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Sample records for binding domain protein

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  6. Protein universe containing a PUA RNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Cerrudo, Carolina S; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review current knowledge about pseudouridine synthase and archaeosine transglycosylase (PUA)-domain-containing proteins to illustrate progress in this field. A methodological analysis of the literature about the topic was carried out, together with a 'qualitative comparative analysis' to give a more comprehensive review. Bioinformatics methods for whole-protein or protein-domain identification are commonly based on pairwise protein sequence comparisons; we added comparison of structures to detect the whole universe of proteins containing the PUA domain. We present an update of proteins having this domain, focusing on the specific proteins present in Homo sapiens (dyskerin, MCT1, Nip7, eIF2D and Nsun6), and explore the existence of these in other species. We also analyze the phylogenetic distribution of the PUA domain in different species and proteins. Finally, we performed a structural comparison of the PUA domain through data mining of structural databases, determining a conserved structural motif, despite the differences in the sequence, even among eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria. All data discussed in this review, both bibliographic and analytical, corroborate the functional importance of the PUA domain in RNA-binding proteins.

  7. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  8. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  10. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  11. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  12. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  13. The modular organization of domain structures: insights into protein-protein binding.

    PubMed

    del Sol, Antonio; Carbonell, Pablo

    2007-12-01

    Domains are the building blocks of proteins and play a crucial role in protein-protein interactions. Here, we propose a new approach for the analysis and prediction of domain-domain interfaces. Our method, which relies on the representation of domains as residue-interacting networks, finds an optimal decomposition of domain structures into modules. The resulting modules comprise highly cooperative residues, which exhibit few connections with other modules. We found that non-overlapping binding sites in a domain, involved in different domain-domain interactions, are generally contained in different modules. This observation indicates that our modular decomposition is able to separate protein domains into regions with specialized functions. Our results show that modules with high modularity values identify binding site regions, demonstrating the predictive character of modularity. Furthermore, the combination of modularity with other characteristics, such as sequence conservation or surface patches, was found to improve our predictions. In an attempt to give a physical interpretation to the modular architecture of domains, we analyzed in detail six examples of protein domains with available experimental binding data. The modular configuration of the TEM1-beta-lactamase binding site illustrates the energetic independence of hotspots located in different modules and the cooperativity of those sited within the same modules. The energetic and structural cooperativity between intramodular residues is also clearly shown in the example of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, where non-binding site residues have a synergistic effect on binding. Interestingly, the binding site of the T cell receptor beta chain variable domain 2.1 is contained in one module, which includes structurally distant hot regions displaying positive cooperativity. These findings support the idea that modules possess certain functional and energetic independence. A modular organization of binding sites confers

  14. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  15. Characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Takagi, M; Hashida, S; Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H; Segel, I H

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA), a component of the cellulase complex of Clostridium cellulovorans, contains a unique sequence which has been demonstrated to be a cellulose-binding domain (CBD). The DNA coding for this putative CBD was subcloned into pET-8c, an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein produced under the direction of the recombinant plasmid, pET-CBD, had a high affinity for crystalline cellulose. Affinity-purified CBD protein was used in equilibrium binding experiments to characterize the interaction of the protein with various polysaccharides. It was found that the binding capacity of highly crystalline cellulose samples (e.g., cotton) was greater than that of samples of low crystallinity (e.g., fibrous cellulose). At saturating CBD concentration, about 6.4 mumol of protein was bound by 1 g of cotton. Under the same conditions, fibrous cellulose bound only 0.2 mumol of CBD per g. The measured dissociation constant was in the 1 microM range for all cellulose samples. The results suggest that the CBD binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. Chitin, which has a crystal structure similar to that of cellulose, also was bound by the CBD. The presence of high levels of cellobiose or carboxymethyl cellulose in the assay mixture had no effect on the binding of CBD protein to crystalline cellulose. This result suggests that the CBD recognition site is larger than a simple cellobiose unit or more complex than a repeating cellobiose moiety. This CBD is of particular interest because it is the first CBD from a completely sequenced nonenzymatic protein shown to be an independently functional domain. Images PMID:8376323

  16. The PDZ Domain of the LIM Protein Enigma Binds to β-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Pamela M.; Kenny, Daryn A.; Gill, Gordon N.

    1999-01-01

    PDZ and LIM domains are modular protein interaction motifs present in proteins with diverse functions. Enigma is representative of a family of proteins composed of a series of conserved PDZ and LIM domains. The LIM domains of Enigma and its most related family member, Enigma homology protein, bind to protein kinases, whereas the PDZ domains of Enigma and family member actin-associated LIM protein bind to actin filaments. Enigma localizes to actin filaments in fibroblasts via its PDZ domain, and actin-associated LIM protein binds to and colocalizes with the actin-binding protein α-actinin-2 at Z lines in skeletal muscle. We show that Enigma is present at the Z line in skeletal muscle and that the PDZ domain of Enigma binds to a skeletal muscle target, the actin-binding protein tropomyosin (skeletal β-TM). The interaction between Enigma and skeletal β-TM was specific for the PDZ domain of Enigma, was abolished by mutations in the PDZ domain, and required the PDZ-binding consensus sequence (Thr-Ser-Leu) at the extreme carboxyl terminus of skeletal β-TM. Enigma interacted with isoforms of tropomyosin expressed in C2C12 myotubes and formed an immunoprecipitable complex with skeletal β-TM in transfected cells. The association of Enigma with skeletal β-TM suggests a role for Enigma as an adapter protein that directs LIM-binding proteins to actin filaments of muscle cells. PMID:10359609

  17. The Rapamycin-Binding Domain of the Protein Kinase mTOR is a Destabilizing Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Sarah R.; Wandless, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug that binds simultaneously to the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein (FKBP12, or FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB) of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. The resulting ternary complex has been used to conditionally perturb protein function, and one such method involves perturbation of a protein of interest through its mislocalization. We synthesized two rapamycin derivatives that possess large substituents at the C16 position within the FRB-binding interface, and these derivatives were screened against a library of FRB mutants using a three-hybrid assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several FRB mutants responded to one of the rapamycin derivatives, and twenty of these mutants were further characterized in mammalian cells. The mutants most responsive to the ligand were fused to yellow fluorescent protein, and fluorescence levels in the presence and absence of the ligand were measured to determine stability of the fusion proteins. Wild-type and mutant FRB domains were expressed at low levels in the absence of the rapamycin derivative, and expression levels rose up to ten-fold upon treatment with ligand. The synthetic rapamycin derivatives were further analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, and one of the compounds was found to contain contaminating rapamycin. Furthermore, uncontaminated analogs retain the ability to inhibit mTOR, albeit with diminished potency relative to rapamycin. The ligand-dependent stability displayed by wildtype FRB and FRB mutants as well as the inhibitory potential and purity of the rapamycin derivatives should be considered as potentially confounding experimental variables when using these systems. PMID:17350953

  18. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  19. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  20. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes: sequence of the binding domain involved in adherence of streptococci to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Talay, S R; Valentin-Weigand, P; Jerlström, P G; Timmis, K N; Chhatwal, G S

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the fibronectin-binding domain of the fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sfb protein) was determined, and its role in streptococcal adherence was investigated by use of an Sfb fusion protein in adherence studies. A 1-kb DNA fragment coding for the binding domain of Sfb protein was cloned into the expression vector pEX31 to produce an Sfb fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of MS2 polymerase and a C-terminal fragment of the streptococcal protein. Induction of the vector promoter resulted in hyperexpression of fibronectin-binding fusion protein in the cytoplasm of the recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Sequence determination of the cloned 1-kb fragment revealed an in-frame reading frame for a 268-amino-acid peptide composed of a 37-amino-acid sequence which is completely repeated three times and incompletely repeated a fourth time. Cloning of one repeat into pEX31 resulted in expression of small fusion peptides that show fibronectin-binding activity, indicating that one repeat contains at least one binding domain. Each repeat exhibits two charged domains and shows high homology with the 38-amino-acid D3 repeat of the fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus. Sequence comparison with other streptococcal ligand-binding surface proteins, including M protein, failed to reveal significant homology, which suggests that Sfb protein represents a novel type of functional protein in S. pyogenes. The Sfb fusion protein isolated from the cytoplasm of recombinant cells was purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. It showed a strong competitive inhibition of fibronectin binding to S. pyogenes and of the adherence of bacteria to cultured epithelial cells. In contrast, purified streptococcal lipoteichoic acid showed only a weak inhibition of fibronectin binding and streptococcal adherence. These results demonstrate that Sfb protein is directly involved in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of S. pyogenes to

  1. Identification and phylogenetic analyses of VASt, an uncharacterized protein domain associated with lipid-binding domains in Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Khafif, Mehdi; Cottret, Ludovic; Balagué, Claudine; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-06-26

    Several regulators of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants encode proteins with putative lipid-binding domains. Among them, VAD1 is a regulator of PCD propagation harboring a GRAM putative lipid-binding domain. However the function of VAD1 at the subcellular level is unknown and the domain architecture of VAD1 has not been analyzed in details. We analyzed sequence conservation across the plant kingdom in the VAD1 protein and identified an uncharacterized VASt (VAD1 Analog of StAR-related lipid transfer) domain. Using profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) and phylogenetic analysis we found that this domain is conserved among eukaryotes and generally associates with various lipid-binding domains. Proteins containing both a GRAM and a VASt domain include notably the yeast Ysp2 cell death regulator and numerous uncharacterized proteins. Using structure-based phylogeny, we found that the VASt domain is structurally related to Bet v1-like domains. We identified a novel protein domain ubiquitous in Eukaryotic genomes and belonging to the Bet v1-like superfamily. Our findings open perspectives for the functional analysis of VASt-containing proteins and the characterization of novel mechanisms regulating PCD.

  2. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-09

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  3. A small cellulose binding domain protein (CBD1) is highly variable in the nonbinding amino terminus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The small cellulose binding domain protein CBD1 is tightly bound to the cellulosic cell wall of the plant pathogenic stramenophile Phytophthora infestans. Transgene expression of the protein in plants has also demonstrated binding to plant cell walls. A study was undertaken using 47 isolates of P. ...

  4. Methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins: readers of the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Luu, Phuc-Loi; Stirzaker, Clare; Clark, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    How DNA methylation is interpreted and influences genome regulation remains largely unknown. Proteins of the methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) family are primary candidates for the readout of DNA methylation as they recruit chromatin remodelers, histone deacetylases and methylases to methylated DNA associated with gene repression. MBD protein binding requires both functional MBD domains and methyl-CpGs; however, some MBD proteins also bind unmethylated DNA and active regulatory regions via alternative regulatory domains or interaction with the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD/Mi-2) complex members. Mutations within MBD domains occur in many diseases, including neurological disorders and cancers, leading to loss of MBD binding specificity to methylated sites and gene deregulation. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge about MBD proteins and their role as readers of the epigenome.

  5. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  6. The Modular Organization of Domain Structures: Insights into Protein–Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Carbonell, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    Domains are the building blocks of proteins and play a crucial role in protein–protein interactions. Here, we propose a new approach for the analysis and prediction of domain–domain interfaces. Our method, which relies on the representation of domains as residue-interacting networks, finds an optimal decomposition of domain structures into modules. The resulting modules comprise highly cooperative residues, which exhibit few connections with other modules. We found that non-overlapping binding sites in a domain, involved in different domain–domain interactions, are generally contained in different modules. This observation indicates that our modular decomposition is able to separate protein domains into regions with specialized functions. Our results show that modules with high modularity values identify binding site regions, demonstrating the predictive character of modularity. Furthermore, the combination of modularity with other characteristics, such as sequence conservation or surface patches, was found to improve our predictions. In an attempt to give a physical interpretation to the modular architecture of domains, we analyzed in detail six examples of protein domains with available experimental binding data. The modular configuration of the TEM1-β-lactamase binding site illustrates the energetic independence of hotspots located in different modules and the cooperativity of those sited within the same modules. The energetic and structural cooperativity between intramodular residues is also clearly shown in the example of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, where non–binding site residues have a synergistic effect on binding. Interestingly, the binding site of the T cell receptor β chain variable domain 2.1 is contained in one module, which includes structurally distant hot regions displaying positive cooperativity. These findings support the idea that modules possess certain functional and energetic independence. A modular organization of binding sites

  7. Specific binding of the methyl binding domain protein 2 at the BRCA1-NBR2 locus

    PubMed Central

    Auriol, Emilie; Billard, Lise-Marie; Magdinier, Frédérique; Dante, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins are key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing. We investigated their binding specificity at the constitutively methylated region of a CpG island containing the bidirectional promoter of the Breast cancer predisposition gene 1, BRCA1, and the Near BRCA1 2 (NBR2) gene. In HeLa cells, quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that MBD2 is associated with the methylated region, while MeCP2 and MBD1 were not detected at this locus. MBD2 depletion (∼90%), mediated by a transgene expressing a small interfering RNA (siRNA), did not induce MeCP2 or MBD1 binding at the methylated area. Furthermore, the lack of MBD2 at the BRCA1-NBR2 CpG island is associated with an elevated level of NBR2 transcripts and with a significant reduction of induced-DNA-hypomethylation response. In MBD2 knockdown cells, transient expression of a Mbd2 cDNA, refractory to siRNA-mediated decay, shifted down the NBR2 mRNA level to that observed in unmodified HeLa cells. Variations in MBD2 levels did not affect BRCA1 expression despite its stimulation by DNA hypomethylation. Collectively, our data indicate that MBD2 has specific targets and its presence at these targets is indispensable for gene repression. PMID:16052033

  8. Structure of the caspase-recruitment domain from a zebrafish guanylate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tengchuan; Huang, Mo; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam

    2013-08-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) mediates homotypic protein-protein interactions that assemble large oligomeric signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes during innate immune responses. Structural studies of the mammalian CARDs demonstrate that their six-helix bundle folds belong to the death-domain superfamily, whereas such studies have not been reported for other organisms. Here, the zebrafish interferon-induced guanylate-binding protein 1 (zIGBP1) was identified that contains an N-terminal GTPase domain and a helical domain typical of the mammalian guanylate-binding proteins, followed by a FIIND domain and a C-terminal CARD similar to the mammalian inflammasome proteins NLRP1 and CARD8. The structure of the zIGBP1 CARD as a fusion with maltose-binding protein was determined at 1.47 Å resolution. This revealed a six-helix bundle fold similar to the NLRP1 CARD structure with the bent α1 helix typical of all known CARD structures. The zIGBP1 CARD surface contains a positively charged patch near its α1 and α4 helices and a negatively charged patch near its α2, α3 and α5 helices, which may mediate its interaction with partner domains. Further studies using binding assays and other analyses will be required in order to address the physiological function(s) of this zebrafish protein.

  9. CREB-binding protein transcription activation domain for enhanced transgene expression by a positive feedback system.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Genki; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The positive feedback system using a fusion protein of the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of yeast GAL4 and the transcription activation domain of herpes simplex virus VP16 (GAL4-VP16), in which GAL4-VP16 promotes its own expression as well as that of a reporter gene product, is useful for efficient transgene expression from plasmid DNA. In this study, the transcription activation domains of endogenous proteins, instead of VP16, were fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain, and the positive feedback systems employing the novel fusion proteins were examined. Plasmid DNAs encoding the transcription factors were introduced into mouse Hepa 1-6 cells by electroporation and lipofection. Among CREB-binding protein (226-460), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (1-140), p53 (1-70), and Med15 (9-73), the CREB-binding protein functioned efficiently as an activator. These results indicated that the GAL4-CREB-binding protein is useful for enhanced transgene expression by the positive feedback system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutational definition of RNA-binding and protein-protein interaction domains of heterogeneous nuclear RNP C1.

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Kim, J K; Pollard, V W; Dreyfuss, G

    2001-03-09

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hn- RNP) C proteins, among the most abundant pre-mRNA-binding proteins in the eukaryotic nucleus, have a single RNP motif RNA-binding domain. The RNA-binding domain (RBD) is comprised of approximately 80-100 amino acids, and its structure has been determined. However, relatively little is known about the role of specific amino acids of the RBD in the binding to RNA. We have devised a phage display-based screening method for the rapid identification of amino acids in hnRNP C1 that are essential for its binding to RNA. The identified mutants were further tested for binding to poly(U)-Sepharose, a substrate to which wild type hnRNP C1 binds with high affinity. We found both previously predicted, highly conserved residues as well as additional residues in the RBD to be essential for C1 RNA binding. We also identified three mutations in the leucine-rich C1-C1 interaction domain near the carboxyl terminus of the protein that both abolished C1 oligomerization and reduced RNA binding. These results demonstrate that although the RBD is the primary determinant of C1 RNA binding, residues in the C1-C1 interaction domain also influence the RNA binding activity of the protein. The experimental approach we described should be generally applicable for the screening and identification of amino acids that play a role in the binding of proteins to nucleic acid substrates.

  11. Biological effects of individually synthesized TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Tsyrendorzhiev, D D; Orlovskaya, I A; Sennikov, S V; Tregubchak, T V; Gileva, I P; Tsyrendorzhieva, M D; Shchelkunov, S N

    2014-06-01

    The biological characteristics of a 17-kDa protein synthesized in bacterial cells, a TNF-binding domain (VARV-TNF-BP) of a 47-kDa variola virus CrmB protein (VARV-CrmB) consisting of TNF-binding and chemokine-binding domains, were studied. Removal of the C-terminal chemokine-binding domain from VARV-CrmB protein was inessential for the efficiency of its inhibition of TNF cytotoxicity towards L929 mouse fibroblast culture and for TNF-induced oxidative metabolic activity of mouse blood leukocytes. The results of this study could form the basis for further studies of VARV-TNF-BP mechanisms of activity for prospective use in practical medicine.

  12. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  13. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat.

  14. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  15. IQGAP proteins reveal an atypical phosphoinositide (aPI) binding domain with a pseudo C2 domain fold.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Miles J; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R; van Aalten, Daan M F; Downes, C Peter; Batty, Ian H

    2012-06-29

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP(3)). The binding affinity for PtdInsP(3), together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP(3) effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  16. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105–107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules. PMID:22493426

  17. Prediction of small molecule binding property of protein domains with Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chains.

    PubMed

    Bulashevska, Alla; Stein, Martin; Jackson, David; Eils, Roland

    2009-12-01

    Accurate computational methods that can help to predict biological function of a protein from its sequence are of great interest to research biologists and pharmaceutical companies. One approach to assume the function of proteins is to predict the interactions between proteins and other molecules. In this work, we propose a machine learning method that uses a primary sequence of a domain to predict its propensity for interaction with small molecules. By curating the Pfam database with respect to the small molecule binding ability of its component domains, we have constructed a dataset of small molecule binding and non-binding domains. This dataset was then used as training set to learn a Bayesian classifier, which should distinguish members of each class. The domain sequences of both classes are modelled with Markov chains. In a Jack-knife test, our classification procedure achieved the predictive accuracies of 77.2% and 66.7% for binding and non-binding classes respectively. We demonstrate the applicability of our classifier by using it to identify previously unknown small molecule binding domains. Our predictions are available as supplementary material and can provide very useful information to drug discovery specialists. Given the ubiquitous and essential role small molecules play in biological processes, our method is important for identifying pharmaceutically relevant components of complete proteomes. The software is available from the author upon request.

  18. A Novel Protein Domain Induces High Affinity Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence Binding and Elongation Factor Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Caban, Kelvin; Ranaweera, Ruchira; Gonzalez-Flores, Jonathan N.; Copeland, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is incorporated at UGA codons in mRNAs possessing a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in their 3′-untranslated region. At least three additional factors are necessary for Sec incorporation: SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), Sec-tRNASec, and a Sec-specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec). The C-terminal half of SBP2 is sufficient to promote Sec incorporation in vitro, which is carried out by the concerted action of a novel Sec incorporation domain and an L7Ae RNA-binding domain. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we show that two distinct regions of the Sec incorporation domain are required for Sec incorporation. Physical separation of the Sec incorporation and RNA-binding domains revealed that they are able to function in trans and established a novel role of the Sec incorporation domain in promoting SECIS and eEFSec binding to the SBP2 RNA-binding domain. We propose a model in which SECIS binding induces a conformational change in SBP2 that recruits eEFSec, which in concert with the Sec incorporation domain gains access to the ribosomal A site. PMID:18948268

  19. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  20. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  1. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the μ-wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN. PMID:22713343

  2. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  3. Cooperative binding of LysM domains determines the carbohydrate affinity of a bacterial endopeptidase protein.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2014-02-01

    Cellulose, chitin and peptidoglycan are major long-chain carbohydrates in living organisms, and constitute a substantial fraction of the biomass. Characterization of the biochemical basis of dynamic changes and degradation of these β,1-4-linked carbohydrates is therefore important for both functional studies of biological polymers and biotechnology. Here, we investigated the functional role of multiplicity of the carbohydrate-binding lysin motif (LysM) domain that is found in proteins involved in bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. The Bacillus subtilis peptidoglycan-hydrolysing NlpC/P60 D,L-endopeptidase, cell wall-lytic enzyme associated with cell separation, possesses four LysM domains. The contribution of each LysM domain was determined by direct carbohydrate-binding studies in aqueous solution with microscale thermophoresis. We found that bacterial LysM domains have affinity for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNac) polymers in the lower-micromolar range. Moreover, we demonstrated that a single LysM domain is able to bind carbohydrate ligands, and that LysM domains act additively to increase the binding affinity. Our study reveals that affinity for GlcNAc polymers correlates with the chain length of the carbohydrate, and suggests that binding of long carbohydrates is mediated by LysM domain cooperativity. We also show that bacterial LysM domains, in contrast to plant LysM domains, do not discriminate between GlcNAc polymers, and recognize both peptidoglycan fragments and chitin polymers with similar affinity. Finally, an Ala replacement study suggested that the carbohydrate-binding site in LysM-containing proteins is conserved across phyla. © 2013 FEBS.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus protein A activates TNFR1 signaling through conserved IgG binding domains.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Marisa I; O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; Magargee, Mariah; Foster, Timothy J; Prince, Alice S

    2006-07-21

    Staphylococcus aureus continues to be a major cause of infection in normal as well as immunocompromised hosts, and the increasing prevalence of highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains is a public health concern. A highly expressed surface component of S. aureus, protein A (SpA), contributes to its success as a pathogen by both activating inflammation and by interfering with immune clearance. SpA is known to bind to IgG Fc, which impedes phagocytosis. SpA is also a potent activator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling, inducing both chemokine expression and TNF-converting enzyme-dependent soluble TNFR1 (sTNFR1) shedding, which has anti-inflammatory consequences, particularly in the lung. Using a collection of glutathione S-transferase fusions to the intact IgG binding region of SpA and to each of the individual binding domains, we found that the SpA IgG binding domains also mediate binding to human airway cells. TNFR1-dependent CXCL8 production could be elicited by any one of the individual SpA IgG binding domains as efficiently as by either the entire SpA or the intact IgG binding region. SpA induction of sTNFR1 shedding required the entire IgG binding region and tolerated fewer substitutions in residues known to interact with IgG. Each of the repeated domains of the IgG binding domain can affect multiple immune responses independently, activating inflammation through TNFR1 and thwarting opsonization by trapping IgG Fc domains, while the intact IgG binding region can limit further signaling through sTNFR1 shedding.

  5. VH3 family antibodies bind domain D of staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed

    Roben, P W; Salem, A N; Silverman, G J

    1995-06-15

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is a 45-kDa bacterial membrane protein that can interact with either Fc gamma, a constant region portion of IgG, or with the Fab portion that also mediates conventional Ag binding. In recent reports, SpA has been shown to specifically interact with Fab derived from the VH3 family and is little affected by VH CDR3, JH, or light chain usage. To identify a site on SpA responsible for VH3 Fab binding, we cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli the 61 amino acid sequence of SpA that represents domain D, and this small protein exhibited both the VH3 Fab and Fc gamma binding specificities. Surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated that domain D and native SpA had the strongest binding interactions with an IgM-kappa encoded by the germline configuration of the VH3 gene VH26c. In contrast, the apparent affinities for Fc gamma binding were at least fivefold weaker. A variant of domain D was also created that is devoid of the three-codon insertion that distinguishes domain D from all other domains in SpA. Although this deletion did not significantly affect the VH3 Fab-mediated SpA binding activity, it did improve the affinity of Fc gamma binding by an order of magnitude. These observations characterize a site on SpA responsible for binding interactions with B cell Ag receptors that are highly analogous to that of superantigens for T cell receptors.

  6. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  7. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  8. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  9. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  11. Molecular insights into the binding of phosphoinositides to the TH domain region of TIPE proteins.

    PubMed

    Antony, Priya; Baby, Bincy; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-11-01

    Phosphatidylinositols and their phosphorylated derivatives, phosphoinositides, play a central role in regulating diverse cellular functions. These phospholipids have been shown to interact with the hydrophobic TH domain of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) family of proteins. However, the precise mechanism of interaction of these lipids is unclear. Here we report the binding mode and interactions of these phospholipids in the TH domain, as elucidated using molecular docking and simulations. Results indicate that phosphoinositides bind to the TH domain in a similar way by inserting their lipid tails in the hydrophobic cavity. The exposed head group is stabilized by interactions with critical positively charged residues on the surface of these proteins. Further MD simulations confirmed the dynamic stability of these lipids in the TH domain. This computational analysis thus provides insight into the binding mode of phospholipids in the TH domain of the TIPE family of proteins. Graphical abstract A phosphoinositide (phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate; PtdIns4P) docked to TIPE2.

  12. Probing the Determinants of Diacylglycerol Binding Affinity in C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Morgan, Brittany; Massi, Francesca; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2012-01-01

    C1 domains are independently folded modules that are responsible for targeting their parent proteins to lipid membranes containing diacylglycerol (DAG), a ubiquitous second messenger. The DAG-binding affinities of C1 domains determine the threshold concentration of DAG required for the propagation of the signaling response and the selectivity of this response among the DAG receptors in the cell. The structural information currently available for C1 domains offers little insight into the molecular basis of their differential DAG-binding affinities. In this work, we characterized the C1B domain of Protein Kinase Cα (C1Bα) and its diagnostic mutant, Y123W, using solution NMR methods and molecular dynamics simulations. The mutation did not perturb the C1Bα structure or sub-nanosecond dynamics of the protein backbone, but resulted in a >100-fold increase of DAG binding affinity and substantial change in μs-timescale conformational dynamics, as quantified by NMR rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion methods. The differences in the conformational exchange behavior between the wild-type and Y123W C1Bα were localized to the hinge regions of ligand-binding loops. Molecular dynamics simulations provided insight into the identity of the exchanging conformers and revealed the significance of a particular residue, Gln128, in modulating the geometry of the ligand-binding site. Taken together with the results of binding studies, our findings suggest that the conformational dynamics and preferential partitioning of the tryptophan sidechain into the water-lipid interface are important factors that modulate the DAG-binding properties of C1 domains. PMID:21419781

  13. The SARS Coronavirus 3a protein binds calcium in its cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Minakshi, Rinki; Padhan, Kartika; Rehman, Safikur; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2014-10-13

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a positive stranded RNA virus with ∼30kb genome. Among all open reading frames (orfs) of this virus, the orf3a is the largest, and encodes a protein of 274 amino acids, named as 3a protein. Sequence analysis suggests that the orf3a aligned to one calcium pump present in Plasmodium falciparum and the enzyme glutamine synthetase found in Leptospira interrogans. This sequence similarity was found to be limited only to amino acid residues 209-264 which form the cytoplasmic domain of the orf3a. Furthermore, this region was predicted to be involved in the calcium binding. Owing to this hypothesis, we were driven to establish its calcium binding property in vitro. Here, we expressed and purified the cytoplasmic domain of the 3a protein, called Cyto3a, as a recombinant His-tagged protein in the E. coli. The calcium binding nature was established by performing various staining methods such as ruthenium red and stains-all. (45)Ca overlay method was also done to further support the data. Since the 3a protein forms ion channels, we were interested to see any conformational changes occurring in the Cyot3a upon calcium binding, using fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. These studies clearly indicate a significant change in the conformation of the Cyto3a protein after binding with calcium. Our results strongly suggest that the cytoplasmic domain of the 3a protein of SARS-CoV binds calcium in vitro, causing a change in protein conformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural feature extraction protocol for classifying reversible membrane binding protein domains.

    PubMed

    Källberg, Morten; Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Machine learning based classification protocols for automated function annotation of protein structures have in many instances proven superior to simpler sequence based procedures. Here we present an automated method for extracting features from protein structures by construction of surface patches to be used in such protocols. The utility of the developed patch-growing procedure is exemplified by its ability to identify reversible membrane binding domains from the C1, C2, and PH families.

  15. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  16. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  17. Identification of the erythrocyte binding domains of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi proteins involved in erythrocyte invasion

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax and the related monkey malaria, P. knowlesi, require interaction with the Duffy blood group antigen, a receptor for a family of chemokines that includes interleukin 8, to invade human erythrocytes. One P. vivax and three P. knowlesi proteins that serve as erythrocyte binding ligands in such interactions share sequence homology. Expression of different regions of the P. vivax protein in COS7 cells identified a cysteine-rich domain that bound Duffy blood group-positive but not Duffy blood group-negative human erythrocytes. The homologous domain of the P. knowlesi proteins also bound erythrocytes, but had different specificities. The P. vivax and P. knowlesi binding domains lie in one of two regions of homology with the P. falciparum sialic acid binding protein, another erythrocyte binding ligand, indicating conservation of the domain for erythrocyte binding in evolutionarily distant malaria species. The binding domains of these malaria ligands represent potential vaccine candidates and targets for receptor-blockade therapy. PMID:8046329

  18. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  19. Ephemeral Protein Binding to DNA Shapes Stable Nuclear Bodies and Chromatin Domains.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Chris A; Liebchen, Benno; Michieletto, Davide; Mouvet, Francois; Cook, Peter R; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2017-03-28

    Fluorescence microscopy reveals that the contents of many (membrane-free) nuclear bodies exchange rapidly with the soluble pool while the underlying structure persists; such observations await a satisfactory biophysical explanation. To shed light on this, we perform large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of a chromatin fiber interacting with an ensemble of (multivalent) DNA-binding proteins able to switch between an "on" (binding) and an "off" (nonbinding) state. This system provides a model for any DNA-binding protein that can be posttranslationally modified to change its affinity for DNA (e.g., through phosphorylation). Protein switching is a nonequilibrium process, and it leads to the formation of clusters of self-limiting size, where individual proteins in a cluster exchange with the soluble pool with kinetics similar to those seen in photobleaching experiments. This behavior contrasts sharply with that exhibited by nonswitching proteins, which are permanently in the on-state; when these bind to DNA nonspecifically, they form clusters that grow indefinitely in size. To explain these findings, we propose a mean-field theory from which we obtain a scaling relation between the typical cluster size and the protein switching rate. Protein switching also reshapes intrachromatin contacts to give networks resembling those seen in topologically associating domains, as switching markedly favors local (short-range) contacts over distant ones. Our results point to posttranslational modification of chromatin-bridging proteins as a generic mechanism driving the self-assembly of highly dynamic, nonequilibrium, protein clusters with the properties of nuclear bodies.

  20. RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alice Ford; Shorter, James

    2017-04-07

    Approximately 70 human RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) contain a prion-like domain (PrLD). PrLDs are low-complexity domains that possess a similar amino acid composition to prion domains in yeast, which enable several proteins, including Sup35 and Rnq1, to form infectious conformers, termed prions. In humans, PrLDs contribute to RBP function and enable RBPs to undergo liquid-liquid phase transitions that underlie the biogenesis of various membraneless organelles. However, this activity appears to render RBPs prone to misfolding and aggregation connected to neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, numerous RBPs with PrLDs, including TDP-43 (transactivation response element DNA-binding protein 43), FUS (fused in sarcoma), TAF15 (TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15), EWSR1 (Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1), and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A1 and A2 (hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2), have now been connected via pathology and genetics to the etiology of several neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, and multisystem proteinopathy. Here, we review the physiological and pathological roles of the most prominent RBPs with PrLDs. We also highlight the potential of protein disaggregases, including Hsp104, as a therapeutic strategy to combat the aberrant phase transitions of RBPs with PrLDs that likely underpin neurodegeneration.

  1. Resonance assignment of the ribosome binding domain of E. coli ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierre; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Uzan, Marc; Bontems, François; Sizun, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is an essential actor for protein synthesis in Escherichia coli. It is involved in mRNA recruitment by the 30S ribosomal subunit and recognition of the correct start codon during translation initiation. E. coli S1 is a modular protein that contains six repeats of an S1 motif, which have distinct functions despite structural homology. Whereas the three central repeats have been shown to be involved in mRNA recognition, the two first repeats that constitute the N-terminal domain of S1 are responsible for binding to the 30S subunit. Here we report the almost complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of two fragments of the 30S binding region of S1. The first fragment comprises only the first repeat. The second corresponds to the entire ribosome binding domain. Since S1 is absent from all high resolution X-ray structures of prokaryotic ribosomes, these data provide a first step towards atomic level structural characterization of this domain by NMR. Chemical shift analysis of the first repeat provides evidence for structural divergence from the canonical OB-fold of an S1 motif. In contrast the second domain displays the expected topology for an S1 motif, which rationalizes the functional specialization of the two subdomains.

  2. Conformational stability and domain coupling in D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The monomeric D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) from Escherichia coli (Mr 33000) is a periplasmic protein that serves as a high-affinity receptor for the active transport and chemotaxis towards both sugars. The effect of D-glucose binding on the thermal unfolding of the GGBP protein at pH 7.0 has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), far-UV CD and intrinsic tryptophanyl residue fluorescence (Trp fluorescence). All three techniques reveal reversible, thermal transitions and a midpoint temperature (Tm) increase from 50 to 63 °C produced by 10 mM D-glucose. Both in the absence and presence of D-glucose a single asymmetric endotherm for GGBP is observed in DSC, although each endotherm consists of two transitions about 4 °C apart in Tm values. In the absence of D-glucose, the protein unfolding is best described by two non-ideal transitions, suggesting the presence of unfolding intermediates. In the presence of D-glucose protein, unfolding is more co-operative than in the absence of the ligand, and the experimental data are best fitted to a model that assumes two ideal (two-state) sequential transitions. Thus D-glucose binding changes the character of the GGBP protein folding/unfolding by linking the two domains such that protein unfolding becomes a cooperative, two two-state process. A KA′ value of 5.6×106 M−1 at 63 °C for D-glucose binding is estimated from DSC results. The domain with the lower stability in DSC measurements has been identified as the C-terminal domain of GGBP from thermally induced Trp fluorescence changes. PMID:15032747

  3. Domain dislocation: a change of core structure in periplasmic binding proteins in their evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Tateno, Y; Nishikawa, K

    1999-02-12

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) serve as receptors for various water-soluble ligands in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport systems, and form one of the largest protein families in eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. They are considered to be derived from a common ancestor, judging from their similarities of three-dimensional structure, their mechanism of ligand binding and the operon structure of their genes. Nevertheless, there are two types of topological arrangements of the central beta-sheets in their core structures. It follows that there must have been differentiation in the core structure, which we call "domain dislocation", in the course of evolution of the PBP family. To find a clue as to when the domain dislocation occurred, we constructed phylogenetic trees for PBPs based on their amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures, respectively. The trees show that the proteins of each type clearly cluster together, strongly indicating that the change in the core structure occurred only once in the evolution of PBPs. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ABC proteins that are encoded by the same operon of their partner PBP, and obtained the same result. Based on the phylogenetic relationship and comparison of the topological arrangements of PBPs, we obtained a reasonable genealogical chart of structural changes in the PBP family. The present analysis shows that the unidirectional change of protein evolution is clearly deduced at the level of protein three-dimensional structure rather than the level of amino acid sequence.

  4. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein–albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug. PMID:25864124

  5. Quercetin-3-rutinoside Inhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase by Binding to Its b′x Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Gopal, Srila; Sharda, Anish; Passam, Freda; Bowley, Sheryl R.; Stopa, Jack; Xue, Guangpu; Yuan, Cai; Furie, Barbara C.; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Huang, Mingdong; Furie, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin-3-rutinoside inhibits thrombus formation in a mouse model by inhibiting extracellular protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme required for platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation. Prior studies have identified PDI as a potential target for novel antithrombotic agents. Using a fluorescence enhancement-based assay and isothermal calorimetry, we show that quercetin-3-rutinoside directly binds to the b′ domain of PDI with a 1:1 stoichiometry. The binding of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI induces a more compact conformation and restricts the conformational flexibility of PDI, as revealed by small angle x-ray scattering. The binding sites of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI were determined by studying its interaction with isolated fragments of PDI. Quercetin-3-rutinoside binds to the b′x domain of PDI. The infusion of the b′x fragment of PDI rescued thrombus formation that was inhibited by quercetin-3-rutinoside in a mouse thrombosis model. This b′x fragment does not possess reductase activity and, in the absence of quercetin-3-rutinoside, does not affect thrombus formation in vivo. The isolated b′ domain of PDI has potential as an antidote to reverse the antithrombotic effect of quercetin-3-rutinoside by binding and neutralizing quercetin-3-rutinoside. PMID:26240139

  6. Quercetin-3-rutinoside Inhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase by Binding to Its b'x Domain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Gopal, Srila; Sharda, Anish; Passam, Freda; Bowley, Sheryl R; Stopa, Jack; Xue, Guangpu; Yuan, Cai; Furie, Barbara C; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Huang, Mingdong; Furie, Bruce

    2015-09-25

    Quercetin-3-rutinoside inhibits thrombus formation in a mouse model by inhibiting extracellular protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme required for platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation. Prior studies have identified PDI as a potential target for novel antithrombotic agents. Using a fluorescence enhancement-based assay and isothermal calorimetry, we show that quercetin-3-rutinoside directly binds to the b' domain of PDI with a 1:1 stoichiometry. The binding of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI induces a more compact conformation and restricts the conformational flexibility of PDI, as revealed by small angle x-ray scattering. The binding sites of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI were determined by studying its interaction with isolated fragments of PDI. Quercetin-3-rutinoside binds to the b'x domain of PDI. The infusion of the b'x fragment of PDI rescued thrombus formation that was inhibited by quercetin-3-rutinoside in a mouse thrombosis model. This b'x fragment does not possess reductase activity and, in the absence of quercetin-3-rutinoside, does not affect thrombus formation in vivo. The isolated b' domain of PDI has potential as an antidote to reverse the antithrombotic effect of quercetin-3-rutinoside by binding and neutralizing quercetin-3-rutinoside. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Nanofibrillar hydrogel scaffolds from recombinant protein-based polymers with integrin- and proteoglycan-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K; Werten, Marc W T; Posadowska, Urszula; Storm, Ingeborg M; de Wolf, Frits A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-12-01

    This study describes the design, production, and testing of functionalized variants of a recombinant protein-based polymer that forms nanofibrillar hydrogels with self-healing properties. With a view to bone tissue engineering applications, we equipped these variants with N-terminal extensions containing either (1) integrin-binding (RGD) or (2) less commonly studied proteoglycan-binding (KRSR) cell-adhesive motifs. The polymers were efficiently produced as secreted proteins using the yeast Pichia pastoris and were essentially monodisperse. The pH-responsive protein-based polymers are soluble at low pH and self-assemble into supramolecular fibrils and hydrogels at physiological pH. By mixing functionalized and nonfunctionalized proteins in different ratios, and adjusting pH, hydrogel scaffolds with the same protein concentration but varying content of the two types of cell-adhesive motifs were readily obtained. The scaffolds were used for the two-dimensional culture of MG-63 osteoblastic cells. RGD domains had a slightly stronger effect than KRSR domains on adhesion, activity, and spreading. However, scaffolds featuring both functional domains revealed a clear synergistic effect on cell metabolic activity and spreading, and provided the highest final degree of cell confluency. The mixed functionalized hydrogels presented here thus allowed to tailor the osteoblastic cell response, offering prospects for their further development as scaffolds for bone regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3082-3092, 2016.

  8. RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in ALS and FTLD-U.

    PubMed

    Gitler, Aaron D; Shorter, James

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is a debilitating, and universally fatal, neurodegenerative disease that devastates upper and lower motor neurons. The causes of ALS are poorly understood. A central role for RNA-binding proteins and RNA metabolism in ALS has recently emerged. The RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, are principal components of cytoplasmic inclusions found in motor neurons of ALS patients and mutations in TDP-43 and FUS are linked to familial and sporadic ALS. Pathology and genetics also connect TDP-43 and FUS with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). It was unknown whether mechanisms of FUS aggregation and toxicity were similar or different to those of TDP-43. To address this issue, we have employed yeast models and pure protein biochemistry to define mechanisms underlying TDP-43 and FUS aggregation and toxicity, and to identify genetic modifiers relevant for human disease. We have identified prion-like domains in FUS and TDP-43 and provide evidence that these domains are required for aggregation. Our studies have defined key similarities as well as important differences between the two proteins. Collectively, however, our findings lead us to suggest that FUS and TDP-43, though similar RNA-binding proteins, likely aggregate and confer disease phenotypes via distinct mechanisms.

  9. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  10. Structure of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein copper-binding domain at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey Kwai-Wai; Adams, Julian J.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.

    2007-10-01

    An atomic resolution structure of the copper-binding domain of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein is presented. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, as its cleavage generates the Aβ peptide that is toxic to cells. APP is able to bind Cu{sup 2+} and reduce it to Cu{sup +} through its copper-binding domain (CuBD). The interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and APP leads to a decrease in Aβ production and to alleviation of the symptoms of the disease in mouse models. Structural studies of CuBD have been undertaken in order to better understand the mechanism behind the process. Here, the crystal structure of CuBD in the metal-free form determined to ultrahigh resolution (0.85 Å) is reported. The structure shows that the copper-binding residues of CuBD are rather rigid but that Met170, which is thought to be the electron source for Cu{sup 2+} reduction, adopts two different side-chain conformations. These observations shed light on the copper-binding and redox mechanisms of CuBD. The structure of CuBD at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of molecules that will deplete Aβ production.

  11. The LIM motif defines a specific zinc-binding protein domain.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, J W; Schmeichel, K L; Beckerle, M C; Winge, D R

    1993-05-15

    The cysteine-rich protein (CRP) contains two copies of the LIM sequence motif, CX2CX17HX2CX2CX2CX17-CX2C, that was first identified in the homeodomain proteins Lin-11, Is1-1, and Mec-3. The abundance and spacing of the cysteine residues in the LIM motif are reminiscent of a metal-binding domain. We examined the metal-binding properties of CRP isolated from chicken smooth muscle (cCRP) and from a bacterial expression system and observed that cCRP is a specific Zn-binding metalloprotein. Four Zn(II) ions are maximally bound to cCRP, consistent with the idea that each LIM domain coordinates two metal ions. From spectroscopic studies of Co(II)- and 113Cd(II)-substituted cCRP, we determined that each metal ion is tetrahedrally coordinated with cysteinyl sulfurs dominating the ligand types. One metal site within each LIM motif has tetrathiolate (S4) coordination, the second site may either be S4 or S3N1. The LIM motif represents another example of a specific Zn-binding protein sequence.

  12. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, Rebecca L.; Fraser, LaTasha C.R.; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2015-01-01

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining 3JNC’ couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of 1HN and 15N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded β-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short α-helix and three-stranded β-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and 3JNC’ H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by 1HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when 15N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of 1HN and 15N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility. PMID:26682823

  13. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Rebecca L; Fraser, LaTasha C R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2015-12-15

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining (3)JNC' couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded β-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short α-helix and three-stranded β-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and (3)JNC' H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by (1)HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when (15)N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility.

  14. Proteins that contain a functional Z-DNA-binding domain localize to cytoplasmic stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Siew Kit; Weissbach, Rebekka; Ronson, George E.; Scadden, A. D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Long double-stranded RNA may undergo hyper-editing by adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs), where up to 50% of adenosine residues may be converted to inosine. However, although numerous RNAs may undergo hyper-editing, the role for inosine-containing hyper-edited double-stranded RNA in cells is poorly understood. Nevertheless, editing plays a critical role in mammalian cells, as highlighted by the analysis of ADAR-null mutants. In particular, the long form of ADAR1 (ADAR1p150) is essential for viability. Moreover, a number of studies have implicated ADAR1p150 in various stress pathways. We have previously shown that ADAR1p150 localized to cytoplasmic stress granules in HeLa cells following either oxidative or interferon-induced stress. Here, we show that the Z-DNA-binding domain (ZαADAR1) exclusively found in ADAR1p150 is required for its localization to stress granules. Moreover, we show that fusion of ZαADAR1 to either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or polypyrimidine binding protein 4 (PTB4) also results in their localization to stress granules. We additionally show that the Zα domain from other Z-DNA-binding proteins (ZBP1, E3L) is likewise sufficient for localization to stress granules. Finally, we show that Z-RNA or Z-DNA binding is important for stress granule localization. We have thus identified a novel role for Z-DNA-binding domains in mammalian cells. PMID:23982513

  15. The C-terminal helices of heat shock protein 70 are essential for J-domain binding and ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Chao; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Wu, Meng; Cao, Chun-Yang; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-02-17

    The J-domain co-chaperones work together with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) chaperone to regulate many cellular events, but the mechanism underlying the J-domain-mediated HSP70 function remains elusive. We studied the interaction between human-inducible HSP70 and Homo sapiens J-domain protein (HSJ1a), a J domain and UIM motif-containing co-chaperone. The J domain of HSJ1a shares a conserved structure with other J domains from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic species, and it mediates the interaction with and the ATPase cycle of HSP70. Our in vitro study corroborates that the N terminus of HSP70 including the ATPase domain and the substrate-binding β-subdomain is not sufficient to bind with the J domain of HSJ1a. The C-terminal helical α-subdomain of HSP70, which was considered to function as a lid of the substrate-binding domain, is crucial for binding with the J domain of HSJ1a and stimulating the ATPase activity of HSP70. These fluctuating helices are likely to contribute to a proper conformation of HSP70 for J-domain binding other than directly bind with the J domain. Our findings provide an alternative mechanism of allosteric activation for functional regulation of HSP70 by its J-domain co-chaperones.

