNA and small-molecule walker systems reviewed (142 references). PMID:21416072

  4. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. PMID:26773299

  5. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution.

  6. Multipose binding in molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Atkovska, Kalina; Samsonov, Sergey A; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2014-02-14

    Molecular docking has been extensively applied in virtual screening of small molecule libraries for lead identification and optimization. A necessary prerequisite for successful differentiation between active and non-active ligands is the accurate prediction of their binding affinities in the complex by use of docking scoring functions. However, many studies have shown rather poor correlations between docking scores and experimental binding affinities. Our work aimed to improve this correlation by implementing a multipose binding concept in the docking scoring scheme. Multipose binding, i.e., the property of certain protein-ligand complexes to exhibit different ligand binding modes, has been shown to occur in nature for a variety of molecules. We conducted a high-throughput docking study and implemented multipose binding in the scoring procedure by considering multiple docking solutions in binding affinity prediction. In general, improvement of the agreement between docking scores and experimental data was observed, and this was most pronounced in complexes with large and flexible ligands and high binding affinities. Further developments of the selection criteria for docking solutions for each individual complex are still necessary for a general utilization of the multipose binding concept for accurate binding affinity prediction by molecular docking.

  7. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  8. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  9. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-10-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron-perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance.

  10. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    PubMed Central

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron–perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance. PMID:27703143

  11. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis

    2004-08-31

    Disclosed herein is a photonic silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls selectively bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and determine the concentration of bound target.

  12. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis; Hart, Bradley R.

    2006-12-26

    Disclosed herein is a porous silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and calculate the concentration of bound target.

  13. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M; Ferry, Vivian E; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A Paul; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-07-01

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  14. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M.; Ferry, Vivian E.; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-06-03

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Lastly, such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  15. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  16. The Small Molecule Chloropyramine Hydrochloride (C4) Targets the Binding Site of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 and Suppresses Breast Cancer Growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kurenova, Elena V.; Hunt, Darell L.; He, Dihua; Magis, Andrew T.; Ostrov, David A.; Cance, William G.

    2009-01-01

    FAK is a tyrosine kinase that functions as a key orchestrator of signals leading to invasion and metastasis. Since FAK interacts directly with a number of critical proteins involved in survival signaling in tumor cells, we hypothesized that targeting a key protein-protein interface with drug-like small molecules was a feasible strategy for inhibiting tumor growth. In this study, we targeted the protein-protein interface between FAK and VEGFR-3 and identified compound C4 (chloropyramine hydrochloride) as a drug capable of 1) inhibiting the biochemical function of VEGFR-3 and FAK, 2) inhibiting proliferation of a diverse set of cancer cell types in vitro, and 3) reducing tumor growth in vivo. Chloropyramine hydrochloride reduced tumor growth as a single agent, while concomitant administration with doxorubicin had a pronounced synergistic effect. Our data demonstrate that the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction can be targeted by small drug-like molecules and this interaction can provide the basis for highly-specific novel cancer therapeutics. PMID:19610651

  17. Tests of Lorentz invariance using hydrogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Holger; Herrmann, Sven; Saenz, Alejandro; Peters, Achim; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the consequences of Lorentz violation (as expressed within the Lorentz-violating extension of the standard model) for the hydrogen molecule, which represents a generic model of a molecular binding. Lorentz-violating shifts of electronic, vibrational and rotational energy levels, and of the internuclear distance are calculated. This offers the possibility of obtaining improved bounds on Lorentz invariance by experiments using molecules.

