Science.gov

Sample records for binding domain protein

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  5. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  6. Protein universe containing a PUA RNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Cerrudo, Carolina S; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review current knowledge about pseudouridine synthase and archaeosine transglycosylase (PUA)-domain-containing proteins to illustrate progress in this field. A methodological analysis of the literature about the topic was carried out, together with a 'qualitative comparative analysis' to give a more comprehensive review. Bioinformatics methods for whole-protein or protein-domain identification are commonly based on pairwise protein sequence comparisons; we added comparison of structures to detect the whole universe of proteins containing the PUA domain. We present an update of proteins having this domain, focusing on the specific proteins present in Homo sapiens (dyskerin, MCT1, Nip7, eIF2D and Nsun6), and explore the existence of these in other species. We also analyze the phylogenetic distribution of the PUA domain in different species and proteins. Finally, we performed a structural comparison of the PUA domain through data mining of structural databases, determining a conserved structural motif, despite the differences in the sequence, even among eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria. All data discussed in this review, both bibliographic and analytical, corroborate the functional importance of the PUA domain in RNA-binding proteins.

  7. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  8. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  10. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  11. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  12. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  13. Characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Takagi, M; Hashida, S; Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H; Segel, I H

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA), a component of the cellulase complex of Clostridium cellulovorans, contains a unique sequence which has been demonstrated to be a cellulose-binding domain (CBD). The DNA coding for this putative CBD was subcloned into pET-8c, an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein produced under the direction of the recombinant plasmid, pET-CBD, had a high affinity for crystalline cellulose. Affinity-purified CBD protein was used in equilibrium binding experiments to characterize the interaction of the protein with various polysaccharides. It was found that the binding capacity of highly crystalline cellulose samples (e.g., cotton) was greater than that of samples of low crystallinity (e.g., fibrous cellulose). At saturating CBD concentration, about 6.4 mumol of protein was bound by 1 g of cotton. Under the same conditions, fibrous cellulose bound only 0.2 mumol of CBD per g. The measured dissociation constant was in the 1 microM range for all cellulose samples. The results suggest that the CBD binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. Chitin, which has a crystal structure similar to that of cellulose, also was bound by the CBD. The presence of high levels of cellobiose or carboxymethyl cellulose in the assay mixture had no effect on the binding of CBD protein to crystalline cellulose. This result suggests that the CBD recognition site is larger than a simple cellobiose unit or more complex than a repeating cellobiose moiety. This CBD is of particular interest because it is the first CBD from a completely sequenced nonenzymatic protein shown to be an independently functional domain. Images PMID:8376323

  14. The PDZ Domain of the LIM Protein Enigma Binds to β-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Pamela M.; Kenny, Daryn A.; Gill, Gordon N.

    1999-01-01

    PDZ and LIM domains are modular protein interaction motifs present in proteins with diverse functions. Enigma is representative of a family of proteins composed of a series of conserved PDZ and LIM domains. The LIM domains of Enigma and its most related family member, Enigma homology protein, bind to protein kinases, whereas the PDZ domains of Enigma and family member actin-associated LIM protein bind to actin filaments. Enigma localizes to actin filaments in fibroblasts via its PDZ domain, and actin-associated LIM protein binds to and colocalizes with the actin-binding protein α-actinin-2 at Z lines in skeletal muscle. We show that Enigma is present at the Z line in skeletal muscle and that the PDZ domain of Enigma binds to a skeletal muscle target, the actin-binding protein tropomyosin (skeletal β-TM). The interaction between Enigma and skeletal β-TM was specific for the PDZ domain of Enigma, was abolished by mutations in the PDZ domain, and required the PDZ-binding consensus sequence (Thr-Ser-Leu) at the extreme carboxyl terminus of skeletal β-TM. Enigma interacted with isoforms of tropomyosin expressed in C2C12 myotubes and formed an immunoprecipitable complex with skeletal β-TM in transfected cells. The association of Enigma with skeletal β-TM suggests a role for Enigma as an adapter protein that directs LIM-binding proteins to actin filaments of muscle cells. PMID:10359609

  15. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  16. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  17. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes: sequence of the binding domain involved in adherence of streptococci to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Talay, S R; Valentin-Weigand, P; Jerlström, P G; Timmis, K N; Chhatwal, G S

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the fibronectin-binding domain of the fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sfb protein) was determined, and its role in streptococcal adherence was investigated by use of an Sfb fusion protein in adherence studies. A 1-kb DNA fragment coding for the binding domain of Sfb protein was cloned into the expression vector pEX31 to produce an Sfb fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of MS2 polymerase and a C-terminal fragment of the streptococcal protein. Induction of the vector promoter resulted in hyperexpression of fibronectin-binding fusion protein in the cytoplasm of the recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Sequence determination of the cloned 1-kb fragment revealed an in-frame reading frame for a 268-amino-acid peptide composed of a 37-amino-acid sequence which is completely repeated three times and incompletely repeated a fourth time. Cloning of one repeat into pEX31 resulted in expression of small fusion peptides that show fibronectin-binding activity, indicating that one repeat contains at least one binding domain. Each repeat exhibits two charged domains and shows high homology with the 38-amino-acid D3 repeat of the fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus. Sequence comparison with other streptococcal ligand-binding surface proteins, including M protein, failed to reveal significant homology, which suggests that Sfb protein represents a novel type of functional protein in S. pyogenes. The Sfb fusion protein isolated from the cytoplasm of recombinant cells was purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. It showed a strong competitive inhibition of fibronectin binding to S. pyogenes and of the adherence of bacteria to cultured epithelial cells. In contrast, purified streptococcal lipoteichoic acid showed only a weak inhibition of fibronectin binding and streptococcal adherence. These results demonstrate that Sfb protein is directly involved in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of S. pyogenes to

  18. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-09

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  19. Methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins: readers of the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Luu, Phuc-Loi; Stirzaker, Clare; Clark, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    How DNA methylation is interpreted and influences genome regulation remains largely unknown. Proteins of the methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) family are primary candidates for the readout of DNA methylation as they recruit chromatin remodelers, histone deacetylases and methylases to methylated DNA associated with gene repression. MBD protein binding requires both functional MBD domains and methyl-CpGs; however, some MBD proteins also bind unmethylated DNA and active regulatory regions via alternative regulatory domains or interaction with the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD/Mi-2) complex members. Mutations within MBD domains occur in many diseases, including neurological disorders and cancers, leading to loss of MBD binding specificity to methylated sites and gene deregulation. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge about MBD proteins and their role as readers of the epigenome.

  20. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  1. Specific binding of the methyl binding domain protein 2 at the BRCA1-NBR2 locus.

    PubMed

    Auriol, Emilie; Billard, Lise-Marie; Magdinier, Frédérique; Dante, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins are key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing. We investigated their binding specificity at the constitutively methylated region of a CpG island containing the bidirectional promoter of the Breast cancer predisposition gene 1, BRCA1, and the Near BRCA1 2 (NBR2) gene. In HeLa cells, quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that MBD2 is associated with the methylated region, while MeCP2 and MBD1 were not detected at this locus. MBD2 depletion (approximately 90%), mediated by a transgene expressing a small interfering RNA (siRNA), did not induce MeCP2 or MBD1 binding at the methylated area. Furthermore, the lack of MBD2 at the BRCA1-NBR2 CpG island is associated with an elevated level of NBR2 transcripts and with a significant reduction of induced-DNA-hypomethylation response. In MBD2 knockdown cells, transient expression of a Mbd2 cDNA, refractory to siRNA-mediated decay, shifted down the NBR2 mRNA level to that observed in unmodified HeLa cells. Variations in MBD2 levels did not affect BRCA1 expression despite its stimulation by DNA hypomethylation. Collectively, our data indicate that MBD2 has specific targets and its presence at these targets is indispensable for gene repression.

  2. Structure of the caspase-recruitment domain from a zebrafish guanylate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tengchuan; Huang, Mo; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam

    2013-08-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) mediates homotypic protein-protein interactions that assemble large oligomeric signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes during innate immune responses. Structural studies of the mammalian CARDs demonstrate that their six-helix bundle folds belong to the death-domain superfamily, whereas such studies have not been reported for other organisms. Here, the zebrafish interferon-induced guanylate-binding protein 1 (zIGBP1) was identified that contains an N-terminal GTPase domain and a helical domain typical of the mammalian guanylate-binding proteins, followed by a FIIND domain and a C-terminal CARD similar to the mammalian inflammasome proteins NLRP1 and CARD8. The structure of the zIGBP1 CARD as a fusion with maltose-binding protein was determined at 1.47 Å resolution. This revealed a six-helix bundle fold similar to the NLRP1 CARD structure with the bent α1 helix typical of all known CARD structures. The zIGBP1 CARD surface contains a positively charged patch near its α1 and α4 helices and a negatively charged patch near its α2, α3 and α5 helices, which may mediate its interaction with partner domains. Further studies using binding assays and other analyses will be required in order to address the physiological function(s) of this zebrafish protein.

  3. Biological effects of individually synthesized TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Tsyrendorzhiev, D D; Orlovskaya, I A; Sennikov, S V; Tregubchak, T V; Gileva, I P; Tsyrendorzhieva, M D; Shchelkunov, S N

    2014-06-01

    The biological characteristics of a 17-kDa protein synthesized in bacterial cells, a TNF-binding domain (VARV-TNF-BP) of a 47-kDa variola virus CrmB protein (VARV-CrmB) consisting of TNF-binding and chemokine-binding domains, were studied. Removal of the C-terminal chemokine-binding domain from VARV-CrmB protein was inessential for the efficiency of its inhibition of TNF cytotoxicity towards L929 mouse fibroblast culture and for TNF-induced oxidative metabolic activity of mouse blood leukocytes. The results of this study could form the basis for further studies of VARV-TNF-BP mechanisms of activity for prospective use in practical medicine.

  4. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  5. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat.

  6. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  7. A Novel Protein Domain Induces High Affinity Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence Binding and Elongation Factor Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Caban, Kelvin; Ranaweera, Ruchira; Gonzalez-Flores, Jonathan N.; Copeland, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is incorporated at UGA codons in mRNAs possessing a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in their 3′-untranslated region. At least three additional factors are necessary for Sec incorporation: SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), Sec-tRNASec, and a Sec-specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec). The C-terminal half of SBP2 is sufficient to promote Sec incorporation in vitro, which is carried out by the concerted action of a novel Sec incorporation domain and an L7Ae RNA-binding domain. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we show that two distinct regions of the Sec incorporation domain are required for Sec incorporation. Physical separation of the Sec incorporation and RNA-binding domains revealed that they are able to function in trans and established a novel role of the Sec incorporation domain in promoting SECIS and eEFSec binding to the SBP2 RNA-binding domain. We propose a model in which SECIS binding induces a conformational change in SBP2 that recruits eEFSec, which in concert with the Sec incorporation domain gains access to the ribosomal A site. PMID:18948268

  8. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  9. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  10. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus protein A activates TNFR1 signaling through conserved IgG binding domains.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Marisa I; O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; Magargee, Mariah; Foster, Timothy J; Prince, Alice S

    2006-07-21

    Staphylococcus aureus continues to be a major cause of infection in normal as well as immunocompromised hosts, and the increasing prevalence of highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains is a public health concern. A highly expressed surface component of S. aureus, protein A (SpA), contributes to its success as a pathogen by both activating inflammation and by interfering with immune clearance. SpA is known to bind to IgG Fc, which impedes phagocytosis. SpA is also a potent activator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling, inducing both chemokine expression and TNF-converting enzyme-dependent soluble TNFR1 (sTNFR1) shedding, which has anti-inflammatory consequences, particularly in the lung. Using a collection of glutathione S-transferase fusions to the intact IgG binding region of SpA and to each of the individual binding domains, we found that the SpA IgG binding domains also mediate binding to human airway cells. TNFR1-dependent CXCL8 production could be elicited by any one of the individual SpA IgG binding domains as efficiently as by either the entire SpA or the intact IgG binding region. SpA induction of sTNFR1 shedding required the entire IgG binding region and tolerated fewer substitutions in residues known to interact with IgG. Each of the repeated domains of the IgG binding domain can affect multiple immune responses independently, activating inflammation through TNFR1 and thwarting opsonization by trapping IgG Fc domains, while the intact IgG binding region can limit further signaling through sTNFR1 shedding.

  12. VH3 family antibodies bind domain D of staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed

    Roben, P W; Salem, A N; Silverman, G J

    1995-06-15

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is a 45-kDa bacterial membrane protein that can interact with either Fc gamma, a constant region portion of IgG, or with the Fab portion that also mediates conventional Ag binding. In recent reports, SpA has been shown to specifically interact with Fab derived from the VH3 family and is little affected by VH CDR3, JH, or light chain usage. To identify a site on SpA responsible for VH3 Fab binding, we cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli the 61 amino acid sequence of SpA that represents domain D, and this small protein exhibited both the VH3 Fab and Fc gamma binding specificities. Surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated that domain D and native SpA had the strongest binding interactions with an IgM-kappa encoded by the germline configuration of the VH3 gene VH26c. In contrast, the apparent affinities for Fc gamma binding were at least fivefold weaker. A variant of domain D was also created that is devoid of the three-codon insertion that distinguishes domain D from all other domains in SpA. Although this deletion did not significantly affect the VH3 Fab-mediated SpA binding activity, it did improve the affinity of Fc gamma binding by an order of magnitude. These observations characterize a site on SpA responsible for binding interactions with B cell Ag receptors that are highly analogous to that of superantigens for T cell receptors.

  13. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  14. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  15. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  16. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Molecular insights into the binding of phosphoinositides to the TH domain region of TIPE proteins.

    PubMed

    Antony, Priya; Baby, Bincy; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-11-01

    Phosphatidylinositols and their phosphorylated derivatives, phosphoinositides, play a central role in regulating diverse cellular functions. These phospholipids have been shown to interact with the hydrophobic TH domain of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) family of proteins. However, the precise mechanism of interaction of these lipids is unclear. Here we report the binding mode and interactions of these phospholipids in the TH domain, as elucidated using molecular docking and simulations. Results indicate that phosphoinositides bind to the TH domain in a similar way by inserting their lipid tails in the hydrophobic cavity. The exposed head group is stabilized by interactions with critical positively charged residues on the surface of these proteins. Further MD simulations confirmed the dynamic stability of these lipids in the TH domain. This computational analysis thus provides insight into the binding mode of phospholipids in the TH domain of the TIPE family of proteins. Graphical abstract A phosphoinositide (phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate; PtdIns4P) docked to TIPE2.

  18. The SARS Coronavirus 3a protein binds calcium in its cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Minakshi, Rinki; Padhan, Kartika; Rehman, Safikur; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2014-10-13

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a positive stranded RNA virus with ∼30kb genome. Among all open reading frames (orfs) of this virus, the orf3a is the largest, and encodes a protein of 274 amino acids, named as 3a protein. Sequence analysis suggests that the orf3a aligned to one calcium pump present in Plasmodium falciparum and the enzyme glutamine synthetase found in Leptospira interrogans. This sequence similarity was found to be limited only to amino acid residues 209-264 which form the cytoplasmic domain of the orf3a. Furthermore, this region was predicted to be involved in the calcium binding. Owing to this hypothesis, we were driven to establish its calcium binding property in vitro. Here, we expressed and purified the cytoplasmic domain of the 3a protein, called Cyto3a, as a recombinant His-tagged protein in the E. coli. The calcium binding nature was established by performing various staining methods such as ruthenium red and stains-all. (45)Ca overlay method was also done to further support the data. Since the 3a protein forms ion channels, we were interested to see any conformational changes occurring in the Cyot3a upon calcium binding, using fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. These studies clearly indicate a significant change in the conformation of the Cyto3a protein after binding with calcium. Our results strongly suggest that the cytoplasmic domain of the 3a protein of SARS-CoV binds calcium in vitro, causing a change in protein conformation.

  19. Structural feature extraction protocol for classifying reversible membrane binding protein domains.

    PubMed

    Källberg, Morten; Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Machine learning based classification protocols for automated function annotation of protein structures have in many instances proven superior to simpler sequence based procedures. Here we present an automated method for extracting features from protein structures by construction of surface patches to be used in such protocols. The utility of the developed patch-growing procedure is exemplified by its ability to identify reversible membrane binding domains from the C1, C2, and PH families.

  20. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  1. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  2. Ephemeral Protein Binding to DNA Shapes Stable Nuclear Bodies and Chromatin Domains.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Chris A; Liebchen, Benno; Michieletto, Davide; Mouvet, Francois; Cook, Peter R; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2017-03-28

    Fluorescence microscopy reveals that the contents of many (membrane-free) nuclear bodies exchange rapidly with the soluble pool while the underlying structure persists; such observations await a satisfactory biophysical explanation. To shed light on this, we perform large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of a chromatin fiber interacting with an ensemble of (multivalent) DNA-binding proteins able to switch between an "on" (binding) and an "off" (nonbinding) state. This system provides a model for any DNA-binding protein that can be posttranslationally modified to change its affinity for DNA (e.g., through phosphorylation). Protein switching is a nonequilibrium process, and it leads to the formation of clusters of self-limiting size, where individual proteins in a cluster exchange with the soluble pool with kinetics similar to those seen in photobleaching experiments. This behavior contrasts sharply with that exhibited by nonswitching proteins, which are permanently in the on-state; when these bind to DNA nonspecifically, they form clusters that grow indefinitely in size. To explain these findings, we propose a mean-field theory from which we obtain a scaling relation between the typical cluster size and the protein switching rate. Protein switching also reshapes intrachromatin contacts to give networks resembling those seen in topologically associating domains, as switching markedly favors local (short-range) contacts over distant ones. Our results point to posttranslational modification of chromatin-bridging proteins as a generic mechanism driving the self-assembly of highly dynamic, nonequilibrium, protein clusters with the properties of nuclear bodies.

  3. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  4. Conformational stability and domain coupling in D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The monomeric D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) from Escherichia coli (Mr 33000) is a periplasmic protein that serves as a high-affinity receptor for the active transport and chemotaxis towards both sugars. The effect of D-glucose binding on the thermal unfolding of the GGBP protein at pH 7.0 has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), far-UV CD and intrinsic tryptophanyl residue fluorescence (Trp fluorescence). All three techniques reveal reversible, thermal transitions and a midpoint temperature (Tm) increase from 50 to 63 °C produced by 10 mM D-glucose. Both in the absence and presence of D-glucose a single asymmetric endotherm for GGBP is observed in DSC, although each endotherm consists of two transitions about 4 °C apart in Tm values. In the absence of D-glucose, the protein unfolding is best described by two non-ideal transitions, suggesting the presence of unfolding intermediates. In the presence of D-glucose protein, unfolding is more co-operative than in the absence of the ligand, and the experimental data are best fitted to a model that assumes two ideal (two-state) sequential transitions. Thus D-glucose binding changes the character of the GGBP protein folding/unfolding by linking the two domains such that protein unfolding becomes a cooperative, two two-state process. A KA′ value of 5.6×106 M−1 at 63 °C for D-glucose binding is estimated from DSC results. The domain with the lower stability in DSC measurements has been identified as the C-terminal domain of GGBP from thermally induced Trp fluorescence changes. PMID:15032747

  5. Domain dislocation: a change of core structure in periplasmic binding proteins in their evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Tateno, Y; Nishikawa, K

    1999-02-12

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) serve as receptors for various water-soluble ligands in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport systems, and form one of the largest protein families in eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. They are considered to be derived from a common ancestor, judging from their similarities of three-dimensional structure, their mechanism of ligand binding and the operon structure of their genes. Nevertheless, there are two types of topological arrangements of the central beta-sheets in their core structures. It follows that there must have been differentiation in the core structure, which we call "domain dislocation", in the course of evolution of the PBP family. To find a clue as to when the domain dislocation occurred, we constructed phylogenetic trees for PBPs based on their amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures, respectively. The trees show that the proteins of each type clearly cluster together, strongly indicating that the change in the core structure occurred only once in the evolution of PBPs. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ABC proteins that are encoded by the same operon of their partner PBP, and obtained the same result. Based on the phylogenetic relationship and comparison of the topological arrangements of PBPs, we obtained a reasonable genealogical chart of structural changes in the PBP family. The present analysis shows that the unidirectional change of protein evolution is clearly deduced at the level of protein three-dimensional structure rather than the level of amino acid sequence.

  6. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  7. Nanofibrillar hydrogel scaffolds from recombinant protein-based polymers with integrin- and proteoglycan-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K; Werten, Marc W T; Posadowska, Urszula; Storm, Ingeborg M; de Wolf, Frits A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-12-01

    This study describes the design, production, and testing of functionalized variants of a recombinant protein-based polymer that forms nanofibrillar hydrogels with self-healing properties. With a view to bone tissue engineering applications, we equipped these variants with N-terminal extensions containing either (1) integrin-binding (RGD) or (2) less commonly studied proteoglycan-binding (KRSR) cell-adhesive motifs. The polymers were efficiently produced as secreted proteins using the yeast Pichia pastoris and were essentially monodisperse. The pH-responsive protein-based polymers are soluble at low pH and self-assemble into supramolecular fibrils and hydrogels at physiological pH. By mixing functionalized and nonfunctionalized proteins in different ratios, and adjusting pH, hydrogel scaffolds with the same protein concentration but varying content of the two types of cell-adhesive motifs were readily obtained. The scaffolds were used for the two-dimensional culture of MG-63 osteoblastic cells. RGD domains had a slightly stronger effect than KRSR domains on adhesion, activity, and spreading. However, scaffolds featuring both functional domains revealed a clear synergistic effect on cell metabolic activity and spreading, and provided the highest final degree of cell confluency. The mixed functionalized hydrogels presented here thus allowed to tailor the osteoblastic cell response, offering prospects for their further development as scaffolds for bone regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3082-3092, 2016.

  8. RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in ALS and FTLD-U.

    PubMed

    Gitler, Aaron D; Shorter, James

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is a debilitating, and universally fatal, neurodegenerative disease that devastates upper and lower motor neurons. The causes of ALS are poorly understood. A central role for RNA-binding proteins and RNA metabolism in ALS has recently emerged. The RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, are principal components of cytoplasmic inclusions found in motor neurons of ALS patients and mutations in TDP-43 and FUS are linked to familial and sporadic ALS. Pathology and genetics also connect TDP-43 and FUS with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). It was unknown whether mechanisms of FUS aggregation and toxicity were similar or different to those of TDP-43. To address this issue, we have employed yeast models and pure protein biochemistry to define mechanisms underlying TDP-43 and FUS aggregation and toxicity, and to identify genetic modifiers relevant for human disease. We have identified prion-like domains in FUS and TDP-43 and provide evidence that these domains are required for aggregation. Our studies have defined key similarities as well as important differences between the two proteins. Collectively, however, our findings lead us to suggest that FUS and TDP-43, though similar RNA-binding proteins, likely aggregate and confer disease phenotypes via distinct mechanisms.

  9. Structure of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein copper-binding domain at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey Kwai-Wai; Adams, Julian J.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.

    2007-10-01

    An atomic resolution structure of the copper-binding domain of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein is presented. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, as its cleavage generates the Aβ peptide that is toxic to cells. APP is able to bind Cu{sup 2+} and reduce it to Cu{sup +} through its copper-binding domain (CuBD). The interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and APP leads to a decrease in Aβ production and to alleviation of the symptoms of the disease in mouse models. Structural studies of CuBD have been undertaken in order to better understand the mechanism behind the process. Here, the crystal structure of CuBD in the metal-free form determined to ultrahigh resolution (0.85 Å) is reported. The structure shows that the copper-binding residues of CuBD are rather rigid but that Met170, which is thought to be the electron source for Cu{sup 2+} reduction, adopts two different side-chain conformations. These observations shed light on the copper-binding and redox mechanisms of CuBD. The structure of CuBD at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of molecules that will deplete Aβ production.

  10. The LIM motif defines a specific zinc-binding protein domain.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, J W; Schmeichel, K L; Beckerle, M C; Winge, D R

    1993-05-15

    The cysteine-rich protein (CRP) contains two copies of the LIM sequence motif, CX2CX17HX2CX2CX2CX17-CX2C, that was first identified in the homeodomain proteins Lin-11, Is1-1, and Mec-3. The abundance and spacing of the cysteine residues in the LIM motif are reminiscent of a metal-binding domain. We examined the metal-binding properties of CRP isolated from chicken smooth muscle (cCRP) and from a bacterial expression system and observed that cCRP is a specific Zn-binding metalloprotein. Four Zn(II) ions are maximally bound to cCRP, consistent with the idea that each LIM domain coordinates two metal ions. From spectroscopic studies of Co(II)- and 113Cd(II)-substituted cCRP, we determined that each metal ion is tetrahedrally coordinated with cysteinyl sulfurs dominating the ligand types. One metal site within each LIM motif has tetrathiolate (S4) coordination, the second site may either be S4 or S3N1. The LIM motif represents another example of a specific Zn-binding protein sequence.

  11. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Rebecca L; Fraser, LaTasha C R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2015-12-15

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining (3)JNC' couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded β-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short α-helix and three-stranded β-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and (3)JNC' H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by (1)HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when (15)N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility.

  12. The C-terminal helices of heat shock protein 70 are essential for J-domain binding and ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Chao; Zhou, Chen-Jie; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Wu, Meng; Cao, Chun-Yang; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-02-17

    The J-domain co-chaperones work together with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) chaperone to regulate many cellular events, but the mechanism underlying the J-domain-mediated HSP70 function remains elusive. We studied the interaction between human-inducible HSP70 and Homo sapiens J-domain protein (HSJ1a), a J domain and UIM motif-containing co-chaperone. The J domain of HSJ1a shares a conserved structure with other J domains from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic species, and it mediates the interaction with and the ATPase cycle of HSP70. Our in vitro study corroborates that the N terminus of HSP70 including the ATPase domain and the substrate-binding β-subdomain is not sufficient to bind with the J domain of HSJ1a. The C-terminal helical α-subdomain of HSP70, which was considered to function as a lid of the substrate-binding domain, is crucial for binding with the J domain of HSJ1a and stimulating the ATPase activity of HSP70. These fluctuating helices are likely to contribute to a proper conformation of HSP70 for J-domain binding other than directly bind with the J domain. Our findings provide an alternative mechanism of allosteric activation for functional regulation of HSP70 by its J-domain co-chaperones.

  13. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  14. Cooperative binding of dominant-negative prion protein to kringle domains.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Chongsuk; Prusiner, Stanley B; Legname, Giuseppe

    2003-05-30

    Conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a major biochemical alteration in the progression of prion disease. This conversion process is thought to require interaction between PrP(C) and an as yet unidentified auxiliary factor, provisionally designated protein X. In searching for protein X, we screened a phage display cDNA expression library constructed from prion-infected neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells and identified a kringle protein domain using full-length recombinant mouse PrP (recMoPrP(23-231), hereafter recMoPrP) expressing a dominant-negative mutation at codon 218 (recMoPrP(Q218K)). In vitro binding analysis using ELISA verified specific interaction of recMoPrP to kringle domains (K(1+2+3)) with higher binding by recMoPrP(Q218K) than by full-length recMoPrP without the mutation. This interaction was confirmed by competitive binding analysis, in which the addition of either a specific anti-kringle antibody or L-lysine abolished the interaction. Biochemical studies of the interactions between K(1+2+3) and various concentrations of both recMoPrP molecules demonstrated binding in a dose-dependent manner. A Hill plot analysis of the data indicates positive cooperative binding of both recMoPrP(Q218K) and recMoPrP to K(1+2+3) with stronger binding by recMoPrP(Q218K). Using full-length and an N-terminally truncated MoPrP(89-231), we demonstrate that N-terminal sequences enable PrP to bind strongly to K(1+2+3). Further characterization with truncated MoPrP(89-231) refolded in different conformations revealed that both alpha-helical and beta-sheet conformations bind to K(1+2+3). Our data demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of a dominant-negative PrP as well as binding of other PrPs to K(1+2+3). The relevance of such interactions during prion pathogenesis remains to be established.

  15. Regulation and action of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein AAA+ domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial EBPs (enhancer-binding proteins) play crucial roles in regulating cellular responses to environmental changes, in part by providing efficient control over σ54-dependent gene transcription. The AAA+ (ATPase associated with various cellular activites) domain of the EBPs, when assembled into a ring, uses energy from ATP binding, hydrolysis and product release to remodel the σ54–RNAP (RNA polymerase) holoenzyme so that it can transition from closed to open form at promoter DNA. The assembly, and hence activity, of these ATPases are regulated by many different signal transduction mechanisms. Recent advances in solution scattering techniques, when combined with high-resolution structures and biochemical data, have enabled us to obtain mechanistic insights into the regulation and action of a subset of these σ54 activators: those whose assembly into ring form is controlled by two-component signal transduction. We review (i) experimental considerations of applying the SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering)/WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) technique, (ii) distinct regulation mechanisms of the AAA+ domains of three EBPs by similar two-component signal transduction receiver domains, and (iii) major conformational changes and correlated σ54-binding activity of an isolated EBP AAA+ domain in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:18208392

  16. An Epigenetic Regulator: Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein 1 (MBD1)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Chen, Bi-Feng; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important form of epigenetic regulation in both normal development and cancer. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 1 (MBD1) is highly related to DNA methylation. Its MBD domain recognizes and binds to methylated CpGs. This binding allows it to trigger methylation of H3K9 and results in transcriptional repression. The CXXC3 domain of MBD1 makes it a unique member of the MBD family due to its affinity to unmethylated DNA. MBD1 acts as an epigenetic regulator via different mechanisms, such as the formation of the MCAF1/MBD1/SETDB1 complex or the MBD1-HDAC3 complex. As methylation status always changes along with carcinogenesis or neurogenesis, MBD1 with its interacting partners, including proteins and non-coding RNAs, participates in normal or pathological processes and functions in different regulatory systems. Because of the important role of MBD1 in epigenetic regulation, it is a good candidate as a therapeutic target for diseases. PMID:25751725

  17. In vivo binding properties of SH2 domains from GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J A; Kashishian, A

    1993-01-01

    We have used a transient expression system and mutant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors to study the binding specificities of the Src homology 2 (SH2) regions of the Ras GTPase-activator protein (GAP) and the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase). A number of fusion proteins, each tagged with an epitope allowing recognition by a monoclonal antibody, were expressed at levels comparable to those of endogenous GAP. Fusion proteins containing the central SH2-SH3-SH2 region of GAP or the C-terminal region of p85 alpha, which includes two SH2 domains, bound to PDGF receptors in response to PDGF stimulation. Both fusion proteins showed the same requirements for tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the PDGF receptor as the full-length proteins from which they were derived, i.e., binding of the GAP fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-771, and binding of the p85 fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-740, Tyr-751, or both residues. Fusion proteins containing single SH2 domains from either GAP or p85 alpha did not bind detectably to PDGF receptors in this system, suggesting that two SH2 domains in a single polypeptide cooperate to raise the affinity of binding. The sequence specificities of individual SH2 domains were deduced from the binding properties of fusion proteins containing one SH2 domain from GAP and another from p85. The results suggest that the C-terminal GAP SH2 domain specifies binding to Tyr-771, the C-terminal p85 alpha SH2 domain binds to either Tyr-740 or Tyr-751, and each protein's N-terminal SH2 domain binds to unidentified phosphorylation sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8382774

  18. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Radakovics, Katharina; Smith, Terry K.; Bobik, Nina; Round, Adam; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Usón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1–83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1–83) structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1–240), we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88. PMID:27973613

  19. The expanded octarepeat domain selectively binds prions and disrupts homomeric prion protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Leliveld, Sirik Rutger; Dame, Remus Thei; Wuite, Gijs J L; Stitz, Lothar; Korth, Carsten

    2006-02-10

    Insertion of additional octarepeats into the prion protein gene has been genetically linked to familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease and hence to de novo generation of infectious prions. The pivotal event during prion formation is the conversion of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc, which subsequently induces further conversion in an autocatalytic manner. Apparently, an expanded octarepeat domain directs folding of PrP toward the PrPSc conformation and initiates a self-replicating conversion process. Here, based on three main observations, we have provided a model on how altered molecular interactions between wild-type and mutant PrP set the stage for familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease with octarepeat insertions. First, we showed that wild-type octarepeat domains interact in a copper-dependent and reversible manner, a "copper switch." This interaction becomes irreversible upon domain expansion, possibly reflecting a loss of function. Second, expanded octarepeat domains of increasing length gradually form homogenous globular multimers of 11-21 nm in the absence of copper ions when expressed as soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Third, octarepeat domain expansion causes a gain of function with at least 10 repeats selectively binding PrPSc in a denaturant-resistant complex in the absence of copper ions. Thus, the combination of both a loss and gain of function profoundly influences homomeric interaction behavior of PrP with an expanded octarepeat domain. A multimeric cluster of prion proteins carrying expanded octarepeat domains may therefore capture and incorporate spontaneously arising short-lived PrPSc-like conformers, thereby providing a matrix for their conversion.

  20. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Protein Contains Domains for ATP Binding, Nuclear Localization, and Type IV Secretion▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Vergunst, Annette C.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Moyer, Deborah M.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Ream, Walt

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are closely related plant pathogens that cause different diseases, crown gall and hairy root. Both diseases result from transfer, integration, and expression of plasmid-encoded bacterial genes located on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) in the plant genome. Bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins necessary for infection are also translocated into plant cells. Transfer of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and Vir proteins requires a type IV secretion system, a protein complex spanning the bacterial envelope. A. tumefaciens translocates the ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells, where it binds single-stranded T-DNA and helps target it to the nucleus. Although some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, they are pathogenic and transfer T-DNA efficiently. Instead, these bacteria express the GALLS protein, which is essential for their virulence. The GALLS protein can complement an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation, indicating that GALLS can substitute for VirE2. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. Both GALLS and VirE2 contain nuclear localization sequences and a C-terminal type IV secretion signal. Here we show that mutations in any of these domains abolished the ability of GALLS to substitute for VirE2. PMID:17012398

  1. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  2. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  3. Properties of natural and artificial proteins displaying multiple ubiquitin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Aillet, Fabienne

    2010-02-01

    Ubiquitylation provides a rapid alternative to control the activity of crucial cellular factors through the remodelling of a target protein. Diverse ubiquitin chains are recognized by domains with affinity for UBDs (ubiquitin-binding domains) present in receptor/effector proteins. Interestingly, some proteins contain more than one UBD and the preservation of this structure in many species suggests an evolutionary advantage for this topology. Here, we review some typical proteins that naturally contain more than one UBD and emphasize how such structures contribute to the mechanism they mediate. Characteristics such as higher affinities for polyubiquitin chains and chain-linkage preferences can be replicated by the TUBEs (tandem ubiquitin-binding entities). Furthermore, TUBEs show two additional properties: protection of ubiquitylated substrates from deubiquitylating enzymes and interference with the action of the proteasome. Consequently, TUBEs behave as 'ubiquitin traps' that efficiently capture endogenous ubiquitylated proteins. Interpretations and hypothetical models proposed by different groups to understand the synchronous action of multiple UBDs are discussed herein.

  4. Enzyme immobilization using a cellulose-binding domain: properties of a beta-glucosidase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ong, E; Gilkes, N R; Miller, R C; Warren, A J; Kilburn, D G

    1991-01-01

    Using molecular genetic techniques, a fusion protein has been produced which contains the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of an exoglucanase (Cex) from Cellulomonas fimi fused to a beta-glucosidase (Abg) from Agrobacterium sp. The CBD functions as an affinity tag for the simultaneous purification and immobilization of the enzyme on cellulose. Binding to cellulose was stable for prolonged periods at temperatures from 4 degrees C to at least 50 degrees C, at ionic strengths from 10 mM to greater than 1 M, and at pH values below 8. The fusion protein can be desorbed from cellulose with distilled water or at pH greater than 8. Immobilized enzyme columns of the fusion protein bound to cotton fibers exhibited stable beta-glucosidase activity for at least 10 days of continuous operation at temperatures up to 37 degrees C. At higher temperatures, the bound enzyme lost activity. The thermal stability of the fusion protein was greatly improved by immobilization. Immobilization did not alter the pH stability. Except for its ability to bind to cellulose, the properties of the fusion protein were virtually the same as those of the native enzyme.

  5. Multivalent binding of formin-binding protein 21 (FBP21)-tandem-WW domains fosters protein recognition in the pre-spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Stefan; Wieczorek, Marek; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Marg, Berenice; Seidel, Thorsten; Meyer, Tim; Knapp, Ernst-Walter; Freund, Christian

    2011-11-04

    The high abundance of repetitive but nonidentical proline-rich sequences in spliceosomal proteins raises the question of how these known interaction motifs recruit their interacting protein domains. Whereas complex formation of these adaptors with individual motifs has been studied in great detail, little is known about the binding mode of domains arranged in tandem repeats and long proline-rich sequences including multiple motifs. Here we studied the interaction of the two adjacent WW domains of spliceosomal protein FBP21 with several ligands of different lengths and composition to elucidate the hallmarks of multivalent binding for this class of recognition domains. First, we show that many of the proteins that define the cellular proteome interacting with FBP21-WW1-WW2 contain multiple proline-rich motifs. Among these is the newly identified binding partner SF3B4. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis reveals the tandem-WW domains of FBP21 to interact with splicing factor 3B4 (SF3B4) in nuclear speckles where splicing takes place. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR shows that the tandem arrangement of WW domains and the multivalency of the proline-rich ligands both contribute to affinity enhancement. However, ligand exchange remains fast compared with the NMR time scale. Surprisingly, a N-terminal spin label attached to a bivalent ligand induces NMR line broadening of signals corresponding to both WW domains of the FBP21-WW1-WW2 protein. This suggests that distinct orientations of the ligand contribute to a delocalized and semispecific binding mode that should facilitate search processes within the spliceosome.

  6. From keys to bulldozers: expanding roles for winged helix domains in nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Harami, Gábor M; Gyimesi, Máté; Kovács, Mihály

    2013-07-01

    The winged helix domain (WHD) is a widespread nucleic-acid-binding protein structural element found in all kingdoms of life. Although the overall structure of the WHD is conserved, its functional properties and interaction profiles are extremely versatile. WHD-containing proteins can exploit nearly the full spectrum of nucleic acid structural features for recognition and even covalent modification or noncovalent rearrangement of target molecules. WHD functions range from sequence-recognizing keys in transcription factors and bulldozer-like strand-separating wedges in helicases to mediators of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Further investigations are needed to understand the contribution of WHD structural dynamics to nucleic-acid-modifying enzymatic functions.

  7. Cellular localization and characterization of cytosolic binding partners for Gla domain-containing proteins PRRG4 and PRRG2.

    PubMed

    Yazicioglu, Mustafa N; Monaldini, Luca; Chu, Kirk; Khazi, Fayaz R; Murphy, Samuel L; Huang, Heshu; Margaritis, Paris; High, Katherine A

    2013-09-06

    The genes encoding a family of proteins termed proline-rich γ-carboxyglutamic acid (PRRG) proteins were identified and characterized more than a decade ago, but their functions remain unknown. These novel membrane proteins have an extracellular γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) protein domain and cytosolic WW binding motifs. We screened WW domain arrays for cytosolic binding partners for PRRG4 and identified novel protein-protein interactions for the protein. We also uncovered a new WW binding motif in PRRG4 that is essential for these newly found protein-protein interactions. Several of the PRRG-interacting proteins we identified are essential for a variety of physiologic processes. Our findings indicate possible novel and previously unidentified functions for PRRG proteins.

  8. Disruption of actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin protein causes dystonia musculorum in mice.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masao; Watanabe, Keisuke; Bepari, Asim K; Nashimoto, Jun-Ichiro; Araki, Kimi; Sano, Hiromi; Chiken, Satomi; Nambu, Atsushi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2014-11-01

    The Dystonin gene (Dst) is responsible for dystonia musculorum (dt), an inherited mouse model of hereditary neuropathy accompanied by progressive motor symptoms such as dystonia and cerebellar ataxia. Dst-a isoforms, which contain actin-binding domains, are predominantly expressed in the nervous system. Although sensory neuron degeneration in the peripheral nervous system during the early postnatal stage is a well-recognised phenotype in dt, the histological characteristics and neuronal circuits in the central nervous system responsible for motor symptoms remain unclear. To analyse the causative neuronal networks and roles of Dst isoforms, we generated novel multipurpose Dst gene trap mice, in which actin-binding domain-containing isoforms are disrupted. Homozygous mice showed typical dt phenotypes with sensory degeneration and progressive motor symptoms. The gene trap allele (Dst(Gt) ) encodes a mutant Dystonin-LacZ fusion protein, which is detectable by X-gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactoside) staining. We observed wide expression of the actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin isoforms in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system. This raised the possibility that not only secondary neuronal defects in the CNS subsequent to peripheral sensory degeneration but also cell-autonomous defects in the CNS contribute to the motor symptoms. Expression analysis of immediate early genes revealed decreased neuronal activity in the cerebellar-thalamo-striatal pathway in the homozygous brain, implying the involvement of this pathway in the dt phenotype. These novel Dst(Gt) mice showed that a loss-of-function mutation in the actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin isoforms led to typical dt phenotypes. Furthermore, this novel multipurpose Dst(Gt) allele offers a unique tool for analysing the causative neuronal networks involved in the dt phenotype.

  9. Solution structure and intermolecular interactions of the third metal-binding domain of ATP7A, the Menkes disease protein.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Cantini, Francesca; DellaMalva, Nunzia; Herrmann, Torsten; Rosato, Antonio; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-09-29

    The third metal-binding domain of the human Menkes protein (MNK3), a copper(I)-transporting ATPase, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in solution. The solution structure of MNK3, its copper(I)-binding properties, and its interaction with the physiological partner, HAH1, have been studied. MNK3 is the domain most dissimilar in structure from the other domains of the Menkes protein. This is reflected in a significant rearrangement of the last strand of the four-stranded beta-sheet when compared with the other known homologous proteins or protein domains. MNK3 is also peculiar with respect to its interaction with the copper(I) ion, as it was found to be a comparatively weak binder. Copper(I) transfer from metal-loaded HAH1 was observed experimentally, but the metal distribution was shifted toward binding by HAH1. This is at variance with what is observed for the other Menkes domains.

  10. Preferential binding of the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 at methylated transcriptional start site regions.

    PubMed

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Perriaud, Laury; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Benhattar, Jean; Lachuer, Joël; Dante, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD) proteins are thought to be key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing through recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. In cancer, the MBD-family member, MBD2, may be primarily involved in the repression of genes exhibiting methylated CpG at their 5' end. Here we ask whether MBD2 randomly associates methylated sequences, producing chance effects on transcription, or exhibits a more specific recognition of some methylated regions. Using chromatin and DNA immunoprecipitation, we analyzed MBD2 and RNA polymerase II deposition and DNA methylation in HeLa cells on arrays representing 25,500 promoter regions. This first whole-genome mapping revealed the preferential localization of MBD2 near transcription start sites (TSSs), within the region analyzed, 7.5 kb upstream through 2.45 kb downstream of 5' transcription start sites. Probe by probe analysis correlated MBD2 deposition and DNA methylation. Motif analysis did not reveal specific sequence motifs; however, CCG and CGC sequences seem to be overrepresented. Nonrandom association (multiple correspondence analysis, p < 0.0001) between silent genes, DNA methylation and MBD2 binding was observed. The association between MBD2 binding and transcriptional repression weakened as the distance between binding site and TSS increased, suggesting that MBD2 represses transcriptional initiation. This hypothesis may represent a functional explanation for the preferential binding of MBD2 at methyl-CpG in TSS regions.

  11. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene silencing in Arabidopsis by interacting with RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Parida, Adwaita Prasad; Sharma, Amrapali; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome from transposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG binding domain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind to methylated DNA. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 methyl CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins, but the molecular/biological functions of most of these proteins are still not clear. In the present study, we identified four proteins that interact with AtMBD6. Interestingly, three of them contain RNA binding domains and are co-localized with AtMBD6 in the nucleus. The interacting partners includes AtRPS2C (a 40S ribosomal protein), AtNTF2 (nuclear transport factor 2) and AtAGO4 (Argonoute 4). The fourth protein that physically interacts with AtMBD6 is a histone-modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 6 (AtHDA6), which is a known component of the RNA-mediated gene silencing system. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation in the atmbd6, atrps2c and atntf2 mutants, using methylation-sensitive PCR detected decreased DNA methylation at miRNA/siRNA producing loci, pseudogenes and other targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our results indicate that AtMBD6 is involved in RNA-mediated gene silencing and it binds to RNA binding proteins like AtRPS2C, AtAGO4 and AtNTF2. AtMBD6 also interacts with histone deacetylase AtHDA6 that might have a role in chromatin condensation at the targets of RdDM.