  16. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  17. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs—consisting of 2–3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)—arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1–β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. PMID:28333205

  18. Cooperative binding of dominant-negative prion protein to kringle domains.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Chongsuk; Prusiner, Stanley B; Legname, Giuseppe

    2003-05-30

    Conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a major biochemical alteration in the progression of prion disease. This conversion process is thought to require interaction between PrP(C) and an as yet unidentified auxiliary factor, provisionally designated protein X. In searching for protein X, we screened a phage display cDNA expression library constructed from prion-infected neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells and identified a kringle protein domain using full-length recombinant mouse PrP (recMoPrP(23-231), hereafter recMoPrP) expressing a dominant-negative mutation at codon 218 (recMoPrP(Q218K)). In vitro binding analysis using ELISA verified specific interaction of recMoPrP to kringle domains (K(1+2+3)) with higher binding by recMoPrP(Q218K) than by full-length recMoPrP without the mutation. This interaction was confirmed by competitive binding analysis, in which the addition of either a specific anti-kringle antibody or L-lysine abolished the interaction. Biochemical studies of the interactions between K(1+2+3) and various concentrations of both recMoPrP molecules demonstrated binding in a dose-dependent manner. A Hill plot analysis of the data indicates positive cooperative binding of both recMoPrP(Q218K) and recMoPrP to K(1+2+3) with stronger binding by recMoPrP(Q218K). Using full-length and an N-terminally truncated MoPrP(89-231), we demonstrate that N-terminal sequences enable PrP to bind strongly to K(1+2+3). Further characterization with truncated MoPrP(89-231) refolded in different conformations revealed that both alpha-helical and beta-sheet conformations bind to K(1+2+3). Our data demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of a dominant-negative PrP as well as binding of other PrPs to K(1+2+3). The relevance of such interactions during prion pathogenesis remains to be established.

  19. Regulation and action of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein AAA+ domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial EBPs (enhancer-binding proteins) play crucial roles in regulating cellular responses to environmental changes, in part by providing efficient control over σ54-dependent gene transcription. The AAA+ (ATPase associated with various cellular activites) domain of the EBPs, when assembled into a ring, uses energy from ATP binding, hydrolysis and product release to remodel the σ54–RNAP (RNA polymerase) holoenzyme so that it can transition from closed to open form at promoter DNA. The assembly, and hence activity, of these ATPases are regulated by many different signal transduction mechanisms. Recent advances in solution scattering techniques, when combined with high-resolution structures and biochemical data, have enabled us to obtain mechanistic insights into the regulation and action of a subset of these σ54 activators: those whose assembly into ring form is controlled by two-component signal transduction. We review (i) experimental considerations of applying the SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering)/WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) technique, (ii) distinct regulation mechanisms of the AAA+ domains of three EBPs by similar two-component signal transduction receiver domains, and (iii) major conformational changes and correlated σ54-binding activity of an isolated EBP AAA+ domain in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:18208392

  20. Regulation and action of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein AAA+ domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2008-08-04

    Bacterial EBPs (enhancer-binding proteins) play crucial roles in regulating cellular responses to environmental changes, in part by providing efficient control over {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent gene transcription. The AAA+ (ATPase associated with various cellular activites) domain of the EBPs, when assembled into a ring, uses energy from ATP binding, hydrolysis and product release to remodel the {sigma}{sup 54}-RNAP (RNA polymerase) holoenzyme so that it can transition from closed to open form at promoter DNA. The assembly, and hence activity, of these ATPases are regulated by many different signal transduction mechanisms. Recent advances in solution scattering techniques, when combined with high-resolution structures and biochemical data, have enabled us to obtain mechanistic insights into the regulation and action of a subset of these {sigma}{sup 54} activators: those whose assembly into ring form is controlled by two-component signal transduction. We review (i) experimental considerations of applying the SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering)/WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) technique, (ii) distinct regulation mechanisms of the AAA+ domains of three EBPs by similar two-component signal transduction receiver domains, and (iii) major conformational changes and correlated {sigma}{sup 54}-binding activity of an isolated EBP AAA+ domain in the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  1. An Epigenetic Regulator: Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein 1 (MBD1)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Chen, Bi-Feng; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important form of epigenetic regulation in both normal development and cancer. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 1 (MBD1) is highly related to DNA methylation. Its MBD domain recognizes and binds to methylated CpGs. This binding allows it to trigger methylation of H3K9 and results in transcriptional repression. The CXXC3 domain of MBD1 makes it a unique member of the MBD family due to its affinity to unmethylated DNA. MBD1 acts as an epigenetic regulator via different mechanisms, such as the formation of the MCAF1/MBD1/SETDB1 complex or the MBD1-HDAC3 complex. As methylation status always changes along with carcinogenesis or neurogenesis, MBD1 with its interacting partners, including proteins and non-coding RNAs, participates in normal or pathological processes and functions in different regulatory systems. Because of the important role of MBD1 in epigenetic regulation, it is a good candidate as a therapeutic target for diseases. PMID:25751725

  2. Clathrin assembly protein AP180: primary structure, domain organization and identification of a clathrin binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, S A; Schröder, S; Plessmann, U; Weber, K; Ungewickell, E

    1993-01-01

    Binding of AP180 to clathrin triskelia induces their assembly into 60-70 nm coats. The largest rat brain cDNA clone isolated predicts a molecular weight of 91,430 for AP180. Two cDNA clones have an additional small 57 bp insert. The deduced molecular weight agrees with gel filtration results provided the more chaotropic denaturant 6 M guanidinium thiocyanate is substituted for the weaker guanidinium chloride. The sequence and the proteolytic cleavage pattern suggest a three domain structure. The N-terminal 300 residues (pI 8.7) harbour a clathrin binding site. An acidic middle domain (pI 3.6, 450 residues), interrupted by an uncharged alanine rich segment of 59 residues, appears to be responsible for the anomalous physical properties of AP180. The C-terminal domain (166 residues) has a pI of 10.4. AP180 mRNA is restricted to neuronal sources. AP180 shows no significant homology to known clathrin binding proteins, but is nearly identical to a mouse phosphoprotein (F1-20). This protein, localized to synaptic termini, has so far been of unknown function. Images PMID:8440257

  3. Identification of Src, Fyn, and Lyn SH3-binding proteins: implications for a function of SH3 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Z; Thomas, S M; Rickles, R J; Taylor, J A; Brauer, A W; Seidel-Dugan, C; Michael, W M; Dreyfuss, G; Brugge, J S

    1994-01-01

    Src homology 3 (SH3) domains mediate protein-protein interactions necessary for the coupling of cellular proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction. We previously established solution-binding conditions that allow affinity isolation of Src SH3-binding proteins from cellular extracts (Z. Weng, J. A. Taylor, C. E. Turner, J. S. Brugge, and C. Seidel-Dugan, J. Biol. Chem. 268:14956-14963, 1993). In this report, we identified three of these proteins: Shc, a signaling protein that couples membrane tyrosine kinases with Ras; p62, a protein which can bind to p21rasGAP; and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, a pre-mRNA-binding protein. All of these proteins contain proline-rich peptide motifs that could serve as SH3 domain ligands, and the binding of these proteins to the Src SH3 domain was inhibited with a proline-rich Src SH3 peptide ligand. These three proteins, as well as most of the other Src SH3 ligands, also bound to the SH3 domains of the closely related protein tyrosine kinases Fyn and Lyn. However, Src- and Lyn-specific SH3-binding proteins were also detected, suggesting subtle differences in the binding specificity of the SH3 domains from these related proteins. Several Src SH3-binding proteins were phosphorylated in Src-transformed cells. The phosphorylation of these proteins was not detected in cells transformed by a mutant variant of Src lacking the SH3 domain, while there was little change in tyrosine phosphorylation of other Src-induced phosphoproteins. In addition, the coprecipitation of v-Src with two tyrosyl-phosphorylated proteins with M(r)s of 62,000 and 130,000 was inhibited by incubation with a Src SH3 peptide ligand, suggesting that the binding of these substrate proteins is dependent on interactions with the SH3 domain. These results strongly suggest a role for the Src SH3 domain in the recruitment of substrates to this protein tyrosine kinase, either through direct interaction with the SH3 domain or indirectly through

  4. Identification of Adducin-Binding Residues on the Cytoplasmic Domain of Erythrocyte Membrane Protein, Band 3

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Taina; Chu, Haiyan; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Two major complexes form structural bridges that connect the erythrocyte membrane to its underlying spectrin-based cytoskeleton. Although the band 3-ankyrin bridge may account for most of the membrane-to-cytoskeleton interactions, the linkage between the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) and adducin has also been shown to be critical to membrane integrity. In this paper, we demonstrate that adducin, a major component of the spectrin-actin junctional complex, binds primarily to residues 246 through 264 of cdb3, and mutation of two exposed glutamic acid residues within this sequence completely abrogates both α- and β-adducin binding. Because these residues are located next to the ankyrin binding site on cdb3, it seems unlikely that band 3 can bind ankyrin and adducin concurrently, reducing the chances of an association between the ankyrin and junctional complexes that would significantly compromise erythrocyte membrane integrity. We also demonstrate the adducin binds the kidney isoform of cdb3, a spliceoform that lacks the first 65 amino acids of erythrocyte cdb3, including the central strand of a large beta-pleated sheet. Because kidney cdb3 is not known to bind any of the common peripheral protein partners of erythrocyte cdb3, including ankyrin, protein 4.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and phosphofructokinase, retention of this affinity for adducin was unexpected. PMID:27435097

  5. In vivo binding properties of SH2 domains from GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J A; Kashishian, A

    1993-01-01

    We have used a transient expression system and mutant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors to study the binding specificities of the Src homology 2 (SH2) regions of the Ras GTPase-activator protein (GAP) and the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase). A number of fusion proteins, each tagged with an epitope allowing recognition by a monoclonal antibody, were expressed at levels comparable to those of endogenous GAP. Fusion proteins containing the central SH2-SH3-SH2 region of GAP or the C-terminal region of p85 alpha, which includes two SH2 domains, bound to PDGF receptors in response to PDGF stimulation. Both fusion proteins showed the same requirements for tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the PDGF receptor as the full-length proteins from which they were derived, i.e., binding of the GAP fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-771, and binding of the p85 fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-740, Tyr-751, or both residues. Fusion proteins containing single SH2 domains from either GAP or p85 alpha did not bind detectably to PDGF receptors in this system, suggesting that two SH2 domains in a single polypeptide cooperate to raise the affinity of binding. The sequence specificities of individual SH2 domains were deduced from the binding properties of fusion proteins containing one SH2 domain from GAP and another from p85. The results suggest that the C-terminal GAP SH2 domain specifies binding to Tyr-771, the C-terminal p85 alpha SH2 domain binds to either Tyr-740 or Tyr-751, and each protein's N-terminal SH2 domain binds to unidentified phosphorylation sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8382774

  6. Protein CTC from Aquifex aeolicus possesses a full-sized 5S rRNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Korobeinikova, A V; Shestakov, S A; Korepanov, A P; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal 5S RNA is the only identified target for proteins of the CTC family. All known proteins of this family, except for CTC from Aquifex aeolicus, contain a full-sized 5S rRNA-binding domain. In the present study a mistake in the published A. aeolicus genome is corrected. It has been demonstrated that the ctc gene of this organism encodes the protein with a full-length 5S rRNA-binding domain. This protein binds specifically to the bacterial 5S rRNA. Thereby, our data show that CTC A. aeolicus is not an exception from the other known CTC proteins.

  7. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Radakovics, Katharina; Smith, Terry K.; Bobik, Nina; Round, Adam; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Usón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1–83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1–83) structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1–240), we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88. PMID:27973613

  8. The expanded octarepeat domain selectively binds prions and disrupts homomeric prion protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Leliveld, Sirik Rutger; Dame, Remus Thei; Wuite, Gijs J L; Stitz, Lothar; Korth, Carsten

    2006-02-10

    Insertion of additional octarepeats into the prion protein gene has been genetically linked to familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease and hence to de novo generation of infectious prions. The pivotal event during prion formation is the conversion of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc, which subsequently induces further conversion in an autocatalytic manner. Apparently, an expanded octarepeat domain directs folding of PrP toward the PrPSc conformation and initiates a self-replicating conversion process. Here, based on three main observations, we have provided a model on how altered molecular interactions between wild-type and mutant PrP set the stage for familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease with octarepeat insertions. First, we showed that wild-type octarepeat domains interact in a copper-dependent and reversible manner, a "copper switch." This interaction becomes irreversible upon domain expansion, possibly reflecting a loss of function. Second, expanded octarepeat domains of increasing length gradually form homogenous globular multimers of 11-21 nm in the absence of copper ions when expressed as soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Third, octarepeat domain expansion causes a gain of function with at least 10 repeats selectively binding PrPSc in a denaturant-resistant complex in the absence of copper ions. Thus, the combination of both a loss and gain of function profoundly influences homomeric interaction behavior of PrP with an expanded octarepeat domain. A multimeric cluster of prion proteins carrying expanded octarepeat domains may therefore capture and incorporate spontaneously arising short-lived PrPSc-like conformers, thereby providing a matrix for their conversion.

  9. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Protein Contains Domains for ATP Binding, Nuclear Localization, and Type IV Secretion▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Vergunst, Annette C.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Moyer, Deborah M.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Ream, Walt

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are closely related plant pathogens that cause different diseases, crown gall and hairy root. Both diseases result from transfer, integration, and expression of plasmid-encoded bacterial genes located on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) in the plant genome. Bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins necessary for infection are also translocated into plant cells. Transfer of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and Vir proteins requires a type IV secretion system, a protein complex spanning the bacterial envelope. A. tumefaciens translocates the ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells, where it binds single-stranded T-DNA and helps target it to the nucleus. Although some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, they are pathogenic and transfer T-DNA efficiently. Instead, these bacteria express the GALLS protein, which is essential for their virulence. The GALLS protein can complement an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation, indicating that GALLS can substitute for VirE2. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. Both GALLS and VirE2 contain nuclear localization sequences and a C-terminal type IV secretion signal. Here we show that mutations in any of these domains abolished the ability of GALLS to substitute for VirE2. PMID:17012398

  10. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  11. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  12. Properties of natural and artificial proteins displaying multiple ubiquitin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Aillet, Fabienne

    2010-02-01

    Ubiquitylation provides a rapid alternative to control the activity of crucial cellular factors through the remodelling of a target protein. Diverse ubiquitin chains are recognized by domains with affinity for UBDs (ubiquitin-binding domains) present in receptor/effector proteins. Interestingly, some proteins contain more than one UBD and the preservation of this structure in many species suggests an evolutionary advantage for this topology. Here, we review some typical proteins that naturally contain more than one UBD and emphasize how such structures contribute to the mechanism they mediate. Characteristics such as higher affinities for polyubiquitin chains and chain-linkage preferences can be replicated by the TUBEs (tandem ubiquitin-binding entities). Furthermore, TUBEs show two additional properties: protection of ubiquitylated substrates from deubiquitylating enzymes and interference with the action of the proteasome. Consequently, TUBEs behave as 'ubiquitin traps' that efficiently capture endogenous ubiquitylated proteins. Interpretations and hypothetical models proposed by different groups to understand the synchronous action of multiple UBDs are discussed herein.

  13. Ultrafast differential flexibility of Cro-protein binding domains of two operator DNAs with different sequences.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Ghosh, Basusree; Singh, Priya; Ghosh, Raka; Roy, Siddhartha; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-07-21

    The nature of the interface of specific protein-DNA complexes has attracted immense interest in contemporary molecular biology. Although extensive studies on the role of flexibility of DNA in the specific interaction in the genetic regulatory activity of lambda Cro (Cro-protein) have been performed, the exploration of quantitative features remains deficient. In this study, we have mutated (site directed mutagenesis: SDM) Cro-protein at the 37th position with a cysteine residue (G37C) retaining the functional integrity of the protein and labelled the cysteine residue, which is close to the interface, with a fluorescent probe (AEDANS), for the investigation of its interface with operator DNAs (OR3 and OR2). We have employed picosecond resolved polarization gated fluorescence spectroscopy and the well known strategy of solvation dynamics for the exploration of physical motions of the fluorescent probes and associated environments, respectively. Even though this particular probe on the protein (AEDANS) shows marginal changes in its structural flexibility upon interaction with the DNAs, a non-covalent DNA bound probe (DAPI), which binds to the minor groove, shows a major differential alteration in the dynamical flexibility in the OR3-Cro complex when compared to that of the OR2 complex with the Cro-protein. We attempt to correlate the observed significant structural fluctuation of the Cro-protein binding domain of OR3 for the specificity of the protein to the operator DNA.

  14. Alternative conformations of the Tau repeat domain in complex with an engineered binding protein.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Clara S R; Mirecka, Ewa A; Klein, Antonia N; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Willbold, Dieter; Marino, Stephen F; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The aggregation of Tau into paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. The aggregation reaction is characterized by conformational conversion of the repeat domain, which partially adopts a cross-β-structure in the resulting amyloid-like fibrils. Here, we report the selection and characterization of an engineered binding protein, β-wrapin TP4, targeting the Tau repeat domain. TP4 was obtained by phage display using the four-repeat Tau construct K18ΔK280 as a target. TP4 binds K18ΔK280 as well as the longest isoform of human Tau, hTau40, with nanomolar affinity. NMR spectroscopy identified two alternative TP4-binding sites in the four-repeat domain, with each including two hexapeptide motifs with high β-sheet propensity. Both binding sites contain the aggregation-determining PHF6 hexapeptide within repeat 3. In addition, one binding site includes the PHF6* hexapeptide within repeat 2, whereas the other includes the corresponding hexapeptide Tau(337-342) within repeat 4, denoted PHF6**. Comparison of TP4-binding with Tau aggregation reveals that the same regions of Tau are involved in both processes. TP4 inhibits Tau aggregation at substoichiometric concentration, demonstrating that it interferes with aggregation nucleation. This study provides residue-level insight into the interaction of Tau with an aggregation inhibitor and highlights the structural flexibility of Tau. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Enzyme immobilization using a cellulose-binding domain: properties of a beta-glucosidase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ong, E; Gilkes, N R; Miller, R C; Warren, A J; Kilburn, D G

    1991-01-01

    Using molecular genetic techniques, a fusion protein has been produced which contains the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of an exoglucanase (Cex) from Cellulomonas fimi fused to a beta-glucosidase (Abg) from Agrobacterium sp. The CBD functions as an affinity tag for the simultaneous purification and immobilization of the enzyme on cellulose. Binding to cellulose was stable for prolonged periods at temperatures from 4 degrees C to at least 50 degrees C, at ionic strengths from 10 mM to greater than 1 M, and at pH values below 8. The fusion protein can be desorbed from cellulose with distilled water or at pH greater than 8. Immobilized enzyme columns of the fusion protein bound to cotton fibers exhibited stable beta-glucosidase activity for at least 10 days of continuous operation at temperatures up to 37 degrees C. At higher temperatures, the bound enzyme lost activity. The thermal stability of the fusion protein was greatly improved by immobilization. Immobilization did not alter the pH stability. Except for its ability to bind to cellulose, the properties of the fusion protein were virtually the same as those of the native enzyme.

  16. Novel RNA chaperone domain of RNA-binding protein La is regulated by AKT phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnert, Julia; Sommer, Gunhild; Zierk, Avery W.; Fedarovich, Alena; Brock, Alexander; Fedarovich, Dzmitry; Heise, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The cellular function of the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La has been linked to translation of viral and cellular mRNAs. Recently, we have shown that the human La protein stimulates IRES-mediated translation of the cooperative oncogene CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. However, there is little known about the underlying molecular mechanism by which La stimulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation, and we propose that its RNA chaperone activity is required. Herein, we show that La binds close to the CCND1 start codon and demonstrate that La's RNA chaperone activity can change the folding of its binding site. We map the RNA chaperone domain (RCD) within the C-terminal region of La in close proximity to a novel AKT phosphorylation site (T389). Phosphorylation at T389 by AKT-1 strongly impairs its RNA chaperone activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the RCD as well as T389 is required to stimulate CCND1 IRES-mediated translation in cells. In summary, we provide a model whereby a novel interplay between RNA-binding, RNA chaperoning and AKT phosphorylation of La protein regulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation. PMID:25520193

  17. From keys to bulldozers: expanding roles for winged helix domains in nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Harami, Gábor M; Gyimesi, Máté; Kovács, Mihály

    2013-07-01

    The winged helix domain (WHD) is a widespread nucleic-acid-binding protein structural element found in all kingdoms of life. Although the overall structure of the WHD is conserved, its functional properties and interaction profiles are extremely versatile. WHD-containing proteins can exploit nearly the full spectrum of nucleic acid structural features for recognition and even covalent modification or noncovalent rearrangement of target molecules. WHD functions range from sequence-recognizing keys in transcription factors and bulldozer-like strand-separating wedges in helicases to mediators of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Further investigations are needed to understand the contribution of WHD structural dynamics to nucleic-acid-modifying enzymatic functions.

  18. Multivalent binding of formin-binding protein 21 (FBP21)-tandem-WW domains fosters protein recognition in the pre-spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Stefan; Wieczorek, Marek; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Marg, Berenice; Seidel, Thorsten; Meyer, Tim; Knapp, Ernst-Walter; Freund, Christian

    2011-11-04

    The high abundance of repetitive but nonidentical proline-rich sequences in spliceosomal proteins raises the question of how these known interaction motifs recruit their interacting protein domains. Whereas complex formation of these adaptors with individual motifs has been studied in great detail, little is known about the binding mode of domains arranged in tandem repeats and long proline-rich sequences including multiple motifs. Here we studied the interaction of the two adjacent WW domains of spliceosomal protein FBP21 with several ligands of different lengths and composition to elucidate the hallmarks of multivalent binding for this class of recognition domains. First, we show that many of the proteins that define the cellular proteome interacting with FBP21-WW1-WW2 contain multiple proline-rich motifs. Among these is the newly identified binding partner SF3B4. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis reveals the tandem-WW domains of FBP21 to interact with splicing factor 3B4 (SF3B4) in nuclear speckles where splicing takes place. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR shows that the tandem arrangement of WW domains and the multivalency of the proline-rich ligands both contribute to affinity enhancement. However, ligand exchange remains fast compared with the NMR time scale. Surprisingly, a N-terminal spin label attached to a bivalent ligand induces NMR line broadening of signals corresponding to both WW domains of the FBP21-WW1-WW2 protein. This suggests that distinct orientations of the ligand contribute to a delocalized and semispecific binding mode that should facilitate search processes within the spliceosome.

  19. Crystal structure of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase reveals new domains in penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Eric; Herman, Raphaël; Petrella, Stephanie; Duez, Colette; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Frère, Jean-Marie; Charlier, Paulette

    2005-09-02

    Actinomadura sp. R39 produces an exocellular DD-peptidase/penicillin-binding protein (PBP) whose primary structure is similar to that of Escherichia coli PBP4. It is characterized by a high beta-lactam-binding activity (second order rate constant for the acylation of the active site serine by benzylpenicillin: k2/K = 300 mm(-1) s(-1)). The crystal structure of the DD-peptidase from Actinomadura R39 was solved at a resolution of 1.8 angstroms by single anomalous dispersion at the cobalt resonance wavelength. The structure is composed of three domains: a penicillin-binding domain similar to the penicillin-binding domain of E. coli PBP5 and two domains of unknown function. In most multimodular PBPs, additional domains are generally located at the C or N termini of the penicillin-binding domain. In R39, the other two domains are inserted in the penicillin-binding domain, between the SXXK and SXN motifs, in a manner similar to "Matryoshka dolls." One of these domains is composed of a five-stranded beta-sheet with two helices on one side, and the other domain is a double three-stranded beta-sheet inserted in the previous domain. Additionally, the 2.4-angstroms structure of the acyl-enzyme complex of R39 with nitrocefin reveals the absence of active site conformational change upon binding the beta-lactams.

  20. Disruption of actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin protein causes dystonia musculorum in mice.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masao; Watanabe, Keisuke; Bepari, Asim K; Nashimoto, Jun-Ichiro; Araki, Kimi; Sano, Hiromi; Chiken, Satomi; Nambu, Atsushi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2014-11-01

    The Dystonin gene (Dst) is responsible for dystonia musculorum (dt), an inherited mouse model of hereditary neuropathy accompanied by progressive motor symptoms such as dystonia and cerebellar ataxia. Dst-a isoforms, which contain actin-binding domains, are predominantly expressed in the nervous system. Although sensory neuron degeneration in the peripheral nervous system during the early postnatal stage is a well-recognised phenotype in dt, the histological characteristics and neuronal circuits in the central nervous system responsible for motor symptoms remain unclear. To analyse the causative neuronal networks and roles of Dst isoforms, we generated novel multipurpose Dst gene trap mice, in which actin-binding domain-containing isoforms are disrupted. Homozygous mice showed typical dt phenotypes with sensory degeneration and progressive motor symptoms. The gene trap allele (Dst(Gt) ) encodes a mutant Dystonin-LacZ fusion protein, which is detectable by X-gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactoside) staining. We observed wide expression of the actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin isoforms in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system. This raised the possibility that not only secondary neuronal defects in the CNS subsequent to peripheral sensory degeneration but also cell-autonomous defects in the CNS contribute to the motor symptoms. Expression analysis of immediate early genes revealed decreased neuronal activity in the cerebellar-thalamo-striatal pathway in the homozygous brain, implying the involvement of this pathway in the dt phenotype. These novel Dst(Gt) mice showed that a loss-of-function mutation in the actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin isoforms led to typical dt phenotypes. Furthermore, this novel multipurpose Dst(Gt) allele offers a unique tool for analysing the causative neuronal networks involved in the dt phenotype.

  1. Preferential binding of the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 at methylated transcriptional start site regions.

    PubMed

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Perriaud, Laury; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Benhattar, Jean; Lachuer, Joël; Dante, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD) proteins are thought to be key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing through recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. In cancer, the MBD-family member, MBD2, may be primarily involved in the repression of genes exhibiting methylated CpG at their 5' end. Here we ask whether MBD2 randomly associates methylated sequences, producing chance effects on transcription, or exhibits a more specific recognition of some methylated regions. Using chromatin and DNA immunoprecipitation, we analyzed MBD2 and RNA polymerase II deposition and DNA methylation in HeLa cells on arrays representing 25,500 promoter regions. This first whole-genome mapping revealed the preferential localization of MBD2 near transcription start sites (TSSs), within the region analyzed, 7.5 kb upstream through 2.45 kb downstream of 5' transcription start sites. Probe by probe analysis correlated MBD2 deposition and DNA methylation. Motif analysis did not reveal specific sequence motifs; however, CCG and CGC sequences seem to be overrepresented. Nonrandom association (multiple correspondence analysis, p < 0.0001) between silent genes, DNA methylation and MBD2 binding was observed. The association between MBD2 binding and transcriptional repression weakened as the distance between binding site and TSS increased, suggesting that MBD2 represses transcriptional initiation. This hypothesis may represent a functional explanation for the preferential binding of MBD2 at methyl-CpG in TSS regions.

  2. Solution structure and intermolecular interactions of the third metal-binding domain of ATP7A, the Menkes disease protein.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Cantini, Francesca; DellaMalva, Nunzia; Herrmann, Torsten; Rosato, Antonio; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-09-29

    The third metal-binding domain of the human Menkes protein (MNK3), a copper(I)-transporting ATPase, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in solution. The solution structure of MNK3, its copper(I)-binding properties, and its interaction with the physiological partner, HAH1, have been studied. MNK3 is the domain most dissimilar in structure from the other domains of the Menkes protein. This is reflected in a significant rearrangement of the last strand of the four-stranded beta-sheet when compared with the other known homologous proteins or protein domains. MNK3 is also peculiar with respect to its interaction with the copper(I) ion, as it was found to be a comparatively weak binder. Copper(I) transfer from metal-loaded HAH1 was observed experimentally, but the metal distribution was shifted toward binding by HAH1. This is at variance with what is observed for the other Menkes domains.

  3. Structures of the first and second double-stranded RNA-binding domains of human TAR RNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Kawazoe, Masahito; Takemoto, Chie; Kigawa, Takanori; Güntert, Peter; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    The TAR RNA-binding Protein (TRBP) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein, which binds to Dicer and is required for the RNA interference pathway. TRBP consists of three dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). The first and second dsRBDs (dsRBD1 and dsRBD2, respectively) have affinities for dsRNA, whereas the third dsRBD (dsRBD3) binds to Dicer. In this study, we prepared the single domain fragments of human TRBP corresponding to dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 and solved the crystal structure of dsRBD1 and the solution structure of dsRBD2. The two structures contain an α−β−β−β−α fold, which is common to the dsRBDs. The overall structures of dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 are similar to each other, except for a slight shift of the first α helix. The residues involved in dsRNA binding are conserved. We examined the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-binding properties of these dsRBDs by isothermal titration colorimetry measurements. The dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 fragments both bound to siRNA, with dissociation constants of 220 and 113 nM, respectively. In contrast, the full-length TRBP and its fragment with dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 exhibited much smaller dissociation constants (0.24 and 0.25 nM, respectively), indicating that the tandem dsRBDs bind simultaneously to one siRNA molecule. On the other hand, the loop between the first α helix and the first β strand of dsRBD2, but not dsRBD1, has a Trp residue, which forms hydrophobic and cation-π interactions with the surrounding residues. A circular dichroism analysis revealed that the thermal stability of dsRBD2 is higher than that of dsRBD1 and depends on the Trp residue. PMID:21080422

  4. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene silencing in Arabidopsis by interacting with RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Parida, Adwaita Prasad; Sharma, Amrapali; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome from transposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG binding domain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind to methylated DNA. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 methyl CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins, but the molecular/biological functions of most of these proteins are still not clear. In the present study, we identified four proteins that interact with AtMBD6. Interestingly, three of them contain RNA binding domains and are co-localized with AtMBD6 in the nucleus. The interacting partners includes AtRPS2C (a 40S ribosomal protein), AtNTF2 (nuclear transport factor 2) and AtAGO4 (Argonoute 4). The fourth protein that physically interacts with AtMBD6 is a histone-modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 6 (AtHDA6), which is a known component of the RNA-mediated gene silencing system. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation in the atmbd6, atrps2c and atntf2 mutants, using methylation-sensitive PCR detected decreased DNA methylation at miRNA/siRNA producing loci, pseudogenes and other targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our results indicate that AtMBD6 is involved in RNA-mediated gene silencing and it binds to RNA binding proteins like AtRPS2C, AtAGO4 and AtNTF2. AtMBD6 also interacts with histone deacetylase AtHDA6 that might have a role in chromatin condensation at the targets of RdDM.

  5. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family.

    PubMed

    Antonets, Denis V; Nepomnyashchikh, Tatyana S; Shchelkunov, Sergei N

    2010-10-27

    Variola virus (VARV) the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF) through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor) is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI) and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  6. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Variola virus (VARV) the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF) through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor) is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. Findings De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI) and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein. PMID:20979600

  7. New Helical Binding Domain Mediates a Glycosyltransferase Activity of a Bifunctional Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Meixian; Yang, Tiandi; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) conserved in streptococci and staphylococci are important for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis. Fap1, a well studied SRRP is a major surface constituent of Streptococcus parasanguinis and is required for bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Biogenesis of Fap1 is a multistep process that involves both glycosylation and secretion. A series of glycosyltransferases catalyze sequential glycosylation of Fap1. We have identified a unique hybrid protein dGT1 (dual glycosyltransferase 1) that contains two distinct domains. N-terminal DUF1792 is a novel GT-D-type glycosyltransferase, transferring Glc residues to Glc-GlcNAc-modified Fap1. C-terminal dGT1 (CgT) is predicted to possess a typical GT-A-type glycosyltransferase, however, the activity remains unknown. In this study, we determine that CgT is a distinct glycosyltransferase, transferring GlcNAc residues to Glc-Glc-GlcNAc-modified Fap1. A 2.4-Å x-ray crystal structure reveals that CgT has a unique binding domain consisting of three α helices in addition to a typical GT-A-type glycosyltransferase domain. The helical domain is crucial for the oligomerization of CgT. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the helix domain is required for the protein-protein interaction and crucial for the glycosyltransferase activity of CgT in vitro and in vivo. As the helix domain presents a novel structural fold, we conclude that CgT represents a new member of GT-A-type glycosyltransferases. PMID:27539847

  8. A Rational Engineering Strategy for Designing Protein A-Binding Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Sulea, Traian; van Faassen, Henk; Hussack, Greg; Purisima, Enrico O.; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and streptococcal protein G (SpG) affinity chromatography are the gold standards for purifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic applications. However, camelid VHH single-domain Abs (sdAbs or VHHs) are not bound by SpG and only sporadically bound by SpA. Currently, VHHs require affinity tag-based purification, which limits their therapeutic potential and adds considerable complexity and cost to their production. Here we describe a simple and rapid mutagenesis-based approach designed to confer SpA binding upon a priori non-SpA-binding VHHs. We show that SpA binding of VHHs is determined primarily by the same set of residues as in human mAbs, albeit with an unexpected degree of tolerance to substitutions at certain core and non-core positions and some limited dependence on at least one residue outside the SpA interface, and that SpA binding could be successfully introduced into five VHHs against three different targets with no adverse effects on expression yield or antigen binding. Next-generation sequencing of llama, alpaca and dromedary VHH repertoires suggested that species differences in SpA binding may result from frequency variation in specific deleterious polymorphisms, especially Ile57. Thus, the SpA binding phenotype of camelid VHHs can be easily modulated to take advantage of tag-less purification techniques, although the frequency with which this is required may depend on the source species. PMID:27631624

  9. Phylogenetic distribution and evolution of the linked RNA-binding and NOT1-binding domains in the tristetraprolin family of tandem CCCH zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, Perry J; Perera, Lalith

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans.

  10. Phylogenetic Distribution and Evolution of the Linked RNA-Binding and NOT1-Binding Domains in the Tristetraprolin Family of Tandem CCCH Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans. PMID:24697206

  11. Molecular Details of the PH Domain of ACAP1(BAR-PH) Protein Binding to PIP-Containing Membrane.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin Chun; Lu, Lanyuan; Sun, Fei; Fan, Jun

    2017-02-03

    ACAP1 proteins were previously reported to specifically bind PIP2-containing cell membranes and form well-structured protein lattices in order to conduct membrane tubulation. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations to characterize orientation of the PH domains with respect to the BAR domains inside the protein dimer. Followed by molecular dynamics simulations, we present a comprehensive orientation analysis of PH domain under different states including unbound and bound with lipids. We have examined two binding pockets on the PH domain and present PMF profiles of the two pockets to account for their preference to PIP2 lipids. Combining orientation analysis and studies of binding pockets, our simulations results reveal valuable molecular basis for protein-lipid interactions of ACAP1 proteins during membrane remodeling process.

  12. Two domains of interaction with calcium binding proteins can be mapped using fragments of calponin.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, F. L.; McCubbin, W. D.; Gimona, M.; Strasser, P.; Kay, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Native calponin is able to bind 2 mol of calcium binding protein (CaBP) per mole calponin. This study extends this observation to define the 2 domains of interaction, one of which is near the actin binding site, and the other in the amino-terminal region of calponin. Also, the first evidence for a differentiation in the response of calponin to interaction with caltropin versus calmodulin is demonstrated. The binding of caltropin to cleavage and recombinant fragments of calponin was determined by 3 techniques: tryptophan fluorescence of the fragments, CD measurements to determine secondary structure changes, and analytical ultracentrifugation. In order to delineate the sites of interaction, 3 fragments of calponin have been studied. From a cyanogen bromide cleavage of calponin, residues 2-51 were isolated. This fragment is shown to bind to CaBPs and the affinity for caltropin is slightly higher than that for calmodulin. A carboxyl-terminal truncated mutant of calponin comprising residues 1-228 (CP 1-228) has been produced by recombinant techniques. Analytical ultracentrifugation has shown that CP 1-228, like the parent calponin, is able to bind 2 mol of caltropin per mol of 1-228 in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, indicating that there is a second site of interaction between residues 52-228. Temperature denaturation of the carboxyl-terminal truncated fragment compared with whole calponin show that the carboxyl-terminal region does not change the temperature at which calponin melts; however, there is greater residual secondary structure with whole calponin versus the fragment. A second mutant produced through recombinant techniques comprises residues 45-228 and is also able to bind caltropin, thus mapping the location of the second site of interaction to near the actin binding site. PMID:7756987

  13. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  14. De novo design and engineering of functional metal and porphyrin-binding protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, Bernard H.

    In this work, I describe an approach to the rational, iterative design and characterization of two functional cofactor-binding protein domains. First, a hybrid computational/experimental method was developed with the aim of algorithmically generating a suite of porphyrin-binding protein sequences with minimal mutual sequence information. This method was explored by generating libraries of sequences, which were then expressed and evaluated for function. One successful sequence is shown to bind a variety of porphyrin-like cofactors, and exhibits light- activated electron transfer in mixed hemin:chlorin e6 and hemin:Zn(II)-protoporphyrin IX complexes. These results imply that many sophisticated functions such as cofactor binding and electron transfer require only a very small number of residue positions in a protein sequence to be fixed. Net charge and hydrophobic content are important in determining protein solubility and stability. Accordingly, rational modifications were made to the aforementioned design procedure in order to improve its overall success rate. The effects of these modifications are explored using two `next-generation' sequence libraries, which were separately expressed and evaluated. Particular modifications to these design parameters are demonstrated to effectively double the purification success rate of the procedure. Finally, I describe the redesign of the artificial di-iron protein DF2 into CDM13, a single chain di-Manganese four-helix bundle. CDM13 acts as a functional model of natural manganese catalase, exhibiting a kcat of 0.08s-1 under steady-state conditions. The bound manganese cofactors have a reduction potential of +805 mV vs NHE, which is too high for efficient dismutation of hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that as a high-potential manganese complex, CDM13 may represent a promising first step toward a polypeptide model of the Oxygen Evolving Complex of the photosynthetic enzyme Photosystem II.

  15. Multiple DNA Binding Domains Mediate the Function of the ERCC1-XPF Protein in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan; Orelli, Barbara; Madireddy, Advaitha; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2012-01-01

    ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric, structure-specific endonuclease that cleaves single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions and has roles in nucleotide excision repair (NER), interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair, homologous recombination, and possibly other pathways. In NER, ERCC1-XPF is recruited to DNA lesions by interaction with XPA and incises the DNA 5′ to the lesion. We studied the role of the four C-terminal DNA binding domains in mediating NER activity and cleavage of model substrates. We found that mutations in the helix-hairpin-helix domain of ERCC1 and the nuclease domain of XPF abolished cleavage activity on model substrates. Interestingly, mutations in multiple DNA binding domains were needed to significantly diminish NER activity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that interactions with proteins in the NER incision complex can compensate for some defects in DNA binding. Mutations in DNA binding domains of ERCC1-XPF render cells more sensitive to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C than to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting that the ICL repair function of ERCC1-XPF requires tighter substrate binding than NER. Our studies show that multiple domains of ERCC1-XPF contribute to substrate binding, and are consistent with models of NER suggesting that multiple weak protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions drive progression through the pathway. Our findings are discussed in the context of structural studies of individual domains of ERCC1-XPF and of its role in multiple DNA repair pathways. PMID:22547097

  16. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E. O.; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J.; Andersen, Jens S.; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1’s defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made. PMID:22836166

  17. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  18. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  19. Negative Cooperativity and High Affinity in Chitooligosaccharide Binding by a Mycobacterium smegmatis Protein Containing LysM and Lectin Domains.

    PubMed

    Patra, Dhabaleswar; Mishra, Padmanabh; Vijayan, Mamannamana; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2016-01-12

    LysM domains have been recognized in bacteria and eukaryotes as carbohydrate-binding protein modules, but the mechanism of their binding to chitooligosaccharides has been underexplored. Binding of a Mycobacterium smegmatis protein containing a lectin (MSL) and one LysM domain to chitooligosaccharides has been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence titration that demonstrate the presence of two binding sites of nonidentical affinities per dimeric MSL-LysM molecule. The affinity of the molecule for chitooligosaccharides correlates with the length of the carbohydrate chain. Its binding to chitooligosaccharides is characterized by negative cooperativity in the interactions of the two domains. Apparently, the flexibility of the long linker that connects the LysM and MSL domains plays a facilitating role in this recognition. The LysM domain in the MSL-LysM molecule, like other bacterial domains but unlike plant LysM domains, recognizes equally well peptidoglycan fragments as well as chitin polymers. Interestingly, in the case presented here, two LysM domains are enough for binding to peptidoglycan in contrast to the three reportedly required by the LysM domains of Bacillus subtilis and Lactococcus lactis. Also, the affinity of the MSL-LysM molecule for chitooligosaccharides is higher than that of LysM-chitooligosaccharide interactions reported so far.

  20. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U. /Monash U. /Melbourne U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  1. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  2. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Michael Garavito, R

    2011-04-22

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain (∼310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain (∼20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain (∼19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain (∼30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V(0) portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0Å (maltose-free) and 2.15Å (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in protein oligomerization.

  3. Exploring human 40S ribosomal proteins binding to the 18S rRNA fragment containing major 3'-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Gopanenko, Alexander V; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-02-01

    Association of ribosomal proteins with rRNA during assembly of ribosomal subunits is an intricate process, which is strictly regulated in vivo. As for the assembly in vitro, it was reported so far only for prokaryotic subunits. Bacterial ribosomal proteins are capable of selective binding to 16S rRNA as well as to its separate morphological domains. In this work, we explored binding of total protein of human 40S ribosomal subunit to the RNA transcript corresponding to the major 3'-domain of 18S rRNA. We showed that the resulting ribonucleoprotein particles contained almost all of the expected ribosomal proteins, whose binding sites are located in this 18S rRNA domain in the 40S subunit, together with several nonspecific proteins. The binding in solution was accompanied with aggregation of the RNA-protein complexes. Ribosomal proteins bound to the RNA transcript protected from chemical modification mostly those 18S rRNA nucleotides that are known to be involved in binding with the proteins in the 40S subunit and thereby demonstrated their ability to selectively bind to the rRNA in vitro. The possible implication of unstructured extensions of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in their nonspecific binding with rRNA and in subsequent aggregation of the resulting complexes is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  5. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  6. Direct correlation of DNA binding and single protein domain motion via dual illumination fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Mohamed; Spies, Maria

    2014-10-08

    We report a dual illumination, single-molecule imaging strategy to dissect directly and in real-time the correlation between nanometer-scale domain motion of a DNA repair protein and its interaction with individual DNA substrates. The strategy was applied to XPD, an FeS cluster-containing DNA repair helicase. Conformational dynamics was assessed via FeS-mediated quenching of a fluorophore site-specifically incorporated into XPD. Simultaneously, binding of DNA molecules labeled with a spectrally distinct fluorophore was detected by colocalization of the DNA- and protein-derived signals. We show that XPD undergoes thermally driven conformational transitions that manifest in spatial separation of its two auxiliary domains. DNA binding does not strictly enforce a specific conformation. Interaction with a cognate DNA damage, however, stabilizes the compact conformation of XPD by increasing the weighted average lifetime of this state by 140% relative to an undamaged DNA. Our imaging strategy will be a valuable tool to study other FeS-containing nucleic acid processing enzymes.

  7. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1/Genethonin 1 Is a Novel Participant in Glycogen Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sixin; Heller, Brigitte; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin; Irimia, Jose M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Wells, Clark D.; Skurat, Alexander V.; Roach, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Stbd1 is a protein of previously unknown function that is most prevalent in liver and muscle, the major sites for storage of the energy reserve glycogen. The protein is predicted to contain a hydrophobic N terminus and a C-terminal CBM20 glycan binding domain. Here, we show that Stbd1 binds to glycogen in vitro and that endogenous Stbd1 locates to perinuclear compartments in cultured mouse FL83B or Rat1 cells. When overexpressed in COSM9 cells, Stbd1 concentrated at enlarged perinuclear structures, co-localized with glycogen, the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the autophagy protein GABARAPL1. Mutant Stbd1 lacking the N-terminal hydrophobic segment had a diffuse distribution throughout the cell. Point mutations in the CBM20 domain did not change the perinuclear localization of Stbd1, but glycogen was no longer concentrated in this compartment. Stable overexpression of glycogen synthase in Rat1WT4 cells resulted in accumulation of glycogen as massive perinuclear deposits, where a large fraction of the detectable Stbd1 co-localized. Starvation of Rat1WT4 cells for glucose resulted in dissipation of the massive glycogen stores into numerous and much smaller glycogen deposits that retained Stbd1. In vitro, in cells, and in animal models, Stbd1 consistently tracked with glycogen. We conclude that Stbd1 is involved in glycogen metabolism by binding to glycogen and anchoring it to membranes, thereby affecting its cellular localization and its intracellular trafficking to lysosomes. PMID:20810658

  8. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Kadamur, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  9. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquiti-nation and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  11. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquitination and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  12. Solution structure of the C-terminal domain from poly(A)-binding protein in Trypanosoma cruzi: A vegetal PABC domain

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Nadeem; Kozlov, Guennadi; D’Orso, Iván; Trempe, Jean-François; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-01

    PABC is a phylogenetically conserved peptide-binding domain primarily found within the C terminus of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs). This domain recruits a series of translation factors including poly(A)-interacting proteins (Paip1 and Paip2) and release factor 3 (RF3/GSPT) to the initiation complex on mRNA. Here, we determine the solution structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi PABC domain (TcPABC), a representative of the vegetal class of PABP proteins. TcPABC is similar to human PABC (hPABC) and consists of five α-helices, in contrast to the four helices observed in PABC domains from yeast (yPABC) and hyper plastic disk proteins (hHYD). A mobile N-terminal helix is observed in TcPABC that does not pack against the core of the protein, as found in hPABC. Characteristic to all PABC domains, the last four helices of TcPABC fold into a right-handed super coil. TcPABC demonstrates high-affinity binding to PABP interacting motif-2 (PAM-2) and reveals a peptide-binding surface homologous to that of hPABC. Our results demonstrate the last four helices in TcPABC are sufficient for peptide recognition and we predict a similar binding mode in PABC domains. Furthermore, these results point to the presence of putative PAM-2 site-containing proteins in trypanosomes. PMID:12930992

  13. A novel AT-rich DNA binding protein that combines an HMG I-like DNA binding domain with a putative transcription domain.

