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Sample records for binding protein family

  1. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  2. The neuronal calcium sensor family of Ca2+-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, R D; Weiss, J L

    2001-01-01

    Ca(2+) plays a central role in the function of neurons as the trigger for neurotransmitter release, and many aspects of neuronal activity, from rapid modulation to changes in gene expression, are controlled by Ca(2+). These actions of Ca(2+) must be mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including calmodulin, which is involved in Ca(2+) regulation, not only in neurons, but in most other cell types. A large number of other EF-hand-containing Ca(2+)-binding proteins are known. One family of these, the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins, has a restricted expression in retinal photoreceptors or neurons and neuroendocrine cells, suggesting that they have specialized roles in these cell types. Two members of the family (recoverin and guanylate cyclase-activating protein) have established roles in the regulation of phototransduction. Despite close sequence similarities, the NCS proteins have distinct neuronal distributions, suggesting that they have different functions. Recent work has begun to demonstrate the physiological roles of members of this protein family. These include roles in the modulation of neurotransmitter release, control of cyclic nucleotide metabolism, biosynthesis of polyphosphoinositides, regulation of gene expression and in the direct regulation of ion channels. In the present review we describe the known sequences and structures of the NCS proteins, information on their interactions with target proteins and current knowledge about their cellular and physiological functions. PMID:11115393

  3. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  4. An oxysterol-binding protein family identified in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Anniss, Angela M; Apostolopoulos, Jim; Dworkin, Sebastian; Purton, Louise E; Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2002-08-01

    Oxysterols are oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol. They have been shown to influence a variety of biological functions including sterol metabolism, lipid trafficking, and apoptosis. Recently, 12 human OSBP-related genes have been identified. In this study, we have identified a family of 12 oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins (ORPs) in the mouse. A high level of amino acid identity (88-97%) was determined between mouse and human ORPs, indicating a very high degree of evolutionary conservation. All proteins identified contained the conserved OSBP amino acid sequence signature motif "EQVSHHPP," and most contained a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Using RT-PCR, each mouse ORP gene was found to exhibit a unique tissue distribution with many showing high expression in testicular, brain, and heart tissues. Interestingly, the tissue distribution of ORP-4 and ORP-10 were the most selective within the family. Expression of the various ORP genes was also investigated, specifically in highly purified populations of hemopoietic precursor cells defined by the lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LKS(+)) and lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(-) (LKS(-)) immunophenotype. Most ORP genes were expressed in both LKS(+) and LKS(-) populations, although ORP-4 appeared to be more highly expressed in the primitive, stem-cell enriched LKS(+) population, whereas ORP-10 was more highly expressed by maturing LKS(-) cells. The identification of a family of ORP proteins in the mouse, the frequently preferred animal model for in vivo studies, should further our understanding of the function of these proteins and their interactions with each other.

  5. In-silico characterization of Formin Binding Protein 4 Family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Bhattacharya, Simanti; Bagchi, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Rakhi

    2015-03-01

    Members of the Formin Binding Protein 4 Family or the FNBP4 were indirectly reported to be associated with many of the biological processes. These proteins possess two WW domains. So far there are practically no reports regarding the characterization and classification of the protein by any means. Keeping in mind the importance of the proteins from this FNBP4 family, we have tried an in silico approach to come up with a comprehensive analysis of the proteins. We have analyzed the proteins by considering their sequence conservation, their phylogenetic distributions among the different organisms. We have also investigated the functional properties of the WW domains in the proteins. Finally, we have made an attempt to elucidate the structural details of the domains and predicted the possible modes of their interactions. Our findings show that FNBP4 is eukaryotic in its distribution and follows a trend of evolution where animal and plant homologues have evolved in an independent manner. While the WW domain is the only common motif present across the FNBP4 family of proteins, there are different classes (mainly two) of WW domains that are found among different FNBP4 proteins. Structure function predictions indicate a possible role of FNBP4 in either protein stabilization control or transcript processing. Our study on FNBP4 may therefore open up new avenues to generate new interest in this highly important but largely unexplored class of proteins. Future studies with proteins from this family may answer many important questions of protein-protein interactions in different biologically important processes.

  6. A Web-based classification system of DNA-binding protein families.

    PubMed

    Karmirantzou, M; Hamodrakas, S J

    2001-07-01

    Rational classification of proteins encoded in sequenced genomes is critical for making the genome sequences maximally useful for functional and evolutionary studies. The family of DNA-binding proteins is one of the most populated and studied amongst the various genomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes and the Web-based system presented here is an approach to their classification. The DnaProt resource is an annotated and searchable collection of protein sequences for the families of DNA-binding proteins. The database contains 3238 full-length sequences (retrieved from the SWISS-PROT database, release 38) that include, at least, a DNA-binding domain. Sequence entries are organized into families defined by PROSITE patterns, PRINTS motifs and de novo excised signatures. Combining global similarities and functional motifs into a single classification scheme, DNA-binding proteins are classified into 33 unique classes, which helps to reveal comprehensive family relationships. To maximize family information retrieval, DnaProt contains a collection of multiple alignments for each DNA-binding family while the recognized motifs can be used as diagnostically functional fingerprints. All available structural class representatives have been referenced. The resource was developed as a Web-based management system for online free access of customized data sets. Entries are fully hyperlinked to facilitate easy retrieval of the original records from the source databases while functional and phylogenetic annotation will be applied to newly sequenced genomes. The database is freely available for online search of a library containing specific patterns of the identified DNA-binding protein classes and retrieval of individual entries from our WWW server (http://kronos.biol.uoa.gr/~mariak/dbDNA.html).

  7. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  8. Analysis of the Nse3/MAGE-Binding Domain of the Nse4/EID Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guerineau, Marc; Kriz, Zdenek; Kozakova, Lucie; Bednarova, Katerina; Janos, Pavel; Palecek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background The Nse1, Nse3 and Nse4 proteins form a tight sub-complex of the large SMC5-6 protein complex. hNSE3/MAGEG1, the mammalian ortholog of Nse3, is the founding member of the MAGE (melanoma-associated antigen) protein family and the Nse4 kleisin subunit is related to the EID (E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation) family of proteins. We have recently shown that human MAGE proteins can interact with NSE4/EID proteins through their characteristic conserved hydrophobic pocket. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mutagenesis and protein-protein interaction analyses, we have identified a new Nse3/MAGE-binding domain (NMBD) of the Nse4/EID proteins. This short domain is located next to the Nse4 N-terminal kleisin motif and is conserved in all NSE4/EID proteins. The central amino acid residues of the human NSE4b/EID3 domain were essential for its binding to hNSE3/MAGEG1 in yeast two-hybrid assays suggesting they form the core of the binding domain. PEPSCAN ELISA measurements of the MAGEC2 binding affinity to EID2 mutant peptides showed that similar core residues contribute to the EID2-MAGEC2 interaction. In addition, the N-terminal extension of the EID2 binding domain took part in the EID2-MAGEC2 interaction. Finally, docking and molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to generate a structure model for EID2-MAGEC2. Combination of our experimental data and the structure modeling showed how the core helical region of the NSE4/EID domain binds into the conserved pocket characteristic of the MAGE protein family. Conclusions/Significance We have identified a new Nse4/EID conserved domain and characterized its binding to Nse3/MAGE proteins. The conservation and binding of the interacting surfaces suggest tight co-evolution of both Nse4/EID and Nse3/MAGE protein families. PMID:22536443

  9. Delineation of the Pasteurellaceae-specific GbpA-family of glutathione-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus influenzae is a glutathione auxotroph and acquires the redox-active tripeptide by import. The dedicated glutathione transporter belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporter superfamily and displays more than 60% overall sequence identity with the well-studied dipeptide (Dpp) permease of Escherichia coli. The solute binding protein (SBP) that mediates glutathione transport in H. influenzae is a lipoprotein termed GbpA and is 54% identical to E. coli DppA, a well-studied member of family 5 SBP's. The discovery linking GbpA to glutathione import came rather unexpectedly as this import-priming SBP was previously annotated as a heme-binding protein (HbpA), and was thought to mediate heme acquisition. Nonetheless, although many SBP's have been implicated in more than one function, a prominent physiological role for GbpA and its partner permease in heme acquisition appears to be very unlikely. Here, we sought to characterize five representative GbpA homologs in an effort to delineate the novel GbpA-family of glutathione-specific family 5 SBPs and to further clarify their functional role in terms of ligand preferences. Results Lipoprotein and non-lipoprotein GbpA homologs were expressed in soluble form and substrate specificity was evaluated via a number of ligand binding assays. A physiologically insignificant affinity for hemin was observed for all five GbpA homologous test proteins. Three out of five test proteins were found to bind glutathione and some of its physiologically relevant derivatives with low- or submicromolar affinity. None of the tested SBP family 5 allocrites interacted with the remaining two GbpA test proteins. Structure-based sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that the two binding-inert GbpA homologs clearly form a separate phylogenetic cluster. To elucidate a structure-function rationale for this phylogenetic differentiation, we determined the crystal structure of one of the

  10. The HMGN Family of Chromatin-Binding Proteins: Dynamic Modulators of Epigenetic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Jamie E.; Deng, Tao; Bustin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The HMGN family of proteins binds to nucleosomes without any specificity for the underlying DNA sequence. They affect the global and local structure of chromatin, as well as the levels of histone modifications and thus play a role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review focuses on the recent studies that provide new insights on the interactions between HMGN proteins, nucleosomes, and chromatin, and the effects of these interactions on epigenetic and transcriptional regulation. PMID:22326857

  11. A bone sialoprotein-binding protein from Staphylococcus aureus: a member of the staphylococcal Sdr family.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, H s; Guss, B; Hellman, U; Persson, L; Rubin, K; Rydén, C

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, isolated from bone and joint infections, specifically interact with bone sialoprotein (BSP), a glycoprotein of bone and dentine extracellular matrix, via a cell-surface protein of M(r) 97000 [Yacoub, Lindahl, Rubin, Wendel, Heinegârd and Rydén, (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 222, 919-925]. Amino acid sequences of seven trypsin fragments from the 97000-M(r) BSP-binding protein were determined. A gene encoding a protein encompassing all seven peptide sequences was identified from chromosomal DNA isolated from S. aureus strain O24. This gene encodes a protein with 1171 amino acids, called BSP-binding protein (Bbp), which displays similarity to recently described proteins of the Sdr family from S. aureus. SdrC, SdrD and SdrE encode putative cell-surface proteins with no described ligand specificity. Bbp also shows similarity to a fibrinogen-binding protein from S. epidermidis called Fbe. A serine-aspartic acid repeat sequence was found close to the cell-wall-anchoring Leu-Pro-Xaa-Thr-Gly sequence in the C-terminal end of the protein. Escherichia coli cells were transformed with an expression vector containing a major part of the bbp gene fused to the gene for glutathione S-transferase. The affinity-purified fusion protein bound radiolabelled native BSP, and inhibited the binding of radiolabelled BSP to staphylococcal cells. Serum from patients suffering from bone and joint infection contained antibodies that reacted with the fusion protein of the BSP-binding protein, indicating that the protein is expressed during an infection and is immunogenic. The S. aureus Bbp protein may be important in the localization of bacteria to bone tissue, and thus might be of relevance in the pathogenicity of osteomyelitis. PMID:10642520

  12. A mysterious family of calcium-binding proteins from parasitic worms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2016-08-15

    There is a family of proteins from parasitic worms which combine N-terminal EF-hand domains with C-terminal dynein light chain-like domains. Data are accumulating on the biochemistry and cell biology of these proteins. However, little is known about their functions in vivo Schistosoma mansoni expresses 13 family members (SmTAL1-SmTAL13). Three of these (SmTAL1, SmTAL2 and SmTAL3) have been subjected to biochemical analysis which demonstrated that they have different molecular properties. Although their overall folds are predicted to be similar, small changes in the EF-hand domains result in differences in their ion binding properties. Whereas SmTAL1 and SmTAL2 are able to bind calcium (and some other) ions, SmTAL3 appears to be unable to bind any divalent cations. Similar biochemical diversity has been seen in the CaBP proteins from Fasciola hepatica Four family members are known (FhCaBP1-4). All of these bind to calcium ions. However, FhCaBP4 dimerizes in the presence of calcium ions, FhCaBP3 dimerizes in the absence of calcium ions and FhCaBP2 dimerizes regardless of the prevailing calcium ion concentration. In both the SmTAL and FhCaBP families, the proteins also differ in their ability to bind calmodulin antagonists and related drugs. Interestingly, SmTAL1 interacts with praziquantel (the drug of choice for treating schistosomiasis). The pharmacological significance (if any) of this finding is unknown. PMID:27528745

  13. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  14. Family-wide Characterization of Histone Binding Abilities of Human CW Domain-containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Tempel, Wolfram; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Xiao; Loppnau, Peter; Qin, Su; Min, Jinrong

    2016-04-22

    Covalent modifications of histone N-terminal tails play a critical role in regulating chromatin structure and controlling gene expression. These modifications are controlled by histone-modifying enzymes and read out by histone-binding proteins. Numerous proteins have been identified as histone modification readers. Here we report the family-wide characterization of histone binding abilities of human CW domain-containing proteins. We demonstrate that the CW domains in ZCWPW2 and MORC3/4 selectively recognize histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4, similar to ZCWPW1 reported previously, while the MORC1/2 and LSD2 lack histone H3 Lys-4 binding ability. Our crystal structures of the CW domains of ZCWPW2 and MORC3 in complex with the histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 peptide reveal the molecular basis of this interaction. In each complex, two tryptophan residues in the CW domain form the "floor" and "right wall," respectively, of the methyllysine recognition cage. Our mutation results based on ZCWPW2 reveal that the right wall tryptophan residue is essential for binding, and the floor tryptophan residue enhances binding affinity. Our structural and mutational analysis highlights the conserved roles of the cage residues of CW domain across the histone methyllysine binders but also suggests why some CW domains lack histone binding ability. PMID:26933034

  15. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  16. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer. PMID:23306615

  17. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein-lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein-lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein-lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein-lipid binding abilities. PMID:25431407

  18. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein-lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein-lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein-lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein-lipid binding abilities.