  12. Structures of the first and second double-stranded RNA-binding domains of human TAR RNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Kawazoe, Masahito; Takemoto, Chie; Kigawa, Takanori; Güntert, Peter; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    The TAR RNA-binding Protein (TRBP) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein, which binds to Dicer and is required for the RNA interference pathway. TRBP consists of three dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). The first and second dsRBDs (dsRBD1 and dsRBD2, respectively) have affinities for dsRNA, whereas the third dsRBD (dsRBD3) binds to Dicer. In this study, we prepared the single domain fragments of human TRBP corresponding to dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 and solved the crystal structure of dsRBD1 and the solution structure of dsRBD2. The two structures contain an α−β−β−β−α fold, which is common to the dsRBDs. The overall structures of dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 are similar to each other, except for a slight shift of the first α helix. The residues involved in dsRNA binding are conserved. We examined the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-binding properties of these dsRBDs by isothermal titration colorimetry measurements. The dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 fragments both bound to siRNA, with dissociation constants of 220 and 113 nM, respectively. In contrast, the full-length TRBP and its fragment with dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 exhibited much smaller dissociation constants (0.24 and 0.25 nM, respectively), indicating that the tandem dsRBDs bind simultaneously to one siRNA molecule. On the other hand, the loop between the first α helix and the first β strand of dsRBD2, but not dsRBD1, has a Trp residue, which forms hydrophobic and cation-π interactions with the surrounding residues. A circular dichroism analysis revealed that the thermal stability of dsRBD2 is higher than that of dsRBD1 and depends on the Trp residue. PMID:21080422

  13. Phylogenetic distribution and evolution of the linked RNA-binding and NOT1-binding domains in the tristetraprolin family of tandem CCCH zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, Perry J; Perera, Lalith

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans.

  14. Phylogenetic Distribution and Evolution of the Linked RNA-Binding and NOT1-Binding Domains in the Tristetraprolin Family of Tandem CCCH Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans. PMID:24697206

  15. New Helical Binding Domain Mediates a Glycosyltransferase Activity of a Bifunctional Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Meixian; Yang, Tiandi; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) conserved in streptococci and staphylococci are important for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis. Fap1, a well studied SRRP is a major surface constituent of Streptococcus parasanguinis and is required for bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Biogenesis of Fap1 is a multistep process that involves both glycosylation and secretion. A series of glycosyltransferases catalyze sequential glycosylation of Fap1. We have identified a unique hybrid protein dGT1 (dual glycosyltransferase 1) that contains two distinct domains. N-terminal DUF1792 is a novel GT-D-type glycosyltransferase, transferring Glc residues to Glc-GlcNAc-modified Fap1. C-terminal dGT1 (CgT) is predicted to possess a typical GT-A-type glycosyltransferase, however, the activity remains unknown. In this study, we determine that CgT is a distinct glycosyltransferase, transferring GlcNAc residues to Glc-Glc-GlcNAc-modified Fap1. A 2.4-Å x-ray crystal structure reveals that CgT has a unique binding domain consisting of three α helices in addition to a typical GT-A-type glycosyltransferase domain. The helical domain is crucial for the oligomerization of CgT. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the helix domain is required for the protein-protein interaction and crucial for the glycosyltransferase activity of CgT in vitro and in vivo. As the helix domain presents a novel structural fold, we conclude that CgT represents a new member of GT-A-type glycosyltransferases. PMID:27539847

  16. A Rational Engineering Strategy for Designing Protein A-Binding Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Sulea, Traian; van Faassen, Henk; Hussack, Greg; Purisima, Enrico O.; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and streptococcal protein G (SpG) affinity chromatography are the gold standards for purifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic applications. However, camelid VHH single-domain Abs (sdAbs or VHHs) are not bound by SpG and only sporadically bound by SpA. Currently, VHHs require affinity tag-based purification, which limits their therapeutic potential and adds considerable complexity and cost to their production. Here we describe a simple and rapid mutagenesis-based approach designed to confer SpA binding upon a priori non-SpA-binding VHHs. We show that SpA binding of VHHs is determined primarily by the same set of residues as in human mAbs, albeit with an unexpected degree of tolerance to substitutions at certain core and non-core positions and some limited dependence on at least one residue outside the SpA interface, and that SpA binding could be successfully introduced into five VHHs against three different targets with no adverse effects on expression yield or antigen binding. Next-generation sequencing of llama, alpaca and dromedary VHH repertoires suggested that species differences in SpA binding may result from frequency variation in specific deleterious polymorphisms, especially Ile57. Thus, the SpA binding phenotype of camelid VHHs can be easily modulated to take advantage of tag-less purification techniques, although the frequency with which this is required may depend on the source species. PMID:27631624

  17. Molecular Details of the PH Domain of ACAP1(BAR-PH) Protein Binding to PIP-Containing Membrane.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin Chun; Lu, Lanyuan; Sun, Fei; Fan, Jun

    2017-02-03

    ACAP1 proteins were previously reported to specifically bind PIP2-containing cell membranes and form well-structured protein lattices in order to conduct membrane tubulation. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations to characterize orientation of the PH domains with respect to the BAR domains inside the protein dimer. Followed by molecular dynamics simulations, we present a comprehensive orientation analysis of PH domain under different states including unbound and bound with lipids. We have examined two binding pockets on the PH domain and present PMF profiles of the two pockets to account for their preference to PIP2 lipids. Combining orientation analysis and studies of binding pockets, our simulations results reveal valuable molecular basis for protein-lipid interactions of ACAP1 proteins during membrane remodeling process.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  19. De novo design and engineering of functional metal and porphyrin-binding protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, Bernard H.

    In this work, I describe an approach to the rational, iterative design and characterization of two functional cofactor-binding protein domains. First, a hybrid computational/experimental method was developed with the aim of algorithmically generating a suite of porphyrin-binding protein sequences with minimal mutual sequence information. This method was explored by generating libraries of sequences, which were then expressed and evaluated for function. One successful sequence is shown to bind a variety of porphyrin-like cofactors, and exhibits light- activated electron transfer in mixed hemin:chlorin e6 and hemin:Zn(II)-protoporphyrin IX complexes. These results imply that many sophisticated functions such as cofactor binding and electron transfer require only a very small number of residue positions in a protein sequence to be fixed. Net charge and hydrophobic content are important in determining protein solubility and stability. Accordingly, rational modifications were made to the aforementioned design procedure in order to improve its overall success rate. The effects of these modifications are explored using two `next-generation' sequence libraries, which were separately expressed and evaluated. Particular modifications to these design parameters are demonstrated to effectively double the purification success rate of the procedure. Finally, I describe the redesign of the artificial di-iron protein DF2 into CDM13, a single chain di-Manganese four-helix bundle. CDM13 acts as a functional model of natural manganese catalase, exhibiting a kcat of 0.08s-1 under steady-state conditions. The bound manganese cofactors have a reduction potential of +805 mV vs NHE, which is too high for efficient dismutation of hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that as a high-potential manganese complex, CDM13 may represent a promising first step toward a polypeptide model of the Oxygen Evolving Complex of the photosynthetic enzyme Photosystem II.

  20. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E. O.; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J.; Andersen, Jens S.; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1’s defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made. PMID:22836166

  1. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  2. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  3. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Michael Garavito, R

    2011-04-22

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain (∼310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain (∼20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain (∼19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain (∼30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V(0) portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0Å (maltose-free) and 2.15Å (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in protein oligomerization.

  4. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U. /Monash U. /Melbourne U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  5. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  6. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  7. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  8. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquiti-nation and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  9. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquitination and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  10. A novel AT-rich DNA binding protein that combines an HMG I-like DNA binding domain with a putative transcription domain.

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, G; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    There is growing evidence that AT-rich promoter elements play a role in transcription of plant genes. For the promoter of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glutamine synthetase from pea (GS2), the deletion of a 33-bp AT-rich sequence (box 1 native) from the 5' end of a GS2 promoter-beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion resulted in a 10-fold reduction in GUS activity. The box 1 native element was used in gel shift analysis and two distinct complexes were detected. One complex is related to the low-mobility complex reported previously for AT-rich elements from several other plant promoters. A multimer of the box 1 sequence was used to isolate a cDNA encoding an AT-rich DNA binding protein (ATBP-1). ATBP-1 is not a high-mobility group protein, but it is a novel protein that combines a high-mobility group I/Y-like DNA binding domain with a glutamine-rich putative transcriptional domain. PMID:7907505

  11. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  12. Modular structure of chromosomal proteins HMG-14 and HMG-17: Definition of a transcriptional enhancement domain distinct from the nucleosomal binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Trieschmann, L.; Postnikov, Y.V.; Rickers, A.; Bustin, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how deletion mutants and peptides were used to identify the transcriptional enhancement domain and the nucleosome binding domain of two chromosomal proteins, HMG-14 and HMG-17. The research indicates that mutations involving C-terminal amino acids significantly reduces the ability of the nucleoproteins to enhance transcription from chromatin templates. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A putative nucleoside triphosphate-binding domain in the nonstructural protein of B19 parvovirus is required for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Momoeda, M; Wong, S; Kawase, M; Young, N S; Kajigaya, S

    1994-01-01

    Cytotoxicity secondary to B19 parvovirus infection is due to expression of the viral nonstructural protein. Nonstructural proteins of many parvoviruses contain a well-conserved nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding motif, which has been shown to be essential for a variety of protein functions. We show here that cytotoxicity of the B19 parvovirus nonstructural protein was abolished by single mutations of amino acids within the NTP-binding domain, especially within the A motif, implicating NTP-binding in virus-induced cell death. Images PMID:7966641

  14. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: multiple domains for multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; Altschuler, Sarah E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-07-02

    The recognition of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is integral to myriad cellular functions. In eukaryotes, ssDNA is present stably at the ends of chromosomes and at some promoter elements. Furthermore, it is formed transiently by several cellular processes including telomere synthesis, transcription, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. To coordinate these diverse activities, a variety of proteins have evolved to bind ssDNA in a manner specific to their function. Here, we review the recognition of ssDNA through the analysis of high-resolution structures of proteins in complex with ssDNA. This functionally diverse set of proteins arises from a limited set of structural motifs that can be modified and arranged to achieve distinct activities, including a range of ligand specificities. We also investigate the ways in which these domains interact in the context of large multidomain proteins/complexes. These comparisons reveal the structural features that define the range of functions exhibited by these proteins.

  15. Prion-like domains in RNA binding proteins are essential for building subnuclear paraspeckles

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Sven; Kong, Geraldine; Mannen, Taro; Sadowska, Agata; Kobelke, Simon; Blythe, Amanda; Knott, Gavin J.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Ho, Diwei; Newcombe, Estella A.; Hosoki, Kana; Goshima, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hatters, Danny; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bond, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Prion-like domains (PLDs) are low complexity sequences found in RNA binding proteins associated with the neurodegenerative disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recently, PLDs have been implicated in mediating gene regulation via liquid-phase transitions that drive ribonucleoprotein granule assembly. In this paper, we report many PLDs in proteins associated with paraspeckles, subnuclear bodies that form around long noncoding RNA. We mapped the interactome network of paraspeckle proteins, finding enrichment of PLDs. We show that one protein, RBM14, connects key paraspeckle subcomplexes via interactions mediated by its PLD. We further show that the RBM14 PLD, as well as the PLD of another essential paraspeckle protein, FUS, is required to rescue paraspeckle formation in cells in which their endogenous counterpart has been knocked down. Similar to FUS, the RBM14 PLD also forms hydrogels with amyloid-like properties. These results suggest a role for PLD-mediated liquid-phase transitions in paraspeckle formation, highlighting this nuclear body as an excellent model system for understanding the perturbation of such processes in neurodegeneration. PMID:26283796

  16. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to von Willebrand factor A1 domain is mediated by conserved IgG binding regions.

    PubMed

    O'Seaghdha, Maghnus; van Schooten, Carina J; Kerrigan, Steven W; Emsley, Jonas; Silverman, Gregg J; Cox, Dermot; Lenting, Peter J; Foster, Timothy J

    2006-11-01

    Protein A (Spa) is a surface-associated protein of Staphylococcus aureus best known for its ability to bind to the Fc region of IgG. Spa also binds strongly to the Fab region of the immunoglobulins bearing V(H)3 heavy chains and to von Willebrand factor (vWF). Previous studies have suggested that the protein A-vWF interaction is important in S. aureus adherence to platelets under conditions of shear stress. We demonstrate that Spa expression is sufficient for adherence of bacteria to immobilized vWF under low fluid shear. The full length recombinant Ig-binding region of protein A, Spa-EDABC, fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST), bound recombinant vWF in a dose-dependent and saturable fashion with half maximal binding of about 30 nm in immunosorbent assays. Full length-Spa did not bind recombinant vWF A3 domain but displayed binding to recombinant vWF domains A1 and D'-D3 (half maximal binding at 100 nm and 250 nm, respectively). Each recombinant protein A Ig-binding domain bound to the A1 domain in a similar manner to the full length-Spa molecule (half maximal binding 100 nm). Amino acid substitutions were introduced in the GST-SpaD protein at sites known to be involved in IgG Fc or in V(H)3 Fab binding. Mutants altered in residues that recognized IgG Fc but not those that recognized V(H)3 Fab had reduced binding to vWF A1 and D'-D3. This indicated that both vWF regions recognized a region on helices I and II that overlapped the IgG Fc binding site.

  17. Characterization of the human sigma-1 receptor chaperone domain structure and binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interactions.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R

    2013-07-19

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198-206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions.

  18. Characterization of the Human Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Domain Structure and Binding Immunoglobulin Protein (BiP) Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane protein chaperone involved in the ER stress response. S1R activity is implicated in diseases of the central nervous system including amnesia, schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer disease, and addiction. S1R has been shown previously to regulate the Hsp70 binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and the inositol triphosphate receptor calcium channel through a C-terminal domain. We have developed methods for bacterial expression and reconstitution of the chaperone domain of human S1R into detergent micelles that enable its study by solution NMR spectroscopy. The chaperone domain is found to contain a helix at the N terminus followed by a largely dynamic region and a structured, helical C-terminal region that encompasses a membrane associated domain containing four helices. The helical region at residues ∼198–206 is strongly amphipathic and proposed to anchor the chaperone domain to micelles and membranes. Three of the helices in the C-terminal region closely correspond to previously identified cholesterol and drug recognition sites. In addition, it is shown that the chaperone domain interacts with full-length BiP or the isolated nucleotide binding domain of BiP, but not the substrate binding domain, suggesting that the nucleotide binding domain is sufficient for S1R interactions. PMID:23760505

  19. Characterization of substrate binding of the WW domains in human WWP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahong; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-07-08

    WW domains harbor substrates containing proline-rich motifs, but the substrate specificity and binding mechanism remain elusive for those WW domains less amenable for structural studies, such as human WWP2 (hWWP2). Herein we have employed multiple techniques to investigate the second WW domain (WW2) in hWWP2. Our results show that hWWP2 is a specialized E3 for PPxY motif-containing substrates only and does not recognize other amino acids and phospho-residues. The strongest binding affinity of WW2, and the incompatibility between each WW domain, imply a novel relationship, and our SPR experiment reveals a dynamic binding mode in Class-I WW domains for the first time. The results from alanine-scanning mutagenesis and modeling further point to functionally conserved residues in WW2.

  20. Methyl Binding Domain Protein 2 (MBD2) dependent proliferation and survival of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Omar Y.; Wang, Shou Zhen; Zhu, Sheng Zu; Gnanapragasam, Merlin N.; Graham, Laura; Bear, Harry D.; Ginder, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    Methyl Cytosine Binding Domain Protein 2 (MBD2) has been shown to bind to and mediate repression of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cancer cells, where re-patterning of CpG methylation and associated gene silencing is common. We have investigated the role of MBD2 in breast cancer cell growth and tumor suppressor gene expression. We show that stable shRNA mediated knockdown of MBD2 leads to growth suppression of cultured human mammary epithelial cancer lines, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435. The peak anti-proliferative occurs only after sustained, stable MBD2 knockdown. Once established, the growth inhibition persists over time and leads to a markedly decreased propensity for aggressive breast cancer cell lines to form in vivo xenograft tumors in BALB/C nu/nu mice. The growth effects of MBD2 knockdown are accompanied by de-repression of tumor suppressor genes including DAPK1 and KLK10. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and bisulfite sequencing demonstrate MBD2 binding directly to the hyper-methylated and CpG-rich promoters of both DAPK1 and KLK10. Remarkably, the promoter CpG-island associated methylation of these genes remained stable despite robust transcriptional activation in MBD2 knockdown cells. Expression of a shRNA-resistant MBD2 protein resulted in restoration of growth and re-silencing of the MBD2 dependent tumor suppressor genes. Our data suggest that uncoupling CpG-methylation from repressive chromatin remodeling and histone modifications by removing MBD2 is sufficient to initiate and maintain tumor suppressor gene transcription and suppress neoplastic cell growth. These results demonstrate a role for MBD2 in cancer progression and provide support for the prospect of targeting MBD2 therapeutically in aggressive breast cancers. PMID:21693597

  1. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  2. FhCaBP3: a Fasciola hepatica calcium binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    PubMed

    Banford, Samantha; Drysdale, Orla; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2013-04-01

    A DNA sequence encoding a protein with predicted EF-hand and dynein light chain binding domains was identified in a Fasciola hepatica EST library. Sequence analysis of the encoded protein revealed that the most similar known protein was the Fasciola gigantica protein FgCaBP3 and so this newly identified protein was named FhCaBP3. Molecular modelling of FhCaBP3 predicted a highly flexible N-terminal region, followed by a domain containing two EF-hand motifs the second of which is likely to be a functioning divalent ion binding site. The C-terminal domain of the protein contains a dynein light chain like region. Interestingly, molecular modelling predicts that calcium ion binding to the N-terminal domain destabilises the β-sheet structure of the C-terminal domain. FhCaBP3 can be expressed in, and purified from, Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein dimerises and the absence of calcium ions appeared to promote dimerisation. Native gel shift assays demonstrated that the protein bound to calcium and manganese ions, but not to magnesium, barium, zinc, strontium, nickel, copper or cadmium ions. FhCaBP3 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide and chlorpromazine as well as the myosin regulatory light chain-binding drug praziquantel. Despite sequence and structural similarities to other members of the same protein family from F. hepatica, FhCaBP3 has different biochemical properties to the other well characterised family members, FH22 and FhCaBP4. This suggests that each member of this trematode calcium-binding family has discrete functional roles within the organism.

  3. Thermostable single domain antibody-maltose binding protein fusion for Bacillus anthracis spore protein BclA detection.

    PubMed

    Walper, Scott A; Battle, Shawna R; Audrey Brozozog Lee, P; Zabetakis, Dan; Turner, Kendrick B; Buckley, Patricia E; Calm, Alena M; Welsh, Heather S; Warner, Candice R; Zacharko, Melody A; Goldman, Ellen R; Anderson, George P

    2014-02-15

    We constructed a genetic fusion of a single domain antibody (sdAb) with the thermal stable maltose binding protein from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (PfuMBP). Produced in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm with high yield, it proved to be a rugged and effective immunoreagent. The sdAb-A5 binds BclA, a Bacillus anthracis spore protein, with high affinity (K(D) ∼ 50 pM). MBPs, including the thermostable PfuMBP, have been demonstrated to be excellent folding chaperones, improving production of many recombinant proteins. A three-step purification of E. coli shake flask cultures of PfuMBP-sdAb gave a yield of approximately 100mg/L highly purified product. The PfuMBP remained stable up to 120 °C, whereas the sdAb-A5 portion unfolded at approximately 68 to 70 °C but could refold to regain activity. This fusion construct was stable to heating at 1mg/ml for 1h at 70 °C, retaining nearly 100% of its binding activity; nearly one-quarter (24%) activity remained after 1h at 90 °C. The PfuMBP-sdAb construct also provides a stable and effective method to coat gold nanoparticles. Most important, the construct was found to provide enhanced detection of B. anthracis Sterne strain (34F2) spores relative to the sdAb-A5 both as a capture reagent and as a detection reagent.

  4. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum double C2 domain protein, PfDOC2, binds to calcium when associated with membranes.

    PubMed

    Jean, Sophonie; Zapata-Jenks, Mónica A; Farley, Julie M; Tracy, Erin; Mayer, D C Ghislaine

    2014-09-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is strongly correlated with secretion of the micronemes, the apical organelles which contain the adhesins required for invasion of Plasmodium falciparum into human erythrocytes. A critical event in P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion is the production of calcium transients. After entering the cell, Ca(2+) binds to soluble Ca(2+)-binding proteins, such as the double C2 domains (DOC2). Recently, deletion of a P. falciparum DOC2 protein, PfDOC2, was shown to cause impairment in microneme secretion. However, PfDOC2 remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that PfDOC2 is expressed throughout the erythrocytic cycle and demonstrate that it is associated with membrane fractions and binds to calcium when it is part of these membranous structures. In summary, we show that PfDOC2 is a calcium lipid-binding protein of the protein kinase C type of DOC2 proteins.

  6. The structure of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding , glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin- A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Lawler, J.

    2011-05-10

    F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin{_}N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain) comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. We present the crystal structure of human F-spondin FS domain at 1.95{angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a Ca{sup 2+}-binding C2 domain variant with an 8-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sandwich fold. Though the primary sequences of the FS domains of F-spondin and mindin are less than 36% identical, their overall structures are very similar. The unique feature of F-spondin FS domain is the presence of three disulfide bonds associated with the N- and C-termini of the domain and a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site. The integrin-binding motif found in mindin is not conserved in the F-spondin FS domain. The structure of the F-spondin FS domain completes the structural studies of the multiple-domain ECM molecule. The homology of its core structure to a common Ca{sup 2+}- and lipid-binding C2 domain suggests that the F-spondin FS domain may be responsible for part of the membrane targeting of F-spondin in its regulation of axon development. The structural properties of the FS domain revealed in this study pave the way for further exploration into the functions of F-spondin.

  7. Soluble protein expression in E. coli cells using IgG-binding domain of protein A as a solubilizing partner in the cold induced system.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara, Yuiko

    2008-11-21

    We constructed a cold induced expression vector in Escherichia coli cells that consists of a histidine tag sequence for nickel chelate affinity purification, IgG-binding domain of protein A (ZZ-domain) and the multiple cloning sites. The role of ZZ-domain as a solubilizing partner at 15 degrees C was demonstrated by expressing the imidazopyrazinone-type luciferases of Renilla, Oplophorus, Gaussia, and Vargula (Cypridina) as well as the calcium-binding photoproteins and firefly luciferase. The fused protein with ZZ-domain was expressed efficiently as a soluble form in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells at low temperature.

  8. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS.

    PubMed

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutations in vivo.

  9. Ubiquitin regulates caspase recruitment domain-mediated signaling by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins NOD1 and NOD2.

    PubMed

    Ver Heul, Aaron M; Fowler, C Andrew; Ramaswamy, S; Piper, Robert C

    2013-03-08

    NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammation and autophagy. These pathways rely on the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) within the receptors, which serve as protein interaction platforms that coordinately regulate immune signaling. We show that NOD1 CARD binds ubiquitin (Ub), in addition to directly binding its downstream targets receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2) and autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1). NMR spectroscopy and structure-guided mutagenesis identified a small hydrophobic surface of NOD1 CARD that binds Ub. In vitro, Ub competes with RIP2 for association with NOD1 CARD. In vivo, we found that the ligand-stimulated activity of NOD1 with a mutant CARD lacking Ub binding but retaining ATG16L1 and RIP2 binding is increased relative to wild-type NOD1. Likewise, point mutations in the tandem NOD2 CARDs at positions analogous to the surface residues defining the Ub interface on NOD1 resulted in loss of Ub binding and increased ligand-stimulated NOD2 signaling. These data suggest that Ub binding provides a negative feedback loop upon NOD-dependent activation of RIP2.

  10. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Michael Garavito, R.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Crystal structure of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor (PRR-IC) as MBP fusion protein at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). {yields} MBP fusion protein is a dimer in crystals in the presence and absence of maltose. {yields} PRR-IC domain is responsible for the dimerization of the fusion protein. {yields} Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermolecular interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in PRR dimerization. -- Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain ({approx}310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain ({approx}20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain ({approx}19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain ({approx}30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V{sub 0} portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR

  11. Sperm postacrosomal WW domain-binding protein is not required for mouse egg activation.

    PubMed

    Satouh, Yuhkoh; Nozawa, Kaori; Ikawa, Masahito

    2015-10-01

    To begin embryonic development, the zygote must resume the cell cycle correctly after stimulation by sperm-borne oocyte-activating factors (SOAFs). The postacrosomal WW domain-binding protein (PAWP) is one of the strongest SOAF candidates and is widely conserved among eutherian mammals. It has been reported that the microinjection of recombinant PAWP protein can trigger not only Ca(2+) oscillations in mammalian eggs but also intracellular Ca(2+) release in amphibian eggs. It was also suggested that PAWP is involved in the formation of high-quality spermatozoa. On the other hand, negligible SOAF activity for PAWP cRNA has also been reported. In this study, we generated PAWP null mice and examined the fertilizing ability of male mice. Electron microscopy showed no aberrant morphology in spermatogenesis. Intracytoplasmic injection of a single spermatozoon from the null mouse line showed that depletion of PAWP elicited no quantitative differences in Ca(2+) oscillations or in subsequent development of the embryos. We conclude that PAWP does not play an essential role in mouse fertilization.

  12. Lumazine proteins from photobacteria: localization of the single ligand binding site to the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Illarionov, Boris; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Wirth, Martina; Yong Lee, Chan; Eun Woo, Young; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus

    2007-12-01

    Lumazine protein is believed to serve as an optical transponder in bioluminescence emission by certain marine bacteria. Sequence arguments suggest that the protein comprises two similarly folded riboflavin synthase-type domains, but earlier work also suggested that only one domain binds 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine (DMRL). We show that the replacement of serine-48 or threonine-50 in the N-terminal domain of lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi modulates the absorbance and fluorescence properties of bound DMRL or riboflavin. Moreover, the replacement of these amino acids is accompanied by reduced ligand affinity. Replacement of serine-48 by tryptophan shifts the (13)C NMR signal of the 6-methyl group in bound DMRL upfield by 2.9 ppm as compared to the wild-type protein complex. Replacement of threonine-50 causes a downfield shift of approximately 20 ppm for the (15)N NMR signal of N-5, as well as an upfield shift of 3 ppm for the (13)C NMR signal of C-7 in bound DMRL, respectively. The replacement of the topologically equivalent serine-144 and proline-146 in the C-terminal domain had no significant impact on optical properties, chemical shifts and apparent binding constants of bound DMRL. These data show that the N-terminal domain is the unique site for ligand binding in lumazine protein.

  13. Solution structure of the RNA binding domain in the human muscleblind-like protein 2

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Dang, Weirong; Abe, Chikage; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Watanabe, Satoru; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Harada, Takushi; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Güntert, Peter; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins 1, 2, and 3, which contain four CCCH zinc finger motifs (ZF1–4), are involved in the differentiation of muscle inclusion by controlling the splicing patterns of several pre-mRNAs. Especially, MBNL1 plays a crucial role in myotonic dystrophy. The CCCH zinc finger is a sequence motif found in many RNA binding proteins and is suggested to play an important role in the recognition of RNA molecules. Here, we solved the solution structures of both tandem zinc finger (TZF) motifs, TZF12 (comprising ZF1 and ZF2) and TZF34 (ZF3 and ZF4), in MBNL2 from Homo sapiens. In TZF12 of MBNL2, ZF1 and ZF2 adopt a similar fold, as reported previously for the CCCH-type zinc fingers in the TIS11d protein. The linker between ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 forms an antiparallel β-sheet with the N-terminal extension of ZF1. Furthermore, ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 interact with each other through hydrophobic interactions. Consequently, TZF12 forms a single, compact global fold, where ZF1 and ZF2 are approximately symmetrical about the C2 axis. The structure of the second tandem zinc finger (TZF34) in MBNL2 is similar to that of TZF12. This novel three-dimensional structure of the TZF domains in MBNL2 provides a basis for functional studies of the CCCH-type zinc finger motifs in the MBNL protein family. PMID:19177353

  14. Solution structure of the RNA binding domain in the human muscleblind-like protein 2.

    PubMed

    He, Fahu; Dang, Weirong; Abe, Chikage; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Watanabe, Satoru; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Harada, Takushi; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Güntert, Peter; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins 1, 2, and 3, which contain four CCCH zinc finger motifs (ZF1-4), are involved in the differentiation of muscle inclusion by controlling the splicing patterns of several pre-mRNAs. Especially, MBNL1 plays a crucial role in myotonic dystrophy. The CCCH zinc finger is a sequence motif found in many RNA binding proteins and is suggested to play an important role in the recognition of RNA molecules. Here, we solved the solution structures of both tandem zinc finger (TZF) motifs, TZF12 (comprising ZF1 and ZF2) and TZF34 (ZF3 and ZF4), in MBNL2 from Homo sapiens. In TZF12 of MBNL2, ZF1 and ZF2 adopt a similar fold, as reported previously for the CCCH-type zinc fingers in the TIS11d protein. The linker between ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 forms an antiparallel beta-sheet with the N-terminal extension of ZF1. Furthermore, ZF1 and ZF2 in MBNL2 interact with each other through hydrophobic interactions. Consequently, TZF12 forms a single, compact global fold, where ZF1 and ZF2 are approximately symmetrical about the C2 axis. The structure of the second tandem zinc finger (TZF34) in MBNL2 is similar to that of TZF12. This novel three-dimensional structure of the TZF domains in MBNL2 provides a basis for functional studies of the CCCH-type zinc finger motifs in the MBNL protein family.

  15. Structural and binding properties of the PASTA domain of PonA2, a key penicillin binding protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; Falcigno, Lucia; Maglione, Cira; Marasco, Daniela; Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Berisio, Rita; D'Auria, Gabriella

    2014-07-01

    PonA2 is one of the two class A penicillin binding proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. It plays a complex role in mycobacterial physiology and is spotted as a promising target for inhibitors. PonA2 is involved in adaptation of M. tuberculosis to dormancy, an ability which has been attributed to the presence in its sequence of a C-terminal PASTA domain. Since PASTA modules are typically considered as β-lactam antibiotic binding domains, we determined the solution structure of the PASTA domain from PonA2 and analyzed its binding properties versus a plethora of potential binders, including the β-lactam antibiotics, two typical muropeptide mimics, and polymeric peptidoglycan. We show that, despite a high structural similarity with other PASTA domains, the PASTA domain of PonA2 displays different binding properties, as it is not able to bind muropeptides, or β-lactams, or polymeric peptidoglycan. These results indicate that the role of PASTA domains cannot be generalized, as their specific binding properties strongly depend on surface residues, which are widely variable.

  16. A modified oestrogen receptor ligand-binding domain as an improved switch for the regulation of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, T D; Hancock, D C; Danielian, P S; Parker, M G; Evan, G I

    1995-01-01

    A number of proteins have been rendered functionally oestrogen-dependent by fusion with the hormone-binding domain of the oestrogen receptor. There are, however, several significant disadvantages with such fusion proteins. First, their use in cells in vitro requires phenol red-free medium and laborious stripping of steroid hormones from serum in order to avoid constitutive activation. Secondly, control of oestrogen receptor fusion proteins in vivo is precluded by high endogenous levels of circulating oestrogens. Thirdly, the hormone-binding domain of the oestrogen receptor functions as a hormone-dependent transcriptional activation domain making interpretation of fusions with transcription factors problematical. In order to overcome these drawbacks we have used a transcriptionally inactive mutant of the murine oestrogen receptor which is unable to bind oestrogen yet retains normal affinity for the synthetic ligand, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. When the hormone-binding domain of this mutant oestrogen receptor is fused to the C-terminus of the c-Myc protein, Myc-induced proliferation and apoptosis in fibroblasts becomes dependent on 4-hydroxytamoxifen, but remains refractory to 17 beta-oestradiol. Images PMID:7784172

  17. Role of Cysteines in Stabilizing the Randomized Receptor Binding Domains within Feline Leukemia Virus Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso-Torres, Leonardo; Sarangi, Anindita; Whidby, Jillian; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retargeting of gammaretroviral envelope proteins has shown promising results in the isolation of novel isolates with therapeutic potential. However, the optimal conditions required to obtain high-affinity retargeted envelope proteins with narrow tropism are not understood. This study highlights the advantage of constrained peptides within receptor binding domains and validates the random library screening technique of obtaining novel retargeted Env proteins. Using a modified vector backbone to screen the envelope libraries on 143B osteosarcoma cells, three novel and unique retargeted envelopes were isolated. The use of complex disulfide bonds within variable regions required for receptor binding is found within natural gammaretroviral envelope isolates. Interestingly, two of the isolates, named AII and BV2, have a pair of cysteines located within the randomized region of 11 amino acids similar to that identified within the CP Env, an isolate identified in a previous Env library screen on the human renal carcinoma Caki-1 cell line. The amino acids within the randomized region of AII and BV2 envelopes that are essential for viral infection have been identified in this study and include these cysteine residues. Through mutagenesis studies, the putative disulfide bond pairs including and beyond the randomized region were examined. In parallel, the disulfide bonds of CP Env were identified using mass spectrometry. The results indicate that this pair of cysteines creates the structural context to position key hydrophobic (F and W) and basic (K and H) residues critical for viral titer and suggest that AII, BV2, and CP internal cysteines bond together in distinct ways. IMPORTANCE Retargeted gammaretroviral particles have broad applications for therapeutic use. Although great advances have been achieved in identifying new Env-host cell receptor pairs, the rules for designing optimal Env libraries are still unclear. We have found that isolates with an additional

  18. A new protein domain for binding to DNA through the minor groove.

    PubMed Central

    Freire, R; Salas, M; Hermoso, J M

    1994-01-01

    Protein p6 of the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 binds with low sequence specificity to DNA through the minor groove, forming a multimeric nucleoprotein complex that activates the initiation of phi 29 DNA replication. Deletion analysis suggested that the N-terminal part of protein p6, predicted to form an amphipathic alpha-helix, is involved in DNA binding. We have constructed site-directed mutants at the polar side of the putative alpha-helix. DNA binding and activation of initiation of phi 29 DNA replication were impaired in most of the mutant proteins obtained. A 19 amino acid peptide comprising the N-terminus of protein p6 interacted with a DNA fragment containing high-affinity signals for protein p6 binding with approximately 50-fold higher affinity than the peptide corresponding to an inactive mutant. Both wild-type peptide and protein p6 recognized the same sequences in this DNA fragment. This result, together with distamycin competition experiments, suggested that the wild-type peptide also binds to DNA through the minor groove. In addition, CD spectra of the wild-type peptide showed an increase in the alpha-helical content when bound to DNA. All these results indicate that an alpha-helical structure located in the N-terminal region of protein p6 is involved in DNA binding through the minor groove. Images PMID:7925279

  19. The tip of the iceberg: RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    King, Oliver D; Gitler, Aaron D; Shorter, James

    2012-06-26

    Prions are self-templating protein conformers that are naturally transmitted between individuals and promote phenotypic change. In yeast, prion-encoded phenotypes can be beneficial, neutral or deleterious depending upon genetic background and environmental conditions. A distinctive and portable 'prion domain' enriched in asparagine, glutamine, tyrosine and glycine residues unifies the majority of yeast prion proteins. Deletion of this domain precludes prionogenesis and appending this domain to reporter proteins can confer prionogenicity. An algorithm designed to detect prion domains has successfully identified 19 domains that can confer prion behavior. Scouring the human genome with this algorithm enriches a select group of RNA-binding proteins harboring a canonical RNA recognition motif (RRM) and a putative prion domain. Indeed, of 210 human RRM-bearing proteins, 29 have a putative prion domain, and 12 of these are in the top 60 prion candidates in the entire genome. Startlingly, these RNA-binding prion candidates are inexorably emerging, one by one, in the pathology and genetics of devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U), Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. For example, FUS and TDP-43, which rank 1st and 10th among RRM-bearing prion candidates, form cytoplasmic inclusions in the degenerating motor neurons of ALS patients and mutations in TDP-43 and FUS cause familial ALS. Recently, perturbed RNA-binding proteostasis of TAF15, which is the 2nd ranked RRM-bearing prion candidate, has been connected with ALS and FTLD-U. We strongly suspect that we have now merely reached the tip of the iceberg. We predict that additional RNA-binding prion candidates identified by our algorithm will soon surface as genetic modifiers or causes of diverse neurodegenerative conditions. Indeed, simple prion-like transfer mechanisms involving the prion

  20. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile; Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen; Cosson, Bertrand; Paillard, Luc; Poncet, Didier; Osborne, H. Beverley

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  1. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Jocelyn M.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Steer, David L.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A. Ian; Gell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen. PMID:27637108

  2. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  3. Molecular characterization and ligand binding specificity of the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC3 from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a serious global health problem that afflicts more than 230 million people in 77 countries. Long-term mass treatments with the only available drug, praziquantel, have caused growing concerns about drug resistance. PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins are recognized as potential targets for the next generation of drug development. However, the PDZ domain-containing protein family in parasites has largely been unexplored. Methods We present the molecular characteristics of a PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC3, from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGIPC3) according to bioinformatics analysis and experimental approaches. The ligand binding specificity of the PDZ domain of SjGIPC3 was confirmed by screening an arbitrary peptide library in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays. The native ligand candidates were predicted by Tailfit software based on the C-terminal binding specificity, and further validated by Y2H assays. Results SjGIPC3 is a single PDZ domain-containing protein comprised of 328 amino acid residues. Structural prediction revealed that a conserved PDZ domain was presented in the middle region of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SjGIPC3 and other trematode orthologues clustered into a well-defined cluster but were distinguishable from those of other phyla. Transcriptional analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the SjGIPC3 gene was relatively highly expressed in the stages within the host, especially in male adult worms. By using Y2H assays to screen an arbitrary peptide library, we confirmed the C-terminal binding specificity of the SjGIPC3-PDZ domain, which could be deduced as a consensus sequence, -[SDEC]-[STIL]-[HSNQDE]-[VIL]*. Furthermore, six proteins were predicted to be native ligand candidates of SjGIPC3 based on the C-terminal binding properties and other biological information; four of these were confirmed to be potential ligands using the Y2H system. Conclusions In this study, we first

  4. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L2; a protein at the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, A; Nakashima, T; Taniguchi, M; Hosaka, H; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    1999-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L2 is the largest protein component in the ribosome. It is located at or near the peptidyl transferase center and has been a prime candidate for the peptidyl transferase activity. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and plays a crucial role in its assembly. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of L2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 2.3 A resolution by X-ray crystallography using the selenomethionyl MAD method. The RNA-binding domain of L2 consists of two recurring motifs of approximately 70 residues each. The N-terminal domain (positions 60-130) is homologous to the OB-fold, and the C-terminal domain (positions 131-201) is homologous to the SH3-like barrel. Residues Arg86 and Arg155, which have been identified by mutation experiments to be involved in the 23S rRNA binding, are located at the gate of the interface region between the two domains. The molecular architecture suggests how this important protein has evolved from the ancient nucleic acid-binding proteins to create a 23S rRNA-binding domain in the very remote past. PMID:10075918

  5. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  6. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  7. The Molecular Chaperone Hsp70 Activates Protein Phosphatase 5 (PP5) by Binding the Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Connarn, Jamie N.; Assimon, Victoria A.; Reed, Rebecca A.; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development. PMID:24327656

  8. Structural basis of the versatile DNA recognition ability of the methyl-CpG binding domain of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4.

    PubMed

    Otani, Junji; Arita, Kyohei; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Mariko; Kimura, Hironobu; Suetake, Isao; Tajima, Shoji; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    The methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) protein MBD4 participates in DNA repair as a glycosylase that excises mismatched thymine bases in CpG sites and also functions in transcriptional repression. Unlike other MBD proteins, MBD4 recognizes not only methylated CpG dinucleotides ((5m)CG/(5m)CG) but also T/G mismatched sites generated by spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)CG/TG). The glycosylase activity of MBD4 is also implicated in active DNA demethylation initiated by the deaminase-catalyzed conversion of 5-methylcytosine to thymine. Here, we report the crystal structures of the MBD of MBD4 (MBDMBD4) complexed with (5m)CG/(5m)CG and (5m)CG/TG. The crystal structures show that the DNA interface of MBD4 has flexible structural features and harbors an extensive water network that supports its dual base specificities. Combined with the results of biochemical analyses, the crystal structure of MBD4 bound to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine further demonstrates that MBDMBD4 is able to recognize a wide range of 5-methylcytosine modifications through the unique water network. The versatile base recognition ability of MBDMBD4 implies multifunctional roles for MBD4 in the regulation of dynamic DNA methylation patterns coupled with deamination and/or oxidation of 5-methylcytosine.

  9. RNA helicase activity of the plum pox potyvirus CI protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Mapping of an RNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, A; Laín, S; García, J A

    1995-01-01

    The plum pox potyvirus (PPV) cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP) has been synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography in amylose resin. In the absence of any other viral factors, the fusion product had NTPase, RNA binding and RNA helicase activities. These in vitro activities were not affected by removal of the last 103 amino acids of the CI protein. However, other deletions in the C-terminal part of the protein, although leaving intact all the region conserved in RNA helicases, drastically impaired the ability to unwind dsRNA and to hydrolyze NTPs. A mutant protein lacking the last 225 residues retained the competence to interact with RNA. Further deletions mapped boundaries of the RNA binding domain within residues 350 and 402 of the PPV CI protein. This region includes the arginine-rich motif VI, the most carboxy terminal conserved domain of RNA helicases of the superfamily SF2. These results indicate that NTP hydrolysis is not an essential component for RNA binding of the PPV CI protein. Images PMID:7538661

  10. Role of the two structural domains from the periplasmic Escherichia coli histidine-binding protein HisJ.

    PubMed

    Chu, Byron C H; DeWolf, Timothy; Vogel, Hans J

    2013-11-01

    Escherichia coli HisJ is a type II periplasmic binding protein that functions to reversibly capture histidine and transfer it to its cognate inner membrane ABC permease. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the structure of apo-HisJ (26.5 kDa) in solution. HisJ is a bilobal protein in which domain 1 (D1) is made up of two noncontiguous subdomains, and domain 2 (D2) is expressed as the inner domain. To better understand the roles of D1 and D2, we have isolated and characterized each domain separately. Structurally, D1 closely resembles its homologous domain in apo- and holo-HisJ, whereas D2 is more similar to the holo-form. NMR relaxation experiments reveal that HisJ becomes more ordered upon ligand binding, whereas isolated D2 experiences a significant reduction in slower (millisecond to microsecond) motions compared with the homologous domain in apo-HisJ. NMR titrations reveal that D1 is able to bind histidine in a similar manner as full-length HisJ, albeit with lower affinity. Unexpectedly, isolated D1 and D2 do not interact with each other in the presence or absence of histidine, which indicates the importance of intact interdomain-connecting elements (i.e. hinge regions) for HisJ functioning. Our results shed light on the binding mechanism of type II periplasmic binding proteins where ligand is initially bound by D1, and D2 plays a supporting role in this dynamic process.

  11. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  12. GIL, a new c-di-GMP-binding protein domain involved in regulation of cellulose synthesis in enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Ahmad, Irfan; Blanka, Andrea; Schottkowski, Marco; Cimdins, Annika; Galperin, Michael Y; Römling, Ute; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to numerous enzymes involved in c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation in enterobacteria, only a handful of c-di-GMP receptors/effectors have been identified. In search of new c-di-GMP receptors, we screened the Escherichia coli ASKA overexpression gene library using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA) with fluorescently and radioisotope-labelled c-di-GMP. We uncovered three new candidate c-di-GMP receptors in E. coli and characterized one of them, BcsE. The bcsE gene is encoded in cellulose synthase operons in representatives of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The purified BcsE proteins from E. coli, Salmonella enterica and Klebsiella pneumoniae bind c-di-GMP via the domain of unknown function, DUF2819, which is hereby designated GIL, GGDEF I-site like domain. The RxGD motif of the GIL domain is required for c-di-GMP binding, similar to the c-di-GMP-binding I-site of the diguanylate cyclase GGDEF domain. Thus, GIL is the second protein domain, after PilZ, dedicated to c-di-GMP-binding. We show that in S. enterica, BcsE is not essential for cellulose synthesis but is required for maximal cellulose production, and that c-di-GMP binding is critical for BcsE function. It appears that cellulose production in enterobacteria is controlled by a two-tiered c-di-GMP-dependent system involving BcsE and the PilZ domain containing glycosyltransferase BcsA.