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, G; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    There is growing evidence that AT-rich promoter elements play a role in transcription of plant genes. For the promoter of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glutamine synthetase from pea (GS2), the deletion of a 33-bp AT-rich sequence (box 1 native) from the 5' end of a GS2 promoter-beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion resulted in a 10-fold reduction in GUS activity. The box 1 native element was used in gel shift analysis and two distinct complexes were detected. One complex is related to the low-mobility complex reported previously for AT-rich elements from several other plant promoters. A multimer of the box 1 sequence was used to isolate a cDNA encoding an AT-rich DNA binding protein (ATBP-1). ATBP-1 is not a high-mobility group protein, but it is a novel protein that combines a high-mobility group I/Y-like DNA binding domain with a glutamine-rich putative transcriptional domain. PMID:7907505

  14. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  15. Single TRAM domain RNA-binding proteins in Archaea: functional insight from Ctr3 from the Antarctic methanogen Methanococcoides burtonii.

    PubMed

    Taha; Siddiqui, K S; Campanaro, S; Najnin, T; Deshpande, N; Williams, T J; Aldrich-Wright, J; Wilkins, M; Curmi, P M G; Cavicchioli, R

    2016-09-01

    TRAM domain proteins present in Archaea and Bacteria have a β-barrel shape with anti-parallel β-sheets that form a nucleic acid binding surface; a structure also present in cold shock proteins (Csps). Aside from protein structures, experimental data defining the function of TRAM domains is lacking. Here, we explore the possible functional properties of a single TRAM domain protein, Ctr3 (cold-responsive TRAM domain protein 3) from the Antarctic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii that has increased abundance during low temperature growth. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) bound by Ctr3 in vitro was determined using RNA-seq. Ctr3-bound M. burtonii RNA with a preference for transfer (t)RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA, and a potential binding motif was identified. In tRNA, the motif represented the C loop; a region that is conserved in tRNA from all domains of life and appears to be solvent exposed, potentially providing access for Ctr3 to bind. Ctr3 and Csps are structurally similar and are both inferred to function in low temperature translation. The broad representation of single TRAM domain proteins within Archaea compared with their apparent absence in Bacteria, and scarcity of Csps in Archaea but prevalence in Bacteria, suggests they represent distinct evolutionary lineages of functionally equivalent RNA-binding proteins.

  16. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  17. Modular structure of chromosomal proteins HMG-14 and HMG-17: Definition of a transcriptional enhancement domain distinct from the nucleosomal binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Trieschmann, L.; Postnikov, Y.V.; Rickers, A.; Bustin, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how deletion mutants and peptides were used to identify the transcriptional enhancement domain and the nucleosome binding domain of two chromosomal proteins, HMG-14 and HMG-17. The research indicates that mutations involving C-terminal amino acids significantly reduces the ability of the nucleoproteins to enhance transcription from chromatin templates. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A putative nucleoside triphosphate-binding domain in the nonstructural protein of B19 parvovirus is required for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Momoeda, M; Wong, S; Kawase, M; Young, N S; Kajigaya, S

    1994-01-01

    Cytotoxicity secondary to B19 parvovirus infection is due to expression of the viral nonstructural protein. Nonstructural proteins of many parvoviruses contain a well-conserved nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding motif, which has been shown to be essential for a variety of protein functions. We show here that cytotoxicity of the B19 parvovirus nonstructural protein was abolished by single mutations of amino acids within the NTP-binding domain, especially within the A motif, implicating NTP-binding in virus-induced cell death. Images PMID:7966641

  19. Molecular analysis of the binding mode of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain proteins during TLR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nada, Masatoshi; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro; Kimura, Takeshi; Kubota, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Kamatari, Yuji O; Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Kondo, Naomi

    2012-10-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is initiated by the binding of various adaptor proteins through ligand-induced oligomerization of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains of the TLRs. TLR2, which recognizes peptidoglycans, lipoproteins or lipopeptides derived from Gram-positive bacteria, is known to use the TIR domain-containing adaptor proteins myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88) and MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal). Molecular analyses of the binding specificity of MyD88, Mal, and TLR2 are important for understanding the initial defenses mounted against Gram-positive bacterial infections such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in the multiple interactions of these TIR domains remain unclear. Our study demonstrates that the TIR domain proteins MyD88, Mal, TLR1, and TLR2 directly bind to each other in vitro. We have also identified two binding interfaces of the MyD88 TIR domain for the TLR2 TIR domain. A residue at these interfaces has recently been found to be mutated in innate immune deficiency patients. These novel insights into the binding mode of TIR proteins will contribute to elucidation of the mechanisms underlying innate immune deficiency diseases, and to future structural studies of hetero-oligomeric TIR-TIR complexes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prion-like domains in RNA binding proteins are essential for building subnuclear paraspeckles

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Sven; Kong, Geraldine; Mannen, Taro; Sadowska, Agata; Kobelke, Simon; Blythe, Amanda; Knott, Gavin J.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Ho, Diwei; Newcombe, Estella A.; Hosoki, Kana; Goshima, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hatters, Danny; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bond, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Prion-like domains (PLDs) are low complexity sequences found in RNA binding proteins associated with the neurodegenerative disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recently, PLDs have been implicated in mediating gene regulation via liquid-phase transitions that drive ribonucleoprotein granule assembly. In this paper, we report many PLDs in proteins associated with paraspeckles, subnuclear bodies that form around long noncoding RNA. We mapped the interactome network of paraspeckle proteins, finding enrichment of PLDs. We show that one protein, RBM14, connects key paraspeckle subcomplexes via interactions mediated by its PLD. We further show that the RBM14 PLD, as well as the PLD of another essential paraspeckle protein, FUS, is required to rescue paraspeckle formation in cells in which their endogenous counterpart has been knocked down. Similar to FUS, the RBM14 PLD also forms hydrogels with amyloid-like properties. These results suggest a role for PLD-mediated liquid-phase transitions in paraspeckle formation, highlighting this nuclear body as an excellent model system for understanding the perturbation of such processes in neurodegeneration. PMID:26283796

  1. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: multiple domains for multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; Altschuler, Sarah E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-07-02

    The recognition of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is integral to myriad cellular functions. In eukaryotes, ssDNA is present stably at the ends of chromosomes and at some promoter elements. Furthermore, it is formed transiently by several cellular processes including telomere synthesis, transcription, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. To coordinate these diverse activities, a variety of proteins have evolved to bind ssDNA in a manner specific to their function. Here, we review the recognition of ssDNA through the analysis of high-resolution structures of proteins in complex with ssDNA. This functionally diverse set of proteins arises from a limited set of structural motifs that can be modified and arranged to achieve distinct activities, including a range of ligand specificities. We also investigate the ways in which these domains interact in the context of large multidomain proteins/complexes. These comparisons reveal the structural features that define the range of functions exhibited by these proteins.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to von Willebrand factor A1 domain is mediated by conserved IgG binding regions.

    PubMed

    O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; van Schooten, Carina J; Kerrigan, Steven W; Emsley, Jonas; Silverman, Gregg J; Cox, Dermot; Lenting, Peter J; Foster, Timothy J

    2006-11-01

    Protein A (Spa) is a surface-associated protein of Staphylococcus aureus best known for its ability to bind to the Fc region of IgG. Spa also binds strongly to the Fab region of the immunoglobulins bearing V(H)3 heavy chains and to von Willebrand factor (vWF). Previous studies have suggested that the protein A-vWF interaction is important in S. aureus adherence to platelets under conditions of shear stress. We demonstrate that Spa expression is sufficient for adherence of bacteria to immobilized vWF under low fluid shear. The full length recombinant Ig-binding region of protein A, Spa-EDABC, fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST), bound recombinant vWF in a dose-dependent and saturable fashion with half maximal binding of about 30 nm in immunosorbent assays. Full length-Spa did not bind recombinant vWF A3 domain but displayed binding to recombinant vWF domains A1 and D'-D3 (half maximal binding at 100 nm and 250 nm, respectively). Each recombinant protein A Ig-binding domain bound to the A1 domain in a similar manner to the full length-Spa molecule (half maximal binding 100 nm). Amino acid substitutions were introduced in the GST-SpaD protein at sites known to be involved in IgG Fc or in V(H)3 Fab binding. Mutants altered in residues that recognized IgG Fc but not those that recognized V(H)3 Fab had reduced binding to vWF A1 and D'-D3. This indicated that both vWF regions recognized a region on helices I and II that overlapped the IgG Fc binding site.

  3. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  4. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  5. The tricalbin C2 domains: lipid-binding properties of a novel, synaptotagmin-like yeast protein family.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Timothy A; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-04-06

    The tricalbins are a recently discovered family of Saccharomyces cerevisae proteins containing a predicted N-terminal transmembrane domain and at least three C2 domains. They are thought to be yeast homologues of synaptotagmin, a hypothesis supported by structural similarities and past studies that implicated tricalbins in processes of membrane trafficking and sorting. We expressed and purified constructs consisting of single tricalbin C2 domains, and assayed their ability to bind lipids in response to calcium. Protein-lipid overlay assays indicated that the C-terminal C2 domains (C2C) of tricalbins 1 and 3 bind numerous species of acidic phospholipid, including phosphatidylserine and several phosphoinositides, and the amount of protein bound was greatly enhanced in the presence of 1 mM calcium. Sedimentation assays using mixed phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylcholine (PS/PC) vesicles confirmed that the C2C domains of tricalbin 1 and 3 bind membranes in a calcium-responsive manner and showed that they are more sensitive to calcium than the C2A domain of synaptotagmin I. Both assays revealed that all of the C2 domains of tricalbin 2 are insensitive to calcium. Fluorimetric assays exploiting the position of naturally occurring tryptophans in tricalbin 1 C2C and tricalbin 3 C2C confirmed that these domains are capable of binding calcium and that this is coupled to the binding of acidic phospholipid. Combining this with past protein-protein interaction data, we theorize that the calcium-insensitive tricalbin 2 mediates the creation of hetero-oligomeric tricalbin complexes in which tricalbin 1 or 3 or both supply a calcium-dependent membrane binding activity.

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis initiator binding protein (IBP39) and RNA polymerase II large subunit carboxy terminal domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Lau, Audrey O T; Smith, Alias J; Brown, Mark T; Johnson, Patricia J

    2006-11-01

    The core promoter that directs RNA polymerase to the start of transcription in the protist Trichomonas vaginalis is an initiator (Inr) element recognized by the Inr Binding Protein, IBP39. This nuclear protein is composed of two domains: a 14.5 kDa amino (N-terminal) and a 25 kDa carboxy terminal domain (C-domain). Here we describe the identification of an IBP39-interacting protein by screening a T. vaginalis expression library using a two-hybrid system with the IBP39 C-domain as bait. The CTD of the large subunit of RNAP II was found to specifically interact with the C-domain. The specificity and nature of the interaction between the CTD of RNAP II and the C-domain of IBP39 was validated by three independent biochemical methods: co-immunoprecipitation with epitope-tagged proteins, affinity chromatography and enzyme linked ligand sorbent (ELLSA) assays. Binding was shown to involve hydrophobic bonds and to have a disassociation constant (K(d)) of 690 nM (+/-55). These results confirm and extend our previous binding studies using a peptide composed of the last nine amino acids of RNAP II CTD [Schumacher MA, Lau AOT, Johnson PJ. Structural basis of core promoter recognition in a primitive eukaryote. Cell 2003;115:413-24] that predicted an interaction between the CTD and IBP39. These data further demonstrate that IBP39 minimally possesses two functional domains: a N-terminal DNA binding domain (that recognizes the Inr) [Liston DR, Johnson PJ. Analysis of a ubiquitous promoter element in a primitive eukaryote: early evolution of the initiator element. Mol Cell Biol 1999;19:2380-8] and a C-terminal protein binding domain that recognizes the RNAP II CTD, an interaction that may be critical for recruiting RNAP II for initiation of transcription.

  7. Characterization of substrate binding of the WW domains in human WWP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahong; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-07-08

    WW domains harbor substrates containing proline-rich motifs, but the substrate specificity and binding mechanism remain elusive for those WW domains less amenable for structural studies, such as human WWP2 (hWWP2). Herein we have employed multiple techniques to investigate the second WW domain (WW2) in hWWP2. Our results show that hWWP2 is a specialized E3 for PPxY motif-containing substrates only and does not recognize other amino acids and phospho-residues. The strongest binding affinity of WW2, and the incompatibility between each WW domain, imply a novel relationship, and our SPR experiment reveals a dynamic binding mode in Class-I WW domains for the first time. The results from alanine-scanning mutagenesis and modeling further point to functionally conserved residues in WW2.

  8. Tagging methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins reveals different spatiotemporal expression and supports distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kathleen H; Johnson, Brian S; Welsh, Sarah A; Lee, Jun Y; Cui, Yue; Krizman, Elizabeth; Brodkin, Edward S; Blendy, Julie A; Robinson, Michael B; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-04-01

    DNA methylation is recognized by methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins. Multiple MBDs are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and mice. However, the functions of MBD2 are poorly understood. We characterized Mbd2 knockout mice and determined spatiotemporal expression of MBDs and MBD2-NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) interactions. We analyzed behavioral phenotypes, generated biotin-tagged MBD1 and MBD2 knockin mice, and performed biochemical studies of MBD2-NuRD. Most behavioral measures are minimally affected in Mbd2 knockout mice. In contrast to other MBDs, MBD2 shows distinct expression patterns. Unlike most MBDs, MBD2 is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined and appears dispensable for brain functions measured in this study. We provide novel genetic tools and reveal new directions to investigate MBD2 functions in vivo.

  9. Tagging methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins reveals different spatiotemporal expression and supports distinct functions

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kathleen H; Johnson, Brian S; Welsh, Sarah A; Lee, Jun Y; Cui, Yue; Krizman, Elizabeth; Brodkin, Edward S; Blendy, Julie A; Robinson, Michael B; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DNA methylation is recognized by methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins. Multiple MBDs are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and mice. However, the functions of MBD2 are poorly understood. We characterized Mbd2 knockout mice and determined spatiotemporal expression of MBDs and MBD2–NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) interactions. Experimental procedures: We analyzed behavioral phenotypes, generated biotin-tagged MBD1 and MBD2 knockin mice, and performed biochemical studies of MBD2–NuRD. Results: Most behavioral measures are minimally affected in Mbd2 knockout mice. In contrast to other MBDs, MBD2 shows distinct expression patterns. Conclusion: Unlike most MBDs, MBD2 is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined and appears dispensable for brain functions measured in this study. We provide novel genetic tools and reveal new directions to investigate MBD2 functions in vivo. PMID:27066839

  10. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP).

    PubMed

    Kamina, Anyango D; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains' interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP.

  11. Protein Kinase Cθ C2 Domain Is a Phosphotyrosine Binding Module That Plays a Key Role in Its Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Stahelin, Robert V.; Kong, Kok-Fai; Raha, Sumita; Tian, Wen; Melowic, Heather R.; Ward, Katherine E.; Murray, Diana; Altman, Amnon; Cho, Wonhwa

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ) is a novel PKC that plays a key role in T lymphocyte activation. To understand how PKCθ is regulated in T cells, we investigated the properties of its N-terminal C2 domain that functions as an autoinhibitory domain. Our measurements show that a Tyr(P)-containing peptide derived from CDCP1 binds the C2 domain of PKCθ with high affinity and activates the enzyme activity of the intact protein. The Tyr(P) peptide also binds the C2 domain of PKCδ tightly, but no enzyme activation was observed with PKCδ. Mutations of PKCθ-C2 residues involved in Tyr(P) binding abrogated the enzyme activation and association of PKCθ with Tyr-phosphorylated full-length CDCP1 and severely inhibited the T cell receptor/CD28-mediated activation of a PKCθ-dependent reporter gene in T cells. Collectively, these studies establish the C2 domain of PKCθ as a Tyr(P)-binding domain and suggest that the domain may play a major role in PKCθ activation via its Tyr(P) binding. PMID:22787157

  12. Functional Analysis of a Bacterial Antifreeze Protein Indicates a Cooperative Effect between Its Two Ice-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Oliver, Erin E; Christner, Brent C; Luo, Bing-Hao

    2016-07-19

    Antifreeze proteins make up a class of ice-binding proteins (IBPs) that are possessed and expressed by certain cold-adapted organisms to enhance their freezing tolerance. Here we report the biophysical and functional characterization of an IBP discovered in a bacterium recovered from a deep glacial ice core drilled at Vostok Station, Antarctica (IBPv). Our study showed that the recombinant protein rIBPv exhibited a thermal hysteresis of 2 °C at concentrations of >50 μM, effectively inhibited ice recrystallization, and enhanced bacterial viability during freeze-thaw cycling. Circular dichroism scans indicated that rIBPv mainly consists of β strands, and its denaturing temperature was 53.5 °C. Multiple-sequence alignment of homologous IBPs predicted that IBPv contains two ice-binding domains, a feature unique among known IBPs. To examine functional differences between the IBPv domains, each domain was cloned, expressed, and purified. The second domain (domain B) expressed greater ice binding activity. Data from thermal hysteresis and gel filtration assays supported the idea that the two domains cooperate to achieve a higher ice binding effect by forming heterodimers. However, physical linkage of the domains was not required for this effect.

  13. Methyl Binding Domain Protein 2 (MBD2) dependent proliferation and survival of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Omar Y.; Wang, Shou Zhen; Zhu, Sheng Zu; Gnanapragasam, Merlin N.; Graham, Laura; Bear, Harry D.; Ginder, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    Methyl Cytosine Binding Domain Protein 2 (MBD2) has been shown to bind to and mediate repression of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cancer cells, where re-patterning of CpG methylation and associated gene silencing is common. We have investigated the role of MBD2 in breast cancer cell growth and tumor suppressor gene expression. We show that stable shRNA mediated knockdown of MBD2 leads to growth suppression of cultured human mammary epithelial cancer lines, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435. The peak anti-proliferative occurs only after sustained, stable MBD2 knockdown. Once established, the growth inhibition persists over time and leads to a markedly decreased propensity for aggressive breast cancer cell lines to form in vivo xenograft tumors in BALB/C nu/nu mice. The growth effects of MBD2 knockdown are accompanied by de-repression of tumor suppressor genes including DAPK1 and KLK10. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and bisulfite sequencing demonstrate MBD2 binding directly to the hyper-methylated and CpG-rich promoters of both DAPK1 and KLK10. Remarkably, the promoter CpG-island associated methylation of these genes remained stable despite robust transcriptional activation in MBD2 knockdown cells. Expression of a shRNA-resistant MBD2 protein resulted in restoration of growth and re-silencing of the MBD2 dependent tumor suppressor genes. Our data suggest that uncoupling CpG-methylation from repressive chromatin remodeling and histone modifications by removing MBD2 is sufficient to initiate and maintain tumor suppressor gene transcription and suppress neoplastic cell growth. These results demonstrate a role for MBD2 in cancer progression and provide support for the prospect of targeting MBD2 therapeutically in aggressive breast cancers. PMID:21693597

  14. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  15. An avidin-like domain that does not bind biotin is adopted for oligomerization by the extracellular mosaic protein fibropellin.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Itai; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Xiahui; Cantor, Charles R; Weng, Zhiping

    2005-02-01

    The protein avidin found in egg white seems optimized for binding the small vitamin biotin as a stable homotetramer. Indeed, along with its streptavidin ortholog in the bacterium Streptomyces avidinii, this protein shows the strongest known noncovalent bond of a protein with a small ligand. A third known member of the avidin family, as similar to avidin as is streptavidin, is found at the C-terminal ends of the multidomain fibropellin proteins found in sea urchin. The fibropellins form a layer known as the apical lamina that surrounds the sea urchin embryo throughout development. Based upon the structure of avidin, we deduced a structural model for the avidin-like domain of the fibropellins and found that computational modeling predicts a lack of biotin binding and the preservation of tetramerization. To test this prediction we expressed and purified the fibropellin avidin-like domain and found it indeed to be a homotetramer incapable of binding biotin. Several lines of evidence suggest that the avidin-like domain causes the entire fibropellin protein to tetramerize. We suggest that the presence of the avidin-like domain serves a structural (tetrameric form) rather than functional (biotin-binding) role and may therefore be a molecular instance of exaptation-the modification of an existing function toward a new function. Finally, based upon the oligomerization of the avidin-like domain, we propose a model for the overall structure of the apical lamina.

  16. An avidin-like domain that does not bind biotin is adopted for oligomerization by the extracellular mosaic protein fibropellin

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Itai; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Xiahui; Cantor, Charles R.; Weng, Zhiping

    2005-01-01

    The protein avidin found in egg white seems optimized for binding the small vitamin biotin as a stable homotetramer. Indeed, along with its streptavidin ortholog in the bacterium Streptomyces avidinii, this protein shows the strongest known noncovalent bond of a protein with a small ligand. A third known member of the avidin family, as similar to avidin as is streptavidin, is found at the C-terminal ends of the multidomain fibropellin proteins found in sea urchin. The fibropellins form a layer known as the apical lamina that surrounds the sea urchin embryo throughout development. Based upon the structure of avidin, we deduced a structural model for the avidin-like domain of the fibropellins and found that computational modeling predicts a lack of biotin binding and the preservation of tetramerization. To test this prediction we expressed and purified the fibropellin avidin-like domain and found it indeed to be a homotetramer incapable of binding biotin. Several lines of evidence suggest that the avidin-like domain causes the entire fibropellin protein to tetramerize. We suggest that the presence of the avidin-like domain serves a structural (tetrameric form) rather than functional (biotin-binding) role and may therefore be a molecular instance of exaptation—the modification of an existing function toward a new function. Finally, based upon the oligomerization of the avidin-like domain, we propose a model for the overall structure of the apical lamina. PMID:15659374

  17. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, R.; Wilton, R.; Cuff, M. E.; ...

    2017-02-07

    The tandem Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) like sensors are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. The periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domains are found ubiquitously and are generally involved in solute transport. These domains are widely observed as parts of separate proteins but not within the same polypeptide chain. We report the structural and biochemical characterization of the extracellular ligand-binding receptor, Dret_0059 from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from the Retba salt lake in Senegal. The structure of Dret_0059 consists of a novel combination of SBP and TPAS sensor domains. The N-terminal region forms an SBP domain and the C-terminalmore » region folds into a tandem PAS-like domain structure. A ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS domain of the TPAS. The differential scanning flourimetry studies in solution support the ligands observed in the crystal structure. There are only two other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base and we predict that they too bind the same substrates. There is significant interaction between the SBP and TPAS domains, and it is quite conceivable that the binding of one ligand will have an effect on the binding of the other. Our attempts to remove the ligands bound to the protein during expression were not successful, therefore, it is not clear what the relative affects are. The genomic context of this receptor does not contain any protein components expected for transport function, hence, we suggest that Dret_0059 is likely involved in signal transduction and not in solute transport.« less

  18. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain.

    PubMed

    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-08-25

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH-START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH-START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine-rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Antiproliferative factor (APF) binds specifically to sites within the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4 (CKAP4) extracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Chavda, Burzin; Ling, Jun; Majernick, Thomas; Planey, Sonia Lobo

    2017-09-11

    Antiproliferative factor (APF) is a sialoglycopeptide elevated in the urine of patients with interstitial cystitis-a chronic, painful bladder disease. APF inhibits the proliferation of normal bladder epithelial cells and cancer cells in vitro, presumably by binding to its cellular receptor, cytoskeleton associated-protein 4 (CKAP4); however, the biophysical interaction of APF with CKAP4 has not been characterized previously. In this study, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to explore the binding kinetics of the interaction of APF and as-APF (a desialylated APF analogue with full activity) to CKAP4. We immobilized non-glycosylated APF (TVPAAVVVA) to the Fc1 channel as the control and as-APF to Fc2 channel as the ligand in order to measure the binding of CKAP4 recombinant proteins encompassing only the extracellular domain (Aa 127-602) or the extracellular domain plus the transmembrane domain (Aa 106-602). Positive binding was detected to both CKAP4126-602 and CKAP4106-602, suggesting that as-APF can bind specifically to CKAP4 and that the potential binding site(s) are located within the extracellular domain. To identify the primary APF binding site(s) within the CKAP4 extracellular domain, deletion mutants were designed according to structural predictions, and the purified recombinant proteins were immobilized on a CM5 chip through amine-coupling to measure as-APF binding activity. Importantly, both CKAP4127-360 and CKAP4361-524 exhibited a fast association rate (k on ) and a slow dissociation rate (k off ), thus generating high binding affinity and suggesting that both regions contribute relatively equally to overall as-APF binding. Therefore, two or more as-APF binding sites may exist within the Aa 127-524 region of the CKAP4 extracellular domain. We determined that the CKAP4127-360 and CKAP4361-524 mutants exhibit improved binding activity to as-APF as compared to the full-length extracellular domain, making it possible to detect low concentrations of as

  20. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP)

    PubMed Central

    Kamina, Anyango D.; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains’ interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP. PMID:28542332

  1. Thermostable single domain antibody-maltose binding protein fusion for Bacillus anthracis spore protein BclA detection.

    PubMed

    Walper, Scott A; Battle, Shawna R; Audrey Brozozog Lee, P; Zabetakis, Dan; Turner, Kendrick B; Buckley, Patricia E; Calm, Alena M; Welsh, Heather S; Warner, Candice R; Zacharko, Melody A; Goldman, Ellen R; Anderson, George P

    2014-02-15

    We constructed a genetic fusion of a single domain antibody (sdAb) with the thermal stable maltose binding protein from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (PfuMBP). Produced in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm with high yield, it proved to be a rugged and effective immunoreagent. The sdAb-A5 binds BclA, a Bacillus anthracis spore protein, with high affinity (K(D) ∼ 50 pM). MBPs, including the thermostable PfuMBP, have been demonstrated to be excellent folding chaperones, improving production of many recombinant proteins. A three-step purification of E. coli shake flask cultures of PfuMBP-sdAb gave a yield of approximately 100mg/L highly purified product. The PfuMBP remained stable up to 120 °C, whereas the sdAb-A5 portion unfolded at approximately 68 to 70 °C but could refold to regain activity. This fusion construct was stable to heating at 1mg/ml for 1h at 70 °C, retaining nearly 100% of its binding activity; nearly one-quarter (24%) activity remained after 1h at 90 °C. The PfuMBP-sdAb construct also provides a stable and effective method to coat gold nanoparticles. Most important, the construct was found to provide enhanced detection of B. anthracis Sterne strain (34F2) spores relative to the sdAb-A5 both as a capture reagent and as a detection reagent.

  2. The CKK domain (DUF1781) binds microtubules and defines the CAMSAP/ssp4 family of animal proteins.

    PubMed

    Baines, Anthony J; Bignone, Paola A; King, Mikayala D A; Maggs, Alison M; Bennett, Pauline M; Pinder, Jennifer C; Phillips, Gareth W

    2009-09-01

    We describe a structural domain common to proteins related to human calmodulin-regulated spectrin-associated protein1 (CAMSAP1). Analysis of the sequence of CAMSAP1 identified a domain near the C-terminus common to CAMSAP1 and two other mammalian proteins KIAA1078 and KIAA1543, which we term a CKK domain. This domain was also present in invertebrate CAMSAP1 homologues and was found in all available eumetazoan genomes (including cnidaria), but not in the placozoan Trichoplax adherens, nor in any nonmetazoan organism. Analysis of codon alignments by the sitewise likelihood ratio method gave evidence for strong purifying selection on all codons of mammalian CKK domains, potentially indicating conserved function. Interestingly, the Drosophila homologue of the CAMSAP family is encoded by the ssp4 gene, which is required for normal formation of mitotic spindles. To investigate function of the CKK domain, human CAMSAP1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and fragments including the CKK domain were expressed in HeLa cells. Both whole CAMSAP1 and the CKK domain showed localization coincident with microtubules. In vitro, both whole CAMSAP1-glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and CKK-GST bound to microtubules. Immunofluorescence using anti-CAMSAP1 antibodies on cerebellar granule neurons revealed a microtubule pattern. Overexpression of the CKK domain in PC12 cells blocked production of neurites, a process that requires microtubule function. We conclude that the CKK domain binds microtubules and represents a domain that evolved with the metazoa.

  3. FhCaBP3: a Fasciola hepatica calcium binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    PubMed

    Banford, Samantha; Drysdale, Orla; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2013-04-01

    A DNA sequence encoding a protein with predicted EF-hand and dynein light chain binding domains was identified in a Fasciola hepatica EST library. Sequence analysis of the encoded protein revealed that the most similar known protein was the Fasciola gigantica protein FgCaBP3 and so this newly identified protein was named FhCaBP3. Molecular modelling of FhCaBP3 predicted a highly flexible N-terminal region, followed by a domain containing two EF-hand motifs the second of which is likely to be a functioning divalent ion binding site. The C-terminal domain of the protein contains a dynein light chain like region. Interestingly, molecular modelling predicts that calcium ion binding to the N-terminal domain destabilises the β-sheet structure of the C-terminal domain. FhCaBP3 can be expressed in, and purified from, Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein dimerises and the absence of calcium ions appeared to promote dimerisation. Native gel shift assays demonstrated that the protein bound to calcium and manganese ions, but not to magnesium, barium, zinc, strontium, nickel, copper or cadmium ions. FhCaBP3 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide and chlorpromazine as well as the myosin regulatory light chain-binding drug praziquantel. Despite sequence and structural similarities to other members of the same protein family from F. hepatica, FhCaBP3 has different biochemical properties to the other well characterised family members, FH22 and FhCaBP4. This suggests that each member of this trematode calcium-binding family has discrete functional roles within the organism.

  4. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  5. The Biologically Relevant Targets and Binding Affinity Requirements for the Function of the Yeast Actin-Binding Protein 1 Src-Homology 3 Domain Vary With Genetic Context

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Jennifer; Garcia, Bianca; Stollar, Elliott J.; Rath, Arianna; Andrews, Brenda J.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2007-01-01

    Many protein–protein interaction domains bind to multiple targets. However, little is known about how the interactions of a single domain with many proteins are controlled and modulated under varying cellular conditions. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of Abp1p SH3 domain mutants that incrementally reduce target-binding affinity in four different yeast mutant backgrounds in which Abp1p activity is essential for growth. Although the severity of the phenotypic defects observed generally increased as binding affinity was reduced, some genetic backgrounds (prk1Δ and sla1Δ) tolerated large affinity reductions while others (sac6Δ and sla2Δ) were much more sensitive to these reductions. To elucidate the mechanisms behind these observations, we determined that Ark1p is the most important Abp1p SH3 domain interactor in prk1Δ cells, but that interactions with multiple targets, including Ark1p and Scp1p, are required in the sac6Δ background. We establish that the Abp1p SH3 domain makes different, functionally important interactions under different genetic conditions, and these changes in function are reflected by changes in the binding affinity requirement of the domain. These data provide the first evidence of biological relevance for any Abp1p SH3 domain-mediated interaction. We also find that considerable reductions in binding affinity are tolerated by the cell with little effect on growth rate, even when the actin cytoskeletal morphology is significantly perturbed. PMID:17409071

  6. Plasmodium falciparum double C2 domain protein, PfDOC2, binds to calcium when associated with membranes.

    PubMed

    Jean, Sophonie; Zapata-Jenks, Mónica A; Farley, Julie M; Tracy, Erin; Mayer, D C Ghislaine

    2014-09-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is strongly correlated with secretion of the micronemes, the apical organelles which contain the adhesins required for invasion of Plasmodium falciparum into human erythrocytes. A critical event in P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion is the production of calcium transients. After entering the cell, Ca(2+) binds to soluble Ca(2+)-binding proteins, such as the double C2 domains (DOC2). Recently, deletion of a P. falciparum DOC2 protein, PfDOC2, was shown to cause impairment in microneme secretion. However, PfDOC2 remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that PfDOC2 is expressed throughout the erythrocytic cycle and demonstrate that it is associated with membrane fractions and binds to calcium when it is part of these membranous structures. In summary, we show that PfDOC2 is a calcium lipid-binding protein of the protein kinase C type of DOC2 proteins.

  7. The structure of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding , glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin- A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Lawler, J.

    2011-05-10

    F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin{_}N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain) comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. We present the crystal structure of human F-spondin FS domain at 1.95{angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a Ca{sup 2+}-binding C2 domain variant with an 8-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sandwich fold. Though the primary sequences of the FS domains of F-spondin and mindin are less than 36% identical, their overall structures are very similar. The unique feature of F-spondin FS domain is the presence of three disulfide bonds associated with the N- and C-termini of the domain and a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site. The integrin-binding motif found in mindin is not conserved in the F-spondin FS domain. The structure of the F-spondin FS domain completes the structural studies of the multiple-domain ECM molecule. The homology of its core structure to a common Ca{sup 2+}- and lipid-binding C2 domain suggests that the F-spondin FS domain may be responsible for part of the membrane targeting of F-spondin in its regulation of axon development. The structural properties of the FS domain revealed in this study pave the way for further exploration into the functions of F-spondin.

  8. Identification and characterization of a laminin-binding protein of Aspergillus fumigatus: extracellular thaumatin domain protein (AfCalAp).

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Mahajan, Lakshna; Ramjee, Sandhya; Singh, Yogendra; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Madan, Taruna

    2009-06-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, infects the human host via inhalation of airborne conidia. Adhesion of fungal conidia, to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components associated with host tissue surfaces, is thought to be the primary step in the pathogenesis and dissemination of infection. To identify novel adhesion proteins (adhesins) of A. fumigatus, we screened its proteome in silico using SPAAN (software program for prediction of adhesins and adhesin-like proteins using neural networks). One of the predicted adhesin-encoding genes with a P(ad) (probability of being adhesin) value >0.9, the gene encoding extracellular thaumatin domain protein (AfCalA), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant AfCalAp showed significant binding with laminin and murine lung cells. Anti-AfCalAp antibodies inhibited the binding of AfCalAp to laminin in a dose-dependent manner. Significant binding of anti-AfCalAp antibodies to 2 h swollen conidia suggests the presence of AfCalAp on the conidial surface. AfCalA transcript was not detectable in resting conidia but was detected in conidia incubated with RPMI 1640 medium in the presence and absence of lung epithelial cell line (A539)-derived ECM. Elevated levels of IgE antibodies specific to AfCalAp were observed in the sera of two out of seven patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. The study confirms the relevance of the bioinformatic approach for predicting fungal adhesins and establishes AfCalAp as a novel laminin-binding protein of A. fumigatus.

  9. Soluble protein expression in E. coli cells using IgG-binding domain of protein A as a solubilizing partner in the cold induced system.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara, Yuiko

    2008-11-21

    We constructed a cold induced expression vector in Escherichia coli cells that consists of a histidine tag sequence for nickel chelate affinity purification, IgG-binding domain of protein A (ZZ-domain) and the multiple cloning sites. The role of ZZ-domain as a solubilizing partner at 15 degrees C was demonstrated by expressing the imidazopyrazinone-type luciferases of Renilla, Oplophorus, Gaussia, and Vargula (Cypridina) as well as the calcium-binding photoproteins and firefly luciferase. The fused protein with ZZ-domain was expressed efficiently as a soluble form in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells at low temperature.

  10. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS.

    PubMed

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutations in vivo.

  11. Ubiquitin Regulates Caspase Recruitment Domain-mediated Signaling by Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain-containing Proteins NOD1 and NOD2*

    PubMed Central

    Ver Heul, Aaron M.; Fowler, C. Andrew; Ramaswamy, S.; Piper, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammation and autophagy. These pathways rely on the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) within the receptors, which serve as protein interaction platforms that coordinately regulate immune signaling. We show that NOD1 CARD binds ubiquitin (Ub), in addition to directly binding its downstream targets receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2) and autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1). NMR spectroscopy and structure-guided mutagenesis identified a small hydrophobic surface of NOD1 CARD that binds Ub. In vitro, Ub competes with RIP2 for association with NOD1 CARD. In vivo, we found that the ligand-stimulated activity of NOD1 with a mutant CARD lacking Ub binding but retaining ATG16L1 and RIP2 binding is increased relative to wild-type NOD1. Likewise, point mutations in the tandem NOD2 CARDs at positions analogous to the surface residues defining the Ub interface on NOD1 resulted in loss of Ub binding and increased ligand-stimulated NOD2 signaling. These data suggest that Ub binding provides a negative feedback loop upon NOD-dependent activation of RIP2. PMID:23300079

  12. Ubiquitin regulates caspase recruitment domain-mediated signaling by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins NOD1 and NOD2.

    PubMed

    Ver Heul, Aaron M; Fowler, C Andrew; Ramaswamy, S; Piper, Robert C

    2013-03-08

    NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammation and autophagy. These pathways rely on the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) within the receptors, which serve as protein interaction platforms that coordinately regulate immune signaling. We show that NOD1 CARD binds ubiquitin (Ub), in addition to directly binding its downstream targets receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2) and autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1). NMR spectroscopy and structure-guided mutagenesis identified a small hydrophobic surface of NOD1 CARD that binds Ub. In vitro, Ub competes with RIP2 for association with NOD1 CARD. In vivo, we found that the ligand-stimulated activity of NOD1 with a mutant CARD lacking Ub binding but retaining ATG16L1 and RIP2 binding is increased relative to wild-type NOD1. Likewise, point mutations in the tandem NOD2 CARDs at positions analogous to the surface residues defining the Ub interface on NOD1 resulted in loss of Ub binding and increased ligand-stimulated NOD2 signaling. These data suggest that Ub binding provides a negative feedback loop upon NOD-dependent activation of RIP2.

  13. Sperm postacrosomal WW domain-binding protein is not required for mouse egg activation.

    PubMed

    Satouh, Yuhkoh; Nozawa, Kaori; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-10-01

    To begin embryonic development, the zygote must resume the cell cycle correctly after stimulation by sperm-borne oocyte-activating factors (SOAFs). The postacrosomal WW domain-binding protein (PAWP) is one of the strongest SOAF candidates and is widely conserved among eutherian mammals. It has been reported that the microinjection of recombinant PAWP protein can trigger not only Ca(2+) oscillations in mammalian eggs but also intracellular Ca(2+) release in amphibian eggs. It was also suggested that PAWP is involved in the formation of high-quality spermatozoa. On the other hand, negligible SOAF activity for PAWP cRNA has also been reported. In this study, we generated PAWP null mice and examined the fertilizing ability of male mice. Electron microscopy showed no aberrant morphology in spermatogenesis. Intracytoplasmic injection of a single spermatozoon from the null mouse line showed that depletion of PAWP elicited no quantitative differences in Ca(2+) oscillations or in subsequent development of the embryos. We conclude that PAWP does not play an essential role in mouse fertilization.

  14. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  15. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Michael Garavito, R.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Crystal structure of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor (PRR-IC) as MBP fusion protein at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). {yields} MBP fusion protein is a dimer in crystals in the presence and absence of maltose. {yields} PRR-IC domain is responsible for the dimerization of the fusion protein. {yields} Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermolecular interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in PRR dimerization. -- Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain ({approx}310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain ({approx}20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain ({approx}19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain ({approx}30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V{sub 0} portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR

  16. Lumazine proteins from photobacteria: localization of the single ligand binding site to the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Illarionov, Boris; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Wirth, Martina; Yong Lee, Chan; Eun Woo, Young; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus

    2007-12-01

    Lumazine protein is believed to serve as an optical transponder in bioluminescence emission by certain marine bacteria. Sequence arguments suggest that the protein comprises two similarly folded riboflavin synthase-type domains, but earlier work also suggested that only one domain binds 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine (DMRL). We show that the replacement of serine-48 or threonine-50 in the N-terminal domain of lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi modulates the absorbance and fluorescence properties of bound DMRL or riboflavin. Moreover, the replacement of these amino acids is accompanied by reduced ligand affinity. Replacement of serine-48 by tryptophan shifts the (13)C NMR signal of the 6-methyl group in bound DMRL upfield by 2.9 ppm as compared to the wild-type protein complex. Replacement of threonine-50 causes a downfield shift of approximately 20 ppm for the (15)N NMR signal of N-5, as well as an upfield shift of 3 ppm for the (13)C NMR signal of C-7 in bound DMRL, respectively. The replacement of the topologically equivalent serine-144 and proline-146 in the C-terminal domain had no significant impact on optical properties, chemical shifts and apparent binding constants of bound DMRL. These data show that the N-terminal domain is the unique site for ligand binding in lumazine protein.

  17. Solution structure of the RNA binding domain in the human muscleblind-like protein 2

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Dang, Weirong; Abe, Chikage; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Watanabe, Satoru; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Harada, Takushi; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Güntert, Peter; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins 1, 2, and 3, which contain four CCCH zinc finger motifs (ZF1–4), are involved in the differentiation of muscle inclusion by controlling the splicing patterns of several pre-mRNAs. Especially, MBNL1 plays a crucial role in myotonic dystrophy. The CCCH zinc finger is a sequence motif found in many RNA binding proteins and is suggested to play an important role in the recognition of RNA molecules. Here, we solved the solution structures of both tandem zinc finger (TZF) motifs, TZF12 (comprising ZF1 and ZF2) and TZF34 (ZF3 and ZF4), in MBNL2 from Homo sapiens. In TZF12 of MBNL2, ZF1 and ZF2 adopt a similar fold, as reported previously for the CCCH-type zinc fingers in the TIS11d protein. The linker between ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 forms an antiparallel β-sheet with the N-terminal extension of ZF1. Furthermore, ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 interact with each other through hydrophobic interactions. Consequently, TZF12 forms a single, compact global fold, where ZF1 and ZF2 are approximately symmetrical about the C2 axis. The structure of the second tandem zinc finger (TZF34) in MBNL2 is similar to that of TZF12. This novel three-dimensional structure of the TZF domains in MBNL2 provides a basis for functional studies of the CCCH-type zinc finger motifs in the MBNL protein family. PMID:19177353

  18. Solution structure of the RNA binding domain in the human muscleblind-like protein 2.

    PubMed

    He, Fahu; Dang, Weirong; Abe, Chikage; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Watanabe, Satoru; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Harada, Takushi; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Güntert, Peter; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins 1, 2, and 3, which contain four CCCH zinc finger motifs (ZF1-4), are involved in the differentiation of muscle inclusion by controlling the splicing patterns of several pre-mRNAs. Especially, MBNL1 plays a crucial role in myotonic dystrophy. The CCCH zinc finger is a sequence motif found in many RNA binding proteins and is suggested to play an important role in the recognition of RNA molecules. Here, we solved the solution structures of both tandem zinc finger (TZF) motifs, TZF12 (comprising ZF1 and ZF2) and TZF34 (ZF3 and ZF4), in MBNL2 from Homo sapiens. In TZF12 of MBNL2, ZF1 and ZF2 adopt a similar fold, as reported previously for the CCCH-type zinc fingers in the TIS11d protein. The linker between ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 forms an antiparallel beta-sheet with the N-terminal extension of ZF1. Furthermore, ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 interact with each other through hydrophobic interactions. Consequently, TZF12 forms a single, compact global fold, where ZF1 and ZF2 are approximately symmetrical about the C2 axis. The structure of the second tandem zinc finger (TZF34) in MBNL2 is similar to that of TZF12. This novel three-dimensional structure of the TZF domains in MBNL2 provides a basis for functional studies of the CCCH-type zinc finger motifs in the MBNL protein family.

  19. Protective effect of ligand-binding domain of fibronectin-binding protein on mastitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changmin; Gong, Rui; Guo, Aizhen; Chen, Huanchun

    2010-05-28

    The immunoprotective effect of the ligand-binding domain of fibronectin-binding protein (lFnBP) from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was investigated in a mouse mastitis model. The recombinant lFnBP (rlFnBP) and inactivated S. aureus were emulsified in Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil adjuvant or Seppic adjuvant, respectively. Seven groups of mice (n=12 each) were immunized with these six vaccines or phosphate-buffered saline. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers of mice immunized with rlFnBP vaccine were higher than those in the inactivated vaccine group (P<0.01). Antiserum capacities to opsonize adhesion and phagocytosis were significantly greater in the rlFnBP immunization group than in the killed bacteria group (P<0.05). The immunized lactating mice were challenged with S. aureus. At 24h postinfection, the numbers of bacteria recovered in the rlFnBP group were significantly lower than those in the killed bacteria group (P<0.001). Levels of both interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma from the mammary glands in the rlFnBP group were higher than those in the inactivated group (P<0.05). Better protection of mammary gland tissue was shown in the rlFnBP group. Thus, the rlFnBP, emulsified in an oil adjuvant, provided strong immune protection against S. aureus mastitis in mice, and could therefore be a promising vaccine candidate against bovine mastitis induced by S. aureus. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein FhCaBP2: structure of the dynein light chain-like domain.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J; van Raaij, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica causes an increasing burden on human and animal health, partly because of the spread of drug-resistant isolates. As a consequence, there is considerable interest in developing new drugs to combat liver fluke infections. A group of potential targets is a family of calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain with two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal domain with predicted similarity to dynein light chains (DLC-like domain). The function of these proteins is unknown, although in several species, they have been localised to the tegument, an important structure at the host-parasite interface. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the DLC-like domain of F. hepatica calcium-binding protein 2 (FhCaBP2), solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined at 2.3 Å resolution in two different crystal forms. The FhCaBP2 DLC-like domain has a structure similar to other DLC domains, with an anti-parallel β-sheet packed against an α-helical hairpin. Like other DLC domains, it dimerises through its β2-strand, which extends in an arch and forms the fifth strand in an extended β-sheet of the other monomer. The structure provides molecular details of the dimerisation of FhCaBP2, the first example from this family of parasite proteins.