  18. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  19. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  20. The Role of Inclusion Binding Contributions for β-Cyclodextrin Polymers Cross-Linked with Divinyl Sulfone?--A Comment on Morales-Sanfrutos et al. Entitled "Divinyl Sulfone Cross-Linked Cyclodextrin-Based Polymeric Materials: Synthesis and Applications as Sorbents and Encapsulating Agents", Molecules, 2015, 20, 3565-3581.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee D; Mohamed, Mohamed H; McMartin, Dena W

    2016-01-14

    This commentary reports on a recent scientific study reported in this journal (cf. Molecules 2015, 20(3), 3565-3581). Some key scientific issues that require further explanation and clarification in the former article are as follows: (i) the relationship between the inclusion site accessibility and the level of cross-linking employed are brought into question for the case of α-CD and β-CD cross-linked adsorbent materials; (ii) the binding affinity of the CD/guest complexes were not related to the isotherm parameters for the CD-polymer/guest systems; (iii) the limited molecular level structural characterization of the cross-linked polymer materials; and (iv) the interpretation of the adsorption isotherm results by the authors.

  1. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  2. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  3. Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ferez, Rosario

    2016-05-01

    Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules are formed when a ground-state atom is bound to a Rydberg atom. The binding mechanism of these Rydberg molecules is based on the low-energy collisions between a Rydberg electron and a ground-state atom and leads to the unusual oscillatory behavior of the adiabatic potential energy curves. If the ground-state atom immersed into the Rydberg wave function is replaced by a heteronuclear diatomic molecule another type of polyatomic Rydberg molecules can form. In this case, the Rydberg electron is coupled to the internal states of the polar ground-state molecule. In this talk, we will explore the electronic structure and rovibrational properties of these ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecule. For the second type of Rydberg molecules, the polar dimer is allowed to rotate in the electric fields generated by the Rydberg electron and Rydberg core as well as an additional external field. We will investigate the metamorphosis of the Born-Oppenheimer potential curves, essential for the binding mechanism, with varying electric field and analyze the resulting properties such as the vibrational structure and the alignment and orientation of the polar dimer.

  4. Nanoelectronics of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the nanoelectronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule, modeled by a tight-binding effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, to investigate the electronic density of states, the electronic transmissivity, and the current-voltage characteristic curves of sequences of a DNA finite segment.We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  5. Mechanisms of small molecule-DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almaqwashi, Ali A; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2016-05-19

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA-ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  6. A high-mobility group box 1 that binds to DNA, enhances pro-inflammatory activity, and acts as an anti-infection molecule in black rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Xin-Peng, Zhao; Yong-Hua, Hu; Yong, Liu; Jing-Jing, Wang; Guang-Hua, Wang; Ren-Jie, Wang; Min, Zhang

    2016-09-01

    High-mobility group box (HMGB) 1 is a chromosomal protein that plays critical roles in DNA transcription, replication and repair. In addition, HMGB1 functions as a pro-inflammatory molecule in many vertebrates and invertebrates. In teleosts, very limited studies of HMGB1 have been reported. In this study, we identified a HMGB1 homologue (SsHMGB1) from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii) and analyzed its structure, expression and biological function. The open reading frame of SsHMGB1 is 621 bp, with a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 62 bp and a 3'-UTR of 645 bp. SsHMGB1 contains two typical HMG boxes and an acidic C-terminal tail. The deduced amino acid sequence of SsHMGB1 shares the highest overall identity (89.4%) with the HMGB1 of Anoplopoma fimbria. The expression of SsHMGB1 occurred in multiple tissues and was highest in the brain. Moreover, the mRNA level of SsHMGB1 in head kidney (HK) macrophages could be induced by Listonella anguillarum in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant SsHMGB1 purified from Escherichia coli (i) bound DNA fragments in a dose-dependent manner; and (ii) induced the expression of cytokines in HK macrophages, including a significant increase in TNF-α activity and enhanced mRNA level of TNF13B and IL-1 β, which are known to be involved in antibacterial defense; moreover, (iii) significantly improved the macrophage bactericidal activity together with reduced pathogen dissemination and replication of bacteria in fish kidney. These results indicated that SsHMGB1 is a novel HMGB1 that possesses apparent immunoregulatory properties and is likely to be involved in fighting bacterial infection. PMID:27492120

  7. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  8. FTMAP: extended protein mapping with user-selected probe molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Chi Ho; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott E.; Beglov, Dmitri; Villar, Elizabeth A.; Hall, David R.; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2012-01-01