  13. Phage P4 origin-binding domain structure reveals a mechanism for regulation of DNA-binding activity by homo- and heterodimerization of winged helix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Ziegelin, Günter; Korolev, Sergey; Calendar, Richard; Lanka, Erich; Waksman, Gabriel

    2002-02-01

    The origin-binding domain of the gpalpha protein of phage P4 (P4-OBD) mediates origin recognition and regulation of gpalpha activity by the protein Cnr. We have determined the crystal structure of P4-OBD at 2.95 A resolution. The structure of P4-OBD is that of a dimer with pseudo twofold symmetry. Each subunit has a winged helix topology with a unique structure among initiator proteins. The only structural homologue of the P4-OBD subunit is the DNA-binding domain of the eukaryotic transcriptional activator Rfx1. Based on this structural alignment, a model for origin recognition by the P4-OBD dimer is suggested. P4-OBD mutations that interfere with Cnr binding locate to the dimer interface, indicating that Cnr acts by disrupting the gpalpha dimer. P4-OBD dimerization is mediated by helices alpha1 and alpha3 in both subunits, a mode of winged helix protein dimerization that is reminiscent of that of the eukaryotic transcription factors E2F and DP. This, in turn, suggests that Cnr is also a winged helix protein, a possibility that is supported by previously unreported sequence homologies between Cnr and Rfx1 and homology modelling. Hence, in a mechanism that appears to be conserved from phage to man, the DNA-binding activity of winged helix proteins can be regulated by other winged helix proteins via the versatile use of the winged helix motif as a homo- or heterodimerization scaffold.

  14. Novel benzimidazole inhibitors bind to a unique site in the kinesin spindle protein motor domain.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Shipps, Gerald W; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Smith, Catherine K; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Sanden, David; Basso, Andrea D; Vilenchik, Lev; Gray, Kimberly; Annis, D Allen; Nickbarg, Elliott; Ma, Yao; Lahue, Brian; Herbst, Ronald; Le, Hung V

    2010-09-28

    Affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) screening of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) followed by enzyme inhibition studies and temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) characterization was utilized to identify a series of benzimidazole compounds. This series also binds in the presence of Ispinesib, a known anticancer KSP inhibitor in phase I/II clinical trials for breast cancer. TdCD and AS-MS analyses support simultaneous binding implying existence of a novel non-Ispinesib binding pocket within KSP. Additional TdCD analyses demonstrate direct binding of these compounds to Ispinesib-resistant mutants (D130V, A133D, and A133D + D130V double mutant), further strengthening the hypothesis that the compounds bind to a distinct binding pocket. Also importantly, binding to this pocket causes uncompetitive inhibition of KSP ATPase activity. The uncompetitive inhibition with respect to ATP is also confirmed by the requirement of nucleotide for binding of the compounds. After preliminary affinity optimization, the benzimidazole series exhibited distinctive antimitotic activity as evidenced by blockade of bipolar spindle formation and appearance of monoasters. Cancer cell growth inhibition was also demonstrated either as a single agent or in combination with Ispinesib. The combination was additive as predicted by the binding studies using TdCD and AS-MS analyses. The available data support the existence of a KSP inhibitory site hitherto unknown in the literature. The data also suggest that targeting this novel site could be a productive strategy for eluding Ispinesib-resistant tumors. Finally, AS-MS and TdCD techniques are general in scope and may enable screening other targets in the presence of known drugs, clinical candidates, or tool compounds that bind to the protein of interest in an effort to identify potency-enhancing small molecules that increase efficacy and impede resistance in combination therapy.

  15. Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x: importance of the C-terminal penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains for beta-lactam binding.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Todorova, Katya; Sauerbier, Julia; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2012-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) mutations that occur during the selection with beta-lactams are located within the central penicillin-binding/transpeptidase (TP) domain, and are believed to mediate resistance by interfering with the formation of a covalent complex of the active site serine with the antibiotic. We now investigated the effect of two point mutations found in two independently obtained laboratory mutants that are located at the surface of the TP domain with their side chains facing outside (G422D respectively R426C). They have no significant effect on resistance to cefotaxime in vivo or on binding to Bocillin™FL to the active site in vitro using purified PBP2x derivatives, thus apparently do not affect the active site directly. In contrast, in silico modeling revealed that they affect van der Waal's interactions with the PASTA1 (PBP and serine/threonine kinase associated) domain of the C-terminal extension and a noncovalent cefuroxime molecule found in the X-ray structure of an acylated PBP2x, suggesting some effect of the mutations on the interaction of the TP domain with PASTA1 and/or with the antibiotic associated with PASTA1. The effect of the PASTA domains on covalent binding of PBP2x to Bocillin FL was then investigated using a series of soluble truncated PBP2x derivatives. Deletion of 127 C-terminal residues, that is, of both PASTA domains, decreased binding dramatically by ∼90%. Surprisingly, deletion of only 40 amino acids resulted in the same phenotype, whereas the absence of 30 amino acids affected binding marginally by 10%, documenting a crucial role of the C-terminal domain for beta-lactam binding.

  16. A single gene from yeast for both nuclear and cytoplasmic polyadenylate-binding proteins: domain structure and expression.

    PubMed

    Sachs, A B; Bond, M W; Kornberg, R D

    1986-06-20

    Nuclear and cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins have been purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and antisera have been used to isolate a gene that encodes them. The gene occurs in a single copy on chromosome 5 and gives rise to a unique, unspliced 2.1 kb transcript. The nuclear protein appears to be derived from the cytoplasmic one by proteolytic cleavage into 53 and 17 kd polypeptides that remain associated during isolation. DNA sequence determination reveals four tandemly arrayed 90 amino acid regions of homology that probably represent poly(A)-binding domains. A 55 residue A-rich region upstream of the initiator methionine codon in the mRNA shows an affinity for poly(A)-binding protein comparable to that of poly(A)180-220, raising the possibility of feedback regulation of translation.

  17. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  18. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-07

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  19. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika; Allingham, John S.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  20. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  1. Interaction of the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT with heparan sulfate: binding mechanism and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, André; Seelig, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The positively charged protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 TAT protein (TAT-PTD; residues 47-57 of TAT) rapidly translocates across the plasma membrane of living cells. This property is exploited for the delivery of proteins, drugs, and genes into cells. The mechanism of this translocation is, however, not yet understood. Recent theories for translocation suggest binding of the protein transduction domain (PTD) to extracellular glycosaminoglycans as a possible mechanism. We have studied the binding equilibrium between TAT-PTD and three different glycosaminoglycans with high sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry and provide the first quantitative thermodynamic description. The polysulfonated macromolecules were found to exhibit multiple identical binding sites for TAT-PTD with only small differences between the three species as far as the thermodynamic parameters are concerned. Heparan sulfate (HS, molecular weight, 14.2 +/- 2 kDa) has 6.3 +/- 1.0 independent binding sites for TAT-PTD which are characterized by a binding constant K0 = (6.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) M(-1) and a reaction enthalpy deltaHpep0 = -4.6 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. The binding affinity, deltaGpep0, is determined to equal extent by enthalpic and entropic contributions. The HS-TAT-PTD complex formation entails a positive heat capacity change of deltaCp0 = +135 cal/mol peptide, which is characteristic of a charge neutralization reaction. This is in contrast to hydrophobic binding reactions which display a large negative heat capacity change. The stoichiometry of 6-7 TAT-PTD molecules per HS corresponds to an electric charge neutralization. Light scattering data demonstrate a maximum scattering intensity at this stoichiometric ratio, the intensity of which depends on the order of mixing of the two components. The data suggest cross-linking and/or aggregation of HS-TAT-PTD complexes. Two other glycosaminoglycans, namely heparin and chondroitin sulfate B, were also studied with isothermal

  2. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin. PMID:8552082

  3. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  4. Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by a CUE ubiquitin-binding domain in the FANCD2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Vuono, Elizabeth A; Mauro, Maurizio; Howlett, Niall G

    2012-09-06

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway is critical for the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and the maintenance of chromosome stability. A key step in FA-BRCA pathway activation is the covalent attachment of monoubiquitin to FANCD2 and FANCI. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize in chromatin-associated nuclear foci where they interact with several well-characterized DNA repair proteins. Importantly, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of FANCD2. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of a CUE (coupling of ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation) ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in FANCD2, and demonstrate that the CUE domain mediates noncovalent binding to ubiquitin in vitro. We show that although mutation of the CUE domain destabilizes FANCD2, the protein remains competent for DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitination and phosphorylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that the CUE domain is required for interaction with FANCI, retention of monoubiquitinated FANCD2, and FANCI in chromatin, and for efficient ICL repair. Our results suggest a model by which heterodimerization of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI in chromatin is mediated in part through a noncovalent interaction between the FANCD2 CUE domain and monoubiquitin covalently attached to FANCI, and that this interaction shields monoubiquitinated FANCD2 from polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation.

  5. An ectromelia virus protein that interacts with chemokines through their glycosaminoglycan binding domain.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Smith, Vincent P; Campanella, Gabriele S V; Baleux, Françoise; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Luster, Andrew D; Alcami, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Poxviruses encode a number of secreted virulence factors that modulate the host immune response. The vaccinia virus A41 protein is an immunomodulatory protein with amino acid sequence similarity to the 35-kDa chemokine binding protein, but the host immune molecules targeted by A41 have not been identified. We report here that the vaccinia virus A41 ortholog encoded by ectromelia virus, a poxvirus pathogen of mice, named E163 in the ectromelia virus Naval strain, is a secreted 31-kDa glycoprotein that selectively binds a limited number of CC and CXC chemokines with high affinity. A detailed characterization of the interaction of ectromelia virus E163 with mutant forms of the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL12alpha indicated that E163 binds to the glycosaminoglycan binding site of the chemokines. This suggests that E163 inhibits the interaction of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans and provides a mechanism by which E163 prevents chemokine-induced leukocyte migration to the sites of infection. In addition to interacting with chemokines, E163 can interact with high affinity with glycosaminoglycan molecules, enabling E163 to attach to cell surfaces and to remain in the vicinity of the sites of viral infection. These findings identify E163 as a new chemokine binding protein in poxviruses and provide a molecular mechanism for the immunomodulatory activity previously reported for the vaccinia virus A41 ortholog. The results reported here also suggest that the cell surface and extracellular matrix are important targeting sites for secreted poxvirus immune modulators.

  6. Single-stranded DNA Binding by the Helix-Hairpin-Helix Domain of XPF Protein Contributes to the Substrate Specificity of the ERCC1-XPF Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Faridounnia, Maryam; Kovacic, Lidija; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2017-02-17

    The nucleotide excision repair protein complex ERCC1-XPF is required for incision of DNA upstream of DNA damage. Functional studies have provided insights into the binding of ERCC1-XPF to various DNA substrates. However, because no structure for the ERCC1-XPF-DNA complex has been determined, the mechanism of substrate recognition remains elusive. Here we biochemically characterize the substrate preferences of the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains of XPF and ERCC-XPF and show that the binding to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/dsDNA junctions is dependent on joint binding to the DNA binding domain of ERCC1 and XPF. We reveal that the homodimeric XPF is able to bind various ssDNA sequences but with a clear preference for guanine-containing substrates. NMR titration experiments and in vitro DNA binding assays also show that, within the heterodimeric ERCC1-XPF complex, XPF specifically recognizes ssDNA. On the other hand, the HhH domain of ERCC1 preferentially binds dsDNA through the hairpin region. The two separate non-overlapping DNA binding domains in the ERCC1-XPF heterodimer jointly bind to an ssDNA/dsDNA substrate and, thereby, at least partially dictate the incision position during damage removal. Based on structural models, NMR titrations, DNA-binding studies, site-directed mutagenesis, charge distribution, and sequence conservation, we propose that the HhH domain of ERCC1 binds to dsDNA upstream of the damage, and XPF binds to the non-damaged strand within a repair bubble.

  7. The DNA Binding Domain of a Papillomavirus E2 Protein Programs a Chimeric Nuclease To Cleave Integrated Human Papillomavirus DNA in HeLa Cervical Carcinoma Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Viral DNA binding proteins that direct nucleases or other protein domains to viral DNA in lytically or latently infected cells may provide a novel approach to modulate viral gene expression or replication. Cervical carcinogenesis is initiated by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and viral DNA persists in the cancer cells. To test whether a DNA binding domain of a papillomavirus protein can direct a nuclease domain to cleave HPV DNA in cervical cancer cells, we fused the DNA binding domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 protein to the catalytic domain of the FokI restriction endonuclease, generating a BPV1 E2-FokI chimeric nuclease (BEF). BEF introduced DNA double-strand breaks on both sides of an E2 binding site in vitro, whereas DNA binding or catalytic mutants of BEF did not. After expression of BEF in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, we detected cleavage at E2 binding sites in the integrated HPV18 DNA in these cells and also at an E2 binding site in cellular DNA. BEF-expressing cells underwent senescence, which required the DNA binding activity of BEF, but not its nuclease activity. These results demonstrate that DNA binding domains of viral proteins can target effector molecules to cognate binding sites in virally infected cells. PMID:17392356

  8. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  9. Long-term memory consolidation: The role of RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Indulekha P; Ramaswami, Mani

    2016-10-11

    Long-term and short-term memories differ primarily in the duration of their retention. At a molecular level, long-term memory (LTM) is distinguished from short-term memory (STM) by its requirement for new gene expression. In addition to transcription (nuclear gene expression) the translation of stored mRNAs is necessary for LTM formation. The mechanisms and functions for temporal and spatial regulation of mRNAs required for LTM is a major contemporary problem, of interest from molecular, cell biological, neurobiological and clinical perspectives. This review discusses primary evidence in support for translational regulatory events involved in LTM and a model in which different phases of translation underlie distinct phases of consolidation of memories. However, it focuses largely on mechanisms of memory persistence and the role of prion-like domains in this defining aspect of long-term memory. We consider primary evidence for the concept that Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding (CPEB) protein enables the persistence of formed memories by transforming in prion-like manner from a soluble monomeric state to a self-perpetuating and persistent polymeric translationally active state required for maintaining persistent synaptic plasticity. We further discuss prion-like domains prevalent on several other RNA-binding proteins involved in neuronal translational control underlying LTM. Growing evidence indicates that such RNA regulatory proteins are components of mRNP (RiboNucleoProtein) granules. In these proteins, prion-like domains, being intrinsically disordered, could mediate weak transient interactions that allow the assembly of RNP granules, a source of silenced mRNAs whose translation is necessary for LTM. We consider the structural bases for RNA granules formation as well as functions of disordered domains and discuss how these complicate the interpretation of existing experimental data relevant to general mechanisms by which prion-domain containing RBPs

  10. Differential distribution of Y-box-binding protein 1 and cold shock domain protein A in developing and adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Brandt, Sabine; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Mertens, Peter R

    2015-07-01

    The two cold shock domain containing proteins, Y-box-binding protein-1 and cold shock domain protein A were immunolocalized in developing and adult human brain. With the exception of a small population of hypothalamic astrocytes, brain Y-box-binding protein-1 was predominantly found in multiple neurons in the mature human CNS, which might be related to its involvement in neurotransmission and other neuron-associated functions. Cold shock domain protein A was typically observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, choroid plexus epithelia and nerve fibers. However, in circumscribed brain regions as hypothalamus, habenula, and cerebellum, this protein was also expressed in neurons. In the prenatal brain, both proteins were found to be abundantly expressed in radial glial cells, neuroblasts and neurons, which might be an anatomical correlate of the proposed roles of both proteins in cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Y-box-binding protein-1 was identified in cultured, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells, which underscores its putative role as a mediator in immune and inflammatory processes.

  11. Dephosphorylation of microtubule-binding sites at the neurofilament-H tail domain by alkaline, acid, and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hisanaga, S; Yasugawa, S; Yamakawa, T; Miyamoto, E; Ikebe, M; Uchiyama, M; Kishimoto, T

    1993-06-01

    The dephosphorylation-induced interaction of neurofilaments (NFs) with microtubules (MTs) was investigated by using several phosphatases. Escherichia coli alkaline and wheat germ acid phosphatases increased the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H and NF-M by dephosphorylation, and induced the binding of NF-H to MTs. The binding of NFs to MTs was observed only after the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H approached the exhaustively dephosphorylated level when alkaline phosphatase was used. The number of phosphate remaining when NF-H began to bind to MTs was estimated by measuring phosphate bound to NF-H. NF-H did not bind to MTs even when about 40 phosphates from the total of 51 had been removed by alkaline phosphatase. The removal of 6 further phosphates finally resulted in the association of NF-H with MTs. A similar finding, that the restricted phosphorylation sites in the NF-H tail domain, but not the total amount of phosphates, were important for binding to MTs, was also obtained with acid phosphatases. In contrast to alkaline and acid phosphatases, four classes of protein phosphatases (protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B, and 2C) were ineffective for shifting the electrophoretic mobility of NF proteins and for inducing the association of NFs to MTs.

  12. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  13. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC, and tilted domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g., the acyl chain of glycerolipids) and their polar head (e.g., the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids). Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar α face and a rough β face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  14. Bruton's tyrosine kinase activity is negatively regulated by Sab, the Btk-SH3 domain-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yamadori, T; Baba, Y; Matsushita, M; Hashimoto, S; Kurosaki, M; Kurosaki, T; Kishimoto, T; Tsukada, S

    1999-05-25

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is crucial for human and murine B cell development, and its deficiency causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. In this report, we describe the function of the Btk-binding protein Sab (SH3-domain binding protein that preferentially associates with Btk), which we reported previously as a newly identified Src homology 3 domain-binding protein. Sab was shown to inhibit the auto- and transphosphorylation activity of Btk, which prompted us to propose that Sab functions as a transregulator of Btk. Forced overexpression of Sab in B cells led to the reduction of B cell antigen receptor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Btk and significantly reduced both early and late B cell antigen receptor-mediated events, including calcium mobilization, inositol 1, 4,5-trisphosphate production, and apoptotic cell death, where the involvement of Btk activity has been demonstrated previously. Together, these results indicate the negative regulatory role of Sab in the B cell cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase pathway.

  15. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase activity is negatively regulated by Sab, the Btk-SH3 domain-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamadori, Tomoki; Baba, Yoshihiro; Matsushita, Masato; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kurosaki, Mari; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Tsukada, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is crucial for human and murine B cell development, and its deficiency causes human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. In this report, we describe the function of the Btk-binding protein Sab (SH3-domain binding protein that preferentially associates with Btk), which we reported previously as a newly identified Src homology 3 domain-binding protein. Sab was shown to inhibit the auto- and transphosphorylation activity of Btk, which prompted us to propose that Sab functions as a transregulator of Btk. Forced overexpression of Sab in B cells led to the reduction of B cell antigen receptor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Btk and significantly reduced both early and late B cell antigen receptor-mediated events, including calcium mobilization, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production, and apoptotic cell death, where the involvement of Btk activity has been demonstrated previously. Together, these results indicate the negative regulatory role of Sab in the B cell cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase pathway. PMID:10339589

  16. A Fab-Selective Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain from Streptococcal Protein G with Improved Half-Life Extension Properties

    PubMed Central

    Unverdorben, Felix; Hutt, Meike; Seifert, Oliver; Kontermann, Roland E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Half-life extension strategies have gained increasing interest to improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of protein therapeutics. Recently, we established an immunoglobulin-binding domain (IgBD) from streptococcal protein G (SpGC3) as module for half-life extension. SpGC3 is capable of binding to the Fc region as well as the CH1 domain of Fab arms under neutral and acidic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using site-directed mutagenesis, we generated a Fab-selective mutant (SpGC3Fab) to avoid possible interference with the FcRn-mediated recycling process and improved its affinity for mouse and human IgG by site-directed mutagenesis and phage display selections. In mice, this affinity-improved mutant (SpGC3FabRR) conferred prolonged plasma half-lives compared with SpGC3Fab when fused to small recombinant antibody fragments, such as single-chain Fv (scFv) and bispecific single-chain diabody (scDb). Hence, the SpGC3FabRR domain seems to be a suitable fusion partner for the half-life extension of small recombinant therapeutics. Conclusions/Significance The half-life extension properties of SpGC3 can be retained by restricting binding to the Fab fragment of serum immunoglobulins and can be improved by increasing binding activity. The modified SpGC3 module should be suitable to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins and, thus to improve therapeutic activity. PMID:26430884

  17. Competition between LIM-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jacqueline M; Bhati, Mugdha; Craig, Vanessa J; Deane, Janet E; Jeffries, Cy; Lee, Christopher; Nancarrow, Amy L; Ryan, Daniel P; Sunde, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    LMO (LIM-only) and LIM-HD (LIM-homeodomain) proteins form a family of proteins that is required for myriad developmental processes and which can contribute to diseases such as T-cell leukaemia and breast cancer. The four LMO and 12 LIM-HD proteins in mammals are expressed in a combinatorial manner in many cell types, forming a transcriptional 'LIM code'. The proteins all contain a pair of closely spaced LIM domains near their N-termini that mediate protein-protein interactions, including binding to the approximately 30-residue LID (LIM interaction domain) of the essential co-factor protein Ldb1 (LIM domain-binding protein 1). In an attempt to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the LIM code, we have determined the molecular basis of binding of LMO and LIM-HD proteins for Ldb1(LID) through a series of structural, mutagenic and biophysical studies. These studies provide an explanation for why Ldb1 binds the LIM domains of the LMO/LIM-HD family, but not LIM domains from other proteins. The LMO/LIM-HD family exhibit a range of affinities for Ldb1, which influences the formation of specific functional complexes within cells. We have also identified an additional LIM interaction domain in one of the LIM-HD proteins, Isl1. Despite low sequence similarity to Ldb1(LID), this domain binds another LIM-HD protein, Lhx3, in an identical manner to Ldb1(LID). Through our and other studies, it is emerging that the multiple layers of competitive binding involving LMO and LIM-HD proteins and their partner proteins contribute significantly to cell fate specification and development.

  18. Coil-to-helix transitions in intrinsically disordered methyl CpG binding protein 2 and its isolated domains

    PubMed Central

    Hite, Kristopher C; Kalashnikova, Anna A; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a canonical intrinsically disordered protein (IDP), that is, it lacks stable secondary structure throughout its entire polypeptide chain. Because IDPs often have the propensity to become locally ordered, we tested whether full-length MeCP2 and its constituent domains would gain secondary structure in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), a cosolvent that stabilizes intramolecular hydrogen bonding in proteins. The α-helix, β-strand/turn, and unstructured content were determined as a function of TFE concentration by deconvolution of circular dichroism data. Results indicate that approximately two-thirds of the unstructured residues present in full-length MeCP2 were converted to α-helix in 70% TFE without a change in β-strand/turn. Thus, much of the MeCP2 polypeptide chain undergoes coil-to-helix transitions under conditions that favor intrachain hydrogen bond formation. The unstructured residues of the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains were partially converted to α-helix in 70% TFE. In contrast, the central transcription regulation domain (TRD) became almost completely α-helical in 70% TFE. Unlike the NTD, CTD, and TRD, the unstructured content of the methyl DNA binding domain and the intervening domain did not change with increasing TFE concentration. These results indicate that the coil-to-helix transitions that occur in full-length MeCP2 are localized to the NTD, CTD, and TRD, with the TRD showing the greatest tendency for helix formation. The potential relationships between intrinsic disorder, coil-to-helix transitions, and MeCP2 structure and function are discussed. PMID:22294343

  19. Theory of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of conformational fluctuations of DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Murugan, R

    2010-07-21

    We develop a theory that explains how the thermally driven conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of the DNA binding proteins (DBPs) are effectively coupled to the one-dimensional searching dynamics of DBPs for their cognate sites on DNA. We show that the rate gammaopt, associated with the flipping of conformational states of DBDs beyond which the maximum search efficiency of DBPs is achieved, varies with the one-dimensional sliding length L as gammaopt proportional, L(-2) and with the number of roadblock protein molecules present on the same DNA m as gammaopt proportional, m2. The required free energy barrier ERTO associated with this flipping transition seems to be varying with L as ERTO proportional, variant ln L2. When the barrier height associated with the conformational flipping of DBDs is comparable with that of the thermal free energy, then the possible value of L under in vivo conditions seems to be L

  20. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-06-18

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca(2+) dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved.

  1. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-01-01

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca2+ dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved. PMID:23778582

  2. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  3. cAPK-phosphorylation controls the interaction of the regulatory domain of cardiac myosin binding protein C with myosin-S2 in an on-off fashion.

    PubMed

    Gruen, M; Prinz, H; Gautel, M

    1999-06-25

    Myosin binding protein C is a protein of the myosin filaments of striated muscle which is expressed in isoforms specific for cardiac and skeletal muscle. The cardiac isoform is phosphorylated rapidly upon adrenergic stimulation of myocardium by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and together with the phosphorylation of troponin-I and phospholamban contributes to the positive inotropy that results from adrenergic stimulation of the heart. Cardiac myosin binding protein C is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase on three sites in a myosin binding protein C specific N-terminal domain which binds to myosin-S2. This interaction with myosin close to the motor domain is likely to mediate the regulatory function of the protein. Cardiac myosin binding protein C is a common target gene of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most mutations encode N-terminal subfragments of myosin binding protein C. The understanding of the signalling interactions of the N-terminal region is therefore important for understanding the pathophysiology of myosin binding protein C associated cardiomyopathy. We demonstrate here by cosedimentation assays and isothermal titration calorimetry that the myosin-S2 binding properties of the myosin binding protein C motif are abolished by cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated tris-phosphorylation, decreasing the S2 affinity from a Kd of approximately 5 microM to undetectable levels. We show that the slow and fast skeletal muscle isoforms are no cAMP-dependent protein kinase substrates and that the S2 interaction of these myosin binding protein C isoforms is therefore constitutively on. The regulation of cardiac contractility by myosin binding protein C therefore appears to be a 'brake-off' mechanism that will free a specific subset of myosin heads from sterical constraints imposed by the binding to the myosin binding protein C motif.

  4. Human iron regulatory protein 2 is easily cleaved in its specific domain: consequences for the haem binding properties of the protein

    PubMed Central

    Dycke, Camille; Bougault, Catherine; Gaillard, Jacques; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Pantopoulos, Kostas; Moulis, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian IRPs (iron regulatory proteins), IRP1 and IRP2, are cytosolic RNA-binding proteins that post-transcriptionally control the mRNA of proteins involved in storage, transport, and utilization of iron. In iron-replete cells, IRP2 undergoes degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Binding of haem to a 73aa-Domain (73-amino-acid domain) that is unique in IRP2 has been previously proposed as the initial iron-sensing mechanism. It is shown here that recombinant IRP2 and the 73aa-Domain are sensitive to proteolysis at the same site. NMR results suggest that the isolated 73aa-Domain is not structured. Iron-independent cleavage of IRP2 within the 73aa-Domain also occurs in lung cancer (H1299) cells. Haem interacts with a cysteine residue only in truncated forms of the 73aa-Domain, as shown by a series of complementary physicochemical approaches, including NMR, EPR and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy. In contrast, the cofactor is not ligated by the same residue in the full-length peptide or intact IRP2, although non-specific interaction occurs between these molecular forms and haem. Therefore it is unlikely that the iron-dependent degradation of IRP2 is mediated by haem binding to the intact 73aa-Domain, since the sequence resembling an HRM (haem-regulatory motif) in the 73aa-Domain does not provide an axial ligand of the cofactor unless this domain is cleaved. PMID:17760563

  5. Src-homology 3 domain of protein kinase p59fyn mediates binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K V; Janssen, O; Kapeller, R; Raab, M; Cantley, L C; Rudd, C E

    1993-01-01

    The Src-related tyrosine kinase p59fyn(T) plays an important role in the generation of intracellular signals from the T-cell antigen receptor TCR zeta/CD3 complex. A key question concerns the nature and the binding sites of downstream components that interact with this Src-related kinase. p59fyn(T) contains Src-homology 2 and 3 domains (SH2 and SH3) with a capacity to bind to intracellular proteins. One potential downstream target is phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). In this study, we demonstrate that anti-CD3 and anti-Fyn immunoprecipitates possess PI 3-kinase activity as assessed by TLC and HPLC. Both free and receptor-bound p59fyn(T) were found to bind to the lipid kinase. Further, our results indicate that Src-related kinases have developed a novel mechanism to interact with PI 3-kinase. Precipitation using GST fusion proteins containing Fyn SH2, SH3, and SH2/SH3 domains revealed that PI 3-kinase bound principally to the SH3 domain of Fyn. Fyn SH3 bound directly to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase as expressed in a baculoviral system. Anti-CD3 crosslinking induced an increase in the detection of Fyn SH3-associated PI 3-kinase activity. Thus PI 3-kinase is a target of SH3 domains and is likely to play a major role in the signals derived from the TCR zeta/CD3-p59fyn complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8394019

  6. Activity Augmentation of Amphioxus Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein BbtPGRP3 via Fusion with a Chitin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Jie; Cheng, Wang; Luo, Ming; Yan, Qingyu; Yu, Hong-Mei; Li, Qiong; Cao, Dong-Dong; Huang, Shengfeng; Xu, Anlong; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have been identified in most animals, are pattern recognition molecules that involve antimicrobial defense. Resulting from extraordinary expansion of innate immune genes, the amphioxus encodes many PGRPs of diverse functions. For instance, three isoforms of PGRP encoded by Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense, termed BbtPGRP1~3, are fused with a chitin binding domain (CBD) at the N-terminus. Here we report the 2.7 Å crystal structure of BbtPGRP3, revealing an overall structure of an N-terminal hevein-like CBD followed by a catalytic PGRP domain. Activity assays combined with site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the individual PGRP domain exhibits amidase activity towards both DAP-type and Lys-type peptidoglycans (PGNs), the former of which is favored. The N-terminal CBD not only has the chitin-binding activity, but also enables BbtPGRP3 to gain a five-fold increase of amidase activity towards the Lys-type PGNs, leading to a significantly broadened substrate spectrum. Together, we propose that modular evolution via domain shuffling combined with gene horizontal transfer makes BbtPGRP1~3 novel PGRPs of augmented catalytic activity and broad recognition spectrum. PMID:26479246

  7. Structure of a Construct of a Human Poly(C)-binding Protein Containing the First and Second KH Domains Reveals Insights into Its Regulatory Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhihua; Fenn, Sebastian; Tjhen, Richard; James, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(C)-binding proteins (PCBPs) are important regulatory proteins that contain three KH (hnRNP K homology) domains. Binding poly(C) D/RNA sequences via KH domains is essential for multiple PCBP functions. To reveal the basis for PCBP-D/RNA interactions and function, we determined the structure of a construct containing the first two domains (KH1-KH2) of human PCBP2 by NMR. KH1 and KH2 form an intramolecular pseudodimer. The large hydrophobic dimerization surface of each KH domain is on the side opposite the D/RNA binding interface. Chemical shift mapping indicates both domains bind poly(C) DNA motifs without disrupting the KH1-KH2 interaction. Spectral comparison of KH1-KH2, KH3, and full-length PCBP2 constructs suggests that the KH1-KH2 pseudodimer forms, but KH3 does not interact with other parts of the protein. From NMR studies and modeling, we propose possible modes of cooperative binding tandem poly(C) motifs by the KH domains. D/RNA binding may induce pseudodimer dissociation or stabilize dissociated KH1 and KH2, making protein interaction surfaces available to PCBP-binding partners. This conformational change may represent a regulatory mechanism linking D/RNA binding to PCBP functions. PMID:18701464

  8. Maturation and Activity of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 Is Inhibited by Acyl-CoA Binding Domain Containing 3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Patel, Vishala; Bang, Sookhee; Cohen, Natalie; Millar, John; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2012-01-01

    Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis. PMID:23166793

  9. The protein conformation and a zinc-binding domain of an autoantigen from mouse seminal vesicle.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y H; Luo, C W; Yu, L C; Chu, S T; Chen, Y H

    1995-01-01

    The protein conformation of a mouse seminal vesicle autoantigen was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. At pH 7.4, the spectrum in the UV region appears as one negative band at 217 nm and one positive band at 200 nm. This together with the predicted secondary structures indicates no helices but a mixture of beta form, beta turn, and unordered form in the protein molecule. The conformation is stable even at pH 10.5 or 3.0. The spectrum in the near-UV region consists of fine structures that are disturbed in acidic or alkaline solution. The environments around Trp2 and Trp82 of this protein were studied by intrinsic fluorescence and solute quenching. They give an emission peak at 345 nm, and about 87% of them are accessible to quenching by acrylamide. Correlating the quenching effect of CsCl and Kl on the protein fluorescence to the charged groups along the polypeptide chain suggests the difference in the "local charge" around the two tryptophan residues. The presence of ZnCl2 in the protein solution effects no change in the circular dichroism but perturbs the fluorescence due to Trp82. Analysis of the fluorescence data suggests a Zn(2+)-binding site on the protein, which cannot coordinate with both Ca2+ and Mg2+. The association constant for the complex formation is 1.35 x 10(5) +/- 0.04 x 10(5) M-1 at pH 7.4. PMID:8580352

  10. An immunogenic, surface-exposed domain of Haemophilus ducreyi outer membrane protein HgbA is involved in hemoglobin binding.

    PubMed

    Nepluev, Igor; Afonina, Galyna; Fusco, William G; Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Temple, Brenda; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    HgbA is the sole TonB-dependent receptor for hemoglobin (Hb) acquisition of Haemophilus ducreyi. Binding of Hb to HgbA is the initial step in heme acquisition from Hb. To better understand this step, we mutagenized hgbA by deletion of each of the 11 putative surface-exposed loops and expressed each of the mutant proteins in trans in host strain H. ducreyi FX547 hgbA. All mutant proteins were expressed, exported, and detected on the surface by anti-HgbA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Deletion of sequences in loops 5 and 7 of HgbA abolished Hb binding in two different formats. In contrast, HgbA proteins containing deletions in the other nine loops retained the ability to bind Hb. None of the clones expressing mutant proteins were able to grow on plates containing low concentrations of Hb. Previously we demonstrated in a swine model of chancroid infection that an HgbA vaccine conferred complete protection from a challenge infection. Using anti-HgbA IgG from this study and the above deletion mutants, we show that loops 4, 5, and 7 of HgbA were immunogenic and surface exposed and that IgG directed against loops 4 and 5 blocked Hb binding. Furthermore, loop 6 was cleaved by protease on intact H. ducreyi, suggesting surface exposure. These data implicate a central domain of HgbA (in respect to the primary amino acid sequence) as important in Hb binding and suggest that this region of the molecule might have potential as a subunit vaccine.

  11. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Mototsugu Watanabe, Takashi; Baba, Nobuyoshi; Miyara, Takako; Saito, Jun; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2008-04-01

    The selenomethionyl-substituted transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from S. pneumoniae was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of the soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. MAD data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae catalyzes the cross-linking of peptidoglycan precursors that occurs during bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. A selenomethionyl (SeMet) substituted PBP 2B transpeptidase domain was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of a soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 86.39, c = 143.27 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution using the BL32B2 beamline at SPring-8. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule and 63.7% solvent.

  13. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  14. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  15. LIVE CELL IMAGING OF PHOSPHOINOSITIDES WITH EXPRESSED INOSITIDE-BINDING PROTEIN DOMAINS

    PubMed Central

    Várnai, Péter; Balla, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    Summary Inositol lipids and calcium signaling has been inseparable twins during the 1980s when the molecular details of phospholipase C-mediated generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) and its Ca2+ mobilizing action were discovered. Since then, both the Ca2+- and inositol lipid signaling fields have hugely expanded and the tools allowing dissection of the finest details of their molecular organization also followed closely. Although phosphoinositides regulate many cell functions unrelated to Ca2+ signaling there are still many open questions even in the Ca2+ field that would benefit from single cell monitoring of PtdIns(4,5)P2 or InsP3 changes during agonist stimulation. This chapter is designed to provide practical guidance as well as some theoretical background on measurements of phosphoinositides in live cells using protein domain-GFP chimeras that could be also useful for people working on calcium signaling. PMID:18930153

  16. Use of a fusion protein between GFP and an actin-binding domain to visualize transient filamentous-actin structures.

    PubMed

    Pang, K M; Lee, E; Knecht, D A

    1998-03-26

    Many important processes in eukaryotic cells involve changes in the quantity, location and the organization of actin filaments [1] [2] [3]. We have been able to visualize these changes in live cells using a fusion protein (GFP-ABD) comprising the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria and the 25 kDa highly conserved actin-binding domain (ABD) from the amino terminus of the actin cross-linking protein ABP-120 [4]. In live cells of the soil amoeba Dictyostelium that were expressing GFP-ABD, the three-dimensional architecture of the actin cortex was clearly visualized. The pattern of GFP-ABD fluorescence in these cells coincided with that of rhodamine-phalloidin, indicating that GFP-ABD specifically binds filamentous (F) actin. On the ventral surface of non-polarized vegetative cells, a broad ring of F actin periodically assembled and contracted, whereas in polarized cells there were transient punctate F-actin structures; cells cycled between the polarized and non-polarized morphologies. During the formation of pseudopods, an increase in fluorescence intensity coincided with the initial outward deformation of the membrane. This is consistent with the models of pseudopod extension that predict an increase in the local density of actin filaments. In conclusion, GFP-ABD specifically binds F actin and allows the visualization of F-actin dynamics and cellular behavior simultaneously.

  17. Calmodulin binding proteins provide domains of local Ca2+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Bers, Donald M

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common Ca(2+) sensor for many signaling pathways, transducing local Ca(2+) signals into specific cellular outcomes. Many of CaM's signaling functions can be explained by its unique biochemical properties, including high and low affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites with slow and fast kinetics, respectively. CaM is expected to have a limited spatial range of action, emphasizing its role in local Ca(2+) signaling. Interactions with target proteins further fine-tune CaM signal transduction. Here, we focus on only three specific cellular targets for CaM signaling in cardiac myocytes: the L-type Ca(2+) channel, the ryanodine receptor, and the IP(3) receptor. We elaborate a working hypothesis that each channel is regulated by two distinct functional populations of CaM: dedicated CaM and promiscuous CaM. Dedicated CaM is typically tethered to each channel and directly regulates channel activity. In addition, a local pool of promiscuous CaM appears poised to sense local Ca(2+) signals and trigger downstream pathways such as Ca(2+)/CaM dependent-protein kinase II and calcineurin. Understanding how promiscuous CaM coordinates multiple distinct signaling pathways remains a challenge, but is aided by the use of mathematical modeling and a new generation of fluorescent biosensors. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes."

  18. Distinct Z-DNA binding mode of a PKR-like protein kinase containing a Z-DNA binding domain (PKZ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoun; Hur, Jeonghwan; Park, Kwangsoo; Bae, Sangsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Ha, Sung Chul; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded ribonucleic acid-activated protein kinase (PKR) downregulates translation as a defense mechanism against viral infection. In fish species, PKZ, a PKR-like protein kinase containing left-handed deoxyribonucleic acid (Z-DNA) binding domains, performs a similar role in the antiviral response. To understand the role of PKZ in Z-DNA recognition and innate immune response, we performed structural and functional studies of the Z-DNA binding domain (Zα) of PKZ from Carassius auratus (caZαPKZ). The 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of caZαPKZ:Z-DNA revealed that caZαPKZ shares the overall fold with other Zα, but has discrete structural features that differentiate its DNA binding mode from others. Functional analyses of caZαPKZ and its mutants revealed that caZαPKZ mediates the fastest B-to-Z transition of DNA among Zα, and the minimal interaction for Z-DNA recognition is mediated by three backbone phosphates and six residues of caZαPKZ. Structure-based mutagenesis and B-to-Z transition assays confirmed that Lys56 located in the β-wing contributes to its fast B-to-Z transition kinetics. Investigation of the DNA binding kinetics of caZαPKZ further revealed that the B-to-Z transition rate is positively correlated with the association rate constant. Taking these results together, we conclude that the positive charge in the β-wing largely affects fast B-to-Z transition activity by enhancing the DNA binding rate. PMID:24682817

  19. The HhH2/NDD domain of the Drosophila Nod chromokinesin-like protein is required for binding to chromosomes in the oocyte nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Hawley, R Scott

    2005-12-01

    Nod is a chromokinesin-like protein that plays a critical role in segregating achiasmate chromosomes during female meiosis. The C-terminal half of the Nod protein contains two putative DNA-binding domains. The first of these domains, known as the HMGN domain, consists of three tandemly repeated high-mobility group N motifs. This domain was previously shown to be both necessary and sufficient for binding of the C-terminal half of Nod to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. The second putative DNA-binding domain, denoted HhH(2)/NDD, is a helix-hairpin-helix(2)/Nod-like DNA-binding domain. Although the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not required or sufficient for chromosome binding in embryos, several well-characterized nod mutations have been mapped in this domain. To characterize the role of the HhH(2)/NDD domain in mediating Nod function, we created a series of UAS-driven transgene constructs capable of expressing either a wild-type Nod-GFP fusion protein or proteins in which the HhH(2)/NDD domain had been altered by site-directed mutagenesis. Although wild-type Nod-GFP localizes to the oocyte chromosomes and rescues the segregation defect in nod mutant oocytes, two of three proteins carrying mutants in the HhH(2)/NDD domain fail to either rescue the nod mutant phenotype or bind to oocyte chromosomes. However, these mutant proteins do bind to the polytene chromosomes in nurse-cell nuclei and enter the oocyte nucleus. Thus, even though the HhH(2)/NDD domain is not essential for chromosome binding in other cell types, it is required for chromosome binding in the oocyte. These HhH(2)/NDD mutants also block the localization of Nod to the posterior pole of stage 9-10A oocytes, a process that is thought to facilitate the interaction of Nod with the plus ends of microtubules (Cui et al. 2005). This observation suggests that the Nod HhH2/NDD domain may play other roles in addition to binding Nod to meiotic chromosomes.

  20. Differential tolerance of 'pseudo-pathogenic' tryptophan residues in calcium-binding EGF domains of short fibulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D

    2015-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in the last canonical calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF) domain of fibulin-3 (F3) causes the rare macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML). In cell culture studies, this mutation leads to inefficient F3 secretion and higher intracellular steady state levels, likely due to F3 disulfide bonding and/or protein folding problems. However, how the R345W mutation actually causes ML is still largely unknown. Herein we tested whether the introduction of analogous, 'pseudo-pathogenic' tryptophan mutations immediately after the bn cysteine (bn+1) in other cbEGF domains also caused protein folding/secretion challenges. We found that introduction of tryptophan mutations into each of the four other F3 canonical cbEGF domains caused a significant reduction in protein secretion ranging from 2.7 to 56% of wild-type (WT) F3 levels. Surprisingly, an R185W mutation in the first canonical cbEGF domain of F3 yielded the highest amount of secretion among the F3 tryptophan mutants, and its secretion defect could be rescued to near WT levels (95%) after growth temperature reduction. Interestingly, when similarly positioned tryptophan mutations were introduced into any of the canonical cbEGF domains of the highly homologous protein, fibulin-5 (F5), there was no effect on secretion. In an attempt to make F3 tolerant of tryptophan residues (like F5), we genetically engineered F3 to have a higher sequence homology with F5 by deleting three insert regions present in F3, but not F5. However, deletion of one or more of these regions did not have a beneficial effect on R345W F3 secretion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of tryptophan residues at the bn+1 position does not universally disrupt cbEGF domain folding and secretion, but that their effect is context dependent, and in this case, uniquely disrupt the folding of canonical cbEGF domains of F3, but not F5.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL TOLERANCE OF ‘PSEUDO-PATHOGENIC’ TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES IN CALCIUM-BINDING EGF DOMAINS OF SHORT FIBULIN PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Annie; Hulleman, John D.