  1. Structural and binding properties of the PASTA domain of PonA2, a key penicillin binding protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; Falcigno, Lucia; Maglione, Cira; Marasco, Daniela; Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Berisio, Rita; D'Auria, Gabriella

    2014-07-01

    PonA2 is one of the two class A penicillin binding proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. It plays a complex role in mycobacterial physiology and is spotted as a promising target for inhibitors. PonA2 is involved in adaptation of M. tuberculosis to dormancy, an ability which has been attributed to the presence in its sequence of a C-terminal PASTA domain. Since PASTA modules are typically considered as β-lactam antibiotic binding domains, we determined the solution structure of the PASTA domain from PonA2 and analyzed its binding properties versus a plethora of potential binders, including the β-lactam antibiotics, two typical muropeptide mimics, and polymeric peptidoglycan. We show that, despite a high structural similarity with other PASTA domains, the PASTA domain of PonA2 displays different binding properties, as it is not able to bind muropeptides, or β-lactams, or polymeric peptidoglycan. These results indicate that the role of PASTA domains cannot be generalized, as their specific binding properties strongly depend on surface residues, which are widely variable.

  2. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein–protein interaction module

    PubMed Central

    Salcini, Anna Elisabetta; Confalonieri, Stefano; Doria, Margherita; Santolini, Elisa; Tassi, Elena; Minenkova, Olga; Cesareni, Gianni; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein–protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine–proline–phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct screening of expression libraries with EH domains yielded a number of putative EH interactors, all of which possessed NPF motifs that were shown to be responsible for the interaction. Among these interactors were the human homolog of NUMB, a developmentally reguated gene of Drosophila, and RAB, the cellular cofactor of the HIV REV protein. We demonstrated coimmunoprecipitation of Eps15 with NUMB and RAB. Finally, in vitro binding of NPF-containing peptides to cellular proteins and EST database screening established the existence of a family of EH-containing proteins in mammals. Based on the characteristics of EH-containing and EH-binding proteins, we propose that EH domains are involved in processes connected with the transport and sorting of molecules within the cell. PMID:9303539

  3. Role of Cysteines in Stabilizing the Randomized Receptor Binding Domains within Feline Leukemia Virus Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso-Torres, Leonardo; Sarangi, Anindita; Whidby, Jillian; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retargeting of gammaretroviral envelope proteins has shown promising results in the isolation of novel isolates with therapeutic potential. However, the optimal conditions required to obtain high-affinity retargeted envelope proteins with narrow tropism are not understood. This study highlights the advantage of constrained peptides within receptor binding domains and validates the random library screening technique of obtaining novel retargeted Env proteins. Using a modified vector backbone to screen the envelope libraries on 143B osteosarcoma cells, three novel and unique retargeted envelopes were isolated. The use of complex disulfide bonds within variable regions required for receptor binding is found within natural gammaretroviral envelope isolates. Interestingly, two of the isolates, named AII and BV2, have a pair of cysteines located within the randomized region of 11 amino acids similar to that identified within the CP Env, an isolate identified in a previous Env library screen on the human renal carcinoma Caki-1 cell line. The amino acids within the randomized region of AII and BV2 envelopes that are essential for viral infection have been identified in this study and include these cysteine residues. Through mutagenesis studies, the putative disulfide bond pairs including and beyond the randomized region were examined. In parallel, the disulfide bonds of CP Env were identified using mass spectrometry. The results indicate that this pair of cysteines creates the structural context to position key hydrophobic (F and W) and basic (K and H) residues critical for viral titer and suggest that AII, BV2, and CP internal cysteines bond together in distinct ways. IMPORTANCE Retargeted gammaretroviral particles have broad applications for therapeutic use. Although great advances have been achieved in identifying new Env-host cell receptor pairs, the rules for designing optimal Env libraries are still unclear. We have found that isolates with an additional

  4. Novel Zinc-binding Site in the E2 Domain Regulates Amyloid Precursor-like Protein 1 (APLP1) Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Magnus C.; Kaden, Daniela; Schauenburg, Linda; Hancock, Mark A.; Voigt, Philipp; Roeser, Dirk; Barucker, Christian; Than, Manuel E.; Schaefer, Michael; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the APP-like proteins 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2) are a family of multidomain transmembrane proteins possessing homo- and heterotypic contact sites in their ectodomains. We previously reported that divalent metal ions dictate the conformation of the extracellular APP E2 domain (Dahms, S. O., Könnig, I., Roeser, D., Gührs, K.-H., Mayer, M. C., Kaden, D., Multhaup, G., and Than, M. E. (2012) J. Mol. Biol. 416, 438–452), but unresolved is the nature and functional importance of metal ion binding to APLP1 and APLP2. We found here that zinc ions bound to APP and APLP1 E2 domains and mediated their oligomerization, whereas the APLP2 E2 domain interacted more weakly with zinc possessing a less surface-exposed zinc-binding site, and stayed monomeric. Copper ions bound to E2 domains of all three proteins. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses examined the effect of metal ion binding to APP and APLPs in the cellular context in real time. Zinc ions specifically induced APP and APLP1 oligomerization and forced APLP1 into multimeric clusters at the plasma membrane consistent with zinc concentrations in the blood and brain. The observed effects were mediated by a novel zinc-binding site within the APLP1 E2 domain as APLP1 deletion mutants revealed. Based upon its cellular localization and its dominant response to zinc ions, APLP1 is mainly affected by extracellular zinc among the APP family proteins. We conclude that zinc binding and APP/APLP oligomerization are intimately linked, and we propose that this represents a novel mechanism for regulating APP/APLP protein function at the molecular level. PMID:24855651

  5. A new protein domain for binding to DNA through the minor groove.

    PubMed Central

    Freire, R; Salas, M; Hermoso, J M

    1994-01-01

    Protein p6 of the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 binds with low sequence specificity to DNA through the minor groove, forming a multimeric nucleoprotein complex that activates the initiation of phi 29 DNA replication. Deletion analysis suggested that the N-terminal part of protein p6, predicted to form an amphipathic alpha-helix, is involved in DNA binding. We have constructed site-directed mutants at the polar side of the putative alpha-helix. DNA binding and activation of initiation of phi 29 DNA replication were impaired in most of the mutant proteins obtained. A 19 amino acid peptide comprising the N-terminus of protein p6 interacted with a DNA fragment containing high-affinity signals for protein p6 binding with approximately 50-fold higher affinity than the peptide corresponding to an inactive mutant. Both wild-type peptide and protein p6 recognized the same sequences in this DNA fragment. This result, together with distamycin competition experiments, suggested that the wild-type peptide also binds to DNA through the minor groove. In addition, CD spectra of the wild-type peptide showed an increase in the alpha-helical content when bound to DNA. All these results indicate that an alpha-helical structure located in the N-terminal region of protein p6 is involved in DNA binding through the minor groove. Images PMID:7925279

  6. A modified oestrogen receptor ligand-binding domain as an improved switch for the regulation of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, T D; Hancock, D C; Danielian, P S; Parker, M G; Evan, G I

    1995-01-01

    A number of proteins have been rendered functionally oestrogen-dependent by fusion with the hormone-binding domain of the oestrogen receptor. There are, however, several significant disadvantages with such fusion proteins. First, their use in cells in vitro requires phenol red-free medium and laborious stripping of steroid hormones from serum in order to avoid constitutive activation. Secondly, control of oestrogen receptor fusion proteins in vivo is precluded by high endogenous levels of circulating oestrogens. Thirdly, the hormone-binding domain of the oestrogen receptor functions as a hormone-dependent transcriptional activation domain making interpretation of fusions with transcription factors problematical. In order to overcome these drawbacks we have used a transcriptionally inactive mutant of the murine oestrogen receptor which is unable to bind oestrogen yet retains normal affinity for the synthetic ligand, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. When the hormone-binding domain of this mutant oestrogen receptor is fused to the C-terminus of the c-Myc protein, Myc-induced proliferation and apoptosis in fibroblasts becomes dependent on 4-hydroxytamoxifen, but remains refractory to 17 beta-oestradiol. Images PMID:7784172

  7. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Jocelyn M.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Steer, David L.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A. Ian; Gell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen. PMID:27637108

  8. The tip of the iceberg: RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    King, Oliver D; Gitler, Aaron D; Shorter, James

    2012-06-26

    Prions are self-templating protein conformers that are naturally transmitted between individuals and promote phenotypic change. In yeast, prion-encoded phenotypes can be beneficial, neutral or deleterious depending upon genetic background and environmental conditions. A distinctive and portable 'prion domain' enriched in asparagine, glutamine, tyrosine and glycine residues unifies the majority of yeast prion proteins. Deletion of this domain precludes prionogenesis and appending this domain to reporter proteins can confer prionogenicity. An algorithm designed to detect prion domains has successfully identified 19 domains that can confer prion behavior. Scouring the human genome with this algorithm enriches a select group of RNA-binding proteins harboring a canonical RNA recognition motif (RRM) and a putative prion domain. Indeed, of 210 human RRM-bearing proteins, 29 have a putative prion domain, and 12 of these are in the top 60 prion candidates in the entire genome. Startlingly, these RNA-binding prion candidates are inexorably emerging, one by one, in the pathology and genetics of devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U), Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. For example, FUS and TDP-43, which rank 1st and 10th among RRM-bearing prion candidates, form cytoplasmic inclusions in the degenerating motor neurons of ALS patients and mutations in TDP-43 and FUS cause familial ALS. Recently, perturbed RNA-binding proteostasis of TAF15, which is the 2nd ranked RRM-bearing prion candidate, has been connected with ALS and FTLD-U. We strongly suspect that we have now merely reached the tip of the iceberg. We predict that additional RNA-binding prion candidates identified by our algorithm will soon surface as genetic modifiers or causes of diverse neurodegenerative conditions. Indeed, simple prion-like transfer mechanisms involving the prion

  9. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile; Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen; Cosson, Bertrand; Paillard, Luc; Poncet, Didier; Osborne, H. Beverley

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  10. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  11. Molecular characterization and ligand binding specificity of the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC3 from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a serious global health problem that afflicts more than 230 million people in 77 countries. Long-term mass treatments with the only available drug, praziquantel, have caused growing concerns about drug resistance. PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins are recognized as potential targets for the next generation of drug development. However, the PDZ domain-containing protein family in parasites has largely been unexplored. Methods We present the molecular characteristics of a PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC3, from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGIPC3) according to bioinformatics analysis and experimental approaches. The ligand binding specificity of the PDZ domain of SjGIPC3 was confirmed by screening an arbitrary peptide library in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays. The native ligand candidates were predicted by Tailfit software based on the C-terminal binding specificity, and further validated by Y2H assays. Results SjGIPC3 is a single PDZ domain-containing protein comprised of 328 amino acid residues. Structural prediction revealed that a conserved PDZ domain was presented in the middle region of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SjGIPC3 and other trematode orthologues clustered into a well-defined cluster but were distinguishable from those of other phyla. Transcriptional analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the SjGIPC3 gene was relatively highly expressed in the stages within the host, especially in male adult worms. By using Y2H assays to screen an arbitrary peptide library, we confirmed the C-terminal binding specificity of the SjGIPC3-PDZ domain, which could be deduced as a consensus sequence, -[SDEC]-[STIL]-[HSNQDE]-[VIL]*. Furthermore, six proteins were predicted to be native ligand candidates of SjGIPC3 based on the C-terminal binding properties and other biological information; four of these were confirmed to be potential ligands using the Y2H system. Conclusions In this study, we first

  12. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  13. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L2; a protein at the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, A; Nakashima, T; Taniguchi, M; Hosaka, H; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    1999-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L2 is the largest protein component in the ribosome. It is located at or near the peptidyl transferase center and has been a prime candidate for the peptidyl transferase activity. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and plays a crucial role in its assembly. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of L2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 2.3 A resolution by X-ray crystallography using the selenomethionyl MAD method. The RNA-binding domain of L2 consists of two recurring motifs of approximately 70 residues each. The N-terminal domain (positions 60-130) is homologous to the OB-fold, and the C-terminal domain (positions 131-201) is homologous to the SH3-like barrel. Residues Arg86 and Arg155, which have been identified by mutation experiments to be involved in the 23S rRNA binding, are located at the gate of the interface region between the two domains. The molecular architecture suggests how this important protein has evolved from the ancient nucleic acid-binding proteins to create a 23S rRNA-binding domain in the very remote past. PMID:10075918

  14. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  15. The Molecular Chaperone Hsp70 Activates Protein Phosphatase 5 (PP5) by Binding the Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Connarn, Jamie N.; Assimon, Victoria A.; Reed, Rebecca A.; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development. PMID:24327656

  16. Structural basis of the versatile DNA recognition ability of the methyl-CpG binding domain of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4.

    PubMed

    Otani, Junji; Arita, Kyohei; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Mariko; Kimura, Hironobu; Suetake, Isao; Tajima, Shoji; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    The methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) protein MBD4 participates in DNA repair as a glycosylase that excises mismatched thymine bases in CpG sites and also functions in transcriptional repression. Unlike other MBD proteins, MBD4 recognizes not only methylated CpG dinucleotides ((5m)CG/(5m)CG) but also T/G mismatched sites generated by spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)CG/TG). The glycosylase activity of MBD4 is also implicated in active DNA demethylation initiated by the deaminase-catalyzed conversion of 5-methylcytosine to thymine. Here, we report the crystal structures of the MBD of MBD4 (MBDMBD4) complexed with (5m)CG/(5m)CG and (5m)CG/TG. The crystal structures show that the DNA interface of MBD4 has flexible structural features and harbors an extensive water network that supports its dual base specificities. Combined with the results of biochemical analyses, the crystal structure of MBD4 bound to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine further demonstrates that MBDMBD4 is able to recognize a wide range of 5-methylcytosine modifications through the unique water network. The versatile base recognition ability of MBDMBD4 implies multifunctional roles for MBD4 in the regulation of dynamic DNA methylation patterns coupled with deamination and/or oxidation of 5-methylcytosine.

  17. Ultrastructural localization of the fibrinogen-binding domain of streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rýc, M; Beachey, E H; Whitnack, E

    1989-01-01

    Binding of fibrinogen to the M protein located on the surface fibrillae of group A streptococci impedes deposition of complement and thus contributes to the virulence of these organisms. We investigated this binding by electron microscopy using postembedding immunogold labeling. Both fibrinogen and its D fragment formed a distinct dense layer in the surface fibrillae, separated by 10 nm from the compact part of the cell wall. Labeling the sections with anti-fibrinogen or anti-fragment D showed that the fibrinogen-binding region lay within a 25-nm segment of the fibrillae beginning approximately 30 nm from the inner surface of the cell wall. The outer surface of the fibrinogen layer could be labeled with antibody to the amino-terminal half of type 24 M protein, indicating that the fibrillar tips remained exposed after fibrinogen binding. The degree of labeling with anti-fibrinogen, determined by gold particle counting, was the same whether the bacterial cells had been incubated with purified fibrinogen or whole plasma. These results indicate that the fibrinogen-binding region lies in the distal (amino-terminal) half of the M protein molecule but excludes the most distal portion, which is the site of epitopes that interact with opsonic anti-M antibody, and that plasma proteins other than fibrinogen, a number of which are known to bind to group A streptococci, do not interfere with fibrinogen binding. Images PMID:2473035

  18. RNA helicase activity of the plum pox potyvirus CI protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Mapping of an RNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, A; Laín, S; García, J A

    1995-01-01

    The plum pox potyvirus (PPV) cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP) has been synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography in amylose resin. In the absence of any other viral factors, the fusion product had NTPase, RNA binding and RNA helicase activities. These in vitro activities were not affected by removal of the last 103 amino acids of the CI protein. However, other deletions in the C-terminal part of the protein, although leaving intact all the region conserved in RNA helicases, drastically impaired the ability to unwind dsRNA and to hydrolyze NTPs. A mutant protein lacking the last 225 residues retained the competence to interact with RNA. Further deletions mapped boundaries of the RNA binding domain within residues 350 and 402 of the PPV CI protein. This region includes the arginine-rich motif VI, the most carboxy terminal conserved domain of RNA helicases of the superfamily SF2. These results indicate that NTP hydrolysis is not an essential component for RNA binding of the PPV CI protein. Images PMID:7538661

  19. Effects of ortho substituent groups of protocatechualdehyde derivatives on binding to the C1 domain of novel protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Narsimha; Borah, Rituparna; Sinha, Narayan; Jana, Chandramohan; Manna, Debasis

    2012-09-06

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) regulates a broad range of cellular functions including tumor promotion, apoptosis, differentiation, and growth. Thus, the DAG-responsive C1 domain of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes is considered to be an attractive drug target for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. To develop effective PKC regulators, we conveniently synthesized (hydroxymethyl)phenyl ester analogues targeted to the DAG binding site within the C1 domain. Biophysical studies and molecular docking analysis showed that the hydroxymethyl group, hydrophobic side chains, and acyl group at the ortho position are essential for their interactions with the C1-domain backbone. Modifications of these groups showed diminished binding to the C1 domain. The active (hydroxymethyl)phenyl ester analogues showed more than 5-fold stronger binding affinity for the C1 domain than DAG. Therefore, our findings reveal that (hydroxymethyl)phenyl ester analogues represent an attractive group of C1-domain ligands that can be further structurally modified to improve their binding and activity.

  20. Role of the two structural domains from the periplasmic Escherichia coli histidine-binding protein HisJ.

    PubMed

    Chu, Byron C H; DeWolf, Timothy; Vogel, Hans J

    2013-11-01

    Escherichia coli HisJ is a type II periplasmic binding protein that functions to reversibly capture histidine and transfer it to its cognate inner membrane ABC permease. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the structure of apo-HisJ (26.5 kDa) in solution. HisJ is a bilobal protein in which domain 1 (D1) is made up of two noncontiguous subdomains, and domain 2 (D2) is expressed as the inner domain. To better understand the roles of D1 and D2, we have isolated and characterized each domain separately. Structurally, D1 closely resembles its homologous domain in apo- and holo-HisJ, whereas D2 is more similar to the holo-form. NMR relaxation experiments reveal that HisJ becomes more ordered upon ligand binding, whereas isolated D2 experiences a significant reduction in slower (millisecond to microsecond) motions compared with the homologous domain in apo-HisJ. NMR titrations reveal that D1 is able to bind histidine in a similar manner as full-length HisJ, albeit with lower affinity. Unexpectedly, isolated D1 and D2 do not interact with each other in the presence or absence of histidine, which indicates the importance of intact interdomain-connecting elements (i.e. hinge regions) for HisJ functioning. Our results shed light on the binding mechanism of type II periplasmic binding proteins where ligand is initially bound by D1, and D2 plays a supporting role in this dynamic process.

  1. The YTH Domain Is a Novel RNA Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaiyi; Theler, Dominik; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Hiller, Michael; de la Grange, Pierre; Pudimat, Rainer; Rafalska, Ilona; Heinrich, Bettina; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Allain, Frédéric H.-T.; Stamm, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The YTH (YT521-B homology) domain was identified by sequence comparison and is found in 174 different proteins expressed in eukaryotes. It is characterized by 14 invariant residues within an α-helix/β-sheet structure. Here we show that the YTH domain is a novel RNA binding domain that binds to a short, degenerated, single-stranded RNA sequence motif. The presence of the binding motif in alternative exons is necessary for YT521-B to directly influence splice site selection in vivo. Array analyses demonstrate that YT521-B predominantly regulates vertebrate-specific exons. An NMR titration experiment identified the binding surface for single-stranded RNA on the YTH domain. Structural analyses indicate that the YTH domain is related to the pseudouridine synthase and archaeosine transglycosylase (PUA) domain. Our data show that the YTH domain conveys RNA binding ability to a new class of proteins that are found in all eukaryotic organisms. PMID:20167602

  2. The minimal transactivation domain of the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL interacts with TATA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Friedman, James S; Khanna, Hemant; Swain, Prabodh K; Denicola, Raphael; Cheng, Hong; Mitton, Kenneth P; Weber, Christian H; Hicks, David; Swaroop, Anand

    2004-11-05

    The basic motif-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor NRL controls the expression of rhodopsin and other phototransduction genes and is a key mediator of photoreceptor differentiation. To delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional initiation of rod-specific genes, we characterized different regions of the NRL protein using yeast-based autoactivation assays. We identified 35 amino acid residues in the proline- and serine-rich N-terminal region (called minimal transactivation domain, MTD), which, when combined with LexA or Gal4 DNA binding domains, exhibited activation of target promoters. Because this domain is conserved in all proteins of the large Maf family, we hypothesized that NRL-MTD played an important role in assembling the transcription initiation complex. Our studies showed that the NRL protein, including the MTD, interacted with full-length or the C-terminal domain of TATA-binding protein (TBP) in vitro. NRL and TBP could be co-immunoprecipitated from bovine retinal nuclear extract. TBP was also part of c-Maf and MafA (two other large Maf proteins)-containing complex(es) in vivo. Our data suggest that the function of NRL-MTD is to activate transcription by recruiting or stabilizing TBP (and consequently other components of the general transcription complex) at the promoter of target genes, and a similar function may be attributed to other bZIP proteins of the large Maf family.

  3. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  4. [Binding of human ribosomal protein S13 to the central domain of 18S rRNA].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2011-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S13 is a structural element of the small subunit of ribosome. It is a homologue of eubacterial ribosomal protein S15, and, besides, it possesses an extended N-terminal region, characteristic of the S15p family in eukaryotes and archaea. In the present study, we investigated binding of recombinant ribosomal protein S13 and its mutants containing deletions or substitutions of amino acid residues in different regions with an RNA transcript corresponding to a fragment of the central domain of 18S rRNA. We found that replacement of ultra-conservative residues H101 and D108 as well as deletions of either 29 C-terminal or 27 N-terminal residues substantially reduced affinity of the protein to the RNA transcript. Deletion of 54 C-terminal or 80 N-terminal residues completely deprived the protein of binding capacity. Using a footprinting assay, we identified sites in the RNA transcript changing their accessibilities to action of hydroxyl radicals under binding of either full-length protein S13 or its mutant lacking 27 N-terminal residues. It is shown that these sites are located mainly in helix H22 of the 18S rRNA and in the region of its junction with helix H20 and are consistent predominantly with contacts of the rRNA with the conserved part of the protein. We concluded that binding of ribosomal protein S13 to 18S rRNA is provided mainly by conserved motifs of the protein corresponding to those motifs in its eubacterial homologue that are involved in the interaction with 16S rRNA in the 30S subunit. Role of the N-terminal region of the protein in its binding to the central domain of 18S rRNA is discussed.

  5. Novel benzimidazole inhibitors bind to a unique site in the kinesin spindle protein motor domain.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Shipps, Gerald W; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Smith, Catherine K; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Sanden, David; Basso, Andrea D; Vilenchik, Lev; Gray, Kimberly; Annis, D Allen; Nickbarg, Elliott; Ma, Yao; Lahue, Brian; Herbst, Ronald; Le, Hung V

    2010-09-28

    Affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) screening of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) followed by enzyme inhibition studies and temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) characterization was utilized to identify a series of benzimidazole compounds. This series also binds in the presence of Ispinesib, a known anticancer KSP inhibitor in phase I/II clinical trials for breast cancer. TdCD and AS-MS analyses support simultaneous binding implying existence of a novel non-Ispinesib binding pocket within KSP. Additional TdCD analyses demonstrate direct binding of these compounds to Ispinesib-resistant mutants (D130V, A133D, and A133D + D130V double mutant), further strengthening the hypothesis that the compounds bind to a distinct binding pocket. Also importantly, binding to this pocket causes uncompetitive inhibition of KSP ATPase activity. The uncompetitive inhibition with respect to ATP is also confirmed by the requirement of nucleotide for binding of the compounds. After preliminary affinity optimization, the benzimidazole series exhibited distinctive antimitotic activity as evidenced by blockade of bipolar spindle formation and appearance of monoasters. Cancer cell growth inhibition was also demonstrated either as a single agent or in combination with Ispinesib. The combination was additive as predicted by the binding studies using TdCD and AS-MS analyses. The available data support the existence of a KSP inhibitory site hitherto unknown in the literature. The data also suggest that targeting this novel site could be a productive strategy for eluding Ispinesib-resistant tumors. Finally, AS-MS and TdCD techniques are general in scope and may enable screening other targets in the presence of known drugs, clinical candidates, or tool compounds that bind to the protein of interest in an effort to identify potency-enhancing small molecules that increase efficacy and impede resistance in combination therapy.

  6. GIL, a new c-di-GMP-binding protein domain involved in regulation of cellulose synthesis in enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Ahmad, Irfan; Blanka, Andrea; Schottkowski, Marco; Cimdins, Annika; Galperin, Michael Y; Römling, Ute; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to numerous enzymes involved in c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation in enterobacteria, only a handful of c-di-GMP receptors/effectors have been identified. In search of new c-di-GMP receptors, we screened the Escherichia coli ASKA overexpression gene library using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA) with fluorescently and radioisotope-labelled c-di-GMP. We uncovered three new candidate c-di-GMP receptors in E. coli and characterized one of them, BcsE. The bcsE gene is encoded in cellulose synthase operons in representatives of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The purified BcsE proteins from E. coli, Salmonella enterica and Klebsiella pneumoniae bind c-di-GMP via the domain of unknown function, DUF2819, which is hereby designated GIL, GGDEF I-site like domain. The RxGD motif of the GIL domain is required for c-di-GMP binding, similar to the c-di-GMP-binding I-site of the diguanylate cyclase GGDEF domain. Thus, GIL is the second protein domain, after PilZ, dedicated to c-di-GMP-binding. We show that in S. enterica, BcsE is not essential for cellulose synthesis but is required for maximal cellulose production, and that c-di-GMP binding is critical for BcsE function. It appears that cellulose production in enterobacteria is controlled by a two-tiered c-di-GMP-dependent system involving BcsE and the PilZ domain containing glycosyltransferase BcsA.

  7. Phage P4 origin-binding domain structure reveals a mechanism for regulation of DNA-binding activity by homo- and heterodimerization of winged helix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Ziegelin, Günter; Korolev, Sergey; Calendar, Richard; Lanka, Erich; Waksman, Gabriel

    2002-02-01

    The origin-binding domain of the gpalpha protein of phage P4 (P4-OBD) mediates origin recognition and regulation of gpalpha activity by the protein Cnr. We have determined the crystal structure of P4-OBD at 2.95 A resolution. The structure of P4-OBD is that of a dimer with pseudo twofold symmetry. Each subunit has a winged helix topology with a unique structure among initiator proteins. The only structural homologue of the P4-OBD subunit is the DNA-binding domain of the eukaryotic transcriptional activator Rfx1. Based on this structural alignment, a model for origin recognition by the P4-OBD dimer is suggested. P4-OBD mutations that interfere with Cnr binding locate to the dimer interface, indicating that Cnr acts by disrupting the gpalpha dimer. P4-OBD dimerization is mediated by helices alpha1 and alpha3 in both subunits, a mode of winged helix protein dimerization that is reminiscent of that of the eukaryotic transcription factors E2F and DP. This, in turn, suggests that Cnr is also a winged helix protein, a possibility that is supported by previously unreported sequence homologies between Cnr and Rfx1 and homology modelling. Hence, in a mechanism that appears to be conserved from phage to man, the DNA-binding activity of winged helix proteins can be regulated by other winged helix proteins via the versatile use of the winged helix motif as a homo- or heterodimerization scaffold.

  8. NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis that differentially bind and hydrolyze peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Bannantine, John P; Lingle, Cari K; Adam, Philip R; Ramyar, Kasra X; McWhorter, William J; Stabel, Judith R; Picking, William D; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-04-01

    A subset of proteins containing NlpC/P60 domains are bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases that cleave noncanonical peptide linkages and contribute to cell wall remodeling as well as cell separation during late stages of division. Some of these proteins have been shown to cleave peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and play a role in Mycobacterium marinum virulence of zebra fish; however, there are still significant knowledge gaps concerning the molecular function of these proteins in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). The MAP genome sequence encodes five NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins. We describe atomic resolution crystal structures of two such MAP proteins, MAP_1272c and MAP_1204. These crystal structures, combined with functional assays to measure peptidoglycan cleavage activity, led to the observation that MAP_1272c does not have a functional catalytic core for peptidoglycan hydrolysis. Furthermore, the structure and sequence of MAP_1272c demonstrate that the catalytic residues normally required for hydrolysis are absent, and the protein does not bind peptidoglycan as efficiently as MAP_1204. While the NlpC/P60 catalytic triad is present in MAP_1204, changing the catalytic cysteine-155 residue to a serine significantly diminished catalytic activity, but did not affect binding to peptidoglycan. Collectively, these findings suggest a broader functional repertoire for NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins than simply hydrolases.

  9. Cys/Gly-rich proteins with a putative single chitin-binding domain from oat (Avena sativa) seeds.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Sheng; Claeson, Per

    2003-06-01

    Through a reliable and repeatable procedure based on solid-phase extraction techniques, a protein fraction (P fraction) rich in Cys/Gly residues was extracted and captured from oat (Avena sativa L.) seeds. Quantitative amino acid analysis and MS of the P fraction indicated that it contains a series of heterogeneous Cys/Gly-rich proteins with molecular masses of 3.6-4.0 kDa. Preliminary results from bioassays showed that these proteins possess weak to moderate antifungal properties to some fungal strains. From this fraction, a new polypeptide, designated avesin A, was purified and sequenced by Edman degradation. Avesin A consists of 37 amino-acid residues, with 10 glycine residues and eight cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges, and contains a single chitin-binding domain, which indicates that avesin A is a new member of the putative chitin-binding proteins. Avesin A is the first identified hevein-like small protein from cereal grains.

  10. Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x: importance of the C-terminal penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains for beta-lactam binding.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Todorova, Katya; Sauerbier, Julia; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2012-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) mutations that occur during the selection with beta-lactams are located within the central penicillin-binding/transpeptidase (TP) domain, and are believed to mediate resistance by interfering with the formation of a covalent complex of the active site serine with the antibiotic. We now investigated the effect of two point mutations found in two independently obtained laboratory mutants that are located at the surface of the TP domain with their side chains facing outside (G422D respectively R426C). They have no significant effect on resistance to cefotaxime in vivo or on binding to Bocillin™FL to the active site in vitro using purified PBP2x derivatives, thus apparently do not affect the active site directly. In contrast, in silico modeling revealed that they affect van der Waal's interactions with the PASTA1 (PBP and serine/threonine kinase associated) domain of the C-terminal extension and a noncovalent cefuroxime molecule found in the X-ray structure of an acylated PBP2x, suggesting some effect of the mutations on the interaction of the TP domain with PASTA1 and/or with the antibiotic associated with PASTA1. The effect of the PASTA domains on covalent binding of PBP2x to Bocillin FL was then investigated using a series of soluble truncated PBP2x derivatives. Deletion of 127 C-terminal residues, that is, of both PASTA domains, decreased binding dramatically by ∼90%. Surprisingly, deletion of only 40 amino acids resulted in the same phenotype, whereas the absence of 30 amino acids affected binding marginally by 10%, documenting a crucial role of the C-terminal domain for beta-lactam binding.

  11. A single gene from yeast for both nuclear and cytoplasmic polyadenylate-binding proteins: domain structure and expression.

    PubMed

    Sachs, A B; Bond, M W; Kornberg, R D

    1986-06-20

    Nuclear and cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins have been purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and antisera have been used to isolate a gene that encodes them. The gene occurs in a single copy on chromosome 5 and gives rise to a unique, unspliced 2.1 kb transcript. The nuclear protein appears to be derived from the cytoplasmic one by proteolytic cleavage into 53 and 17 kd polypeptides that remain associated during isolation. DNA sequence determination reveals four tandemly arrayed 90 amino acid regions of homology that probably represent poly(A)-binding domains. A 55 residue A-rich region upstream of the initiator methionine codon in the mRNA shows an affinity for poly(A)-binding protein comparable to that of poly(A)180-220, raising the possibility of feedback regulation of translation.

  12. Structural and functional studies of a large winged Z-DNA-binding domain of Danio rerio protein kinase PKZ.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Vinod Kumar; Kim, Doyoun; Yun, Kyunghee; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The Z-DNA-binding domain of PKZ from zebrafish (Danio rerio; drZαPKZ ) contains the largest β-wing among known Z-DNA-binding domains. To elucidate the functional implication of the β-wing, we solved the crystal structure of apo-drZαPKZ . Structural comparison with its Z-DNA-bound form revealed a large conformational change within the β-wing during Z-DNA binding. Biochemical studies of protein mutants revealed that two basic residues in the β-wing are responsible for Z-DNA recognition as well as fast B-Z transition. Therefore, the extra basic residues in the β-wing of drZαPKZ are necessary for the fast B-Z transition activity. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  14. Tomato MBD5, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, physically interacting with UV-damaged DNA binding protein-1, functions in multiple processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxiang; Deng, Heng; Miao, Min; Li, Huirong; Huang, Shengxiong; Wang, Songhu; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-04-01

    In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), high pigment mutations (hp-1 and hp-2) were mapped to genes encoding UV-damaged DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) and de-etiolated-1 (DET1), respectively. Here we characterized a tomato methyl-CpG-binding domain protein SlMBD5 identified by yeast two-hybrid screening using SlDDB1 as a bait. Yeast two-hybrid assay demonstrated that the physical interaction of SlMBD5 with SlDDB1 is mediated by the C-termini of SlMBD5 and the β-propeller-C (BPC) of SlDDB1. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SlMBD5 associates with SlDDB1-interacting partners including SlDET1, SlCUL4, SlRBX1a and SlRBX1b in vivo. SlMBD5 was shown to target to nucleus and dimerizes via its MBD motif. Electrophoresis mobility shift analysis suggested that the MBD of SlMBD5 specifically binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides but not to methylated CpHpG or CpHpH dinucleotides. SlMBD5 expressed in protoplast is capable of activating transcription of CG islands, whereas CUL4/DDB1 antagonizes this effect. Overexpressing SlMBD5 resulted in diverse developmental alterations including darker green fruits with increased plastid level and elevated pigmentation, as well as enhanced expression of SlGLK2, a key regulator of plastid biogenesis. Taken together, we hypothesize that the physical interaction of SlMBD5 with the CUL4-DDB1-DET1 complex component may affect its binding activity to methylated DNA and subsequently attenuate its transcription activation of downstream genes. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-07

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  16. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) interaction with actin and the calponin homology (CH) domain of actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Leinweber, B D; Leavis, P C; Grabarek, Z; Wang, C L; Morgan, K G

    1999-01-01

    An interaction between extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and calponin has previously been reported (Menice, Hulvershorn, Adam, Wang and Morgan (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272 (40), 25157-25161) and has been suggested to reflect a function of calponin as a signalling molecule. We report in this study that calponin binds to both ERK1 and ERK2 under native conditions as well as in an overlay assay. Using chymotryptic fragments of calponin, the binding site of ERK on calponin was identified as the calponin homology (CH) domain, an N-terminal region of calponin found in other actin-binding proteins. ERK also bound, in a gel overlay assay, alpha-actinin, a protein with two tandem CH domains, as well as a 27 kDa thermolysin product of alpha-actinin containing the CH domains of alpha-actinin. The CH domain of calponin could compete with intact calponin or alpha-actinin for ERK binding. Titration of acrylodan-labelled calponin with ERK gave a K(a) of 6x10(6) M(-1) and titration of acrylodan-labelled calponin with a peptide from the alphaL16 helix of ERK gave a K(a) of 1x10(6) M(-1). Recombinant ERK was found to co-sediment with purified actin and induced a fluorescence change in pyrene-labelled F-actin (K(a)=5x10(6) M(-1)). The interaction of ERK with CH domains points to a new potential function for CH domains. The interaction of ERK with actin raises the possibility that actin may provide a scaffold for ERK signalling complexes in both muscle and non-muscle cells. PMID:10548541

  17. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika; Allingham, John S.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  18. Identification of AML-1 and the (8;21) translocation protein (AML-1/ETO) as sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins: the runt homology domain is required for DNA binding and protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S; Downing, J R; Hiebert, S W

    1993-01-01

    The AML1 gene on chromosome 21 is disrupted in the (8;21)(q22;q22) translocation associated with acute myelogenous leukemia and encodes a protein with a central 118-amino-acid domain with 69% homology to the Drosophila pair-rule gene, runt. We demonstrate that AML-1 is a DNA-binding protein which specifically interacts with a sequence belonging to the group of enhancer core motifs, TGT/cGGT. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis of cell extracts identified two AML-1-containing protein-DNA complexes whose electrophoretic mobilities were slower than those of complexes formed with AML-1 produced in vitro. Mixing of in vitro-produced AML-1 with cell extracts prior to gel mobility shift analysis resulted in the formation of higher-order complexes. Deletion mutagenesis of AML-1 revealed that the runt homology domain mediates both sequence-specific DNA binding and protein-protein interactions. The hybrid product, AML-1/ETO, which results from the (8;21) translocation and retains the runt homology domain, both recognizes the AML-1 consensus sequence and interacts with other cellular proteins. Images PMID:8413232

  19. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions differentially tune membrane binding kinetics of the C2 domain of protein kinase Cα.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela M; Antal, Corina E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2013-06-07

    The cellular activation of conventional protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes is initiated by the binding of their C2 domains to membranes in response to elevations in intracellular Ca(2+). Following this C2 domain-mediated membrane recruitment, the C1 domain binds its membrane-embedded ligand diacylglycerol, resulting in activation of PKC. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which the C2 domain controls the initial step in the activation of PKC. Using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to measure association and dissociation rate constants, we show that hydrophobic interactions are the major driving force in the binding of the C2 domain to anionic membranes, whereas electrostatic interactions dominate in membrane retention. Specifically, mutation of select hydrophobic or select basic residues in the Ca(2+)-binding loops reduces membrane affinity by distinct mechanisms; mutation of hydrophobic residues primarily alters association rate constants, whereas mutation of charged residues affects dissociation rate constants. Live cell imaging reveals that introduction of these mutations into full-length PKCα not only reduces the Ca(2+)-dependent translocation to plasma membrane but, by impairing the plasma membrane-sensing role of the C2 domain, causes phorbol ester-triggered redistribution of PKCα to other membranes, such as the Golgi. These data underscore the key role of the C2 domain in driving conventional PKC isozymes to the plasma membrane and reveal that not only the amplitude but also the subcellular location of conventional PKC signaling can be tuned by altering the affinity of this module for membranes.

  20. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Differentially Tune Membrane Binding Kinetics of the C2 Domain of Protein Kinase Cα*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela M.; Antal, Corina E.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular activation of conventional protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes is initiated by the binding of their C2 domains to membranes in response to elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Following this C2 domain-mediated membrane recruitment, the C1 domain binds its membrane-embedded ligand diacylglycerol, resulting in activation of PKC. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which the C2 domain controls the initial step in the activation of PKC. Using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to measure association and dissociation rate constants, we show that hydrophobic interactions are the major driving force in the binding of the C2 domain to anionic membranes, whereas electrostatic interactions dominate in membrane retention. Specifically, mutation of select hydrophobic or select basic residues in the Ca2+-binding loops reduces membrane affinity by distinct mechanisms; mutation of hydrophobic residues primarily alters association rate constants, whereas mutation of charged residues affects dissociation rate constants. Live cell imaging reveals that introduction of these mutations into full-length PKCα not only reduces the Ca2+-dependent translocation to plasma membrane but, by impairing the plasma membrane-sensing role of the C2 domain, causes phorbol ester-triggered redistribution of PKCα to other membranes, such as the Golgi. These data underscore the key role of the C2 domain in driving conventional PKC isozymes to the plasma membrane and reveal that not only the amplitude but also the subcellular location of conventional PKC signaling can be tuned by altering the affinity of this module for membranes. PMID:23589289

  1. The cytoskeletal protein talin contains at least two distinct vinculin binding domains

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have mapped the vinculin-binding sites in the cytoskeletal protein talin as well as those sequences which target the talin molecule to focal contacts. Using a series of overlapping talin-fusion proteins expressed in E. coli and 125I-vinculin in both gel-overlay and microtitre well binding assays, we present evidence for three separable binding sites for vinculin. All three are in the tail segment of talin (residues 434-2541) and are recognized by the same fragment of vinculin (residues 1-258). Two sites are adjacent to each other and span residues 498-950, and the third site is more than 700 residues distant in the primary sequence. Scatchard analysis of 125I-vinculin binding to talin also indicates three sites, each with a similar affinity (Kd = 2- 6 x 10(-7) M). We also detect a substoichiometric interaction of higher affinity (Kd = 3 x 10(-8) M) which remains unexplained. By expressing regions of the chicken talin molecule in heterologous cells, we have shown that the sequences required to target talin to focal contacts overlap those which bind vinculin. PMID:8320257

  2. Mechanochemistry of the alternatively spliced spectrin-actin binding domain in membrane skeletal protein 4.1.

    PubMed

    Discher, D; Parra, M; Conboy, J G; Mohandas, N

    1993-04-05

    Protein 4.1's interaction with the erythroid skeletal proteins spectrin and actin and its essential role in regulating membrane strength are both attributable to expression of an alternatively spliced 63-nucleotide exon. The corresponding 21-amino acid (21-aa) cassette is within the previously identified spectrin-actin binding domain (10 kDa molecular mass) of erythroid protein 4.1. This cassette is absent, however, in several isoforms that are generated by tissue- and development-specific RNA splicing. Four isoforms of the 10-kDa domain were constructed for comparative assessment of functions particularly relevant to red cells. In vitro translated isoforms containing the 21-aa cassette, denoted 10k21 and 10k19,21, were able to bind spectrin, stabilize spectrin-actin complexes, and associate with red cell membrane. Isoforms replacing or lacking the 21-aa cassette, 10k19 and 10k0, did not function in these assays. A bacterially expressed fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase, designated GST-10k21, congealed spectrin-actin into a network in vitro as found with purified protein 4.1. Additionally, incorporation of GST-10k21 into mechanically weak, 4.1-deficient membranes increased mechanical strength of these membranes to normal. GST-10k19 did not function in these assays. These results show that the 21-aa sequence in protein 4.1 is critical to mechanical integrity of the red cell membrane. These results also allow the role of protein 4.1 in membrane mechanics to be interpreted primarily in terms of its spectrin-actin binding function. Alternatively expressed sequences within the 10-kDa domain of nonerythroid protein 4.1 are suggested to have different, yet to be defined functions.

  3. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  4. Interaction of the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT with heparan sulfate: binding mechanism and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, André; Seelig, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The positively charged protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 TAT protein (TAT-PTD; residues 47-57 of TAT) rapidly translocates across the plasma membrane of living cells. This property is exploited for the delivery of proteins, drugs, and genes into cells. The mechanism of this translocation is, however, not yet understood. Recent theories for translocation suggest binding of the protein transduction domain (PTD) to extracellular glycosaminoglycans as a possible mechanism. We have studied the binding equilibrium between TAT-PTD and three different glycosaminoglycans with high sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry and provide the first quantitative thermodynamic description. The polysulfonated macromolecules were found to exhibit multiple identical binding sites for TAT-PTD with only small differences between the three species as far as the thermodynamic parameters are concerned. Heparan sulfate (HS, molecular weight, 14.2 +/- 2 kDa) has 6.3 +/- 1.0 independent binding sites for TAT-PTD which are characterized by a binding constant K0 = (6.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) M(-1) and a reaction enthalpy deltaHpep0 = -4.6 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. The binding affinity, deltaGpep0, is determined to equal extent by enthalpic and entropic contributions. The HS-TAT-PTD complex formation entails a positive heat capacity change of deltaCp0 = +135 cal/mol peptide, which is characteristic of a charge neutralization reaction. This is in contrast to hydrophobic binding reactions which display a large negative heat capacity change. The stoichiometry of 6-7 TAT-PTD molecules per HS corresponds to an electric charge neutralization. Light scattering data demonstrate a maximum scattering intensity at this stoichiometric ratio, the intensity of which depends on the order of mixing of the two components. The data suggest cross-linking and/or aggregation of HS-TAT-PTD complexes. Two other glycosaminoglycans, namely heparin and chondroitin sulfate B, were also studied with isothermal

  5. RNA-protein binding motifs mining with a new hybrid deep learning based cross-domain knowledge integration approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2017-02-28

    RNAs play key roles in cells through the interactions with proteins known as the RNA-binding proteins (RBP) and their binding motifs enable crucial understanding of the post-transcriptional regulation of RNAs. How the RBPs correctly recognize the target RNAs and why they bind specific positions is still far from clear. Machine learning-based algorithms are widely acknowledged to be capable of speeding up this process. Although many automatic tools have been developed to predict the RNA-protein binding sites from the rapidly growing multi-resource data, e.g. sequence, structure, their domain specific features and formats have posed significant computational challenges. One of current difficulties is that the cross-source shared common knowledge is at a higher abstraction level beyond the observed data, resulting in a low efficiency of direct integration of observed data across domains. The other difficulty is how to interpret the prediction results. Existing approaches tend to terminate after outputting the potential discrete binding sites on the sequences, but how to assemble them into the meaningful binding motifs is a topic worth of further investigation. In viewing of these challenges, we propose a deep learning-based framework (iDeep) by using a novel hybrid convolutional neural network and deep belief network to predict the RBP interaction sites and motifs on RNAs. This new protocol is featured by transforming the original observed data into a high-level abstraction feature space using multiple layers of learning blocks, where the shared representations across different domains are integrated. To validate our iDeep method, we performed experiments on 31 large-scale CLIP-seq datasets, and our results show that by integrating multiple sources of data, the average AUC can be improved by 8% compared to the best single-source-based predictor; and through cross-domain knowledge integration at an abstraction level, it outperforms the state-of-the-art predictors by 6

  6. An ectromelia virus protein that interacts with chemokines through their glycosaminoglycan binding domain.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Smith, Vincent P; Campanella, Gabriele S V; Baleux, Françoise; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Luster, Andrew D; Alcami, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Poxviruses encode a number of secreted virulence factors that modulate the host immune response. The vaccinia virus A41 protein is an immunomodulatory protein with amino acid sequence similarity to the 35-kDa chemokine binding protein, but the host immune molecules targeted by A41 have not been identified. We report here that the vaccinia virus A41 ortholog encoded by ectromelia virus, a poxvirus pathogen of mice, named E163 in the ectromelia virus Naval strain, is a secreted 31-kDa glycoprotein that selectively binds a limited number of CC and CXC chemokines with high affinity. A detailed characterization of the interaction of ectromelia virus E163 with mutant forms of the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL12alpha indicated that E163 binds to the glycosaminoglycan binding site of the chemokines. This suggests that E163 inhibits the interaction of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans and provides a mechanism by which E163 prevents chemokine-induced leukocyte migration to the sites of infection. In addition to interacting with chemokines, E163 can interact with high affinity with glycosaminoglycan molecules, enabling E163 to attach to cell surfaces and to remain in the vicinity of the sites of viral infection. These findings identify E163 as a new chemokine binding protein in poxviruses and provide a molecular mechanism for the immunomodulatory activity previously reported for the vaccinia virus A41 ortholog. The results reported here also suggest that the cell surface and extracellular matrix are important targeting sites for secreted poxvirus immune modulators.