  19. Chlorophyll-binding proteins revisited - a multigenic family of light-harvesting and stress proteins from a brown algal perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlorophyll-binding proteins (CBPs) constitute a large family of proteins with diverse functions in both light-harvesting and photoprotection. The evolution of CBPs has been debated, especially with respect to the origin of the LI818 subfamily, members of which function in non-photochemical quenching and have been found in chlorophyll a/c-containing algae and several organisms of the green lineage, but not in red algae so far. The recent publication of the Ectocarpus siliculosus genome represents an opportunity to expand on previous work carried out on the origin and function of CBPs. Results The Ectocarpus genome codes for 53 CBPs falling into all major families except the exclusively green family of chlorophyll a/b binding proteins. Most stress-induced CBPs belong to the LI818 family. However, we highlight a few stress-induced CBPs from Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Chondrus crispus that belong to different sub-families and are promising targets for future functional studies. Three-dimensional modeling of two LI818 proteins revealed features common to all LI818 proteins that are likely to interfere with their capacity to bind chlorophyll b and lutein, but may enable binding of chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin. In the light of this finding, we examined the possibility that LI818 proteins may have originated in a chlorophyll c/fucoxanthin containing organism and compared this scenario to three alternatives: an independent evolution of LI818 proteins in different lineages, an ancient origin together with the first CBPs, before the separation of the red and the green lineage, or an origin in the green lineage and a transfer to an ancestor of haptophytes and heterokonts during a cryptic endosymbiosis event. Conclusions Our findings reinforce the idea that the LI818 family of CBPs has a role in stress response. In addition, statistical analyses of phylogenetic trees show an independent origin in different eukaryotic lineages or a green algal origin of LI818

  20. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    PubMed

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  1. Multiple Evolutionary Origins of Ubiquitous Cu2+ and Zn2+ Binding in the S100 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lucas C.; Donor, Micah T.; Prell, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a large family of signaling proteins that play critical roles in biology and disease. Many S100 proteins bind Zn2+, Cu2+, and/or Mn2+ as part of their biological functions; however, the evolutionary origins of binding remain obscure. One key question is whether divalent transition metal binding is ancestral, or instead arose independently on multiple lineages. To tackle this question, we combined phylogenetics with biophysical characterization of modern S100 proteins. We demonstrate an earlier origin for established S100 subfamilies than previously believed, and reveal that transition metal binding is widely distributed across the tree. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that Cu2+ and Zn2+ binding are common features of the family: the full breadth of human S100 paralogs—as well as two early-branching S100 proteins found in the tunicate Oikopleura dioica—bind these metals with μM affinity and stoichiometries ranging from 1:1 to 3:1 (metal:protein). While binding is consistent across the tree, structural responses to binding are quite variable. Further, mutational analysis and structural modeling revealed that transition metal binding occurs at different sites in different S100 proteins. This is consistent with multiple origins of transition metal binding over the evolution of this protein family. Our work reveals an evolutionary pattern in which the overall phenotype of binding is a constant feature of S100 proteins, even while the site and mechanism of binding is evolutionarily labile. PMID:27764152

  2. Sterol Transport In Yeast and the Oxysterol Binding Protein Homologue (OSH) Family

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Prinz, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol are a significant component of eukaryotic cellular membranes, and their unique physical properties influence a wide variety of membrane processes. It is known that the concentration of sterol within the membrane varies widely between organelles, and that the cell actively maintains this distribution through various transport processes. Vesicular pathways such as secretion or endocytosis may account for this traffic, but increasing evidence highlights the importance of nonvesicular routes as well. The structure of an oxysterol-binding protein homologue (OSH) in yeast (Osh4p/Kes1p) has recently been solved, identifying it as a sterol binding protein, and there is evidence consistent with the role of a cytoplasmic, nonvesicular sterol transporter. Yeast have seven such proteins, which appear to have distinct but overlapping functions with regard to maintaining intracellular sterol distribution and homeostasis. Control of sterol distribution can have far-reaching effects on membrane-related functions, and Osh proteins have been implicated in a variety of processes such as secretory vesicle budding from the Golgi and establishment of cell polarity. This review summarizes the current body of knowledge regarding this family and its potential functions, placing it in the context of known and hypothesized pathways of sterol transport in yeast. PMID:17434796

  3. A large family of divergent Drosophila odorant-binding proteins expressed in gustatory and olfactory sensilla.

    PubMed

    Galindo, K; Smith, D P

    2001-11-01

    We identified a large family of putative odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Some of these genes are present in large clusters in the genome. Most members are expressed in various taste organs, including gustatory sensilla in the labellum, the pharyngeal labral sense organ, dorsal and ventral cibarial organs, as well as taste bristles located on the wings and tarsi. Some of the gustatory OBPs are expressed exclusively in taste organs, but most are expressed in both olfactory and gustatory sensilla. Multiple binding proteins can be coexpressed in the same gustatory sensillum. Cells in the tarsi that express OBPs are required for normal chemosensation mediated through the leg, as ablation of these cells dramatically reduces the sensitivity of the proboscis extension reflex to sucrose. Finally, we show that OBP genes expressed in the pharyngeal taste sensilla are still expressed in the poxneuro genetic background while OBPs expressed in the labellum are not. These findings support a broad role for members of the OBP family in gustation and olfaction and suggest that poxneuro is required for cell fate determination of labellar but not pharyngeal taste organs. PMID:11729153

  4. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  5. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  6. Evolution of signal multiplexing by 14-3-3-binding 2R-ohnologue protein families in the vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Tinti, Michele; Johnson, Catherine; Toth, Rachel; Ferrier, David E. K.; MacKintosh, Carol

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate cellular responses to stimuli by docking onto pairs of phosphorylated residues on target proteins. The present study shows that the human 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteome is highly enriched in 2R-ohnologues, which are proteins in families of two to four members that were generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication at the origin of the vertebrates. We identify 2R-ohnologue families whose members share a ‘lynchpin’, defined as a 14-3-3-binding phosphosite that is conserved across members of a given family, and aligns with a Ser/Thr residue in pro-orthologues from the invertebrate chordates. For example, the human receptor expression enhancing protein (REEP) 1–4 family has the commonest type of lynchpin motif in current datasets, with a phosphorylatable serine in the –2 position relative to the 14-3-3-binding phosphosite. In contrast, the second 14-3-3-binding sites of REEPs 1–4 differ and are phosphorylated by different kinases, and hence the REEPs display different affinities for 14-3-3 dimers. We suggest a conceptual model for intracellular regulation involving protein families whose evolution into signal multiplexing systems was facilitated by 14-3-3 dimer binding to lynchpins, which gave freedom for other regulatory sites to evolve. While increased signalling complexity was needed for vertebrate life, these systems also generate vulnerability to genetic disorders. PMID:22870394

  7. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics. PMID:24230972

  8. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics.

  9. Phylogenetic Distribution and Evolution of the Linked RNA-Binding and NOT1-Binding Domains in the Tristetraprolin Family of Tandem CCCH Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the tristetraprolin or TTP family of CCCH tandem zinc finger (TZF) proteins comprises 3 members, encoded by the genes ZFP36, ZFP36L1, and ZFP36L2. These proteins have direct orthologues in essentially all vertebrates studied, with the exception of birds, which appear to lack a version of ZFP36. Additional family members are found in rodents, amphibians, and fish. In general, the encoded proteins contain 2 critical macromolecular interaction domains: the CCCH TZF domain, which is necessary for high-affinity binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA; and an extreme C-terminal domain that, in the case of TTP, interacts with NOT1, the scaffold of a large multi-protein complex that contains deadenylases. TTP and its related proteins act by first binding to AU-rich elements in mRNA, and then recruiting deadenylases to the mRNA, where they can processively remove the adenosine residues from the poly(A) tail. Highly conserved TZF domains have been found in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts, and these domains can bind AU-rich elements that resemble those bound by the mammalian proteins. However, certain fungi appear to lack proteins with intact TZF domains, and the TTP family proteins that are expressed in other fungi often lack the characteristic C-terminal NOT1 binding domain found in the mammalian proteins. For these reasons, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the relevant sequences in available databases. Both domains are present in family member proteins from most lineages of eukaryotes, suggesting their mutual presence in a common ancestor. However, the vertebrate type of NOT1-binding domain is missing in most fungi, and the TZF domain itself has disappeared or degenerated in recently evolved fungi. Nonetheless, both domains are present together in the proteins from several unicellular eukaryotes, including at least 1 fungus, and they seem to have remained together during the evolution of metazoans. PMID:24697206

  10. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  11. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  12. Differential Binding Activity of TGF-β Family Proteins to Select TGF-β Receptors.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ashraf M; Dotimas, Hyna; Kahn, Julius; Lamerdin, Jane E; Hayes, David B; Gupta, Priyanka; Franti, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Growth differentiation factor-11 (GDF11) and myostatin (MSTN) are highly related transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands with 89% amino acid sequence homology. They have different biologic activities and diverse tissue distribution patterns. However, the activities of these ligands are indistinguishable in in vitro assays. SMAD2/3 signaling has been identified as the canonical pathway for GDF11 and MSTN, However, it remains unclear which receptor heterodimer and which antagonists preferentially mediate and regulate signaling. In this study, we investigated the initiation and regulation of GDF11 and MSTN signaling at the receptor level using a novel receptor dimerization detection technology. We used the dimerization platform to link early receptor binding events to intracellular downstream signaling. This approach was instrumental in revealing differential receptor binding activity within the TGF-β family. We verified the ActR2b/ALK5 heterodimer as the predominant receptor for GDF11- and MSTN-induced SMAD2/3 signaling. We also showed ALK7 specifically mediates activin-B signaling. We verified follistatin as a potent antagonist to neutralize both SMAD2/3 signaling and receptor dimerization. More remarkably, we showed that the two related antagonists, growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP)-1 and GASP2, differentially regulate GDF11 (and MSTN) signaling. GASP1 blocks both receptor dimerization and downstream signaling. However, GASP2 blocks only downstream signaling without interference from receptor dimerization. Our data strongly suggest that physical binding of GDF11 (and MSTN) to both ActR2b and ALK5 receptors is required for initiation of signaling. PMID:27340210

  13. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveal Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelyhood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  14. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  15. The FTMap family of web servers for determining and characterizing ligand binding hot spots of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Grove, Laurie E.; Hall, David R.; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott; Luo, Lingqi; Xia, Bing; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor

    2016-01-01

    FTMap is a computational mapping server that identifies binding hot spots of macromolecules, i.e., regions of the surface with major contributions to the ligand binding free energy. To use FTMap, users submit a protein, DNA, or RNA structure in PDB format. FTMap samples billions of positions of small organic molecules used as probes and scores the probe poses using a detailed energy expression. Regions that bind clusters of multiple probe types identify the binding hot spots, in good agreement with experimental data. FTMap serves as basis for other servers, namely FTSite to predict ligand binding sites, FTFlex to account for side chain flexibility, FTMap/param to parameterize additional probes, and FTDyn to map ensembles of protein structures. Applications include determining druggability of proteins, identifying ligand moieties that are most important for binding, finding the most bound-like conformation in ensembles of unliganded protein structures, and providing input for fragment based drug design. FTMap is more accurate than classical mapping methods such as GRID and MCSS, and is much faster than the more recent approaches to protein mapping based on mixed molecular dynamics. Using 16 probe molecules, the FTMap server finds the hot spots of an average size protein in less than an hour. Since FTFlex performs mapping for all low energy conformers of side chains in the binding site, its completion time is proportionately longer. PMID:25855957

  16. The TITAN5 gene of Arabidopsis encodes a protein related to the ADP ribosylation factor family of GTP binding proteins.