    2015-01-01

    An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in the last canonical calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF) domain of fibulin-3 (F3) causes the rare macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML). In cell culture studies, this mutation leads to inefficient F3 secretion and higher intracellular steady state levels, likely due to F3 disulfide bonding and/or protein folding problems. However, how the R345W mutation actually causes ML is still largely unknown. Herein we tested whether the introduction of analogous, ‘pseudo-pathogenic’ tryptophan mutations immediately after the bn cysteine (bn+1) in other cbEGF domains also caused protein folding/secretion challenges. We found that introduction of tryptophan mutations into each of the four other F3 canonical cbEGF domains caused a significant reduction in protein secretion ranging from 2.7 to 56% of wild-type (WT) F3 levels. Surprisingly, an R185W mutation in the first canonical cbEGF domain of F3 yielded the highest amount of secretion among the F3 tryptophan mutants, and its secretion defect could be rescued to near WT levels (95%) after growth temperature reduction. Interestingly, when similarly positioned tryptophan mutations were introduced into any of the canonical cbEGF domains of the highly homologous protein, fibulin-5 (F5), there was no effect on secretion. In an attempt to make F3 tolerant of tryptophan residues (like F5), we genetically engineered F3 to have a higher sequence homology with F5 by deleting three insert regions present in F3, but not F5. However, deletion of one or more of these regions did not have a beneficial effect on R345W F3 secretion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of tryptophan residues at the bn+1 position does not universally disrupt cbEGF domain folding and secretion, but that their effect is context dependent, and in this case, uniquely disrupt the folding of canonical cbEGF domains of F3, but not F5. PMID:25481286

  2. DNA-damage-inducible 1 protein (Ddi1) contains an uncharacteristic ubiquitin-like domain that binds ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka, Urszula; Zhang, Daoning; Walker, Olivier; Krutauz, Daria; Castañeda, Carlos A.; Chaturvedi, Apurva; Chen, Tony Y.; Reis, Noa; Glickman, Michael H.; Fushman, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Ddi1 belongs to a family of shuttle proteins targeting polyubiquitinated substrates for proteasomal degradation. Unlike the other proteasomal shuttles, Rad23 and Dsk2, Ddi1 remains an enigma: its function is not fully understood and structural properties are poorly characterized. We determined the structure and binding properties of the ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains of Ddi1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that, while Ddi1UBA forms a characteristic UBA:ubiquitin complex, Ddi1UBL has entirely uncharacteristic binding preferences. Despite having a ubiquitin-like fold, Ddi1UBL does not interact with typical UBL-receptors but, unexpectedly, binds ubiquitin, forming a unique interface mediated by hydrophobic contacts and by salt-bridges between oppositely-charged residues of Ddi1UBL and ubiquitin. In stark contrast with ubiquitin and other UBLs, the β-sheet surface of Ddi1UBL is negatively charged and, therefore, is recognized in a completely different way. The dual functionality of Ddi1UBL, capable of binding both ubiquitin and proteasome, suggests a novel mechanism for Ddi1 as a proteasomal shuttle. PMID:25703377

  3. Design and Use of Chimeric Proteins Containing a Collagen-Binding Domain for Wound Healing and Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Addi, Cyril; Murschel, Frederic; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2016-12-12

    Collagen-based biomaterials are widely used in the field of tissue engineering; they can be loaded with biomolecules such as growth factors (GFs) to modulate the biological response of the host and thus improve its potential for regeneration. Recombinant chimeric GFs fused to a collagen-binding domain (CBD) have been reported to improve their bioavailability and the host response, especially when combined with an appropriate collagen-based biomaterial. This review first provides an extensive description of the various CBDs that have been fused to proteins, with a focus on the need for accurate characterization of their interaction with collagen. The second part of the review highlights the benefits of various CBD/GF fusion proteins that have been designed for wound healing and bone regeneration.

  4. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study is focused on the characterization and expression of genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, encoding proteins that possess six-cysteine-containing chitin-binding domains (CBDs) related to the peritrophin A domain (ChtBD2). An exhaustive bioinformatics search of the genome of...

  5. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    PubMed

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-06-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain.

  6. serpentine and vermiform encode matrix proteins with chitin binding and deacetylation domains that limit tracheal tube length in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Luschnig, Stefan; Bätz, Tilmann; Armbruster, Kristina; Krasnow, Mark A

    2006-01-24

    Many organs contain epithelial tubes that transport gases or liquids . Proper tube size and shape is crucial for organ function, but the mechanisms controlling tube diameter and length are poorly understood. Recent studies of tracheal (respiratory) tube morphogenesis in Drosophila show that chitin synthesis genes produce an expanding chitin cylinder in the apical (luminal) extracellular matrix (ECM) that coordinates the dilation of the surrounding epithelium . Here, we describe two genes involved in chitin modification, serpentine (serp) and vermiform (verm), mutations in which cause excessively long and tortuous tracheal tubes. The genes encode similar proteins with an LDL-receptor ligand binding motif and chitin binding and deacetylation domains. Both proteins are expressed and secreted during tube expansion and localize throughout the lumen in a chitin-dependent manner. Unlike previously characterized chitin pathway genes, serp and verm are not required for chitin synthesis or secretion but rather for its normal fibrillar structure. The mutations also affect structural properties of another chitinous matrix, epidermal cuticle. Our work demonstrates that chitin and the matrix proteins Serp and Verm limit tube elongation, and it suggests that tube length is controlled independently of diameter by modulating physical properties of the chitin ECM, presumably by N-deacetylation of chitin and conversion to chitosan.

  7. The coiled-coil and nucleotide binding domains of the Potato Rx disease resistance protein function in pathogen recognition and signaling.

    PubMed

    Rairdan, Gregory J; Collier, Sarah M; Sacco, Melanie A; Baldwin, Thomas T; Boettrich, Teresa; Moffett, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Plant genomes encode large numbers of nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins, some of which mediate the recognition of pathogen-encoded proteins. Following recognition, the initiation of a resistance response is thought to be mediated by the domains present at the N termini of NB-LRR proteins, either a Toll and Interleukin-1 Receptor or a coiled-coil (CC) domain. In order to understand the role of the CC domain in NB-LRR function, we have undertaken a systematic structure-function analysis of the CC domain of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) CC-NB-LRR protein Rx, which confers resistance to Potato virus X. We show that the highly conserved EDVID motif of the CC domain mediates an intramolecular interaction that is dependent on several domains within the rest of the Rx protein, including the NB and LRR domains. Other conserved and nonconserved regions of the CC domain mediate the interaction with the Ran GTPase-activating protein, RanGAP2, a protein required for Rx function. Furthermore, we show that the Rx NB domain is sufficient for inducing cell death typical of hypersensitive plant resistance responses. We describe a model of CC-NB-LRR function wherein the LRR and CC domains coregulate the signaling activity of the NB domain in a recognition-specific manner.

  8. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the β1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor–induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor. PMID:11807099

  9. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-21

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the beta1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor-induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor.

  10. The γ-secretase-generated intracellular domain of β-amyloid precursor protein binds Numb and inhibits Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Roberta; Šestan, Nenad; Scheinfeld, Meir H.; Berechid, Bridget E.; Lopez, Peter A.; Meucci, Olimpia; McGlade, Jane C.; Rakic, Pasko; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2002-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the Notch receptor undergo intramembranous proteolysis by the Presenilin-dependent γ-secretase. The cleavage of APP by γ-secretase releases amyloid-β peptides, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and the APP intracellular domain (AID), for which the function is not yet well understood. A similar γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the Notch receptor liberates the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). NICD translocates to the nucleus and activates the transcription of genes that regulate the generation, differentiation, and survival of neuronal cells. Hence, some of the effects of APP signaling and Alzheimer's disease pathology may be mediated by the interaction of APP and Notch. Here, we show that membrane-tethered APP binds to the cytosolic Notch inhibitors Numb and Numb-like in mouse brain lysates. AID also binds Numb and Numb-like, and represses Notch activity when released by APP. Thus, γ-secretase may have opposing effects on Notch signaling; positive by cleaving Notch and generating NICD, and negative by processing APP and generating AID, which inhibits the function of NICD. PMID:12011466

  11. Determination of floral organ identity by Arabidopsis MADS domain homeotic proteins AP1, AP3, PI, and AG is independent of their DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, J L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-01-01

    The MADS domain homeotic proteins APETALA1 (AP1), APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI), and AGAMOUS (AG) combinatorially specify the identity of Arabidopsis floral organs. AP1/AP1, AG/AG, and AP3/PI dimers bind to similar CArG box sequences; thus, differences in DNA-binding specificity among these proteins do not seem to be the origin of their distinct organ identity properties. To assess the overall contribution that specific DNA binding could make to their biological specificity, we have generated chimeric genes in which the amino-terminal half of the MADS domain of AP1, AP3, PI, and AG was substituted by the corresponding sequences of human SRF and MEF2A proteins. In vitro DNA-binding assays reveal that the chimeric proteins acquired the respective, and distinct, DNA-binding specificity of SRF or MEF2A. However, ectopic expression of the chimeric genes reproduces the dominant gain-of-function phenotypes exhibited by plants ectopically expressing the corresponding Arabidopsis wild-type genes. In addition, both the SRF and MEF2 chimeric genes can complement the pertinent ap1-1, ap3-3, pi-1, or ag-3 mutations to a degree similar to that of AP1, AP3, PI, and AG when expressed under the control of the same promoter. These results indicate that determination of floral organ identity by the MADS domain homeotic proteins AP1, AP3, PI, and AG is independent of their DNA-binding specificity. In addition, the DNA-binding experiments show that either one of the two MADS domains of a dimer can be sufficient to confer a particular DNA-binding specificity to the complex and that sequences outside the amino-terminal basic region of the MADS domain can, in some cases, contribute to the DNA-binding specificity of the proteins. Images PMID:9243505

  12. [High-efficiency expression of a receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein in tobacco chloroplasts].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xue; Qi, Guangxun; Yang, Jing; Xing, Guojie; Liu, Jianfeng; Yang, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Chloroplast-based expression system is promising for the hyper-expression of plant-derived recombinant therapeutic proteins and vaccines. To verify the feasibility of obtaining high-level expression of the SARS subunit vaccine and to provide a suitable plant-derived vaccine production platform against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a 193-amino acid fragment of SARS CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), fused with the peptide vector cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), was expressed in tobacco chloroplasts. Codon-optimized CTB-RBD sequence was integrated into the chloroplast genome and homoplasmy was obtained, as confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Western blot showed expression of the recombinant fusion protein mostly in soluble monomeric form. Quantification of the recombinant fusion protein CTB-RBD was conducted by ELISA analysis from the transplastomic leaves at different developmental stages, attachment positions and time points in a day and the different expression levels of the CTB-RBD were observed with the highest expression of 10.2% total soluble protein obtained from mature transplastomic leaves. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of highly expressing SARS subunit vaccine RBD, indicating its potential in subsequent development of a plant-derived recombinant subunit vaccine and reagents production for antibody detection in SARS serological tests.

  13. A single amino acid substitution (R441A) in the receptor-binding domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein disrupts the antigenic structure and binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    He Yuxian . E-mail: yhe@nybloodcenter.org; Li Jingjing; Jiang Shibo

    2006-05-26

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has two major functions: interacting with the receptor to mediate virus entry and inducing protective immunity. Coincidently, the receptor-binding domain (RBD, residues 318-510) of SAR-CoV S protein is a major antigenic site to induce neutralizing antibodies. Here, we used RBD-Fc, a fusion protein containing the RBD and human IgG1 Fc, as a model in the studies and found that a single amino acid substitution in the RBD (R441A) could abolish the immunogenicity of RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice and rabbits. With a panel of anti-RBD mAbs as probes, we observed that R441A substitution was able to disrupt the majority of neutralizing epitopes in the RBD, suggesting that this residue is critical for the antigenic structure responsible for inducing protective immune responses. We also demonstrated that the RBD-Fc bearing R441A mutation could not bind to soluble and cell-associated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor for SARS-CoV and failed to block S protein-mediated pseudovirus entry, indicating that this point mutation also disrupted the receptor-binding motif (RBM) in the RBD. Taken together, these data provide direct evidence to show that a single amino acid residue at key position in the RBD can determine the major function of SARS-CoV S protein and imply for designing SARS vaccines and therapeutics.

  14. NonO, a non-POU-domain-containing, octamer-binding protein, is the mammalian homolog of Drosophila nonAdiss.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Hanke, J H; Carayannopoulos, L; Craft, C M; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W

    1993-09-01

    We have cloned the ubiquitous form of an octamer-binding, 60-kDa protein (NonO) that appears to be the mammalian equivalent of the Drosophila visual and courtship song behavior protein, no-on-transient A/dissonance (nonAdiss). A region unprecedently rich in aromatic amino acids containing two ribonuclear protein binding motifs is highly conserved between the two proteins. A ubiquitous form of NonO is present in all adult tissues, whereas lymphocytes and retina express unique forms of NonO mRNA. The ubiquitous form contains a potential helix-turn-helix motif followed by a highly charged region but differs from prototypic octamer-binding factors by lacking the POU DNA-binding domain. In addition to its conventional octamer duplex-binding, NonO binds single-stranded DNA and RNA at a site independent of the duplex site.

  15. A biomimetic Protein G affinity adsorbent: an Ugi ligand for immunoglobulins and Fab fragments based on the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Graziella; Lowe, Christopher R

    2013-04-01

    This work reports the development of a synthetic affinity adsorbent for immunoglobulins based on the Fab-binding domain of Streptococcal Protein G (SpG-domain III). The ligand (A2C7I1) was synthesized by the four-component Ugi reaction to generate a substituted peptoidal scaffold mimicking key amino acid residues of SpG. Computer-aided analysis suggests a putative binding site on the CH 1 domain of the Fab molecule. In silico studies, supported by affinity chromatography in comparison with immobilized SpG, as well as analytical characterization by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance of the ligand synthesized in solution, indicated the authenticity and suitability of the designed ligand for the purification of immunoglobulins. The immobilized ligand displayed an apparent static binding capacity of ~17 mg IgG ml(-1) and a dissociation constant of 5.34 × 10(-5)  M. Preparative chromatography demonstrated the ability of the immobilized ligand to purify IgG and Fab fragments from crude mammalian and yeast cell cultures, under near physiological ionic strength and pH, to yield proteins of 99% and 93% purity, respectively.

  16. Genetic variability and natural selection at the ligand domain of the Duffy binding protein in brazilian Plasmodium vivax populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health challenge in Latin America, Asia and Oceania, with 130-435 million clinical cases per year worldwide. Invasion of host blood cells by P. vivax mainly depends on a type I membrane protein called Duffy binding protein (PvDBP). The erythrocyte-binding motif of PvDBP is a 170 amino-acid stretch located in its cysteine-rich region II (PvDBPII), which is the most variable segment of the protein. Methods To test whether diversifying natural selection has shaped the nucleotide diversity of PvDBPII in Brazilian populations, this region was sequenced in 122 isolates from six different geographic areas. A Bayesian method was applied to test for the action of natural selection under a population genetic model that incorporates recombination. The analysis was integrated with a structural model of PvDBPII, and T- and B-cell epitopes were localized on the 3-D structure. Results The results suggest that: (i) recombination plays an important role in determining the haplotype structure of PvDBPII, and (ii) PvDBPII appears to contain neutrally evolving codons as well as codons evolving under natural selection. Diversifying selection preferentially acts on sites identified as epitopes, particularly on amino acid residues 417, 419, and 424, which show strong linkage disequilibrium. Conclusions This study shows that some polymorphisms of PvDBPII are present near the erythrocyte-binding domain and might serve to elude antibodies that inhibit cell invasion. Therefore, these polymorphisms should be taken into account when designing vaccines aimed at eliciting antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion. PMID:21092207

  17. Analysis of chitin-binding proteins from Manduca sexta provides new insights into evolution of peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in insects.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Dittmer, Neal T; Cao, Xiaolong; Agrawal, Sinu; Chen, Yun-Ru; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Haobo, Jiang; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    In insects, chitin is a major structural component of the cuticle and the peritrophic membrane (PM). In nature, chitin is always associated with proteins among which chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) are the most important for forming, maintaining and regulating the functions of these extracellular structures. In this study, a genome-wide search for genes encoding proteins with ChtBD2-type (peritrophin A-type) chitin-binding domains (CBDs) was conducted. A total of 53 genes encoding 56 CBPs were identified, including 15 CPAP1s (cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophins with 1 CBD), 11 CPAP3s (CPAPs with 3 CBDs) and 17 PMPs (PM proteins) with a variable number of CBDs, which are structural components of cuticle or of the PM. CBDs were also identified in enzymes of chitin metabolism including 6 chitinases and 7 chitin deacetylases encoded by 6 and 5 genes, respectively. RNA-seq analysis confirmed that PMP and CPAP genes have differential spatial expression patterns. The expression of PMP genes is midgut-specific, while CPAP genes are widely expressed in different cuticle forming tissues. Phylogenetic analysis of CBDs of proteins in insects belonging to different orders revealed that CPAP1s from different species constitute a separate family with 16 different groups, including 6 new groups identified in this study. The CPAP3s are clustered into a separate family of 7 groups present in all insect orders. Altogether, they reveal that duplication events of CBDs in CPAP1s and CPAP3s occurred prior to the evolutionary radiation of insect species. In contrast to the CPAPs, all CBDs from individual PMPs are generally clustered and distinct from other PMPs in the same species in phylogenetic analyses, indicating that the duplication of CBDs in each of these PMPs occurred after divergence of insect species. Phylogenetic analysis of these three CBP families showed that the CBDs in CPAP1s form a clearly separate family, while those found in PMPs and CPAP3s were clustered

  18. The gamma-carboxyglutamic acid domain of anticoagulant protein S is involved in activated protein C cofactor activity, independently of phospholipid binding.

    PubMed

    Saller, François; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Amelot, Aymeric; Kaabache, Tahar; Le Bonniec, Bernard F; Aiach, Martine; Gandrille, Sophie; Borgel, Delphine

    2005-01-01

    We expressed 2 chimeras between human protein S (PS) and human prothrombin (FII) in which the prothrombin gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain replaced the PS Gla domain in native PS (Gla(FII)-PS) or in PS deleted of the thrombin-sensitive region (TSR) (Gla(FII)-DeltaTSR-PS). Neither PS/FII chimera had activated protein C (APC) cofactor activity in plasma clotting assays or purified systems, but both bound efficiently to phospholipids. This pointed to a direct involvement of the PS Gla domain in APC cofactor activity through molecular interaction with APC. Using computational methods, we identified 2 opposite faces of solvent-exposed residues on the PS Gla domain (designated faces 1 and 2) as potentially involved in this interaction. Their importance was supported by functional characterization of a PS mutant in which the face 1 and face 2 PS residues were reintroduced into Gla(FII)-PS, leading to significant APC cofactor activity, likely through restored interaction with APC. Furthermore, by characterizing PS mutants in which PS face 1 and PS face 2 were individually replaced by the corresponding prothrombin faces, we found that face 1 was necessary for efficient phospholipid binding but that face 2 residues were not strictly required for phospholipid binding and were involved in the interaction with APC.

  19. Rifampicin-Independent Interactions between the Pregnane X Receptor Ligand Binding Domain and Peptide Fragments of Coactivator and Corepressor Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Punya; Steele, Bridgett L.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Thompson, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in a ligand-dependent manner. The conventional view of nuclear receptor action is that ligand binding enhances the receptor’s affinity for coactivator proteins, while decreasing its affinity for corepressors. To date, however, no known rigorous biophysical studies have been conducted to investigate the interaction among PXR, its coregulators, and ligands. In this work, steady-state total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and total internal reflection with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching were used to measure the thermodynamics and kinetics of the interaction between the PXR ligand binding domain and a peptide fragment of the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) in the presence and absence of the established PXR agonist, rifampicin. Equilibrium dissociation and dissociation rate constants of ~5 μM and ~2 s−1, respectively, were obtained in the presence and absence of rifampicin, indicating that the ligand does not enhance the affinity of the PXR and SRC-1 fragments. Additionally, TIRFM was used to examine the interaction between PXR and a peptide fragment of the corepressor protein, the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT). An equilibrium dissociation constant of ~70 μM was obtained for SMRT in the presence and absence of rifampicin. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of ligand-dependent activation in PXR differs significantly from that seen in many other nuclear receptors. PMID:22185585

  20. Identification, activity, and structural studies of peptides incorporating the phorbol ester-binding domain of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Wender, P A; Irie, K; Miller, B L

    1995-01-01

    The family of homologous enzymes known as protein kinase C (PKC) has been the object of intense interest because of its crucial role in cellular signal transduction. Although considerable information about the activation of PKC has been gained through structure-activity, molecular modeling, and synthetic studies of both natural and designed activators, information about the structure of PKC itself has been limited by its large size and requirement for phospholipid cofactors. Additionally, difficulties in the purification of truncated mutants of PKC have thus far prevented their analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or x-ray crystallographic methods. We describe the identification, synthesis, ligand-binding analysis, cofactor requirements, and preliminary NMR evaluation of two subdomains (peptides B and C) of the regulatory domain of PKC-gamma. Peptides B and C bind [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate with good affinity (Kd = 6.4 microM and 414 nM, respectively) in the presence of phosphatidylserine. In comparison, the binding affinity of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate for PKC was found to be 2.6 nM. Like PKC itself, these peptides also recognize other PKC activators, including dioctanoylglycerol and teleocidin B-4, and exhibit an ability to differentiate phorbol ester from its C-4 epimer. NMR studies of PKC subdomains are also described, indicating that both peptides B and C are well behaved in solution and do not exhibit any concentration-dependent changes. Finally, these studies reveal that peptide B becomes conformationally ordered only in the presence of phospholipid, suggesting that the regulatory domain of PKC itself might be organized for activation only when associated with the lipid bilayer, where its activator (diacylglycerol) is encountered. PMID:7816824

  1. The dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein binds a capsid protein-derived peptide: a biophysical characterization.

    PubMed

    Garzón, María T; Lidón-Moya, María C; Barrera, Francisco N; Prieto, Alicia; Gómez, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G; Neira, José L

    2004-06-01

    The type 1 HIV presents a conical capsid formed by approximately 1500 units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimerization of CA via its C-terminal domain, CA-C, constitutes a key step in virion assembly. CA-C dimerization is largely mediated by reciprocal interactions between residues of its second alpha-helix. Here, we show that an N-terminal-acetylated and C-terminal-amidated peptide, CAC1, comprising the sequence of the CA-C dimerization helix plus three flanking residues at each side, is able to form a complex with the entire CA-C domain. Thermal denaturation measurements followed by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography provided evidence of the interaction between CAC1 and CA-C. The apparent dissociation constant of the heterocomplex formed by CA-C and CAC1 was determined by several biophysical techniques, namely, fluorescence (using an anthraniloyl-labeled peptide), affinity chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The three techniques yielded similar values for the apparent dissociation constant, in the order of 50 microM. This apparent dissociation constant was only five times higher than was the dissociation constant of both CA-C and the intact capsid protein homodimers (10 microM).

  2. The dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein binds a capsid protein-derived peptide: A biophysical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, María T.; Lidón-Moya, María C.; Barrera, Francisco N.; Prieto, Alicia; Gómez, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G.; Neira, José L.

    2004-01-01

    The type 1 HIV presents a conical capsid formed by ~1500 units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimer-ization of CA via its C-terminal domain, CA-C, constitutes a key step in virion assembly. CA-C dimerization is largely mediated by reciprocal interactions between residues of its second α-helix. Here, we show that an N-terminal-acetylated and C-terminal–amidated peptide, CAC1, comprising the sequence of the CA-C dimerization helix plus three flanking residues at each side, is able to form a complex with the entire CA-C domain. Thermal denaturation measurements followed by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography provided evidence of the interaction between CAC1 and CA-C. The apparent dissociation constant of the heterocomplex formed by CA-C and CAC1 was determined by several biophysical techniques, namely, fluorescence (using an anthraniloyl-labeled peptide), affinity chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The three techniques yielded similar values for the apparent dissociation constant, in the order of 50 μM. This apparent dissociation constant was only five times higher than was the dissociation constant of both CA-C and the intact capsid protein homodimers (10 μM). PMID:15152086

  3. Role of Nucleotide Binding and GTPase Domain Dimerization in Dynamin-like Myxovirus Resistance Protein A for GTPase Activation and Antiviral Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  4. The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and Pleckstrin (DEP) Domain-Containing Protein DEPDC7 Binds to CARMA2 and CARMA3 Proteins, and Regulates NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Reale, Carla; Pizzulo, Maddalena; De La Motte, Luigi Regenburgh; De Maio, Chiara; Mazzone, Pellegrino; Telesio, Gianluca; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2014-01-01

    The molecular complexes containing BCL10, MALT1 and CARMA proteins (CBM complex) have been recently identified as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-κB) transcription factor. Herein we identified the DEP domain-containing protein DEPDC7 as cellular binding partners of CARMA2 and CARMA3 proteins. DEPDC7 displays a cytosolic distribution and its expression induces NF-κB activation. Conversely, shRNA-mediated abrogation of DEPDC7 results in impaired NF-κB activation following G protein-coupled receptors stimulation, or stimuli that require CARMA2 and CARMA3, but not CARMA1. Thus, this study identifies DEPDC7 as a CARMA interacting molecule, and provides evidence that DEPDC7 may be required to specifically convey on the CBM complex signals coming from activated G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25541973

  5. The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain-containing protein DEPDC7 binds to CARMA2 and CARMA3 proteins, and regulates NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Egildo Luca; Ferravante, Angela; Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Reale, Carla; Pizzulo, Maddalena; De La Motte, Luigi Regenburgh; De Maio, Chiara; Mazzone, Pellegrino; Telesio, Gianluca; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2014-01-01

    The molecular complexes containing BCL10, MALT1 and CARMA proteins (CBM complex) have been recently identified as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-κB) transcription factor. Herein we identified the DEP domain-containing protein DEPDC7 as cellular binding partners of CARMA2 and CARMA3 proteins. DEPDC7 displays a cytosolic distribution and its expression induces NF-κB activation. Conversely, shRNA-mediated abrogation of DEPDC7 results in impaired NF-κB activation following G protein-coupled receptors stimulation, or stimuli that require CARMA2 and CARMA3, but not CARMA1. Thus, this study identifies DEPDC7 as a CARMA interacting molecule, and provides evidence that DEPDC7 may be required to specifically convey on the CBM complex signals coming from activated G protein-coupled receptors.

  6. [Prospects of application of the chitin-binding domains to isolation and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography: a review].

    PubMed

    Kurek, D V; Lopatin, S A; Varlamov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Properties of substrate-binding domains, some parameters of affinity sorbents, and a number of other special features that were necessary to take into account during creation of chromatographic system for isolation and purification of proteins with incorporated chitin-binding domain were discussed in this review. This method was shown to be successfully used along with metal-chelate affinity chromatography. The metal-chelate affinity chromatography with the use of polyhistidine peptides as affinity labels is successfully applied to isolation, purification, and investigation of recombinant proteins. However, this system had some disadvantages. At present, scientists attracted more and more attention to substrate-binding domains, including those chitin-binding, because they had a number of advantages being used as affinity label.

  7. Identification and characterization of domains responsible for self-assembly and cell wall binding of the surface layer protein of Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 8287

    PubMed Central

    Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Hynönen, Ulla; Ilk, Nicola; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Palva, Airi

    2008-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 8287 is covered by a regular surface (S-) layer consisting of a 435 amino acid protein SlpA. This protein is completely unrelated in sequence to the previously characterized S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus acidophilus group. Results In this work, the self-assembly and cell wall binding domains of SlpA were characterized. The C-terminal self-assembly domain encompassed residues 179–435 of mature SlpA, as demonstrated by the ability of N-terminally truncated recombinant SlpA to form a periodic structure indistinguishable from that formed by full length SlpA. Furthermore, a trypsin degradation analysis indicated the existence of a protease resistant C-terminal domain of 214 amino acids. By producing a set of C-terminally truncated recombinant SlpA (rSlpA) proteins the cell wall binding region was mapped to the N-terminal part of SlpA, where the first 145 amino acids of mature SlpA alone were sufficient for binding to isolated cell wall fragments of L. brevis ATCC 8287. The binding of full length rSlpA to the cell walls was not affected by the treatment of the walls with 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA), indicating that cell wall structures other than teichoic acids are involved, a feature not shared by the Lactobacillus acidophilus group S-layer proteins characterized so far. Conserved carbohydrate binding motifs were identified in the positively charged N-terminal regions of six Lactobacillus brevis S-layer proteins. Conclusion This study identifies SlpA as a two-domain protein in which the order of the functional domains is reversed compared to other characterized Lactobacillus S-layer proteins, and emphasizes the diversity of potential cell wall receptors despite similar carbohydrate binding sequence motifs in Lactobacillus S-layer proteins. PMID:18828902

  8. High-Affinity Binding of the Staphylococcal HarA Protein to Haptoglobin and Hemoglobin Involves a Domain with an Antiparallel Eight-Stranded β-Barrel Fold▿

    PubMed Central

    Dryla, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Bernd; Gelbmann, Dieter; Giefing, Carmen; Hanner, Markus; Meinke, Andreas; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Koppensteiner, Walter; Konrat, Robert; von Gabain, Alexander; Nagy, Eszter

    2007-01-01

    Iron scavenging from the host is essential for the growth of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we further characterized two staphylococcal cell wall proteins previously shown to bind hemoproteins. HarA and IsdB harbor homologous ligand binding domains, the so called NEAT domain (for “near transporter”) present in several surface proteins of gram-positive pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance measurements using glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged HarAD1, one of the ligand binding domains of HarA, and GST-tagged full-length IsdB proteins confirmed high-affinity binding to hemoglobin and haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of 5 to 50 nM. Haptoglobin binding could be detected only with HarA and was in the low micromolar range. In order to determine the fold of this evolutionarily conserved ligand binding domain, the untagged HarAD1 protein was subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which revealed an eight-stranded, purely antiparallel β-barrel with the strand order (-β1↓-β2↑-β3↓-β6↑-β5↓-β4↑-β7↓-β8↑), forming two Greek key motifs. Based on structural-homology searches, the topology of the HarAD1 domain resembles that of the immunoglobulin (Ig) fold family, whose members are involved in protein-protein interactions, but with distinct structural features. Therefore, we consider that the HarAD1/NEAT domain fold is a novel variant of the Ig fold that has not yet been observed in other proteins. PMID:17041047

  9. The zinc fingers of the SR-like protein ZRANB2 are single-stranded RNA-binding domains that recognize 5′ splice site-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mansfield, Robyn E.; Vaz, Paula M.; McGrath, Aaron P.; Setiyaputra, Surya; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Chen, Eva S.; Morris, Brian J.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-09-02

    The alternative splicing of mRNA is a critical process in higher eukaryotes that generates substantial proteomic diversity. Many of the proteins that are essential to this process contain arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. ZRANB2 is a widely-expressed and highly-conserved RS-domain protein that can regulate alternative splicing but lacks canonical RNA-binding domains. Instead, it contains 2 RanBP2-type zinc finger (ZnF) domains. We demonstrate that these ZnFs recognize ssRNA with high affinity and specificity. Each ZnF binds to a single AGGUAA motif and the 2 domains combine to recognize AGGUAA(N{sub x})AGGUAA double sites, suggesting that ZRANB2 regulates alternative splicing via a direct interaction with pre-mRNA at sites that resemble the consensus 5{prime} splice site. We show using X-ray crystallography that recognition of an AGGUAA motif by a single ZnF is dominated by side-chain hydrogen bonds to the bases and formation of a guanine-tryptophan-guanine 'ladder.' A number of other human proteins that function in RNA processing also contain RanBP2 ZnFs in which the RNA-binding residues of ZRANB2 are conserved. The ZnFs of ZRANB2 therefore define another class of RNA-binding domain, advancing our understanding of RNA recognition and emphasizing the versatility of ZnF domains in molecular recognition.

  10. FhCaBP2: a Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2015-09-01

    FhCaBP2 is a Fasciola hepatica protein which belongs to a family of helminth calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain containing two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal dynein light chain-like (DLC-like) domain. Its predicted structure showed two globular domains joined by a flexible linker. Recombinant FhCaBP2 interacted reversibly with calcium and manganese ions, but not with magnesium, barium, strontium, copper (II), colbalt (II), iron (II), nickel, lead or potassium ions. Cadmium (II) ions appeared to bind non-site-specifically and destabilize the protein. Interaction with either calcium or magnesium ions results in a conformational change in which the protein's surface becomes more hydrophobic. The EF-hand domain alone was able to interact with calcium and manganese ions; the DLC-like domain was not. Alteration of a residue (Asp-58 to Ala) in the second EF-hand motif in this domain abolished ion-binding activity. This suggests that the second EF-hand is the one responsible for ion-binding. FhCaBP2 homodimerizes and the extent of dimerization was not affected by calcium ions or by the aspartate to alanine substitution in the second EF-hand. The isolated EF-hand and DLC-like domains are both capable of homodimerization. FhCaBP2 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, thiamylal and W7. Interestingly, while chlorpromazine and thiamylal interacted with the EF-hand domain (as expected), trifluoperazine and W7 bound to the DLC-like domain. Overall, FhCaBP2 has distinct biochemical properties compared with other members of this protein family from Fasciola hepatica, a fact which supports the hypothesis that these proteins have different physiological roles.

  11. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway.

  12. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  13. Localization of the domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter DsrA involved in serum resistance and binding to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi.

  14. Localization of the Domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi Trimeric Autotransporter DsrA Involved in Serum Resistance and Binding to the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Fibronectin and Vitronectin▿

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi. PMID:19015257

  15. Monophyly of class I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, USPA, ETFP, photolyase, and PP-ATPase nucleotide-binding domains: implications for protein evolution in the RNA.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Anantharaman, Vivek; Koonin, Eugene V

    2002-07-01

    Protein sequence and structure comparisons show that the catalytic domains of Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, a related family of nucleotidyltransferases involved primarily in coenzyme biosynthesis, nucleotide-binding domains related to the UspA protein (USPA domains), photolyases, electron transport flavoproteins, and PP-loop-containing ATPases together comprise a distinct class of alpha/beta domains designated the HUP domain after HIGH-signature proteins, UspA, and PP-ATPase. Several lines of evidence are presented to support the monophyly of the HUP domains, to the exclusion of other three-layered alpha/beta folds with the generic "Rossmann-like" topology. Cladistic analysis, with patterns of structural and sequence similarity used as discrete characters, identified three major evolutionary lineages within the HUP domain class: the PP-ATPases; the HIGH superfamily, which includes class I aaRS and related nucleotidyltransferases containing the HIGH signature in their nucleotide-binding loop; and a previously unrecognized USPA-like group, which includes USPA domains, electron transport flavoproteins, and photolyases. Examination of the patterns of phyletic distribution of distinct families within these three major lineages suggests that the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all modern life forms encoded 15-18 distinct alpha/beta ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins of the HUP class. This points to an extensive radiation of HUP domains before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA), during which the multiple class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases emerged only at a late stage. Thus, substantial evolutionary diversification of protein domains occurred well before the modern version of the protein-dependent translation machinery was established, i.e., still in the RNA world.

  16. The RNA-binding domain of influenzavirus non-structural protein-1 cooperatively binds to virus-specific RNA sequences in a structure-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Daniel; Barbachou, Sosthène; Soubieux, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Influenzavirus non-structural protein NS1 is involved in several steps of the virus replication cycle. It counteracts the interferon response, and also exhibits other activities towards viral and cellular RNAs. NS1 is known to bind non-specifically to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as well as to viral and cellular RNAs. We set out to search whether NS1 could preferentially bind sequence-specific RNA patterns, and performed an in vitro selection (SELEX) to isolate NS1-specific aptamers from a pool of 80-nucleotide(nt)-long RNAs. Among the 63 aptamers characterized, two families were found to harbour a sequence that is strictly conserved at the 5′ terminus of all positive-strand RNAs of influenzaviruses A. We found a second virus-specific motif, a 9 nucleotide sequence located 15 nucleotides downstream from NS1’s stop codon. In addition, a majority of aptamers had one or two symmetrically positioned copies of the 5′-GUAAC / 3′-CUUAG double-stranded motif, which closely resembles the canonical 5′-splice site. Through an in-depth analysis of the interaction combining fluorimetry and gel-shift assays, we showed that NS1’s RNA-binding domain (RBD) specifically recognizes sequence patterns in a structure-dependent manner, resulting in an intimate interaction with high affinity (low nanomolar to subnanomolar KD values) that leads to oligomerization of the RBD on its RNA ligands. PMID:23093596

  17. IN VITRO EVOLUTION OF AN HIV INTEGRASE BINDING PROTEIN FROM A LIBRARY OF C-TERMINAL DOMAIN γS-CRYSTALLIN VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Issa S.; Verde, Shawn C.; Overstreet, Cathie M.; Robinson, W. Edward; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    A protein without natural binding functions was engineered to bind HIV-1 integrase. Phage display selections applied a library of variants based on the C-terminal domain of the eye lens protein human γS-crystallin. Multiple loop regions were altered to encode libraries with ≈3.6×1011 different variants. A crystallin variant, termed Integrase-Binding Protein-10 (IBP-10), inhibits integrase catalysis with nanomolar Ki values. IBP-10 interacts with the integrase C-terminal domain and inhibits integrase substrate affinity. This allosteric mechanism allows IBP-10 to inhibit drug resistant integrase variants. The results demonstrate the applicability of the crystallin scaffold for the discovery of binding partners and enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22858140

  18. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  19. The C-terminal Domain Supports a Novel Function for CETPI as a New Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Victor; Gutiérrez-Quintanar, Nadia; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Described by our group a few years ago, the cholesteryl-ester transfer protein isoform (CETPI), exclusively expressed in the small intestine and present in human plasma, lacked a functional identification for a role of physiological relevance. Now, this study introduces CETPI as a new protein with the potential capability to recognise, bind and neutralise lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of CETPI showed that CETPI not only might interact with several LPS serotypes but also might displace LPS bound to the surface of cells. Peptide VSAK, derived from the last 18 residues of CETPI, protected against the cytotoxic effect of LPS on macrophages. At high concentrations, when different cell types were tested in culture, it did not exhibit cytotoxicity by itself and it did prevent the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the generation of oxidative stress conditions. In a rabbit model of septic shock, the infusion of peptide VSAK exerted a protective effect against the effects of LPS and reduced the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) in plasma. Therefore, CETPI is proposed as a new protein with the capability to advance the possibilities for better understanding and treatment of the dangerous effects of LPS in vivo. PMID:26537318

  20. The rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor domain of obscurin regulates assembly of titin at the Z-disk through interactions with Ran binding protein 9.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amber L; Catino, Dawn H; Strong, John C; Randall, William R; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini; Bloch, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Obscurin is an approximately 800-kDa protein composed of structural and signaling domains that organizes contractile structures in striated muscle. We have studied the Rho-GEF domain of obscurin to understand its roles in morphogenesis and signaling. We used adenoviral overexpression of this domain, together with ultrastructural and immunofluorescence methods, to examine its effect on maturing myofibrils. We report that overexpression of the Rho-GEF domain specifically inhibits the incorporation of titin into developing Z-disks and disrupts the structure of the Z-disk and Z/I junction, and alters features of the A/I junction. The organization of other sarcomeric markers, including alpha-actinin, was not affected. We identified Ran binding protein 9 (RanBP9) as a novel ligand of the Rho-GEF domain and showed that binding is specific, with an apparent binding affinity of 1.9 microM. Overexpression of the binding region of RanBP9 also disrupted the incorporation of titin into developing Z-disks. Immunofluorescence localization during myofibrillogenesis indicated that the Rho-GEF domain assembles into sarcomeres before RanBP9, which first occurs in myonuclei and later in development translocates to the myoplasm, where it colocalizes with obscurin. Both the Rho-GEF domain and its binding region on RanBP9 bind directly to the N-terminal Ig domains of titin, which flank the Z-disk. Our results suggest that the Rho-GEF domain interacts with RanBP9 and that both can interact with the N-terminal region of titin to influence the formation of the Z-disk and A/I junction.

  1. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  2. Three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction and function analysis of the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from Bacillus thuringiensis HD73.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yiling; Guo, Shuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is capable of producing a chitin-binding protein believed to be functionally important to bacteria during the stationary phase of its growth cycle. In this paper, the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from B. thuringiensis has been analyzed by computer technology. Primary and secondary structural analyses demonstrated that HD73_3189 is negatively charged and contains several α-helices, aperiodical coils and β-strands. Domain and motif analyses revealed that HD73_3189 contains a signal peptide, an N-terminal chitin binding 3 domains, two copies of a fibronectin-like domain 3 and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding domain classified as CBM_5_12. Moreover, analysis predicted the protein's associated localization site to be the cell wall. Ligand site prediction determined that amino acid residues GLU-312, TRP-334, ILE-341 and VAL-382 exposed on the surface of the target protein exhibit polar interactions with the substrate.

  3. Non-POU Domain-Containing Octamer-Binding Protein Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Infection in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    St Gelais, Corine; Roger, Jonathan; Wu, Li

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 interacts with numerous cellular proteins during viral replication. Identifying such host proteins and characterizing their roles in HIV-1 infection can deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between host and pathogen. We previously identified non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NonO or p54nrb) as one of host factors associated with catalytically active preintegration complexes (PIC) of HIV-1 in infected CD4(+) T cells. NonO is involved in nuclear processes including transcriptional regulation and RNA splicing. Although NonO has been identified as an HIV-1 interactant in several recent studies, its role in HIV-1 replication has not been characterized. We investigated the effect of NonO on the HIV-1 life cycle in CD4(+) T cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells using single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection assays. We observed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated stable NonO knockdown in a CD4(+) Jurkat T cell line and primary CD4(+) T cells did not affect cell viability or proliferation, but enhanced HIV-1 infection. The enhancement of HIV-1 infection in Jurkat T cells correlated with increased viral reverse transcription and gene expression. Knockdown of NonO expression in Jurkat T cells modestly enhanced HIV-1 gag mRNA expression and Gag protein synthesis, suggesting that viral gene expression and RNA regulation are the predominantly affected events causing enhanced HIV-1 replication in NonO knockdown (KD) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NonO in Jurkat T cells reduced HIV-1 single-cycle infection by 41% compared to control cells. Our data suggest that NonO negatively regulates HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, albeit it has modest effects on early and late stages of the viral life cycle, highlighting the importance of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PIC in regulating viral replication.

  4. A model for regulation by SynGAP-α1 of binding of synaptic proteins to PDZ-domain 'Slots' in the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G; Mastro, Tara L; Schenker, Leslie T; Vielmetter, Jost; Hu, Rebecca; Iancu, Ariella; Reghunathan, Meera; Bannon, Barry Dylan; Kennedy, Mary B

    2016-01-01

    SynGAP is a Ras/Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that is a major constituent of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from mammalian forebrain. Its α1 isoform binds to all three PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domains of PSD-95, the principal PSD scaffold, and can occupy as many as 15% of these PDZ domains. We present evidence that synGAP-α1 regulates the composition of the PSD by restricting binding to the PDZ domains of PSD-95. We show that phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and Polo-like kinase-2 (PLK2) decreases its affinity for the PDZ domains by several fold, which would free PDZ domains for occupancy by other proteins. Finally, we show that three critical postsynaptic signaling proteins that bind to the PDZ domains of PSD-95 are present in higher concentration in PSDs isolated from mice with a heterozygous deletion of synGAP. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16813.001 PMID:27623146

  5. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Yoga, Yano M. K.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R.; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5′-CCCTCCCT-3′ DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5′-ACCCCA-3′ DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad. PMID:22344691

  6. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  7. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  9. Breast Cancer Anti-estrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) Protein Augments Binding of the c-Src SH3 Domain to Crk-associated Substrate (p130cas)*

    PubMed Central

    Makkinje, Anthony; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Near, Richard I.; Patel, Prayag S.; Lerner, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The focal adhesion adapter protein p130cas regulates adhesion and growth factor-related signaling, in part through Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of p130cas. AND-34/BCAR3, one of three NSP family members, binds the p130cas carboxyl terminus, adjacent to a bipartite p130cas Src-binding domain (SBD) and induces anti-estrogen resistance in breast cancer cell lines as well as phosphorylation of p130cas. Only a subset of the signaling properties of BCAR3, specifically augmented motility, are dependent upon formation of the BCAR3-p130cas complex. Using GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation studies, we show that among NSP family members, only BCAR3 augments the ability of p130cas to bind the Src SH3 domain through an RPLPSPP motif in the p130cas SBD. Although our prior work identified phosphorylation of the serine within the p130cas RPLPSPP motif, mutation of this residue to alanine or glutamic acid did not alter BCAR3-induced Src SH3 domain binding to p130cas. The ability of BCAR3 to augment Src SH3 binding requires formation of a BCAR3-p130cas complex because mutations that reduce association between these two proteins block augmentation of Src SH3 domain binding. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, BCAR3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the p130cas substrate domain, previously shown to be Src-dependent, was reduced by an R743A mutation that blocks BCAR3 association with p130cas. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that BCAR3 expression alters the intracellular location of both p130cas and Src and that all three proteins co-localize. Our work suggests that BCAR3 expression may regulate Src signaling in a BCAR3-p130cas complex-dependent fashion by altering the ability of the Src SH3 domain to bind the p130cas SBD. PMID:22711540

  10. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the winged helix domain of the meiotic recombination HOP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Moktan, Hem; Guiraldelli, Michel F; Eyster, Craig A; Zhao, Weixing; Lee, Chih-Ying; Mather, Timothy; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel; Sung, Patrick; Zhou, Donghua H; Pezza, Roberto J

    2014-05-23

    The HOP2 protein is required for efficient double-strand break repair which ensures the proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes and normal meiotic progression. We previously showed that in vitro HOP2 shows two distinctive activities: when it is incorporated into a HOP2-MND1 heterodimer, it stimulates DMC1 and RAD51 recombination activities, and the purified HOP2 alone is proficient in promoting strand invasion. The structural and biochemical basis of HOP2 action in recombination are poorly understood; therefore, they are the focus of this work. Herein, we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal portion of mouse HOP2, which contains a typical winged helix DNA-binding domain. Together with NMR spectral changes in the presence of double-stranded DNA, protein docking on DNA, and mutation analysis to identify the amino acids involved in DNA coordination, our results on the three-dimensional structure of HOP2 provide key information on the fundamental structural and biochemical requirements directing the interaction of HOP2 with DNA. These results, in combination with mutational experiments showing the role of a coiled-coil structural feature involved in HOP2 self-association, allow us to explain important aspects of the function of HOP2 in recombination.