  7. Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by a CUE ubiquitin-binding domain in the FANCD2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Vuono, Elizabeth A; Mauro, Maurizio; Howlett, Niall G

    2012-09-06

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway is critical for the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and the maintenance of chromosome stability. A key step in FA-BRCA pathway activation is the covalent attachment of monoubiquitin to FANCD2 and FANCI. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize in chromatin-associated nuclear foci where they interact with several well-characterized DNA repair proteins. Importantly, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of FANCD2. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of a CUE (coupling of ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation) ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in FANCD2, and demonstrate that the CUE domain mediates noncovalent binding to ubiquitin in vitro. We show that although mutation of the CUE domain destabilizes FANCD2, the protein remains competent for DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitination and phosphorylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that the CUE domain is required for interaction with FANCI, retention of monoubiquitinated FANCD2, and FANCI in chromatin, and for efficient ICL repair. Our results suggest a model by which heterodimerization of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI in chromatin is mediated in part through a noncovalent interaction between the FANCD2 CUE domain and monoubiquitin covalently attached to FANCI, and that this interaction shields monoubiquitinated FANCD2 from polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation.

  8. Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by a CUE ubiquitin-binding domain in the FANCD2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Rego, Meghan A.; Kolling, Frederick W.; Vuono, Elizabeth A.; Mauro, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)–BRCA pathway is critical for the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and the maintenance of chromosome stability. A key step in FA-BRCA pathway activation is the covalent attachment of monoubiquitin to FANCD2 and FANCI. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize in chromatin-associated nuclear foci where they interact with several well-characterized DNA repair proteins. Importantly, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of FANCD2. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of a CUE (coupling of ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation) ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in FANCD2, and demonstrate that the CUE domain mediates noncovalent binding to ubiquitin in vitro. We show that although mutation of the CUE domain destabilizes FANCD2, the protein remains competent for DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitination and phosphorylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that the CUE domain is required for interaction with FANCI, retention of monoubiquitinated FANCD2, and FANCI in chromatin, and for efficient ICL repair. Our results suggest a model by which heterodimerization of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI in chromatin is mediated in part through a noncovalent interaction between the FANCD2 CUE domain and monoubiquitin covalently attached to FANCI, and that this interaction shields monoubiquitinated FANCD2 from polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. PMID:22855611

  9. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  10. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin. PMID:8552082

  11. Single-stranded DNA Binding by the Helix-Hairpin-Helix Domain of XPF Protein Contributes to the Substrate Specificity of the ERCC1-XPF Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Faridounnia, Maryam; Kovacic, Lidija; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2017-02-17

    The nucleotide excision repair protein complex ERCC1-XPF is required for incision of DNA upstream of DNA damage. Functional studies have provided insights into the binding of ERCC1-XPF to various DNA substrates. However, because no structure for the ERCC1-XPF-DNA complex has been determined, the mechanism of substrate recognition remains elusive. Here we biochemically characterize the substrate preferences of the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains of XPF and ERCC-XPF and show that the binding to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/dsDNA junctions is dependent on joint binding to the DNA binding domain of ERCC1 and XPF. We reveal that the homodimeric XPF is able to bind various ssDNA sequences but with a clear preference for guanine-containing substrates. NMR titration experiments and in vitro DNA binding assays also show that, within the heterodimeric ERCC1-XPF complex, XPF specifically recognizes ssDNA. On the other hand, the HhH domain of ERCC1 preferentially binds dsDNA through the hairpin region. The two separate non-overlapping DNA binding domains in the ERCC1-XPF heterodimer jointly bind to an ssDNA/dsDNA substrate and, thereby, at least partially dictate the incision position during damage removal. Based on structural models, NMR titrations, DNA-binding studies, site-directed mutagenesis, charge distribution, and sequence conservation, we propose that the HhH domain of ERCC1 binds to dsDNA upstream of the damage, and XPF binds to the non-damaged strand within a repair bubble.

  12. The Lid Domain of Caenorhabditis elegans Hsc70 Influences ATP Turnover, Cofactor Binding and Protein Folding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Gaiser, Andreas M.; Richter, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Hsc70 is a conserved ATP-dependent molecular chaperone, which utilizes the energy of ATP hydrolysis to alter the folding state of its client proteins. In contrast to the Hsc70 systems of bacteria, yeast and humans, the Hsc70 system of C. elegans (CeHsc70) has not been studied to date. We find that CeHsc70 is characterized by a high ATP turnover rate and limited by post-hydrolysis nucleotide exchange. This rate-limiting step is defined by the helical lid domain at the C-terminus. A certain truncation in this domain (CeHsc70-Δ545) reduces the turnover rate and renders the hydrolysis step rate-limiting. The helical lid domain also affects cofactor affinities as the lidless mutant CeHsc70-Δ512 binds more strongly to DNJ-13, forming large protein complexes in the presence of ATP. Despite preserving the ability to hydrolyze ATP and interact with its cofactors DNJ-13 and BAG-1, the truncation of the helical lid domain leads to the loss of all protein folding activity, highlighting the requirement of this domain for the functionality of the nematode's Hsc70 protein. PMID:22479492

  13. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  14. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  15. Long-term memory consolidation: The role of RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Indulekha P; Ramaswami, Mani

    2016-10-11

    Long-term and short-term memories differ primarily in the duration of their retention. At a molecular level, long-term memory (LTM) is distinguished from short-term memory (STM) by its requirement for new gene expression. In addition to transcription (nuclear gene expression) the translation of stored mRNAs is necessary for LTM formation. The mechanisms and functions for temporal and spatial regulation of mRNAs required for LTM is a major contemporary problem, of interest from molecular, cell biological, neurobiological and clinical perspectives. This review discusses primary evidence in support for translational regulatory events involved in LTM and a model in which different phases of translation underlie distinct phases of consolidation of memories. However, it focuses largely on mechanisms of memory persistence and the role of prion-like domains in this defining aspect of long-term memory. We consider primary evidence for the concept that Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding (CPEB) protein enables the persistence of formed memories by transforming in prion-like manner from a soluble monomeric state to a self-perpetuating and persistent polymeric translationally active state required for maintaining persistent synaptic plasticity. We further discuss prion-like domains prevalent on several other RNA-binding proteins involved in neuronal translational control underlying LTM. Growing evidence indicates that such RNA regulatory proteins are components of mRNP (RiboNucleoProtein) granules. In these proteins, prion-like domains, being intrinsically disordered, could mediate weak transient interactions that allow the assembly of RNP granules, a source of silenced mRNAs whose translation is necessary for LTM. We consider the structural bases for RNA granules formation as well as functions of disordered domains and discuss how these complicate the interpretation of existing experimental data relevant to general mechanisms by which prion-domain containing RBPs

  16. Dampening DNA binding: a common mechanism of transcriptional repression for both ncRNAs and protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, James A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2010-01-01

    With eukaryotic non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) now established as critical regulators of cellular transcription, the true diversity with which they can elicit biological effects is beginning to be appreciated. Two ncRNAs, mouse B2 RNA and human Alu RNA, have been found to repress mRNA transcription in response to heat shock. They do so by binding directly to RNA polymerase II, assembling into complexes on promoter DNA, and disrupting contacts between the polymerase and the DNA. Such a mechanism of repression had not previously been observed for a eukaryotic ncRNA; however, there are examples of eukaryotic protein domains that repress transcription by blocking essential protein-DNA interactions. Comparing the mechanism of transcriptional repression utilized by these protein domains to that used by B2 and Alu RNAs raises intriguing questions regarding transcriptional control, and how B2 and Alu RNAs might themselves be regulated. PMID:20436282

  17. Differential distribution of Y-box-binding protein 1 and cold shock domain protein A in developing and adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Brandt, Sabine; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Mertens, Peter R

    2015-07-01

    The two cold shock domain containing proteins, Y-box-binding protein-1 and cold shock domain protein A were immunolocalized in developing and adult human brain. With the exception of a small population of hypothalamic astrocytes, brain Y-box-binding protein-1 was predominantly found in multiple neurons in the mature human CNS, which might be related to its involvement in neurotransmission and other neuron-associated functions. Cold shock domain protein A was typically observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, choroid plexus epithelia and nerve fibers. However, in circumscribed brain regions as hypothalamus, habenula, and cerebellum, this protein was also expressed in neurons. In the prenatal brain, both proteins were found to be abundantly expressed in radial glial cells, neuroblasts and neurons, which might be an anatomical correlate of the proposed roles of both proteins in cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Y-box-binding protein-1 was identified in cultured, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells, which underscores its putative role as a mediator in immune and inflammatory processes.

  18. Dephosphorylation of microtubule-binding sites at the neurofilament-H tail domain by alkaline, acid, and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hisanaga, S; Yasugawa, S; Yamakawa, T; Miyamoto, E; Ikebe, M; Uchiyama, M; Kishimoto, T

    1993-06-01

    The dephosphorylation-induced interaction of neurofilaments (NFs) with microtubules (MTs) was investigated by using several phosphatases. Escherichia coli alkaline and wheat germ acid phosphatases increased the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H and NF-M by dephosphorylation, and induced the binding of NF-H to MTs. The binding of NFs to MTs was observed only after the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H approached the exhaustively dephosphorylated level when alkaline phosphatase was used. The number of phosphate remaining when NF-H began to bind to MTs was estimated by measuring phosphate bound to NF-H. NF-H did not bind to MTs even when about 40 phosphates from the total of 51 had been removed by alkaline phosphatase. The removal of 6 further phosphates finally resulted in the association of NF-H with MTs. A similar finding, that the restricted phosphorylation sites in the NF-H tail domain, but not the total amount of phosphates, were important for binding to MTs, was also obtained with acid phosphatases. In contrast to alkaline and acid phosphatases, four classes of protein phosphatases (protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B, and 2C) were ineffective for shifting the electrophoretic mobility of NF proteins and for inducing the association of NFs to MTs.

  19. Src homology 2 domain containing protein 5 (SH2D5) binds the breakpoint cluster region protein, BCR, and regulates levels of Rac1-GTP.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth J; Petsalaki, Evangelia; James, D Andrew; Bagshaw, Richard D; Stacey, Melissa M; Rocks, Oliver; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pawson, Tony

    2014-12-19

    SH2D5 is a mammalian-specific, uncharacterized adaptor-like protein that contains an N-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain and a C-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. We show that SH2D5 is highly enriched in adult mouse brain, particularly in Purkinjie cells in the cerebellum and the cornu ammonis of the hippocampus. Despite harboring two potential phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) recognition domains, SH2D5 binds minimally to Tyr(P) ligands, consistent with the absence of a conserved Tyr(P)-binding arginine residue in the SH2 domain. Immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry (IP-MS) from cultured cells revealed a prominent association of SH2D5 with breakpoint cluster region protein, a RacGAP that is also highly expressed in brain. This interaction occurred between the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of SH2D5 and an NxxF motif located within the N-terminal region of the breakpoint cluster region. siRNA-mediated depletion of SH2D5 in a neuroblastoma cell line, B35, induced a cell rounding phenotype correlated with low levels of activated Rac1-GTP, suggesting that SH2D5 affects Rac1-GTP levels. Taken together, our data provide the first characterization of the SH2D5 signaling protein. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Src Homology 2 Domain Containing Protein 5 (SH2D5) Binds the Breakpoint Cluster Region Protein, BCR, and Regulates Levels of Rac1-GTP*

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth J.; Petsalaki, Evangelia; James, D. Andrew; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Stacey, Melissa M.; Rocks, Oliver; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pawson, Tony

    2014-01-01

    SH2D5 is a mammalian-specific, uncharacterized adaptor-like protein that contains an N-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain and a C-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. We show that SH2D5 is highly enriched in adult mouse brain, particularly in Purkinjie cells in the cerebellum and the cornu ammonis of the hippocampus. Despite harboring two potential phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) recognition domains, SH2D5 binds minimally to Tyr(P) ligands, consistent with the absence of a conserved Tyr(P)-binding arginine residue in the SH2 domain. Immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry (IP-MS) from cultured cells revealed a prominent association of SH2D5 with breakpoint cluster region protein, a RacGAP that is also highly expressed in brain. This interaction occurred between the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of SH2D5 and an NxxF motif located within the N-terminal region of the breakpoint cluster region. siRNA-mediated depletion of SH2D5 in a neuroblastoma cell line, B35, induced a cell rounding phenotype correlated with low levels of activated Rac1-GTP, suggesting that SH2D5 affects Rac1-GTP levels. Taken together, our data provide the first characterization of the SH2D5 signaling protein. PMID:25331951

  1. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  2. Proteins that bind the Src homology 3 domain of CrkI have distinct roles in Crk transformation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Machida, K; Antoku, S; Ng, K Y; Claffey, K P; Mayer, B J

    2010-12-02

    The v-Crk oncogene product consists of two protein interaction modules, a Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Overexpression of CrkI, the cellular homolog of v-Crk, transforms mouse fibroblasts, and elevated CrkI expression is observed in several human cancers. The SH2 and SH3 domains of Crk are required for transformation, but the identity of the critical cellular binding partners is not known. A number of candidate Crk SH3-binding proteins have been identified, including the nonreceptor tyrosine kinases c-Abl and Arg, and the guanine nucleotide exchange proteins C3G, SOS1 and DOCK180. The aim of this study is to determine which of these are required for transformation by CrkI. We found that short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of C3G or SOS1 suppressed anchorage-independent growth of NIH-3T3 cells overexpressing CrkI, whereas knockdown of SOS1 alone was sufficient to suppress tumor formation by these cells in nude mice. Knockdown of C3G was sufficient to revert morphological changes induced by CrkI expression. By contrast, knockdown of Abl family kinases or their inhibition with imatinib enhanced anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenesis induced by Crk. These results show that SOS1 is essential for CrkI-induced fibroblast transformation, and also reveal a surprising negative role for Abl kinases in Crk transformation.

  3. Bruton's tyrosine kinase activity is negatively regulated by Sab, the Btk-SH3 domain-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yamadori, T; Baba, Y; Matsushita, M; Hashimoto, S; Kurosaki, M; Kurosaki, T; Kishimoto, T; Tsukada, S

    1999-05-25

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is crucial for human and murine B cell development, and its deficiency causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. In this report, we describe the function of the Btk-binding protein Sab (SH3-domain binding protein that preferentially associates with Btk), which we reported previously as a newly identified Src homology 3 domain-binding protein. Sab was shown to inhibit the auto- and transphosphorylation activity of Btk, which prompted us to propose that Sab functions as a transregulator of Btk. Forced overexpression of Sab in B cells led to the reduction of B cell antigen receptor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Btk and significantly reduced both early and late B cell antigen receptor-mediated events, including calcium mobilization, inositol 1, 4,5-trisphosphate production, and apoptotic cell death, where the involvement of Btk activity has been demonstrated previously. Together, these results indicate the negative regulatory role of Sab in the B cell cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase pathway.

  4. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase activity is negatively regulated by Sab, the Btk-SH3 domain-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamadori, Tomoki; Baba, Yoshihiro; Matsushita, Masato; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kurosaki, Mari; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Tsukada, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is crucial for human and murine B cell development, and its deficiency causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. In this report, we describe the function of the Btk-binding protein Sab (SH3-domain binding protein that preferentially associates with Btk), which we reported previously as a newly identified Src homology 3 domain-binding protein. Sab was shown to inhibit the auto- and transphosphorylation activity of Btk, which prompted us to propose that Sab functions as a transregulator of Btk. Forced overexpression of Sab in B cells led to the reduction of B cell antigen receptor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Btk and significantly reduced both early and late B cell antigen receptor-mediated events, including calcium mobilization, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production, and apoptotic cell death, where the involvement of Btk activity has been demonstrated previously. Together, these results indicate the negative regulatory role of Sab in the B cell cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase pathway. PMID:10339589

  5. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC, and tilted domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g., the acyl chain of glycerolipids) and their polar head (e.g., the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids). Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar α face and a rough β face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  6. A Fab-Selective Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain from Streptococcal Protein G with Improved Half-Life Extension Properties

    PubMed Central

    Unverdorben, Felix; Hutt, Meike; Seifert, Oliver; Kontermann, Roland E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Half-life extension strategies have gained increasing interest to improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of protein therapeutics. Recently, we established an immunoglobulin-binding domain (IgBD) from streptococcal protein G (SpGC3) as module for half-life extension. SpGC3 is capable of binding to the Fc region as well as the CH1 domain of Fab arms under neutral and acidic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using site-directed mutagenesis, we generated a Fab-selective mutant (SpGC3Fab) to avoid possible interference with the FcRn-mediated recycling process and improved its affinity for mouse and human IgG by site-directed mutagenesis and phage display selections. In mice, this affinity-improved mutant (SpGC3FabRR) conferred prolonged plasma half-lives compared with SpGC3Fab when fused to small recombinant antibody fragments, such as single-chain Fv (scFv) and bispecific single-chain diabody (scDb). Hence, the SpGC3FabRR domain seems to be a suitable fusion partner for the half-life extension of small recombinant therapeutics. Conclusions/Significance The half-life extension properties of SpGC3 can be retained by restricting binding to the Fab fragment of serum immunoglobulins and can be improved by increasing binding activity. The modified SpGC3 module should be suitable to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins and, thus to improve therapeutic activity. PMID:26430884

  7. Mapping of a Myosin-binding Domain and a Regulatory Phosphorylation Site in M-Protein, a Structural Protein of the Sarcomeric M Band

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Wolfgang M.J.; van der Ven, Peter F.M.; Steiner, Frank; Weber, Klaus; Fürst, Dieter O.

    1998-01-01

    The myofibrils of cross-striated muscle fibers contain in their M bands cytoskeletal proteins whose main function seems to be the stabilization of the three-dimensional arrangement of thick filaments. We identified two immunoglobin domains (Mp2–Mp3) of M-protein as a site binding to the central region of light meromyosin. This binding is regulated in vitro by phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser76) in the immediately adjacent amino-terminal domain Mp1. M-protein phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent kinase A inhibits binding to myosin LMM. Transient transfection studies of cultured cells revealed that the myosin-binding site seems involved in the targeting of M-protein to its location in the myofibril. Using the same method, a second myofibril-binding site was uncovered in domains Mp9–Mp13. These results support the view that specific phosphorylation events could be also important for the control of sarcomeric M band formation and remodeling. PMID:9529381

  8. Competition between LIM-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jacqueline M; Bhati, Mugdha; Craig, Vanessa J; Deane, Janet E; Jeffries, Cy; Lee, Christopher; Nancarrow, Amy L; Ryan, Daniel P; Sunde, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    LMO (LIM-only) and LIM-HD (LIM-homeodomain) proteins form a family of proteins that is required for myriad developmental processes and which can contribute to diseases such as T-cell leukaemia and breast cancer. The four LMO and 12 LIM-HD proteins in mammals are expressed in a combinatorial manner in many cell types, forming a transcriptional 'LIM code'. The proteins all contain a pair of closely spaced LIM domains near their N-termini that mediate protein-protein interactions, including binding to the approximately 30-residue LID (LIM interaction domain) of the essential co-factor protein Ldb1 (LIM domain-binding protein 1). In an attempt to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the LIM code, we have determined the molecular basis of binding of LMO and LIM-HD proteins for Ldb1(LID) through a series of structural, mutagenic and biophysical studies. These studies provide an explanation for why Ldb1 binds the LIM domains of the LMO/LIM-HD family, but not LIM domains from other proteins. The LMO/LIM-HD family exhibit a range of affinities for Ldb1, which influences the formation of specific functional complexes within cells. We have also identified an additional LIM interaction domain in one of the LIM-HD proteins, Isl1. Despite low sequence similarity to Ldb1(LID), this domain binds another LIM-HD protein, Lhx3, in an identical manner to Ldb1(LID). Through our and other studies, it is emerging that the multiple layers of competitive binding involving LMO and LIM-HD proteins and their partner proteins contribute significantly to cell fate specification and development.

  9. Crb apical polarity proteins maintain zebrafish retinal cone mosaics via intercellular binding of their extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Wei, Xiangyun

    2012-06-12

    Cone photoreceptors are assembled by unknown mechanisms into geometrically regular mosaics in many vertebrate species. The formation and maintenance of photoreceptor mosaics are speculated to require differential cell-cell adhesion. However, the molecular basis for this theory has yet to be identified. The retina and many other tissues express Crumbs (Crb) polarity proteins. The functions of the extracellular domains of Crb proteins remain to be understood. Here we report cell-type-specific expression of the crb2a and crb2b genes at the cell membranes of photoreceptor inner segments and Müller cell apical processes in the zebrafish retina. We demonstrate that the extracellular domains of Crb2a and Crb2b mediate a cell-cell adhesion function, which plays an essential role in maintaining the integrity of photoreceptor layer and cone mosaics. Because Crb proteins are expressed in many types of epithelia, the Crb-based cell-cell adhesion may underlie cellular patterning in other epithelium-derived tissues as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Coil-to-helix transitions in intrinsically disordered methyl CpG binding protein 2 and its isolated domains

    PubMed Central

    Hite, Kristopher C; Kalashnikova, Anna A; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a canonical intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), that is, it lacks stable secondary structure throughout its entire polypeptide chain. Because IDPs often have the propensity to become locally ordered, we tested whether full-length MeCP2 and its constituent domains would gain secondary structure in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), a cosolvent that stabilizes intramolecular hydrogen bonding in proteins. The α-helix, β-strand/turn, and unstructured content were determined as a function of TFE concentration by deconvolution of circular dichroism data. Results indicate that approximately two-thirds of the unstructured residues present in full-length MeCP2 were converted to α-helix in 70% TFE without a change in β-strand/turn. Thus, much of the MeCP2 polypeptide chain undergoes coil-to-helix transitions under conditions that favor intrachain hydrogen bond formation. The unstructured residues of the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains were partially converted to α-helix in 70% TFE. In contrast, the central transcription regulation domain (TRD) became almost completely α-helical in 70% TFE. Unlike the NTD, CTD, and TRD, the unstructured content of the methyl DNA binding domain and the intervening domain did not change with increasing TFE concentration. These results indicate that the coil-to-helix transitions that occur in full-length MeCP2 are localized to the NTD, CTD, and TRD, with the TRD showing the greatest tendency for helix formation. The potential relationships between intrinsic disorder, coil-to-helix transitions, and MeCP2 structure and function are discussed. PMID:22294343

  11. Grb-IR: A SH2-Domain-Containing Protein that Binds to the Insulin Receptor and Inhibits Its Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Roth, Richard A.

    1995-10-01

    To identify potential signaling molecules involved in mediating insulin-induced biological responses, a yeast two-hybrid screen was performed with the cytoplasmic domain of the human insulin receptor (IR) as bait to trap high-affinity interacting proteins encoded by human liver or HeLa cDNA libraries. A SH2-domain-containing protein was identified that binds with high affinity in vitro to the autophosphorylated IR. The mRNA for this protein was found by Northern blot analyses to be highest in skeletal muscle and was also detected in fat by PCR. To study the role of this protein in insulin signaling, a full-length cDNA encoding this protein (called Grb-IR) was isolated and stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the human IR. Insulin treatment of these cells resulted in the in situ formation of a complex of the IR and the 60-kDa Grb-IR. Although almost 75% of the Grb-IR protein was bound to the IR, it was only weakly tyrosine-phosphorylated. The formation of this complex appeared to inhibit the insulin-induced increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of two endogenous substrates, a 60-kDa GTPase-activating-protein-associated protein and, to a lesser extent, IR substrate 1. The subsequent association of this latter protein with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase also appeared to be inhibited. These findings raise the possibility that Grb-IR is a SH2-domain-containing protein that directly complexes with the IR and serves to inhibit signaling or redirect the IR signaling pathway.

  12. Theory of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of conformational fluctuations of DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Murugan, R

    2010-07-21

    We develop a theory that explains how the thermally driven conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of the DNA binding proteins (DBPs) are effectively coupled to the one-dimensional searching dynamics of DBPs for their cognate sites on DNA. We show that the rate gammaopt, associated with the flipping of conformational states of DBDs beyond which the maximum search efficiency of DBPs is achieved, varies with the one-dimensional sliding length L as gammaopt proportional, L(-2) and with the number of roadblock protein molecules present on the same DNA m as gammaopt proportional, m2. The required free energy barrier ERTO associated with this flipping transition seems to be varying with L as ERTO proportional, variant ln L2. When the barrier height associated with the conformational flipping of DBDs is comparable with that of the thermal free energy, then the possible value of L under in vivo conditions seems to be L

  13. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-06-18

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca(2+) dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved.

  14. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-01-01

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca2+ dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved. PMID:23778582

  15. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Newman, Joseph A.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40–200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. PMID:25866208

  16. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  17. Quantifying ERK2-protein interactions by fluorescence anisotropy: PEA-15 inhibits ERK2 by blocking the binding of DEJL domains.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Kari; Rainey, Mark A; Dalby, Kevin N

    2005-12-30

    While mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways constitute highly regulated networks of protein-protein interactions, little quantitative information for these interactions is available. Here we highlight recent fluorescence anisotropy binding studies that focus on the interactions of ERK1 and ERK2 with PEA-15 (antiapoptotic phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kDa), a small protein that sequesters ERK2 in the cytoplasm. The regulation of ERK2 by PEA-15 is appraised in the light of a simple equilibrium-binding model for reversible ERK2 nucleoplasmic-cytoplasmic shuttling, which elaborates on the theory of Burack and Shaw (J. Biol. Chem. 280, 3832-3837; 2005). Also highlighted is the recent observation that the peptide N-QKGKPRDLELPLSPSL-C, derived from the docking site for ERK/JNK and LEL (DEJL) in Elk-1, displaces PEA-15 from ERK2. It is proposed that the C-terminus of PEA-15 ((121)LXLXXXXKK(129)) is a reverse DEJL domain [which has a general consensus of R/K-phi(A)-X(3/4)-phi(B), where phi(A) and phi(B) are hydrophobic residues (Leu, Ile, or Val)], which mediates one arm of a bidentate PEA-15 interaction with ERK2. The notion that PEA-15 is a potent inhibitor of many ERK2-mediated phosphorylations, by virtue of its ability to block ERK2-DEJL domain interactions, is proposed.

  18. cAPK-phosphorylation controls the interaction of the regulatory domain of cardiac myosin binding protein C with myosin-S2 in an on-off fashion.

    PubMed

    Gruen, M; Prinz, H; Gautel, M

    1999-06-25

    Myosin binding protein C is a protein of the myosin filaments of striated muscle which is expressed in isoforms specific for cardiac and skeletal muscle. The cardiac isoform is phosphorylated rapidly upon adrenergic stimulation of myocardium by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and together with the phosphorylation of troponin-I and phospholamban contributes to the positive inotropy that results from adrenergic stimulation of the heart. Cardiac myosin binding protein C is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase on three sites in a myosin binding protein C specific N-terminal domain which binds to myosin-S2. This interaction with myosin close to the motor domain is likely to mediate the regulatory function of the protein. Cardiac myosin binding protein C is a common target gene of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most mutations encode N-terminal subfragments of myosin binding protein C. The understanding of the signalling interactions of the N-terminal region is therefore important for understanding the pathophysiology of myosin binding protein C associated cardiomyopathy. We demonstrate here by cosedimentation assays and isothermal titration calorimetry that the myosin-S2 binding properties of the myosin binding protein C motif are abolished by cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated tris-phosphorylation, decreasing the S2 affinity from a Kd of approximately 5 microM to undetectable levels. We show that the slow and fast skeletal muscle isoforms are no cAMP-dependent protein kinase substrates and that the S2 interaction of these myosin binding protein C isoforms is therefore constitutively on. The regulation of cardiac contractility by myosin binding protein C therefore appears to be a 'brake-off' mechanism that will free a specific subset of myosin heads from sterical constraints imposed by the binding to the myosin binding protein C motif.

  19. Human iron regulatory protein 2 is easily cleaved in its specific domain: consequences for the haem binding properties of the protein

    PubMed Central

    Dycke, Camille; Bougault, Catherine; Gaillard, Jacques; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Pantopoulos, Kostas; Moulis, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian IRPs (iron regulatory proteins), IRP1 and IRP2, are cytosolic RNA-binding proteins that post-transcriptionally control the mRNA of proteins involved in storage, transport, and utilization of iron. In iron-replete cells, IRP2 undergoes degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Binding of haem to a 73aa-Domain (73-amino-acid domain) that is unique in IRP2 has been previously proposed as the initial iron-sensing mechanism. It is shown here that recombinant IRP2 and the 73aa-Domain are sensitive to proteolysis at the same site. NMR results suggest that the isolated 73aa-Domain is not structured. Iron-independent cleavage of IRP2 within the 73aa-Domain also occurs in lung cancer (H1299) cells. Haem interacts with a cysteine residue only in truncated forms of the 73aa-Domain, as shown by a series of complementary physicochemical approaches, including NMR, EPR and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy. In contrast, the cofactor is not ligated by the same residue in the full-length peptide or intact IRP2, although non-specific interaction occurs between these molecular forms and haem. Therefore it is unlikely that the iron-dependent degradation of IRP2 is mediated by haem binding to the intact 73aa-Domain, since the sequence resembling an HRM (haem-regulatory motif) in the 73aa-Domain does not provide an axial ligand of the cofactor unless this domain is cleaved. PMID:17760563

  20. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper Binding Domain Histidine Residues 149 and 151 Mediate APP Stability and Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Spoerri, Loredana; Vella, Laura J.; Pham, Chi L. L.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    One of the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of the APP-derived amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain. Altered copper homeostasis has also been reported in AD patients and is thought to increase oxidative stress and to contribute to toxic Aβ accumulation and regulate APP metabolism. The potential involvement of the N-terminal APP copper binding domain (CuBD) in these events has not been investigated. Based on the tertiary structure of the APP CuBD, we examined the histidine residues of the copper binding site (His147, His149, and His151). We report that histidines 149 and 151 are crucial for CuBD stability and APP metabolism. Co-mutation of the APP CuBD His149 and His151 to asparagine decreased APP proteolytic processing, impaired APP endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi trafficking, and promoted aberrant APP oligomerization in HEK293 cells. Expression of the triple H147N/H149N/H151N-APP mutant led to up-regulation of the unfolded protein response. Using recombinant protein encompassing the APP CuBD, we found that insertion of asparagines at positions 149 and 151 altered the secondary structure of the domain. This study identifies two APP CuBD residues that are crucial for APP metabolism and suggests an additional role of this domain in APP folding and stability besides its previously identified copper binding activity. These findings are of major significance for the design of novel AD therapeutic drugs targeting this APP domain. PMID:22685292

  1. Src-homology 3 domain of protein kinase p59fyn mediates binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K V; Janssen, O; Kapeller, R; Raab, M; Cantley, L C; Rudd, C E

    1993-01-01

    The Src-related tyrosine kinase p59fyn(T) plays an important role in the generation of intracellular signals from the T-cell antigen receptor TCR zeta/CD3 complex. A key question concerns the nature and the binding sites of downstream components that interact with this Src-related kinase. p59fyn(T) contains Src-homology 2 and 3 domains (SH2 and SH3) with a capacity to bind to intracellular proteins. One potential downstream target is phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). In this study, we demonstrate that anti-CD3 and anti-Fyn immunoprecipitates possess PI 3-kinase activity as assessed by TLC and HPLC. Both free and receptor-bound p59fyn(T) were found to bind to the lipid kinase. Further, our results indicate that Src-related kinases have developed a novel mechanism to interact with PI 3-kinase. Precipitation using GST fusion proteins containing Fyn SH2, SH3, and SH2/SH3 domains revealed that PI 3-kinase bound principally to the SH3 domain of Fyn. Fyn SH3 bound directly to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase as expressed in a baculoviral system. Anti-CD3 crosslinking induced an increase in the detection of Fyn SH3-associated PI 3-kinase activity. Thus PI 3-kinase is a target of SH3 domains and is likely to play a major role in the signals derived from the TCR zeta/CD3-p59fyn complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8394019

  2. The amyloid precursor protein copper binding domain histidine residues 149 and 151 mediate APP stability and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spoerri, Loredana; Vella, Laura J; Pham, Chi L L; Barnham, Kevin J; Cappai, Roberto

    2012-08-03

    One of the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of the APP-derived amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain. Altered copper homeostasis has also been reported in AD patients and is thought to increase oxidative stress and to contribute to toxic Aβ accumulation and regulate APP metabolism. The potential involvement of the N-terminal APP copper binding domain (CuBD) in these events has not been investigated. Based on the tertiary structure of the APP CuBD, we examined the histidine residues of the copper binding site (His(147), His(149), and His(151)). We report that histidines 149 and 151 are crucial for CuBD stability and APP metabolism. Co-mutation of the APP CuBD His(149) and His(151) to asparagine decreased APP proteolytic processing, impaired APP endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi trafficking, and promoted aberrant APP oligomerization in HEK293 cells. Expression of the triple H147N/H149N/H151N-APP mutant led to up-regulation of the unfolded protein response. Using recombinant protein encompassing the APP CuBD, we found that insertion of asparagines at positions 149 and 151 altered the secondary structure of the domain. This study identifies two APP CuBD residues that are crucial for APP metabolism and suggests an additional role of this domain in APP folding and stability besides its previously identified copper binding activity. These findings are of major significance for the design of novel AD therapeutic drugs targeting this APP domain.

  3. Activity Augmentation of Amphioxus Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein BbtPGRP3 via Fusion with a Chitin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Jie; Cheng, Wang; Luo, Ming; Yan, Qingyu; Yu, Hong-Mei; Li, Qiong; Cao, Dong-Dong; Huang, Shengfeng; Xu, Anlong; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have been identified in most animals, are pattern recognition molecules that involve antimicrobial defense. Resulting from extraordinary expansion of innate immune genes, the amphioxus encodes many PGRPs of diverse functions. For instance, three isoforms of PGRP encoded by Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense, termed BbtPGRP1~3, are fused with a chitin binding domain (CBD) at the N-terminus. Here we report the 2.7 Å crystal structure of BbtPGRP3, revealing an overall structure of an N-terminal hevein-like CBD followed by a catalytic PGRP domain. Activity assays combined with site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the individual PGRP domain exhibits amidase activity towards both DAP-type and Lys-type peptidoglycans (PGNs), the former of which is favored. The N-terminal CBD not only has the chitin-binding activity, but also enables BbtPGRP3 to gain a five-fold increase of amidase activity towards the Lys-type PGNs, leading to a significantly broadened substrate spectrum. Together, we propose that modular evolution via domain shuffling combined with gene horizontal transfer makes BbtPGRP1~3 novel PGRPs of augmented catalytic activity and broad recognition spectrum. PMID:26479246

  4. Maturation and Activity of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 Is Inhibited by Acyl-CoA Binding Domain Containing 3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Patel, Vishala; Bang, Sookhee; Cohen, Natalie; Millar, John; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2012-01-01

    Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis. PMID:23166793

  5. Maturation and activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 is inhibited by acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Patel, Vishala; Bang, Sookhee; Cohen, Natalie; Millar, John; Kim, Sangwon F

    2012-01-01

    Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis.

  6. Structure of a Construct of a Human Poly(C)-binding Protein Containing the First and Second KH Domains Reveals Insights into Its Regulatory Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhihua; Fenn, Sebastian; Tjhen, Richard; James, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(C)-binding proteins (PCBPs) are important regulatory proteins that contain three KH (hnRNP K homology) domains. Binding poly(C) D/RNA sequences via KH domains is essential for multiple PCBP functions. To reveal the basis for PCBP-D/RNA interactions and function, we determined the structure of a construct containing the first two domains (KH1-KH2) of human PCBP2 by NMR. KH1 and KH2 form an intramolecular pseudodimer. The large hydrophobic dimerization surface of each KH domain is on the side opposite the D/RNA binding interface. Chemical shift mapping indicates both domains bind poly(C) DNA motifs without disrupting the KH1-KH2 interaction. Spectral comparison of KH1-KH2, KH3, and full-length PCBP2 constructs suggests that the KH1-KH2 pseudodimer forms, but KH3 does not interact with other parts of the protein. From NMR studies and modeling, we propose possible modes of cooperative binding tandem poly(C) motifs by the KH domains. D/RNA binding may induce pseudodimer dissociation or stabilize dissociated KH1 and KH2, making protein interaction surfaces available to PCBP-binding partners. This conformational change may represent a regulatory mechanism linking D/RNA binding to PCBP functions. PMID:18701464

  7. The protein conformation and a zinc-binding domain of an autoantigen from mouse seminal vesicle.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y H; Luo, C W; Yu, L C; Chu, S T; Chen, Y H

    1995-01-01

    The protein conformation of a mouse seminal vesicle autoantigen was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. At pH 7.4, the spectrum in the UV region appears as one negative band at 217 nm and one positive band at 200 nm. This together with the predicted secondary structures indicates no helices but a mixture of beta form, beta turn, and unordered form in the protein molecule. The conformation is stable even at pH 10.5 or 3.0. The spectrum in the near-UV region consists of fine structures that are disturbed in acidic or alkaline solution. The environments around Trp2 and Trp82 of this protein were studied by intrinsic fluorescence and solute quenching. They give an emission peak at 345 nm, and about 87% of them are accessible to quenching by acrylamide. Correlating the quenching effect of CsCl and Kl on the protein fluorescence to the charged groups along the polypeptide chain suggests the difference in the "local charge" around the two tryptophan residues. The presence of ZnCl2 in the protein solution effects no change in the circular dichroism but perturbs the fluorescence due to Trp82. Analysis of the fluorescence data suggests a Zn(2+)-binding site on the protein, which cannot coordinate with both Ca2+ and Mg2+. The association constant for the complex formation is 1.35 x 10(5) +/- 0.04 x 10(5) M-1 at pH 7.4. PMID:8580352

  8. ZP Domain Proteins in the Abalone Egg Coat Include a Paralog of VERL under Positive Selection That Binds Lysin and 18-kDa Sperm Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Jan E.; Vacquier, Victor D.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying fertilization molecules is key to our understanding of reproductive biology, yet only a few examples of interacting sperm and egg proteins are known. One of the best characterized comes from the invertebrate archeogastropod abalone (Haliotis spp.), where sperm lysin mediates passage through the protective egg vitelline envelope (VE) by binding to the VE protein vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL). Rapid adaptive divergence of abalone lysin and VERL are an example of positive selection on interacting fertilization proteins contributing to reproductive isolation. Previously, we characterized a subset of the abalone VE proteins that share a structural feature, the zona pellucida (ZP) domain, which is common to VERL and the egg envelopes of vertebrates. Here, we use additional expressed sequence tag sequencing and shotgun proteomics to characterize this family of proteins in the abalone egg VE. We expand 3-fold the number of known ZP domain proteins present within the VE (now 30 in total) and identify a paralog of VERL (vitelline envelope zona pellucida domain protein [VEZP] 14) that contains a putative lysin-binding motif. We find that, like VERL, the divergence of VEZP14 among abalone species is driven by positive selection on the lysin-binding motif alone and that these paralogous egg VE proteins bind a similar set of sperm proteins including a rapidly evolving 18-kDa paralog of lysin, which may mediate sperm–egg fusion. This work identifies an egg coat paralog of VERL under positive selection and the candidate sperm proteins with which it may interact during abalone fertilization. PMID:19767347

  9. Mutational analysis of the human HSP70 protein: distinct domains for nucleolar localization and adenosine triphosphate binding

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The human HSP70 gene was modified in vitro using oligonucleotide- directed mutagenesis to add sequences encoding a peptide from the testis-specific form of human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to the carboxy terminus of HSP70. The peptide-tagged HSP70 can be distinguished from the endogenous HSP70 protein using an LDH peptide- specific antiserum in indirect immunofluorescence assays of cells transiently transfected with an expression vector containing the tagged HSP70 gene regulated by the human HSP70 promoter. A series of deletion mutants within the HSP70 protein coding region were generated. Using double-label indirect immunofluorescence with the LDH peptide-specific antiserum and HSP70-specific mAbs, we compared the intracellular distribution of the deletion mutants to that of endogenous HSP70. We have determined that sequences in the carboxy terminus of HSP70 are necessary for proper nucleolar localization after heat shock. In contrast, sequences in the amino terminus of HSP70 are responsible for the ATP-binding ability of the protein. Mutants that were unable to bind ATP, however, still displayed nucleolar association, indicating that ATP binding is apparently not required for interaction with substrate. Additional support that HSP70 appears to be composed of at least two domains follows from the results of trypsin digestions of wild type and mutant HSP70. Protease digestion of the mutant HSP70 proteins identified a region of HSP70 that, when deleted, affected HSP70 conformation. PMID:2681224

  10. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B{sup ca} expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  11. An immunogenic, surface-exposed domain of Haemophilus ducreyi outer membrane protein HgbA is involved in hemoglobin binding.

    PubMed

    Nepluev, Igor; Afonina, Galyna; Fusco, William G; Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Temple, Brenda; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    HgbA is the sole TonB-dependent receptor for hemoglobin (Hb) acquisition of Haemophilus ducreyi. Binding of Hb to HgbA is the initial step in heme acquisition from Hb. To better understand this step, we mutagenized hgbA by deletion of each of the 11 putative surface-exposed loops and expressed each of the mutant proteins in trans in host strain H. ducreyi FX547 hgbA. All mutant proteins were expressed, exported, and detected on the surface by anti-HgbA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Deletion of sequences in loops 5 and 7 of HgbA abolished Hb binding in two different formats. In contrast, HgbA proteins containing deletions in the other nine loops retained the ability to bind Hb. None of the clones expressing mutant proteins were able to grow on plates containing low concentrations of Hb. Previously we demonstrated in a swine model of chancroid infection that an HgbA vaccine conferred complete protection from a challenge infection. Using anti-HgbA IgG from this study and the above deletion mutants, we show that loops 4, 5, and 7 of HgbA were immunogenic and surface exposed and that IgG directed against loops 4 and 5 blocked Hb binding. Furthermore, loop 6 was cleaved by protease on intact H. ducreyi, suggesting surface exposure. These data implicate a central domain of HgbA (in respect to the primary amino acid sequence) as important in Hb binding and suggest that this region of the molecule might have potential as a subunit vaccine.

  12. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Mototsugu Watanabe, Takashi; Baba, Nobuyoshi; Miyara, Takako; Saito, Jun; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2008-04-01

    The selenomethionyl-substituted transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from S. pneumoniae was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of the soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. MAD data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae catalyzes the cross-linking of peptidoglycan precursors that occurs during bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. A selenomethionyl (SeMet) substituted PBP 2B transpeptidase domain was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of a soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 86.39, c = 143.27 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution using the BL32B2 beamline at SPring-8. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule and 63.7% solvent.

  14. Sperm-derived WW domain-binding protein, PAWP, elicits calcium oscillations and oocyte activation in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Balakier, Hanna; Bashar, Siamak; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sutovsky, Peter; Librach, Clifford L; Oko, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian zygotic development is initiated by sperm-mediated intracellular calcium oscillations, followed by activation of metaphase II-arrested oocytes. Sperm postacrosomal WW binding protein (PAWP) fulfils the criteria set for an oocyte-activating factor by inducing oocyte activation and being stored in the perinuclear theca, the sperm compartment whose content is first released into oocyte cytoplasm during fertilization. However, proof that PAWP initiates mammalian zygotic development relies on demonstration that it acts upstream of oocyte calcium oscillations. Here, we show that PAWP triggers calcium oscillations and pronuclear formation in human and mouse oocytes similar to what is observed during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Most important, sperm-induced calcium oscillations are blocked by coinjection of a competitive inhibitor, derived from the WWI domain-binding motif of PAWP, implying the requirement of sperm PAWP and an oocyte-derived WWI domain protein substrate of PAWP for successful fertilization. Sperm-delivered PAWP is, therefore, a unique protein with a nonredundant role during human and mouse fertilization, required to trigger zygotic development. Presented data confirm our previous findings in nonmammalian models and suggest potential applications of PAWP in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility.- © FASEB.