    PubMed

    McElver, J; Patton, D; Rumbaugh, M; Liu, C; Yang, L J; Meinke, D

    2000-08-01

    The titan (ttn) mutants of Arabidopsis exhibit dramatic alterations in mitosis and cell cycle control during seed development. Endosperm development in these mutants is characterized by the formation of giant polyploid nuclei with enlarged nucleoli. Embryo development is accompanied by significant cell enlargement in some mutants (ttn1 and ttn5) but not others (ttn2 and ttn3). We describe here the molecular cloning of TTN5 using a T-DNA-tagged allele. A second allele with a similar phenotype contains a nonsense mutation in the same coding region. The predicted protein is related to ADP ribosylation factors (ARFs), members of the RAS family of small GTP binding proteins that regulate various cellular functions in eukaryotes. TTN5 is most closely related in sequence to the ARL2 class of ARF-like proteins isolated from humans, rats, and mice. Although the cellular functions of ARL proteins remain unclear, the ttn5 phenotype is consistent with the known roles of ARFs in the regulation of intracellular vesicle transport.

  17. Functional Evolution in the Plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Hileman, Lena C.

    2013-01-01

    The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development. PMID:23577017

  18. Extensive Association of Functionally and Cytotopically Related mRNAs with Puf Family RNA-Binding Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Genes encoding RNA-binding proteins are diverse and abundant in eukaryotic genomes. Although some have been shown to have roles in post-transcriptional regulation of the expression of specific genes, few of these proteins have been studied systematically. We have used an affinity tag to isolate each of the five members of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and DNA microarrays to comprehensively identify the associated mRNAs. Distinct groups of 40–220 different mRNAs with striking common themes in the functions and subcellular localization of the proteins they encode are associated with each of the five Puf proteins: Puf3p binds nearly exclusively to cytoplasmic mRNAs that encode mitochondrial proteins; Puf1p and Puf2p interact preferentially with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; Puf4p preferentially binds mRNAs encoding nucleolar ribosomal RNA-processing factors; and Puf5p is associated with mRNAs encoding chromatin modifiers and components of the spindle pole body. We identified distinct sequence motifs in the 3′-untranslated regions of the mRNAs bound by Puf3p, Puf4p, and Puf5p. Three-hybrid assays confirmed the role of these motifs in specific RNA–protein interactions in vivo. The results suggest that combinatorial tagging of transcripts by specific RNA-binding proteins may be a general mechanism for coordinated control of the localization, translation, and decay of mRNAs and thus an integral part of the global gene expression program. PMID:15024427

  19. The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants: phylogeny, structural modeling, activity and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Puf proteins have important roles in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by promoting RNA decay and repressing translation. The Pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD) is a conserved region within Puf proteins that binds to RNA with sequence specificity. Although Puf proteins have been well characterized in animal and fungal systems, little is known about the structural and functional characteristics of Puf-like proteins in plants. Results The Arabidopsis and rice genomes code for 26 and 19 Puf-like proteins, respectively, each possessing eight or fewer Puf repeats in their PUM-HD. Key amino acids in the PUM-HD of several of these proteins are conserved with those of animal and fungal homologs, whereas other plant Puf proteins demonstrate extensive variability in these amino acids. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the predicted structure of this domain in plant Puf proteins provides a suitable surface for binding RNA. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments showed that the Arabidopsis AtPum2 PUM-HD binds with high affinity to BoxB of the Drosophila Nanos Response Element I (NRE1) RNA, whereas a point mutation in the core of the NRE1 resulted in a significant reduction in binding affinity. Transient expression of several of the Arabidopsis Puf proteins as fluorescent protein fusions revealed a dynamic, punctate cytoplasmic pattern of localization for most of these proteins. The presence of predicted nuclear export signals and accumulation of AtPuf proteins in the nucleus after treatment of cells with leptomycin B demonstrated that shuttling of these proteins between the cytosol and nucleus is common among these proteins. In addition to the cytoplasmically enriched AtPum proteins, two AtPum proteins showed nuclear targeting with enrichment in the nucleolus. Conclusions The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants consists of a greater number of members than any other model species studied to date. This, along with the

  20. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane.

  1. GTP-binding proteins of the Rho/Rac family: regulation, effectors and functions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bustelo, Xosé R.; Sauzeau, Vincent; Berenjeno, Inmaculada M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Rho/Rac proteins constitute a subgroup of the Ras superfamily of GTP hydrolases. Although originally implicated in the control of cytoskeletal events, it is currently known that these GTPases coordinate diverse cellular functions, including cell polarity, vesicular trafficking, the cell cycle and transcriptomal dynamics. In this review, we will provide an overview on the recent advances in this field regarding the mechanism of regulation and signaling, and the roles in vivo of this important GTPase family. PMID:17373658

  2. Cysteine protease-binding protein family 6 mediates the trafficking of amylases to phagosomes in the enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Atsushi; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Phagocytosis plays a pivotal role in nutrient acquisition and evasion from the host defense systems in Entamoeba histolytica, the intestinal protozoan parasite that causes amoebiasis. We previously reported that E. histolytica possesses a unique class of a hydrolase receptor family, designated the cysteine protease-binding protein family (CPBF), that is involved in trafficking of hydrolases to lysosomes and phagosomes, and we have also reported that CPBF1 and CPBF8 bind to cysteine proteases or β-hexosaminidase α-subunit and lysozymes, respectively. In this study, we showed by immunoprecipitation that CPBF6, one of the most highly expressed CPBF proteins, specifically binds to α-amylase and γ-amylase. We also found that CPBF6 is localized in lysosomes, based on immunofluorescence imaging. Immunoblot and proteome analyses of the isolated phagosomes showed that CPBF6 mediates transport of amylases to phagosomes. We also demonstrated that the carboxyl-terminal cytosolic region of CPBF6 is engaged in the regulation of the trafficking of CPBF6 to phagosomes. Our proteome analysis of phagosomes also revealed new potential phagosomal proteins.

  3. Evasins: Therapeutic Potential of a New Family of Chemokine-Binding Proteins from Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin, Pauline; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-sucking parasites, such as ticks, remain attached to their hosts for relatively long periods of time in order to obtain their blood meal without eliciting an immune response. One mechanism used to avoid rejection is the inhibition of the recruitment of immune cells, which can be achieved by a class of chemokine-binding proteins (CKBPs) known as Evasins. We have identified three distinct Evasins produced by the salivary glands of the common brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. They display different selectivities for chemokines, the first two identified show a narrow selectivity profile, while the third has a broader binding spectrum. The Evasins showed efficacy in animal models of inflammatory disease. Here, we will discuss the potential of their development for therapeutic use, addressing both the advantages and disadvantages that this entails. PMID:27375615

  4. Mutation Analysis of Inhibitory Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein Alpha (GNAI) Loci in Young and Familial Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15–20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:25291362

  5. Identification of the RNA recognition element of the RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins and their transcriptome-wide mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Farazi, Thalia A; Leonhardt, Carl S; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Li, Song; Max, Klaas E A; Meyer, Cindy; Yamaji, Masashi; Cekan, Pavol; Jacobs, Nicholas C; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Bognanni, Claudia; Larsson, Erik; Ohler, Uwe; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies implicated the RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) family of proteins in oocyte, retinal ganglion cell, heart, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle development. These RNA-binding proteins contain a single RNA recognition motif (RRM), and their targets and molecular function have not yet been identified. We defined transcriptome-wide RNA targets using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) in HEK293 cells, revealing exonic mature and intronic pre-mRNA binding sites, in agreement with the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of the proteins. Computational and biochemical approaches defined the RNA recognition element (RRE) as a tandem CAC trinucleotide motif separated by a variable spacer region. Similar to other mRNA-binding proteins, RBPMS family of proteins relocalized to cytoplasmic stress granules under oxidative stress conditions suggestive of a support function for mRNA localization in large and/or multinucleated cells where it is preferentially expressed.

  6. Multimodular Penicillin-Binding Proteins: An Enigmatic Family of Orthologs and Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Colette; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie

    1998-01-01

    The monofunctional penicillin-binding dd-peptidases and penicillin-hydrolyzing serine β-lactamases diverged from a common ancestor by the acquisition of structural changes in the polypeptide chain while retaining the same folding, three-motif amino acid sequence signature, serine-assisted catalytic mechanism, and active-site topology. Fusion events gave rise to multimodular penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). The acyl serine transferase penicillin-binding (PB) module possesses the three active-site defining motifs of the superfamily; it is linked to the carboxy end of a non-penicillin-binding (n-PB) module through a conserved fusion site; the two modules form a single polypeptide chain which folds on the exterior of the plasma membrane and is anchored by a transmembrane spanner; and the full-size PBPs cluster into two classes, A and B. In the class A PBPs, the n-PB modules are a continuum of diverging sequences; they possess a five-motif amino acid sequence signature, and conserved dicarboxylic amino acid residues are probably elements of the glycosyl transferase catalytic center. The PB modules fall into five subclasses: A1 and A2 in gram-negative bacteria and A3, A4, and A5 in gram-positive bacteria. The full-size class A PBPs combine the required enzymatic activities for peptidoglycan assembly from lipid-transported disaccharide-peptide units and almost certainly prescribe different, PB-module specific traits in peptidoglycan cross-linking. In the class B PBPs, the PB and n-PB modules cluster in a concerted manner. A PB module of subclass B2 or B3 is linked to an n-PB module of subclass B2 or B3 in gram-negative bacteria, and a PB module of subclass B1, B4, or B5 is linked to an n-PB module of subclass B1, B4, or B5 in gram-positive bacteria. Class B PBPs are involved in cell morphogenesis. The three motifs borne by the n-PB modules are probably sites for module-module interaction and the polypeptide stretches which extend between motifs 1 and 2 are sites for

  7. The Conserved Candida albicans CA3427 Gene Product Defines a New Family of Proteins Exhibiting the Generic Periplasmic Binding Protein Structural Fold

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Mouz, Nicolas; Rousselle, Tristan; Maza, Caroline; Monchois, Vincent; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial diseases due to Candida albicans infections are in constant rise in hospitals, where they cause serious complications to already fragile intensive care patients. Antifungal drug resistance is fast becoming a serious issue due to the emergence of strains resistant to currently available antifungal agents. Thus the urgency to identify new potential protein targets, the function and structure of which may guide the development of new antifungal drugs. In this context, we initiated a comparative genomics study in search of promising protein coding genes among the most conserved ones in reference fungal genomes. The CA3427 gene was selected on the basis of its presence among pathogenic fungi contrasting with its absence in the non pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report the crystal 3D-structure of the Candida albicans CA3427 protein at 2.1 Å resolution. The combined analysis of its sequence and structure reveals a structural fold originally associated with periplasmic binding proteins. The CA3427 structure highlights a binding site located between the two protein domains, corresponding to a sequence segment conserved among fungi. Two crystal forms of CA3427 were found, suggesting that the presence or absence of a ligand at the proposed binding site might trigger a “Venus flytrap” motion, coupled to the previously described activity of bacterial periplasmic binding proteins. The conserved binding site defines a new subfamily of periplasmic binding proteins also found in many bacteria of the bacteroidetes division, in a choanoflagellate (a free-living unicellular and colonial flagellate eukaryote) and in a placozoan (the closest multicellular relative of animals). A phylogenetic analysis suggests that this gene family originated in bacteria before its horizontal transfer to an ancestral eukaryote prior to the radiation of fungi. It was then lost by the Saccharomycetales which include Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:21494601

  8. Plant acyl-CoA-binding proteins: An emerging family involved in plant development and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Arias, Tatiana; Meng, Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) was first identified in mammals as a neuropeptide, and was demonstrated to belong to an important house-keeping protein family that extends across eukaryotes and some prokaryotes. In plants, the Arabidopsis ACBP family consists of six AtACBPs (AtACBP1 to AtACBP6), and has been investigated using gene knock-out mutants and overexpression lines. Herein, recent findings on the AtACBPs are examined to provide an insight on their functions in various plant developmental processes, such as embryo and seed development, seed dormancy and germination, seedling development and cuticle formation, as well as their roles under various environmental stresses. The significance of the AtACBPs in acyl-CoA/lipid metabolism, with focus on their interaction with long to very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters and their potential role in the formation of lipid droplets in seeds and vegetative tissues are discussed. In addition, recent findings on the rice ACBP family are presented. The similarities and differences between ACBPs from Arabidopsis and rice, that represent eudicot and monocot model plants, respectively, are analyzed and the evolution of plant ACBPs by phylogenetic analysis reviewed. Finally, we propose potential uses of plant ACBPs in phytoremediation and in agriculture related to the improvement of environmental stress tolerance and seed oil production. PMID:27368137

  9. Structural determinants of Rab and Rab Escort Protein interaction: Rab family motifs define a conserved binding surface.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Leal, José B; Strom, Molly; Godfrey, Richard F; Seabra, Miguel C

    2003-01-31

    Rab proteins are a large family of monomeric GTPases with 60 members identified in the human genome. Rab GTPases require an isoprenyl modification to their C-terminus for membrane association and function in the regulation of vesicular trafficking pathways. This reaction is catalysed by Rab geranylgeranyl transferase, which recognises as protein substrate any given Rab in a 1:1 complex with Rab Escort Protein (REP). REP is therefore able to bind many distinct Rab proteins but the molecular basis for this activity is still unclear. We recently identified conserved motifs in Rabs termed RabF motifs, which we proposed to mediate a conserved mode of interaction between Rabs and REPs. Here, we tested this hypothesis. We first used REP1 as a bait in the yeast two-hybrid system and isolated strictly full-length Rabs, suggesting that REP recognises multiple regions within and properly folded Rabs. We introduced point mutations in Rab3a as a model Rab and assessed the ability of the mutants to interact with REP using the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro prenylation assay. We identified several residues that affect REP:Rab binding in the RabF1, RabF3, and RabF4 regions (which include parts of the switch I and II regions), but not other RabF regions. These results support the hypothesis that Rabs bind REP via conserved RabF motifs and provide a molecular explanation for the preferential recognition of the GDP-bound conformation of Rab by REP. PMID:12535645