  11. The Scw1 RNA-binding domain protein regulates septation and cell-wall structure in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim; Oulton, Rena; Young, Paul G

    2002-01-01

    Loss of the nonessential RNA-binding domain protein, Scw1, increases resistance to cell-wall-degrading enzymes in fission yeast. Surprisingly, scw1 null mutations also suppress the lethality of mutations (cdc11-136, cdc7-24, cdc14-118, sid1-239, sid2-250, sid3-106, sid4-A1, and mob1-1) at all levels of the sid pathway. This pathway forms part of the septation initiation network (SIN), which regulates the onset of septum formation and ensures the proper coupling of mitosis to cytokinesis. In contrast, scw1(-) mutations do not suppress ts alleles of the rng genes, cdc12 or cdc15. These mutations also prevent the formation of a septum and in addition block assembly and/or function of the contractile acto-myosin ring. sid mutants exhibit a hyper-sensitivity to cell-wall-degrading enzymes that is suppressed by loss of Scw1. Furthermore, scw1(-)-mediated rescue of sid mutants is abolished in the presence of calcofluor white, a compound that interferes with cell-wall synthesis. These data suggest that Scw1 acts in opposition to the SIN as a negative regulator of cell-wall/septum deposition. Unlike components of the SIN, Scw1 is predominantly a cytoplasmic protein and is not localized to the spindle pole body. PMID:12242222

  12. Resveratrol induces apoptosis by directly targeting Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1)

    PubMed Central

    Oi, Naomi; Yuan, Jian; Malakhova, Margarita; Luo, Kuntian; Li, Yunhui; Ryu, Joohyun; Zhang, Lei; Bode, Ann M.; Xu, Zengguang; Li, Yan; Lou, Zhenkun; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol possesses a strong anticancer activity exhibited as the induction of apoptosis through p53 activation. However, the molecular mechanism and direct target(s) of resveratrol-induced p53 activation remain elusive. Here, the Ras-GTPase activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) was identified as a potential target of resveratrol, and in vitro binding assay results using resveratrol (RSVL)-conjugated Sepharose 4B beads confirmed their direct binding. Depletion of G3BP1 significantly diminishes resveratrol-induced p53 expression and apoptosis. We also found that G3BP1 negatively regulates p53 expression by interacting with ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a deubiquitinating enzyme of p53. Disruption of the interaction of p53 with USP10 by G3BP1 interference leads to suppression of p53 deubiquitination. Resveratrol, on the other hand, directly binds to G3BP1 and prevents the G3BP1/USP10 interaction, resulting in enhanced USP10-mediated deubiquitination of p53 and consequently increased p53 expression. These findings disclose a novel mechanism of resveratrol-induced p53 activation and resveratrol-induced apoptosis by direct targeting of G3BP1. PMID:24998844

  13. Role of the nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanhui; Fei, Dongsheng; Chen, Mingwei; Sun, Miao; Xu, Jun; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Mingyan

    2015-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), which is associated with high mortality rates, involves renal inflammation related to the activation of innate immunity. The inflammatory response in AKI involves the inflammasome, which integrates danger signals into caspase-1-activating platforms, leading to the processing and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome plays a role in the development of many diseases, including AKI. However, the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome translates different danger signals into the expression of proinflammatory cytokines remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in renal injury in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis-induced AKI. CLP decreased blood pressure and increased serum creatinine levels and neutrophil infiltration into the kidney in parallel with the upregulation of NLRP3, the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, and caspase-1 expression and activity in kidney tissues, and increases in the serum and kidney levels of IL-1β and IL-18. Genetic deletion of NLRP3 reversed the CLP-induced reduction in blood pressure and increases in serum creatinine level and neutrophil infiltration, and attenuated the CLP-induced upregulation of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, caspase-1 expression and activity, and the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18, similarly to the effects of caspase-1 inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to the development of hypotension and the inflammatory response of AKI, suggesting its possible role as a therapeutic target for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  14. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  15. Structure of the apo form of the catabolite control protein A (CcpA) from Bacillus megaterium with a DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Palm, Gottfried J.; Panjikar, Santosh

    2007-04-01

    Crystal structure analysis of the apo form of catabolite control protein A reveals the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain. In the crystal packing, this domain interacts with the binding site for the corepressor protein. Crystal structure determination of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) at 2.6 Å resolution reveals for the first time the structure of a full-length apo-form LacI-GalR family repressor protein. In the crystal structures of these transcription regulators, the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain has only been observed in cognate DNA complexes; it has not been observed in other crystal structures owing to its mobility. In the crystal packing of apo-CcpA, the protein–protein contacts between the N-terminal three-helix bundle and the core domain consisted of interactions between the homodimers that were similar to those between the corepressor protein HPr and the CcpA N-subdomain in the ternary DNA complex. In contrast to the DNA complex, the apo-CcpA structure reveals large subdomain movements in the core, resulting in a complete loss of contacts between the N-subdomains of the homodimer.

  16. Interaction between the RNA binding domains of Ser-Arg splicing factor 1 and U1-70K snRNP protein determines early spliceosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cho, Suhyung; Hoang, Amy; Sinha, Rahul; Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Krainer, Adrian R; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2011-05-17

    It has been widely accepted that the early spliceosome assembly begins with U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) binding to the 5' splice site (5'SS), which is assisted by the Ser/Arg (SR)-rich proteins in mammalian cells. In this process, the RS domain of SR proteins is thought to directly interact with the RS motif of U1-70K, which is subject to regulation by RS domain phosphorylation. Here we report that the early spliceosome assembly event is mediated by the RNA recognition domains (RRM) of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1), which bridges the RRM of U1-70K to pre-mRNA by using the surface opposite to the RNA binding site. Specific mutation in the RRM of SRSF1 that disrupted the RRM-RRM interaction also inhibits the formation of spliceosomal E complex and splicing. We further demonstrate that the hypo-phosphorylated RS domain of SRSF1 interacts with its own RRM, thus competing with U1-70K binding, whereas the hyper-phosphorylated RS domain permits the formation of a ternary complex containing ESE, an SR protein, and U1 snRNP. Therefore, phosphorylation of the RS domain in SRSF1 appears to induce a key molecular switch from intra- to intermolecular interactions, suggesting a plausible mechanism for the documented requirement for the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle during pre-mRNA splicing.

  17. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    PubMed

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  18. DNA-binding domain of the RepE initiator protein of mini-F plasmid: involvement of the carboxyl-terminal region.

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, F; Kawasaki, Y; Ishiai, M; Nishikawa, K; Yura, T; Wada, C

    1995-01-01

    The RepE initiator protein (251 residues) is essential for mini-F replication in Escherichia coli and exhibits two major functions: initiation of DNA replication from ori2 and autogenous repression of repE transcription. Whereas the initiation is mediated by RepE monomers that bind to the ori2 iterons (direct repeats), the autogenous repression is mediated by dimers that bind to the repE operator, which contains an inverted repeat sequence related to the iterons. We now report that the binding of RepE to these DNA sites is primarily determined by the C-terminal region of this protein. The mutant RepE proteins lacking either the N-terminal 33 (or more) residues or the C-terminal 7 (or more) residues were first shown to be defective in binding to both the ori2 and the operator DNAs. However, direct screening and analysis of mutant RepEs which are specifically affected in binding to the ori2 iterons revealed that the mutations (mostly amino acid substitutions) occur exclusively in the C-terminal region (residues 168 to 242). These mutant proteins exhibited reduced binding to ori2 and no detectable binding to the operator. Thus, whereas truncation of either end of RepE can destroy the DNA-binding activities, the C-terminal region appears to represent a primary DNA-binding domain of RepE for both ori2 and the operator. Analogous DNA-binding domains seem to be conserved among the initiator proteins of certain related plasmids. PMID:7721691

  19. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  20. Effects on differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia PML/RARalpha protein depend on the fusion of the PML protein dimerization and RARalpha DNA binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Grignani, F; Testa, U; Rogaia, D; Ferrucci, P F; Samoggia, P; Pinto, A; Aldinucci, D; Gelmetti, V; Fagioli, M; Alcalay, M; Seeler, J; Grignani, F; Nicoletti, I; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1996-01-01

    The block of terminal differentiation is a prominent feature of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and its release by retinoic acid correlates with disease remission. Expression of the APL-specific PML/RARalpha fusion protein in hematopoietic precursor cell lines blocks terminal differentiation, suggesting that PML/ RARalpha may have the same activity in APL blasts. We expressed different PML/RARalpha mutants in U937 and TF-1 cells and demonstrated that the integrity of the PML protein dimerization and RARalpha DNA binding domains is crucial for the differentiation block induced by PML/RARalpha, and that these domains exert their functions only within the context of the fusion protein. Analysis of the in vivo dimerization and cell localization properties of the PML/RARalpha mutants revealed that PML/RARalpha--PML and PML/RARalpha--RXR heterodimers are not necessary for PML/RARalpha activity on differentiation. We propose that a crucial mechanism underlying PML/RARalpha oncogenic activity is the deregulation of a transcription factor, RARalpha, through its fusion with the dimerization interface of another nuclear protein, PML. Images PMID:8890168

  1. Amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the yeast Rab escort protein are both required for binding of Ypt small G proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, B E; Lorenzetti, S; Miaczynska, M; Bui, D M; Schweyen, R J; Ragnini, A

    1996-01-01

    The Rab escort protein (REP) is an essential component of the heterotrimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase that modifies the carboxy-terminal cysteines of the Ras-like small G proteins belonging to the Rab/Ypt family. Deletions in the human CHM locus, encoding one of the two REPs known in humans, result in a retinal degenerative syndrome called choroideremia. The only known yeast homologue of the choroideremia gene product is encoded by an essential gene called MRS6. Besides three structurally conserved regions (SCRs) previously detected in the amino-terminal half of REPs and RabGDIs, three other regions in the carboxy-terminal domain (RCR 1-3) are here identified as being characteristic of REPs alone. We have performed the first mutational analysis of a REP protein to experimentally define the regions functionally important for Rab/Ypt protein binding, making use of the genetic system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis has shown that the SCRs are necessary but not sufficient for Ypt1p binding by the yeast REP, the carboxy-terminal region also being required. Images PMID:8898359

  2. Synthetic actin-binding domains reveal compositional constraints for function.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Maria; Gimona, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The actin-binding domains of many proteins consist of a canonical type 1/type 2 arrangement of the structurally conserved calponin homology domain. Using the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin-1 as a scaffold we have generated synthetic actin-binding domains by altering position and composition of the calponin homology domains. We show that the presence of two calponin homology domains alone and in the context of an actin-binding domain is not sufficient for actin-binding, and that both single and homotypic type 2 calponin homology domain tandems fail to bind to actin in vitro and in transfected cells. In contrast, single and tandem type 1 calponin homology domain arrays bind actin directly but result in defective turnover rates on actin filaments, and in aberrant actin bundling when introduced into the full-length alpha-actinin molecule. An actin-binding domain harboring the calponin homology domains in an inverted position, however, functions both in isolation and in the context of the dimeric alpha-actinin molecule. Our data demonstrate that the dynamics and specificity of actin-binding via actin-binding domains requires both the filament binding properties of the type 1, and regulation by type 2 calponin homology domains, and appear independent of their position.

  3. Domain-specific phosphomimetic mutation allows dissection of different protein kinase C (PKC) isotype-triggered activities of the RNA binding protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sebastian; Doller, Anke; Pendini, Nicole R; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR) participates in the post-transcriptional regulation of many AU-rich element (ARE)-bearing mRNAs. Previously, by using in vitro kinase assay, we have identified serines (Ser) 158, 221 and 318 as targets of protein kinase C (PKC)-triggered phosphorylation. In this study, we tested whether GFP- or GST-tagged HuR constructs bearing a phosphomimetic Ser (S)-to-Asp (D) substitution at the different PKC target sites, would affect different HuR functions including HuR nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution and binding to different types of ARE-containing mRNAs. The phosphomimetic GFP-tagged HuR protein bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in the hinge region of HuR (HuR-S221D) showed an increased cytoplasmic abundance when compared to wild-type HuR. Conversely, data from in vitro kinase assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), implicates that phosphorylation at Ser 221 is not relevant for mRNA binding of HuR. Quantification of in vitro binding affinities of GST-tagged wild-type HuR and corresponding HuR proteins bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in either RRM2 (HuR-S158D) or in RRM3 (HuR-S318D) by microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates a specific binding of wild-type HuR to type I, II or type III-ARE-oligonucleotides in the high nanomolar range. Interestingly, phosphomimetic mutation at position 158 or 318 had a negative influence on HuR binding to type I- and type II-ARE-mRNAs whereas it significantly enhanced HuR affinity to a type III-ARE substrate. Our data suggest that differential phosphorylation of HuR by PKCs at different HuR domains coordinates subcellular HuR distribution and leads to a preferential binding to U-rich bearing target mRNA.

  4. Evaluation and mapping of the DNA binding and oligomerization domains of the IE2 regulatory protein of human cytomegalovirus using yeast one and two hybrid interaction assays.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J H; Chiou, C J; Hayward, G S

    1998-03-27

    The 86-kDa IE2 nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major immediate-early (MIE) gene behaves as both a non-specific transactivator of viral and cellular gene expression and as a specific DNA-binding protein targeted to the cis-repression sequence (CRS) at the cap site of its own promoter/enhancer region. Although the IE2 protein produced in bacteria has been shown to bind to the 14-bp palindromic CRS motif and IE2 synthesized in vitro forms stable dimers in solution through the conserved C-terminus of the protein, there is no direct evidence as yet that the intracellular mammalian forms of IE2 do so. Here, we show that the intact HCMV IE2 protein both binds to CRS DNA and dimerizes in yeast cells. In a one-hybrid assay system, a GAL4/IE2 fusion protein expressed in yeast cells activated target HIS3 expression only when CRS sites were located upstream of the GAL1 minimal promoter, but failed to do so on mutant CRS sites, demonstrating a requirement for sequence-specific DNA-binding by IE2. Examination of a series of deletion and triple amino acid point mutations in the C-terminal half of IE2 mapped the domains required for DNA-binding in yeast to the entire region between codons 313 and 579, whereas in the previous in-vitro study with truncated bacterial GST fusion proteins, it was mapped to between codons 346 and 579. Transient co-transfection assays with deleted IE2 effector genes in Vero cells showed that the extra segment of IE2 between codons 313 and 346 is also required for both autoregulation and transactivation activity in mammalian cells. In a two-hybrid assay to study IE2 self-interations, we generated both GAL4 DNA-binding (DB) and activation domain (A)/IE2 fusion proteins and showed that IE2 could also dimerize or oligomerize through the C-terminus of the protein in yeast cells. Domains required for this interaction were all mapped to within the region between codons 388 and 542, which is coincident with the domain mapped

  5. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein acts to regulate the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers on rice DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Changxun; Chen, Weisi; Li, Chengxun; Jian, Xin; Li, Yingzhe; Lin, Hongmei; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-01-01

    UVB radiation causes cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) to form on the DNA of living organisms. This study found that overexpression of the silicon absorbance gene Lsi1 reduced the accumulation of CPDs in rice, which profited from the reactivation by photolyase. The transcript abundance of deoxyribodipyrimidine photolyase (Os10g0167600) was generally correlated with the silicon content of the rice, and the up-regulation of Os10g0167600 was found to be highest in the UVB-treated Lsi1-overexpressed (Lsi1-OX) rice. A trans-acting factor, methyl-CpG binding domain protein (OsMeCP), was found to interact with the cis-element of Os10g0167600. The nucleic location of OsMeCP effectively enabled the transcriptional regulation. Compared with the WT, the level of OsMeCP was lower in the Lsi1-OX rice but higher in the Lsi1-RNAi line. Rice cultured in a high silicate-concentration solution also exhibited less OsMeCP abundance. Overexpression of OsMeCP led to lower Os10g0167600 transcript levels and a higher CPD content than in the WT, but the reverse was true in the OsMeCP-RNAi line. These findings indicate that OsMeCP acts as a negative regulator of silicon, and can mediate the repression of the transcription from Os10g0167600, which inhibits the photoreactivation of the photolyase involved in the repair of CPDs. PMID:27694845

  6. Structural Insights into Immune Recognition of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus S Protein Receptor Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.; Sharon, C; Satkunarajah, M; Thierry, C; Cameron, C; Kelvin, D; Seetharaman, J; Cochrane, A; Plummer, F; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is responsible for host cell attachment and fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. Within S the receptor binding domain (RBD) mediates the interaction with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV host cell receptor. Both S and the RBD are highly immunogenic and both have been found to elicit neutralizing antibodies. Reported here is the X-ray crystal structure of the RBD in complex with the Fab of a neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody, F26G19, elicited by immunization with chemically inactivated SARS-CoV. The RBD-F26G19 Fab complex represents the first example of the structural characterization of an antibody elicited by an immune response to SARS-CoV or any fragment of it. The structure reveals that the RBD surface recognized by F26G19 overlaps significantly with the surface recognized by ACE2 and, as such, suggests that F26G19 likely neutralizes SARS-CoV by blocking the virus-host cell interaction.

  7. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life.

  8. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Activation by Competition with WH2 Domain Proteins for Actin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Weissbach, Julia; Schikora, Franziska; Weber, Anja; Kessels, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are coactivators of serum response factor (SRF)-mediated gene expression. Activation of MRTF-A occurs in response to alterations in actin dynamics and critically requires the dissociation of repressive G-actin–MRTF-A complexes. However, the mechanism leading to the release of MRTF-A remains unclear. Here we show that WH2 domains compete directly with MRTF-A for actin binding. Actin nucleation-promoting factors, such as N-WASP and WAVE2, as well as isolated WH2 domains, including those of Spire2 and Cobl, activate MRTF-A independently of changes in actin dynamics. Simultaneous inhibition of Arp2-Arp3 or mutation of the CA region only partially reduces MRTF-A activation by N-WASP and WAVE2. Recombinant WH2 domains and the RPEL domain of MRTF-A bind mutually exclusively to cellular and purified G-actin in vitro. The competition by different WH2 domains correlates with MRTF-SRF activation. Following serum stimulation, nonpolymerizable actin dissociates from MRTF-A, and de novo formation of the G-actin–RPEL complex is impaired by a transferable factor. Our work demonstrates that WH2 domains activate MRTF-A and contribute to target gene regulation by a competitive mechanism, independently of their role in actin filament formation. PMID:26976641

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey K.-W.; Galatis, Denise; Barnham, Kevin J.; Polekhina, Galina; Adams, Julian J.; Masters, Colin L.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.; McKinstry, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The binding of Cu{sup 2+} ions to the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease reduces the production of the amyloid β peptide, which is centrally involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Structural studies of the copper-binding domain will provide a basis for structure-based drug design that might prove useful in treating this devastating disease. Alzheimer’s disease is thought to be triggered by production of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide through proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The binding of Cu{sup 2+} to the copper-binding domain (CuBD) of APP reduces the production of Aβ in cell-culture and animal studies. It is expected that structural studies of the CuBD will lead to a better understanding of how copper binding causes Aβ depletion and will define a potential drug target. The crystallization of CuBD in two different forms suitable for structure determination is reported here.

  10. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E Ann

    2011-10-10

    Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor-regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences and tertiary structures of CBM20 and CBM48 reveals the close relatedness of these SBDs and, in some cases, glycogen-binding domains (GBDs). The families CBM20 and CBM48 share both an ancestral form and the mode of starch/glycogen binding at one or two binding sites. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that they exhibit independent behaviour, i.e. each family forms its own part in an evolutionary tree, with enzyme specificity (protein function) being well represented within each family. The distinction between CBM20 and CBM48 families is not sharp since there are representatives in both CBM families that possess an intermediate character. These are, for example, CBM20s from hypothetical GH57 amylopullulanase (probably lacking the starch-binding site 2) and CBM48s from the GH13 pullulanase subfamily (probably lacking the starch/glycogen-binding site 1). The knowledge gained concerning the occurrence of these SBDs and GBDs through the range of taxonomy will support future experimental research.

  11. An external loop region of domain III of dengue virus type 2 envelope protein is involved in serotype-specific binding to mosquito but not mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jan-Jong; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Young, Ming-Jer; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Wen

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is a flavivirus and infects mammalian cells through mosquito vectors. This study investigates the roles of domain III of DV type 2 envelope protein (EIII) in DV binding to the host cell. Recombinant EIII interferes with DV infection to BHK21 and C6/36 cells by blocking dengue virion adsorption to these cells. Inhibition of EIII on BHK21 cells was broad with no serotype specificity; however, inhibition of EIII on C6/36 cells was relatively serotype specific. Soluble heparin completely blocks binding of EIII to BHK21 cells, suggesting that domain III binds mainly to cell surface heparan sulfates. This suggestion is supported by the observation that EIII binds very weakly to gro2C and sog9 mutant mammalian cell lines that lack heparan sulfate. In contrast, heparin does not block binding of EIII to mosquito cells. Furthermore, a synthetic peptide that includes amino acids (aa) 380 to 389 of EIII, IGVEPGQLKL, inhibits binding of EIII to C6/36 but not BHK21 cells. This peptide corresponds to a lateral loop region on domain III of E protein, indicating a possible role of this loop in binding to mosquito cells. In summary, these results suggest that EIII plays an important role in binding of DV type 2 to host cells. In addition, EIII interacts with heparan sulfates when binding to BHK21 cells, and a loop region containing aa 380 to 389 of EIII may participate in DV type 2 binding to C6/36 cells.

  12. An External Loop Region of Domain III of Dengue Virus Type 2 Envelope Protein Is Involved in Serotype-Specific Binding to Mosquito but Not Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Jan-Jong; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Young, Ming-Jer; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Wen

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is a flavivirus and infects mammalian cells through mosquito vectors. This study investigates the roles of domain III of DV type 2 envelope protein (EIII) in DV binding to the host cell. Recombinant EIII interferes with DV infection to BHK21 and C6/36 cells by blocking dengue virion adsorption to these cells. Inhibition of EIII on BHK21 cells was broad with no serotype specificity; however, inhibition of EIII on C6/36 cells was relatively serotype specific. Soluble heparin completely blocks binding of EIII to BHK21 cells, suggesting that domain III binds mainly to cell surface heparan sulfates. This suggestion is supported by the observation that EIII binds very weakly to gro2C and sog9 mutant mammalian cell lines that lack heparan sulfate. In contrast, heparin does not block binding of EIII to mosquito cells. Furthermore, a synthetic peptide that includes amino acids (aa) 380 to 389 of EIII, IGVEPGQLKL, inhibits binding of EIII to C6/36 but not BHK21 cells. This peptide corresponds to a lateral loop region on domain III of E protein, indicating a possible role of this loop in binding to mosquito cells. In summary, these results suggest that EIII plays an important role in binding of DV type 2 to host cells. In addition, EIII interacts with heparan sulfates when binding to BHK21 cells, and a loop region containing aa 380 to 389 of EIII may participate in DV type 2 binding to C6/36 cells. PMID:14671119

  13. Identification and characterization of a novel SH3-domain binding protein, Sab, which preferentially associates with Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BtK).

    PubMed

    Matsushita, M; Yamadori, T; Kato, S; Takemoto, Y; Inazawa, J; Baba, Y; Hashimoto, S; Sekine, S; Arai, S; Kunikata, T; Kurimoto, M; Kishimoto, T; Tsukada, S

    1998-04-17

    Protein interaction cloning method was used to identify a novel molecule, Sab, which binds to the SH3 domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), the deficient cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase in human X-linked agammaglobulinemia and murine X-linked immunodeficiency. Immunoprecipitation using the anti-Sab antibody identified the protein product of the gene as a 70 kDa molecule. While Sab does not have a proline-rich sequence, it was shown to bind to Btk through the commonly conserved structure among SH3 domains. Remarkably, Sab exhibited a high preference for binding to Btk rather than to other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, which suggests a unique role of Sab in the Btk signal transduction pathway.

  14. FHA domains: Phosphopeptide binding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Almawi, Ahmad W; Matthews, Lindsay A; Guarné, Alba

    2016-12-08

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are small phosphopeptide recognition modules found in eubacterial and eukaryotic, but not archeal, genomes. Although they were originally found in forkhead-type transcription factors, they have now been identified in many other signaling proteins. FHA domains share a remarkably conserved fold despite very low sequence conservation. They only have five conserved amino acids that are important for binding to phosphorylated epitopes. Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that FHA domains can mediate many interactions that do not depend on their ability to recognize a phosphorylated threonine. In this review, we present structural and biochemical work that has unveiled novel interaction interfaces on FHA domains. We discuss how these non-canonical interactions modulate the recognition of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated substrates, as well as protein oligomerization - events that collectively determine FHA function.

  15. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  16. Novel hemin binding domains in the Corynebacterium diphtheriae HtaA protein interact with hemoglobin and are critical for heme iron utilization by HtaA.

    PubMed

    Allen, Courtni E; Schmitt, Michael P

    2011-10-01

    The human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin as iron sources for growth in iron-depleted environments. The use of hemin iron in C. diphtheriae involves the dtxR- and iron-regulated hmu hemin uptake locus, which encodes an ABC hemin transporter, and the surface-anchored hemin binding proteins HtaA and HtaB. Sequence analysis of HtaA and HtaB identified a conserved region (CR) of approximately 150 amino acids that is duplicated in HtaA and present in a single copy in HtaB. The two conserved regions in HtaA, designated CR1 and CR2, were used to construct glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins (GST-CR1 and GST-CR2) to assess hemin binding by UV-visual spectroscopy. These studies showed that both domains were able to bind hemin, suggesting that the conserved sequences are responsible for the hemin binding property previously ascribed to HtaA. HtaA and the CR2 domain were also shown to be able to bind hemoglobin (Hb) by the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in which Hb was immobilized on a microtiter plate. The CR1 domain exhibited a weak interaction with Hb in the ELISA system, while HtaB showed no significant binding to Hb. Competitive binding studies demonstrated that soluble hemin and Hb were able to inhibit the binding of HtaA and the CR domains to immobilized Hb. Moreover, HtaA was unable to bind to Hb from which the hemin had been chemically removed. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of CR domains from various Corynebacterium species revealed several conserved residues, including two highly conserved tyrosine (Y) residues and one histidine (H) residue. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Y361 and H412 were critical for the binding to hemin and Hb by the CR2 domain. Biological assays showed that Y361 was essential for the hemin iron utilization function of HtaA. Hemin transfer experiments demonstrated that HtaA was able to acquire hemin from Hb and that hemin bound to HtaA could be

  17. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-03-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors.

  18. Hybrid In Silico/In Vitro Approaches for the Identification of Functional Cholesterol-Binding Domains in Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Fantini, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, cholesterol is an important regulator of a broad range of membrane proteins, including receptors, transporters, and ion channels. Understanding how cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins is a difficult task because structural data of these proteins complexed with cholesterol are scarce. Here, we describe a dual approach based on in silico studies of protein-cholesterol interactions, combined with physico-chemical measurements of protein insertion into cholesterol-containing monolayers. Our algorithm is validated through careful analysis of the effect of key mutations within and outside the predicted cholesterol-binding site. Our method is illustrated by a complete analysis of cholesterol-binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide, a protein that penetrates the plasma membrane of brain cells through a cholesterol-dependent process.

  19. The single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain of the GAGA protein flanked by basic residues is sufficient for high-affinity specific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Pedone, P V; Ghirlando, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Felsenfeld, G; Omichinski, J G

    1996-01-01

    Specific DNA binding to the core consensus site GAGAGAG has been shown with an 82-residue peptide (residues 310-391) taken from the Drosophila transcription factor GAGA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was demonstrated that the minimal domain required for specific binding (residues 310-372) includes a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family and a stretch of basic amino acids located on the N-terminal end of the zinc finger. In gel retardation assays, the specific binding seen with either the peptide or the whole protein is zinc dependent and corresponds to a dissociation constant of approximately 5 x 10(-9) M for the purified peptide. It has previously been thought that a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family is incapable of specific, high-affinity binding to DNA. The combination of an N-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger in the GAGA protein can thus be viewed as a novel DNA binding domain. This raises the possibility that other proteins carrying only one Cys2-His2 finger are also capable of high-affinity specific binding to DNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610125

  20. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-03-03

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression.

  1. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins.

  2. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  3. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2015-07-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R(141) and R(10) residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  4. The SLE variant Ala71Thr of BLK severely decreases protein abundance and binding to BANK1 through impairment of the SH3 domain function.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Barreiro, A; Bernal-Quirós, M; Georg, I; Marañón, C; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Castillejo-López, C

    2016-03-01

    The B-lymphocyte kinase (BLK) gene is associated genetically with several human autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus. We recently described that the genetic risk is given by two haplotypes: one covering several strongly linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the promoter of the gene that correlated with low transcript levels, and a second haplotype that includes a rare nonsynonymous variant (Ala71Thr). Here we show that this variant, located within the BLK SH3 domain, is a major determinant of protein levels. In vitro analyses show that the 71Thr isoform is hyperphosphorylated and promotes kinase activation. As a consequence, BLK is ubiquitinated, its proteasomal degradation enhanced and the average life of the protein is reduced by half. Altogether, these findings suggest that an intrinsic autoregulatory mechanism previously unappreciated in BLK is disrupted by the 71Thr substitution. Because the SH3 domain is also involved in protein interactions, we sought for differences between the two isoforms in trafficking and binding to protein partners. We found that binding of the 71Thr variant to the adaptor protein BANK1 is severely reduced. Our study provides new insights on the intrinsic regulation of BLK activation and highlights the dominant role of its SH3 domain in BANK1 binding.

  5. The Ras suppressor Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of the adaptor protein PINCH1 and participates in adhesion-related functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Chopp, Treasa; Qi Shengmei; Cutler, Mary Lou . E-mail: mcutler@usuhs.mil

    2005-05-15

    Rsu-1 is a highly conserved leucine rich repeat (LRR) protein that is expressed ubiquitously in mammalian cells. Rsu-1 was identified based on its ability to inhibit transformation by Ras, and previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed cells and human tumor cell lines. Using GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid screening, the LIM domain protein, PINCH1, was identified as the binding partner of Rsu-1. PINCH1 is an adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions and it has been implicated in the regulation of adhesion functions. Subdomain mapping in yeast revealed that Rsu-1 binds to the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1, a region not previously identified as a specific binding domain for any other protein. Additional testing demonstrated that PINCH2, which is highly homologous to PINCH1, except in the LIM 5 domain, does not interact with Rsu-1. Glutathione transferase fusion protein binding studies determined that the LRR region of Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1. Transient expression studies using epitope-tagged Rsu-1 and PINCH1 revealed that Rsu-1 co-immunoprecipitated with PINCH1 and colocalized with vinculin at sites of focal adhesions in mammalian cells. In addition, endogenous P33 Rsu-1 from 293T cells co-immunoprecipitated with transiently expressed myc-tagged PINCH1. Furthermore, RNAi-induced reduction in Rsu-1 RNA and protein inhibited cell attachment, and while previous studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rsu-1 inhibited Jun kinase activation, the depletion of Rsu-1 resulted in activation of Jun and p38 stress kinases. These studies demonstrate that Rsu-1 interacts with PINCH1 in mammalian cells and functions, in part, by altering cell adhesion.

  6. The Crystal Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of the Salmonella enterica PduO Protein: An Old Fold with a New Heme-Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Hickey, Neal; Hensel, Michael; Klare, Johann P.; Geremia, Silvano; Tiufiakova, Tatiana; Torda, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    The two-domain protein PduO, involved in 1,2-propanediol utilization in the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica is an ATP:Cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase, but this is a function of the N-terminal domain alone. The role of its C-terminal domain (PduOC) is, however, unknown. In this study, comparative growth assays with a set of Salmonella mutant strains showed that this domain is necessary for effective in vivo catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. It was also shown that isolated, recombinantly-expressed PduOC binds heme in vivo. The structure of PduOC co-crystallized with heme was solved (1.9 Å resolution) showing an octameric assembly with four heme moieities. The four heme groups are highly solvent-exposed and the heme iron is hexa-coordinated with bis-His ligation by histidines from different monomers. Static light scattering confirmed the octameric assembly in solution, but a mutation of the heme-coordinating histidine caused dissociation into dimers. Isothermal titration calorimetry using the PduOC apoprotein showed strong heme binding (Kd = 1.6 × 10−7 M). Biochemical experiments showed that the absence of the C-terminal domain in PduO did not affect adenosyltransferase activity in vitro. The evidence suggests that PduOC:heme plays an important role in the set of cobalamin transformations required for effective catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. Salmonella PduO is one of the rare proteins which binds the redox-active metabolites heme and cobalamin, and the heme-binding mode of the C-terminal domain differs from that in other members of this protein family. PMID:27446048

  7. An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2008-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (alpha-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (alpha-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (alpha-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (alpha-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SP-R210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-alpha but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-gamma production by alpha-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-beta1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

  8. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase- and Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-binding Domains of the Alpha4 Protein Are Both Required for Alpha4 to Inhibit PP2A Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    LeNoue-Newton, Michele; Watkins, Guy R.; Zou, Ping; Germane, Katherine L.; McCorvey, Lisa R.; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-30

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and association with regulatory proteins. Alpha4 is one such regulatory protein that binds the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) and protects it from polyubiquitination and degradation. Alpha4 is a multidomain protein with a C-terminal domain that binds Mid1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, and an N-terminal domain containing the PP2Ac-binding site. In this work, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain of mammalian Alpha4 determined by x-ray crystallography and use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy to show that it is a flexible tetratricopeptide repeat-like protein. Structurally, Alpha4 differs from its yeast homolog, Tap42, in two important ways: (1) the position of the helix containing the PP2Ac-binding residues is in a more open conformation, showing flexibility in this region; and (2) Alpha4 contains a ubiquitin-interacting motif. The effects of wild-type and mutant Alpha4 on PP2Ac ubiquitination and stability were examined in mammalian cells by performing tandem ubiquitin-binding entity precipitations and cycloheximide chase experiments. Our results reveal that both the C-terminal Mid1-binding domain and the PP2Ac-binding determinants are required for Alpha4-mediated protection of PP2Ac from polyubiquitination and degradation.

  9. Oxidation of 4-bromophenol by the recombinant fused protein cellulose-binding domain-horseradish peroxidase immobilized on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Ward, Gary; Hadar, Yitzhak; Shoseyov, Oded; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2003-04-20

    A fused protein consisting of cellulose-binding domain (CBD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Refolded recombinant CBD-HRP (95% recovery yield) was bound to microcrystalline cellulose and applied for the oxidation of a model toxic phenol, 4-bromophenol (BP). Oxidation of BP by CBD-HRP resulted in the formation of dimers to pentamers as evidenced by mass spectrometry analysis. When immobilized, the vast majority of the oxidation products adsorbed to the cellulose matrix. CBD-HRP (0.75 pyrogallol units) bound to 0.1 g cellulose was packed in a column, connected to an HPLC pump and monitoring system, and column performance and capacity were studied under various operating conditions. When performance was studied as a function of BP loading rate at a constant H(2)O(2) loading rate of 1500 nmol/min, V(app) (max) and K(m) (app) were calculated to be 5.29 +/- 0.46 micromol mL min and 644.9 +/- 114.3 microM, respectively. Immobilized CBD-HRP exhibited enhanced stability to H(2)O(2) and oxidized considerably more BP than free CBD-HRP. Inclusion of gelatin, which suppresses product-dependent inactivation, further increased the amount of BP oxidation. These findings may have potential impact in terms of enzyme supply in high-rate treatment of wastewater contaminated with toxic phenols, since the susceptibility of peroxidases to both H(2)O(2) - and product-dependent inactivation demands continuous supply of fresh enzyme.

  10. Full-contact domain labeling: identification of a novel phosphoinositide binding site on gelsolin that requires the complete protein.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Mejillano, M; Yin, H L; Chen, J; Prestwich, G D

    2001-01-30

    Gelsolin, an actin and phosphoinositide binding protein, was photoaffinity labeled using a variety of benzophenone-containing phosphoinositide polyphosphate analogues. The N-terminal half and the C-terminal half of gelsolin showed synergy in the binding of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. Competitive displacement experiments with dibutyryl, dioctanoyl, or dipalmitoyl derivatives of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) suggested that, in addition to the inositol headgroup, a diacylglyceryl moiety was important for binding; these analogues also inhibited the gelsolin-severing activity of F-actin. In addition to the previously identified PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding site in the N-terminal half of gelsolin, a new binding site was identified in the C-terminal half by mapping the photocovalently modified peptide fragments. Moreover, increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) decreased the binding of the photolabile analogues to the C-terminal phosphoinositide binding site on gelsolin. A molecular model of the binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 within two folded repeats of gelsolin has been calculated using these data.

  11. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-07

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future.

  12. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Jasrapuria, Sinu; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Osman, Gamal; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2010-03-01

    This study is focused on the characterization and expression of genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, encoding proteins that possess one or more six-cysteine-containing chitin-binding domains related to the peritrophin A domain (ChtBD2). An exhaustive bioinformatics search of the genome of T. castaneum queried with ChtBD2 sequences yielded 13 previously characterized chitin metabolic enzymes and 29 additional proteins with signal peptides as well as one to 14 ChtBD2s. Using phylogenetic analyses, these additional 29 proteins were classified into three large families. The first family includes 11 proteins closely related to the peritrophins, each containing one to 14 ChtBD2s. These are midgut-specific and are expressed only during feeding stages. We propose the name "Peritrophic Matrix Proteins" (PMP) for this family. The second family contains eight proteins encoded by seven genes (one gene codes for 2 splice variants), which are closely related to gasp/obstructor-like proteins that contain 3 ChtBD2s each. The third family has ten proteins that are of diverse sizes and sequences with only one ChtBD2 each. The genes of the second and third families are expressed in non-midgut tissues throughout all stages of development. We propose the names "Cuticular Proteins Analogous to Peritophins 3" (CPAP3) for the second family that has three ChtBD2s and "Cuticular Proteins Analogous to Peritophins 1 (CPAP1) for the third family that has 1 ChtBD2. Even though proteins of both CPAP1 and CPAP3 families have the "peritrophin A" domain, they are expressed only in cuticle-forming tissues. We determined the exon-intron organization of the genes, encoding these 29 proteins as well as the domain organization of the encoded proteins with ChtBD2s. All 29 proteins have predicted cleavable signal peptides and ChtBD2s, suggesting that they interact with chitin in extracellular locations. Comparison of ChtBD2s-containing proteins in different insect species belonging to

  13. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  14. Avian and 1918 Spanish influenza a virus NS1 proteins bind to Crk/CrkL Src homology 3 domains to activate host cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Leena S; Kazlauskas, Arunas; Melén, Krister; Wagner, Ralf; Ziegler, Thedi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2008-02-29

    NS1 (nonstructural protein 1) is an important virulence factor of the influenza A virus. We observed that NS1 proteins of the 1918 pandemic virus (A/Brevig Mission/1/18) and many avian influenza A viruses contain a consensus Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-binding motif. Screening of a comprehensive human SH3 phage library revealed the N-terminal SH3 of Crk and CrkL as the preferred binding partners. Studies with recombinant proteins confirmed avid binding of NS1 proteins of the 1918 virus and a representative avian H7N3 strain to Crk/CrkL SH3 but not to other SH3 domains tested, including p85alpha and p85beta. Endogenous CrkL readily co-precipitated NS1 from cells infected with the H7N3 virus. In transfected cells association with CrkL was observed for NS1 of the 1918 and H7N3 viruses but not A/Udorn/72 or A/WSN/33 NS1 lacking this sequence motif. SH3 binding was dispensable for suppression of interferon-induced gene expression by NS1 but was associated with enhanced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, as evidenced by increased Akt phosphorylation. Thus, the Spanish Flu virus resembles avian influenza A viruses in its ability to recruit Crk/CrkL to modulate host cell signaling.

  15. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  16. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  17. Crystallographic and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of the Impact of Peptide Binding to the Second PDZ Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1E

    SciTech Connect

    J Zhang; P Sapienza; H Ke; A Chang; S Hengel; H Wang; G Phillips Jr.; A Lee

    2011-12-31

    PDZ (PSD95/Discs large/ZO-1) domains are ubiquitous protein interaction motifs found in scaffolding proteins involved in signal transduction. Despite the fact that many PDZ domains show a limited tendency to undergo structural change, the PDZ family has been associated with long-range communication and allostery. One of the PDZ domains studied most in terms of structure and biophysical properties is the second PDZ ('PDZ2') domain from protein tyrosine phosphatase 1E (PTP1E, also known as PTPL1). Previously, we showed through NMR relaxation studies that binding of the RA-GEF2 C-terminal peptide substrate results in long-range propagation of side-chain dynamic changes in human PDZ2 [Fuentes, E. J., et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 335, 1105-1115]. Here, we present the first X-ray crystal structures of PDZ2 in the absence and presence of RA-GEF2 ligand, determined to resolutions of 1.65 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures deviate somewhat from previously determined NMR structures and indicate that very minor structural changes in PDZ2 accompany peptide binding. NMR residual dipolar couplings confirm the crystal structures to be accurate models of the time-averaged atomic coordinates of PDZ2. The impact on side-chain dynamics was further tested with a C-terminal peptide from APC, which showed results nearly identical to those of RA-GEF2. Thus, allosteric transmission in PDZ2 induced by peptide binding is conveyed purely and robustly by dynamics. {sup 15}N relaxation dispersion measurements did not detect appreciable populations of a kinetic structural intermediate. Collectively, for ligand binding to PDZ2, these data support a lock-and-key binding model from a structural perspective and an allosteric model from a dynamical perspective, which together suggest a complex energy landscape for functional transitions within the ensemble.

  18. Overproduction, purification and crystallization of a chondroitin sulfate A-binding DBL domain from a Plasmodium falciparum var2csa-encoded PfEMP1 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Matthew K.

    2008-03-01

    A chondroitin sulfate A-binding DBL important in placental malaria has been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The PfEMP1 proteins of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are inserted into the membrane of infected red blood cells, where they mediate adhesion to a variety of human receptors. The DBL domains of the var2csa-encoded PfEMP1 protein play a critical role in malaria of pregnancy, tethering infected cells to the surface of the placenta through interactions with the glycosaminoglycan carbohydrate chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). A CSA-binding DBL domain has been overproduced in a bacterial expression system, purified and crystallized. Native data sets extending to 1.9 Å resolution have been collected and phasing is under way.