  15. Structural Determination of Functional Units of the Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD94) of the Reticulocyte Binding Protein Py235 of Plasmodium yoelii

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Asha M.; Hunke, Cornelia; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Preiser, Peter R.; Grüber, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasion of the red blood cells (RBC) by the merozoite of malaria parasites involves a large number of receptor ligand interactions. The reticulocyte binding protein homologue family (RH) plays an important role in erythrocyte recognition as well as virulence. Recently, it has been shown that members of RH in addition to receptor binding may also have a role as ATP/ADP sensor. A 94 kDa region named Nucleotide-Binding Domain 94 (NBD94) of Plasmodium yoelii YM, representative of the putative nucleotide binding region of RH, has been demonstrated to bind ATP and ADP selectively. Binding of ATP or ADP induced nucleotide-dependent structural changes in the C-terminal hinge-region of NBD94, and directly impacted on the RBC binding ability of RH. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to find the smallest structural unit, able to bind nucleotides, and its coupling module, the hinge region, three truncated domains of NBD94 have been generated, termed NBD94444–547, NBD94566–663 and NBD94674–793, respectively. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy NBD94444–547 has been identified to form the smallest nucleotide binding segment, sensitive for ATP and ADP, which became inhibited by 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. The shape of NBD94444–547 in solution was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data, revealing an elongated molecule, comprised of two globular domains, connected by a spiral segment of about 73.1 Å in length. The high quality of the constructs, forming the hinge-region, NBD94566–663 and NBD94674–793 enabled to determine the first crystallographic and solution structure, respectively. The crystal structure of NBD94566–663 consists of two helices with 97.8 Å and 48.6 Å in length, linked by a loop. By comparison, the low resolution structure of NBD94674–793 in solution represents a chair–like shape with three architectural segments. Conclusions These structures give the first insight into how nucleotide binding impacts on

  16. Protein transduction domains of HIV-1 and SIV TAT interact with charged lipid vesicles. Binding mechanism and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, André; Blatter, Xiaochun Li; Seelig, Anna; Seelig, Joachim

    2003-08-05

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) traverse cell membranes of cultured cells very efficiently by a mechanism not yet identified. Recent theories for the translocation suggest either the binding of the CPPs to extracellular glycosaminoglycans or the formation of inverted micelles with negatively charged lipids. In the present study, the binding of the protein transduction domains (PTD) of human (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) TAT peptide (amino acid residues 47-57, electric charge z(p) = +8) to membranes containing various proportions of negatively charged lipid (POPG) is characterized. Monolayer expansion measurements demonstrate that TAT-PTD insertion between lipids requires loosely packed monolayer films. For densely packed monolayers (pi > 29 mN/m) and lipid bilayers, no insertion is possible, and binding occurs via electrostatic adsorption to the membrane surface. Light scattering experiments show an aggregation of anionic lipid vesicles when the electric surface charge is neutralized by TAT-PTD, the observed stoichiometry being close to the theoretical value of 1:8. Membrane binding was quantitated with isothermal titration calorimetry and three further methods. The reaction enthalpy is Delta H degrees approximately equal to -1.5 kcal/mol peptide and is almost temperature-independent with Delta C(p) degrees approximately 0 kcal/(mol K), indicating equal contributions of polar and hydrophobic interactions to the reaction heat capacity. The binding of TAT-PTD to the anionic membrane is described by an electrostatic attraction/chemical partition model. The electrostatic attraction energy, calculated with the Gouy-Chapman theory, accounts for approximately 80% of the binding energy. The overall binding constant, K(app), is approximately 10(3)-10(4) M(-1). The intrinsic binding constant (K(p)), corrected for electrostatic effects and describing the partitioning of the peptide between the lipid-water interface and the membrane, is small and is K

  17. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  18. LIVE CELL IMAGING OF PHOSPHOINOSITIDES WITH EXPRESSED INOSITIDE-BINDING PROTEIN DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Várnai, Péter; Balla, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    Summary Inositol lipids and calcium signaling has been inseparable twins during the 1980s when the molecular details of phospholipase C-mediated generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) and its Ca2+ mobilizing action were discovered. Since then, both the Ca2+- and inositol lipid signaling fields have hugely expanded and the tools allowing dissection of the finest details of their molecular organization also followed closely. Although phosphoinositides regulate many cell functions unrelated to Ca2+ signaling there are still many open questions even in the Ca2+ field that would benefit from single cell monitoring of PtdIns(4,5)P2 or InsP3 changes during agonist stimulation. This chapter is designed to provide practical guidance as well as some theoretical background on measurements of phosphoinositides in live cells using protein domain-GFP chimeras that could be also useful for people working on calcium signaling. PMID:18930153

  19. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  20. Use of a fusion protein between GFP and an actin-binding domain to visualize transient filamentous-actin structures.

    PubMed

    Pang, K M; Lee, E; Knecht, D A

    1998-03-26

    Many important processes in eukaryotic cells involve changes in the quantity, location and the organization of actin filaments [1] [2] [3]. We have been able to visualize these changes in live cells using a fusion protein (GFP-ABD) comprising the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria and the 25 kDa highly conserved actin-binding domain (ABD) from the amino terminus of the actin cross-linking protein ABP-120 [4]. In live cells of the soil amoeba Dictyostelium that were expressing GFP-ABD, the three-dimensional architecture of the actin cortex was clearly visualized. The pattern of GFP-ABD fluorescence in these cells coincided with that of rhodamine-phalloidin, indicating that GFP-ABD specifically binds filamentous (F) actin. On the ventral surface of non-polarized vegetative cells, a broad ring of F actin periodically assembled and contracted, whereas in polarized cells there were transient punctate F-actin structures; cells cycled between the polarized and non-polarized morphologies. During the formation of pseudopods, an increase in fluorescence intensity coincided with the initial outward deformation of the membrane. This is consistent with the models of pseudopod extension that predict an increase in the local density of actin filaments. In conclusion, GFP-ABD specifically binds F actin and allows the visualization of F-actin dynamics and cellular behavior simultaneously.

  1. Orientation of Myosin Binding Protein C in the Cardiac Muscle Sarcomere Determined by Domain-Specific Immuno-EM

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyounghwan; Harris, Samantha P.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Craig, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Myosin binding protein-C is a thick filament protein of vertebrate striated muscle. The cardiac isoform (cMyBP-C) is essential for normal cardiac function, and mutations in cMyBP-C cause cardiac muscle disease. The rod-shaped molecule is composed primarily of 11 immunoglobulin- or fibronectin-like domains, and is located at 9 sites, 43 nm apart, in each half of the A-band. To understand how cMyBP-C functions, it is important to know its structural organization in the sarcomere, as this will affect its ability to interact with other sarcomeric proteins. Several models have been proposed, in which cMyBP-C wraps around, extends radially from, or runs axially along the thick filament. Our goal was to define cMyBP-C orientation by determining the relative axial positions of different cMyBP-C domains. Immuno-electron microscopy was performed using mouse cardiac myofibrils labeled with antibodies specific to the N- and C-terminal domains and to the middle of cMyBP-C. Antibodies to all regions of the molecule, except the C-terminus, labeled at the same nine axial positions in each half A-band, consistent with a circumferential and/or radial rather than an axial orientation of the bulk of the molecule. The C-terminal antibody stripes were slightly displaced axially, demonstrating an axial orientation of the C-terminal 3 domains, with the C-terminus closer to the M-line. These results, combined with previous studies, suggest that the C-terminal domains of cMyBP-C run along the thick filament surface, while the N-terminus extends towards neighboring thin filaments. This organization provides a structural framework for understanding cMyBP-C’s modulation of cardiac muscle contraction. PMID:25451032

  2. Calmodulin binding proteins provide domains of local Ca2+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Bers, Donald M

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common Ca(2+) sensor for many signaling pathways, transducing local Ca(2+) signals into specific cellular outcomes. Many of CaM's signaling functions can be explained by its unique biochemical properties, including high and low affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites with slow and fast kinetics, respectively. CaM is expected to have a limited spatial range of action, emphasizing its role in local Ca(2+) signaling. Interactions with target proteins further fine-tune CaM signal transduction. Here, we focus on only three specific cellular targets for CaM signaling in cardiac myocytes: the L-type Ca(2+) channel, the ryanodine receptor, and the IP(3) receptor. We elaborate a working hypothesis that each channel is regulated by two distinct functional populations of CaM: dedicated CaM and promiscuous CaM. Dedicated CaM is typically tethered to each channel and directly regulates channel activity. In addition, a local pool of promiscuous CaM appears poised to sense local Ca(2+) signals and trigger downstream pathways such as Ca(2+)/CaM dependent-protein kinase II and calcineurin. Understanding how promiscuous CaM coordinates multiple distinct signaling pathways remains a challenge, but is aided by the use of mathematical modeling and a new generation of fluorescent biosensors. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes."

  3. Distinct Z-DNA binding mode of a PKR-like protein kinase containing a Z-DNA binding domain (PKZ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoun; Hur, Jeonghwan; Park, Kwangsoo; Bae, Sangsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Ha, Sung Chul; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded ribonucleic acid-activated protein kinase (PKR) downregulates translation as a defense mechanism against viral infection. In fish species, PKZ, a PKR-like protein kinase containing left-handed deoxyribonucleic acid (Z-DNA) binding domains, performs a similar role in the antiviral response. To understand the role of PKZ in Z-DNA recognition and innate immune response, we performed structural and functional studies of the Z-DNA binding domain (Zα) of PKZ from Carassius auratus (caZαPKZ). The 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of caZαPKZ:Z-DNA revealed that caZαPKZ shares the overall fold with other Zα, but has discrete structural features that differentiate its DNA binding mode from others. Functional analyses of caZαPKZ and its mutants revealed that caZαPKZ mediates the fastest B-to-Z transition of DNA among Zα, and the minimal interaction for Z-DNA recognition is mediated by three backbone phosphates and six residues of caZαPKZ. Structure-based mutagenesis and B-to-Z transition assays confirmed that Lys56 located in the β-wing contributes to its fast B-to-Z transition kinetics. Investigation of the DNA binding kinetics of caZαPKZ further revealed that the B-to-Z transition rate is positively correlated with the association rate constant. Taking these results together, we conclude that the positive charge in the β-wing largely affects fast B-to-Z transition activity by enhancing the DNA binding rate. PMID:24682817

  4. The HhH(2)/NDD Domain of the Drosophila Nod Chromokinesin-like Protein Is Required for Binding to Chromosomes in the Oocyte Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei; Hawley, R. Scott

    2005-01-01

    Nod is a chromokinesin-like protein that plays a critical role in segregating achiasmate chromosomes during female meiosis. The C-terminal half of the Nod protein contains two putative DNA-binding domains. The first of these domains, known as the HMGN domain, consists of three tandemly repeated high-mobility group N motifs. This domain was previously shown to be both necessary and sufficient for binding of the C-terminal half of Nod to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. The second putative DNA-binding domain, denoted HhH(2)/NDD, is a helix-hairpin-helix(2)/Nod-like DNA-binding domain. Although the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not required or sufficient for chromosome binding in embryos, several well-characterized nod mutations have been mapped in this domain. To characterize the role of the HhH(2)/NDD domain in mediating Nod function, we created a series of UAS-driven transgene constructs capable of expressing either a wild-type Nod-GFP fusion protein or proteins in which the HhH(2)/NDD domain had been altered by site-directed mutagenesis. Although wild-type Nod-GFP localizes to the oocyte chromosomes and rescues the segregation defect in nod mutant oocytes, two of three proteins carrying mutants in the HhH(2)/NDD domain fail to either rescue the nod mutant phenotype or bind to oocyte chromosomes. However, these mutant proteins do bind to the polytene chromosomes in nurse-cell nuclei and enter the oocyte nucleus. Thus, even though the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not essential for chromosome binding in other cell types, it is required for chromosome binding in the oocyte. These HhH(2)/NDD mutants also block the localization of Nod to the posterior pole of stage 9–10A oocytes, a process that is thought to facilitate the interaction of Nod with the plus ends of microtubules (Cui et al. 2005). This observation suggests that the Nod HhH2/NDD domain may play other roles in addition to binding Nod to meiotic chromosomes. PMID:16143607

  5. The HhH2/NDD domain of the Drosophila Nod chromokinesin-like protein is required for binding to chromosomes in the oocyte nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Hawley, R Scott

    2005-12-01

    Nod is a chromokinesin-like protein that plays a critical role in segregating achiasmate chromosomes during female meiosis. The C-terminal half of the Nod protein contains two putative DNA-binding domains. The first of these domains, known as the HMGN domain, consists of three tandemly repeated high-mobility group N motifs. This domain was previously shown to be both necessary and sufficient for binding of the C-terminal half of Nod to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. The second putative DNA-binding domain, denoted HhH(2)/NDD, is a helix-hairpin-helix(2)/Nod-like DNA-binding domain. Although the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not required or sufficient for chromosome binding in embryos, several well-characterized nod mutations have been mapped in this domain. To characterize the role of the HhH(2)/NDD domain in mediating Nod function, we created a series of UAS-driven transgene constructs capable of expressing either a wild-type Nod-GFP fusion protein or proteins in which the HhH(2)/NDD domain had been altered by site-directed mutagenesis. Although wild-type Nod-GFP localizes to the oocyte chromosomes and rescues the segregation defect in nod mutant oocytes, two of three proteins carrying mutants in the HhH(2)/NDD domain fail to either rescue the nod mutant phenotype or bind to oocyte chromosomes. However, these mutant proteins do bind to the polytene chromosomes in nurse-cell nuclei and enter the oocyte nucleus. Thus, even though the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not essential for chromosome binding in other cell types, it is required for chromosome binding in the oocyte. These HhH(2)/NDD mutants also block the localization of Nod to the posterior pole of stage 9-10A oocytes, a process that is thought to facilitate the interaction of Nod with the plus ends of microtubules (Cui et al. 2005). This observation suggests that the Nod HhH2/NDD domain may play other roles in addition to binding Nod to meiotic chromosomes.

  6. Specific Binding of Cholesterol to C99 Domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein Depends Critically on Charge State of Protein.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Afra; Bandara, Asanga; Pantelopulos, George A; Dominguez, Laura; Straub, John E

    2016-09-15

    Recent NMR chemical shift measurements of the 99 residue C-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein (APP-C99) in the presence of cholesterol provide evidence of binary complex formation between C99 and cholesterol in membrane mimetic environments. It has also been observed that the production of Aβ protein is enhanced under conditions of high cholesterol concentration. In this study, we investigated the impact of the charge state of C99 on the structure and stability of the C99-cholesterol complex. We observed that the binding of C99 to cholesterol depends critically on the charge state of Glu 693 (E22) and Asp 694 (D23). Evaluation of the pKa values of the Asp and Glu side chains suggests that these residues may be predominantly neutral in existing experimental observations of a stable C99-cholesterol complex at lower pH (characteristic of the endosomal environment), while binding is destabilized near neutral pH (characteristic of the cytoplasm). These observations suggest that specific binding of cholesterol to C99 is a sensitive function of the pH encountered in vivo, with key E22 and D23 residues serving as a "pH switch" controlling C99-cholesterol binding.

  7. Differential tolerance of 'pseudo-pathogenic' tryptophan residues in calcium-binding EGF domains of short fibulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D

    2015-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in the last canonical calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF) domain of fibulin-3 (F3) causes the rare macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML). In cell culture studies, this mutation leads to inefficient F3 secretion and higher intracellular steady state levels, likely due to F3 disulfide bonding and/or protein folding problems. However, how the R345W mutation actually causes ML is still largely unknown. Herein we tested whether the introduction of analogous, 'pseudo-pathogenic' tryptophan mutations immediately after the bn cysteine (bn+1) in other cbEGF domains also caused protein folding/secretion challenges. We found that introduction of tryptophan mutations into each of the four other F3 canonical cbEGF domains caused a significant reduction in protein secretion ranging from 2.7 to 56% of wild-type (WT) F3 levels. Surprisingly, an R185W mutation in the first canonical cbEGF domain of F3 yielded the highest amount of secretion among the F3 tryptophan mutants, and its secretion defect could be rescued to near WT levels (95%) after growth temperature reduction. Interestingly, when similarly positioned tryptophan mutations were introduced into any of the canonical cbEGF domains of the highly homologous protein, fibulin-5 (F5), there was no effect on secretion. In an attempt to make F3 tolerant of tryptophan residues (like F5), we genetically engineered F3 to have a higher sequence homology with F5 by deleting three insert regions present in F3, but not F5. However, deletion of one or more of these regions did not have a beneficial effect on R345W F3 secretion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of tryptophan residues at the bn+1 position does not universally disrupt cbEGF domain folding and secretion, but that their effect is context dependent, and in this case, uniquely disrupt the folding of canonical cbEGF domains of F3, but not F5.

  8. DIFFERENTIAL TOLERANCE OF ‘PSEUDO-PATHOGENIC’ TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES IN CALCIUM-BINDING EGF DOMAINS OF SHORT FIBULIN PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D.

    2015-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in the last canonical calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF) domain of fibulin-3 (F3) causes the rare macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML). In cell culture studies, this mutation leads to inefficient F3 secretion and higher intracellular steady state levels, likely due to F3 disulfide bonding and/or protein folding problems. However, how the R345W mutation actually causes ML is still largely unknown. Herein we tested whether the introduction of analogous, ‘pseudo-pathogenic’ tryptophan mutations immediately after the bn cysteine (bn+1) in other cbEGF domains also caused protein folding/secretion challenges. We found that introduction of tryptophan mutations into each of the four other F3 canonical cbEGF domains caused a significant reduction in protein secretion ranging from 2.7 to 56% of wild-type (WT) F3 levels. Surprisingly, an R185W mutation in the first canonical cbEGF domain of F3 yielded the highest amount of secretion among the F3 tryptophan mutants, and its secretion defect could be rescued to near WT levels (95%) after growth temperature reduction. Interestingly, when similarly positioned tryptophan mutations were introduced into any of the canonical cbEGF domains of the highly homologous protein, fibulin-5 (F5), there was no effect on secretion. In an attempt to make F3 tolerant of tryptophan residues (like F5), we genetically engineered F3 to have a higher sequence homology with F5 by deleting three insert regions present in F3, but not F5. However, deletion of one or more of these regions did not have a beneficial effect on R345W F3 secretion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of tryptophan residues at the bn+1 position does not universally disrupt cbEGF domain folding and secretion, but that their effect is context dependent, and in this case, uniquely disrupt the folding of canonical cbEGF domains of F3, but not F5. PMID:25481286

  9. Localization of the serine protease-binding sites in the collagen-like domain of mannose-binding protein: indirect effects of naturally occurring mutations on protease binding and activation.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Russell; Shaw, Jonathan M; Uitdehaag, Joost; Chen, Ce-Belle; Torgersen, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt

    2004-04-02

    Mutations in the collagen-like domain of serum mannose-binding protein (MBP) interfere with the ability of the protein to initiate complement fixation through the MBP-associated serine proteases (MASPs). The resulting deficiency in the innate immune response leads to susceptibility to infections. Studies have been undertaken to define the region of MBP that interacts with MASPs and to determine how the naturally occurring mutations affect this interaction. Truncated and modified MBPs and synthetic peptides that represent segments of the collagen-like domain of MBP have been used to demonstrate that MASPs bind on the C-terminal side of the hinge region formed by an interruption in the Gly-X-Y repeat pattern of the collagen-like domain. The binding sites for MASP-2 and for MASP-1 and -3 overlap but are not identical. The two most common naturally occurring mutations in MBP result in substitution of acidic amino acids for glycine residues in Gly-X-Y triplets on the N-terminal side of the hinge. Circular dichroism analysis and differential scanning calorimetry demonstrate that the triple helical structure of the collagen-like domain is largely intact in the mutant proteins, but it is more easily unfolded than in wild-type MBP. Thus, the effect of the mutations is to destabilize the collagen-like domain, indirectly disrupting the binding sites for MASPs. In addition, at least one of the mutations has a further effect on the ability of MBP to activate MASPs.

  10. Structural analyses of von Willebrand factor C domains of collagen 2A and CCN3 reveal an alternative mode of binding to bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Emma-Ruoqi; Blythe, Emily E; Fischer, Gerhard; Hyvönen, Marko

    2017-07-28

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are secreted growth factors that promote differentiation processes in embryogenesis and tissue development. Regulation of BMP signaling involves binding to a variety of extracellular proteins, among which are many von Willebrand factor C (vWC) domain-containing proteins. Although the crystal structure of the complex of crossveinless-2 (CV-2) vWC1 and BMP-2 previously revealed one mode of the vWC/BMP-binding mechanism, other vWC domains may bind to BMP differently. Here, using X-ray crystallography, we present for the first time structures of the vWC domains of two proteins thought to interact with BMP-2: collagen IIA and matricellular protein CCN3. We found that these two vWC domains share a similar N-terminal fold that differs greatly from that in CV-2 vWC, which comprises its BMP-2-binding site. We analyzed the ability of these vWC domains to directly bind to BMP-2 and detected an interaction only between the collagen IIa vWC and BMP-2. Guided by the collagen IIa vWC domain crystal structure and conservation of surface residues among orthologous domains, we mapped the BMP-binding epitope on the subdomain 1 of the vWC domain. This binding site is different from that previously observed in the complex between CV-2 vWC and BMP-2, revealing an alternative mode of interaction between vWC domains and BMPs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. DNA-damage-inducible 1 protein (Ddi1) contains an uncharacteristic ubiquitin-like domain that binds ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka, Urszula; Zhang, Daoning; Walker, Olivier; Krutauz, Daria; Castañeda, Carlos A.; Chaturvedi, Apurva; Chen, Tony Y.; Reis, Noa; Glickman, Michael H.; Fushman, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Ddi1 belongs to a family of shuttle proteins targeting polyubiquitinated substrates for proteasomal degradation. Unlike the other proteasomal shuttles, Rad23 and Dsk2, Ddi1 remains an enigma: its function is not fully understood and structural properties are poorly characterized. We determined the structure and binding properties of the ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains of Ddi1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that, while Ddi1UBA forms a characteristic UBA:ubiquitin complex, Ddi1UBL has entirely uncharacteristic binding preferences. Despite having a ubiquitin-like fold, Ddi1UBL does not interact with typical UBL-receptors but, unexpectedly, binds ubiquitin, forming a unique interface mediated by hydrophobic contacts and by salt-bridges between oppositely-charged residues of Ddi1UBL and ubiquitin. In stark contrast with ubiquitin and other UBLs, the β-sheet surface of Ddi1UBL is negatively charged and, therefore, is recognized in a completely different way. The dual functionality of Ddi1UBL, capable of binding both ubiquitin and proteasome, suggests a novel mechanism for Ddi1 as a proteasomal shuttle. PMID:25703377

  12. Design and Use of Chimeric Proteins Containing a Collagen-Binding Domain for Wound Healing and Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Addi, Cyril; Murschel, Frederic; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    Collagen-based biomaterials are widely used in the field of tissue engineering; they can be loaded with biomolecules such as growth factors (GFs) to modulate the biological response of the host and thus improve its potential for regeneration. Recombinant chimeric GFs fused to a collagen-binding domain (CBD) have been reported to improve their bioavailability and the host response, especially when combined with an appropriate collagen-based biomaterial. This review first provides an extensive description of the various CBDs that have been fused to proteins, with a focus on the need for accurate characterization of their interaction with collagen. The second part of the review highlights the benefits of various CBD/GF fusion proteins that have been designed for wound healing and bone regeneration.

  13. Quantitative analysis of multisite protein-ligand interactions by NMR: binding of intrinsically disordered p53 transactivation subdomains with the TAZ2 domain of CBP.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Ferreon, Josephine C; Wright, Peter E

    2012-02-29

    Determination of affinities and binding sites involved in protein-ligand interactions is essential for understanding molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Here we combine singular value decomposition and global analysis of NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by protein-protein interactions to determine the number and location of binding sites on the protein surface and to measure the binding affinities. Using this method we show that the isolated AD1 and AD2 binding motifs, derived from the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain of the tumor suppressor p53, both interact with the TAZ2 domain of the transcriptional coactivator CBP at two binding sites. Simulations of titration curves and line shapes show that a primary dissociation constant as small as 1-10 nM can be accurately estimated by NMR titration methods, provided that the primary and secondary binding processes are coupled. Unexpectedly, the site of binding of AD2 on the hydrophobic surface of TAZ2 overlaps with the binding site for AD1, but AD2 binds TAZ2 more tightly. The results highlight the complexity of interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins and their targets. Furthermore, the association rate of AD2 to TAZ2 is estimated to be 1.7 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), approaching the diffusion-controlled limit and indicating that intrinsic disorder plus complementary electrostatics can significantly accelerate protein binding interactions. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study is focused on the characterization and expression of genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, encoding proteins that possess six-cysteine-containing chitin-binding domains (CBDs) related to the peritrophin A domain (ChtBD2). An exhaustive bioinformatics search of the genome of...

  15. Alcohol binding in the C1 (C1A + C1B) domain of protein kinase C epsilon

    PubMed Central

    Pany, Satyabrata; Das, Joydip

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol regulates the expression and function of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε). In a previous study we identified an alcohol binding site in the C1B, one of the twin C1 subdomains of PKCε. Methods In this study, we investigated alcohol binding in the entire C1 domain (combined C1A and C1B) of PKCε. Fluorescent phorbol ester, SAPD and fluorescent diacylglycerol (DAG) analog, dansyl-DAG were used to study the effect of ethanol, butanol, and octanol on the ligand binding using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). To identify alcohol binding site(s), PKCεC1 was photolabeled with 3-azibutanol and 3-azioctanol, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The effects of alcohols and the azialcohols on PKCε were studied in NG108-15 cells. Results In the presence of alcohol, SAPD and dansyl-DAG showed different extent of FRET, indicating differential effects of alcohol on the C1A and C1B subdomains. Effects of alcohols and azialcohols on PKCε in NG108-15 cells were comparable. Azialcohols labeled Tyr-176 of C1A and Tyr-250 of C1B. Inspection of the model structure of PKCεC1 reveals that these residues are 40 Å apart from each other indicating that these residues form two different alcohol binding sites. Conclusions The present results provide evidence for the presence of multiple alcohol-binding sites on PKCε and underscore the importance of targeting this PKC isoform in developing alcohol antagonists. PMID:26210390

  16. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    PubMed

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-06-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain.

  17. Protein domain histochemistry (PDH): binding of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of recombinant human glycoreceptor CLEC10A (CD301) to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Nollau, Peter; Wolters-Eisfeld, Gerrit; Mortezai, Naghmeh; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Klampe, Birgit; Debus, Annegret; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Niendorf, Axel; Wagener, Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Specialized protein domains bind to posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation or glycosylation. When such PTM-binding protein domains are used as analytical tools, the functional states of cells and tissues can be determined with high precision. Here, we describe the use of recombinant CLEC10A (CD301), a human glycoreceptor of the C-type lectin family, for the detection of ligands in sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded normal and cancerous mammary tissues. A construct, in which part of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) was deleted, was used as a negative control. In comparison to normal mammary glands, a pronounced staining of tumor tissues was observed. Because the construct with the truncated CRD did not show any tissue staining, the binding of the wild-type glycoreceptor can be attributed to its carbohydrate recognition domain. To distinguish our novel approach from immunohistochemistry, we propose the designation "protein domain histochemistry" (PDH).

  18. Is the LysM domain of L. monocytogenes p60 protein suitable for engineering a protein with high peptidoglycan binding affinity?

    PubMed

    Yu, Minfeng; Yang, Jing; Guo, Minliang

    2016-11-01

    Lysin motif (LysM) is a highly conserved carbohydrate binding module that is widely present in proteins from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. LysM domains from many LysM-containing proteins can be taken out of their natural context and retain their ability to bind peptidoglycan. Therefore, LysM has enormous potential for applications in both industry and medicine. This potential has stimulated an intensive search for LysM modules with different evolutionary origins. The p60 protein (Lm-p60) is an NlpC/P60-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase secreted by Listeria monocytogenes. The N-terminus of Lm-p60 contains 2 LysM modules separated by an SH3 module. Our recent study of Lm-p60 demonstrates that the N-terminal half of Lm-p60, comprised of 2 LysM and 1 SH3 module, is able to recognize and bind peptidoglycan. The LysM domain of Lm-p60 contains only 2 LysM modules, which is the minimum number of LysM modules in most NlpC/P60-containing proteins, but it shows strong affinity for peptidoglycan. Moreover, these 2 LysM modules have only 38.64% similarity to each other. These data allowed us to conclude that the 2 LysM modules from Lm-p60 have different evolutionary origins, suggesting that they are suitable candidate peptidoglycan-binding modules for protein engineering in order to create a protein with a high binding affinity to peptidoglycan.

  19. Is the LysM domain of L. monocytogenes p60 protein suitable for engineering a protein with high peptidoglycan binding affinity?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Minfeng; Yang, Jing; Guo, Minliang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lysin motif (LysM) is a highly conserved carbohydrate binding module that is widely present in proteins from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. LysM domains from many LysM-containing proteins can be taken out of their natural context and retain their ability to bind peptidoglycan. Therefore, LysM has enormous potential for applications in both industry and medicine. This potential has stimulated an intensive search for LysM modules with different evolutionary origins. The p60 protein (Lm-p60) is an NlpC/P60-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase secreted by Listeria monocytogenes. The N-terminus of Lm-p60 contains 2 LysM modules separated by an SH3 module. Our recent study of Lm-p60 demonstrates that the N-terminal half of Lm-p60, comprised of 2 LysM and 1 SH3 module, is able to recognize and bind peptidoglycan. The LysM domain of Lm-p60 contains only 2 LysM modules, which is the minimum number of LysM modules in most NlpC/P60-containing proteins, but it shows strong affinity for peptidoglycan. Moreover, these 2 LysM modules have only 38.64% similarity to each other. These data allowed us to conclude that the 2 LysM modules from Lm-p60 have different evolutionary origins, suggesting that they are suitable candidate peptidoglycan-binding modules for protein engineering in order to create a protein with a high binding affinity to peptidoglycan. PMID:27333274

  20. Disarming Bacterial Virulence through Chemical Inhibition of the DNA Binding Domain of an AraC-like Transcriptional Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji; Hocking, Dianna M.; Cheng, Catherine; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Holien, Jessica K.; Parker, Michael W.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Tauschek, Marija; Robins-Browne, Roy M.

    2013-01-01

    The misuse of antibiotics during past decades has led to pervasive antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Hence, there is an urgent need for the development of new and alternative approaches to combat bacterial infections. In most bacterial pathogens the expression of virulence is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level. Therefore, targeting pathogens with drugs that interfere with virulence gene expression offers an effective alternative to conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Many Gram-negative intestinal pathogens produce AraC-like proteins that control the expression of genes required for infection. In this study we investigated the prototypical AraC-like virulence regulator, RegA, from the mouse attaching and effacing pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium, as a potential drug target. By screening a small molecule chemical library and chemical optimization, we identified two compounds that specifically inhibited the ability of RegA to activate its target promoters and thus reduced expression of a number of proteins required for virulence. Biophysical, biochemical, genetic, and computational analyses indicated that the more potent of these two compounds, which we named regacin, disrupts the DNA binding capacity of RegA by interacting with amino acid residues within a conserved region of the DNA binding domain. Oral administration of regacin to mice, commencing 15 min before or 12 h after oral inoculation with C. rodentium, caused highly significant attenuation of intestinal colonization by the mouse pathogen comparable to that of an isogenic regA-deletion mutant. These findings demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the DNA binding domains of transcriptional regulators is a viable strategy for the development of antimicrobial agents that target bacterial pathogens. PMID:24019519

  1. Dynamic localization and persistent stimulation of factor-dependent cells by a stem cell factor / cellulose binding domain fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Eric J; Guarna, M Marta; Doheny, J Greg; Haynes, Charles A; Kilburn, Douglas G

    2005-08-05

    The extracellular matrix provides structural components that support the development of tissue morphology and the distribution of growth factors that modulate the overall cellular response to those growth factors. The ability to manipulate the presentation of factors in culture systems should provide an additional degree of control in regulating the stimulation of factor-dependent cells for tissue engineering applications. Cellulose binding domain (CBD) fusion protein technology facilitates the binding of bioactive cytokines to cellulose materials, and has permitted the analysis of several aspects of cell stimulation by surface-localized growth factors. We previously reported the synthesis and initial characterization of a fusion protein comprised of a CBD and murine stem cell factor (SCF) (Doheny et al. [1999] Biochem J 339:429-434). A significant advantage of the CBD fusion protein system is that it permits the stimulation of factor-dependent cells with localized growth factor, essentially free of nonfactor-derived interactions between the cell and matrix. In this work, the long-term stability and bioactivity of SCF-CBD fusions adsorbed to microcrystalline cellulose under cell culture conditions is demonstrated. Cellulose-bound SCF-CBD is shown to stimulate receptor polarization in the cell membrane and adherence to the cellulose matrix. In addition, cellulose-surface presentation of the SCF-CBD attenuates c-kit dephosphorylation kinetics, potentially modulating the overall response of the cell to the SCF signal.

  2. serpentine and vermiform encode matrix proteins with chitin binding and deacetylation domains that limit tracheal tube length in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Luschnig, Stefan; Bätz, Tilmann; Armbruster, Kristina; Krasnow, Mark A

    2006-01-24

    Many organs contain epithelial tubes that transport gases or liquids . Proper tube size and shape is crucial for organ function, but the mechanisms controlling tube diameter and length are poorly understood. Recent studies of tracheal (respiratory) tube morphogenesis in Drosophila show that chitin synthesis genes produce an expanding chitin cylinder in the apical (luminal) extracellular matrix (ECM) that coordinates the dilation of the surrounding epithelium . Here, we describe two genes involved in chitin modification, serpentine (serp) and vermiform (verm), mutations in which cause excessively long and tortuous tracheal tubes. The genes encode similar proteins with an LDL-receptor ligand binding motif and chitin binding and deacetylation domains. Both proteins are expressed and secreted during tube expansion and localize throughout the lumen in a chitin-dependent manner. Unlike previously characterized chitin pathway genes, serp and verm are not required for chitin synthesis or secretion but rather for its normal fibrillar structure. The mutations also affect structural properties of another chitinous matrix, epidermal cuticle. Our work demonstrates that chitin and the matrix proteins Serp and Verm limit tube elongation, and it suggests that tube length is controlled independently of diameter by modulating physical properties of the chitin ECM, presumably by N-deacetylation of chitin and conversion to chitosan.

  3. Identification of a Region in the Stalk Domain of the Nipah Virus Receptor Binding Protein That Is Critical for Fusion Activation

    PubMed Central

    Talekar, Aparna; DeVito, Ilaria; Salah, Zuhair; Palmer, Samantha G.; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Rose, John K.; Xu, Rui; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the emerging lethal human Nipah virus (NiV) and the avian Newcastle disease virus (NDV), enter host cells through fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. For paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion is the result of the concerted action of two viral envelope glycoproteins: a receptor binding protein and a fusion protein (F). The NiV receptor binding protein (G) attaches to ephrin B2 or B3 on host cells, whereas the corresponding hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) attachment protein of NDV interacts with sialic acid moieties on target cells through two regions of its globular domain. Receptor-bound G or HN via its stalk domain triggers F to undergo the conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We show that chimeric proteins containing the NDV HN receptor binding regions and the NiV G stalk domain require a specific sequence at the connection between the head and the stalk to activate NiV F for fusion. Our findings are consistent with a general mechanism of paramyxovirus fusion activation in which the stalk domain of the receptor binding protein is responsible for F activation and a specific connecting region between the receptor binding globular head and the fusion-activating stalk domain is required for transmitting the fusion signal. PMID:23903846

  4. The recruitment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein into stress granules: new insights into the contribution of the different protein domains.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Martani, Francesca; Branduardi, Paola

    2017-09-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 is a modular protein composed of four RNA recognition motifs (RRM), a proline-rich domain (P) and a C-terminus. Thanks to this modularity, Pab1 is involved in different interactions that regulate many aspects of mRNA metabolism, including the assembly of stress granules. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of each domain for the recruitment of the protein within stress granules by comparing the intracellular distribution of synthetic Pab1-GFP variants, lacking one or more domains, with the localization of the endogenous mCherry-tagged Pab1. Glucose starvation and heat shock were used to trigger the formation of stress granules. We found that Pab1 association into these aggregates relies mainly on RRMs, whose number is important for an efficient recruitment of the protein. Interestingly, although the P and C domains do not directly participate in Pab1 association to stress granules, their presence strengthens or decreases, respectively, the distribution of synthetic Pab1 lacking at least one RRM into these aggregates. In addition to describing the contribution of domains in determining Pab1 association within stress granules, the outcomes of this study suggest the modularity of Pab1 as an attractive platform for synthetic biology approaches aimed at rewiring mRNA metabolism. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The coiled-coil and nucleotide binding domains of the Potato Rx disease resistance protein function in pathogen recognition and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rairdan, Gregory J; Collier, Sarah M; Sacco, Melanie A; Baldwin, Thomas T; Boettrich, Teresa; Moffett, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Plant genomes encode large numbers of nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins, some of which mediate the recognition of pathogen-encoded proteins. Following recognition, the initiation of a resistance response is thought to be mediated by the domains present at the N termini of NB-LRR proteins, either a Toll and Interleukin-1 Receptor or a coiled-coil (CC) domain. In order to understand the role of the CC domain in NB-LRR function, we have undertaken a systematic structure-function analysis of the CC domain of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) CC-NB-LRR protein Rx, which confers resistance to Potato virus X. We show that the highly conserved EDVID motif of the CC domain mediates an intramolecular interaction that is dependent on several domains within the rest of the Rx protein, including the NB and LRR domains. Other conserved and nonconserved regions of the CC domain mediate the interaction with the Ran GTPase-activating protein, RanGAP2, a protein required for Rx function. Furthermore, we show that the Rx NB domain is sufficient for inducing cell death typical of hypersensitive plant resistance responses. We describe a model of CC-NB-LRR function wherein the LRR and CC domains coregulate the signaling activity of the NB domain in a recognition-specific manner.

  6. The γ-secretase-generated intracellular domain of β-amyloid precursor protein binds Numb and inhibits Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Roberta; Šestan, Nenad; Scheinfeld, Meir H.; Berechid, Bridget E.; Lopez, Peter A.; Meucci, Olimpia; McGlade, Jane C.; Rakic, Pasko; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2002-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the Notch receptor undergo intramembranous proteolysis by the Presenilin-dependent γ-secretase. The cleavage of APP by γ-secretase releases amyloid-β peptides, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and the APP intracellular domain (AID), for which the function is not yet well understood. A similar γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the Notch receptor liberates the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). NICD translocates to the nucleus and activates the transcription of genes that regulate the generation, differentiation, and survival of neuronal cells. Hence, some of the effects of APP signaling and Alzheimer's disease pathology may be mediated by the interaction of APP and Notch. Here, we show that membrane-tethered APP binds to the cytosolic Notch inhibitors Numb and Numb-like in mouse brain lysates. AID also binds Numb and Numb-like, and represses Notch activity when released by APP. Thus, γ-secretase may have opposing effects on Notch signaling; positive by cleaving Notch and generating NICD, and negative by processing APP and generating AID, which inhibits the function of NICD. PMID:12011466

  7. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the β1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor–induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor. PMID:11807099

  8. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-21

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the beta1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor-induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor.

  9. [High-efficiency expression of a receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein in tobacco chloroplasts].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xue; Qi, Guangxun; Yang, Jing; Xing, Guojie; Liu, Jianfeng; Yang, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Chloroplast-based expression system is promising for the hyper-expression of plant-derived recombinant therapeutic proteins and vaccines. To verify the feasibility of obtaining high-level expression of the SARS subunit vaccine and to provide a suitable plant-derived vaccine production platform against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a 193-amino acid fragment of SARS CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), fused with the peptide vector cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), was expressed in tobacco chloroplasts. Codon-optimized CTB-RBD sequence was integrated into the chloroplast genome and homoplasmy was obtained, as confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Western blot showed expression of the recombinant fusion protein mostly in soluble monomeric form. Quantification of the recombinant fusion protein CTB-RBD was conducted by ELISA analysis from the transplastomic leaves at different developmental stages, attachment positions and time points in a day and the different expression levels of the CTB-RBD were observed with the highest expression of 10.2% total soluble protein obtained from mature transplastomic leaves. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of highly expressing SARS subunit vaccine RBD, indicating its potential in subsequent development of a plant-derived recombinant subunit vaccine and reagents production for antibody detection in SARS serological tests.

  10. Determination of floral organ identity by Arabidopsis MADS domain homeotic proteins AP1, AP3, PI, and AG is independent of their DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, J L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-01-01

    The MADS domain homeotic proteins APETALA1 (AP1), APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI), and AGAMOUS (AG) combinatorially specify the identity of Arabidopsis floral organs. AP1/AP1, AG/AG, and AP3/PI dimers bind to similar CArG box sequences; thus, differences in DNA-binding specificity among these proteins do not seem to be the origin of their distinct organ identity properties. To assess the overall contribution that specific DNA binding could make to their biological specificity, we have generated chimeric genes in which the amino-terminal half of the MADS domain of AP1, AP3, PI, and AG was substituted by the corresponding sequences of human SRF and MEF2A proteins. In vitro DNA-binding assays reveal that the chimeric proteins acquired the respective, and distinct, DNA-binding specificity of SRF or MEF2A. However, ectopic expression of the chimeric genes reproduces the dominant gain-of-function phenotypes exhibited by plants ectopically expressing the corresponding Arabidopsis wild-type genes. In addition, both the SRF and MEF2 chimeric genes can complement the pertinent ap1-1, ap3-3, pi-1, or ag-3 mutations to a degree similar to that of AP1, AP3, PI, and AG when expressed under the control of the same promoter. These results indicate that determination of floral organ identity by the MADS domain homeotic proteins AP1, AP3, PI, and AG is independent of their DNA-binding specificity. In addition, the DNA-binding experiments show that either one of the two MADS domains of a dimer can be sufficient to confer a particular DNA-binding specificity to the complex and that sequences outside the amino-terminal basic region of the MADS domain can, in some cases, contribute to the DNA-binding specificity of the proteins. Images PMID:9243505

  11. A single amino acid substitution (R441A) in the receptor-binding domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein disrupts the antigenic structure and binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    He Yuxian . E-mail: yhe@nybloodcenter.org; Li Jingjing; Jiang Shibo

    2006-05-26

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has two major functions: interacting with the receptor to mediate virus entry and inducing protective immunity. Coincidently, the receptor-binding domain (RBD, residues 318-510) of SAR-CoV S protein is a major antigenic site to induce neutralizing antibodies. Here, we used RBD-Fc, a fusion protein containing the RBD and human IgG1 Fc, as a model in the studies and found that a single amino acid substitution in the RBD (R441A) could abolish the immunogenicity of RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice and rabbits. With a panel of anti-RBD mAbs as probes, we observed that R441A substitution was able to disrupt the majority of neutralizing epitopes in the RBD, suggesting that this residue is critical for the antigenic structure responsible for inducing protective immune responses. We also demonstrated that the RBD-Fc bearing R441A mutation could not bind to soluble and cell-associated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor for SARS-CoV and failed to block S protein-mediated pseudovirus entry, indicating that this point mutation also disrupted the receptor-binding motif (RBM) in the RBD. Taken together, these data provide direct evidence to show that a single amino acid residue at key position in the RBD can determine the major function of SARS-CoV S protein and imply for designing SARS vaccines and therapeutics.

  12. NonO, a non-POU-domain-containing, octamer-binding protein, is the mammalian homolog of Drosophila nonAdiss.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Hanke, J H; Carayannopoulos, L; Craft, C M; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W

    1993-09-01

    We have cloned the ubiquitous form of an octamer-binding, 60-kDa protein (NonO) that appears to be the mammalian equivalent of the Drosophila visual and courtship song behavior protein, no-on-transient A/dissonance (nonAdiss). A region unprecedently rich in aromatic amino acids containing two ribonuclear protein binding motifs is highly conserved between the two proteins. A ubiquitous form of NonO is present in all adult tissues, whereas lymphocytes and retina express unique forms of NonO mRNA. The ubiquitous form contains a potential helix-turn-helix motif followed by a highly charged region but differs from prototypic octamer-binding factors by lacking the POU DNA-binding domain. In addition to its conventional octamer duplex-binding, NonO binds single-stranded DNA and RNA at a site independent of the duplex site.