    Binding hot spots, protein sites with high-binding affinity, can be identified using X-ray crystallography or NMR by screening libraries of small organic molecules that tend to cluster at such regions. FTMAP, a direct computational analog of the experimental screening approaches, globally samples the surface of a target protein using small organic molecules as probes, finds favorable positions, clusters the conformations and ranks the clusters on the basis of the average energy. The regions that bind several probe clusters predict the binding hot spots, in good agreement with experimental results. Small molecules discovered by fragment-based approaches to drug design also bind at the hot spot regions. To identify such molecules and their most likely bound positions, we extend the functionality of FTMAP (http://ftmap.bu.edu/param) to accept any small molecule as an additional probe. In its updated form, FTMAP identifies the hot spots based on a standard set of probes, and for each additional probe shows representative structures of nearby low energy clusters. This approach helps to predict bound poses of the user-selected molecules, detects if a compound is not likely to bind in the hot spot region, and provides input for the design of larger ligands. PMID:22589414

  9. Simulation Studies of Protein and Small Molecule Interactions and Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Zhang, J; Che, X; Gao, Y Q

    2016-01-01

    Computational studies of protein and small molecule (protein-ligand/enzyme-substrate) interactions become more and more important in biological science and drug discovery. Computer modeling can provide molecular details of the processes such as conformational change, binding, and transportation of small molecules/proteins, which are not easily to be captured in experiments. In this chapter, we discussed simulation studies of both protein and small molecules from three aspects: conformation sampling, transportations of small molecules in enzymes, and enzymatic reactions involving small molecules. Both methodology developments and examples of simulation studies in this field were presented.

  10. Simulation Studies of Protein and Small Molecule Interactions and Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Zhang, J; Che, X; Gao, Y Q

    2016-01-01

    Computational studies of protein and small molecule (protein-ligand/enzyme-substrate) interactions become more and more important in biological science and drug discovery. Computer modeling can provide molecular details of the processes such as conformational change, binding, and transportation of small molecules/proteins, which are not easily to be captured in experiments. In this chapter, we discussed simulation studies of both protein and small molecules from three aspects: conformation sampling, transportations of small molecules in enzymes, and enzymatic reactions involving small molecules. Both methodology developments and examples of simulation studies in this field were presented. PMID:27497167

  11. Vertically coupled dipolar exciton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Kobi; Khodas, Maxim; Laikhtman, Boris; Santos, Paulo V.; Rapaport, Ronen

    2016-06-01

    While the interaction potential between two dipoles residing in a single plane is repulsive, in a system of two vertically adjacent layers of dipoles it changes from repulsive interaction in the long range to attractive interaction in the short range. Here we show that for dipolar excitons in semiconductor heterostructures, such a potential may give rise to bound states if two such excitons are excited in two separate layers, leading to the formation of vertically coupled dipolar exciton molecules. Our calculations prove the existence of such bound states and predict their binding energy as a function of the layers separation as well as their thermal distributions. We show that these molecules should be observed in realistic systems such as semiconductor coupled quantum well structures and the more recent van der Waals bound heterostructures. Formation of such molecules can lead to new effects such as a collective dipolar drag between layers and new forms of multiparticle correlations, as well as to the study of dipolar molecular dynamics in a controlled system.

  12. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  13. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  14. Metastable feshbach molecules in high rotational states.