  19. The N-terminal domain of DnaT, a primosomal DNA replication protein, is crucial for PriB binding and self-trimerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2013-12-13

    DnaT and PriB are replication restart primosomal proteins required for re-initiating chromosomal DNA replication in bacteria. Although the interaction of DnaT with PriB has been proposed, which region of DnaT is involved in PriB binding and self-trimerization remains unknown. In this study, we identified the N-terminal domain in DnaT (aa 1-83) that is important in PriB binding and self-trimerization but not in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding. DnaT and the deletion mutant DnaT42-179 protein can bind to PriB according to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot analysis, and pull-down assay, whereas DnaT84-179 cannot bind to PriB. In contrast to DnaT, DnaT26-179, and DnaT42-179 proteins, which form distinct complexes with ssDNA of different lengths, DnaT84-179 forms only a single complex with ssDNA. Analysis of DnaT84-179 protein by gel filtration chromatography showed a stable monomer in solution rather than a trimer, such as DnaT, DnaT26-179, and DnaT42-179 proteins. These results constitute a pioneering study of the domain definition of DnaT. Further research can directly focus on determining how DnaT binds to the PriA-PriB-DNA tricomplex in replication restart by the hand-off mechanism.

  20. Flexibility of the Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Pro-domain Enables Productive Binding of Protein Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Valnickova, Zuzana; Sanglas, Laura; Arolas, Joan L.; Petersen, Steen V.; Schar, Christine; Otzen, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) exhibits intrinsic proteolytic activity toward large peptides. The structural basis for this observation was clarified by the crystal structures of human and bovine TAFI. These structures evinced a significant rotation of the pro-domain away from the catalytic moiety when compared with other pro-carboxypeptidases, thus enabling access of large peptide substrates to the active site cleft. Here, we further investigated the flexible nature of the pro-domain and demonstrated that TAFI forms productive complexes with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors from potato, leech, and tick (PCI, LCI, and TCI, respectively). We determined the crystal structure of the bovine TAFI-TCI complex, revealing that the pro-domain was completely displaced from the position observed in the TAFI structure. It protruded into the bulk solvent and was disordered, whereas TCI occupied the position previously held by the pro-domain. The authentic nature of the presently studied TAFI-inhibitor complexes was supported by the trimming of the C-terminal residues from the three inhibitors upon complex formation. This finding suggests that the inhibitors interact with the active site of TAFI in a substrate-like manner. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TAFI is able to form a bona fide complex with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors. This underlines the unusually flexible nature of the pro-domain and implies a possible mechanism for regulation of TAFI intrinsic proteolytic activity in vivo. PMID:20880845

  1. Heat shock protein 70 in lung and kidney of specific-pathogen-free chickens is a receptor-associated protein that interacts with the binding domain of the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhiKun; Yang, Xin; Xu, PengWei; Wu, Xuan; Zhou, Long; Wang, HongNing

    2017-02-21

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a member of the family Coronaviridae. A binding domain that mediates the attachment of the virus to its receptor has been identified in the S1 protein of prototype IBV strain M41. In this study, we identified this binding domain in a different strain, as well as the cellular proteins that interact with it. First, we expressed the S1N proteins (residues 19-270) of M41 and another isolate, SCZJ3, and compared the binding capacities of recombinant S1N-M41 and S1N-SCZJ3 to host tissues. Protein histochemistry showed that both S1N-M41 and S1N-SCZJ3 could bind to lung and kidney, and that recombinant S1N-SCZJ3 displayed a distinctive staining pattern in the proventriculus. Recombinant S1N-SCZJ3 was then employed to purify binding-associated proteins in lung, kidney, and proventriculus. Using an affinity chromatography assay, two common bands of about 60 kDa and 70 kDa were obtained from the total tissue proteins. These protein bands were identified by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Finally, infection of chicken embryo kidney (CEK) cells by SCZJ3 was found to be inhibited by anti-HSP70 but not anti-PDI polyclonal antibody. These data indicate that HSP70 is part of the receptor complex of IBV and might help to understand the mechanism of S-mediated cell entry of IBV.

  2. Specific association between the methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 and the hypermethylated region of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Bougel, Stéphanie; Perriaud, Laury; Lachuer, Joël; Benhattar, Jean; Dante, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is expressed in most cancer cells. Paradoxically, its promoter is embedded in a hypermethylated CpG island. A short region escapes to this alteration, allowing a basal level of transcription. However, the methylation of adjacent regions may play a role in the maintenance of low hTERT expression. It is now well established that methyl-CpG binding domain proteins mediate the transcriptional silencing of hypermethylated genes. The potential involvement of these proteins in the control of hTERT expression was firstly investigated in HeLa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that only methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) associated the hypermethylated hTERT promoter. In MBD2 knockdown HeLa cells, constitutively depleted in MBD2, neither methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) nor MBD1 acted as substitutes for MBD2. MBD2 depletion by transient or constitutive RNA interference led to an upregulation of hTERT transcription that can be downregulated by expressing mouse Mbd2 protein. Our results indicate that MBD2 is specifically and directly involved in the transcriptional repression of hTERT in HeLa cells. This specific transcriptional repression was also observed in breast, liver and neuroblastoma cancer cell lines. Thus, MBD2 seems to be a general repressor of hTERT in hTERT-methylated telomerase-positive cells.

  3. The semidominant Mi(b) mutation identifies a role for the HLH domain in DNA binding in addition to its role in protein dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, E; Nii, A; Fisher, D E; Ferré-D'Amaré, A R; McCormick, R J; Russell, L B; Burley, S K; Ward, J M; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1996-01-01

    The mouse microphthalmia (mi) locus encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factor called MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor). Mutations at mi affect the development of several different cell types, including melanocytes, mast cells, osteoclasts and pigmented epithelial cells of the eye. Here we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the semidominant Microphthalmia(brwnish) (Mi(b)) mutation. We show that this mutation primarily affects melanocytes and produces retinal degeneration. The mutation is a G to A transition leading to a Gly244Glu substitution in helix 2 of the HLH dimerization domain. This location is surprising since other semidominant mi mutations characterized to date have been shown to affect DNA binding or transcriptional activation domains of MITF and act as dominant negatives, while mutations that affect MITF dimerization are inherited recessively. Gel retardation assays showed that while the mutant MITF(Mi-b) protein retains its dimerization potential, it is defective in its ability to bind DNA. Computer modeling suggested that the Gly244Glu mutation might disrupt DNA binding by interfering with productive docking of the protein dimer onto DNA. The Mi(b) mutation therefore appears to dissociate a DNA recognition function of the HLH domain from its role in protein dimerization. Images PMID:8947051

  4. ITC-derived binding affinity may be biased due to titrant (nano)-aggregation. Binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the catalytic domain of human protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Winiewska, Maria; Bugajska, Ewa; Poznański, Jarosław

    2017-01-01

    The binding of four bromobenzotriazoles to the catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 was assessed by two complementary methods: Microscale Thermophoresis (MST) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). New algorithm proposed for the global analysis of MST pseudo-titration data enabled reliable determination of binding affinities for two distinct sites, a relatively strong one with the Kd of the order of 100 nM and a substantially weaker one (Kd > 1 μM). The affinities for the strong binding site determined for the same protein-ligand systems using ITC were in most cases approximately 10-fold underestimated. The discrepancy was assigned directly to the kinetics of ligand nano-aggregates decay occurring upon injection of the concentrated ligand solution to the protein sample. The binding affinities determined in the reverse ITC experiment, in which ligands were titrated with a concentrated protein solution, agreed with the MST-derived data. Our analysis suggests that some ITC-derived Kd values, routinely reported together with PDB structures of protein-ligand complexes, may be biased due to the uncontrolled ligand (nano)-aggregation, which may occur even substantially below the solubility limit.

  5. ITC-derived binding affinity may be biased due to titrant (nano)-aggregation. Binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the catalytic domain of human protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    Winiewska, Maria; Bugajska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The binding of four bromobenzotriazoles to the catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 was assessed by two complementary methods: Microscale Thermophoresis (MST) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). New algorithm proposed for the global analysis of MST pseudo-titration data enabled reliable determination of binding affinities for two distinct sites, a relatively strong one with the Kd of the order of 100 nM and a substantially weaker one (Kd > 1 μM). The affinities for the strong binding site determined for the same protein-ligand systems using ITC were in most cases approximately 10-fold underestimated. The discrepancy was assigned directly to the kinetics of ligand nano-aggregates decay occurring upon injection of the concentrated ligand solution to the protein sample. The binding affinities determined in the reverse ITC experiment, in which ligands were titrated with a concentrated protein solution, agreed with the MST-derived data. Our analysis suggests that some ITC-derived Kd values, routinely reported together with PDB structures of protein-ligand complexes, may be biased due to the uncontrolled ligand (nano)-aggregation, which may occur even substantially below the solubility limit. PMID:28273138

  6. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  7. Crystal structure-based exploration of the important role of Arg106 in the RNA-binding domain of human coronavirus OC43 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Jung; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Chang, Yu-Ming; Lin, Shing-Yen; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley; Shen, Yo-Yu; Huang, Tai-Huang; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is a causative agent of the common cold. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, which is a major structural protein of CoVs, binds to the viral RNA genome to form the virion core and results in the formation of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. We have solved the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HCoV-OC43 N protein (N-NTD) (residues 58 to 195) to a resolution of 2.0Å. The HCoV-OC43 N-NTD is a single domain protein composed of a five-stranded β-sheet core and a long extended loop, similar to that observed in the structures of N-NTDs from other coronaviruses. The positively charged loop of the HCoV-OC43 N-NTD contains a structurally well-conserved positively charged residue, R106. To assess the role of R106 in RNA binding, we undertook a series of site-directed mutagenesis experiments and docking simulations to characterize the interaction between R106 and RNA. The results show that R106 plays an important role in the interaction between the N protein and RNA. In addition, we showed that, in cells transfected with plasmids that encoded the mutant (R106A) N protein and infected with virus, the level of the matrix protein gene was decreased by 7-fold compared to cells that were transfected with the wild-type N protein. This finding suggests that R106, by enhancing binding of the N protein to viral RNA plays a critical role in the viral replication. The results also indicate that the strength of N protein/RNA interactions is critical for HCoV-OC43 replication. PMID:23501675

  8. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among RecA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L; Hess, R M; McEntee, K

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N3ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the [alpha-32P]8N3ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T31 of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N3ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10(7) years.

  9. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  10. Strategy for treating motor neuron diseases using a fusion protein of botulinum toxin binding domain and streptavidin for viral vector access: work in progress.

    PubMed

    Drachman, Daniel B; Adams, Robert N; Balasubramanian, Uma; Lu, Yang

    2010-12-01

    Although advances in understanding of the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) have suggested attractive treatment strategies, delivery of agents to motor neurons embedded within the spinal cord is problematic. We have designed a strategy based on the specificity of botulinum toxin, to direct entry of viral vectors carrying candidate therapeutic genes into motor neurons. We have engineered and expressed fusion proteins consisting of the binding domain of botulinum toxin type A fused to streptavidin (SAv). This fusion protein will direct biotinylated viral vectors carrying therapeutic genes into motor nerve terminals where they can enter the acidified endosomal compartments, be released and undergo retrograde transport, to deliver the genes to motor neurons. Both ends of the fusion proteins are shown to be functionally intact. The binding domain end binds to mammalian nerve terminals at neuromuscular junctions, ganglioside GT1b (a target of botulinum toxin), and a variety of neuronal cells including primary chick embryo motor neurons, N2A neuroblastoma cells, NG108-15 cells, but not to NG CR72 cells, which lack complex gangliosides. The streptavidin end binds to biotin, and to a biotinylated Alexa 488 fluorescent tag. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the delivery of genes to motor neurons in vivo, by the use of biotinylated viral vectors.

  11. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C.; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.—Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  12. Long-range repression by multiple polycomb group (PcG) proteins targeted by fusion to a defined DNA-binding domain in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, R R; Morgan, K; Mallin, D R; Roberson, R; Parnell, T J; Bornemann, D J; Simon, J A; Geyer, P K

    2001-01-01

    A tethering assay was developed to study the effects of Polycomb group (PcG) proteins on gene expression in vivo. This system employed the Su(Hw) DNA-binding domain (ZnF) to direct PcG proteins to transposons that carried the white and yellow reporter genes. These reporters constituted naive sensors of PcG effects, as bona fide PcG response elements (PREs) were absent from the constructs. To assess the effects of different genomic environments, reporter transposons integrated at nearly 40 chromosomal sites were analyzed. Three PcG fusion proteins, ZnF-PC, ZnF-SCM, and ZnF-ESC, were studied, since biochemical analyses place these PcG proteins in distinct complexes. Tethered ZnF-PcG proteins repressed white and yellow expression at the majority of sites tested, with each fusion protein displaying a characteristic degree of silencing. Repression by ZnF-PC was stronger than ZnF-SCM, which was stronger than ZnF-ESC, as judged by the percentage of insertion lines affected and the magnitude of the conferred repression. ZnF-PcG repression was more effective at centric and telomeric reporter insertion sites, as compared to euchromatic sites. ZnF-PcG proteins tethered as far as 3.0 kb away from the target promoter produced silencing, indicating that these effects were long range. Repression by ZnF-SCM required a protein interaction domain, the SPM domain, which suggests that this domain is not primarily used to direct SCM to chromosomal loci. This targeting system is useful for studying protein domains and mechanisms involved in PcG repression in vivo. PMID:11333237

  13. Structural Determination of Functional Domains in Early B-cell Factor (EBF) Family of Transcription Factors Reveals Similarities to Rel DNA-binding Proteins and a Novel Dimerization Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Siponen, Marina I.; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Lehtiö, Lari; Johansson, Ida; Svensson, Linda; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Nilsson, Lennart; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Berglund, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The early B-cell factor (EBF) transcription factors are central regulators of development in several organs and tissues. This protein family shows low sequence similarity to other protein families, which is why structural information for the functional domains of these proteins is crucial to understand their biochemical features. We have used a modular approach to determine the crystal structures of the structured domains in the EBF family. The DNA binding domain reveals a striking resemblance to the DNA binding domains of the Rel homology superfamily of transcription factors but contains a unique zinc binding structure, termed zinc knuckle. Further the EBF proteins contain an IPT/TIG domain and an atypical helix-loop-helix domain with a novel type of dimerization motif. The data presented here provide insights into unique structural features of the EBF proteins and open possibilities for detailed molecular investigations of this important transcription factor family. PMID:20592035

  14. Yeast-expressed recombinant protein of the receptor-binding domain in SARS-CoV spike protein with deglycosylated forms as a SARS vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Du, Lanying; Chag, Shivali M; Ma, Cuiqing; Tricoche, Nancy; Tao, Xinrong; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-01-01

    Development of vaccines for preventing a future pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and for biodefense preparedness is urgently needed. Our previous studies have shown that a candidate SARS vaccine antigen consisting of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein can induce potent neutralizing antibody responses and protection against SARS-CoV challenge in vaccinated animals. To optimize expression conditions for scale-up production of the RBD vaccine candidate, we hypothesized that this could be potentially achieved by removing glycosylation sites in the RBD protein. In this study, we constructed two RBD protein variants: 1) RBD193-WT (193-aa, residues 318-510) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD193-N1, RBD193-N2, RBD193-N3); 2) RBD219-WT (219-aa, residues 318-536) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD219-N1, RBD219-N2, and RBD219-N3). All constructs were expressed as recombinant proteins in yeast. The purified recombinant proteins of these constructs were compared for their antigenicity, functionality and immunogenicity in mice using alum as the adjuvant. We found that RBD219-N1 exhibited high expression yield, and maintained its antigenicity and functionality. More importantly, RBD219-N1 induced significantly stronger RBD-specific antibody responses and a higher level of neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice than RBD193-WT, RBD193-N1, RBD193-N3, or RBD219-WT. These results suggest that RBD219-N1 could be selected as an optimal SARS vaccine candidate for further development.

  15. Cdc37 (Cell Division Cycle 37) Restricts Hsp90 (Heat Shock Protein 90) Motility by Interaction with N-terminal and Middle Domain Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Eckl, Julia M.; Rutz, Daniel A.; Haslbeck, Veronika; Zierer, Bettina K.; Reinstein, Jochen; Richter, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The ATPase-driven dimeric molecular Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) and its cofactor Cdc37 (cell division cycle 37 protein) are crucial to prevent the cellular depletion of many protein kinases. In complex with Hsp90, Cdc37 is thought to bind an important lid structure in the ATPase domain of Hsp90 and inhibit ATP turnover by Hsp90. As different interaction modes have been reported, we were interested in the interaction mechanism of Hsp90 and Cdc37. We find that Cdc37 can bind to one subunit of the Hsp90 dimer. The inhibition of the ATPase activity is caused by a reduction in the closing rate of Hsp90 without obviously bridging the two subunits or affecting nucleotide accessibility to the binding site. Although human Cdc37 binds to the N-terminal domain of Hsp90, nematodal Cdc37 preferentially interacts with the middle domain of CeHsp90 and hHsp90, exposing two Cdc37 interaction sites. A previously unreported site in CeCdc37 is utilized for the middle domain interaction. Dephosphorylation of CeCdc37 by the Hsp90-associated phosphatase PPH-5, a step required during the kinase activation process, proceeds normally, even if only the new interaction site is used. This shows that the second interaction site is also functionally relevant and highlights that Cdc37, similar to the Hsp90 cofactors Sti1 and Aha1, may utilize two different attachment sites to restrict the conformational freedom and the ATP turnover of Hsp90. PMID:23569206

  16. Bimodal intramolecular excitation energy transfer in a multichromophore photosynthetic model system: hybrid fusion proteins comprising natural phycobilin- and artificial chlorophyll-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-Li; Tang, Kun; Zhou, Nan; Zhou, Ming; Hou, Harvey J M; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Noy, Dror

    2013-09-11

    The phycobilisomes of cyanobacteria and red-algae are highly efficient peripheral light-harvesting complexes that capture and transfer light energy in a cascade of excitation energy transfer steps through multiple phycobilin chromophores to the chlorophylls of core photosystems. In this work, we focus on the last step of this process by constructing simple functional analogs of natural phycobilisome-photosystem complexes that are based on bichromophoric protein complexes comprising a phycobilin- and a chlorophyll- or porphyrin-binding domain. The former is based on ApcE(1-240), the N-terminal chromophore-binding domain of the phycobilisome's L(CM) core-membrane linker, and the latter on HP7, a de novo designed four-helix bundle protein that was originally planned as a high-affinity heme-binding protein, analogous to b-type cytochromes. We fused a modified HP7 protein sequence to ApcEΔ, a water-soluble fragment of ApcE(1-240) obtained by excising a putative hydrophobic loop sequence of residues 77-153. HP7 was fused either to the N- or the C-terminus of ApcEΔ or inserted between residues 76 and 78, thereby replacing the native hydrophobic loop domain. We describe the assembly, spectral characteristics, and intramolecular excitation energy transfer of two unique systems: in the first, the short-wavelength absorbing zinc-mesoporphyrin is bound to the HP7 domain and serves as an excitation-energy donor to the long-wavelength absorbing phycocyanobilin bound to the ApcE domain; in the second, the short-wavelength absorbing phycoerythrobilin is bound to the ApcE domain and serves as an excitation energy donor to the long-wavelength absorbing zinc-bacteriochlorophyllide bound to the HP7 domain. All the systems that were constructed and tested exhibited significant intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer with yields ranging from 21% to 50%. This confirms that our modular, covalent approach for studying EET between the cyclic and open chain tetrapyrroles is

  17. Identification of Two Binding Domains, One for Peptidoglycan and Another for a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer, on the N-Terminal Part of the S-Layer Protein SbsB from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    PubMed Central

    Sára, Margit; Egelseer, Eva M.; Dekitsch, Christine; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    First studies on the structure-function relationship of the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p2 revealed the coexistence of two binding domains on its N-terminal part, one for peptidoglycan and another for a secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). The peptidoglycan binding domain is located between amino acids 1 to 138 of the mature S-layer protein comprising a typical S-layer homologous domain. The SCWP binding domain lies between amino acids 240 to 331 and possesses a high serine plus glycine content. PMID:9852032

  18. The Human Centriolar Protein CEP135 Contains a Two-Stranded Coiled-Coil Domain Critical for Microtubule Binding.

    PubMed

    Kraatz, Sebastian; Guichard, Paul; Obbineni, Jagan M; Olieric, Natacha; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Hilbert, Manuel; Sen, Indrani; Missimer, John; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-07-20

    Centrioles are microtubule-based structures that play important roles notably in cell division and cilium biogenesis. CEP135/Bld10p family members are evolutionarily conserved microtubule-binding proteins important for centriole formation. Here, we analyzed in detail the microtubule-binding activity of human CEP135 (HsCEP135). X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with molecular modeling revealed that the 158 N-terminal residues of HsCEP135 (HsCEP135-N) form a parallel two-stranded coiled-coil structure. Biochemical, cryo-electron, and fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that in vitro HsCEP135-N interacts with tubulin, protofilaments, and microtubules and induces the formation of microtubule bundles. We further identified a 13 amino acid segment spanning residues 96-108, which represents a major microtubule-binding site in HsCEP135-N. Within this segment, we identified a cluster of three lysine residues that contribute to the microtubule bundling activity of HsCEP135-N. Our results provide the first structural information on CEP135/Bld10p proteins and offer insights into their microtubule-binding mechanism.

  19. Penicillin-binding protein 2x of Streptococcus pneumoniae: the mutation Ala707Asp within the C-terminal PASTA2 domain leads to destabilization.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Inga; Peters, Katharina; Stahlmann, Christoph; Hakenbeck, Regine; Denapaite, Dalia

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) is an enzyme involved in the last stages of peptidoglycan assembly and essential for bacterial growth and survival. PBP2x localizes to the division site, a process that depends on its Penicillin-Binding Protein And Serine-Threonine-kinase Associated (PASTA) domains, which was previously demonstrated via GFP-PBP2x in living cells. During this study a mutant strain was isolated in which the GFP-PBP2x fusion protein did not localize at division sites and it contained reduced amounts of the full-length GFP-PBP2x. We now show that this defect is due to a point mutation within the C-terminal PASTA2 domain of PBP2x. The mutant protein was analyzed in detail in terms of beta-lactam binding, functionality, and localization in live cells. We demonstrate that the mutation affects the GFP-tagged PBP2x variant severely and renders it susceptible to the protease/chaperone HtrA.

  20. A humanized neutralizing antibody against MERS-CoV targeting the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wan, Yuhua; Liu, Peipei; Zhao, Jincun; Lu, Guangwen; Qi, Jianxun; Wang, Qihui; Lu, Xuancheng; Wu, Ying; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Buchang; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Perlman, Stanley; Gao, George F; Yan, Jinghua

    2015-11-01

    The newly-emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) can cause severe and fatal acute respiratory disease in humans. Despite global efforts, the potential for an associated pandemic in the future cannot be excluded. The development of effective counter-measures is urgent. MERS-CoV-specific anti-viral drugs or vaccines are not yet available. Using the spike receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV (MERS-RBD) to immunize mice, we identified two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 4C2 and 2E6. Both mAbs potently bind to MERS-RBD and block virus entry in vitro with high efficacy. We further investigated their mechanisms of neutralization by crystallizing the complex between the Fab fragments and the RBD, and solved the structure of the 4C2 Fab/MERS-RBD complex. The structure showed that 4C2 recognizes an epitope that partially overlaps the receptor-binding footprint in MERS-RBD, thereby interfering with the virus/receptor interactions by both steric hindrance and interface-residue competition. 2E6 also blocks receptor binding, and competes with 4C2 for binding to MERS-RBD. Based on the structure, we further humanized 4C2 by preserving only the paratope residues and substituting the remaining amino acids with the counterparts from human immunoglobulins. The humanized 4C2 (4C2h) antibody sustained similar neutralizing activity and biochemical characteristics to the parental mouse antibody. Finally, we showed that 4C2h can significantly abate the virus titers in lungs of Ad5-hCD26-transduced mice infected with MERS-CoV, therefore representing a promising agent for prophylaxis and therapy in clinical settings.

  1. Electrostatics effects on Ca(2+) binding and conformational changes in EF-hand domains: Functional implications for EF-hand proteins.

    PubMed

    Ababou, Abdessamad; Zaleska, Mariola

    2015-12-01

    Mutations of Gln41 and Lys75 with nonpolar residues in the N-terminal domain of calmodulin (N-Cam) revealed the importance of solvation energetics in conformational change of Ca(2+) sensor EF-hand domains. While in general these domains have polar residues at these corresponding positions yet the extent of their conformational response to Ca(2+) binding and their Ca(2+) binding affinity can be different from N-Cam. Consequently, here we address the charge state of the polar residues at these positions. The results show that the charge state of these polar residues can affect substantially the conformational change and the Ca(2+) binding affinity of our N-Cam variants. Since all the variants kept their conformational activity in the presence of Ca(2+) suggests that the differences observed among them mainly originate from the difference in their molecular dynamics. Hence we propose that the molecular dynamics of Ca(2+) sensor EF-hand domains is a key factor in the multifunctional aspect of EF-hand proteins.

  2. A novel domain cassette identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 proteins binding ICAM-1 and is a target of cross-reactive, adhesion-inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S; Olsen, Rebecca W; Andersen, Marianne A; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G; Hviid, Lars; Higgins, Matthew K; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan; Jensen, Anja T R

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1-binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1-binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding-like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum-exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1-specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration.

  3. LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL1) binds to the C-terminal domain of ATM-interacting protein (ATMIN/ASCIZ) and regulates its subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Rapali, Peter; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor; Martinez-Moreno, Monica; Tarnok, Krisztian; Schlett, Katalin; Albar, Juan Pablo; Bruix, Marta; Nyitray, Laszlo; Rodriguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have screened a human library with dynein light chain DYNLL1 (DLC8) as bait. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynein light chain DYNLL1 binds to ATM-kinase interacting protein (ATMIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATMIN has 17 SQ/TQ motifs, a motif frequently found in DYNLL1-binding partners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two proteins interact in vitro, with ATMIN displaying at least five binding sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction of ATMIN and DYNNL1 in transfected cells can also be observed. -- Abstract: LC8 dynein light chain (now termed DYNLL1 and DYNLL2 in mammals), a dimeric 89 amino acid protein, is a component of the dynein multi-protein complex. However a substantial amount of DYNLL1 is not associated to microtubules and it can thus interact with dozens of cellular and viral proteins that display well-defined, short linear motifs. Using DYNLL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart library we identified ATMIN, an ATM kinase-interacting protein, as a DYNLL1-binding partner. Interestingly, ATMIN displays at least 18 SQ/TQ motifs in its sequence and DYNLL1 is known to bind to proteins with KXTQT motifs. Using pepscan and yeast two-hybrid techniques we show that DYNLL1 binds to multiple SQ/TQ motifs present in the carboxy-terminal domain of ATMIN. Recombinant expression and purification of the DYNLL1-binding region of ATMIN allowed us to obtain a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass in gel filtration close to 400 kDa that could bind to DYNLL1 in vitro. The NMR data-driven modelled complexes of DYNLL1 with two selected ATMIN peptides revealed a similar mode of binding to that observed between DYNLL1 and other peptide targets. Remarkably, co-expression of mCherry-DYNLL1 and GFP-ATMIN mutually affected intracellular protein localization. In GFP-ATMIN expressing-cells DNA damage induced efficiently nuclear foci formation, which was partly impeded by the presence of mCherry-DYNLL1

  4. Analysis of the binding of the Src homology 2 domain of Csk to tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in the suppression and mitotic activation of c-Src.

    PubMed Central

    Sabe, H; Hata, A; Okada, M; Nakagawa, H; Hanafusa, H

    1994-01-01

    Csk (C-terminal Src kinase), a protein-tyrosine kinase, bearing the Src homology 2 and 3 (SH2 and SH3) domains, has been implicated in phosphorylation of c-Src Tyr-527, resulting in suppression of c-Src kinase activity. We found that mutations in the SH2 or SH3 domain of Csk, though they did not affect its kinase activity, resulted in a loss of suppression of c-Src activity in fibroblasts. In normal fibroblasts, tyrosine-phosphorylated paxillin and focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK, which colocalize at focal adhesion plaques, were the major proteins to which the Csk SH2 domain bound. Loss of binding to these proteins by the Csk SH2 mutants correlated with loss of the activity to suppress c-Src. Consistent with this observation, the levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK were greatly reduced during mitosis, whereas the kinase activity of c-Src was elevated. We suggest that the SH2 domain is required for Csk to suppress c-Src, perhaps in combination with the SH3 domain, by anchoring Csk to a particular subcellular location where c-Src may exist. Our data also indicate that a certain fraction of the Csk and Src family kinases function at the focal adhesion plaques. The activity of the c-Src kinase localized at the focal adhesion plaques appears to be regulated by cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Images PMID:7513429

  5. A novel non-canonical forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-binding interface mediates the interaction between Rad53 and Dbf4 proteins.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lindsay A; Selvaratnam, Rajeevan; Jones, Darryl R; Akimoto, Madoka; McConkey, Brendan J; Melacini, Giuseppe; Duncker, Bernard P; Guarné, Alba

    2014-01-31

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) and BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains are overrepresented in DNA damage and replication stress response proteins. They function primarily as phosphoepitope recognition modules but can also mediate non-canonical interactions. The latter are rare, and only a few have been studied at a molecular level. We have identified a crucial non-canonical interaction between the N-terminal FHA1 domain of the checkpoint effector kinase Rad53 and the BRCT domain of the regulatory subunit of the Dbf4-dependent kinase that is critical to suppress late origin firing and to stabilize stalled forks during replication stress. The Rad53-Dbf4 interaction is phosphorylation-independent and involves a novel non-canonical interface on the FHA1 domain. Mutations within this surface result in hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress. Importantly, this surface is not conserved in the FHA2 domain of Rad53, suggesting that the FHA domains of Rad53 gain specificity by engaging additional interaction interfaces beyond their phosphoepitope-binding site. In general, our results point to FHA domains functioning as complex logic gates rather than mere phosphoepitope-targeting modules.

  6. Preliminary X-ray analysis of the binding domain of the soybean vacuolar sorting receptor complexed with a sorting determinant of a seed storage protein.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Goshi, Tomohiro; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Niiyama, Mayumi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Mikami, Bunzo

    2015-02-01

    β-Conglycinin is a major seed storage protein in soybeans, which are an important source of protein. The major subunits (α, α' and β) of β-conglycinin are sorted to protein-storage vacuoles in seed cells. Vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) is an integral membrane protein that recognizes the sorting determinant of vacuolar proteins, including β-conglycinin, and regulates their sorting process. Vacuolar sorting determinants of the α' and β subunits of β-conglycinin exist in their C-terminal peptides. Here, the preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the binding domain of soybean VSR crystallized with the peptide responsible for the sorting determinant in β-conglycinin is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.5 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.4, c = 86.1 Å.

  7. OsSRO1a Interacts with RNA Binding Domain-Containing Protein (OsRBD1) and Functions in Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shweta; Kaur, Charanpreet; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.; Sopory, Sudhir K.

    2016-01-01

    SRO1 is an important regulator of stress and hormonal response in plants and functions by interacting with transcription factors and several other proteins involved in abiotic stress response. In the present study, we report OsRBD1, an RNA binding domain 1- containing protein as a novel interacting partner of OsSRO1a from rice. The interaction of OsSRO1a with OsRBD1 was shown in yeast as well as in planta. Domain–domain interaction study revealed that C-terminal RST domain of OsSRO1a interacts with the N-terminal RRM1 domain of OsRBD1 protein. Both the proteins were found to co-localize in nucleus. Transcript profiling under different stress conditions revealed co-regulation of OsSRO1a and OsRBD1 expression under some abiotic stress conditions. Further, co-transformation of both OsSRO1a and OsRBD1 in yeast conferred enhanced tolerance toward salinity, osmotic, and methylglyoxal treatments. Our study suggests that the interaction of OsSRO1a with OsRBD1 confers enhanced stress tolerance in yeast and may play an important role under abiotic stress responses in plants. PMID:26870074

  8. Screening and identification of T helper 1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes in spike 1 domain and membrane protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Morioka, Hiroyuki; Gomi, Kohji; Tomizawa, Keisuke; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2014-04-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV) causes a fatal disease in wild and domestic cats. The development of an FIP-preventive vaccine requires an antigen that does not induce antibody-dependent enhancement, and T helper (Th)1 activity plays an important role in protect against FIPV infection. In the present study, we identified synthetic peptides including Th1 and a linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope in the S1 domain and M protein of FIPV. We also identified peptides that strongly induce Th1 activity from those derived from the structural proteins (S, M, and N proteins) of FIPV based on this and previous studies (Satoh et al. [19]). No Th1 epitope-containing peptide was identified in the peptides derived from the S1 domain of type I FIPV. In contrast, 7 Th1 epitope-containing peptides were identified in the S1 domain of type II FIPV, and no linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope was contained in any of these peptides. Eleven Th1 epitope-containing peptides common to each serotype were identified in the M protein-derived peptides, and 2 peptides (M-11 and M-12) contained the linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope. Of the peptides derived from the S, M, and N proteins of FIPV, those that induced significantly stronger Th1 activity than that of the FIPV antigen were rescreened, and 4 peptides were identified. When 3 of these peptides (M-9, I-S2-15, and II-S1-24) were selected and administered with CpG-ODNs to SPF cats, M-9 and II-S1-24 induced Th1 activity. Our results may provide important information for the development of a peptide-based vaccine against FIPV infection.

  9. The Roles of the RIIβ Linker and N-terminal Cyclic Nucleotide-binding Domain in Determining the Unique Structures of the Type IIβ Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. PMID:25112875

  10. The histidine composition of the amyloid-β domain, but not the E1 copper binding domain, modulates β-secretase processing of amyloid-β protein precursor in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gough, Mallory; Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee; Parkin, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) proteolysis by β- and γ-secretases generates neurotoxic amyloid-β (Aβ)-peptides in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have investigated the role of histidine residues within the extracellular E1 copper binding and Aβ domains of AβPP in its proteolysis. By stably expressing histidine to alanine AβPP mutant constructs in SH-SY5Y cells, we show that mutations in the E1 copper binding domain had no impact on α- or β-secretase processing. Mutation of histidine 14 within the Aβ-domain specifically down-regulated β-secretase processing without impacting on non-amyloidogenic proteolysis. Understanding how histidine 14 participates in AβPP proteolysis may reveal new intervention points for AD treatments.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Binds to Cytokeratin through Conserved Peptide Motifs Found in the Laminin-G-Like Domain of the gp85/Trans-sialidase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; de Vasconcelos, Veronica de Cássia Sardinha; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria Júlia Manso; Giordano, Ricardo José

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a disease that affects millions of people most of them living in South and Central Americas. There are few treatment options for individuals with Chagas' disease making it important to understand the molecular details of parasite infection, so novel therapeutic alternatives may be developed for these patients. Here, we investigate the interaction between host cell intermediate filament proteins and the T. cruzi gp85 glycoprotein superfamily with hundreds of members that have long been implicated in parasite cell invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico analysis was utilized to identify peptide motifs shared by the gp85 T. cruzi proteins and, using phage display, these selected peptide motifs were screened for their ability to bind to cells. One peptide, named TS9, showed significant cell binding capacity and was selected for further studies. Affinity chromatography, phage display and invasion assays revealed that peptide TS9 binds to cytokeratins and vimentin, and prevents T. cruzi cell infection. Interestingly, peptide TS9 and a previously identified binding site for intermediate filament proteins are disposed in an antiparallel β-sheet fold, present in a conserved laminin-G-like domain shared by all members of the family. Moreover, peptide TS9 overlaps with an immunodominant T cell epitope. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the present study reinforces previous results from our group implicating the gp85 superfamily of glycoproteins and the intermediate filament proteins cytokeratin and vimentin in the parasite infection process. It also suggests an important role in parasite biology for the conserved laminin-G-like domain, present in all members of this large family of cell surface proteins. PMID:26398185

  12. TRAF2-binding BIR1 domain of c-IAP2/MALT1 fusion protein is essential for activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Garrison, J B; Samuel, T; Reed, J C

    2009-04-02

    Marginal zone mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) B-cell lymphoma is the most common extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The t(11;18)(q21;q21) translocation occurs frequently in MALT lymphomas and creates a chimeric NF-kappaB-activating protein containing the baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR) domains of c-IAP2 (inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2) fused with portions of the MALT1 protein. The BIR1 domain of c-IAP2 interacts directly with TRAF2 (TNFalpha-receptor-associated factor-2), but its role in NF-kappaB activation is still unclear. Here, we investigated the role of TRAF2 in c-IAP2/MALT1-induced NF-kappaB activation. We show the BIR1 domain of c-IAP2 is essential for NF-kappaB activation, whereas BIR2 and BIR3 domains are not. Studies of c-IAP2/MALT1 BIR1 mutant (E47A/R48A) that fails to activate NF-kappaB showed loss of TRAF2 binding, but retention of TRAF6 binding, suggesting that interaction of c-IAP2/MALT1 with TRAF6 is insufficient for NF-kappaB induction. In addition, a dominant-negative TRAF2 mutant or downregulation of TRAF2 achieved by small interfering RNA inhibited NF-kappaB activation by c-IAP2/MALT1 showing that TRAF2 is indispensable. Comparisons of the bioactivity of intact c-IAP2/MALT1 oncoprotein and BIR1 E47A/R48A c-IAP2/MALT1 mutant that cannot bind TRAF2 in a lymphoid cell line provided evidence that TRAF2 interaction is critical for c-IAP2/MALT1-mediated increases in the NF-kappaB activity, increased expression of endogenous NF-kappaB target genes (c-FLIP, TRAF1), and resistance to apoptosis.

  13. The N-terminal domain of the thermo-regulated surface protein PrpA of Enterococcus faecium binds to fibrinogen, fibronectin and platelets.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Zhang, Xinglin; Bierschenk, Damien; Koekman, C Arnold; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Pape, Marieke; Paganelli, Fernanda L; Wobser, Dominique; Huebner, Johannes; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; van Schaik, Willem

    2015-12-17

    Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but is also found in non-enteric environments where it can grow between 10 °C and 45 °C. E. faecium has recently emerged as a multi-drug resistant nosocomial pathogen. We hypothesized that genes involved in the colonization and infection of mammals exhibit temperature-regulated expression control and we therefore performed a transcriptome analysis of the clinical isolate E. faecium E1162, during mid-exponential growth at 25 °C and 37 °C. One of the genes that exhibited differential expression between 25 °C and 37 °C, was predicted to encode a peptidoglycan-anchored surface protein. The N-terminal domain of this protein is unique to E. faecium and closely related enterococci, while the C-terminal domain is homologous to the Streptococcus agalactiae surface protein BibA. This region of the protein contains proline-rich repeats, leading us to name the protein PrpA for proline-rich protein A. We found that PrpA is a surface-exposed protein which is most abundant during exponential growth at 37 °C in E. faecium E1162. The heterologously expressed and purified N-terminal domain of PrpA was able to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins fibrinogen and fibronectin. In addition, the N-terminal domain of PrpA interacted with both non-activated and activated platelets.

  14. The N-terminal domain of the thermo-regulated surface protein PrpA of Enterococcus faecium binds to fibrinogen, fibronectin and platelets

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M.; Urbanus, Rolf T.; Zhang, Xinglin; Bierschenk, Damien; Koekman, C. Arnold; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Pape, Marieke; Paganelli, Fernanda L.; Wobser, Dominique; Huebner, Johannes; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Willems, Rob J. L.; van Schaik, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but is also found in non-enteric environments where it can grow between 10 °C and 45 °C. E. faecium has recently emerged as a multi-drug resistant nosocomial pathogen. We hypothesized that genes involved in the colonization and infection of mammals exhibit temperature-regulated expression control and we therefore performed a transcriptome analysis of the clinical isolate E. faecium E1162, during mid-exponential growth at 25 °C and 37 °C. One of the genes that exhibited differential expression between 25 °C and 37 °C, was predicted to encode a peptidoglycan-anchored surface protein. The N-terminal domain of this protein is unique to E. faecium and closely related enterococci, while the C-terminal domain is homologous to the Streptococcus agalactiae surface protein BibA. This region of the protein contains proline-rich repeats, leading us to name the protein PrpA for proline-rich protein A. We found that PrpA is a surface-exposed protein which is most abundant during exponential growth at 37 °C in E. faecium E1162. The heterologously expressed and purified N-terminal domain of PrpA was able to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins fibrinogen and fibronectin. In addition, the N-terminal domain of PrpA interacted with both non-activated and activated platelets. PMID:26675410

  15. Effect of point substitutions within the minimal DNA-binding domain of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein on interaction with DNA intermediates of nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, E A; Krasikova, Y S; Naegeli, H; Lavrik, O I; Rechkunova, N I

    2014-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum factor A (XPA) is one of the key proteins in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. The effects of point substitutions in the DNA-binding domain of XPA (positively charged lysine residues replaced by negatively charged glutamate residues: XPA K204E, K179E, K141E, and tandem mutant K141E/K179E) on the interaction of the protein with DNA structures modeling intermediates of the damage recognition and pre-incision stages in NER were analyzed. All these mutations decreased the affinity of the protein to DNA, the effect depending on the substitution and the DNA structure. The mutant as well as wild-type proteins bind with highest efficiency partly open damaged DNA duplex, and the affinity of the mutants to this DNA is reduced in the order: K204E > K179E > K141E = K141/179E. For all the mutants, decrease in DNA binding efficiency was more pronounced in the case of full duplex and single-stranded DNA than with bubble-DNA structure, the difference between protein affinities to different DNA structures increasing as DNA binding activity of the mutant decreased. No effect of the studied XPA mutations on the location of the protein on the partially open DNA duplex was observed using photoinduced crosslinking with 5-I-dUMP in different positions of the damaged DNA strand. These results combined with earlier published data suggest no direct correlation between DNA binding and activity in NER for these XPA mutants.

  16. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.

  17. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    DOE PAGES

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; ...

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. Amore » putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.« less

  18. Alternatively spliced products of the maize P gene encode proteins with homology to the DNA-binding domain of myb-like transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Grotewold, E; Athma, P; Peterson, T

    1991-01-01

    The Zea mays P gene has been postulated to regulate the biosynthetic pathway of a flavonoid-derived pigment in certain floral tissues [Styles, E. D. & Ceska, O. (1977) Can. J. Genet. Cytol. 19, 289-302]. We have characterized two P transcripts that are alternatively spliced at their 3' ends. One message of 1802 nucleotides encodes a 43.7-kDa protein with an N-terminal region showing approximately 40% homology to the DNA-binding domain of several members of the myb family of protooncogene proteins. A second message of 945 nucleotides encodes a 17.3-kDa protein that contains most of the myb-homologous domain but differs from the first protein at the C terminus. The deduced P-encoded proteins show an even higher homology (70%) in the myb-homologous domain to the maize regulatory gene C1. Additionally, the P and C1 genes are structurally similar in the sizes and positions of the first and second exons and first intron. We show that P is required for accumulation in the pericarp of transcripts of two genes (A1 and C2) encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis--genes also regulated by C1 in the aleurone. Images PMID:2052542

  19. Overexpression of Sna3 stabilizes tryptophan permease Tat2, potentially competing for the WW domain of Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase with its binding protein Bul1.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Toshiki; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2010-01-04

    Tryptophan permease Tat2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes Rsp5-dependent degradation upon exposure to high hydrostatic pressure and it limits the growth of tryptophan auxotrophs. Overexpression of SNA3 encoding an endosomal/vacuolar protein possessing the PPAY motif allowed growth at 25 MPa, which was potentiated by marked stabilization of Tat2. This appeared to depend on the PPAY motif, which interacted with the WW domain of Rsp5. Subcellular localization of Rsp5 was unchanged by overexpression of either SNA3 or SNA3-AAAY. While the loss of Bul1, a binding protein of Rsp5, or the rsp5-ww3 mutation allowed high-pressure growth, overexpression of BUL1 abolished the Sna3-mediated growth at 25 MPa. These results suggest that Sna3 and Bul1 compete for the WW domain of Rsp5 upon Tat2 ubiquitination.