  10. The Drosophila Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 Family Member Has Two Isoforms and Is Potentially Involved in Embryonic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Oosthuysen, Brent; Cajee, Umar-Faruq; Mokgohloa, Lehlogonolo; Nweke, Ekene; Antunes, Ricardo Jorge; Coetzer, Theresa H. T.; Ntwasa, Monde

    2015-01-01

    The human retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) is implicated in esophageal, lung, hepatocellular and colon cancers. Furthermore, RBBP6 was identified as a strong marker for colon cancer prognosis and as a predisposing factor in familial myeloproliferative neoplasms. Functionally, the mammalian protein interacts with p53 and enhances the activity of Mdm2, the prototypical negative regulator of p53. However, since RBBP6 (known as PACT in mice) exists in multiple isoforms and pact−/− mice exhibit a more severe phenotype than mdm2−/− mutants, it must possess some Mdm2-independent functions. The function of the invertebrate homologue is poorly understood. This is complicated by the absence of the Mdm2 gene in both Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We have experimentally identified the promoter region of Snama, the Drosophila homologue, analyzed potential transcription factor binding sites and confirmed the existence of an additional isoform. Using band shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays combined with mass spectrometry, we found evidence that this gene may be regulated by, amongst others, DREF, which regulates hundreds of genes related to cell proliferation. The potential transcription factors for Snama fall into distinct functional groups, including anteroposterior embryonic patterning and nucleic acid metabolism. Significantly, previous work in mice shows that pact−/− induces an anteroposterior phenotype in embryos when rescued by simultaneous deletion of p53. Taken together, these observations indicate the significance of RBBP6 proteins in carcinogenesis and in developmental defects. PMID:25955646

  11. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Jin-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wei; Hu, Jing; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Chao; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10) against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase–ligand interaction space in the PDB. PMID:26229444

  12. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Jin-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wei; Hu, Jing; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Chao; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10) against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase-ligand interaction space in the PDB. PMID:26229444

  13. The protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPRZ and PTPRG bind to distinct members of the contactin family of neural recognition molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain, Samuel; Watkins, Dara J.

    2010-04-05

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ) are expressed primarily in the nervous system and mediate cell adhesion and signaling events during development. We report here the crystal structures of the carbonic anhydrase-like domains of PTPRZ and PTPRG and show that these domains interact directly with the second and third immunoglobulin repeats of the members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural recognition molecules. Interestingly, these receptors exhibit distinct specificities: PTPRZ binds only to CNTN1, whereas PTPRG interacts with CNTN3, 4, 5, and 6. Furthermore, we present crystal structures of the four N-terminal immunoglobulin repeats of mouse CNTN4 both alone and in complex with the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of mouse PTPRG. In these structures, the N-terminal region of CNTN4 adopts a horseshoe-like conformation found also in CNTN2 and most likely in all CNTNs. This restrained conformation of the second and third immunoglobulin domains creates a binding site that is conserved among CNTN3, 4, 5, and 6. This site contacts a discrete region of PTPRG composed primarily of an extended {beta}-hairpin loop found in both PTPRG and PTPRZ. Overall, these findings implicate PTPRG, PTPRZ and CNTNs as a group of receptors and ligands involved in the manifold recognition events that underlie the construction of neural networks.

  14. The FTMap family of web servers for determining and characterizing ligand-binding hot spots of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kozakov, Dima; Grove, Laurie E; Hall, David R; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott E; Luo, Lingqi; Xia, Bing; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-01

    FTMap is a computational mapping server that identifies binding hot spots of macromolecules-i.e., regions of the surface with major contributions to the ligand-binding free energy. To use FTMap, users submit a protein, DNA or RNA structure in PDB (Protein Data Bank) format. FTMap samples billions of positions of small organic molecules used as probes, and it scores the probe poses using a detailed energy expression. Regions that bind clusters of multiple probe types identify the binding hot spots in good agreement with experimental data. FTMap serves as the basis for other servers, namely FTSite, which is used to predict ligand-binding sites, FTFlex, which is used to account for side chain flexibility, FTMap/param, used to parameterize additional probes and FTDyn, for mapping ensembles of protein structures. Applications include determining the druggability of proteins, identifying ligand moieties that are most important for binding, finding the most bound-like conformation in ensembles of unliganded protein structures and providing input for fragment-based drug design. FTMap is more accurate than classical mapping methods such as GRID and MCSS, and it is much faster than the more-recent approaches to protein mapping based on mixed molecular dynamics. By using 16 probe molecules, the FTMap server finds the hot spots of an average-size protein in <1 h. As FTFlex performs mapping for all low-energy conformers of side chains in the binding site, its completion time is proportionately longer.

  15. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  16. The prosomal RNA-binding protein p27K is a member of the alpha-type human prosomal gene family.

    PubMed

    Bey, F; Silva Pereira, I; Coux, O; Viegas-Péquignot, E; Recillas Targa, F; Nothwang, H G; Dutrillaux, B; Scherrer, K

    1993-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies demonstrated high conservation during evolution of a prosomal protein of M(r) 27,000 and differentiation--specific expression of the epitope. More than 90% of the reacting antigen was found as a p27K protein in the free messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) fraction but another protein of M(r) 38,000, which shared protease fingerprint patterns with the p27K polypeptide, was also labelled in the nuclear and polyribosomal fractions. Sequencing of cDNA recombinant clones encoding the p27/38K protein and comparison with another prosomal protein, p30-33K, demonstrated the existence of a common characteristic sequence pattern containing three highly conserved segments. The genes Hs PROS-27 and Hs PROS-30 were mapped to chromosomes 14 (14q13) and 11 (11p15.1), respectively. The structure of the p27K protein shows multiple potential phosphorylation sites, an NTP-binding fold and an RNA-binding consensus sequence. The Hs PROS-27/beta-galactosidase fusion protein binds a single RNA of about 120 nucleotides from total HeLa cell RNA. Sequence comparisons show that the Hs PROS-27 and Hs PROS-30 genes belong to the gene family that encodes the prosome--MCP (multicatalytic proteinase)--proteasome proteins. Comparison with other members of the family from various species allowed us to show that the tripartite consensus sequence characteristic of the alpha-type sub-family is conserved from archeobacteria to man. The members of this gene family are characterised by very high evolutionary conservation of amino acid sequences of homologous genes and 20%-35% sequence similarity, between different family member within the same species and are clearly distinct from the beta-type family. PMID:7681138

  17. The Hedgehog protein family.

    PubMed

    Bürglin, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is one of the fundamental signal transduction pathways in animal development and is also involved in stem-cell maintenance and carcinogenesis. The hedgehog (hh) gene was first discovered in Drosophila, and members of the family have since been found in most metazoa. Hh proteins are composed of two domains, an amino-terminal domain HhN, which has the biological signal activity, and a carboxy-terminal autocatalytic domain HhC, which cleaves Hh into two parts in an intramolecular reaction and adds a cholesterol moiety to HhN. HhC has sequence similarity to the self-splicing inteins, and the shared region is termed Hint. New classes of proteins containing the Hint domain have been discovered recently in bacteria and eukaryotes, and the Hog class, of which Hh proteins comprise one family, is widespread throughout eukaryotes. The non-Hh Hog proteins have carboxy-terminal domains (the Hog domain) highly similar to HhC, although they lack the HhN domain, and instead have other amino-terminal domains. Hog proteins are found in many protists, but the Hh family emerged only in early metazoan evolution. HhN is modified by cholesterol at its carboxyl terminus and by palmitate at its amino terminus in both flies and mammals. The modified HhN is released from the cell and travels through the extracellular space. On binding its receptor Patched, it relieves the inhibition that Patched exerts on Smoothened, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The resulting signaling cascade converges on the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), or its mammalian counterparts, the Gli proteins, which activate or repress target genes.

  18. Temporal expression of the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family during liver development correlates with differential promoter activation by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, liver activator protein, and D-element-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, C; Snyder, R C; Paeper, B W; Duester, G

    1992-01-01

    The human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family consists of ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3, which are sequentially activated in early fetal, late fetal, and postnatal liver, respectively. Analysis of ADH promoters revealed differential activation by several factors previously shown to control liver transcription. In cotransfection assays, the ADH1 promoter, but not the ADH2 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1), which has previously been shown to regulate transcription in early liver development. The ADH2 promoter, but not the ADH1 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha), a transcription factor particularly active during late fetal liver and early postnatal liver development. The ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 promoters all responded to the liver transcription factors liver activator protein (LAP) and D-element-binding protein (DBP), which are most active in postnatal liver. For all three promoters, the activation by LAP or DBP was higher than that seen by HNF-1 or C/EBP alpha, and a significant synergism between C/EBP alpha and LAP was noticed for the ADH2 and ADH3 promoters when both factors were simultaneously cotransfected. A hierarchy of ADH promoter responsiveness to C/EBP alpha and LAP homo- and heterodimers is suggested. In all three ADH genes, LAP bound to the same four sites previously reported for C/EBP alpha (i.e., -160, -120, -40, and -20 bp), but DBP bound strongly only to the site located at -40 bp relative to the transcriptional start. Mutational analysis of ADH2 indicated that the -40 bp element accounts for most of the promoter regulation by the bZIP factors analyzed. These studies suggest that HNF-1 and C/EBP alpha help establish ADH gene family transcription in fetal liver and that LAP and DBP help maintain high-level ADH gene family transcription in postnatal liver. Images PMID:1620113

  19. The folate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Corrocher, R; Olivieri, O; Pacor, M L

    1991-01-01

    Folates are essential molecules for cell life and, not surprisingly, their transport in biological fluids and their transfer to cells are finely regulated. Folate binding proteins play a major role in this regulation. This paper will review our knowledge on these proteins and examine the most recent advances in this field. PMID:1820987

  20. Dynamic Conformational Change Regulates the Protein-DNA Recognition: An Investigation on Binding of a Y-Family Polymerase to Its Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiakun; Liu, Fei; Maxwell, Brian A.; Wang, Yong; Suo, Zucai; Wang, Haijun; Han, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4) during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates. PMID:25188490

  1. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family.

    PubMed

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins.

  2. The bldC Developmental Locus of Streptomyces coelicolor Encodes a Member of a Family of Small DNA-Binding Proteins Related to the DNA-Binding Domains of the MerR Family

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Alison C.; Servín-González, Luis; Kelemen, Gabriella H.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    The bldC locus, required for formation of aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor, was localized by map-based cloning to the overlap between cosmids D17 and D25 of a minimal ordered library. Subcloning and sequencing showed that bldC encodes a member of a previously unrecognized family of small (58- to 78-residue) DNA-binding proteins, related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family of transcriptional activators. BldC family members are found in a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Constructed ΔbldC mutants were defective in differentiation and antibiotic production. They failed to form an aerial mycelium on minimal medium and showed severe delays in aerial mycelium formation on rich medium. In addition, they failed to produce the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin, and bldC was shown to be required for normal and sustained transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene actII-orf4. Although ΔbldC mutants produced the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin, transcripts of the pathway-specific activator gene (redD) were reduced to almost undetectable levels after 48 h in the bldC mutant, in contrast to the bldC+ parent strain in which redD transcription continued during aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. This suggests that bldC may be required for maintenance of redD transcription during differentiation. bldC is expressed from a single promoter. S1 nuclease protection assays and immunoblotting showed that bldC is constitutively expressed and that transcription of bldC does not depend on any of the other known bld genes. The bldC18 mutation that originally defined the locus causes a Y49C substitution that results in instability of the protein. PMID:15629942

  3. Association analyses of vitamin D-binding protein gene with compression strength index variation in Caucasian nuclear families

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X.-H.; Xiong, D.-H.; Liu, X.-G.; Guo, Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, J.; Recker, R. R.; Deng, H.-W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study was conducted to test whether there exists an association between vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene and compression strength index (CSI) phenotype. Candidate gene association analyses were conducted in total sample, male subgroup, and female subgroup, respectively. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significant association results were found in males, suggesting the importance of DBP gene polymorphisms on the variation in CSI especially in Caucasian males. Introduction CSI of the femoral neck (FN) is a newly developed phenotype integrating information about bone size, body size, and bone mineral density. It is considered to have the potential to improve the performance of risk assessment for hip fractures because it is based on a combination of phenotypic traits influencing hip fractures rather than a single trait. CSI is under moderate genetic determination (with a heritability of ~44% found in this study), but the relevant genetic study is still rather scarce. Methods Based on the known physiological role of DBP in bone biology and the relatively high heritability of CSI, we tested 12 SNPs of the DBP gene for association with CSI variation in 405 Caucasian nuclear families comprising 1,873 subjects from the Midwestern US. Association analyses were performed in the total sample, male and female subgroups, respectively. Results Significant associations with CSI were found with two SNPs (rs222029, P=0.0019; rs222020, P=0.0042) for the male subgroup. Haplotype-based association tests corroborated the single-SNP results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the DBP gene might be one of the genetic factors influencing CSI phenotype in Caucasians, especially in males. PMID:19543766

  4. The CopC Family: Structural and Bioinformatic Insights into a Diverse Group of Periplasmic Copper Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Thomas J; Kenney, Grace E; Hurley, Joseph D; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-04-19

    The CopC proteins are periplasmic copper binding proteins believed to play a role in bacterial copper homeostasis. Previous studies have focused on CopCs that are part of seven-protein Cop or Pco systems involved in copper resistance. These canonical CopCs contain distinct Cu(I) and Cu(II) binding sites. Mounting evidence suggests that CopCs are more widely distributed, often present only with the CopD inner membrane protein, frequently as a fusion protein, and that the CopC and CopD proteins together function in the uptake of copper to the cytoplasm. In the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, genes encoding a CopCD pair are located adjacent to the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) operon. The CopC from this organism (Mst-CopC) was expressed, purified, and structurally characterized. The 1.46 Å resolution crystal structure of Mst-CopC reveals a single Cu(II) binding site with coordination somewhat different from that in canonical CopCs, and the absence of a Cu(I) binding site. Extensive bioinformatic analyses indicate that the majority of CopCs in fact contain only a Cu(II) site, with just 10% of sequences corresponding to the canonical two-site CopC. Accordingly, a new classification scheme for CopCs was developed, and detailed analyses of the sequences and their genomic neighborhoods reveal new proteins potentially involved in copper homeostasis, providing a framework for expanded models of CopCD function.