    PubMed

    Knoop, S; Mark, M; Ferlaino, F; Danzl, J G; Kraemer, T; Nägerl, H-C; Grimm, R

    2008-02-29

    We experimentally demonstrate Cs2 Feshbach molecules well above the dissociation threshold, which are stable against spontaneous decay on the time scale of 1 s. An optically trapped sample of ultracold dimers is prepared in a high rotational state and magnetically tuned into a region with a negative binding energy. The metastable character of these molecules arises from the large centrifugal barrier in combination with negligible coupling to states with low rotational angular momentum. A sharp onset of dissociation with increasing magnetic field is mediated by a crossing with a lower rotational dimer state and facilitates dissociation on demand with a well-defined energy. PMID:18352621

  15. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  16. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Timothy S; Lightstone, Felice C

    2016-04-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  17. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  18. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  19. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines. PMID:26755272

  20. Nanopore Device for Reversible Ion and Molecule Sensing or Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourmand, Nader (Inventor); Vilozny, Boaz (Inventor); Actis, Paolo (Inventor); Seger, R. Adam (Inventor); Singaram, Bakthan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and devices for detection of ion migration and binding, utilizing a nanopipette adapted for use in an electrochemical sensing circuit. The nanopipette may be functionalized on its interior bore with metal chelators for binding and sensing metal ions or other specific binding molecules such as boronic acid for binding and sensing glucose. Such a functionalized nanopipette is comprised in an electrical sensor that detects when the nanopipette selectively and reversibly binds ions or small molecules. Also disclosed is a nanoreactor, comprising a nanopipette, for controlling precipitation in aqueous solutions by voltage-directed ion migration, wherein ions may be directed out of the interior bore by a repulsing charge in the bore.

  1. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  2. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  3. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  4. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Constants for the WT1-DNA Interaction Using a Filter Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium binding of WT1 to specific sites in DNA and potentially RNA molecules is central in mediating the regulatory roles of this protein. In order to understand the functional effects of mutations in the nucleic acid-binding domain of WT1 proteins and/or mutations in the DNA- or RNA-binding sites, it is necessary to measure the equilibrium constant for formation of the protein-nucleic acid complex. This chapter describes the use of a filter binding assay to make accurate measurements of the binding of the WT1 zinc finger domain to the consensus WT1-binding site in DNA. The method described is readily adapted to the measurement of the effects of mutations in either the WT1 zinc finger domain or the putative binding sites within a promoter element or cellular RNA.

  5. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    PubMed

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  6. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  7. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Synaptic scaffolding molecule interacts with axin.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Susumu; Nishimura, Wataru; Iida, Junko; Kansaku, Ai; Kishida, Shosei; Kikuchi, Akira; Tanaka, Noriaki; Hata, Yutaka

    2004-07-01

    Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a synaptic protein that consists of PDZ domains, a guanylate kinase domain, and WW domains. It interacts with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits, neuroligin, and beta-catenin. Here, we identified Axin as a novel binding partner of S-SCAM. Axin was co-immunoprecipitated with S-SCAM from rat brain, detected in the post-synaptic density fraction in rat brain subcellular fractionation, and partially co-localized with S-SCAM in neurons. The guanylate kinase domain of S-SCAM directly bound to the GSK3beta-binding region of Axin. S-SCAM formed a complex with beta-catenin and Axin, but competed with GSK3beta for Axin-binding. Thereby, S-SCAM inhibited the Axin-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin by GSK3beta.

  10. Conformational dynamics of peptide T molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2002-05-01

    Using a method of the theoretical conformational analysis, a conformational dynamics of the side chains of the amino acid residues of peptide T, a competitor of the human immuno-deficiency virus in the binding to human T cells, was investigated. For this purpose, the conformational maps of the potential surfaces were constructed over the angles of the side chains for the preferable conformations of peptide T molecule. Permissible deviations of these angles from the optimal values were determined. It has been found that the angles of the side chains of the amino acid residues involved in physiologically active fragment Thr4-Thr8 are more rigid than in the other segment of the molecule. This fact confirms the existence of such a regular structure as β-turn revealed previously in studies of the spatial structure of the peptide T molecule.