  13. Genetic variability and natural selection at the ligand domain of the Duffy binding protein in brazilian Plasmodium vivax populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health challenge in Latin America, Asia and Oceania, with 130-435 million clinical cases per year worldwide. Invasion of host blood cells by P. vivax mainly depends on a type I membrane protein called Duffy binding protein (PvDBP). The erythrocyte-binding motif of PvDBP is a 170 amino-acid stretch located in its cysteine-rich region II (PvDBPII), which is the most variable segment of the protein. Methods To test whether diversifying natural selection has shaped the nucleotide diversity of PvDBPII in Brazilian populations, this region was sequenced in 122 isolates from six different geographic areas. A Bayesian method was applied to test for the action of natural selection under a population genetic model that incorporates recombination. The analysis was integrated with a structural model of PvDBPII, and T- and B-cell epitopes were localized on the 3-D structure. Results The results suggest that: (i) recombination plays an important role in determining the haplotype structure of PvDBPII, and (ii) PvDBPII appears to contain neutrally evolving codons as well as codons evolving under natural selection. Diversifying selection preferentially acts on sites identified as epitopes, particularly on amino acid residues 417, 419, and 424, which show strong linkage disequilibrium. Conclusions This study shows that some polymorphisms of PvDBPII are present near the erythrocyte-binding domain and might serve to elude antibodies that inhibit cell invasion. Therefore, these polymorphisms should be taken into account when designing vaccines aimed at eliciting antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion. PMID:21092207

  14. C-Terminal Region of MAP7 Domain Containing Protein 3 (MAP7D3) Promotes Microtubule Polymerization by Binding at the C-Terminal Tail of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Saroj; Verma, Paul J.; Panda, Dulal

    2014-01-01

    MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3), a newly identified microtubule associated protein, has been shown to promote microtubule assembly and stability. Its microtubule binding region has been reported to consist of two coiled coil motifs located at the N-terminus. It possesses a MAP7 domain near the C-terminus and belongs to the microtubule associated protein 7 (MAP7) family. The MAP7 domain of MAP7 protein has been shown to bind to kinesin-1; however, the role of MAP7 domain in MAP7D3 remains unknown. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of MAP7D3, we hypothesized that the MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 may have microtubule binding activity. Indeed, we found that MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 bound to microtubules as well as enhanced the assembly of microtubules in vitro. Interestingly, a longer fragment MDCT that contained the MAP7 domain (MD) with the C-terminal tail (CT) of the protein promoted microtubule polymerization to a greater extent than MD and CT individually. MDCT stabilized microtubules against dilution induced disassembly. MDCT bound to reconstituted microtubules with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.0±0.5 µM. An immunostaining experiment showed that MDCT localized along the length of the preassembled microtubules. Competition experiments with tau indicated that MDCT shares its binding site on microtubules with tau. Further, we present evidence indicating that MDCT binds to the C-terminal tail of tubulin. In addition, MDCT could bind to tubulin in HeLa cell extract. Here, we report a microtubule binding region in the C-terminal region of MAP7D3 that may have a role in regulating microtubule assembly dynamics. PMID:24927501

  15. A biomimetic Protein G affinity adsorbent: an Ugi ligand for immunoglobulins and Fab fragments based on the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Graziella; Lowe, Christopher R

    2013-04-01

    This work reports the development of a synthetic affinity adsorbent for immunoglobulins based on the Fab-binding domain of Streptococcal Protein G (SpG-domain III). The ligand (A2C7I1) was synthesized by the four-component Ugi reaction to generate a substituted peptoidal scaffold mimicking key amino acid residues of SpG. Computer-aided analysis suggests a putative binding site on the CH 1 domain of the Fab molecule. In silico studies, supported by affinity chromatography in comparison with immobilized SpG, as well as analytical characterization by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance of the ligand synthesized in solution, indicated the authenticity and suitability of the designed ligand for the purification of immunoglobulins. The immobilized ligand displayed an apparent static binding capacity of ~17 mg IgG ml(-1) and a dissociation constant of 5.34 × 10(-5)  M. Preparative chromatography demonstrated the ability of the immobilized ligand to purify IgG and Fab fragments from crude mammalian and yeast cell cultures, under near physiological ionic strength and pH, to yield proteins of 99% and 93% purity, respectively.

  16. [Cloning, expression and immunodiagnostic analysis of Schistosoma japonicum calcium-binding EF-hand domain containing protein].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Bin; Ju, Chuan; Mo, Xiao-Jin; Chen, Shen-Bo; Feng, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Hu, Wei

    2012-06-30

    To clone and expression Schistosoma japonicum calcium-binding EF-hand domain containing protein (SjEFCAB), purify the expressed protein, and evaluate its antigenicity and diagnostic value. The positive clone screened from egg cDNA library was used as template to amplify the SjEFCAB gene by PCR. The target fragment was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1. The positive recombinant plasmids were transformed into E.coli BL21 and induced by IPTG for expression of the protein. The recombinant protein was purified with GST-tag affinity chromatography. Western blotting was used to analyze the antigenicity. The purified protein was used as coating antigen for indirect ELISA to evaluate its diagnostic effect. Serum samples from patients with schistosomiasis japonica (78 cases), clonorchiasis sinensis (5 cases), cysticercosis (10 cases), paragonimiasis westermani (6 cases), trichinosis (9 cases) and healthy persons (50 cases) were examined. The recombinant plasmid pGEX-4T-1-SjEFCAB was constructed and the SjEFCAB recombinant protein (Mr 8 200) was expressed in E. coli. The soluble fusion protein was purified with affinity chromatography. Western blotting analysis showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by sera of infected rabbits and pooled sera of schistosomiasis japonica patients. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA for diagnosis of schistosomiasis japonica were 82.1% (64/78) and 95.0% (76/80), respectively. The cross reaction with sera of clonorchiasis sinensis, cysticercosis, and trichinosis patients were 1/5, 1/10, and 1/9, respectively. There was no cross reaction with sera of paragonimiasis westermani patients. The recombinant SjEFCAB antigen has potential diagnostic value for schistosomiasis japonica.

  17. Rifampicin-Independent Interactions between the Pregnane X Receptor Ligand Binding Domain and Peptide Fragments of Coactivator and Corepressor Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Punya; Steele, Bridgett L.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Thompson, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in a ligand-dependent manner. The conventional view of nuclear receptor action is that ligand binding enhances the receptor’s affinity for coactivator proteins, while decreasing its affinity for corepressors. To date, however, no known rigorous biophysical studies have been conducted to investigate the interaction among PXR, its coregulators, and ligands. In this work, steady-state total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and total internal reflection with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching were used to measure the thermodynamics and kinetics of the interaction between the PXR ligand binding domain and a peptide fragment of the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) in the presence and absence of the established PXR agonist, rifampicin. Equilibrium dissociation and dissociation rate constants of ~5 μM and ~2 s−1, respectively, were obtained in the presence and absence of rifampicin, indicating that the ligand does not enhance the affinity of the PXR and SRC-1 fragments. Additionally, TIRFM was used to examine the interaction between PXR and a peptide fragment of the corepressor protein, the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT). An equilibrium dissociation constant of ~70 μM was obtained for SMRT in the presence and absence of rifampicin. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of ligand-dependent activation in PXR differs significantly from that seen in many other nuclear receptors. PMID:22185585

  18. Analysis of chitin-binding proteins from Manduca sexta provides new insights into evolution of peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in insects.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Dittmer, Neal T; Cao, Xiaolong; Agrawal, Sinu; Chen, Yun-Ru; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Haobo, Jiang; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    In insects, chitin is a major structural component of the cuticle and the peritrophic membrane (PM). In nature, chitin is always associated with proteins among which chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) are the most important for forming, maintaining and regulating the functions of these extracellular structures. In this study, a genome-wide search for genes encoding proteins with ChtBD2-type (peritrophin A-type) chitin-binding domains (CBDs) was conducted. A total of 53 genes encoding 56 CBPs were identified, including 15 CPAP1s (cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophins with 1 CBD), 11 CPAP3s (CPAPs with 3 CBDs) and 17 PMPs (PM proteins) with a variable number of CBDs, which are structural components of cuticle or of the PM. CBDs were also identified in enzymes of chitin metabolism including 6 chitinases and 7 chitin deacetylases encoded by 6 and 5 genes, respectively. RNA-seq analysis confirmed that PMP and CPAP genes have differential spatial expression patterns. The expression of PMP genes is midgut-specific, while CPAP genes are widely expressed in different cuticle forming tissues. Phylogenetic analysis of CBDs of proteins in insects belonging to different orders revealed that CPAP1s from different species constitute a separate family with 16 different groups, including 6 new groups identified in this study. The CPAP3s are clustered into a separate family of 7 groups present in all insect orders. Altogether, they reveal that duplication events of CBDs in CPAP1s and CPAP3s occurred prior to the evolutionary radiation of insect species. In contrast to the CPAPs, all CBDs from individual PMPs are generally clustered and distinct from other PMPs in the same species in phylogenetic analyses, indicating that the duplication of CBDs in each of these PMPs occurred after divergence of insect species. Phylogenetic analysis of these three CBP families showed that the CBDs in CPAP1s form a clearly separate family, while those found in PMPs and CPAP3s were clustered

  19. Identification, activity, and structural studies of peptides incorporating the phorbol ester-binding domain of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Wender, P A; Irie, K; Miller, B L

    1995-01-01

    The family of homologous enzymes known as protein kinase C (PKC) has been the object of intense interest because of its crucial role in cellular signal transduction. Although considerable information about the activation of PKC has been gained through structure-activity, molecular modeling, and synthetic studies of both natural and designed activators, information about the structure of PKC itself has been limited by its large size and requirement for phospholipid cofactors. Additionally, difficulties in the purification of truncated mutants of PKC have thus far prevented their analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or x-ray crystallographic methods. We describe the identification, synthesis, ligand-binding analysis, cofactor requirements, and preliminary NMR evaluation of two subdomains (peptides B and C) of the regulatory domain of PKC-gamma. Peptides B and C bind [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate with good affinity (Kd = 6.4 microM and 414 nM, respectively) in the presence of phosphatidylserine. In comparison, the binding affinity of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate for PKC was found to be 2.6 nM. Like PKC itself, these peptides also recognize other PKC activators, including dioctanoylglycerol and teleocidin B-4, and exhibit an ability to differentiate phorbol ester from its C-4 epimer. NMR studies of PKC subdomains are also described, indicating that both peptides B and C are well behaved in solution and do not exhibit any concentration-dependent changes. Finally, these studies reveal that peptide B becomes conformationally ordered only in the presence of phospholipid, suggesting that the regulatory domain of PKC itself might be organized for activation only when associated with the lipid bilayer, where its activator (diacylglycerol) is encountered. PMID:7816824

  20. The dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein binds a capsid protein-derived peptide: A biophysical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, María T.; Lidón-Moya, María C.; Barrera, Francisco N.; Prieto, Alicia; Gómez, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G.; Neira, José L.

    2004-01-01

    The type 1 HIV presents a conical capsid formed by ~1500 units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimer-ization of CA via its C-terminal domain, CA-C, constitutes a key step in virion assembly. CA-C dimerization is largely mediated by reciprocal interactions between residues of its second α-helix. Here, we show that an N-terminal-acetylated and C-terminal–amidated peptide, CAC1, comprising the sequence of the CA-C dimerization helix plus three flanking residues at each side, is able to form a complex with the entire CA-C domain. Thermal denaturation measurements followed by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography provided evidence of the interaction between CAC1 and CA-C. The apparent dissociation constant of the heterocomplex formed by CA-C and CAC1 was determined by several biophysical techniques, namely, fluorescence (using an anthraniloyl-labeled peptide), affinity chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The three techniques yielded similar values for the apparent dissociation constant, in the order of 50 μM. This apparent dissociation constant was only five times higher than was the dissociation constant of both CA-C and the intact capsid protein homodimers (10 μM). PMID:15152086

  1. The dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein binds a capsid protein-derived peptide: a biophysical characterization.

    PubMed

    Garzón, María T; Lidón-Moya, María C; Barrera, Francisco N; Prieto, Alicia; Gómez, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G; Neira, José L

    2004-06-01

    The type 1 HIV presents a conical capsid formed by approximately 1500 units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimerization of CA via its C-terminal domain, CA-C, constitutes a key step in virion assembly. CA-C dimerization is largely mediated by reciprocal interactions between residues of its second alpha-helix. Here, we show that an N-terminal-acetylated and C-terminal-amidated peptide, CAC1, comprising the sequence of the CA-C dimerization helix plus three flanking residues at each side, is able to form a complex with the entire CA-C domain. Thermal denaturation measurements followed by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography provided evidence of the interaction between CAC1 and CA-C. The apparent dissociation constant of the heterocomplex formed by CA-C and CAC1 was determined by several biophysical techniques, namely, fluorescence (using an anthraniloyl-labeled peptide), affinity chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The three techniques yielded similar values for the apparent dissociation constant, in the order of 50 microM. This apparent dissociation constant was only five times higher than was the dissociation constant of both CA-C and the intact capsid protein homodimers (10 microM).

  2. Roadmap to developing a recombinant coronavirus S protein receptor-binding domain vaccine for severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Curti, Elena; Jones, Kathryn; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    A subunit vaccine, RBD-S, is under development to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which is classified by the US NIH as a category C pathogen. This vaccine is comprised of a recombinant receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein and formulated on alum, together with a synthetic glucopyranosyl lipid A. The vaccine would induce neutralizing antibodies without causing Th2-type immunopathology. Vaccine development is being led by the nonprofit product development partnership; Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with two academic partners (the New York Blood Center and University of Texas Medical Branch); an industrial partner (Immune Design Corporation); and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. A roadmap for the product development of the RBD-S SARS vaccine is outlined with a goal to manufacture the vaccine for clinical testing within the next 5 years.

  3. Structure-function analysis of the heat shock factor-binding protein reveals a protein composed solely of a highly conserved and dynamic coiled-coil trimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Tai, Li-Jung; McFall, Sally M; Huang, Kai; Demeler, Borries; Fox, Sue G; Brubaker, Kurt; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Morimoto, Richard I

    2002-01-04

    Heat shock factor-binding protein (HSBP) 1 is a small, evolutionarily conserved protein originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using the trimerization domain of heat shock factor (HSF) 1 as the bait. Similar in size to HSF1 trimerization domain, human HSBP1 contains two arrays of hydrophobic heptad repeats (designated HR-N and HR-C) characteristic of coiled-coil proteins. Proteins of the HSBP family are relatively small (<100 residues), comprising solely a putative coiled-coil oligomerization domain without any other readily recognizable structural or functional motif. Our biophysical and biochemical characterization of human HSBP1 reveals a cooperatively folded protein with high alpha-helical content and moderate stability. NMR analyses reveal a single continuous helix encompassing both HR-N and HR-C in the highly conserved central region, whereas the less conserved carboxyl terminus is unstructured and accessible to proteases. Unlike previously characterized coiled-coils, backbone 15N relaxation measurements implicate motional processes on the millisecond time scale in the coiled-coil region. Analytical ultracentrifugation and native PAGE studies indicate that HSBP1 is predominantly trimeric over a wide concentration range. NMR analyses suggest a rotationally symmetric trimer. Because the highly conserved hydrophobic heptad repeats extend over 60% of HSBP1, we propose that HSBP most likely regulates the function of other proteins through coiled-coil interactions.

  4. Dimerization of cGMP-dependent protein kinase 1alpha and the myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase: role of leucine zipper domains.

    PubMed

    Surks, Howard K; Mendelsohn, Michael E

    2003-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrovasodilators induce vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation in part by cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-mediated activation of myosin phosphatase, which dephosphorylates myosin light chains. We recently found that cGMP-dependent protein kinase 1alpha binds directly to the myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase via the leucine/isoleucine zipper of cGK. We have now studied the role of the leucine zipper domain of MBS in dimerization with cGK and the leucine/isoleucine zipper and leucine zipper domains of both proteins in homodimerization. Mutagenesis of the MBS leucine zipper domain disrupts cGKIalpha-MBS dimerization. Mutagenesis of the MBS leucine zipper eliminates MBS homodimerization, while similar disruption of the cGKIalpha leucine/isoleucine zipper does not prevent formation of cGK dimers. The MBS leucine zipper domain is phosphorylated by cGK, but this does not have any apparent effect on heterodimer formation between the two proteins. MBS LZ mutants that are unable to bind cGK were poor substrates for cGK. These data support the theory that the MBS leucine zipper domain is necessary and sufficient to mediate both MBS homodimerization and binding of the protein to cGK. In contrast, the leucine/isoleucine zipper of cGK is required for binding to MBS, but not for cGK homodimerization. These data support that the MBS and cGK leucine zipper domains mediate the interaction between these two proteins. The contribution of these domains to both homodimerization and their specific interaction with each other suggest that additional regulatory mechanisms involving these domains may exist.

  5. The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and Pleckstrin (DEP) Domain-Containing Protein DEPDC7 Binds to CARMA2 and CARMA3 Proteins, and Regulates NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Reale, Carla; Pizzulo, Maddalena; De La Motte, Luigi Regenburgh; De Maio, Chiara; Mazzone, Pellegrino; Telesio, Gianluca; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2014-01-01

    The molecular complexes containing BCL10, MALT1 and CARMA proteins (CBM complex) have been recently identified as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-κB) transcription factor. Herein we identified the DEP domain-containing protein DEPDC7 as cellular binding partners of CARMA2 and CARMA3 proteins. DEPDC7 displays a cytosolic distribution and its expression induces NF-κB activation. Conversely, shRNA-mediated abrogation of DEPDC7 results in impaired NF-κB activation following G protein-coupled receptors stimulation, or stimuli that require CARMA2 and CARMA3, but not CARMA1. Thus, this study identifies DEPDC7 as a CARMA interacting molecule, and provides evidence that DEPDC7 may be required to specifically convey on the CBM complex signals coming from activated G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25541973

  6. The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain-containing protein DEPDC7 binds to CARMA2 and CARMA3 proteins, and regulates NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Egildo Luca; Ferravante, Angela; Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Reale, Carla; Pizzulo, Maddalena; De La Motte, Luigi Regenburgh; De Maio, Chiara; Mazzone, Pellegrino; Telesio, Gianluca; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2014-01-01

    The molecular complexes containing BCL10, MALT1 and CARMA proteins (CBM complex) have been recently identified as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-κB) transcription factor. Herein we identified the DEP domain-containing protein DEPDC7 as cellular binding partners of CARMA2 and CARMA3 proteins. DEPDC7 displays a cytosolic distribution and its expression induces NF-κB activation. Conversely, shRNA-mediated abrogation of DEPDC7 results in impaired NF-κB activation following G protein-coupled receptors stimulation, or stimuli that require CARMA2 and CARMA3, but not CARMA1. Thus, this study identifies DEPDC7 as a CARMA interacting molecule, and provides evidence that DEPDC7 may be required to specifically convey on the CBM complex signals coming from activated G protein-coupled receptors.

  7. Metal and DNA binding properties of a two-domain fragment of neural zinc finger factor 1, a CCHC-type zinc binding protein.

    PubMed

    Berkovits, H J; Berg, J M

    1999-12-21

    Neural zinc finger factor 1 (NZF-1) is a member of a family of neural-specific transcription factors that contain multiple copies of a relatively uncharacterized zinc binding motif. We have studied the metal binding and DNA binding properties of a fragment of NZF-1 containing two adjacent zinc binding domains. Partial proteolysis with endoproteinase Lys-C identified metal-stabilized fragments containing either one or both of the zinc binding domains. Both domains were required for specific DNA binding to the beta-retinoic acid receptor element, producing a DNase I footprint covering predominantly one strand. The metal binding site was probed via cobalt(II) substitution. The visible absorption spectrum of the cobalt(II) complex is consistent with Cys-Cys-His-Cys coordination of the metal. The two domains appear to have similar affinities for metal and bind cobalt(II) and zinc(II) with dissociation constants of 4 (+/- 2) x 10(-)(7) M and 1.4 (+/- 0.8) x 10(-)(10) M, respectively. The domains fold upon the addition of zinc, as observed by (1)H NMR. However, an additional weak binding site causes line broadening in the presence of excess zinc, presumably due to aggregation.

  8. [Prospects of application of the chitin-binding domains to isolation and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography: a review].

    PubMed

    Kurek, D V; Lopatin, S A; Varlamov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Properties of substrate-binding domains, some parameters of affinity sorbents, and a number of other special features that were necessary to take into account during creation of chromatographic system for isolation and purification of proteins with incorporated chitin-binding domain were discussed in this review. This method was shown to be successfully used along with metal-chelate affinity chromatography. The metal-chelate affinity chromatography with the use of polyhistidine peptides as affinity labels is successfully applied to isolation, purification, and investigation of recombinant proteins. However, this system had some disadvantages. At present, scientists attracted more and more attention to substrate-binding domains, including those chitin-binding, because they had a number of advantages being used as affinity label.

  9. Role of Nucleotide Binding and GTPase Domain Dimerization in Dynamin-like Myxovirus Resistance Protein A for GTPase Activation and Antiviral Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  10. The structural basis for biphasic kinetics in the folding of the WW domain from a formin-binding protein: Lessons for protein design?

    PubMed Central

    Karanicolas, John; Brooks, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of β-sheets is of great importance because of the significant role of such structures in the initiation and propagation of amyloid diseases. In this study we examine the folding of a series of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets known as WW domains. Whereas other WW domains have been shown to fold with single-exponential kinetics, the WW domain from murine formin-binding protein 28 has recently been shown to fold with biphasic kinetics. By using a combination of kinetics and thermodynamics to characterize a simple model for this protein, the origins of the biphasic kinetics is found to lie in the fact that most of the protein is able to fold without requiring one of the β-hairpins to be correctly registered. The correct register of this hairpin is enforced by a surface-exposed hydrophobic contact, which is not present in other WW domains. This finding suggests the use of judiciously chosen surface-exposed hydrophobic pairs as a protein design strategy for enforcing the desired strand registry. PMID:12655041

  11. Identification and characterization of domains responsible for self-assembly and cell wall binding of the surface layer protein of Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 8287

    PubMed Central

    Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Hynönen, Ulla; Ilk, Nicola; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Palva, Airi

    2008-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 8287 is covered by a regular surface (S-) layer consisting of a 435 amino acid protein SlpA. This protein is completely unrelated in sequence to the previously characterized S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus acidophilus group. Results In this work, the self-assembly and cell wall binding domains of SlpA were characterized. The C-terminal self-assembly domain encompassed residues 179–435 of mature SlpA, as demonstrated by the ability of N-terminally truncated recombinant SlpA to form a periodic structure indistinguishable from that formed by full length SlpA. Furthermore, a trypsin degradation analysis indicated the existence of a protease resistant C-terminal domain of 214 amino acids. By producing a set of C-terminally truncated recombinant SlpA (rSlpA) proteins the cell wall binding region was mapped to the N-terminal part of SlpA, where the first 145 amino acids of mature SlpA alone were sufficient for binding to isolated cell wall fragments of L. brevis ATCC 8287. The binding of full length rSlpA to the cell walls was not affected by the treatment of the walls with 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA), indicating that cell wall structures other than teichoic acids are involved, a feature not shared by the Lactobacillus acidophilus group S-layer proteins characterized so far. Conserved carbohydrate binding motifs were identified in the positively charged N-terminal regions of six Lactobacillus brevis S-layer proteins. Conclusion This study identifies SlpA as a two-domain protein in which the order of the functional domains is reversed compared to other characterized Lactobacillus S-layer proteins, and emphasizes the diversity of potential cell wall receptors despite similar carbohydrate binding sequence motifs in Lactobacillus S-layer proteins. PMID:18828902

  12. High-Affinity Binding of the Staphylococcal HarA Protein to Haptoglobin and Hemoglobin Involves a Domain with an Antiparallel Eight-Stranded β-Barrel Fold▿

    PubMed Central

    Dryla, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Bernd; Gelbmann, Dieter; Giefing, Carmen; Hanner, Markus; Meinke, Andreas; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Koppensteiner, Walter; Konrat, Robert; von Gabain, Alexander; Nagy, Eszter

    2007-01-01

    Iron scavenging from the host is essential for the growth of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we further characterized two staphylococcal cell wall proteins previously shown to bind hemoproteins. HarA and IsdB harbor homologous ligand binding domains, the so called NEAT domain (for “near transporter”) present in several surface proteins of gram-positive pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance measurements using glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged HarAD1, one of the ligand binding domains of HarA, and GST-tagged full-length IsdB proteins confirmed high-affinity binding to hemoglobin and haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of 5 to 50 nM. Haptoglobin binding could be detected only with HarA and was in the low micromolar range. In order to determine the fold of this evolutionarily conserved ligand binding domain, the untagged HarAD1 protein was subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which revealed an eight-stranded, purely antiparallel β-barrel with the strand order (-β1↓-β2↑-β3↓-β6↑-β5↓-β4↑-β7↓-β8↑), forming two Greek key motifs. Based on structural-homology searches, the topology of the HarAD1 domain resembles that of the immunoglobulin (Ig) fold family, whose members are involved in protein-protein interactions, but with distinct structural features. Therefore, we consider that the HarAD1/NEAT domain fold is a novel variant of the Ig fold that has not yet been observed in other proteins. PMID:17041047

  13. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway.

  14. The zinc fingers of the SR-like protein ZRANB2 are single-stranded RNA-binding domains that recognize 5′ splice site-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mansfield, Robyn E.; Vaz, Paula M.; McGrath, Aaron P.; Setiyaputra, Surya; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Chen, Eva S.; Morris, Brian J.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-09-02

    The alternative splicing of mRNA is a critical process in higher eukaryotes that generates substantial proteomic diversity. Many of the proteins that are essential to this process contain arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. ZRANB2 is a widely-expressed and highly-conserved RS-domain protein that can regulate alternative splicing but lacks canonical RNA-binding domains. Instead, it contains 2 RanBP2-type zinc finger (ZnF) domains. We demonstrate that these ZnFs recognize ssRNA with high affinity and specificity. Each ZnF binds to a single AGGUAA motif and the 2 domains combine to recognize AGGUAA(N{sub x})AGGUAA double sites, suggesting that ZRANB2 regulates alternative splicing via a direct interaction with pre-mRNA at sites that resemble the consensus 5{prime} splice site. We show using X-ray crystallography that recognition of an AGGUAA motif by a single ZnF is dominated by side-chain hydrogen bonds to the bases and formation of a guanine-tryptophan-guanine 'ladder.' A number of other human proteins that function in RNA processing also contain RanBP2 ZnFs in which the RNA-binding residues of ZRANB2 are conserved. The ZnFs of ZRANB2 therefore define another class of RNA-binding domain, advancing our understanding of RNA recognition and emphasizing the versatility of ZnF domains in molecular recognition.

  15. FhCaBP2: a Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2015-09-01

    FhCaBP2 is a Fasciola hepatica protein which belongs to a family of helminth calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain containing two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal dynein light chain-like (DLC-like) domain. Its predicted structure showed two globular domains joined by a flexible linker. Recombinant FhCaBP2 interacted reversibly with calcium and manganese ions, but not with magnesium, barium, strontium, copper (II), colbalt (II), iron (II), nickel, lead or potassium ions. Cadmium (II) ions appeared to bind non-site-specifically and destabilize the protein. Interaction with either calcium or magnesium ions results in a conformational change in which the protein's surface becomes more hydrophobic. The EF-hand domain alone was able to interact with calcium and manganese ions; the DLC-like domain was not. Alteration of a residue (Asp-58 to Ala) in the second EF-hand motif in this domain abolished ion-binding activity. This suggests that the second EF-hand is the one responsible for ion-binding. FhCaBP2 homodimerizes and the extent of dimerization was not affected by calcium ions or by the aspartate to alanine substitution in the second EF-hand. The isolated EF-hand and DLC-like domains are both capable of homodimerization. FhCaBP2 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, thiamylal and W7. Interestingly, while chlorpromazine and thiamylal interacted with the EF-hand domain (as expected), trifluoperazine and W7 bound to the DLC-like domain. Overall, FhCaBP2 has distinct biochemical properties compared with other members of this protein family from Fasciola hepatica, a fact which supports the hypothesis that these proteins have different physiological roles.

  16. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  17. Copper-transfer mechanism from the human chaperone Atox1 to a metal-binding domain of Wilson disease protein.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Crespo, Alejandro; Estrin, Dario A; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2010-03-18

    The molecular details of how copper (Cu) is transferred from the human Cu chaperone Atox1 to metal-binding domains (MBDs) of P(1B)-type ATPases are still unclear. Here, we use a computational approach, employing quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, to shed light on the reaction mechanism [probable intermediates, Cu(I) coordination geometries, activation barriers, and energetics] of Cu(I) transfer from Atox1 to the fourth MBD of Wilson disease protein (WD4). Both Atox1 and WD4 have solvent-exposed metal-binding motifs with two Cys residues that coordinate Cu(I). After assessing the existence of all possible 2-, 3- and 4-coordinate Cu-intermediate species, one dominant reaction path emerged. First, without activation barrier, WD4's Cys1 binds Cu(I) in Atox1 to form a 3-coordinated intermediate. Next, with an activation barrier of about 9.5 kcal/mol, a second 3-coordinated intermediate forms that involves both of the Cys residues in WD4 and Cys1 of Atox1. This species can then form the product by decoordination of Atox1's Cys1 (barrier of about 8 kcal/mol). Overall, the Cu-transfer reaction from Atox1 to WD4 appears to be kinetically accessible but less energetically favorable (DeltaE = 7.7 kcal/mol). Our results provide unique insights into the molecular mechanism of protein-mediated Cu(I) transfer in the secretory pathway and are in agreement with existing experimental data.

  18. The RNA-binding domain of influenzavirus non-structural protein-1 cooperatively binds to virus-specific RNA sequences in a structure-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Daniel; Barbachou, Sosthène; Soubieux, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Influenzavirus non-structural protein NS1 is involved in several steps of the virus replication cycle. It counteracts the interferon response, and also exhibits other activities towards viral and cellular RNAs. NS1 is known to bind non-specifically to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as well as to viral and cellular RNAs. We set out to search whether NS1 could preferentially bind sequence-specific RNA patterns, and performed an in vitro selection (SELEX) to isolate NS1-specific aptamers from a pool of 80-nucleotide(nt)-long RNAs. Among the 63 aptamers characterized, two families were found to harbour a sequence that is strictly conserved at the 5′ terminus of all positive-strand RNAs of influenzaviruses A. We found a second virus-specific motif, a 9 nucleotide sequence located 15 nucleotides downstream from NS1’s stop codon. In addition, a majority of aptamers had one or two symmetrically positioned copies of the 5′-GUAAC / 3′-CUUAG double-stranded motif, which closely resembles the canonical 5′-splice site. Through an in-depth analysis of the interaction combining fluorimetry and gel-shift assays, we showed that NS1’s RNA-binding domain (RBD) specifically recognizes sequence patterns in a structure-dependent manner, resulting in an intimate interaction with high affinity (low nanomolar to subnanomolar KD values) that leads to oligomerization of the RBD on its RNA ligands. PMID:23093596

  19. Localization of the Domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi Trimeric Autotransporter DsrA Involved in Serum Resistance and Binding to the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Fibronectin and Vitronectin▿

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi. PMID:19015257

  20. Localization of the domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter DsrA involved in serum resistance and binding to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi.

  1. Monophyly of class I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, USPA, ETFP, photolyase, and PP-ATPase nucleotide-binding domains: implications for protein evolution in the RNA.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Anantharaman, Vivek; Koonin, Eugene V

    2002-07-01

    Protein sequence and structure comparisons show that the catalytic domains of Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, a related family of nucleotidyltransferases involved primarily in coenzyme biosynthesis, nucleotide-binding domains related to the UspA protein (USPA domains), photolyases, electron transport flavoproteins, and PP-loop-containing ATPases together comprise a distinct class of alpha/beta domains designated the HUP domain after HIGH-signature proteins, UspA, and PP-ATPase. Several lines of evidence are presented to support the monophyly of the HUP domains, to the exclusion of other three-layered alpha/beta folds with the generic "Rossmann-like" topology. Cladistic analysis, with patterns of structural and sequence similarity used as discrete characters, identified three major evolutionary lineages within the HUP domain class: the PP-ATPases; the HIGH superfamily, which includes class I aaRS and related nucleotidyltransferases containing the HIGH signature in their nucleotide-binding loop; and a previously unrecognized USPA-like group, which includes USPA domains, electron transport flavoproteins, and photolyases. Examination of the patterns of phyletic distribution of distinct families within these three major lineages suggests that the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all modern life forms encoded 15-18 distinct alpha/beta ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins of the HUP class. This points to an extensive radiation of HUP domains before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA), during which the multiple class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases emerged only at a late stage. Thus, substantial evolutionary diversification of protein domains occurred well before the modern version of the protein-dependent translation machinery was established, i.e., still in the RNA world.

  2. IN VITRO EVOLUTION OF AN HIV INTEGRASE BINDING PROTEIN FROM A LIBRARY OF C-TERMINAL DOMAIN γS-CRYSTALLIN VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Issa S.; Verde, Shawn C.; Overstreet, Cathie M.; Robinson, W. Edward; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    A protein without natural binding functions was engineered to bind HIV-1 integrase. Phage display selections applied a library of variants based on the C-terminal domain of the eye lens protein human γS-crystallin. Multiple loop regions were altered to encode libraries with ≈3.6×1011 different variants. A crystallin variant, termed Integrase-Binding Protein-10 (IBP-10), inhibits integrase catalysis with nanomolar Ki values. IBP-10 interacts with the integrase C-terminal domain and inhibits integrase substrate affinity. This allosteric mechanism allows IBP-10 to inhibit drug resistant integrase variants. The results demonstrate the applicability of the crystallin scaffold for the discovery of binding partners and enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22858140

  3. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  4. The C-terminal Domain Supports a Novel Function for CETPI as a New Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    García-González, Victor; Gutiérrez-Quintanar, Nadia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2015-11-05

    Described by our group a few years ago, the cholesteryl-ester transfer protein isoform (CETPI), exclusively expressed in the small intestine and present in human plasma, lacked a functional identification for a role of physiological relevance. Now, this study introduces CETPI as a new protein with the potential capability to recognise, bind and neutralise lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of CETPI showed that CETPI not only might interact with several LPS serotypes but also might displace LPS bound to the surface of cells. Peptide VSAK, derived from the last 18 residues of CETPI, protected against the cytotoxic effect of LPS on macrophages. At high concentrations, when different cell types were tested in culture, it did not exhibit cytotoxicity by itself and it did prevent the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the generation of oxidative stress conditions. In a rabbit model of septic shock, the infusion of peptide VSAK exerted a protective effect against the effects of LPS and reduced the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) in plasma. Therefore, CETPI is proposed as a new protein with the capability to advance the possibilities for better understanding and treatment of the dangerous effects of LPS in vivo.

  5. The C-terminal Domain Supports a Novel Function for CETPI as a New Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Victor; Gutiérrez-Quintanar, Nadia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Described by our group a few years ago, the cholesteryl-ester transfer protein isoform (CETPI), exclusively expressed in the small intestine and present in human plasma, lacked a functional identification for a role of physiological relevance. Now, this study introduces CETPI as a new protein with the potential capability to recognise, bind and neutralise lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of CETPI showed that CETPI not only might interact with several LPS serotypes but also might displace LPS bound to the surface of cells. Peptide VSAK, derived from the last 18 residues of CETPI, protected against the cytotoxic effect of LPS on macrophages. At high concentrations, when different cell types were tested in culture, it did not exhibit cytotoxicity by itself and it did prevent the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the generation of oxidative stress conditions. In a rabbit model of septic shock, the infusion of peptide VSAK exerted a protective effect against the effects of LPS and reduced the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) in plasma. Therefore, CETPI is proposed as a new protein with the capability to advance the possibilities for better understanding and treatment of the dangerous effects of LPS in vivo. PMID:26537318

  6. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain.

    PubMed

    González-Jamett, Arlek M; Guerra, María J; Olivares, María J; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca(2+) signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca(2+)-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca(2+)-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

  7. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain

    PubMed Central

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Guerra, María J.; Olivares, María J.; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca2+ signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca2+-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca2+-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. PMID:28522963

  8. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  9. The rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor domain of obscurin regulates assembly of titin at the Z-disk through interactions with Ran binding protein 9.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amber L; Catino, Dawn H; Strong, John C; Randall, William R; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini; Bloch, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Obscurin is an approximately 800-kDa protein composed of structural and signaling domains that organizes contractile structures in striated muscle. We have studied the Rho-GEF domain of obscurin to understand its roles in morphogenesis and signaling. We used adenoviral overexpression of this domain, together with ultrastructural and immunofluorescence methods, to examine its effect on maturing myofibrils. We report that overexpression of the Rho-GEF domain specifically inhibits the incorporation of titin into developing Z-disks and disrupts the structure of the Z-disk and Z/I junction, and alters features of the A/I junction. The organization of other sarcomeric markers, including alpha-actinin, was not affected. We identified Ran binding protein 9 (RanBP9) as a novel ligand of the Rho-GEF domain and showed that binding is specific, with an apparent binding affinity of 1.9 microM. Overexpression of the binding region of RanBP9 also disrupted the incorporation of titin into developing Z-disks. Immunofluorescence localization during myofibrillogenesis indicated that the Rho-GEF domain assembles into sarcomeres before RanBP9, which first occurs in myonuclei and later in development translocates to the myoplasm, where it colocalizes with obscurin. Both the Rho-GEF domain and its binding region on RanBP9 bind directly to the N-terminal Ig domains of titin, which flank the Z-disk. Our results suggest that the Rho-GEF domain interacts with RanBP9 and that both can interact with the N-terminal region of titin to influence the formation of the Z-disk and A/I junction.

  10. Solution structure of tandem SH2 domains from Spt6 protein and their binding to the phosphorylated RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Jiahai; Gong, Qingguo; Xiong, Peng; Huang, Hongda; Wu, Bo; Lu, Guowei; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2011-08-19

    Spt6 is a highly conserved transcription elongation factor and histone chaperone. It binds directly to the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (RNAPII CTD) through its C-terminal region that recognizes RNAPII CTD phosphorylation. In this study, we determined the solution structure of the C-terminal region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spt6, and we discovered that Spt6 has two SH2 domains in tandem. Structural and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the second SH2 domain was evolutionarily distant from canonical SH2 domains and represented a novel SH2 subfamily with a novel binding site for phosphoserine. In addition, NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments demonstrated that the tandem SH2 domains recognized Tyr(1), Ser(2), Ser(5), and Ser(7) phosphorylation of RNAPII CTD with millimolar binding affinities. The structural basis for the binding of the tandem SH2 domains to different forms of phosphorylated RNAPII CTD and its physiological relevance are discussed. Our results also suggest that Spt6 may use the tandem SH2 domain module to sense the phosphorylation level of RNAPII CTD.

  11. Non-POU Domain-Containing Octamer-Binding Protein Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Infection in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    St Gelais, Corine; Roger, Jonathan; Wu, Li

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 interacts with numerous cellular proteins during viral replication. Identifying such host proteins and characterizing their roles in HIV-1 infection can deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between host and pathogen. We previously identified non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NonO or p54nrb) as one of host factors associated with catalytically active preintegration complexes (PIC) of HIV-1 in infected CD4(+) T cells. NonO is involved in nuclear processes including transcriptional regulation and RNA splicing. Although NonO has been identified as an HIV-1 interactant in several recent studies, its role in HIV-1 replication has not been characterized. We investigated the effect of NonO on the HIV-1 life cycle in CD4(+) T cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells using single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection assays. We observed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated stable NonO knockdown in a CD4(+) Jurkat T cell line and primary CD4(+) T cells did not affect cell viability or proliferation, but enhanced HIV-1 infection. The enhancement of HIV-1 infection in Jurkat T cells correlated with increased viral reverse transcription and gene expression. Knockdown of NonO expression in Jurkat T cells modestly enhanced HIV-1 gag mRNA expression and Gag protein synthesis, suggesting that viral gene expression and RNA regulation are the predominantly affected events causing enhanced HIV-1 replication in NonO knockdown (KD) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NonO in Jurkat T cells reduced HIV-1 single-cycle infection by 41% compared to control cells. Our data suggest that NonO negatively regulates HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, albeit it has modest effects on early and late stages of the viral life cycle, highlighting the importance of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PIC in regulating viral replication.

  12. Three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction and function analysis of the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from Bacillus thuringiensis HD73.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yiling; Guo, Shuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is capable of producing a chitin-binding protein believed to be functionally important to bacteria during the stationary phase of its growth cycle. In this paper, the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from B. thuringiensis has been analyzed by computer technology. Primary and secondary structural analyses demonstrated that HD73_3189 is negatively charged and contains several α-helices, aperiodical coils and β-strands. Domain and motif analyses revealed that HD73_3189 contains a signal peptide, an N-terminal chitin binding 3 domains, two copies of a fibronectin-like domain 3 and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding domain classified as CBM_5_12. Moreover, analysis predicted the protein's associated localization site to be the cell wall. Ligand site prediction determined that amino acid residues GLU-312, TRP-334, ILE-341 and VAL-382 exposed on the surface of the target protein exhibit polar interactions with the substrate.

  13. Production of recombinant PvDBPII, receptor binding domain of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein, and evaluation of immunogenicity to identify an adjuvant formulation for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Rukmini; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Hans, Dhiraj; Gupta, Pankaj; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Pandey, Gaurav; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2017-08-01

    Plasmodium vivax is dependent on interaction with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) for invasion of human erythrocytes. The P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) mediates interaction of P. vivax merozoites with DARC. The DARC receptor-binding domain lies in a conserved N-terminal cysteine-rich region of PvDBP referred to as region II (PvDBPII). PvDBPII is an attractive vaccine candidate since antibodies raised against PvDBPII block erythrocyte invasion by P. vivax. Here, we describe methods to produce recombinant PvDBPII in its correctly folded conformation. A synthetic gene optimized for expression of PvDBPII in Escherichia coli and fed batch fermentation process based on exponential feeding strategy was used to achieve high levels of expression of recombinant PvDBPII. Recombinant PvDBPII was isolated from inclusion bodies, refolded by rapid dilution and purified by ion exchange chromatography. Purified recombinant PvDBPII was characterized for identity, purity and functional activity using standardized release assays. Recombinant PvDBPII formulated with various human compatible adjuvants including glycosylpyranosyl lipid A-stable emulsion (GLA-SE) and alhydrogel was used for immunogenicity studies in small animals to downselect a suitable formulation for clinical development. Sera collected from immunized animals were tested for recognition of PvDBPII and inhibition of PvDBPII-DARC binding. GLA-SE formulations of PvDBPII yielded higher ELISA and binding inhibition titres compared to PvDBPII formulated with alhydrogel. These data support further development of a recombinant vaccine for P. vivax based on PvDBPII formulated with GLA-SE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The PASTA domain of penicillin-binding protein SpoVD is dispensable for endospore cortex peptidoglycan assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bukowska-Faniband, Ewa; Hederstedt, Lars

    2015-02-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major structural component of the bacterial cell wall. Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), located at the exterior of the cytoplasmic membrane, play a major role in peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. A PASTA domain (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase associated domain) of about 65 residues is found at the C-terminal end of some PBPs and eukaryotic-like protein serine/threonine kinases in a variety of bacteria. The function of PASTA domains is not understood, but some of them are thought to bind uncross linked peptidoglycan. Bacillus subtilis has 16 different PBPs, but only 2 of them, Pbp2b and SpoVD, contain a PASTA domain. SpoVD is specific for sporulation and essential for endospore cortex peptidoglycan synthesis. We have studied the role of the PASTA domain in SpoVD by deleting this domain and analysing the effects on endospore formation and subcellular localization of SpoVD. Our results demonstrate that the PASTA domain in SpoVD is not essential for cortex synthesis and not important for targeting SpoVD to the forespore outer membrane during sporulation.

  15. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the largest editosome interaction protein and its role in promoting RNA binding by RNA-editing ligase L2.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Jun; Budiarto, Tanya; Wu, Meiting; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-08-01

    Trypanosomatids, such as the sleeping sickness parasite Trypanosoma brucei, contain a ∼ 20S RNA-editing complex, also called the editosome, which is required for U-insertion/deletion editing of mitochondrial mRNAs. The editosome contains a core of 12 proteins including the large interaction protein A1, the small interaction protein A6, and the editing RNA ligase L2. Using biochemical and structural data, we identified distinct domains of T. brucei A1 which specifically recognize A6 and L2. We provide evidence that an N-terminal domain of A1 interacts with the C-terminal domain of L2. The C-terminal domain of A1 appears to be required for the interaction with A6 and also plays a key role in RNA binding by the RNA-editing ligase L2 in trans. Three crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of A1 have been elucidated, each in complex with a nanobody as a crystallization chaperone. These structures permitted the identification of putative dsRNA recognition sites. Mutational analysis of conserved residues of the C-terminal domain identified Arg703, Arg731 and Arg734 as key requirements for RNA binding. The data show that the editing RNA ligase activity is modulated by a novel mechanism, i.e. by the trans-acting RNA binding C-terminal domain of A1.

  16. The solution structure of the periplasmic domain of the TonB system ExbD protein reveals an unexpected structural homology with siderophore-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Peacock, R Sean; Howard, S Peter; Vogel, Hans J

    2007-11-01

    The transport of iron complexes through outer membrane transporters from Gram-negative bacteria is highly dependent on the TonB system. Together, the three components of the system, TonB, ExbB and ExbD, energize the transport of iron complexes through the outer membrane by utilizing the proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the periplasmic domain of TonB has previously been determined. However, no detailed structural information for the other two components of the TonB system is currently available and their role in the iron-uptake process is not yet clearly understood. ExbD from Escherichia coli contains 141 residues distributed in three domains: a small N-terminal cytoplasmic region, a single transmembrane helix and a C-terminal periplasmic domain. Here we describe the first well-defined solution structure of the periplasmic domain of ExbD (residues 44-141) solved by multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The monomeric structure presents three clearly distinct regions: an N-terminal flexible tail (residues 44-63), a well-defined folded region (residues 64-133) followed by a small C-terminal flexible region (residues 134-141). The folded region is formed by two alpha-helices that are located on one side of a single beta-sheet. The central beta-sheet is composed of five beta-strands, with a mixed parallel and antiparallel arrangement. Unexpectedly, this fold closely resembles that found in the C-terminal lobe of the siderophore-binding proteins FhuD and CeuE. The ExbD periplasmic domain has a strong tendency to aggregate in vitro and 3D-TROSY (transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy) NMR experiments of the deuterated protein indicate that the multimeric protein has nearly identical secondary structure to that of the monomeric form. Chemical shift perturbation studies suggest that the Glu-Pro region (residues 70-83) of TonB can bind weakly to the surface and the flexible C

  17. A model for regulation by SynGAP-α1 of binding of synaptic proteins to PDZ-domain 'Slots' in the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G; Mastro, Tara L; Schenker, Leslie T; Vielmetter, Jost; Hu, Rebecca; Iancu, Ariella; Reghunathan, Meera; Bannon, Barry Dylan; Kennedy, Mary B

    2016-01-01

    SynGAP is a Ras/Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that is a major constituent of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from mammalian forebrain. Its α1 isoform binds to all three PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domains of PSD-95, the principal PSD scaffold, and can occupy as many as 15% of these PDZ domains. We present evidence that synGAP-α1 regulates the composition of the PSD by restricting binding to the PDZ domains of PSD-95. We show that phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and Polo-like kinase-2 (PLK2) decreases its affinity for the PDZ domains by several fold, which would free PDZ domains for occupancy by other proteins. Finally, we show that three critical postsynaptic signaling proteins that bind to the PDZ domains of PSD-95 are present in higher concentration in PSDs isolated from mice with a heterozygous deletion of synGAP. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16813.001 PMID:27623146

  18. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  20. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Yoga, Yano M. K.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R.; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5′-CCCTCCCT-3′ DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5′-ACCCCA-3′ DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad. PMID:22344691

  1. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  2. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the winged helix domain of the meiotic recombination HOP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Moktan, Hem; Guiraldelli, Michel F; Eyster, Craig A; Zhao, Weixing; Lee, Chih-Ying; Mather, Timothy; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel; Sung, Patrick; Zhou, Donghua H; Pezza, Roberto J

    2014-05-23

    The HOP2 protein is required for efficient double-strand break repair which ensures the proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes and normal meiotic progression. We previously showed that in vitro HOP2 shows two distinctive activities: when it is incorporated into a HOP2-MND1 heterodimer, it stimulates DMC1 and RAD51 recombination activities, and the purified HOP2 alone is proficient in promoting strand invasion. The structural and biochemical basis of HOP2 action in recombination are poorly understood; therefore, they are the focus of this work. Herein, we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal portion of mouse HOP2, which contains a typical winged helix DNA-binding domain. Together with NMR spectral changes in the presence of double-stranded DNA, protein docking on DNA, and mutation analysis to identify the amino acids involved in DNA coordination, our results on the three-dimensional structure of HOP2 provide key information on the fundamental structural and biochemical requirements directing the interaction of HOP2 with DNA. These results, in combination with mutational experiments showing the role of a coiled-coil structural feature involved in HOP2 self-association, allow us to explain important aspects of the function of HOP2 in recombination.