  5. Alternative Binding Modes Identified for Growth and Differentiation Factor-associated Serum Protein (GASP) Family Antagonism of Myostatin*

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ryan G.; Angerman, Elizabeth B.; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  6. Alternative binding modes identified for growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP) family antagonism of myostatin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ryan G; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B

    2015-03-20

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  7. A Novel C-Terminal CIB2 (Calcium and Integrin Binding Protein 2) Mutation Associated with Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss in a Hispanic Family.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunjan; Giese, Arnaud P; Grossheim, J M; Hegde, Rashmi S; Hegde, Rashima S; Delio, Maria; Samanich, Joy; Riazuddin, Saima; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Cai, Jinlu; Ahmed, Zubair M; Morrow, Bernice E

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a complex disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Previously, mutations in CIB2 have been identified as a common cause of genetic hearing loss in Pakistani and Turkish populations. Here we report a novel (c.556C>T; p.(Arg186Trp)) transition mutation in the CIB2 gene identified through whole exome sequencing (WES) in a Caribbean Hispanic family with non-syndromic hearing loss. CIB2 belongs to the family of calcium-and integrin-binding (CIB) proteins. The carboxy-termini of CIB proteins are associated with calcium binding and intracellular signaling. The p.(Arg186Trp) mutation is localized within predicted type II PDZ binding ligand at the carboxy terminus. Our ex vivo studies revealed that the mutation did not alter the interactions of CIB2 with Whirlin, nor its targeting to the tips of hair cell stereocilia. However, we found that the mutation disrupts inhibition of ATP-induced Ca2+ responses by CIB2 in a heterologous expression system. Our findings support p.(Arg186Trp) mutation as a cause for hearing loss in this Hispanic family. In addition, it further highlights the necessity of the calcium binding property of CIB2 for normal hearing.

  8. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  9. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Comparative genomics of the odorant-binding and chemosensory protein gene families across the Arthropoda: origin and evolutionary history of the chemosensory system.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Filipe G; Rozas, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Chemoreception is a biological process essential for the survival of animals, as it allows the recognition of important volatile cues for the detection of food, egg-laying substrates, mates, or predators, among other purposes. Furthermore, its role in pheromone detection may contribute to evolutionary processes, such as reproductive isolation and speciation. This key role in several vital biological processes makes chemoreception a particularly interesting system for studying the role of natural selection in molecular adaptation. Two major gene families are involved in the perireceptor events of the chemosensory system: the odorant-binding protein (OBP) and chemosensory protein (CSP) families. Here, we have conducted an exhaustive comparative genomic analysis of these gene families in 20 Arthropoda species. We show that the evolution of the OBP and CSP gene families is highly dynamic, with a high number of gains and losses of genes, pseudogenes, and independent origins of subfamilies. Taken together, our data clearly support the birth-and-death model for the evolution of these gene families with an overall high gene turnover rate. Moreover, we show that the genome organization of the two families is significantly more clustered than expected by chance and, more important, that this pattern appears to be actively maintained across the Drosophila phylogeny. Finally, we suggest the homologous nature of the OBP and CSP gene families, dating back their most recent common ancestor after the terrestrialization of Arthropoda (380--450 Ma) and we propose a scenario for the origin and diversification of these families.

  11. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein gene family in peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanping; Han, Jan; Liu, Dan; Wen, Xicheng; Li, Yu; Tao, Ran; Peng, Yongbin; Fang, Jinggui; Wang, Chen

    2014-02-25

    The FKBP protein family has prolyl isomerase activity and is related in function to cyclophilins. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete peach genome sequences allowed the identification of 21 FKBP genes by HMMER and BLAST analyses. Scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the peach genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of peach FKBPs were analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between peach FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of peach FKBP gene results revealed that most peach FKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few peach FKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. This data could contribute to better understanding of the complex regulation of the peach FKBP gene family, and also provide valuable information for further research in peach functional genomics.

  12. YIP1 family member 4 (YIPF4) is a novel cellular binding partner of the papillomavirus E5 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Marietta; Wasson, Christopher W.; Bhatia, Ramya; Boxall, Sally; Millan, David; Goh, Grace Y.S.; Haas, Jürgen; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    E5 proteins are amongst the least understood of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) encoded gene products. They are small, membrane-integrated proteins known to modulate a number of critical host pathways associated with pathogenesis including growth factor receptor signaling and immune evasion. Their role in the virus life cycle is less clear, indicating a role in the productive stages of the life cycle. However, a mechanism for this is currently lacking. Here we describe the identification of a novel binding partner of E5, YIPF4 using yeast two-hybrid analysis. YIPF4 is also a poorly characterized membrane spanning protein. Mutagenesis studies implicated the transmembrane regions of each protein as important for their interaction. Binding to YIPF4 was found for all E5 proteins tested suggesting that this interaction may mediate a conserved E5 function. In normal human keratinocytes YIPF4 expression was down-regulated upon differentiation and this reduction was partially rescued in cells harbouring HPV. Despite the conserved nature of the interaction with E5, siRNA mediated depletion of YIPF4 failed to impede two well-characterized functions of E5, namely EGFR trafficking or HLA class I presentation. Continued studies of YIPF4 are warranted to determine its role in the PV life cycle. PMID:26235900

  13. The Torsin-family AAA+ Protein OOC-5 Contains a Critical Disulfide Adjacent to Sensor-II That Couples Redox State to Nucleotide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wrabl, James O.; Hayashi, Adam P.; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2008-01-01

    A subgroup of the AAA+ proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope including human torsinA, a protein mutated in hereditary dystonia, is called the torsin family of AAA+ proteins. A multiple-sequence alignment of this family with Hsp100 proteins of known structure reveals a conserved cysteine in the C-terminus of torsin proteins within the Sensor-II motif. A structural model predicts this cysteine to be a part of an intramolecular disulfide bond, suggesting that it may function as a redox sensor to regulate ATPase activity. In vitro experiments with OOC-5, a torsinA homolog from Caenorhabditis elegans, demonstrate that redox changes that reduce this disulfide bond affect the binding of ATP and ADP and cause an attendant local conformational change detected by limited proteolysis. Transgenic worms expressing an ooc-5 gene with cysteine-to-serine mutations that disrupt the disulfide bond have a very low embryo hatch rate compared with wild-type controls, indicating these two cysteines are essential for OOC-5 function. We propose that the Sensor-II in torsin family proteins is a redox-regulated sensor. This regulatory mechanism may be central to the function of OOC-5 and human torsinA. PMID:18550799

  14. Expression Analysis and Binding Assays in the Chemosensory Protein Gene Family Indicate Multiple Roles in Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Zhu, Jing; Cui, Jin-Jie; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) have been proposed to capture and transport hydrophobic chemicals to receptors on sensory neurons. We identified and cloned 24 CSP genes to better understand the physiological function of CSPs in Helicoverpa armigera. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays indicate that CSP genes are ubiquitously expressed in adult H. armigera tissues. Broad expression patterns in adult tissues suggest that CSPs are involved in a diverse range of cellular processes, including chemosensation as well as other functions not related to chemosensation. The H. armigera CSPs that were highly transcribed in sensory organs or pheromone glands (HarmCSPs 6, 9, 18, 19), were recombinantly expressed in bacteria to explore their function. Fluorescent competitive binding assays were used to measure the binding affinities of these CSPs against 85 plant volatiles and 4 pheromone components. HarmCSP6 displays high binding affinity for pheromone components, whereas the other three proteins do not show affinities for any of the compounds tested. HarmCSP6 is expressed in numerous cells located in or close to long sensilla trichodea on the antennae of both males and females. These results suggest that HarmCSP6 may be involved in transporting female sex pheromones in H. armigera. PMID:25893790

  15. Evolution of a family of metazoan active-site-serine enzymes from penicillin-binding proteins: a novel facet of the bacterial legacy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial penicillin-binding proteins and β-lactamases (PBP-βLs) constitute a large family of serine proteases that perform essential functions in the synthesis and maintenance of peptidoglycan. Intriguingly, genes encoding PBP-βL homologs occur in many metazoan genomes including humans. The emerging role of LACTB, a mammalian mitochondrial PBP-βL homolog, in metabolic signaling prompted us to investigate the evolutionary history of metazoan PBP-βL proteins. Results Metazoan PBP-βL homologs including LACTB share unique structural features with bacterial class B low molecular weight penicillin-binding proteins. The amino acid residues necessary for enzymatic activity in bacterial PBP-βL proteins, including the catalytic serine residue, are conserved in all metazoan homologs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that metazoan PBP-βL homologs comprise four alloparalogus protein lineages that derive from α-proteobacteria. Conclusion While most components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery were dumped by early eukaryotes, a few PBP-βL proteins were conserved and are found in metazoans including humans. Metazoan PBP-βL homologs are active-site-serine enzymes that probably have distinct functions in the metabolic circuitry. We hypothesize that PBP-βL proteins in the early eukaryotic cell enabled the degradation of peptidoglycan from ingested bacteria, thereby maximizing the yield of nutrients and streamlining the cell for effective phagocytotic feeding. PMID:18226203

  16. An olive pollen protein with allergenic activity, Ole e 10, defines a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules and is potentially implicated in pollen germination

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) are the most common non-catalytic modules associated with enzymes active in plant cell-wall hydrolysis. They have been frequently identified by amino acid sequence alignments, but only a few have been experimentally established to have a carbohydrate-binding activity. A small olive pollen protein, Ole e 10 (10 kDa), has been described as a major inducer of type I allergy in humans. In the present study, the ability of Ole e 10 to bind several polysaccharides has been analysed by affinity gel electrophoresis, which demonstrated that the protein bound 1,3-β-glucans preferentially. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed binding to laminarin, at a protein/ligand ratio of 1:1. The interaction of Ole e 10 with laminarin induced a conformational change in the protein, as detected by CD and fluorescence analyses, and an increase of 3.6 °C in the thermal denaturation temperature of Ole e 10 in the presence of the glycan. These results, and the absence of alignment of the sequence of Ole e 10 with that of any classified CBM, indicate that this pollen protein defines a novel family of CBMs, which we propose to name CBM43. Immunolocalization of Ole e 10 in mature and germinating pollen by transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the co-localization of Ole e 10 and callose (1,3-β-glucan) in the growing pollen tube, suggesting a role for this protein in the metabolism of carbohydrates and in pollen tube wall re-formation during germination. PMID:15882149

  17. Structural Analysis of a Periplasmic Binding Protein in the Tripartite ATP-Independent Transporter Family Reveals a Tetrameric Assembly That May Have a Role in Ligand Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.; Changela, A; Miklos, A; Beese, L; Krueger, J; Hellinga, H

    2008-01-01

    Several bacterial solute transport mechanisms involve members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily that bind and deliver ligand to integral membrane transport proteins in the ATP-binding cassette, tripartite tricarboxylate transporter, or tripartite ATP-independent (TRAP) families. PBPs involved in ATP-binding cassette transport systems have been well characterized, but only a few PBPs involved in TRAP transport have been studied. We have measured the thermal stability, determined the oligomerization state by small angle x-ray scattering, and solved the x-ray crystal structure to 1.9 A resolution of a TRAP-PBP (open reading frame tm0322) from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima (TM0322). The overall fold of TM0322 is similar to other TRAP transport related PBPs, although the structural similarity of backbone atoms (2.5-3.1 A root mean square deviation) is unusually low for PBPs within the same group. Individual monomers within the tetrameric asymmetric unit of TM0322 exhibit high root mean square deviation (0.9 A) to each other as a consequence of conformational heterogeneity in their binding pockets. The gel filtration elution profile and the small angle x-ray scattering analysis indicate that TM0322 assembles as dimers in solution that in turn assemble into a dimer of dimers in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Tetramerization has been previously observed in another TRAP-PBP (the Rhodobacter sphaeroides ?-keto acid-binding protein) where quaternary structure formation is postulated to be an important requisite for the transmembrane transport process.