  11. Comprehensive Map of Molecules Implicated in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jagannadham, Jaisri; Jaiswal, Hitesh Kumar; Agrawal, Stuti; Rawal, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting over 1.5 billion people and is one of the risk factors for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We have constructed a comprehensive map of the molecules reported to be implicated in obesity. A deep curation strategy was complemented by a novel semi-automated text mining system in order to screen 1,000 full-length research articles and over 90,000 abstracts that are relevant to obesity. We obtain a scale free network of 804 nodes and 971 edges, composed of 510 proteins, 115 genes, 62 complexes, 23 RNA molecules, 83 simple molecules, 3 phenotype and 3 drugs in "bow-tie" architecture. We classify this network into 5 modules and identify new links between the recently discovered fat mass and obesity associated FTO gene with well studied examples such as insulin and leptin. We further built an automated docking pipeline to dock orlistat as well as other drugs against the 24,000 proteins in the human structural proteome to explain the therapeutics and side effects at a network level. Based upon our experiments, we propose that therapeutic effect comes through the binding of one drug with several molecules in target network, and the binding propensity is both statistically significant and different in comparison with any other part of human structural proteome.

  12. Stability of Matter-Antimatter Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Lee, Teck-Ghee

    2011-01-01

    We examine the stability of matter-antimatter molecules by reducing the four-body problem into a simpler two-body problem with residual interactions. We find that matter-antimatter molecules with constituents (m{sub 1}{sup +}, m{sub 2}{sup -}, {bar m}{sub 2}{sup +}, {bar m}{sub 1}{sup -}) possess bound states if their constituent mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2} is greater than about 4. This stability condition suggests that the binding of matter-antimatter molecules is a rather common phenomenon. We evaluate the binding energies and eigenstates of matter-antimatter molecules ({mu}{sup +}e{sup 0})-(e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), ({pi}{sup +}e{sup -})-(e{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), (K{sup +}e{sup -})-(e{sup +}K{sup -}), (pe{sup -})-(e{sup +}{bar p}), (p{mu}{sup -})-({mu}{sup +}{bar p}), and (K{sup +}{mu}{sup -})-({mu}{sup +}K{sup -}), which satisfy the stability condition. We estimate the molecular annihilation lifetimes in their s states.

  13. Comprehensive Map of Molecules Implicated in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Stuti

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting over 1.5 billion people and is one of the risk factors for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We have constructed a comprehensive map of the molecules reported to be implicated in obesity. A deep curation strategy was complemented by a novel semi-automated text mining system in order to screen 1,000 full-length research articles and over 90,000 abstracts that are relevant to obesity. We obtain a scale free network of 804 nodes and 971 edges, composed of 510 proteins, 115 genes, 62 complexes, 23 RNA molecules, 83 simple molecules, 3 phenotype and 3 drugs in “bow-tie” architecture. We classify this network into 5 modules and identify new links between the recently discovered fat mass and obesity associated FTO gene with well studied examples such as insulin and leptin. We further built an automated docking pipeline to dock orlistat as well as other drugs against the 24,000 proteins in the human structural proteome to explain the therapeutics and side effects at a network level. Based upon our experiments, we propose that therapeutic effect comes through the binding of one drug with several molecules in target network, and the binding propensity is both statistically significant and different in comparison with any other part of human structural proteome. PMID:26886906

  14. Interlocked molecules: Aqueous assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linyi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative self-assembly of mechanically interlocked molecules in water, instead of organic solvents, opens up the possibility of such systems being used in a biological context where their functions can be interfaced with biomolecular systems.

  15. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  16. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  17. Ion-pair binding: is binding both binding better?

    PubMed

    Roelens, Stefano; Vacca, Alberto; Francesconi, Oscar; Venturi, Chiara

    2009-08-17

    It is often tempting to explain chemical phenomena on the basis of intuitive principles, but this practice can frequently lead to biased analysis of data and incorrect conclusions. One such intuitive principle is brought into play in the binding of salts by synthetic receptors. Following the heuristic concept that "binding both is binding better", it is widely believed that ditopic receptors capable of binding both ionic partners of a salt are more effective than monotopic receptors because of a cooperative effect. Using a newly designed ditopic receptor and a generalized binding descriptor, we show here that, when the problem is correctly formulated and the appropriate algorithm is derived, the cooperativity principle is neither general nor predictable, and that competition between ion binding and ion pairing may even lead to inhibition rather than enhancement of the binding of an ion to a ditopic receptor.