  20. The Ability to Associate with Activation Domains in vitro is not Required for the TATA Box-Binding Protein to Support Activated Transcription in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansey, William P.; Herr, Winship

    1995-11-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) interacts in vitro with the activation domains of many viral and cellular transcription factors and has been proposed to be a direct target for transcriptional activators. We have examined the functional relevance of activator-TBP association in vitro to transcriptional activation in vivo. We show that alanine substitution mutations in a single loop of TBP can disrupt its association in vitro with the activation domains of the herpes simplex virus activator VP16 and of the human tumor suppressor protein p53; these mutations do not, however, disrupt the transcriptional response of TBP to either activation domain in vivo. Moreover, we show that a region of VP16 distinct from its activation domain can also tightly associate with TBP in vitro, but fails to activate transcription in vivo. These data suggest that the ability of TBP to interact with activation domains in vitro is not directly relevant to its ability to support activated transcription in vivo.

  1. Chimeras between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveal that their C-terminal domains interact with uracil DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Handa, P; Acharya, N; Varshney, U

    2001-05-18

    Uracil, a promutagenic base in DNA can arise by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or incorporation of dUMP by DNA polymerase. Uracil is removed from DNA by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), the first enzyme in the uracil excision repair pathway. We recently reported that the Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) facilitated uracil excision from certain structured substrates by E. coli UDG (EcoUDG) and suggested the existence of interaction between SSB and UDG. In this study, we have made use of the chimeric proteins obtained by fusion of N- and C-terminal domains of SSBs from E. coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis to investigate interactions between SSBs and UDGs. The EcoSSB or a chimera containing its C-terminal domain interacts with EcoUDG in a binary (SSB-UDG) or a ternary (DNA-SSB-UDG) complex. However, the chimera containing the N-terminal domain from EcoSSB showed no interactions with EcoUDG. Thus, the C-terminal domain (48 amino acids) of EcoSSB is necessary and sufficient for interaction with EcoUDG. The data also suggest that the C-terminal domain (34 amino acids) of MtuSSB is a predominant determinant for mediating its interaction with MtuUDG. The mechanism of how the interactions between SSB and UDG could be important in uracil excision repair pathway has been discussed.

  2. The RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L11 recognizes an rRNA tertiary structure stabilized by both thiostrepton and magnesium ion

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, Lawrence B.; Risen, Lisa M.; Griffey, Richard H.; Draper, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Antibiotics that inhibit ribosomal function may do so by one of several mechanisms, including the induction of incorrect RNA folding or prevention of protein and/or RNA conformational transitions. Thiostrepton, which binds to the ‘GTPase center’ of the large subunit, has been postulated to prevent conformational changes in either the L11 protein or rRNA to which it binds. Scintillation proximity assays designed to look at the binding of the L11 C-terminal RNA-binding domain to a 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) fragment, as well as the ability of thiostrepton to induce that binding, were used to demonstrate the role of Mg2+, L11 and thiostrepton in the formation and maintenance of the rRNA fragment tertiary structure. Experiments using these assays with both an Escherichia coli rRNA fragment and a thermostable variant of that RNA show that Mg2+, L11 and thiostrepton all induce the RNA to fold to an essentially identical tertiary structure. PMID:10734197

  3. Structure of the IGF-binding domain of the insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5): implications for IGF and IGF-I receptor interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, W; Zweckstetter, M; Renner, C; Sanchez, Y; Georgescu, J; Grol, M; Demuth, D; Schumacher, R; Dony, C; Lang, K; Holak, T A

    1998-01-01

    Binding proteins for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) IGF-I and IGF-II, known as IGFBPs, control the distribution, function and activity of IGFs in various cell tissues and body fluids. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is known to modulate the stimulatory effects of IGFs and is the major IGF-binding protein in bone tissue. We have expressed two N-terminal fragments of IGFBP-5 in Escherichia coli; the first encodes the N-terminal domain of the protein (residues 1-104) and the second, mini-IGFBP-5, comprises residues Ala40 to Ile92. We show that the entire IGFBP-5 protein contains only one high-affinity binding site for IGFs, located in mini-IGFBP-5. The solution structure of mini-IGFBP-5, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, discloses a rigid, globular structure that consists of a centrally located three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet. Its scaffold is stabilized further by two inside packed disulfide bridges. The binding to IGFs, which is in the nanomolar range, involves conserved Leu and Val residues localized in a hydrophobic patch on the surface of the IGFBP-5 protein. Remarkably, the IGF-I receptor binding assays of IGFBP-5 showed that IGFBP-5 inhibits the binding of IGFs to the IGF-I receptor, resulting in reduction of receptor stimulation and autophosphorylation. Compared with the full-length IGFBP-5, the smaller N-terminal fragments were less efficient inhibitors of the IGF-I receptor binding of IGFs. PMID:9822601

  4. Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10 (SSL10) inhibits blood coagulation by binding to prothrombin and factor Xa via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Saotomo; Yokoyama, Ryosuke; Kamoshida, Go; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Okada, Hiromi; Takii, Takemasa; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Fujii, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hideki; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2013-07-26

    The staphylococcal superantigen-like protein (SSL) family is composed of 14 exoproteins sharing structural similarity with superantigens but no superantigenic activity. Target proteins of four SSLs have been identified to be involved in host immune responses. However, the counterparts of other SSLs have been functionally uncharacterized. In this study, we have identified porcine plasma prothrombin as SSL10-binding protein by affinity purification using SSL10-conjugated Sepharose. The resin recovered the prodomain of prothrombin (fragment 1 + 2) as well as factor Xa in pull-down analysis. The equilibrium dissociation constant between SSL10 and prothrombin was 1.36 × 10(-7) M in surface plasmon resonance analysis. On the other hand, the resin failed to recover γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain-less coagulation factors and prothrombin from warfarin-treated mice, suggesting that the Gla domain of the coagulation factors is essential for the interaction. SSL10 prolonged plasma clotting induced by the addition of Ca(2+) and factor Xa. SSL10 did not affect the protease activity of thrombin but inhibited the generation of thrombin activity in recalcified plasma. S. aureus produces coagulase that non-enzymatically activates prothrombin. SSL10 attenuated clotting induced by coagulase, but the inhibitory effect was weaker than that on physiological clotting, and SSL10 did not inhibit protease activity of staphylothrombin, the complex of prothrombin with coagulase. These results indicate that SSL10 inhibits blood coagulation by interfering with activation of coagulation cascade via binding to the Gla domain of coagulation factor but not by directly inhibiting thrombin activity. This is the first finding that the bacterial protein inhibits blood coagulation via targeting the Gla domain of coagulation factors.

  5. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  6. Screening and identification of T helper 1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes in the spike 2 domain and the nucleocapsid protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Motokawa, Kenji; Gemma, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Rie; Arai, Setsuo; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-02-17

    The antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection has been recognized in experimentally infected cats, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). In the present study, we synthesized eighty-one kinds of peptides derived from the spike (S)2 domain of type I FIPV KU-2 strain, the S2 domain of type II FIPV 79-1146 strain, and the nucleocapcid (N) protein of FIPV KU-2 strain. To detect the T helper (Th)1 epitope, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from FIPV-infected cats were cultured with each peptide, and Th1-type immune responses were measured using feline interferon (fIFN)-γ production as an index. To detect the linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope, we investigated the reactivity of plasma collected from FIPV-infected cats against each peptide by ELISA. Four and 2 peptides containing Th1 epitopes were identified in the heptad repeat (HR)1 and inter-helical (IH) regions of the S2 domain of type I FIPV, respectively, and these were located on the N-terminal side of the regions. In the S2 domain of type II FIPV, 2, 3, and 2 peptides containing Th1 epitopes were identified in the HR1, IH, and HR2 regions, respectively, and these were mainly located on the C-terminal side of the regions. In the S2 domain of type I FIPV, 3 and 7 peptides containing linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were identified in the IH and HR2 regions, respectively. In the S2 domain of type II FIPV, 4 peptides containing linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were identified in the HR2 region. The Th1 epitopes in the S2 domain of type I and II FIPV were located in different regions, but the linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes were mostly located in the HR2 region. Eight peptides containing Th1 epitopes were identified in N protein, and 3 peptides derived from residues 81 to 100 and 137 to 164 showed strong

  7. A cytoskeletal localizing domain in the cyclase-associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates access to a distant SH3-binding site.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wang, C; Palmieri, S J; Haarer, B K; Field, J

    1999-07-09

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase consists of a 200-kDa catalytic subunit (CYR1) and a 70-kDa subunit (CAP/SRV2). CAP/Srv2p assists the small G protein Ras to activate adenylyl cyclase. CAP also regulates the cytoskeleton through an actin sequestering activity and is directed to cortical actin patches by a proline-rich SH3-binding site (P2). In this report we analyze the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Ras/cAMP signaling. Two alleles of CAP, L16P(Srv2) and R19T (SupC), first isolated in genetic screens for mutants that attenuate cAMP levels, reduced adenylyl cyclase binding, and cortical actin patch localization. A third mutation, L27F, also failed to localize but showed no loss of either cAMP signaling or adenylyl cyclase binding. However, all three N-terminal mutations reduced CAP-CAP multimer formation and SH3 domain binding, although the SH3-binding site is about 350 amino acids away. Finally, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A did not affect the cAMP phenotypes of the hyperactive Ras2(Val19) allele. These data identify a novel region of CAP that controls access to the SH3-binding site and demonstrate that cytoskeletal localization of CAP or an intact cytoskeleton per se is not necessary for cAMP signaling.

  8. Bacterial Genome Partitioning: N-Terminal Domain of IncC Protein Encoded by Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RK2 Modulates Oligomerisation and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Sarah M.; Bingle, Lewis E.H.; Dafforn, Tim R.; Thomas, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    ParA Walker ATPases form part of the machinery that promotes better-than-random segregation of bacterial genomes. ParA proteins normally occur in one of two forms, differing by their N-terminal domain (NTD) of approximately 100 aa, which is generally associated with site-specific DNA binding. Unusually, and for as yet unknown reasons, parA (incC) of IncP-1 plasmids is translated from alternative start codons producing two forms, IncC1 (364 aa) and IncC2 (259 aa), whose ratio varies between hosts. IncC2 could be detected as an oligomeric form containing dimers, tetramers and octamers, but the N-terminal extension present in IncC1 favours nucleotide-stimulated dimerisation as well as high-affinity and ATP-dependent non-specific DNA binding. The IncC1 NTD does not dimerise or bind DNA alone, but it does bind IncC2 in the presence of nucleotides. Mixing IncC1 and IncC2 improved polymerisation and DNA binding. Thus, the NTD may modulate the polymerisation interface, facilitating polymerisation/depolymerisation and DNA binding, to promote the cycle that drives partitioning. PMID:19109978

  9. Identification of Toxoplasma TgPH1, a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein that binds to the phosphoinositide PI(3,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Daher, Wassim; Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Tomavo, Stan; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2016-05-01

    The phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) plays crucial roles in the maintenance of lysosome/vacuole morphology, membrane trafficking and regulation of endolysosome-localized membrane channel activity. In Toxoplasma gondii, we previously reported that PI(3,5)P2 is essential for parasite survival by controlling homeostasis of the apicoplast, a particular organelle of algal origin. Here, by using a phosphoinositide pull-down assay, we identified TgPH1 in Toxoplasma a protein conserved in many apicomplexan parasites. TgPH1 binds specifically to PI(3,5)P2, shows punctate intracellular localization, but plays no vital role for tachyzoite growth in vitro. TgPH1 is a protein predominantly formed by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. So far, PH domains have been described to bind preferentially to bis- or trisphosphate phosphoinositides containing two adjacent phosphates (i.e. PI(3,4)P2, PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4,5)P3). Therefore, our study reveals an unusual feature of TgPH1 which binds preferentially to PI(3,5)P2.

  10. A large protein containing zinc finger domains binds to related sequence elements in the enhancers of the class I major histocompatibility complex and kappa immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, A S; LeClair, K P; Singh, H; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA from a B-cell library was previously isolated that encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein with affinities for related sites in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and kappa immunoglobulin gene enhancers. We report here approximately 6.5 kilobases of sequence of the MBP-1 (MHC enhancer binding protein 1) cDNA. MBP-1 protein has a molecular weight predicted to be greater than 200,000. A DNA-binding domain with high affinity for the MHC enhancer sequence TGGGGATTCCCCA was localized to an 118-amino-acid protein fragment containing two zinc fingers of the class Cys2-X12-His2. Analysis of expression of MBP-1 mRNA revealed relatively high expression in HeLa cells and in a human retinal cell line, with lower levels in Jurkat T cells and in two B-cell lines. Interestingly, expression of MBP-1 mRNA was inducible by mitogen and phorbol ester treatment of Jurkat T cells and by serum treatment of confluent serum-deprived human fibroblasts. Images PMID:2108316

  11. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, Mallory Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee Delury, Craig Parkin, Edward

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  12. Structural dynamics and ssDNA binding activity of the three N-terminal domains of the large subunit of Replication Protein A from small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Tsutakawa, Susan; Brosey, Chris A.; Castillo, Amalchi; Chagot, Marie-Eve; Smith, Jarrod A.; Tainer, John A.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-03-11

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein utilized in diverse DNA transactions in the cell. RPA is a heterotrimeric protein with seven globular domains connected by flexible linkers, which enable substantial inter-domain motion that is essential to its function. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments on two multi-domain constructs from the N-terminus of the large subunit (RPA70) were used to examine the structural dynamics of these domains and their response to the binding of ssDNA. The SAXS data combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal substantial interdomain flexibility for both RPA70AB (the tandem high affinity ssDNA binding domains A and B connected by a 10-residue linker) and RPA70NAB (RPA70AB extended by a 70-residue linker to the RPA70N protein interaction domain). Binding of ssDNA to RPA70NAB reduces the interdomain flexibility between the A and B domains, but has no effect on RPA70N. These studies provide the first direct measurements of changes in orientation of these three RPA domains upon binding ssDNA. The results support a model in which RPA70N remains structurally independent of RPA70AB in the DNA bound state and therefore freely available to serve as a protein recruitment module.

  13. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polekhina, Galina Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  14. Mutation and crystallization of the first KH domain of human polycytosine-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) in complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2011-10-01

    Polycytosine-binding proteins (PCBPs) are triple KH-domain proteins that play an important role in the regulation of translation of eukaryotic mRNA. They are also utilized by viral RNA and have been shown to interact with ssDNA. Underlying their function is the specific recognition of C-rich nucleotides by their KH domains. However, the structural basis of this recognition is only partially understood. Here, the preparation of a His-tagged KH domain is described, representing the first domain of PCBP1 that incorporates a C54S mutation as well as the addition of a C-terminal tryptophan. This construct has facilitated the preparation of highly diffracting crystals in complex with C-rich DNA (sequence ACCCCA). Crystals of the KH1-DNA complex were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in 0.1 M phosphate-citrate pH 4.2, 40%(v/v) PEG 300. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.77 Å resolution and the diffraction was consistent with space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 38.59, b = 111.88, c = 43.42 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 93.37°. The structure of the KH1-DNA complex will further our insight into the basis of cytosine specificity by PCBPs.

  15. Mutation and crystallization of the first KH domain of human polycytosine-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) in complex with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yoga, Yano M. K.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Polycytosine-binding proteins (PCBPs) are triple KH-domain proteins that play an important role in the regulation of translation of eukaryotic mRNA. They are also utilized by viral RNA and have been shown to interact with ssDNA. Underlying their function is the specific recognition of C-rich nucleotides by their KH domains. However, the structural basis of this recognition is only partially understood. Here, the preparation of a His-tagged KH domain is described, representing the first domain of PCBP1 that incorporates a C54S mutation as well as the addition of a C-terminal tryptophan. This construct has facilitated the preparation of highly diffracting crystals in complex with C-rich DNA (sequence ACCCCA). Crystals of the KH1–DNA complex were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in 0.1 M phosphate–citrate pH 4.2, 40%(v/v) PEG 300. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.77 Å resolution and the diffraction was consistent with space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.59, b = 111.88, c = 43.42 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 93.37°. The structure of the KH1–DNA complex will further our insight into the basis of cytosine specificity by PCBPs. PMID:22102042

  16. Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation of a γ-Protocadherin C-terminal Lipid Binding Domain Regulates Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibition and Dendrite Arborization.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Austin B; Schreiner, Dietmar; Weiner, Joshua A

    2015-08-21

    The γ-protocadherins (γ-Pcdhs) are a family of 22 adhesion molecules with multiple critical developmental functions, including the proper formation of dendritic arbors by forebrain neurons. The γ-Pcdhs bind to and inhibit focal adhesion kinase (FAK) via a constant C-terminal cytoplasmic domain shared by all 22 proteins. In cortical neurons lacking the γ-Pcdhs, aberrantly high activity of FAK and of PKC disrupts dendrite arborization. Little is known, however, about how γ-Pcdh function is regulated by other factors. Here we show that PKC phosphorylates a serine residue situated within a phospholipid binding motif at the shared γ-Pcdh C terminus. Western blots using a novel phospho-specific antibody against this site suggest that a portion of γ-Pcdh proteins is phosphorylated in the cortex in vivo. We find that PKC phosphorylation disrupts both phospholipid binding and the γ-Pcdh inhibition of (but not binding to) FAK. Introduction of a non-phosphorylatable (S922A) γ-Pcdh construct into wild-type cortical neurons significantly increases dendrite arborization. This same S922A construct can also rescue dendrite arborization defects in γ-Pcdh null neurons cell autonomously. Consistent with these data, introduction of a phosphomimetic (S/D) γ-Pcdh construct or treatment with a PKC activator reduces dendrite arborization in wild-type cortical neurons. Together, these data identify a novel mechanism through which γ-Pcdh control of a signaling pathway important for dendrite arborization is regulated.

  17. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  18. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  19. The novel SH3 domain protein Dlish/CG10933 mediates fat signaling in Drosophila by binding and regulating Dachs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifei; Wang, Xing; Matakatsu, Hitoshi; Fehon, Richard; Blair, Seth S

    2016-01-01

    Much of the Hippo and planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling mediated by the Drosophila protocadherin Fat depends on its ability to change the subcellular localization, levels and activity of the unconventional myosin Dachs. To better understand this process, we have performed a structure-function analysis of Dachs, and used this to identify a novel and important mediator of Fat and Dachs activities, a Dachs-binding SH3 protein we have named Dlish. We found that Dlish is regulated by Fat and Dachs, that Dlish also binds Fat and the Dachs regulator Approximated, and that Dlish is required for Dachs localization, levels and activity in both wild type and fat mutant tissue. Our evidence supports dual roles for Dlish. Dlish tethers Dachs to the subapical cell cortex, an effect partly mediated by the palmitoyltransferase Approximated under the control of Fat. Conversely, Dlish promotes the Fat-mediated degradation of Dachs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16624.001 PMID:27692068

  20. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  1. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and Its Heparin Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Hoopes, James T.; Liu, Xuying; Xu, Xiaomeng; Demeler, Borries; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Li, Chris; Ha, Ya

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid β-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1. PMID:19906646

  2. The solution structure of the active domain of CAP18--a lipopolysaccharide binding protein from rabbit leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Brock, R; Luh, F; Chou, P J; Larrick, J W; Huang, R F; Huang, T H

    1995-08-14

    We have employed the circular dichroism (CD) technique to characterize the solution structure of CAP18(106-137), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding, antimicrobial protein, and its interaction with lipid A. Our results revealed that CAP18(106-137) may exist in at least three lipid A concentration-dependent, primarily helix conformations. The 'model' structure of CAP18(106-137) in 30% (v/v) TFE, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, was found to be a complete and very rigid helix. In this conformation, the cationic and hydrophobic groups of CAP18(106-137) are separated into patches and stripes in such a way that it can favorably interact with lipid A through either coulombic interaction with the diphosphoryl groups or hydrophobic interaction with the fatty acyl chains.

  3. A human centromere protein, CENP-B, has a DNA binding domain containing four potential alpha helices at the NH2 terminus, which is separable from dimerizing activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The alphoid DNA-CENP-B (centromere protein B) complex is the first sequence-specific DNA/protein complex detected in the centromeric region of human chromosomes. In the reaction, CENP-B recognizes a 17-bp sequence (CENP-B box) and assembles two alphoid DNA molecules into a complex, which is designated complex A (Muro, Y., H. Masumoto, K. Yoda, N. Nozaki, M. Ohashi, and T. Okazaki. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:585-596). Since CENP-B gene is conserved in mammalian species and CENP-B boxes are found also in mouse centromere satellite DNA (minor satellite), this sequence-specific DNA-protein interaction may be important for some kind of common centromere function. In this study we have characterized the structure of CENP-B and CENP-B-alphoid DNA complex. We have shown by chemical cross-linking that CENP-B formed a dimer, and have estimated by molecular weight determination the composition of complex A to be a CENP-B dimer and two molecules of alphoid DNA. The DNA binding domain has been delimited within the NH2-terminal 125-amino acid region containing four potential alpha-helices using truncated CENP-B made in Escherichia coli cells. We have shown that CENP-B had sites highly sensitive to proteases and that the DNA binding domain was separable from the dimerizing activity by the proteolytic cleavage at 20 kD from the COOH terminus of the molecule. Thus, CENP-B may organize a higher order structure in the centromere by juxtaposing two CENP-B boxes in the alphoid DNA repeat through both the DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. PMID:1469042

  4. Bacterial and cell-free production of APP671-726 containing amyloid precursor protein transmembrane and metal-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, O V; Urban, A S; Nadezhdin, K D; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S

    2013-11-01

    More than half of the mutations associated with familiar Alzheimer's disease have been found in the transmembrane domain of amyloid precursor protein (APP). These pathogenic mutations presumably influence the APP transmembrane domain structural and dynamic properties and result in its conformational change or/and lateral dimerization. Despite much data about the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the initial steps of the pathogenesis remain unclear so far. For the investigation of the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease, we selected amyloid precursor protein fragment APP671-726 containing the transmembrane and metal-binding domains. This fragment is the substrate of the γ-secretase complex whose abnormal activity leads to the formation of amyloidogenic Aβ42 peptides. This work for the first time describes a highly effective cell-free APP671-726 production method and improved method of bacterial synthesis. Both methods yield milligram quantities of isotope-labeled protein for structural study by high resolution NMR spectroscopy in membrane mimicking milieus.

  5. Cigarette smoke induces proteasomal-mediated degradation of DNA methyltransferases and methyl CpG-/CpG domain-binding proteins in embryonic orofacial cells.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Greene, Robert M; Pisano, M Michele

    2015-12-01

    Orofacial clefts, the most prevalent of developmental anomalies, occur with a frequency of 1 in 700 live births. Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy represents a risk factor for having a child with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Using primary cultures of first branchial arch-derived cells (1-BA cells), which contribute to the formation of the lip and palate, the present study addressed the hypothesis that components of cigarette smoke alter global DNA methylation, and/or expression of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) and various methyl CpG-binding proteins. Primary cultures of 1-BA cells, exposed to 80μg/mL cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 24h, exhibited a >13% decline in global DNA methylation and triggered proteasomal-mediated degradation of Dnmts (DNMT-1 and -3a), methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein 3 (MBD-3). Pretreatment of 1-BA cells with the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 completely reversed such degradation. Collectively, these data allow the suggestion of a potential epigenetic mechanism underlying maternal cigarette smoke exposure-induced orofacial clefting.

  6. CIGARETTE SMOKE INDUCES PROTEASOMAL-MEDIATED DEGRADATION OF DNA METHYLTRANSFERASES AND METHYL CpG-/CpG DOMAIN-BINDING PROTEINS IN EMBRYONIC OROFACIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial clefts, the most prevalent of developmental anomalies, occur with a frequency of 1 in 700 live births. Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy represents a risk factor for having a child with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Using primary cultures of first branchial arch-derived cells (1-BA cells), which contribute to the formation of the lip and palate, the present study addressed the hypothesis that components of cigarette smoke alter global DNA methylation, and/or expression of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) and various methyl CpG-binding proteins. Primary cultures of 1-BA cells, exposed to 80 μg/ml cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 24 hrs, exhibited a >13% decline in global DNA methylation and triggered proteasomal-mediated degradation of Dnmts (DNMT-1, and - 3a), methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein 3 (MBD-3). Pretreatment of 1-BA cells with the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 completely reversed such degradation. Collectively, these data allow the suggestion of a potential epigenetic mechanism underlying maternal cigarette smoke exposure-induced orofacial clefting. PMID:26482727

  7. Antitumor therapy mediated by 5-fluorocytosine and a recombinant fusion protein containing TSG-6 hyaluronan binding domain and yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Park, Joshua I; Cao, Limin; Platt, Virginia M; Huang, Zhaohua; Stull, Robert A; Dy, Edward E; Sperinde, Jeffrey J; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-01-01

    Matrix attachment therapy (MAT) is an enzyme prodrug strategy that targets hyaluronan in the tumor extracellular matrix to deliver a prodrug converting enzyme near the tumor cells. A recombinant fusion protein containing the hyaluronan binding domain of TSG-6 (Link) and yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) with an N-terminal His(x6) tag was constructed to test MAT on the C26 colon adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice that were given 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) in the drinking water. LinkCD was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-chelation affinity chromatography. The purified LinkCD fusion protein exhibits a K(m) of 0.33 mM and V(max) of 15 microM/min/microg for the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The duration of the enzyme activity for LinkCD was longer than that of CD enzyme at 37 degrees C: the fusion protein retained 20% of its initial enzyme activity after 24 h, and 12% after 48 h. The LinkCD fusion protein can bind to a hyaluronan oligomer (12-mer) at a K(D) of 55 microM at pH 7.4 and a K(D) of 5.32 microM at pH 6.0 measured using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). To evaluate the antitumor effect of LinkCD/5-FC combination therapy in vivo, mice received intratumoral injections of LinkCD on days 11 and 14 after C26 tumor implantation and the drinking water containing 10 mg/mL of 5-FC starting on day 11. To examine if the Link domain by itself was able to reduce tumor growth, we included treatment groups that received LinkCD without 5-FC and Link-mtCD (a functional mutant that lacks cytosine deaminase activity) with 5-FC. Animals that received LinkCD/5-FC treatment showed significant tumor size reduction and increased survival compared to the CD/5-FC treatment group. Treatment groups that were unable to produce 5-FU had no effect on the tumor growth despite receiving the fusion protein that contained the Link domain. The results indicate that a treatment regime consisting of a fusion protein containing the Link domain, the active CD enzyme, and the

  8. Cross-talk between the octarepeat domain and the fifth binding site of prion protein driven by the interaction of copper(II) with the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Turi, Ildikó; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-03-02

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases based on the conformational conversion of the normal form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to the disease-related scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)). Copper(II) coordination to PrP(C) has attracted considerable interest for almost 20 years, mainly due to the possibility that such an interaction would be an important event for the physiological function of PrP(C). In this work, we report the copper(II) coordination features of the peptide fragment Ac(PEG11)3PrP(60-114) [Ac = acetyl] as a model for the whole N-terminus of the PrP(C) metal-binding domain. We studied the complexation properties of the peptide by means of potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry techniques. The results revealed that the preferred histidyl binding sites largely depend on the pH and copper(II)/peptide ratio. Formation of macrochelate species occurs up to a 2:1 metal/peptide ratio in the physiological pH range and simultaneously involves the histidyl residues present both inside and outside the octarepeat domain. However, at increased copper(II)/peptide ratios amide-bound species form, especially within the octarepeat domain. On the contrary, at basic pH the amide-bound species predominate at any copper/peptide ratio and are formed preferably with the binding sites of His96 and His111, which is similar to the metal-binding-affinity order observed in our previous studies.

  9. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis.

  10. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    SciTech Connect

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H. . E-mail: doday@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ({sup 171}EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF{sup 195}) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues {sup 48}KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK{sup 64} that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to {sup 48}EF{sup 49} abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the {sup 48}EF{sup 49} construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

  11. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  12. Members of a Novel Protein Family Containing Microneme Adhesive Repeat Domains Act as Sialic Acid-binding Lectins during Host Cell Invasion by Apicomplexan Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M.; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J.; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for α2–3- over α2–6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to α2–9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6′sulfo-sialyl Lewisx might have implications for tissue tropism. PMID:19901027

  13. A chimeric protein comprising the glucosyltransferase and cysteine proteinase domains of toxin B and the receptor binding domain of toxin A induces protective immunity against Clostridium difficile infection in mice and hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Kai; Yan, Ya-Xian; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Ju, Xianghong; Zhao, Song; Zhang, Keshan; Tzipori, Saul; Sun, Xingmin

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea and colitis in developed countries. The pathogenicity of C. difficile is mainly mediated by the release of 2 large potent exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), both of which require neutralization to prevent disease occurrence. We have generated a novel chimeric protein, designated mTcd138, comprised of the glucosyltransferase and cysteine proteinase domains of TcdB and the receptor binding domain of TcdA and expressed it in Bacillus megaterium. To ensure that mTcd138 is atoxic, 2 point mutations were introduced to the glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB, which essentially eliminates toxicity of mTcd138. Parenteral immunizations of mice and hamsters with mTcd138 induced protective antibodies to both toxins and provided protection against infection with the hyper-virulent C. difficile strain UK6.

  14. Protein covalent immobilization via its scarce thiol versus abundant amine groups: Effect on orientation, cell binding domain exposure and conformational lability.

    PubMed

    Ba, O M; Hindie, M; Marmey, P; Gallet, O; Anselme, K; Ponche, A; Duncan, A C

    2015-10-01

    Quantity, orientation, conformation and covalent linkage of naturally cell adhesive proteins adsorbed or covalently linked to a surface, are known to influence the preservation of their subsequent long term cell adhesion properties and bioactivity. In the present work, we explore two different strategies for the covalent linking of plasma fibronectin (pFN) - used as a cell adhesive model protein, onto a polystyrene (PS) surface. One is aimed at tethering the protein to the surface in a semi-oriented fashion (via one of the 4 free thiol reactive groups on the protein) with a heterofunctional coupling agent (SSMPB method). The other aims to immobilize the protein in a more random fashion by reaction between the abundant pendant primary amine bearing amino acids of the pFN and activated carboxylic surface functions obtained after glutaric anhydride surface treatment (GA method). The overall goal will be to verify the hypothesis of a correlation between covalent immobilization of a model cell adhesive protein to a PS surface in a semi-oriented configuration (versus randomly oriented) with promotion of enhanced exposure of the protein's cell binding domain. This in turn would lead to enhanced cell adhesion. Ideally the goal is to elaborate substrates exhibiting a long term stable protein monolayer with preserved cell adhesive properties and bioactivity for biomaterial and/or cell adhesion commercial plate applications. However, the initial restrictive objective of this paper is to first quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the reversibly (merely adsorbed) versus covalently irreversibly bound protein to the surface after the immobilization procedure. Although immobilized surface amounts were similar (close to the monolayer range) for all immobilization approaches, covalent grafting showed improved retention and stronger "tethering" of the pFN protein to the surface (roughly 40%) after SDS rinsing compared to that for mere adsorption (0%) suggesting an added value

  15. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhen; Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Daskalova, Sasha M; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Hansen, Debra T; Yang, Jay-How; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G; Mor, Tsafrir S; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683) and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684-705) of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1's envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662-683) of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649-705), in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM). Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41.

  16. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Daskalova, Sasha M.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Hansen, Debra T.; Yang, Jay-How; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G.; Mor, Tsafrir S.; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649–683) and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684–705) of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1’s envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662–683) of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649–705), in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM). Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41. PMID:26295457

  17. Structure of the apo form of the catabolite control protein A (CcpA) from Bacillus megaterium with a DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Palm, Gottfried J.; Panjikar, Santosh; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2007-01-01

    Crystal structure determination of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) at 2.6 Å resolution reveals for the first time the structure of a full-length apo-form LacI-GalR family repressor protein. In the crystal structures of these transcription regulators, the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain has only been observed in cognate DNA complexes; it has not been observed in other crystal structures owing to its mobility. In the crystal packing of apo-CcpA, the protein–protein contacts between the N-terminal three-helix bundle and the core domain consisted of interactions between the homodimers that were similar to those between the corepressor protein HPr and the CcpA N-subdomain in the ternary DNA complex. In contrast to the DNA complex, the apo-CcpA structure reveals large subdomain movements in the core, resulting in a complete loss of contacts between the N-subdomains of the homodimer. PMID:17401189

  18. Web-based toolkits for topology prediction of transmembrane helical proteins, fold recognition, structure and binding scoring, folding-kinetics analysis and comparative analysis of domain combinations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2005-07-01

    We have developed the following web servers for protein structural modeling and analysis at http://theory.med.buffalo.edu: THUMBUP, UMDHMM(TMHP) and TUPS, predictors of transmembrane helical protein topology based on a mean-burial-propensity scale of amino acid residues (THUMBUP), hidden Markov model (UMDHMM(TMHP)) and their combinations (TUPS); SPARKS 2.0 and SP3, two profile-profile alignment methods, that match input query sequence(s) to structural templates by integrating sequence profile with knowledge-based structural score (SPARKS 2.0) and structure-derived profile (SP3); DFIRE, a knowledge-based potential for scoring free energy of monomers (DMONOMER), loop conformations (DLOOP), mutant stability (DMUTANT) and binding affinity of protein-protein/peptide/DNA complexes (DCOMPLEX & DDNA); TCD, a program for protein-folding rate and transition-state analysis of small globular proteins; and DOGMA, a web-server that allows comparative analysis of domain combinations between plant and other 55 organisms. These servers provide tools for prediction and/or analysis of proteins on the secondary structure, tertiary structure and interaction levels, respectively.

  19. A Botrytis cinerea Emopamil Binding Domain Protein, Required for Full Virulence, Belongs to a Eukaryotic Superfamily Which Has Expanded in Euascomycetes▿

    PubMed Central

    Gioti, A.; Pradier, J. M.; Fournier, E.; Le Pêcheur, P.; Giraud, C.; Debieu, D.; Bach, J.; Leroux, P.; Levis, C.

    2008-01-01

    A previous transcriptomic analysis of 3,032 fungal genes identified the Botrytis cinerea PIE3 (BcPIE3) gene to be up-regulated early in planta (A. Gioti, A. Simon, P. Le Pêcheur, C. Giraud, J. M. Pradier, M. Viaud, and C. Levis, J. Mol. Biol. 358:372-386, 2006). In the present study, BcPIE3 was disrupted in order to determine its implication in pathogenicity. BcPIE3 was shown to be a virulence factor, since the ΔBcPIE3 mutant was blocked during the colonization of tomato and bean leaves, giving lesions reduced in size by at least 74%. Within the emopamil binding domain (EBD), BcPIE3 shows significant structural similarities to mammalian emopamil binding proteins (EBPs). Mammalian EBPs function as sterol isomerases, but an analysis of the sterol content and the results of growth inhibition experiments with the ΔBcPIE3 strain indicated that BcPIE3 is dispensable for ergosterol biosynthesis. The systematic identification of EBD-containing proteins included in public databases showed that these proteins constitute a protein superfamily present only in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ancestral EBD-encoding gene was duplicated in the common ancestor of animals and fungi after the split from plants. Finally, we present evidence that the EBP phylogenetic clade of this superfamily has further expanded exclusively in euascomycetes, especially in B. cinerea, which contains three copies of the EBP gene. PMID:18156289

  20. The seven-pass transmembrane cadherin Flamingo controls dendritic self-avoidance via its binding to a LIM domain protein, Espinas, in Drosophila sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Daisuke; Horiuchi, Shin-Ya; Shimono, Kohei; Usui, Tadao; Uemura, Tadashi

    2011-09-15

    Members of the Flamingo cadherin family are required in a number of different in vivo contexts of neural development. Even so, molecular identities downstream from the family have been poorly understood. Here we show that a LIM domain protein, Espinas (Esn), binds to an intracellular juxtamembrane domain of Flamingo (Fmi), and that this Fmi-Esn interplay elicits repulsion between dendritic branches of Drosophila sensory neurons. In wild-type larvae, branches of the same class IV dendritic arborization neuron achieve efficient coverage of its two-dimensional receptive field with minimum overlap with each other. However, this self-avoidance was disrupted in a fmi hypomorphic mutant, in an esn knockout homozygote, and in the fmi/esn trans-heterozygote. A functional fusion protein, Fmi:3eGFP, was localized at most of the branch tips, and in a heterologous system, assembly of Esn at cell contact sites required its LIM domain and Fmi. We further show that genes controlling epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP), such as Van Gogh (Vang) and RhoA, are also necessary for the self-avoidance, and that fmi genetically interacts with these loci. On the basis of these and other results, we propose that the Fmi-Esn complex, together with the PCP regulators and the Tricornered (Trc) signaling pathway, executes the repulsive interaction between isoneuronal dendritic branches.

  1. Overproduction of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli and expression of the engineered C-terminal DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1986-01-01

    Overproduction of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli, up to 25% of the soluble cell protein, has been achieved in an inducible host-vector system under transcriptional control of the lambda promoter PL. This system is ideally suited for large scale production and purification of CRP. In addition, a structural gene for the DNA-binding domain of CRP has been constructed. To this end the nucleotide sequence coding for the C-terminus was fused to the sequence coding for the first 10 N-terminal amino acids and cloned into suitable vectors. Good expression was achieved using the lambda PL promoter. The gene product, beta CRP, is recognized by anti-CRP antibodies. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3539103

  2. Receptor-binding domains of spike proteins of emerging or re-emerging viruses as targets for development of antiviral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Liu, Qi; Xu, Wei; Du, Lanying

    2012-01-01

    A number of emerging and re-emerging viruses have caused epidemics or pandemics of infectious diseases leading to major devastations throughout human history. Therefore, developing effective and safe vaccines against these viruses is clearly important for the protection of at-risk populations. Our previous studies have shown that the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a key target for the development of SARS vaccines. In this review, we highlight some key advances in the development of antiviral vaccines targeting the RBDs of spike proteins of emerging and re-emerging viruses, using SARS-CoV, influenza virus, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) as examples. PMID:26038424

  3. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Polekhina, Galina; Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein. PMID:16508085

  4. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  5. Anaplasma marginale Outer Membrane Protein A Is an Adhesin That Recognizes Sialylated and Fucosylated Glycans and Functionally Depends on an Essential Binding Domain.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Kathryn S; Seidman, David; Oki, Aminat T; Izac, Jerilyn; Emani, Sarvani; Oliver, Lee D; Miller, Daniel P; Tegels, Brittney K; Kannagi, Reiji; Marconi, Richard T; Carlyon, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    Anaplasma marginale causes bovine anaplasmosis, a debilitating and potentially fatal tick-borne infection of cattle. Because A. marginale is an obligate intracellular organism, its adhesins that mediate entry into host cells are essential for survival. Here, we demonstrate that A. marginale outer membrane protein A (AmOmpA; AM854) contributes to the invasion of mammalian and tick host cells. AmOmpA exhibits predicted structural homology to OmpA of A. phagocytophilum (ApOmpA), an adhesin that uses key lysine and glycine residues to interact with α2,3-sialylated and α1,3-fucosylated glycan receptors, including 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis x (6-sulfo-sLe(x)). Antisera against AmOmpA or its predicted binding domain inhibits A. marginale infection of host cells. Residues G55 and K58 are contributory, and K59 is essential for recombinant AmOmpA to bind to host cells. Enzymatic removal of α2,3-sialic acid and α1,3-fucose residues from host cell surfaces makes them less supportive of AmOmpA binding. AmOmpA is both an adhesin and an invasin, as coating inert beads with it confers adhesiveness and invasiveness. Recombinant forms of AmOmpA and ApOmpA competitively antagonize A. marginale infection of host cells, but a monoclonal antibody against 6-sulfo-sLe(x) fails to inhibit AmOmpA adhesion and A. marginale infection. Thus, the two OmpA proteins bind related but structurally distinct receptors. This study provides a detailed understanding of AmOmpA function, identifies its essential residues that can be targeted by blocking antibody to reduce infection, and determines that it binds to one or more α2,3-sialylated and α1,3-fucosylated glycan receptors that are unique from those targeted by ApOmpA.

  6. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch.

  7. A C1q Domain Containing Protein from Scallop Chlamys farreri Serving as Pattern Recognition Receptor with Heat-Aggregated IgG Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Siva, Vinu S.; Song, Linsheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins refer to a family of all proteins that contain the globular C1q (gC1q) domain, and participate in a series of immune responses depending on their gC1q domains to bind a variety of self and non-self binding ligands. Methodology In the present study, the mRNA expression patterns, localization, and activities of a C1qDC protein from scallop Chlamys farreri (CfC1qDC) were investigated to understand its possible functions in innate immunity. The relative expression levels of CfC1qDC mRNA in hemocytes were all significantly up-regulated after four typical PAMPs (LPS, PGN, β-glucan and polyI:C) stimulation. During the embryonic development of scallop, the mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC were detected in all the stages, and the expression level was up-regulated from D-hinged larva and reached the highest at eye-spot larva. The endogenous CfC1qDC was dominantly located in the hepatopancreas, gill, kidney and gonad of adult scallop through immunofluorescence. The recombinant protein of CfC1qDC (rCfC1qDC) could not only bind various PAMPs, such as LPS, PGN, β-glucan as well as polyI:C, but also enhance the phagocytic activity of scallop hemocytes towards Escherichia coli. Meanwhile, rCfC1qDC could interact with human heat-aggregated IgG, and this interaction could be inhibited by LPS. Conclusions All these results indicated that CfC1qDC in C. farreri not only served as a PRR involved in the PAMPs recognition, but also an opsonin participating in the clearance of invaders in innate immunity. Moreover, the ability of CfC1qDC to interact with immunoglobulins provided a clue to understand the evolution of classical pathway in complement system. PMID:22905248

  8. A Novel Domain Cassette Identifies Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 Proteins Binding ICAM-1 and Is a Target of Cross-Reactive, Adhesion-Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Rask, Thomas S.; Olsen, Rebecca W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Turner, Louise; Theander, Thor G.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Craig, Alister; Brown, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to the cerebral microvasculature. This has been linked to parasites expressing the structurally related group A subset of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of IE adhesion ligands and to IEs with affinity for ICAM-1. However, recent evidence has cast doubt on both these associations, tempering hopes of the feasibility of developing a vaccine based on ICAM-1–binding PfEMP1. In this study, we report the identification of a domain cassette (DC) present in group A var genes from six genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. The three domains in the cassette, which we call DC4, had a high level of sequence identity and cluster together phylogenetically. Erythrocytes infected by these parasites and selected in vitro for expression of DC4 adhered specifically to ICAM-1. The ICAM-1–binding capacity of DC4 was mapped to the C-terminal third of its Duffy-binding–like β3 domain. DC4 was the target of broadly cross-reactive and adhesion-inhibitory IgG Abs, and levels of DC4-specific and adhesion-inhibitory IgG increased with age among P. falciparum–exposed children. Our study challenges earlier conclusions that group A PfEMP1 proteins are not central to ICAM-1–specific IE adhesion and support the feasibility of developing a vaccine preventing cerebral malaria by inhibiting cerebral IE sequestration. PMID:23209327

  9. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors.

  10. The N-terminal Region of Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 4 (CHD4) Is Essential for Activity and Contains a High Mobility Group (HMG) Box-like-domain That Can Bind Poly(ADP-ribose)*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana P. G.; Ryan, Daniel P.; Galanty, Yaron; Low, Jason K. K.; Vandevenne, Marylene; Jackson, Stephen P.; Mackay, Joel P.