  18. Evidence of mineralization activity and supramolecular assembly by the N-terminal sequence of ACCBP, a biomineralization protein that is homologous to the acetylcholine binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Amos, Fairland F; Ndao, Moise; Evans, John Spencer

    2009-12-14

    Several biomineralization proteins that exhibit intrinsic disorder also possess sequence regions that are homologous to nonmineral associated folded proteins. One such protein is the amorphous calcium carbonate binding protein (ACCBP), one of several proteins that regulate the formation of the oyster shell and exhibit 30% conserved sequence identity to the acetylcholine binding protein sequences. To gain a better understanding of the ACCBP protein, we utilized bioinformatic approaches to identify the location of disordered and folded regions within this protein. In addition, we synthesized a 50 AA polypeptide, ACCN, representing the N-terminal domain of the mature processed ACCBP protein. We then utilized this polypeptide to determine the mineralization activity and qualitative structure of the N-terminal region of ACCBP. Our bioinformatic studies indicate that ACCBP consists of a ten-stranded beta-sandwich structure that includes short disordered sequence blocks, two of which reside within the primarily helical and surface-accessible ACCN sequence. Circular dichroism studies reveal that ACCN is partially disordered in solution; however, ACCN can be induced to fold into an alpha helix in the presence of TFE. Furthermore, we confirm that the ACCN sequence is multifunctional; this sequence promotes radial calcite polycrystal growth on Kevlar threads and forms supramolecular assemblies in solution that contain amorphous-appearing deposits. We conclude that the partially disordered ACCN sequence is a putative site for mineralization activity within the ACCBP protein and that the presence of short disordered sequence regions within the ACCBP fold are essential for function.

  19. Mo-CBP3, an Antifungal Chitin-Binding Protein from Moringa oleifera Seeds, Is a Member of the 2S Albumin Family

    PubMed Central

    Freire, José E. C.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Batista, Adelina B.; Lobo, Marina D. P.; Pereira, Mirella L.; Lima, João P. M. S.; Almeida, Ricardo V. M.; Sousa, Antônio J. S.; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C. O.; Oliveira, José T. A.; Grangeiro, Thalles B.

    2015-01-01

    Mo-CBP3 is a chitin-binding protein from M. oleifera seeds that inhibits the germination and mycelial growth of phytopathogenic fungi. This protein is highly thermostable and resistant to pH changes, and therefore may be useful in the development of new antifungal drugs. However, the relationship of MoCBP3 with the known families of carbohydrate-binding domains has not been established. In the present study, full-length cDNAs encoding 4 isoforms of Mo-CBP3 (Mo-CBP3-1, Mo-CBP3-2, Mo-CBP3-3 and Mo-CBP3-4) were cloned from developing seeds. The polypeptides encoded by the Mo-CBP3 cDNAs were predicted to contain 160 (Mo-CBP3-3) and 163 amino acid residues (Mo-CBP3-1, Mo-CBP3-2 and Mo-CBP3-4) with a signal peptide of 20-residues at the N-terminal region. A comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that Mo-CBP3 is a typical member of the 2S albumin family, as shown by the presence of an eight-cysteine motif, which is a characteristic feature of the prolamin superfamily. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that Mo-CBP3 is a mixture of isoforms that correspond to different mRNA products. The identification of Mo-CBP3 as a genuine member of the 2S albumin family reinforces the hypothesis that these seed storage proteins are involved in plant defense. Moreover, the chitin-binding ability of Mo-CBP3 reveals a novel functionality for a typical 2S albumin. PMID:25789746

  20. Ku antigen binds to Alu family DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Saëgusa, Y; Taira, T; Mimori, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1998-01-01

    The GC-rich segment containing GGAGGC (Alu core) is conserved within the RNA polymerase III (pol III) promoters of Alu family sequences. We have shown that the GGAGGC motif functions as a modulator of DNA replication as well as of transcription, and identified the proteins binding to the motif in human HeLa cells. In this study, the Alu core binding proteins were partially purified from human Raji cells by using an Alu core DNA affinity column. Both the proteins thus purified were implied to be subunits of Ku antigen based on the following criteria: The molecular weights of the proteins estimated on gel electrophoreses were 70 and 85 kDa, respectively, under denaturing conditions, while under non-denaturing conditions only one band was observed for the same sample at 150 kDa, probably representing hetero-dimer formed between the 70 and 85 kDa proteins. The sizes and the hetero-dimer formation are reminiscent of the 70 and 80 kDa subunits of Ku antigen (Ku-p70 and Ku-p80). Moreover, the purified proteins were immunoreactive with anti-Ku antibodies, and the specific DNA-protein complex on the Alu core element was cancelled by the anti-Ku antibodies. The nucleoprotein complex showed the same clipping patterns as those of the complex between the Alu core element and an authentically purified Ku antigen after proteolytic cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin.

  1. A novel BH3 mimetic efficiently induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through direct binding to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, including phosphorylated Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yubo; Xie, Mingzhou; Song, Ting; Sheng, Hongkun; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhichao

    2015-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family modulates sensitivity to chemotherapy in many cancers, including melanoma, in which the RAS/BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway is constitutively activated. Mcl-1, a major anti-apoptotic protein in the Bcl-2 family, is extensively expressed in melanoma and contributes to melanoma's well-documented chemoresistance. Here, we provide the first evidence that Mcl-1 phosphorylation at T163 by ERK1/2 and JNK is associated with the resistance of melanoma cell lines to the existing BH3 mimetics gossypol, S1 and ABT-737, and a novel anti-apoptotic mechanism of phosphorylated Mcl-1 (pMcl-1) is revealed. pMcl-1 antagonized the known BH3 mimetics by sequestering pro-apoptotic proteins that were released from Bcl-2/Mcl-1. Furthermore, an anthraquinone BH3 mimetic, compound 6, was identified to be the first small molecule to that induces endogenous apoptosis in melanoma cells by directly binding Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and pMcl-1 and disrupting the heterodimers of these proteins. Although compound 6 induced upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa, its apoptotic induction was independent of Noxa. These data reveal the promising therapeutic potential of targeting pMcl-1 to treat melanoma. Compound 6 is therefore a potent drug that targets pMcl-1 in melanoma.

  2. A novel abscisic acid- and dehydration-responsive gene family from the resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum encodes a plastid-targeted protein with DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jonathan R; Hilbricht, Tobias; Salamini, Francesco; Bartels, Dorothea

    2002-06-01

    In the desiccation-tolerant resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum Hochst. the chloroplasts undergo major ultrastructural changes during dehydration, which are reversible upon rehydration. Such alterations argue the need for efficient protective/stabilising mechanisms to exist. Here we describe a novel gene family that is rapidly and transiently expressed in response to both dehydration and exogenously applied abscisic acid, mostly in the chloroplast-rich palisade layer on the adaxial side of the leaf. Analysis of the putative coding region suggests that the resulting protein is plastid-targeted. This was confirmed using a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct in transgenic tobacco plants - hence the gene family is termed Plastid Targeted Protein ( CpPTP). Fluorescence microscopy also revealed that CpPTP was localised in structures similar to proplastid nucleoids in transgenic tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) BY-2 cells. The ability of CpPTP to interact with DNA was demonstrated through a DNaseI protection assay. A structure-prediction programme suggests that the mature CpPTP is composed almost entirely of a pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues that form heptad repeats, which are the hallmarks of a coiled-coil domain. Given the localisation and DNA-binding property of the protein, we propose that CpPTP plays a role during the early stages of dehydration-induced chloroplast remodelling.

  3. Cloning of two members of the SIRP alpha family of protein tyrosine phosphatase binding proteins in cattle that are expressed on monocytes and a subpopulation of dendritic cells and which mediate binding to CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Brooke, G P; Parsons, K R; Howard, C J

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have greatly clarified the function of cell surface molecules in the induction and modulation of T cell responses by antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, the differences in ability to stimulate T cells evident for different types and subpopulations of the same APC, such as dendritic cell subsets, is less well understood. This report details an investigation of an antigen expressed on monocytes that is also expressed on a subset of cattle afferent lymph veiled cells (ALVC). A cDNA library derived from cattle monocytes was screened with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for expression in COS-7 cells. Using separate mAb for screening, two cDNA were cloned, the sequences of which showed a single long open reading frame encoding a predicted type I glycoprotein of 506 amino acids that contained three immunoglobulin superfamily domains and a long 112-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. We have termed this antigen MyD-1, reflecting its myeloid and dendritic cell distribution. Analysis of the EMBL database revealed that the molecule is a member of the recently described family of signal regulatory proteins (SIRP). The outeremost Ig domain was of the adhesion/receptor I-type, suggesting that MyD-1 might bind to a ligand on another cell. Evidence for this was subsequently obtained by demonstrating that COS-7 cells transfected with MyD-1 cDNA bound CD4 T cells and this binding was blocked by specific mAb. The potential importance of this interaction was supported by the finding that the proliferation of resting memory CD4 T cells to ovalbumin-pulsed monocytes was significantly reduced in the presence of mAb to MyD-1. A role for the molecule in the modulation of the monocyte/dendritic APC response is also predicted from the existence of multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain, including the presence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and the observation that the SIRP alpha family members have been

  4. Calcium-binding proteins: an overview.

    PubMed

    Weinman, S

    1991-03-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of the various responses evoked by calcium in the cell, the identification and characterization of a number of calcium receptors were undertaken within the past two decades. Advances in amino acid sequence and protein three-dimensional structure led to the description of two families of calcium-binding proteins, the EF-hand homolog family and the annexin family. The EF-hand motif consists of two alpha helices, "E" and "F", joined by a Ca(2+)-binding loop. EF-hands have been identified in numerous Ca(2+)-binding proteins by similarity of amino acid sequence and confirmed in some crystal structures. Functional EF-hands seem always to occur in pairs. To date, the EF-hand homolog family contains more than 160 different Ca(2+)-modulated proteins which have a broad range of functions. Among them, are the calmodulin, the troponin C, the myosin regulatory light chain, the parvalbumin, the S-100 proteins and the calbindins 9- and 28 kDa. The most striking feature of the EF-hand family is the ability to modulate the activity of a number of enzymes. Several groups have identified proteins from various tissues that show calcium-dependent binding to membranes. These proteins, termed annexins have a molecular weight of 35- or 67 kDa. The amino acid sequences of the members of the annexin family show that each protein contains conserved internal repeats of about 70 amino acids each. The 35 kDa annexins contain four repeats, which show a high degree of homology with each other and with the repeat sequences of the other proteins. These repeats correspond to structural domains with a similar fold.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1864864

  5. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  6. Characterization of a Gene Family Encoding SEA (Sea-urchin Sperm Protein, Enterokinase and Agrin)-Domain Proteins with Lectin-Like and Heme-Binding Properties from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Yu, Chuanxin; Wakao, Masahiro; Suda, Yasuo; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin)-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (KD = 1.605×10−6 M) and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. Conclusions The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation), and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted. PMID:24416467

  7. Deletion of the gene family of small chlorophyll-binding proteins (ScpABCDE) offsets C/N homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Tania; Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A; Matthijs, Hans C P; Niyogi, Krishna K; Funk, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    In the family of chlorophyll binding proteins, single helix small CAB-like proteins (SCPs) are found in all organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis. Here, we investigated the function of these stress-inducible proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We compared physiological, proteome and transcriptome traits of a Photosystem I (PSI) deletion strain, which constitutively induces SCPs, and a PSI-less/ScpABCDE(-) without SCPs. The SCP mutant cells were larger in size, showed irregular thylakoid structure and differed in cell-surface morphology. Deletion of scp genes strongly affected the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) balance, resulting in accumulation of carbohydrates and a decrease in N-rich compounds (proteins and chlorophyll). Data from transcriptomic and metabolomic experiments revealed a role of SCPs in the control of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Additionally, SCPs diminished formation of reactive oxygen species, thereby preventing damage within Photosystem II. We conclude that the lack of SCP-function to remove free chlorophyll under stress conditions has a large impact on the metabolism of the entire cell. PMID:26646103

  8. An Arabidopsis cDNA encoding a DNA-binding protein that is highly similar to the DEAH family of RNA/DNA helicase genes.