  18. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  19. Electrical Transport Properties of Au-Doped Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong Seung; Hong, Su Heon; Kim, Hyung Kwon; Kwon, Young Whan; Jin, Jung Il; Hwang, Sung Woo; Ahn, Doyeol

    2005-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules were doped with Au atoms and their electrical transport properties were measured. The Au doping was carried out by incubating a mixture of HAuCl4\\cdot3H2O and DNA solutions. The binding of Au atoms to DNA bases was identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The Au-doped DNA molecules were deposited on nanoelectrodes and the presence of the molecules between the electrodes was determined by both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Measurement of the current-voltage characteristics showed that the Au-doped DNA molecules exhibited a higher conductivity than undoped DNA molecules. Detailed analysis of the chemical composition shows that there is a strong possibility of reliably controlling the conductivity of DNA molecules using this method.

  20. Analyzing binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey J; Neubig, Richard R

    2010-07-01

    Measuring the rate and extent of radioligand binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility of these binding sites for various drugs. This unit explains how to design and analyze such experiments.

  1. Differentiating Alzheimer disease-associated aggregates with small molecules.

    PubMed

    Honson, Nicolette S; Johnson, Ronald L; Huang, Wenwei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer disease is diagnosed postmortem by the density and spatial distribution of beta-amyloid plaques and tau-bearing neurofibrillary tangles. The major protein component of each lesion adopts cross-beta-sheet conformation capable of binding small molecules with submicromolar affinity. In many cases, however, Alzheimer pathology overlaps with Lewy body disease, characterized by the accumulation of a third cross-beta-sheet forming protein, alpha-synuclein. To determine the feasibility of distinguishing tau aggregates from beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein aggregates with small molecule probes, a library containing 72,455 small molecules was screened for antagonists of tau-aggregate-mediated changes in Thioflavin S fluorescence, followed by secondary screens to distinguish the relative affinity for each substrate protein. Results showed that >10-fold binding selectivity among substrates could be achieved, with molecules selective for tau aggregates containing at least three aromatic or rigid moieties connected by two rotatable bonds.

  2. Differentiating Alzheimer Disease-Associated Aggregates with Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Johnson, Ronald L.; Huang, Wenwei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Kuret, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is diagnosed postmortem by the density and spatial distribution of β-amyloid plaques and tau-bearing neurofibrillary tangles. The major protein component of each lesion adopts cross-β-sheet conformation capable of binding small molecules with submicromolar affinity. In many cases, however, Alzheimer pathology overlaps with Lewy body disease, characterized by the accumulation of a third cross-β-sheet forming protein, α-synuclein. To determine the feasibility of distinguishing tau aggregates from β-amyloid and α-synuclein aggregates with small molecule probes, a library containing 71,975 small molecules was screened for antagonists of tau-aggregate mediated changes in Thioflavin S fluorescence, followed by secondary screens to distinguish the relative affinity for each substrate protein. Results showed that >10-fold binding selectivity among substrates could be achieved, with molecules selective for tau aggregates containing at least three aromatic or rigid moieties connected by two rotatable bonds. PMID:17761424

  3. Small-molecule microarrays as tools in ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Vegas, Arturo J.; Fuller, Jason H.; Koehler, Angela N.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecules that bind and modulate specific protein targets are increasingly used as tools to decipher protein function in a cellular context. Identifying specific small-molecule probes for each protein in the proteome will require miniaturized assays that permit screening large collections of compounds against large numbers of proteins in a highly parallel fashion. Simple and general binding assays involving small-molecule microarrays can be used to identify probes for nearly any protein in the proteome. The assay may be used to identify ligands for proteins in the absence of knowledge about structure or function. In this tutorial review, we introduce small-molecule microarrays (SMMs) as tools for ligand discovery; discuss methods for manufacturing SMMs, including both non-covalent and covalent attachment strategies; and provide examples of ligand discovery involving SMMs. PMID:18568164