  3. The Scw1 RNA-binding domain protein regulates septation and cell-wall structure in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim; Oulton, Rena; Young, Paul G

    2002-01-01

    Loss of the nonessential RNA-binding domain protein, Scw1, increases resistance to cell-wall-degrading enzymes in fission yeast. Surprisingly, scw1 null mutations also suppress the lethality of mutations (cdc11-136, cdc7-24, cdc14-118, sid1-239, sid2-250, sid3-106, sid4-A1, and mob1-1) at all levels of the sid pathway. This pathway forms part of the septation initiation network (SIN), which regulates the onset of septum formation and ensures the proper coupling of mitosis to cytokinesis. In contrast, scw1(-) mutations do not suppress ts alleles of the rng genes, cdc12 or cdc15. These mutations also prevent the formation of a septum and in addition block assembly and/or function of the contractile acto-myosin ring. sid mutants exhibit a hyper-sensitivity to cell-wall-degrading enzymes that is suppressed by loss of Scw1. Furthermore, scw1(-)-mediated rescue of sid mutants is abolished in the presence of calcofluor white, a compound that interferes with cell-wall synthesis. These data suggest that Scw1 acts in opposition to the SIN as a negative regulator of cell-wall/septum deposition. Unlike components of the SIN, Scw1 is predominantly a cytoplasmic protein and is not localized to the spindle pole body. PMID:12242222

  4. Breast Cancer Anti-estrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) Protein Augments Binding of the c-Src SH3 Domain to Crk-associated Substrate (p130cas)*

    PubMed Central

    Makkinje, Anthony; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Near, Richard I.; Patel, Prayag S.; Lerner, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The focal adhesion adapter protein p130cas regulates adhesion and growth factor-related signaling, in part through Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of p130cas. AND-34/BCAR3, one of three NSP family members, binds the p130cas carboxyl terminus, adjacent to a bipartite p130cas Src-binding domain (SBD) and induces anti-estrogen resistance in breast cancer cell lines as well as phosphorylation of p130cas. Only a subset of the signaling properties of BCAR3, specifically augmented motility, are dependent upon formation of the BCAR3-p130cas complex. Using GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation studies, we show that among NSP family members, only BCAR3 augments the ability of p130cas to bind the Src SH3 domain through an RPLPSPP motif in the p130cas SBD. Although our prior work identified phosphorylation of the serine within the p130cas RPLPSPP motif, mutation of this residue to alanine or glutamic acid did not alter BCAR3-induced Src SH3 domain binding to p130cas. The ability of BCAR3 to augment Src SH3 binding requires formation of a BCAR3-p130cas complex because mutations that reduce association between these two proteins block augmentation of Src SH3 domain binding. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, BCAR3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the p130cas substrate domain, previously shown to be Src-dependent, was reduced by an R743A mutation that blocks BCAR3 association with p130cas. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that BCAR3 expression alters the intracellular location of both p130cas and Src and that all three proteins co-localize. Our work suggests that BCAR3 expression may regulate Src signaling in a BCAR3-p130cas complex-dependent fashion by altering the ability of the Src SH3 domain to bind the p130cas SBD. PMID:22711540

  5. Resveratrol induces apoptosis by directly targeting Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1)

    PubMed Central

    Oi, Naomi; Yuan, Jian; Malakhova, Margarita; Luo, Kuntian; Li, Yunhui; Ryu, Joohyun; Zhang, Lei; Bode, Ann M.; Xu, Zengguang; Li, Yan; Lou, Zhenkun; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol possesses a strong anticancer activity exhibited as the induction of apoptosis through p53 activation. However, the molecular mechanism and direct target(s) of resveratrol-induced p53 activation remain elusive. Here, the Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) was identified as a potential target of resveratrol, and in vitro binding assay results using resveratrol (RSVL)-conjugated Sepharose 4B beads confirmed their direct binding. Depletion of G3BP1 significantly diminishes resveratrol-induced p53 expression and apoptosis. We also found that G3BP1 negatively regulates p53 expression by interacting with ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a deubiquitinating enzyme of p53. Disruption of the interaction of p53 with USP10 by G3BP1 interference leads to suppression of p53 deubiquitination. Resveratrol, on the other hand, directly binds to G3BP1 and prevents the G3BP1/USP10 interaction, resulting in enhanced USP10-mediated deubiquitination of p53 and consequently increased p53 expression. These findings disclose a novel mechanism of resveratrol-induced p53 activation and resveratrol-induced apoptosis by direct targeting of G3BP1. PMID:24998844

  6. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface.

    PubMed

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2015-08-07

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met(823) was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg(822). The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met(823) or Arg(822) was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg(822) and Met(823). © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Peshenko, Igor V.; Olshevskaya, Elena V.; Dizhoor, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met823 was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg822. The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met823 or Arg822 was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg822 and Met823. PMID:26100624

  8. Role of the nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanhui; Fei, Dongsheng; Chen, Mingwei; Sun, Miao; Xu, Jun; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Mingyan

    2015-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), which is associated with high mortality rates, involves renal inflammation related to the activation of innate immunity. The inflammatory response in AKI involves the inflammasome, which integrates danger signals into caspase-1-activating platforms, leading to the processing and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome plays a role in the development of many diseases, including AKI. However, the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome translates different danger signals into the expression of proinflammatory cytokines remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in renal injury in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis-induced AKI. CLP decreased blood pressure and increased serum creatinine levels and neutrophil infiltration into the kidney in parallel with the upregulation of NLRP3, the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, and caspase-1 expression and activity in kidney tissues, and increases in the serum and kidney levels of IL-1β and IL-18. Genetic deletion of NLRP3 reversed the CLP-induced reduction in blood pressure and increases in serum creatinine level and neutrophil infiltration, and attenuated the CLP-induced upregulation of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, caspase-1 expression and activity, and the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18, similarly to the effects of caspase-1 inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to the development of hypotension and the inflammatory response of AKI, suggesting its possible role as a therapeutic target for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  9. Evolutionary history exposes radical diversification among classes of interaction partners of the MLLE domain of plant poly(A)-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-López, Domingo; Bravo, Jaime; Guzmán, Plinio

    2015-09-16

    Poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that have important functions in the regulation of translation and the control of mRNA stability in eukaryotes. Most PABPs encode a C-terminal domain known as the MLLE domain (previously PABC or CTC), which can mediate protein interactions. In earlier work we identified and predicted that four classes of MLLE-interacting proteins were present in Arabidopsis thaliana, which we named CID A, B, C, and D. These proteins encode transcription-activating domains (CID A), the Lsm and LsmAD domains of ataxin-2 (CID B), the CUE and small MutS-related domains (CID C), and two RNA recognition domains (CID D). We recently found that a novel class that lacks the LsmAD domain is present in CID B proteins. We extended our analysis to other classes of CIDs present in the viridiplantae. We found that novel variants also evolved in classes CID A and CID C. A specific transcription factor domain is present in a distinct lineage in class A, and a variant that lacks at least two distinct domains was also identified in a divergent lineage in class C. We did not detect any variants in Class D CIDs. This class often consists of four to six highly conserved RNA-binding proteins, which suggests that major redundancy is present in this class. CIDs are likely to operate as components of posttranscriptional regulatory assemblies. The evident diversification of CIDs may be neutral or may be important for plant adaptation to the environment and for acquisition of specific traits during evolution. The fact that CIDs subclasses are maintained in early lineages suggest that a presumed interference between duplicates was resolved, and a defined function for each subclass was achieved.

  10. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  11. Structure of the apo form of the catabolite control protein A (CcpA) from Bacillus megaterium with a DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Palm, Gottfried J.; Panjikar, Santosh

    2007-04-01

    Crystal structure analysis of the apo form of catabolite control protein A reveals the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain. In the crystal packing, this domain interacts with the binding site for the corepressor protein. Crystal structure determination of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) at 2.6 Å resolution reveals for the first time the structure of a full-length apo-form LacI-GalR family repressor protein. In the crystal structures of these transcription regulators, the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain has only been observed in cognate DNA complexes; it has not been observed in other crystal structures owing to its mobility. In the crystal packing of apo-CcpA, the protein–protein contacts between the N-terminal three-helix bundle and the core domain consisted of interactions between the homodimers that were similar to those between the corepressor protein HPr and the CcpA N-subdomain in the ternary DNA complex. In contrast to the DNA complex, the apo-CcpA structure reveals large subdomain movements in the core, resulting in a complete loss of contacts between the N-subdomains of the homodimer.

  12. Interaction between the RNA binding domains of Ser-Arg splicing factor 1 and U1-70K snRNP protein determines early spliceosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cho, Suhyung; Hoang, Amy; Sinha, Rahul; Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Krainer, Adrian R; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2011-05-17

    It has been widely accepted that the early spliceosome assembly begins with U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) binding to the 5' splice site (5'SS), which is assisted by the Ser/Arg (SR)-rich proteins in mammalian cells. In this process, the RS domain of SR proteins is thought to directly interact with the RS motif of U1-70K, which is subject to regulation by RS domain phosphorylation. Here we report that the early spliceosome assembly event is mediated by the RNA recognition domains (RRM) of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1), which bridges the RRM of U1-70K to pre-mRNA by using the surface opposite to the RNA binding site. Specific mutation in the RRM of SRSF1 that disrupted the RRM-RRM interaction also inhibits the formation of spliceosomal E complex and splicing. We further demonstrate that the hypo-phosphorylated RS domain of SRSF1 interacts with its own RRM, thus competing with U1-70K binding, whereas the hyper-phosphorylated RS domain permits the formation of a ternary complex containing ESE, an SR protein, and U1 snRNP. Therefore, phosphorylation of the RS domain in SRSF1 appears to induce a key molecular switch from intra- to intermolecular interactions, suggesting a plausible mechanism for the documented requirement for the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle during pre-mRNA splicing.

  13. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    PubMed

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  14. Interleukin-3 binding to the murine betaIL-3 and human betac receptors involves functional epitopes formed by domains 1 and 4 of different protein chains.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James M; Ford, Sally C; Olsen, Jane E; Gustin, Sonja E; Jeffrey, Peter D; Ollis, David L; Young, Ian G

    2004-06-18

    Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is a cytokine produced by activated T-cells and mast cells that is active on a broad range of hematopoietic cells and in the nervous system and appears to be important in several chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, alanine substitutions were used to investigate the role of residues of the human beta-common (hbetac) receptor and the murine IL-3-specific (beta(IL-3)) receptor in IL-3 binding. We show that the domain 1 residues, Tyr(15) and Phe(79), of the hbetac receptor are important for high affinity IL-3 binding and receptor activation as shown previously for the related cytokines, interleukin-5 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which also signal through this receptor subunit. From the x-ray structure of hbetac, it is clear that the domain 1 residues cooperate with domain 4 residues to form a novel ligand-binding interface involving the two protein chains of the intertwined homodimer receptor. We demonstrate by ultracentrifugation that the beta(IL-3) receptor is also a homodimer. Its high sequence homology with hbetac suggests that their structures are homologous, and we identified an analogous binding interface in beta(IL-3) for direct IL-3 binding to the high affinity binding site in hbetac. Tyr(21) (A-B loop), Phe(85), and Asn(87) (E-F loop) of domain 1; Ile(320) of the interdomain loop; and Tyr(348) (B'-C' loop) and Tyr(401) (F'-G' loop) of domain 4 were shown to have critical individual roles and Arg(84) and Tyr(317) major secondary roles in direct murine IL-3 binding to the beta(IL-3)receptor. Most surprising, none of the key residues for direct IL-3 binding were critical for high affinity binding in the presence of the murine IL-3 alpha receptor, indicating a fundamentally different mechanism of high affinity binding to that used by hbetac.

  15. DNA-binding domain of the RepE initiator protein of mini-F plasmid: involvement of the carboxyl-terminal region.

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, F; Kawasaki, Y; Ishiai, M; Nishikawa, K; Yura, T; Wada, C

    1995-01-01

    The RepE initiator protein (251 residues) is essential for mini-F replication in Escherichia coli and exhibits two major functions: initiation of DNA replication from ori2 and autogenous repression of repE transcription. Whereas the initiation is mediated by RepE monomers that bind to the ori2 iterons (direct repeats), the autogenous repression is mediated by dimers that bind to the repE operator, which contains an inverted repeat sequence related to the iterons. We now report that the binding of RepE to these DNA sites is primarily determined by the C-terminal region of this protein. The mutant RepE proteins lacking either the N-terminal 33 (or more) residues or the C-terminal 7 (or more) residues were first shown to be defective in binding to both the ori2 and the operator DNAs. However, direct screening and analysis of mutant RepEs which are specifically affected in binding to the ori2 iterons revealed that the mutations (mostly amino acid substitutions) occur exclusively in the C-terminal region (residues 168 to 242). These mutant proteins exhibited reduced binding to ori2 and no detectable binding to the operator. Thus, whereas truncation of either end of RepE can destroy the DNA-binding activities, the C-terminal region appears to represent a primary DNA-binding domain of RepE for both ori2 and the operator. Analogous DNA-binding domains seem to be conserved among the initiator proteins of certain related plasmids. PMID:7721691

  16. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  17. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  18. Effects on differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia PML/RARalpha protein depend on the fusion of the PML protein dimerization and RARalpha DNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Grignani, F; Testa, U; Rogaia, D; Ferrucci, P F; Samoggia, P; Pinto, A; Aldinucci, D; Gelmetti, V; Fagioli, M; Alcalay, M; Seeler, J; Grignani, F; Nicoletti, I; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1996-01-01

    The block of terminal differentiation is a prominent feature of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and its release by retinoic acid correlates with disease remission. Expression of the APL-specific PML/RARalpha fusion protein in hematopoietic precursor cell lines blocks terminal differentiation, suggesting that PML/ RARalpha may have the same activity in APL blasts. We expressed different PML/RARalpha mutants in U937 and TF-1 cells and demonstrated that the integrity of the PML protein dimerization and RARalpha DNA binding domains is crucial for the differentiation block induced by PML/RARalpha, and that these domains exert their functions only within the context of the fusion protein. Analysis of the in vivo dimerization and cell localization properties of the PML/RARalpha mutants revealed that PML/RARalpha--PML and PML/RARalpha--RXR heterodimers are not necessary for PML/RARalpha activity on differentiation. We propose that a crucial mechanism underlying PML/RARalpha oncogenic activity is the deregulation of a transcription factor, RARalpha, through its fusion with the dimerization interface of another nuclear protein, PML. Images PMID:8890168

  19. Amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the yeast Rab escort protein are both required for binding of Ypt small G proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, B E; Lorenzetti, S; Miaczynska, M; Bui, D M; Schweyen, R J; Ragnini, A

    1996-01-01

    The Rab escort protein (REP) is an essential component of the heterotrimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase that modifies the carboxy-terminal cysteines of the Ras-like small G proteins belonging to the Rab/Ypt family. Deletions in the human CHM locus, encoding one of the two REPs known in humans, result in a retinal degenerative syndrome called choroideremia. The only known yeast homologue of the choroideremia gene product is encoded by an essential gene called MRS6. Besides three structurally conserved regions (SCRs) previously detected in the amino-terminal half of REPs and RabGDIs, three other regions in the carboxy-terminal domain (RCR 1-3) are here identified as being characteristic of REPs alone. We have performed the first mutational analysis of a REP protein to experimentally define the regions functionally important for Rab/Ypt protein binding, making use of the genetic system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis has shown that the SCRs are necessary but not sufficient for Ypt1p binding by the yeast REP, the carboxy-terminal region also being required. Images PMID:8898359

  20. Domain-specific phosphomimetic mutation allows dissection of different protein kinase C (PKC) isotype-triggered activities of the RNA binding protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sebastian; Doller, Anke; Pendini, Nicole R; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR) participates in the post-transcriptional regulation of many AU-rich element (ARE)-bearing mRNAs. Previously, by using in vitro kinase assay, we have identified serines (Ser) 158, 221 and 318 as targets of protein kinase C (PKC)-triggered phosphorylation. In this study, we tested whether GFP- or GST-tagged HuR constructs bearing a phosphomimetic Ser (S)-to-Asp (D) substitution at the different PKC target sites, would affect different HuR functions including HuR nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution and binding to different types of ARE-containing mRNAs. The phosphomimetic GFP-tagged HuR protein bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in the hinge region of HuR (HuR-S221D) showed an increased cytoplasmic abundance when compared to wild-type HuR. Conversely, data from in vitro kinase assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), implicates that phosphorylation at Ser 221 is not relevant for mRNA binding of HuR. Quantification of in vitro binding affinities of GST-tagged wild-type HuR and corresponding HuR proteins bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in either RRM2 (HuR-S158D) or in RRM3 (HuR-S318D) by microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates a specific binding of wild-type HuR to type I, II or type III-ARE-oligonucleotides in the high nanomolar range. Interestingly, phosphomimetic mutation at position 158 or 318 had a negative influence on HuR binding to type I- and type II-ARE-mRNAs whereas it significantly enhanced HuR affinity to a type III-ARE substrate. Our data suggest that differential phosphorylation of HuR by PKCs at different HuR domains coordinates subcellular HuR distribution and leads to a preferential binding to U-rich bearing target mRNA.

  1. Synthetic actin-binding domains reveal compositional constraints for function.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Maria; Gimona, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The actin-binding domains of many proteins consist of a canonical type 1/type 2 arrangement of the structurally conserved calponin homology domain. Using the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin-1 as a scaffold we have generated synthetic actin-binding domains by altering position and composition of the calponin homology domains. We show that the presence of two calponin homology domains alone and in the context of an actin-binding domain is not sufficient for actin-binding, and that both single and homotypic type 2 calponin homology domain tandems fail to bind to actin in vitro and in transfected cells. In contrast, single and tandem type 1 calponin homology domain arrays bind actin directly but result in defective turnover rates on actin filaments, and in aberrant actin bundling when introduced into the full-length alpha-actinin molecule. An actin-binding domain harboring the calponin homology domains in an inverted position, however, functions both in isolation and in the context of the dimeric alpha-actinin molecule. Our data demonstrate that the dynamics and specificity of actin-binding via actin-binding domains requires both the filament binding properties of the type 1, and regulation by type 2 calponin homology domains, and appear independent of their position.

  2. Evaluation and mapping of the DNA binding and oligomerization domains of the IE2 regulatory protein of human cytomegalovirus using yeast one and two hybrid interaction assays.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J H; Chiou, C J; Hayward, G S

    1998-03-27

    The 86-kDa IE2 nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major immediate-early (MIE) gene behaves as both a non-specific transactivator of viral and cellular gene expression and as a specific DNA-binding protein targeted to the cis-repression sequence (CRS) at the cap site of its own promoter/enhancer region. Although the IE2 protein produced in bacteria has been shown to bind to the 14-bp palindromic CRS motif and IE2 synthesized in vitro forms stable dimers in solution through the conserved C-terminus of the protein, there is no direct evidence as yet that the intracellular mammalian forms of IE2 do so. Here, we show that the intact HCMV IE2 protein both binds to CRS DNA and dimerizes in yeast cells. In a one-hybrid assay system, a GAL4/IE2 fusion protein expressed in yeast cells activated target HIS3 expression only when CRS sites were located upstream of the GAL1 minimal promoter, but failed to do so on mutant CRS sites, demonstrating a requirement for sequence-specific DNA-binding by IE2. Examination of a series of deletion and triple amino acid point mutations in the C-terminal half of IE2 mapped the domains required for DNA-binding in yeast to the entire region between codons 313 and 579, whereas in the previous in-vitro study with truncated bacterial GST fusion proteins, it was mapped to between codons 346 and 579. Transient co-transfection assays with deleted IE2 effector genes in Vero cells showed that the extra segment of IE2 between codons 313 and 346 is also required for both autoregulation and transactivation activity in mammalian cells. In a two-hybrid assay to study IE2 self-interations, we generated both GAL4 DNA-binding (DB) and activation domain (A)/IE2 fusion proteins and showed that IE2 could also dimerize or oligomerize through the C-terminus of the protein in yeast cells. Domains required for this interaction were all mapped to within the region between codons 388 and 542, which is coincident with the domain mapped

  3. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein acts to regulate the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers on rice DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Changxun; Chen, Weisi; Li, Chengxun; Jian, Xin; Li, Yingzhe; Lin, Hongmei; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-01-01

    UVB radiation causes cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) to form on the DNA of living organisms. This study found that overexpression of the silicon absorbance gene Lsi1 reduced the accumulation of CPDs in rice, which profited from the reactivation by photolyase. The transcript abundance of deoxyribodipyrimidine photolyase (Os10g0167600) was generally correlated with the silicon content of the rice, and the up-regulation of Os10g0167600 was found to be highest in the UVB-treated Lsi1-overexpressed (Lsi1-OX) rice. A trans-acting factor, methyl-CpG binding domain protein (OsMeCP), was found to interact with the cis-element of Os10g0167600. The nucleic location of OsMeCP effectively enabled the transcriptional regulation. Compared with the WT, the level of OsMeCP was lower in the Lsi1-OX rice but higher in the Lsi1-RNAi line. Rice cultured in a high silicate-concentration solution also exhibited less OsMeCP abundance. Overexpression of OsMeCP led to lower Os10g0167600 transcript levels and a higher CPD content than in the WT, but the reverse was true in the OsMeCP-RNAi line. These findings indicate that OsMeCP acts as a negative regulator of silicon, and can mediate the repression of the transcription from Os10g0167600, which inhibits the photoreactivation of the photolyase involved in the repair of CPDs. PMID:27694845

  4. Structural Insights into Immune Recognition of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus S Protein Receptor Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.; Sharon, C; Satkunarajah, M; Thierry, C; Cameron, C; Kelvin, D; Seetharaman, J; Cochrane, A; Plummer, F; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is responsible for host cell attachment and fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. Within S the receptor binding domain (RBD) mediates the interaction with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV host cell receptor. Both S and the RBD are highly immunogenic and both have been found to elicit neutralizing antibodies. Reported here is the X-ray crystal structure of the RBD in complex with the Fab of a neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody, F26G19, elicited by immunization with chemically inactivated SARS-CoV. The RBD-F26G19 Fab complex represents the first example of the structural characterization of an antibody elicited by an immune response to SARS-CoV or any fragment of it. The structure reveals that the RBD surface recognized by F26G19 overlaps significantly with the surface recognized by ACE2 and, as such, suggests that F26G19 likely neutralizes SARS-CoV by blocking the virus-host cell interaction.

  5. Roadmap to developing a recombinant coronavirus S protein receptor-binding domain vaccine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shibo; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Curti, Elena; Jones, Kathryn; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    A subunit vaccine, RBD-S, is under development to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which is classified by the US NIH as a category C pathogen. This vaccine is comprised of a recombinant receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein and formulated on alum, together with a synthetic glucopyranosyl lipid A. The vaccine would induce neutralizing antibodies without causing Th2-type immunopathology. Vaccine development is being led by the nonprofit product development partnership; Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with two academic partners (the New York Blood Center and University of Texas Medical Branch); an industrial partner (Immune Design Corporation); and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. A roadmap for the product development of the RBD-S SARS vaccine is outlined with a goal to manufacture the vaccine for clinical testing within the next 5 years. PMID:23252385

  6. OlpB, a new outer layer protein of Clostridium thermocellum, and binding of its S-layer-like domains to components of the cell envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, M; Ohayon, H; Gounon, P; Fujino, T; Béguin, P

    1995-01-01

    Several proteins of Clostridium thermocellum possess a C-terminal triplicated sequence related to bacterial cell surface proteins. This sequence was named the SLH domain (for S-layer homology), and it was proposed that it might serve to anchor proteins to the cell surface (A. Lupas, H. Engelhardt, J. Peters, U. Santarius, S. Volker, and W. Baumeister, J. Bacteriol. 176:1224-1233, 1994). This hypothesis was investigated by using the SLH-containing protein ORF1p from C. thermocellum as a model. Subcellular fractionation, immunoblotting, and electron microscopy of immunocytochemically labeled cells indicated that ORF1p was located on the surface of C. thermocellum. To detect C. thermocellum components interacting with the SLH domains of ORF1p, a probe was constructed by grafting these domains on the C terminus of the MalE protein of Escherichia coli. The SLH domains conferred on the chimeric protein (MalE-ORF1p-C) the ability to bind noncovalently to the peptidoglycan of C. thermocellum. In addition, 125I-labeled MalE-ORF1p-C was shown to bind to SLH-bearing proteins transferred onto nitrocellulose, and to a 26- to 28-kDa component of the cell envelope. These results agree with the hypothesis that SLH domains contribute to the binding of exocellular proteins to the cell surface of bacteria. The gene carrying ORF1 and its product, ORF1p, are renamed olpB and OlpB (for outer layer protein B), respectively. PMID:7730277

  7. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life.

  8. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Activation by Competition with WH2 Domain Proteins for Actin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Weissbach, Julia; Schikora, Franziska; Weber, Anja; Kessels, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are coactivators of serum response factor (SRF)-mediated gene expression. Activation of MRTF-A occurs in response to alterations in actin dynamics and critically requires the dissociation of repressive G-actin–MRTF-A complexes. However, the mechanism leading to the release of MRTF-A remains unclear. Here we show that WH2 domains compete directly with MRTF-A for actin binding. Actin nucleation-promoting factors, such as N-WASP and WAVE2, as well as isolated WH2 domains, including those of Spire2 and Cobl, activate MRTF-A independently of changes in actin dynamics. Simultaneous inhibition of Arp2-Arp3 or mutation of the CA region only partially reduces MRTF-A activation by N-WASP and WAVE2. Recombinant WH2 domains and the RPEL domain of MRTF-A bind mutually exclusively to cellular and purified G-actin in vitro. The competition by different WH2 domains correlates with MRTF-SRF activation. Following serum stimulation, nonpolymerizable actin dissociates from MRTF-A, and de novo formation of the G-actin–RPEL complex is impaired by a transferable factor. Our work demonstrates that WH2 domains activate MRTF-A and contribute to target gene regulation by a competitive mechanism, independently of their role in actin filament formation. PMID:26976641

  9. The MUC1-C Oncoprotein Binds to the BH3 Domain of the Pro-apoptotic BAX Protein and Blocks BAX Function*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Rehan; Alam, Maroof; Rajabi, Hasan; Kufe, Donald

    2012-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BAX protein contains a BH3 domain that is necessary for its dimerization and for activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The MUC1 (mucin 1) heterodimeric protein is overexpressed in diverse human carcinomas and blocks apoptosis in the response to stress. In this study, we demonstrate that the oncogenic MUC1-C subunit associates with BAX in human cancer cells. MUC1-C·BAX complexes are detectable in the cytoplasm and mitochondria and are induced by genotoxic and oxidative stress. The association between MUC1-C and BAX is supported by the demonstration that the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain is sufficient for the interaction with BAX. The results further show that the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain CQC motif binds directly to the BAX BH3 domain at Cys-62. Consistent with binding to the BAX BH3 domain, MUC1-C blocked BAX dimerization in response to (i) truncated BID in vitro and (ii) treatment of cancer cells with DNA-damaging agents. In concert with these results, MUC1-C attenuated localization of BAX to mitochondria and the release of cytochrome c. These findings indicate that the MUC1-C oncoprotein binds directly to the BAX BH3 domain and thereby blocks BAX function in activating the mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:22544745

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey K.-W.; Galatis, Denise; Barnham, Kevin J.; Polekhina, Galina; Adams, Julian J.; Masters, Colin L.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.; McKinstry, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The binding of Cu{sup 2+} ions to the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease reduces the production of the amyloid β peptide, which is centrally involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Structural studies of the copper-binding domain will provide a basis for structure-based drug design that might prove useful in treating this devastating disease. Alzheimer’s disease is thought to be triggered by production of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide through proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The binding of Cu{sup 2+} to the copper-binding domain (CuBD) of APP reduces the production of Aβ in cell-culture and animal studies. It is expected that structural studies of the CuBD will lead to a better understanding of how copper binding causes Aβ depletion and will define a potential drug target. The crystallization of CuBD in two different forms suitable for structure determination is reported here.

  11. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E Ann

    2011-10-10

    Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor-regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences and tertiary structures of CBM20 and CBM48 reveals the close relatedness of these SBDs and, in some cases, glycogen-binding domains (GBDs). The families CBM20 and CBM48 share both an ancestral form and the mode of starch/glycogen binding at one or two binding sites. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that they exhibit independent behaviour, i.e. each family forms its own part in an evolutionary tree, with enzyme specificity (protein function) being well represented within each family. The distinction between CBM20 and CBM48 families is not sharp since there are representatives in both CBM families that possess an intermediate character. These are, for example, CBM20s from hypothetical GH57 amylopullulanase (probably lacking the starch-binding site 2) and CBM48s from the GH13 pullulanase subfamily (probably lacking the starch/glycogen-binding site 1). The knowledge gained concerning the occurrence of these SBDs and GBDs through the range of taxonomy will support future experimental research.

  12. An external loop region of domain III of dengue virus type 2 envelope protein is involved in serotype-specific binding to mosquito but not mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jan-Jong; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Young, Ming-Jer; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Wen

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is a flavivirus and infects mammalian cells through mosquito vectors. This study investigates the roles of domain III of DV type 2 envelope protein (EIII) in DV binding to the host cell. Recombinant EIII interferes with DV infection to BHK21 and C6/36 cells by blocking dengue virion adsorption to these cells. Inhibition of EIII on BHK21 cells was broad with no serotype specificity; however, inhibition of EIII on C6/36 cells was relatively serotype specific. Soluble heparin completely blocks binding of EIII to BHK21 cells, suggesting that domain III binds mainly to cell surface heparan sulfates. This suggestion is supported by the observation that EIII binds very weakly to gro2C and sog9 mutant mammalian cell lines that lack heparan sulfate. In contrast, heparin does not block binding of EIII to mosquito cells. Furthermore, a synthetic peptide that includes amino acids (aa) 380 to 389 of EIII, IGVEPGQLKL, inhibits binding of EIII to C6/36 but not BHK21 cells. This peptide corresponds to a lateral loop region on domain III of E protein, indicating a possible role of this loop in binding to mosquito cells. In summary, these results suggest that EIII plays an important role in binding of DV type 2 to host cells. In addition, EIII interacts with heparan sulfates when binding to BHK21 cells, and a loop region containing aa 380 to 389 of EIII may participate in DV type 2 binding to C6/36 cells.

  13. An External Loop Region of Domain III of Dengue Virus Type 2 Envelope Protein Is Involved in Serotype-Specific Binding to Mosquito but Not Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Jan-Jong; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Young, Ming-Jer; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Wen

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is a flavivirus and infects mammalian cells through mosquito vectors. This study investigates the roles of domain III of DV type 2 envelope protein (EIII) in DV binding to the host cell. Recombinant EIII interferes with DV infection to BHK21 and C6/36 cells by blocking dengue virion adsorption to these cells. Inhibition of EIII on BHK21 cells was broad with no serotype specificity; however, inhibition of EIII on C6/36 cells was relatively serotype specific. Soluble heparin completely blocks binding of EIII to BHK21 cells, suggesting that domain III binds mainly to cell surface heparan sulfates. This suggestion is supported by the observation that EIII binds very weakly to gro2C and sog9 mutant mammalian cell lines that lack heparan sulfate. In contrast, heparin does not block binding of EIII to mosquito cells. Furthermore, a synthetic peptide that includes amino acids (aa) 380 to 389 of EIII, IGVEPGQLKL, inhibits binding of EIII to C6/36 but not BHK21 cells. This peptide corresponds to a lateral loop region on domain III of E protein, indicating a possible role of this loop in binding to mosquito cells. In summary, these results suggest that EIII plays an important role in binding of DV type 2 to host cells. In addition, EIII interacts with heparan sulfates when binding to BHK21 cells, and a loop region containing aa 380 to 389 of EIII may participate in DV type 2 binding to C6/36 cells. PMID:14671119

  14. FHA domains: Phosphopeptide binding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Almawi, Ahmad W; Matthews, Lindsay A; Guarné, Alba

    2016-12-08

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are small phosphopeptide recognition modules found in eubacterial and eukaryotic, but not archeal, genomes. Although they were originally found in forkhead-type transcription factors, they have now been identified in many other signaling proteins. FHA domains share a remarkably conserved fold despite very low sequence conservation. They only have five conserved amino acids that are important for binding to phosphorylated epitopes. Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that FHA domains can mediate many interactions that do not depend on their ability to recognize a phosphorylated threonine. In this review, we present structural and biochemical work that has unveiled novel interaction interfaces on FHA domains. We discuss how these non-canonical interactions modulate the recognition of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated substrates, as well as protein oligomerization - events that collectively determine FHA function.

  15. Identification and characterization of a novel SH3-domain binding protein, Sab, which preferentially associates with Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BtK).

    PubMed

    Matsushita, M; Yamadori, T; Kato, S; Takemoto, Y; Inazawa, J; Baba, Y; Hashimoto, S; Sekine, S; Arai, S; Kunikata, T; Kurimoto, M; Kishimoto, T; Tsukada, S

    1998-04-17

    Protein interaction cloning method was used to identify a novel molecule, Sab, which binds to the SH3 domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), the deficient cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase in human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. Immunoprecipitation using the anti-Sab antibody identified the protein product of the gene as a 70 kDa molecule. While Sab does not have a proline-rich sequence, it was shown to bind to Btk through the commonly conserved structure among SH3 domains. Remarkably, Sab exhibited a high preference for binding to Btk rather than to other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, which suggests a unique role of Sab in the Btk signal transduction pathway.

  16. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  17. Novel hemin binding domains in the Corynebacterium diphtheriae HtaA protein interact with hemoglobin and are critical for heme iron utilization by HtaA.

    PubMed

    Allen, Courtni E; Schmitt, Michael P

    2011-10-01

    The human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin as iron sources for growth in iron-depleted environments. The use of hemin iron in C. diphtheriae involves the dtxR- and iron-regulated hmu hemin uptake locus, which encodes an ABC hemin transporter, and the surface-anchored hemin binding proteins HtaA and HtaB. Sequence analysis of HtaA and HtaB identified a conserved region (CR) of approximately 150 amino acids that is duplicated in HtaA and present in a single copy in HtaB. The two conserved regions in HtaA, designated CR1 and CR2, were used to construct glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins (GST-CR1 and GST-CR2) to assess hemin binding by UV-visual spectroscopy. These studies showed that both domains were able to bind hemin, suggesting that the conserved sequences are responsible for the hemin binding property previously ascribed to HtaA. HtaA and the CR2 domain were also shown to be able to bind hemoglobin (Hb) by the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in which Hb was immobilized on a microtiter plate. The CR1 domain exhibited a weak interaction with Hb in the ELISA system, while HtaB showed no significant binding to Hb. Competitive binding studies demonstrated that soluble hemin and Hb were able to inhibit the binding of HtaA and the CR domains to immobilized Hb. Moreover, HtaA was unable to bind to Hb from which the hemin had been chemically removed. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of CR domains from various Corynebacterium species revealed several conserved residues, including two highly conserved tyrosine (Y) residues and one histidine (H) residue. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Y361 and H412 were critical for the binding to hemin and Hb by the CR2 domain. Biological assays showed that Y361 was essential for the hemin iron utilization function of HtaA. Hemin transfer experiments demonstrated that HtaA was able to acquire hemin from Hb and that hemin bound to HtaA could be

  18. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-03-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors.

  19. Hybrid In Silico/In Vitro Approaches for the Identification of Functional Cholesterol-Binding Domains in Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Fantini, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, cholesterol is an important regulator of a broad range of membrane proteins, including receptors, transporters, and ion channels. Understanding how cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins is a difficult task because structural data of these proteins complexed with cholesterol are scarce. Here, we describe a dual approach based on in silico studies of protein-cholesterol interactions, combined with physico-chemical measurements of protein insertion into cholesterol-containing monolayers. Our algorithm is validated through careful analysis of the effect of key mutations within and outside the predicted cholesterol-binding site. Our method is illustrated by a complete analysis of cholesterol-binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide, a protein that penetrates the plasma membrane of brain cells through a cholesterol-dependent process.

  20. Characterization of the DNA-binding properties of the myeloid zinc finger protein MZF1: two independent DNA-binding domains recognize two DNA consensus sequences with a common G-rich core.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J F; Hromas, R; Rauscher, F J

    1994-01-01

    The myeloid zinc finger gene 1, MZF1, encodes a transcription factor which is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells that are committed to myeloid lineage differentiation. MZF1 contains 13 C2H2 zinc fingers arranged in two domains which are separated by a short glycine- and proline-rich sequence. The first domain consists of zinc fingers 1 to 4, and the second domain is formed by zinc fingers 5 to 13. We have determined that both sets of zinc finger domains bind DNA. Purified, recombinant MZF1 proteins containing either the first set of zinc fingers or the second set were prepared and used to affinity select DNA sequences from a library of degenerate oligonucleotides by using successive rounds of gel shift followed by PCR amplification. Surprisingly, both DNA-binding domains of MZF1 selected similar DNA-binding consensus sequences containing a core of four or five guanine residues, reminiscent of an NF-kappa B half-site: 1-4, 5'-AGTGGGGA-3'; 5-13, 5'-CGGGnGAGGGGGAA-3'. The full-length MZF1 protein containing both sets of zinc finger DNA-binding domains recognizes synthetic oligonucleotides containing either the 1-4 or 5-13 consensus binding sites in gel shift assays. Thus, we have identified the core DNA consensus binding sites for each of the two DNA-binding domains of a myeloid-specific zinc finger transcription factor. Identification of these DNA-binding sites will allow us to identify target genes regulated by MZF1 and to assess the role of MZF1 as a transcriptional regulator of hematopoiesis. Images PMID:8114711

  1. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-03-03

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression.

  2. The single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain of the GAGA protein flanked by basic residues is sufficient for high-affinity specific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Pedone, P V; Ghirlando, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Felsenfeld, G; Omichinski, J G

    1996-01-01

    Specific DNA binding to the core consensus site GAGAGAG has been shown with an 82-residue peptide (residues 310-391) taken from the Drosophila transcription factor GAGA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was demonstrated that the minimal domain required for specific binding (residues 310-372) includes a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family and a stretch of basic amino acids located on the N-terminal end of the zinc finger. In gel retardation assays, the specific binding seen with either the peptide or the whole protein is zinc dependent and corresponds to a dissociation constant of approximately 5 x 10(-9) M for the purified peptide. It has previously been thought that a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family is incapable of specific, high-affinity binding to DNA. The combination of an N-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger in the GAGA protein can thus be viewed as a novel DNA binding domain. This raises the possibility that other proteins carrying only one Cys2-His2 finger are also capable of high-affinity specific binding to DNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610125

  3. Intramolecular Interactions and Regulation of Cofactor Binding by the Four Repressive Elements in the Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Inhibitory Domain*♦

    PubMed Central

    Jattani, Rakhi P.; Tritapoe, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    The CARD11 signaling scaffold transmits signaling between antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and the transcription factor NF-κB during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 activity is controlled by an inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions and prevents cofactor binding prior to receptor triggering. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations associated with the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma somehow perturb ID-mediated autoinhibition to confer CARD11 with the dysregulated spontaneous signaling to NF-κB that is required for the proliferation and survival of the lymphoma. Here, we investigate how the four repressive elements (REs) we have discovered in the CARD11 ID function to inhibit CARD11 activity with cooperativity and redundancy. We find that each RE contributes to the maintenance of the closed inactive state of CARD11 that predominates in the absence of receptor engagement. Each RE also contributes to the prevention of Bcl10 binding in the basal unstimulated state. RE1, RE2, and RE3 participate in intramolecular interactions with other CARD11 domains and share domain targets for binding. Remarkably, diffuse large B cell lymphoma-associated gain-of-function mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, LATCH, or coiled coil can perturb intramolecular interactions mediated by multiple REs, suggesting how single amino acid oncogenic CARD11 mutations can perturb or bypass the action of redundant inhibitory REs to achieve the level of hyperactive CARD11 signaling required to support lymphoma growth. PMID:26884334

  4. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  5. A proposed architecture for the central domain of the bacterial enhancer-binding proteins based on secondary structure prediction and fold recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, J.; Soberón, X.; Morett, E.

    1997-01-01

    The expression of genes transcribed by the RNA polymerase with the alternative sigma factor sigma 54 (E sigma 54) is absolutely dependent on activator proteins that bind to enhancer-like sites, located far upstream from the promoter. These unique prokaryotic proteins, known as enhancer-binding proteins (EBP), mediate open promoter complex formation in a reaction dependent on NTP hydrolysis. The best characterized proteins of this family of regulators are NtrC and NifA, which activate genes required for ammonia assimilation and nitrogen fixation, respectively. In a recent IRBM course (@ontiers of protein structure prediction," IRBM, Pomezia, Italy, 1995; see web site http://www.mrc-cpe.cam.uk/irbm-course95/), one of us (J.O.) participated in the elaboration of the proposal that the Central domain of the EBPs might adopt the classical mononucleotide-binding fold. This suggestion was based on the results of a new protein fold recognition algorithm (Map) and in the mapping of correlated mutations calculated for the sequence family on the same mononucleotide-binding fold topology. In this work, we present new data that support the previous conclusion. The results from a number of different secondary structure prediction programs suggest that the Central domain could adopt an alpha/beta topology. The fold recognition programs ProFIT 0.9, 3D PROFILE combined with secondary structure prediction, and 123D suggest a mononucleotide-binding fold topology for the Central domain amino acid sequence. Finally, and most importantly, three of five reported residue alterations that impair the Central domain. ATPase activity of the E sigma 54 activators are mapped to polypeptide regions that might be playing equivalent roles as those involved in nucleotide-binding in the mononucleotide-binding proteins. Furthermore, the known residue substitution that alter the function of the E sigma 54 activators, leaving intact the Central domain ATPase activity, are mapped on region proposed to

  6. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2015-07-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R(141) and R(10) residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  7. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins.

  8. The SLE variant Ala71Thr of BLK severely decreases protein abundance and binding to BANK1 through impairment of the SH3 domain function.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Barreiro, A; Bernal-Quirós, M; Georg, I; Marañón, C; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Castillejo-López, C

    2016-03-01

    The B-lymphocyte kinase (BLK) gene is associated genetically with several human autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus. We recently described that the genetic risk is given by two haplotypes: one covering several strongly linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the promoter of the gene that correlated with low transcript levels, and a second haplotype that includes a rare nonsynonymous variant (Ala71Thr). Here we show that this variant, located within the BLK SH3 domain, is a major determinant of protein levels. In vitro analyses show that the 71Thr isoform is hyperphosphorylated and promotes kinase activation. As a consequence, BLK is ubiquitinated, its proteasomal degradation enhanced and the average life of the protein is reduced by half. Altogether, these findings suggest that an intrinsic autoregulatory mechanism previously unappreciated in BLK is disrupted by the 71Thr substitution. Because the SH3 domain is also involved in protein interactions, we sought for differences between the two isoforms in trafficking and binding to protein partners. We found that binding of the 71Thr variant to the adaptor protein BANK1 is severely reduced. Our study provides new insights on the intrinsic regulation of BLK activation and highlights the dominant role of its SH3 domain in BANK1 binding.

  9. A triad of lys12, lys41, arg78 spatial domain, a novel identified heparin binding site on tat protein, facilitates tat-driven cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jing; Xin, Xianliang; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Shuai; Peng, Shuying; Li, Jing; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Hualiang; Geng, Meiyu

    2008-01-01

    Tat protein, released by HIV-infected cells, has a battery of important biological effects leading to distinct AIDS-associated pathologies. Cell surface heparan sulfate protoglycans (HSPGs) have been accepted as endogenous Tat receptors, and the Tat basic domain has been identified as the heparin binding site. However, findings that deletion or substitution of the basic domain inhibits but does not completely eliminate Tat-heparin interactions suggest that the basic domain is not the sole Tat heparin binding site. In the current study, an approach integrating computational modeling, mutagenesis, biophysical and cell-based assays was used to elucidate a novel, high affinity heparin-binding site: a Lys12, Lys41, Arg78 (KKR) spatial domain. This domain was also found to facilitate Tat-driven β1 integrin activation, producing subsequent SLK cell adhesion in an HSPG-dependent manner, but was not involved in Tat internalization. The identification