    PubMed

    Isono, K; Yamamoto, H; Satoh, K; Kobayashi, H

    1999-09-15

    A cDNA encoding a putative RNA and/or DNA helicase has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA libraries. The cloned cDNA is 5166 bases long, and its largest open reading frame encodes 1538 amino acids. The central region of the predicted protein is homologous to a group of nucleic acid helicases from the DEAD/H family. However, the N- and C-terminal regions of the Arabidopsis cDNA product are distinct from these animal DEIH proteins. We have found that the C-terminal region contains three characteristic sequences: (i) two DNA-binding segments that form a probe helix (PH) involved in DNA recognition; (ii) an SV40-type nuclear localization signal; and (iii) 11 novel tandem-repeat sequences each consisting of about 28 amino acids. We have designated this cDNA as NIH (nuclear DEIH-boxhelicase). Functional character-ization of a recombinant fusion product containing the repeated region indicates that NIH may form homodimers, and that this is the active form in solution. Based on this information and the observation that the sequence homology is limited to the DEAH regions, we conclude that the biological roles of the plant helicase NIH differ from those of the animal DEIH family. PMID:10471743

  9. The lipocalin protein family: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Flower, D R

    1996-01-01

    The lipocalin protein family is a large group of small extracellular proteins. The family demonstrates great diversity at the sequence level; however, most lipocalins share three characteristic conserved sequence motifs, the kernel lipocalins, while a group of more divergent family members, the outlier lipocalins, share only one. Belying this sequence dissimilarity, lipocalin crystal structures are highly conserved and comprise a single eight-stranded continuously hydrogen-bonded antiparallel beta-barrel, which encloses an internal ligand-binding site. Together with two other families of ligand-binding proteins, the fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and the avidins, the lipocalins form part of an overall structural superfamily: the calycins. Members of the lipocalin family are characterized by several common molecular-recognition properties: the ability to bind a range of small hydrophobic molecules, binding to specific cell-surface receptors and the formation of complexes with soluble macromolecules. The varied biological functions of the lipocalins are mediated by one or more of these properties. In the past, the lipocalins have been classified as transport proteins; however, it is now clear that the lipocalins exhibit great functional diversity, with roles in retinol transport, invertebrate cryptic coloration, olfaction and pheromone transport, and prostaglandin synthesis. The lipocalins have also been implicated in the regulation of cell homoeostasis and the modulation of the immune response, and, as carrier proteins, to act in the general clearance of endogenous and exogenous compounds. PMID:8761444

  10. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  11. Expression and characterization of maize ZBP14, a member of a new family of zinc-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K; Jones, D; Howell, S; Soneji, Y; Martin, S; Aitken, A

    1995-01-01

    A maize gene (Mz2-12), with a deduced amino acid sequence similar to that of a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor from bovine brain, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein (ZBP14) purified to homogeneity. The bovine protein was originally identified by Walsh's group and named PKC inhibitor-1 (PKCI-1). The recombinant maize protein (ZBP14) shares characteristics of bovine PKCI-1: it has similar secondary structure, is dimeric, and has a similar affinity for zinc. However, the maize ZBP14 had very little activity as an inhibitor of mammalian brain PKC, thus precluding zinc sequestration as the mechanism of inhibition. The biological role for the maize protein in plant kinase regulation is therefore unclear. In the presence of both maize ZBP14 and 14-3-3 protein (which inhibits PKC in the absence of diacylglycerol), the effects on PKC appeared to be synergistic. Images Figure 1 PMID:7717986

  12. Distinct Effects of Two HIV-1 Capsid Assembly Inhibitor Families That Bind the Same Site within the N-Terminal Domain of the Viral CA Protein

    PubMed Central

    Titolo, Steve; von Schwedler, Uta; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Coulombe, René; Banik, Soma S. R.; Fader, Lee; Gagnon, Alexandre; Kawai, Stephen H.; Rancourt, Jean; Tremblay, Martin; Yoakim, Christiane; Simoneau, Bruno; Archambault, Jacques; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to existing classes of antiretroviral drugs necessitates finding new HIV-1 targets for drug discovery. The viral capsid (CA) protein represents one such potential new target. CA is sufficient to form mature HIV-1 capsids in vitro, and extensive structure-function and mutational analyses of CA have shown that the proper assembly, morphology, and stability of the mature capsid core are essential for the infectivity of HIV-1 virions. Here we describe the development of an in vitro capsid assembly assay based on the association of CA-NC subunits on immobilized oligonucleotides. This assay was used to screen a compound library, yielding several different families of compounds that inhibited capsid assembly. Optimization of two chemical series, termed the benzodiazepines (BD) and the benzimidazoles (BM), resulted in compounds with potent antiviral activity against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analyses showed that both series of inhibitors bound to the N-terminal domain of CA. These inhibitors induce the formation of a pocket that overlaps with the binding site for the previously reported CAP inhibitors but is expanded significantly by these new, more potent CA inhibitors. Virus release and electron microscopic (EM) studies showed that the BD compounds prevented virion release, whereas the BM compounds inhibited the formation of the mature capsid. Passage of virus in the presence of the inhibitors selected for resistance mutations that mapped to highly conserved residues surrounding the inhibitor binding pocket, but also to the C-terminal domain of CA. The resistance mutations selected by the two series differed, consistent with differences in their interactions within the pocket, and most also impaired virus replicative capacity. Resistance mutations had two modes of action, either directly impacting inhibitor binding affinity or apparently increasing the overall

  13. Restraint of the G2/M transition by the SR/RRM family mRNA shuttling binding protein SNXAHRB1 in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    James, Steven W; Banta, Travis; Barra, James; Ciraku, Lorela; Coile, Clifford; Cuda, Zach; Day, Ryan; Dixit, Cheshil; Eastlack, Steven; Giang, Anh; Goode, James; Guice, Alexis; Huff, Yulon; Humbert, Sara; Kelliher, Christina; Kobie, Julie; Kohlbrenner, Emily; Mwambutsa, Faustin; Orzechowski, Amanda; Shingler, Kristin; Spell, Casey; Anglin, Sarah Lea

    2014-10-01

    Control of the eukaryotic G2/M transition by CDC2/CYCLINB is tightly regulated by protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylations, and nuclear localization of CDC2/CYCLINB. We previously reported a screen, in Aspergillus nidulans, for extragenic suppressors of nimX2(cdc2) that resulted in the identification of the cold-sensitive snxA1 mutation. We demonstrate here that snxA1 suppresses defects in regulators of the CDK1 mitotic induction pathway, including nimX2(cdc) (2), nimE6(cyclinB), and nimT23(cdc) (25), but does not suppress G2-arresting nimA1/nimA5 mutations, the S-arresting nimE10(cyclinB) mutation, or three other G1/S phase mutations. snxA encodes the A. nidulans homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hrb1/Gbp2; nonessential shuttling messenger RNA (mRNA)-binding proteins belonging to the serine-arginine-rich (SR) and RNA recognition motif (RRM) protein family; and human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein-M, a spliceosomal component involved in pre-mRNA processing and alternative splicing. snxA(Hrb) (1) is nonessential, its deletion phenocopies the snxA1 mutation, and its overexpression rescues snxA1 and ΔsnxA mutant phenotypes. snxA1 and a second allele isolated in this study, snxA2, are hypomorphic mutations that result from decreased transcript and protein levels, suggesting that snxA acts normally to restrain cell cycle progression. SNXA(HRB1) is predominantly nuclear, but is not retained in the nucleus during the partially closed mitosis of A. nidulans. We show that the snxA1 mutation does not suppress nimX2 by altering NIMX2(CDC2)/NIME(CYCLINB) kinase activity and that snxA1 or ΔsnxA alter localization patterns of NIME(CYCLINB) at the restrictive temperatures for snxA1 and nimX2. Together, these findings suggest a novel and previously unreported role of an SR/RRM family protein in cell cycle regulation, specifically in control of the CDK1 mitotic induction pathway. PMID:25104516

  14. A Detour for Yeast Oxysterol Binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Christopher T.; McMaster, Christopher R.; Kozminski, Keith G.; Menon, Anant K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterol binding protein-related proteins, including the yeast proteins encoded by the OSH gene family (OSH1–OSH7), are implicated in the non-vesicular transfer of sterols between intracellular membranes and the plasma membrane. In light of recent studies, we revisited the proposal that Osh proteins are sterol transfer proteins and present new models consistent with known Osh protein functions. These models focus on the role of Osh proteins as sterol-dependent regulators of phosphoinositide and sphingolipid pathways. In contrast to their posited role as non-vesicular sterol transfer proteins, we propose that Osh proteins coordinate lipid signaling and membrane reorganization with the assembly of tethering complexes to promote molecular exchanges at membrane contact sites. PMID:22334669

  15. When is protein binding important?

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development.

  16. Differential expression and ligand binding indicate alternative functions for zebrafish polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and a family of pIgR-like (PIGRL) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kortum, Amanda N; Rodriguez-Nunez, Ivan; Yang, Jibing; Shim, Juyoung; Runft, Donna; O'Driscoll, Marci L; Haire, Robert N; Cannon, John P; Turner, Poem M; Litman, Ronda T; Kim, Carol H; Neely, Melody N; Litman, Gary W; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    The polymeric immunoglobulin (Ig) receptor (pIgR) is an integral transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in the mammalian immune response by transporting soluble polymeric Igs across mucosal epithelial cells. Single pIgR genes, which are expressed in lymphoid organs including mucosal tissues, have been identified in several teleost species. A single pigr gene has been identified on zebrafish chromosome 2 along with a large multigene family consisting of 29 pigr-like (PIGRL) genes. Full-length transcripts from ten different PIGRL genes that encode secreted and putative inhibitory membrane-bound receptors have been characterized. Although PIGRL and pigr transcripts are detected in immune tissues, only PIGRL transcripts can be detected in lymphoid and myeloid cells. In contrast to pIgR which binds Igs, certain PIGRL proteins bind phospholipids. PIGRL transcript levels are increased after infection with Streptococcus iniae, suggesting a role for PIGRL genes during bacterial challenge. Transcript levels of PIGRL genes are decreased after infection with Snakehead rhabdovirus, suggesting that viral infection may suppress PIGRL function.

  17. Molecular characterization of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) gene family from Citrus and the effect of fruit load on their expression

    PubMed Central

    Shalom, Liron; Shlizerman, Lyudmila; Zur, Naftali; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a Citrus gene encoding SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factor that contained a sequence complementary to miR156. Genes of the SPL family are known to play a role in flowering regulation and phase transition. In Citrus, the mRNA levels of the gene were significantly altered by fruit load in buds; under heavy fruit load (ON-Crop trees), known to suppress next year flowering, the mRNA levels were down-regulated, while fruit removal (de-fruiting), inducing next-year flowering, resulted in its up-regulation. In the current work, we set on to study the function of the gene. We showed that the Citrus SPL was able promote flowering independently of photoperiod in Arabidopsis, while miR156 repressed its flowering-promoting activity. In order to find out if fruit load affected the expression of additional genes of the SPL family, we identified and classified all SPL members in the Citrus genome, and studied their seasonal expression patterns in buds and leaves, and in response to de-fruiting. Results showed that two additional SPL-like genes and miR172, known to be induced by SPLs in Arabidopsis, were altered by fruit load. The relationships between these factors in relation to the fruit-load effect on Citrus flowering are discussed. PMID:26074947

  18. Molecular characterization of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) gene family from Citrus and the effect of fruit load on their expression.

    PubMed

    Shalom, Liron; Shlizerman, Lyudmila; Zur, Naftali; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a Citrus gene encoding SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factor that contained a sequence complementary to miR156. Genes of the SPL family are known to play a role in flowering regulation and phase transition. In Citrus, the mRNA levels of the gene were significantly altered by fruit load in buds; under heavy fruit load (ON-Crop trees), known to suppress next year flowering, the mRNA levels were down-regulated, while fruit removal (de-fruiting), inducing next-year flowering, resulted in its up-regulation. In the current work, we set on to study the function of the gene. We showed that the Citrus SPL was able promote flowering independently of photoperiod in Arabidopsis, while miR156 repressed its flowering-promoting activity. In order to find out if fruit load affected the expression of additional genes of the SPL family, we identified and classified all SPL members in the Citrus genome, and studied their seasonal expression patterns in buds and leaves, and in response to de-fruiting. Results showed that two additional SPL-like genes and miR172, known to be induced by SPLs in Arabidopsis, were altered by fruit load. The relationships between these factors in relation to the fruit-load effect on Citrus flowering are discussed. PMID:26074947

  19. Restraint of the G2/M Transition by the SR/RRM Family mRNA Shuttling Binding Protein SNXAHRB1 in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    James, Steven W.; Banta, Travis; Barra, James; Ciraku, Lorela; Coile, Clifford; Cuda, Zach; Day, Ryan; Dixit, Cheshil; Eastlack, Steven; Giang, Anh; Goode, James; Guice, Alexis; Huff, Yulon; Humbert, Sara; Kelliher, Christina; Kobie, Julie; Kohlbrenner, Emily; Mwambutsa, Faustin; Orzechowski, Amanda; Shingler, Kristin; Spell, Casey; Anglin, Sarah Lea

    2014-01-01

    Control of the eukaryotic G2/M transition by CDC2/CYCLINB is tightly regulated by protein–protein interactions, protein phosphorylations, and nuclear localization of CDC2/CYCLINB. We previously reported a screen, in Aspergillus nidulans, for extragenic suppressors of nimX2cdc2 that resulted in the identification of the cold-sensitive snxA1 mutation. We demonstrate here that snxA1 suppresses defects in regulators of the CDK1 mitotic induction pathway, including nimX2cdc2, nimE6cyclinB, and nimT23cdc25, but does not suppress G2-arresting nimA1/nimA5 mutations, the S-arresting nimE10cyclinB mutation, or three other G1/S phase mutations. snxA encodes the A. nidulans homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hrb1/Gbp2; nonessential shuttling messenger RNA (mRNA)-binding proteins belonging to the serine-arginine-rich (SR) and RNA recognition motif (RRM) protein family; and human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein-M, a spliceosomal component involved in pre-mRNA processing and alternative splicing. snxAHrb1 is nonessential, its deletion phenocopies the snxA1 mutation, and its overexpression rescues snxA1 and ΔsnxA mutant phenotypes. snxA1 and a second allele isolated in this study, snxA2, are hypomorphic mutations that result from decreased transcript and protein levels, suggesting that snxA acts normally to restrain cell cycle progression. SNXAHRB1 is predominantly nuclear, but is not retained in the nucleus during the partially closed mitosis of A. nidulans. We show that the snxA1 mutation does not suppress nimX2 by altering NIMX2CDC2/NIMECYCLINB kinase activity and that snxA1 or ΔsnxA alter localization patterns of NIMECYCLINB at the restrictive temperatures for snxA1 and nimX2. Together, these findings suggest a novel and previously unreported role of an SR/RRM family protein in cell cycle regulation, specifically in control of the CDK1 mitotic induction pathway. PMID:25104516

  20. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  1. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  2. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  5. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study is focused on the characterization and expression of genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, encoding proteins that possess six-cysteine-containing chitin-binding domains (CBDs) related to the peritrophin A domain (ChtBD2). An exhaustive bioinformatics search of the genome of...