  4. Can functionalized cucurbituril bind actinyl cations efficiently? A density functional theory based investigation.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Mahesh; Sinha, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2012-05-01

    The feasibility of using cucurbituril host molecule as a probable actinyl cation binders candidate is investigated through density functional theory based calculations. Various possible binding sites of the cucurbit[5]uril host molecule to uranyl are analyzed and based on the binding energy evaluations, μ(5)-binding is predicted to be favored. For this coordination, the structure, vibrational spectra, and binding energies are evaluated for the binding of three actinyls in hexa-valent and penta-valent oxidation states with functionalized cucurbiturils. Functionalizing cucurbituril with methyl and cyclohexyl groups increases the binding affinities of actinyls, whereas fluorination decreases the binding affinities as compared to the native host molecule. Surprisingly hydroxylation of the host molecule does not distinguish the oxidation state of the three actinyls.

  5. Can functionalized cucurbituril bind actinyl cations efficiently? A density functional theory based investigation.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Mahesh; Sinha, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2012-05-01

    The feasibility of using cucurbituril host molecule as a probable actinyl cation binders candidate is investigated through density functional theory based calculations. Various possible binding sites of the cucurbit[5]uril host molecule to uranyl are analyzed and based on the binding energy evaluations, μ(5)-binding is predicted to be favored. For this coordination, the structure, vibrational spectra, and binding energies are evaluated for the binding of three actinyls in hexa-valent and penta-valent oxidation states with functionalized cucurbiturils. Functionalizing cucurbituril with methyl and cyclohexyl groups increases the binding affinities of actinyls, whereas fluorination decreases the binding affinities as compared to the native host molecule. Surprisingly hydroxylation of the host molecule does not distinguish the oxidation state of the three actinyls. PMID:22471316

  6. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  7. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  8. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  9. Carboplatin binding to histidine.

    PubMed

    Tanley, Simon W M; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M M; Helliwell, John R

    2014-09-01

    Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  10. An Improved Surface Passivation Method for Single-Molecule Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Boyang; Young Han, Kyu; Zhou, Ruobo; Kim, Hajin; Shi, Xinghua; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Jain, Ankur; Singh, Digvijay; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Woodson, Sarah A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a surface passivation method for in vitro single-molecule studies, which more efficiently prevents non-specific binding of biomolecules as compared to the polyethylene glycol surface. The new surface does not perturb the behavior and activities of tethered biomolecules. It can also be used for single-molecule imaging in the presence of high concentrations of labeled species in solution. Reduction in preparation time and cost is another major advantage. PMID:25306544

  11. Protein Binding Studies with Zero Mode Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiee, K.; Foquet, M.; Cox, E. C.; Craighead, H. G.

    2004-03-01

    Single protein molecules binding to their DNA operator site are observed using zero mode waveguides, novel quasi one-dimensional optical nanostructures. The subwavelength features of the waveguides allow the formation of a focal volume smaller than those allowed by classical diffraction limited optics. The small observation volume allows the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure diffusion constants at fluorophore concentrations as high as10uM. Binding is observed between a DNA oligomer containing OR1, an operator site on the Lambda genome, and CI, the repressor protein that inhibits the bacteriophage's lytic growth cycle. The dimensions of the waveguide should allow a single DNA fragment to be fixed at the bottom where its binding dynamics can be characterized on a single molecule basis.

  12. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  13. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  14. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  15. Single Molecule Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    Single-molecule manipulation studies open a door for a close-up investigation of complex biological interactions at the molecular level. In these studies, single biomolecules are pulled while their force response is being monitored. The process is often nonequilibrium, and interpretation of the results has been challenging. We used the atomic force microscope to pull proteins and DNA, and determined the equilibrium properties of the molecules using the recently derived nonequilibrium work theorem. I will present applications of the technique in areas ranging from fundamental biological problems such as DNA mechanics, to complex medical processes such as the m