    2016-01-01

    Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a chromatin-remodeling enzyme that has been reported to regulate DNA-damage responses through its N-terminal region in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent manner. We have identified and determined the structure of a stable domain (CHD4-N) in this N-terminal region. The-fold consists of a four-α-helix bundle with structural similarity to the high mobility group box, a domain that is well known as a DNA binding module. We show that the CHD4-N domain binds with higher affinity to poly(ADP-ribose) than to DNA. We also show that the N-terminal region of CHD4, although not CHD4-N alone, is essential for full nucleosome remodeling activity and is important for localizing CHD4 to sites of DNA damage. Overall, these data build on our understanding of how CHD4-NuRD acts to regulate gene expression and participates in the DNA-damage response. PMID:26565020

  11. Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR of fishes and amphibians: Varying the number of double-stranded RNA binding domains and lineage-specific duplications

    PubMed Central

    Rothenburg, Stefan; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Dey, Madhusudan; Dever, Thomas E; Tazi, Loubna

    2008-01-01

    Background Double-stranded (ds) RNA, generated during viral infection, binds and activates the mammalian anti-viral protein kinase PKR, which phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2α leading to the general inhibition of protein synthesis. Although PKR-like activity has been described in fish cells, the responsible enzymes eluded molecular characterization until the recent discovery of goldfish and zebrafish PKZ, which contain Z-DNA-binding domains instead of dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Fish and amphibian PKR genes have not been described so far. Results Here we report the cloning and identification of 13 PKR genes from 8 teleost fish and amphibian species, including zebrafish, demonstrating the coexistence of PKR and PKZ in this latter species. Analyses of their genomic organization revealed up to three tandemly arrayed PKR genes, which are arranged in head-to-tail orientation. At least five duplications occurred independently in fish and amphibian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the kinase domains of fish PKR genes are more closely related to those of fish PKZ than to the PKR kinase domains of other vertebrate species. The duplication leading to fish PKR and PKZ genes occurred early during teleost fish evolution after the divergence of the tetrapod lineage. While two dsRBDs are found in mammalian and amphibian PKR, one, two or three dsRBDs are present in fish PKR. In zebrafish, both PKR and PKZ were strongly upregulated after immunostimulation with some tissue-specific expression differences. Using genetic and biochemical assays we demonstrate that both zebrafish PKR and PKZ can phosphorylate eIF2α in yeast. Conclusion Considering the important role for PKR in host defense against viruses, the independent duplication and fixation of PKR genes in different lineages probably provided selective advantages by leading to the recognition of an extended spectrum of viral nucleic acid structures, including both dsRNA and Z-DNA/RNA, and

  12. Fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1) contains a novel DNA-binding domain, repeats of the score and three amino acid peptide (STP), conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Shigeharu; Ishikawa, Tetsurou; Ohtsuka, Katsuya; Nishita, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The predicted transcriptional regulatory factor for the fibroin gene of the silkworm Bombyx mori, fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1), was purified by sequential DNA affinity column chromatography, and cDNA clones corresponding to FMBP-1 were isolated from a library. The N-terminal half of FMBP-1 has a weak similarity to the DNA-binding domain of several transcriptional regulatory factors in higher plants. The C-terminal half contains four tandem repeats of a novel 23 amino acid motif, which we named the score and three amino acid peptide (STP). Other genes containing STP repeats were found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. Mutational analysis of FMBP-1 showed that the STP repeats form a novel DNA-binding domain. Sequences flanking STP repeats modulated DNA-binding activity. The FMBP-1 gene was expressed during the fourth to fifth instar. FMBP-1 activity appeared to be regulated at the transcriptional level and by the post-transcriptional modification.

  13. Experimental verification, and domain definition, of structural alerts for protein binding: epoxides, lactones, nitroso, nitros, aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Nelms, M D; Cronin, M T D; Schultz, T W; Enoch, S J

    2013-01-01

    This study outlines how a combination of in chemico and Tetrahymena pyriformis data can be used to define the applicability domain of selected structural alerts within the profilers of the OECD QSAR Toolbox. Thirty-three chemicals were profiled using the OECD and OASIS profilers, enabling the applicability domain of six structural alerts to be defined, the alerts being: epoxides, lactones, nitrosos, nitros, aldehydes and ketones. Analysis of the experimental data showed the applicability domains for the epoxide, nitroso, aldehyde and ketone structural alerts to be well defined. In contrast, the data showed the applicability domains for the lactone and nitro structural alerts needed modifying. The accurate definition of the applicability domain for structural alerts within in silico profilers is important due to their use in the chemical category in predictive and regulatory toxicology. This study highlights the importance of utilizing multiple profilers in category formation.

  14. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Ginger Binds with Importin-α through Its Junction Domain for Nuclear Localization, and Further Interacts with NAC Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Sreekumar, Sweda; Sivakumar, K. C.; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca2+ elevations in plant cells regulating the gene expression linked with various cellular processes like stress response, growth and development, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Ginger is an extensively used spice due to its unique flavor and immense medicinal value. The two major threats that interfere with the large scale production of ginger are the salinity and drought stress. ZoCDPK1 (Zingiber officinale Calcium-dependent protein kinase 1) is a salinity and drought-inducible CDPK gene isolated from ginger and undergoes dynamic subcellular localization during stress conditions. ZoCDPK1, with signature features of a typical Ca2+ regulated kinase, also possesses a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in its junction domain (JD). A striking feature in ZoCDPK1 is the rare occurrence of a coupling between the NLS in JD and consensus sequences in regulatory domain. Here, we further identified its nature of nuclear localization and its interaction partners. In the homology model generated for ZoCDPK1, the regulatory domain mimics the crystal structure of the regulatory domain in Arabidopsis CDPK1. Molecular docking simulation of importin (ZoIMPα), an important protein involved in nuclear translocation, into the NLS of ZoCDPK1 was well-visualized. Furthermore, the direct interaction of ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα proteins was studied by the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H) system, which confirmed that junction domain (JD) is an important interaction module required for ZoCDPK1 and ZoIMPα binding. The probable interacting partners of ZoCDPK1 were also identified using Y2H experiment. Of the 10 different stress-related interacting partners identified for ZoCDPK1, NAC transcription factor (TF) needs special mention, especially in the context of ZoCDPK1 function. The interaction between ZoCDPK1 and NAC TF, in fact, corroborate with the results of gene expression and over-expression studies of ZoCDPK1. Hence

  15. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  16. Targeting polyIC to EGFR over-expressing cells using a dsRNA binding protein domain tethered to EGF

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Nufar; Lebendiker, Mario; Klein, Shoshana; Zigler, Maya; Langut, Yael; Levitzki, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Selective delivery of drugs to tumor cells can increase potency and reduce toxicity. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant chimeric protein, dsRBEC, which can bind polyIC and deliver it selectively into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. dsRBEC, comprises the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) of human PKR (hPKR), which serves as the polyIC binding moiety, fused to human EGF (hEGF), the targeting moiety. dsRBEC shows high affinity towards EGFR and triggers ligand-induced endocytosis of the receptor, thus leading to the selective internalization of polyIC into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. The targeted delivery of polyIC by dsRBEC induced cellular apoptosis and the secretion of IFN-β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. dsRBEC-delivered polyIC is much more potent than naked polyIC and is expected to reduce the toxicity caused by systemic delivery of polyIC. PMID:27598772

  17. Involvement of an RNA binding protein containing Alba domain in the stage-specific regulation of beta-amastin expression in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Silva, Tais Caroline; Teixeira, Santuza M R

    2017-01-01

    Amastins are surface glycoproteins, first identified in amastigotes of T. cruzi but later found to be expressed in several Leishmania species, as well as in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Amastins are encoded by a diverse gene family that can be grouped into four subfamilies named α, β, γ, and δ amastins. Differential expression of amastin genes results from regulatory mechanisms involving changes in mRNA stability and/or translational control. Although distinct regulatory elements were identified in the 3' UTR of T. cruzi and Leishmania amastin mRNAs, RNA binding proteins involved with amastin gene regulation have only being characterized in L. infantum where an Alba-domain protein (LiAlba20) able to bind to the 3' UTR of a δ-amastin mRNA was identified. Here we investigated the role of TcAlba30, the LiAlba20 homologue in T. cruzi, in the post transcriptional regulation of amastin genes. TcAlba30 transcripts are present in all stages of the T. cruzi life cycle. RNA immunoprecipitation assays using a transfected cell line expressing a cMyc tagged TcAlba30 revealed that TcAlba30 can interact with β-amastin mRNA. In addition, over-expression of TcAlba30 in epimastigotes resulted in 50% decreased levels of β-amastin mRNAs compared to wild type parasites. Since luciferase assays indicated the presence of regulatory elements in the 3' UTR of β-amastin mRNA and reduced levels of luciferase mRNA were found in parasites over expressing TcAlba30, we conclude that TcAlba30 acts as a T. cruzi RNA binding protein involved in the negative control of β-amastin expression through interactions with its 3'UTR.

  18. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  19. CARD6 is interferon inducible but not involved in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling leading to NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Dufner, Almut; Duncan, Gordon S; Wakeham, Andrew; Elford, Alisha R; Hall, Håkan T; Ohashi, Pamela S; Mak, Tak W

    2008-03-01

    We have previously reported the cloning and characterization of CARD6, a caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing protein that is structurally related to the interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases. CARD6 associates with microtubules and with receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2). RIP2 mediates NF-kappaB activation induced by the intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors that sense bacterial peptidoglycan. Here we report that the expression of CARD6 and RIP2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages is rapidly induced by beta IFN and gamma IFN. This IFN-induced upregulation of CARD6 is suppressed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in contrast to LPS's enhancement of IFN-induced RIP2 upregulation. We generated CARD6-deficient (CARD6(-/-)) mice and carried out extensive analyses of signaling pathways mediating innate and adaptive immune responses, including the NOD pathways, but did not detect any abnormalities. Moreover, CARD6(-/-) mice were just as susceptible as wild-type mice to infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, or mouse adenovirus type 1. Thus, although structural and in vitro analyses strongly suggest an important role for CARD6 in immune defense, the physiological function of CARD6 remains obscure.

  20. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente . E-mail: vpallas@ibmcp.upv.es

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  1. Configurational Entropy in Protein-Peptide Binding. Computational Study of Tsg101 UEV Domain with an HIV-derived PTAP Nonapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Benjamin J.; Kravitz, Joslyn Yudenfreund; Somani, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Paramita; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Gilson, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Configurational entropy is thought to influence biomolecular processes, but there are still many open questions about this quantity, including its magnitude, its relationship to molecular structure, and the importance of correlation. The mutual information expansion (MIE) provides a novel and systematic approach to computing configurational entropy changes due to correlated motions from molecular simulations. Here, we present the first application of the MIE method to protein-ligand binding, using multiple molecular dynamics simulations (MMDSs) to study association of the UEV domain of the protein Tsg101 and an HIV-derived nonapeptide. The current investigation utilizes the second-order MIE approximation, which treats correlations between all pairs of degrees of freedom. The computed change in configurational entropy is large and is found to have a major contribution from changes in pairwise correlation. The results also reveal intricate structure-entropy relationships. Thus, the present analysis suggests that, in order for a model of binding to be accurate, it must include a careful accounting of configurational entropy changes. PMID:19362095

  2. A green fluorescent protein fusion to actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis fimbrin highlights new features of a dynamic actin cytoskeleton in live plant cells.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, Michael B; Staiger, Chris J; Rose, Ray J; McCurdy, David W

    2004-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton coordinates numerous cellular processes required for plant development. The functions of this network are intricately linked to its dynamic arrangement, and thus progress in understanding how actin orchestrates cellular processes relies on critical evaluation of actin organization and turnover. To investigate the dynamic nature of the actin cytoskeleton, we used a fusion protein between green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the second actin-binding domain (fABD2) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin, AtFIM1. The GFP-fABD2 fusion protein labeled highly dynamic and dense actin networks in diverse species and cell types, revealing structural detail not seen with alternative labeling methods, such as the commonly used mouse talin GFP fusion (GFP-mTalin). Further, we show that expression of the GFP-fABD2 fusion protein in Arabidopsis, unlike GFP-mTalin, has no detectable adverse effects on plant morphology or development. Time-lapse confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses of the actin cytoskeleton labeled with GFP-fABD2 revealed that lateral-filament migration and sliding of individual actin filaments or bundles are processes that contribute to the dynamic and continually reorganizing nature of the actin scaffold. These new observations of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in plant cells using GFP-fABD2 reveal the value of this probe for future investigations of how actin filaments coordinate cellular processes required for plant development.

  3. Fish oil attenuates liver injury caused by LPS in weaned pigs associated with inhibition of TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Yulan; Zhu, Huiling; Hong, Yu; Wu, Zhifeng; Hou, Yongqing; Li, Quan; Ding, Binying; Yi, Dan; Chen, Hongbo

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated whether fish oil exerted a hepatoprotective effect in a LPS-induced liver injury model via regulation of TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein (NOD) signaling pathways. Twenty-four piglets were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design, and the main factors included diet (5% corn oil or 5% fish oil) and immunological challenge (LPS or saline). Fish oil resulted in enrichment of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and total (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids in liver. Less severe liver injury was observed in pigs fed fish oil, as evidenced by improved serum biochemical parameters and less severe histological liver damage. In addition, higher expression of liver tight junction proteins, and lower hepatocyte proliferation and higher hepatocyte apoptosis were observed in pigs fed fish oil. The improved liver integrity in pigs fed fish oil was concurrent with reduced hepatic mRNA expression of TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 and TNF-α receptor-associated factor 6, and NOD1, NOD2 and receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2, as well as reduced hepatic protein expression of NF-κB p65, leading to reduced hepatic pro-inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that fish oil improves liver integrity partially via inhibition of TLR4 and NOD signaling pathways under an inflammatory condition.

  4. Coupling of conformational transitions in the N-terminal domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP51) near its site of interaction with the steroid receptor proteins

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Heroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernandez, Griselda

    2015-05-07

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β45 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β45 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centered near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. As a result, the contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.

  5. Coupling of conformational transitions in the N-terminal domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP51) near its site of interaction with the steroid receptor proteins

    DOE PAGES

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; ...

    2015-05-07

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β4-β5 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β4-β5 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centeredmore » near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. As a result, the contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.« less

  6. [Prokaryotic expression and characterization of two recombinant receptor-binding domain(RBD) proteins of human coronavirus NL63(HcoV-NL63)].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui; Yi, Yao; Zhao, Min; Zhou, Wei-Min; Zhao, Guo-Xia; Wang, Hui-Juan; Bi, Sheng-Li; Gao, Ji-Min; Liu, Bing; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-03-01

    The receptor-binding domain(RBD) protein of HCoV-NL63 is a major target in the development of diagnostic assay and vaccine, it has a pivotal role in receptor attachment, viral entry and membrane fusion. In this study, we prepared 2 purified recombinant HCoV-NL63 RBD proteins using in E. coli system and identified the proteins by Western blotting. We first optimized codon and synthesized the RL (232-684aa)coding gene, then amplified the RL or RS(476-616aa) coding gene via PCR using different primers . The RL or RS coding gene was cloned into the pM48 expression vector fused with TrxA tag. The RBD (RL and RS) of HCoV-NL63 were expressed majorly as inclusion body when expressed in E. coli BL21pLys S under different conditions. The expressed products were purified by affinity chromatography then analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Our results showed that the recombinant RBD proteins were maximally expressed at 37 degrees C with 0. 8mM IPTG induction for 4h. RL or RS protein with 95 % purity was obtained and reacted positively with anti-sera from mice immunized with the recombinant vaccinia virus (Tiantan strain) in which HCoV-NL63 RL or RS protein was expressed. In conclusion, the purified recombinant RBD proteins(RL and RS)derived from E. coli were first prepared in China and they might provide a basis for further exploring biological role and vaccine development of HCoV-NL63.

  7. Evaluation of an Albumin-Binding Domain Protein Fused to Recombinant Human IL-2 and Its Effects on the Bioactivity and Serum Half-Life of the Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Adabi, Elham; Saebi, Fateme; Hasan-Abad, Amin Moradi; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Kardar, Gholam Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer immunotherapy is a promising strategy for cancer treatment. In this strategy, the immune system is triggered to destroy cancer cells. IL-2 is an important factor in passive cancer immunotherapy that helps modulating some important immune functions. One of the IL-2 limitations is low serum half-life; therefore, repetitive high doses of the injections are required to maintain effective concentrations. High-dose IL-2 therapy results in severe side effects; thus, improvement of its serum half-life would provide therapeutic benefits. Methods: We have investigated a strategy that is able to utilize an albumin-binding domain (ABD) from streptococcal protein G. In this strategy, the fusion protein ABD-rIL-2 binds to serum albumin, which results in improvement of the IL-2 serum half-life. PET26b+ plasmid was used as an expression vector, which encoded rIL-2 and ABD-rIL-2, both fused to pelB secretion signal under the control of the strong bacteriophage T7 promoter. The constructs were expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3), and the recombinant proteins were purified from periplasmic fractions. Results: The analysis of in vitro bioactivity proved that the fusion of ABD to rIL-2 does not interfere with its bioactivity. ABD-rIL-2 fusion protein indicated higher serum half-life compared to rIL-2, when it was tested in the BALB/c mice. Conclusion: The current study provides an alternative strategy to extend the half-life and improve pharmacokinetic properties of rIL-2 without reducing its bioactivity in vitro. PMID:27805072

  8. A BAR-Domain Protein SH3P2, Which Binds to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate and ATG8, Regulates Autophagosome Formation in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaohong; Wang, Hao; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Gao, Caiji; Wang, Xiangfeng; Cai, Yi; Jiang, Liwen

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a well-defined catabolic mechanism whereby cytoplasmic materials are engulfed into a structure termed the autophagosome. In plants, little is known about the underlying mechanism of autophagosome formation. In this study, we report that SH3 DOMAIN-CONTAINING PROTEIN2 (SH3P2), a Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs domain–containing protein, translocates to the phagophore assembly site/preautophagosome structure (PAS) upon autophagy induction and actively participates in the membrane deformation process. Using the SH3P2–green fluorescent protein fusion as a reporter, we found that the PAS develops from a cup-shaped isolation membranes or endoplasmic reticulum–derived omegasome-like structures. Using an inducible RNA interference (RNAi) approach, we show that RNAi knockdown of SH3P2 is developmentally lethal and significantly suppresses autophagosome formation. An in vitro membrane/lipid binding assay demonstrates that SH3P2 is a membrane-associated protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. SH3P2 may facilitate membrane expansion or maturation in coordination with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex during autophagy, as SH3P2 promotes PI3K foci formation, while PI3K inhibitor treatment inhibits SH3P2 from translocating to autophagosomes. Further interaction analysis shows that SH3P2 associates with the PI3K complex and interacts with ATG8s in Arabidopsis thaliana, whereby SH3P2 may mediate autophagy. Thus, our study has identified SH3P2 as a novel regulator of autophagy and provided a conserved model for autophagosome biogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:24249832

  9. Amphipathic alpha-helices and putative cholesterol binding domains of the influenza virus matrix M1 protein are crucial for virion structure organisation.

    PubMed

    Tsfasman, Tatyana; Kost, Vladimir; Markushin, Stanislav; Lotte, Vera; Koptiaeva, Irina; Bogacheva, Elena; Baratova, Ludmila; Radyukhin, Victor

    2015-12-02

    The influenza virus matrix M1 protein is an amphitropic membrane-associated protein, forming the matrix layer immediately beneath the virus raft membrane, thereby ensuring the proper structure of the influenza virion. The objective of this study was to elucidate M1 fine structural characteristics, which determine amphitropic properties and raft membrane activities of the protein, via 3D in silico modelling with subsequent mutational analysis. Computer simulations suggest the amphipathic nature of the M1 α-helices and the existence of putative cholesterol binding (CRAC) motifs on six amphipathic α-helices. Our finding explains for the first time many features of this protein, particularly the amphitropic properties and raft/cholesterol binding potential. To verify these results, we generated mutants of the A/WSN/33 strain via reverse genetics. The M1 mutations included F32Y in the CRAC of α-helix 2, W45Y and W45F in the CRAC of α-helix 3, Y100S in the CRAC of α-helix 6, M128A and M128S in the CRAC of α-helix 8 and a double L103I/L130I mutation in both a putative cholesterol consensus motif and the nuclear localisation signal. All mutations resulted in viruses with unusual filamentous morphology. Previous experimental data regarding the morphology of M1-gene mutant influenza viruses can now be explained in structural terms and are consistent with the pivotal role of the CRAC-domains and amphipathic α-helices in M1-lipid interactions.

  10. AcMNPV AC16 (DA26, BV/ODV-E26) regulates the levels of IE0 and IE1 and binds to both proteins via a domain located within the acidic transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yingchao; Fang, Minggang; Theilmann, David A

    2009-03-15

    IE0 and IE1 are the primary viral regulatory proteins of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) involved in the transactivation of early genes, stimulation of late gene expression, and viral DNA replication. The protein interactions required for IE0 or IE1 to achieve these varied roles are not well defined, so to identify proteins that interact with IE0 and IE1, tandem affinity purification (TAP) and LC-MS/MS was used. Analysis of purified proteins identified AC16 (DA26, BV/ODV-E26) from TAP tagged IE0 virus infected Sf9 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that AC16 interacts with both IE0 and IE1 and yeast 2-hybrid analysis mapped the domain required for interaction with AC16. Mutation of the AC16 binding domain enhanced BV production by viruses expressing only IE0 but had no effect if only IE1 is expressed. An ac16 deletion virus was constructed and was shown not to affect the temporal expression of IE0 and IE1; however the relative level of IE0 to IE1 was significantly increased.

  11. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis.

  12. WW Domains of the Yes-Kinase-Associated-Protein (YAP) Transcriptional Regulator Behave as Independent Units with Different Binding Preferences for PPxY Motif-Containing Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S.; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  13. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  14. The conserved core domain of the human TATA binding protein is sufficient to assemble the multisubunit RNA polymerase I-specific transcription factor SL1.

    PubMed Central

    Rudloff, U; Eberhard, D; Grummt, I

    1994-01-01

    The human ribosomal RNA polymerase (Pol) I promoter selectivity factor SL1 is a complex consisting of the TATA binding protein (TBP) and three TBP-associated factors (TAFs). We have investigated which elements of TBP are involved in the assembly of Pol I-specific TBP-TAF complexes by comparing SL1 isolated from two human cell lines, one expressing epitope-tagged full-length TBP and another expressing a deletion of nearly the entire N-terminal domain (e delta NTBP). We have immunopurified epitope-tagged full-length TBP- and e delta NTBP-TAF complexes and show that e delta NTBP reconstitutes SL1 activity almost as well as full-length TBP. Moreover, e delta NTBP is shown to be associated with all three Pol I-specific TAFs. Thus, the core of TBP alone is sufficient for the correct assembly of the Pol I-specific TBP-TAF complex, and the variable N-terminal region of human TBP is not required for transcriptional activity. We also demonstrate by an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay that TBP directly interacts with the smallest TAF, TAFI48. Images PMID:8058785

  15. Peptide recognition by heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) chromoshadow domains revisited: Plasticity in the pseudosymmetric histone binding site of human HP1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Qin, Su; Lei, Ming; Tempel, Wolfram; Zhang, Yuzhe; Loppnau, Peter; Li, Yanjun; Min, Jinrong

    2017-04-07

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), a highly conserved non-histone chromosomal protein in eukaryotes, plays important roles in the regulation of gene transcription. Each of the three human homologs of HP1 includes a chromoshadow domain (CSD). The CSD interacts with various proteins bearing the PXVXL motif but also with a region of histone H3 that bears the similar PXXVXL motif. The latter interaction has not yet been resolved in atomic detail. Here we demonstrate that the CSDs of all three human HP1 homologs have comparable affinities to the PXXVXL motif of histone H3. The HP1 C-terminal extension enhances the affinity, as does the increasing length of the H3 peptide. The crystal structure of the human HP1γ CSD (CSDγ) in complex with an H3 peptide suggests that recognition of H3 by CSDγ to some extent resembles CSD-PXVXL interaction. Nevertheless, the prolyl residue of the PXXVXL motif appears to play a role distinct from that of Pro in the known HP1β CSD-PXVXL complexes. We consequently generalize the historical CSD-PXVXL interaction model and expand the search scope for additional CSD binding partners.

  16. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the LOV2-domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii fused to a maltose binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Susdorf, T.; Álvarez, M.; Islam, Sh. D. M.; Hegemann, P.

    2004-07-01

    The absorption and emission behaviour of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the wild-type light, oxygen and voltage-sensitive (LOV) domain LOV2 of the photoreceptor phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is studied at pH 8. Actually a LOV2-MBP-fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain is investigated. For fresh samples stored in the dark an initial fluorescence quantum yield of φF=0.08±0.01 is determined. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). In the aqueous solutions studied approximately seven percent of the FMN molecules are not bound to the protein (free FMN in oxidized form) and about seven percent of the non-covalently bound FMN are not convertible to an adduct. Approximately two thirds of the intermediate photoproduct recovers with a time constant of 41 ± 1 s, while approximately one third recovers with a time constant of about 7 min. The photo-adduct formation is thought to proceed via singlet excited-state electron transfer and triplet formation.

  17. Deletion mutation analysis of the adenovirus type 2 E3-gp19K protein: identification of sequences within the endoplasmic reticulum lumenal domain that are required for class I antigen binding and protection from adenovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hermiston, T W; Tripp, R A; Sparer, T; Gooding, L R; Wold, W S

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus E3-gp19K is a transmembrane glycoprotein, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which forms a complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens and retains them in the ER, thereby preventing cytolysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The ER lumenal domain of gp19K, residues 1 to 107, is known to be sufficient for binding to class I antigens; the transmembrane and cytoplasmic ER retention domains are located at residues ca. 108 to 127 and 128 to 142, respectively. To identify more precisely which gp19K regions are involved in binding to class I antigens, we constructed 13 in-frame virus deletion mutants (4 to 12 amino acids deleted) in the ER lumenal domain of gp19K, and we analyzed the ability of the mutant proteins to form a complex with class I antigens, retain them in the ER, and prevent cytolysis by adenovirus-specific CTL. All mutant proteins except one (residues 102 to 107 deleted) were defective for these properties, indicating that the ability of gp19K to bind to class I antigens is highly sensitive to mutation. All mutant proteins were stable and were retained in the ER. Sequence comparisons among adenovirus serotypes reveal that the ER lumenal domain of gp19K consists of a variable region (residues 1 to 76) and a conserved region (residues 77 to 98). We show, using the mutant proteins, that the gp19K-specific monoclonal antibody Tw1.3 recognizes a noncontiguous epitope in the variable region and that disruption of the variable region by deletion destroys the epitope. The monoclonal antibody and class I antigen binding results, together with the serotype sequence comparisons, are consistent with the idea that the ER lumenal domain of gp19K has three subdomains that we have termed the ER lumenal variable domain (residues 1 to ca. 77 to 83), the ER lumenal conserved domain (residues ca. 84 to 98), and the ER lumenal spacer domain (residues 99 to 107). We suggest that the ER lumenal variable domain of gp19K has a specific

  18. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  19. RNA binding domain of Jamestown Canyon virus S segment RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ogg, Monica M; Patterson, Jean L

    2007-12-01

    Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family, Orthobunyavirus genus, California serogroup. Replication and, ultimately, assembly and packaging rely on the process of encapsidation. Therefore, the ability of viral RNAs (vRNAs) (genomic and antigenomic) to interact with the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) and the location of this binding domain on the RNAs are of interest. The questions to be addressed are the following. Where is the binding domain located on both the vRNA and cRNA strands, is this RNA bound when double or single stranded, and does this identified region have the ability to transform the binding potential of nonviral RNA? Full-length viral and complementary S segment RNA, as well as 3' deletion mutants of both vRNA and cRNA, nonviral RNA, and hybrid viral/nonviral RNA, were analyzed for their ability to interact with bacterially expressed JCV N protein. RNA-nucleocapsid interactions were examined by UV cross-linking, filter binding assays, and the generation of hybrid RNA to help define the area responsible for RNA-protein binding. The assays identified the region responsible for binding to the nucleocapsid as being contained within the 5' half of both the genomic and antigenomic RNAs. This region, if placed within nonviral RNA, is capable of altering the binding potential of nonviral RNA to levels seen with wild-type vRNAs.

  20. NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis that differentially bind and hydrolyze peptidoglycan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While intense research is being conducted to develop faster and more reliable methods for diagnosis of Johne’s disease, there are still significant knowledge gaps concerning the molecular function of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis proteins. Therefore, we describe atomic resolution ...

  1. [The plate in the zone of oocyte and germinal epithelium contact in scyphomedusa Aurelia aurita binds antibodies to ZP-domain-containing protein mesoglein].

    PubMed

    Adonin, L S; Podgornaia, O I; Matveev, I V; Shaposhnikova, T G

    2009-01-01

    Cnidaria are lower multicellular animals with the body consisting of two epithelial layers. An extracellular substance--mesoglea--is situated between epidermal and gastrodermal layers of these animals. Mesoglein is one of the major mesogleal proteins of adult medusa of Scyphozoan jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Search for the known domains in mesoglein amino acid sequence reveals prominent zona pellucida (ZP) domain (which was found at first in the mammal oocyte zona pellucida proteins), so the protein belongs to ZP family of extracellular matrix proteins and it is an early metazoan member of ZP-domain-containing protein family. However, nothing is known about oogenesis related ZP-domain proteins in the lower multicellular animals. Oogenesis in Scyphozoa is described poorly. In this work morphological features of the zone in contact area between the oocyte and the germinal epithelium were investigated in semi-fine sections: To make it more convenient we identified seven stages according to the oocyte size and the structure found in this area was named the plate. It was shown that the components of the plate bound specifically the antibodies against mesoglein. So it seems the plate material contains ZP-domain proteins. Electrophoresis and immunoblot results give evidence that the proteins immunologically related to mesoglein have a higher molecular mass. It might be due to either the posttranslational modifications of the precursors or that they represent other proteins of ZP-domain family in Cnidaria.

  2. Isolated regulatory domains of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha and Ibeta retain dimerization and native cGMP-binding properties and undergo isoform-specific conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Richie-Jannetta, Robyn; Busch, Jennifer L; Higgins, Kristin A; Corbin, Jackie D; Francis, Sharron H

    2006-03-17

    Molecular mechanisms that provide for cGMP activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) are unknown. PKGs are dimeric; each monomer contains a regulatory (R) and catalytic (C) domain. In this study, isolated recombinant R domains of PKGIalpha-(Delta349-670) and PKGIbeta-(Delta364-685) containing the dimerization and autoinhibitory subdomains and two allosteric cGMP-binding sites were expressed in Sf9 cells. Both R domains were dimers with elongated conformations (Stokes radii of 44 and 51 A, respectively, and frictional coefficients of 1.6 and 1.8, respectively). Exchange dissociation kinetics and K(D) values for cGMP were similar for each holoenzyme and its isolated R domain, indicating that under these conditions the C domain does not appreciably alter cGMP-binding functions of the R domain. As determined by gel filtration chromatography, cGMP binding caused elongation of the PKGIalpha-isolated R domain and contraction of the PKGIbeta-isolated R domain. Cyclic GMP-bound forms of the isoforms have similar physical dimensions that may reflect a common conformation of active isoforms. Elongation of the PKGIbeta holoenzyme associated with cGMP binding and PKG activation cannot be explained solely by conformational change in its R domain, but elongation of the PKGIalpha R domain may partially account for the elongation of wild type PKGIalpha associated with cGMP binding. The cGMP-induced conformational changes in the respective R domains are likely to be critical for kinase activation.

  3. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  5. High-mobility group nucleosome-binding domain 2 protein inhibits the invasion of Klebsiella pneumoniae into mouse lungs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuang; Ren, Laibin; Li, Heng; Shen, Xiaofei; Yang, Xiaolong; Li, Na; Wang, Xinyuan; Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Ning

    2015-07-01

    Since bacterial invasion into host cells is a critical step in the infection process and the predominance of multiple-antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae strains, using molecular agents to interfere with K. pneumoniae invasion is an attractive approach for the prevention of infection and suppress the immune inflammatory response. In previous studies by our group, high-mobility group nucleosome-binding domain 2 (HMGN2) protein was shown to exhibit anti-bacterial activity in vitro. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of HMGN2 protein on the invasion of K. pneumoniae 03183 in vivo. The results showed that pre-treatment with 128 µg/ml HMGN2 significantly reduced K. pneumoniae 03183 invasion into mouse lungs and increased the mRNA expression of CXCL1 and LCN2 within 2 h. Immunohistochemical staining showed that F-actin expression was significantly decreased, and fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis further demonstrated that HMGN2 significantly blocked K. pneumoniae 03183-induced actin polymerization. These changes implied that HMGN2 may provide protection against K. pneumoniae 03183 infection in vivo.

  6. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  7. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2−/−, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil

  8. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jennifer H.; Sumner, Rebecca P.; Lu, Yongxu

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE). Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion. PMID:27907166

  9. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C binds to the N-terminal (NTD) and beta trefoil domains (BTD) of RBP/CSL; Only the NTD interaction is essential for lymphoblastoid cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Calderwood, Michael A.; Lee, Sungwook; Holthaus, Amy M.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kieff, Elliott; Johannsen, Eric

    2011-05-25

    Association of EBV nuclear proteins EBNA2, EBNA3A and EBNA3C with RBP/CSL, is essential for lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) proliferation. Conserved residues in the EBNA3 homology domain, required for RBP/CSL interaction, lack the W{Phi}P motif that mediates EBNA2 and Notch binding to the RBP/CSL beta-trefoil domain (BTD). We map RBP/CSL interacting residues within EBNA3A(aa128-204) and EBNA3C(aa211-233). The EBNA3A results are consistent with an earlier report (aa125-222), but the EBNA3C domain is unexpectedly small and includes a 'WTP' sequence. This EBNA3C WTP motif confers RBP/CSL binding in vitro, in yeast, and in mammalian cells. Further, an EBNA3C WTP {yields} STP(W227S) mutation impaired BTD binding whereas EBNA3 homology domain mutations disrupted RBP/CSL N-terminal domain (NTD) binding. WTP was not essential for EBNA3C repression of EBNA2 in reporter assays or for maintenance of LCL growth. Our results indicate that EBNA3 proteins interact with multiple RBP/CSL domains, but only NTD interactions are required for LCL growth.

  10. Ewing's sarcoma fusion protein, EWS/Fli-1 and Fli-1 protein induce PLD2 but not PLD1 gene expression by binding to an ETS domain of 5' promoter.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, R; Murakami, M; Sobue, S; Iwasaki, T; Hagiwara, K; Takagi, A; Kojima, T; Asano, H; Suzuki, M; Banno, Y; Nozawa, Y; Murate, T

    2007-03-15

    It was reported that short interfering RNA (siRNA) of EWS/Fli-1 downregulated phospholipase D (PLD)2 in Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) cell line, suggesting that PLD2 is the target of aberrant transcription factor, EWS/Fli-1. Here, we further investigated the regulation of PLD2 gene expression by EWS/Fli-1 and Fli-1 in another EWS cell line, and also in EWS/Fli-1- or Fli-1-transfected cell line. EWS/Fli-1- or Fli-1-overexpressed cells showed higher PLD2 but not PLD1 protein expression and enhanced cell proliferation as compared to mock transfectant. The treatment of these cells with 1-butanol or siRNA of PLD2 inhibited cell growth, suggesting the pivotal role of PLD in cell growth promotion. PLD2 but not PLD1 mRNA level was also increased in EWS/Fli-1 or Fli-1-transfectants. After determining the transcription initiation points, we cloned the 5' promoter of both PLD1 and PLD2 and analysed promoter activities. Results showed that EWS/Fli-1 and Fli-1 increase PLD2 gene expression by binding to an erythroblast transformation-specific domain (-126 to -120 bp from the transcription initiation site) of PLD2 promoter, which is the minimal and most powerful region. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay using truncated proteins showed that both DNA-binding domain and trans-activating domain were necessary for the enhanced gene expression of PLD2.

  11. Mechanistic insights into phosphoprotein-binding FHA domains.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiangyang; Van Doren, Steven R

    2008-08-01

    [Structure: see text]. FHA domains are protein modules that switch signals in diverse biological pathways by monitoring the phosphorylation of threonine residues of target proteins. As part of the effort to gain insight into cellular avoidance of cancer, FHA domains involved in the cellular response to DNA damage have been especially well-characterized. The complete protein where the FHA domain resides and the interaction partners determine the nature of the signaling. Thus, a key biochemical question is how do FHA domains pick out their partners from among thousands of alternatives in the cell? This Account discusses the structure, affinity, and specificity of FHA domains and the formation of their functional structure. Although FHA domains share sequence identity at only five loop residues, they all fold into a beta-sandwich of two beta-sheets. The conserved arginine and serine of the recognition loops recognize the phosphorylation of the threonine targeted. Side chains emanating from loops that join beta-strand 4 with 5, 6 with 7, or 10 with 11 make specific contacts with amino acids of the ligand that tailor sequence preferences. Many FHA domains choose a partner in extended conformation, somewhat according to the residue three after the phosphothreonine in sequence (pT + 3 position). One group of FHA domains chooses a short carboxylate-containing side chain at pT + 3. Another group chooses a long, branched aliphatic side chain. A third group prefers other hydrophobic or uncharged polar side chains at pT + 3. However, another FHA domain instead chooses on the basis of pT - 2, pT - 3, and pT + 1 positions. An FHA domain from a marker of human cancer instead chooses a much longer protein fragment that adds a beta-strand to its beta-sheet and that presents hydrophobic residues from a novel helix to the usual recognition surface. This novel recognition site and more remote sites for the binding of other types of protein partners were predicted for the entire family

  12. Discovering interacting domains and motifs in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ng, See-Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Many important biological processes, such as the signaling pathways, require protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are designed for fast response to stimuli. These interactions are usually transient, easily formed, and disrupted, yet specific. Many of these transient interactions involve the binding of a protein domain to a short stretch (3-10) of amino acid residues, which can be characterized by a sequence pattern, i.e., a short linear motif (SLiM). We call these interacting domains and motifs domain-SLiM interactions. Existing methods have focused on discovering SLiMs in the interacting proteins' sequence data. With the recent increase in protein structures, we have a new opportunity to detect SLiMs directly from the proteins' 3D structures instead of their linear sequences. In this chapter, we describe a computational method called SLiMDIet to directly detect SLiMs on domain interfaces extracted from 3D structures of PPIs. SLiMDIet comprises two steps: (1) interaction interfaces belonging to the same domain are extracted and grouped together using structural clustering and (2) the extracted interaction interfaces in each cluster are structurally aligned to extract the corresponding SLiM. Using SLiMDIet, de novo SLiMs interacting with protein domains can be computationally detected from structurally clustered domain-SLiM interactions for PFAM domains which have available 3D structures in the PDB database.

  13. Informing the Human Plasma Protein Binding of Environmental Chemicals by Machine Learning in the Pharmaceutical Space: Applicability Domain and Limits of Predictability

    EPA Science Inventory

    The free fraction of a xenobiotic in plasma (Fub) is an important determinant of chemical adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity, yet experimental plasma protein binding data is scarce for environmentally relevant chemicals. The presented work explores th...

  14. Identification of novel anionic phospholipid binding domains in neutral sphingomyelinase 2 with selective binding preference.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bill X; Clarke, Christopher J; Matmati, Nabil; Montefusco, David; Bartke, Nana; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2011-06-24

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide are recognized as vital regulators of many biological processes. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) is one of the key enzymes regulating ceramide production. It was previously shown that the enzymatic activity of nSMase2 was dependent on anionic phospholipids (APLs). In this study, the structural requirements for APL-selective binding of nSMase2 were determined and characterized. Using lipid-protein overlay assays, nSMase2 interacted specifically and directly with several APLs, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. Lipid-protein binding studies of deletion mutants identified two discrete APL binding domains in the N terminus of nSMase2. Further, mutagenesis experiments pinpointed the core sequences and major cationic amino acids in the domains that are necessary for the cooperative activation of nSMase2 by APLs. The first domain included the first amino-terminal hydrophobic segment and Arg-33, which were essential for nSMase2 to interact with APLs. The second binding domain was comprised of the second hydrophobic segment and Arg-92 and Arg-93. Moreover, mutation of one or both domains decreased APL binding and APL-dependent catalytic activity of nSMase2. Further, mutation of both domains in nSMase2 reduced its plasma membrane localization. Finally, these binding domains are also important for the capability of nSMase2 to rescue the defects of yeast lacking the nSMase homologue, ISC1. In conclusion, these data have identified the APL binding domains of nSMase2 for the first time. The analysis of interactions between nSMase2 and APLs will contribute to our understanding of signaling pathways mediated by sphingolipid metabolites.

  15. Evolution of function in the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Sunil; Meng, Elaine C; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2007-07-01

    Structural and biochemical constraints force some segments of proteins to evolve more slowly than others, often allowing identification of conserved structural or sequence motifs that can be associated with substrate binding properties, chemical mechanisms, and molecular functions. We have assessed the functional and structural constraints imposed by cofactors on the evolution of new functions in a superfamily of flavoproteins characterized by two-dinucleotide binding domains, the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins (tDBDF) superfamily. Although these enzymes catalyze many different types of oxidation/reduction reactions, each is initiated by a stereospecific hydride transfer reaction between two cofactors, a pyridine nucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Sequence and structural analysis of more than 1,600 members of the superfamily reveals new members and identifies details of the evolutionary connections among them. Our analysis shows that in all of the highly divergent families within the superfamily, these cofactors adopt a conserved configuration optimal for stereospecific hydride transfer that is stabilized by specific interactions with amino acids from several motifs distributed among both dinucleotide binding domains. The conservation of cofactor configuration in the active site restricts the pyridine nucleotide to interact with FAD from the re-side, limiting the flow of electrons from the re-side to the si-side. This directionality of electron flow constrains interactions with the different partner proteins of different families to occur on the same face of the cofactor binding domains. As a result, superimposing the structures of tDBDFs aligns not only these interacting proteins, but also their constituent electron acceptors, including heme and iron-sulfur clusters. Thus, not only are specific aspects of the cofactor-directed chemical mechanism conserved across the superfamily, the constraints they impose are manifested in the

  16. Mapping the Binding Domain of the F18 Fimbrial Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Smeds, A.; Pertovaara, M.; Timonen, T.; Pohjanvirta, T.; Pelkonen, S.; Palva, A.

    2003-01-01

    F18 fimbrial Esherichia coli strains are associated with porcine postweaning diarrhea and pig edema disease. Recently, the FedF subunit was identified as the adhesin of the F18 fimbriae. In this study, adhesion domains of FedF were further studied by constructing deletions within the fedF gene and expressing FedF proteins with deletions either together with the other F18 fimbrial subunits or as fusion proteins tagged with maltose binding protein. The region essential for adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells was mapped between amino acid residues 60 and 109 of FedF. To map the binding domain even more closely, all eight charged amino acid residues within this region were independently replaced by alanine. Three of these single point mutants expressing F18 fimbriae exhibited significantly diminished capabilities to adhere to porcine epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, a triple point mutation and a double point mutation completely abolished receptor adhesiveness. The result further confirmed that the region between amino acid residues 60 and 109 is essential for the binding of F18 fimbriae to their receptor. In addition, the adhesion capability of the binding domain was eliminated after treatment with iodoacetamide, suggesting the formation of a disulfide bridge between Cys-63 and Cys-83, whereas Cys-111 and Cys-116 could be deleted without affecting the binding ability of FedF. PMID:12654838

  17. SVOP Is a Nucleotide Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) and SV2-related protein (SVOP) are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF) family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1). In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[γ] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9–12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. Conclusions/Significance SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately. PMID:19390693

  18. Recombinant receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein expressed in mammalian, insect and E. coli cells elicits potent neutralizing antibody and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Zhao, Guangyu; Chan, Chris C S; Sun, Shihui; Chen, Min; Liu, Zhonghua; Guo, Hongxiang; He, Yuxian; Zhou, Yusen; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Jiang, Shibo

    2009-10-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerging infectious disease. The potential recurrence of the disease from animal reservoirs highlights the significance of development of safe and efficient vaccines to prevent a future SARS epidemic. In this study, we expressed the recombinant receptor-binding domain (rRBD) in mammalian (293T) cells, insect (Sf9) cells, and E. coli, respectively, and compared their immunogenicity and protection against SARS-CoV infection in an established mouse model. Our results show that all rRBD proteins expressed in the above systems maintained intact conformation, being able to induce highly potent neutralizing antibody responses and complete protective immunity against SARS-CoV challenge in mice, albeit the rRBD expressed in 293T cells elicited stronger humoral immune responses with significantly higher neutralizing activity (P<0.05) than those expressed in Sf9 and E. coli cells. These results suggest that all three rRBDs are effective in eliciting immune responses and protection against SARS-CoV and any of the above expression systems can be used for production of rRBD-based SARS subunit vaccines. Preference will be given to rRBD expressed in mammalian cells for future evaluation of the vaccine efficacy in a non-human primate model of SARS because of its ability to refold into a native conformation more readily and to induce higher level of neutralizing antibody responses than those expressed in E. coli and insect cells.

  19. Dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junling; Kodippili, Kasun; Yue, Yongping; Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Lakmini; Pan, Xiufang; Zhang, Keqing; Yang, Nora N; Duan, Dongsheng; Lai, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Dystrophin is a large sub-sarcolemmal protein. Its absence leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Binding to the sarcolemma is essential for dystrophin to protect muscle from contraction-induced injury. It has long been thought that membrane binding of dystrophin depends on its cysteine-rich (CR) domain. Here, we provide in vivo evidence suggesting that dystrophin conta