  6. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  7. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  8. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  9. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  10. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  11. A Crayfish Insulin-like-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a “pulldown” methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23–38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development. PMID:23775079

  12. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  13. Cutting edge: members of the Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein family inhibit the interaction of C3d with complement receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Ricklin-Lichtsteiner, Salome K; Markiewski, Maciej M; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Lambris, John D

    2008-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus expresses a highly diversified arsenal of immune evasion proteins, many of which target the complement system. The extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) and the Efb homologous protein (Ehp) have previously been demonstrated to bind to C3 and inhibit complement activation and amplification. In this study we present the first evidence that Efb and Ehp are also capable of inhibiting the interaction of C3d with complement receptor 2 (CR2), which plays an important role in B cell activation and maturation. The C-terminal domain of Efb efficiently blocked this interaction both in surface plasmon resonance-based competition studies and cellular assays and prevented the CR2-mediated stimulation of B cells. Furthermore, analyses of the available structural data were consistent with a molecular mechanism that reflects both steric and electrostatic effects on the C3d-CR2 interaction. Our study therefore suggests that S. aureus may disrupt both the innate and adaptive immune responses with a single protein module. PMID:19017934

  14. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  15. Cello-oligomer-binding dynamics and directionality in family 4 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Kognole, Abhishek A; Payne, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play significant roles in modulating the function of cellulases, and understanding the protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms by which CBMs selectively bind substrate is critical to development of enhanced biomass conversion technology. CBMs exhibit a limited range of specificity and appear to bind polysaccharides in a directional fashion dictated by the position of the ring oxygen relative to the protein fold. The two family 4 CBMs of Cellulomonas fimi Cel9B (CfCBM4) are reported to preferentially bind cellulosic substrates. However, experimental evidence suggests that these CBMs may not exhibit a thermodynamic preference for a particular orientation. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations to investigate protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms in CfCBM4-1 and CfCBM4-2 and to elucidate preferential ligand-binding orientation. We evaluate four cellopentaose orientations including that of the crystal structure and three others suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These four orientations differ based on position of the ligand reducing end (RE) and pyranose ring orientations relative to the protein core. MD simulations indicate that the plausible orientations reduce to two conformations. Calculated ligand-binding free energy discerns each of the orientations is equally favorable. The calculated free energies are in excellent agreement with isothermal titration calorimetry measurements from the literature. MD simulations further reveal the approximate structural symmetry of the oligosaccharides relative to the amino acids along the binding cleft plays a role in the promiscuity of ligand binding. A survey of ligand-bound structures suggests this phenomenon may be characteristic of the broader class of proteins belonging to the β-sandwich fold.

  16. Cello-oligomer-binding dynamics and directionality in family 4 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Kognole, Abhishek A; Payne, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play significant roles in modulating the function of cellulases, and understanding the protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms by which CBMs selectively bind substrate is critical to development of enhanced biomass conversion technology. CBMs exhibit a limited range of specificity and appear to bind polysaccharides in a directional fashion dictated by the position of the ring oxygen relative to the protein fold. The two family 4 CBMs of Cellulomonas fimi Cel9B (CfCBM4) are reported to preferentially bind cellulosic substrates. However, experimental evidence suggests that these CBMs may not exhibit a thermodynamic preference for a particular orientation. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations to investigate protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms in CfCBM4-1 and CfCBM4-2 and to elucidate preferential ligand-binding orientation. We evaluate four cellopentaose orientations including that of the crystal structure and three others suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These four orientations differ based on position of the ligand reducing end (RE) and pyranose ring orientations relative to the protein core. MD simulations indicate that the plausible orientations reduce to two conformations. Calculated ligand-binding free energy discerns each of the orientations is equally favorable. The calculated free energies are in excellent agreement with isothermal titration calorimetry measurements from the literature. MD simulations further reveal the approximate structural symmetry of the oligosaccharides relative to the amino acids along the binding cleft plays a role in the promiscuity of ligand binding. A survey of ligand-bound structures suggests this phenomenon may be characteristic of the broader class of proteins belonging to the β-sandwich fold. PMID:26153106

  17. Crystal Structure of Inhibitor of Growth 4 (ING4) Dimerization Domain Reveals Functional Organization of ING Family of Chromatin-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Culurgioni, Simone; Muñoz, Inés G.; Moreno, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Villate, Maider; Palmero, Ignacio; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    The protein ING4 binds to histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 (H3K4me3) through its C-terminal plant homeodomain, thus recruiting the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex to target promoters. The structure of the plant homeodomain finger bound to an H3K4me3 peptide has been described, as well as the disorder and flexibility in the ING4 central region. We report the crystal structure of the ING4 N-terminal domain, which shows an antiparallel coiled-coil homodimer with each protomer folded into a helix-loop-helix structure. This arrangement suggests that ING4 can bind simultaneously two histone tails on the same or different nucleosomes. Dimerization has a direct impact on ING4 tumor suppressor activity because monomeric mutants lose the ability to induce apoptosis after genotoxic stress. Homology modeling based on the ING4 structure suggests that other ING dimers may also exist. PMID:22334692

  18. RNA-binding protein HuR and the members of the miR-200 family play an unconventional role in the regulation of c-Jun mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Giorgia; De Vito, Francesca; Saunders, Sita J; Risi, Adele; Mannironi, Cecilia; Bozzoni, Irene; Presutti, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation is a fundamental step for coordinating cellular response in a variety of processes. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are the most important factors responsible for this regulation. Here we report that different components of the miR-200 family are involved in c-Jun mRNA regulation with the opposite effect. While miR-200b inhibits c-Jun protein production, miR-200a tends to increase the JUN amount through a stabilization of its mRNA. This action is dependent on the presence of the RBP HuR that binds the 3'UTR of c-Jun mRNA in a region including the mir-200a binding site. The position of the binding site is fundamental; by mutating this site, we demonstrate that the effect is not micro-RNA specific. These results indicate that miR-200a triggers a microRNA-mediated stabilization of c-Jun mRNA, promoting the binding of HuR with c-Jun mRNA. This is the first example of a positive regulation exerted by a microRNA on an important oncogene in proliferating cells.

  19. The coronin family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Clemen, Christoph S; Rybakin, Vasily; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2008-01-01

    The coronins, first described in Dictyostelium discoideum in 1991, have meanwhile been detected in all eukaryotes except plants. They belong to the superfamily of WD40-repeat proteins and represent a large family of proteins, which are often involved in cytoskeletal functions. Phylogenetic studies clearly distinguish 12 subfamilies of which six exclusively occur in vertebrates. In the present book we have made a sincere attempt to provide a comprehensive overview on all aspects of coronin proteins including history, structure, subcellular localization and function in different organisms. In addition, we also included a general overview on the WD40 family of proteins and the structurally related Kelch family. The book should be of interest for scientists outside the field, but is more importantly intended as a fast and competent guide for newcomers as well as doctoral and postdoctoral scientists to coronin research in all its facets.

  20. A Collagen-Binding Adhesin, Acb, and Ten Other Putative MSCRAMM and Pilus Family Proteins of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (Streptococcus bovis Group, Biotype I)▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Jouko; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Qin, Xiang; Singh, Kavindra V.; Muzny, Donna M.; Kovar, Christie L.; Nazareth, Lynne V.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Ferraro, Mary J.; Steckelberg, James M.; Weinstock, George M.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Streptococcus bovis group are important causes of endocarditis. However, factors associated with their pathogenicity, such as adhesins, remain uncharacterized. We recently demonstrated that endocarditis-derived Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates frequently adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Here, we generated a draft genome sequence of an ECM protein-adherent S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus strain and found, by genome-wide analyses, 11 predicted LPXTG-type cell wall-anchored proteins with characteristics of MSCRAMMs, including a modular architecture of domains predicted to adopt immunoglobulin (Ig)-like folding. A recombinant segment of one of these, Acb, showed high-affinity binding to immobilized collagen, and cell surface expression of Acb correlated with the presence of acb and collagen adherence of isolates. Three of the 11 proteins have similarities to major pilus subunits and are organized in separate clusters, each including a second Ig-fold-containing MSCRAMM and a class C sortase, suggesting that the sequenced strain encodes three distinct types of pili. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that all three genes of one cluster, acb-sbs7-srtC1, are cotranscribed, consistent with pilus operons of other gram-positive bacteria. Further analysis detected expression of all 11 genes in cells grown to mid to late exponential growth phases. Wide distribution of 9 of the 11 genes was observed among S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates with fewer genes present in other S. bovis group species/subspecies. The high prevalence of genes encoding putative MSCRAMMs and pili, including a collagen-binding MSCRAMM, among S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates may play an important role in the predominance of this subspecies in S. bovis endocarditis. PMID:19717590

  1. DMR1 (CCM1/YGR150C) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an RNA-binding protein from the pentatricopeptide repeat family required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial 15S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Puchta, Olga; Lubas, Michal; Lipinski, Kamil A; Piatkowski, Jakub; Malecki, Michal; Golik, Pawel

    2010-04-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form the largest known RNA-binding protein family and are found in all eukaryotes, being particularly abundant in higher plants. PPR proteins localize mostly in mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they modulate organellar genome expression on the post-transcriptional level. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DMR1 (CCM1, YGR150C) encodes a PPR protein that localizes to mitochondria. Deletion of DMR1 results in a complete and irreversible loss of respiratory capacity and loss of wild-type mtDNA by conversion to rho(-)/rho(0) petites, regardless of the presence of introns in mtDNA. The phenotype of the dmr1Delta mitochondria is characterized by fragmentation of the small subunit mitochondrial rRNA (15S rRNA), that can be reversed by wild-type Dmr1p. Other mitochondrial transcripts, including the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA (21S rRNA), are not affected by the lack of Dmr1p. The purified Dmr1 protein specifically binds to different regions of 15S rRNA in vitro, consistent with the deletion phenotype. Dmr1p is therefore the first yeast PPR protein, which has an rRNA target and is probably involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes and translation.

  2. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  3. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states. PMID:25004958

  4. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  5. Purification of an oligo(dG).oligo(dC)-binding sea urchin nuclear protein, suGF1: a family of G-string factors involved in gene regulation during development.

    PubMed

    Hapgood, J; Patterton, D

    1994-02-01

    Contiguous deoxyguanosine residues (G strings) have been implicated in regulation of gene expression in several organisms via the binding of G-string factors. Regulation of expression of the chicken adult beta-globin gene may involve the interplay between binding of an erythrocyte-specific G-string factor, BGP1, and the stability of a positioned nucleosome (C. D. Lewis, S. P. Clark, G. Felsenfeld, and H. Gould, Genes Dev. 2:863-873, 1988). We have purified a 59.5-kDa nuclear protein (suGF1) from sea urchin embryos by DNA affinity chromatography. suGF1 has high binding affinity and specificity for oligo(dG).oligo(dC). The identity of the purified protein was confirmed by renaturation of sequence-specific DNA-binding activity from a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel slice and by Southwestern (DNA-protein) blotting. suGF1 binds in vitro to a G11 string present in the H1-H4 intergenic region of a sea urchin early histone gene battery. This suGF1 DNA recognition site occurs within a homopurine-homopyrimidine stretch previously shown to be incorporated into a positioned nucleosome core in vitro. DNase I footprinting shows that suGF1 protects the same base pairs on the promoter of the chicken beta A-globin gene as does BGP1. We show that a G-string cis-regulatory element of a sea urchin cell lineage-specific gene LpS1 (M. Xiang, S.-Y. Lu, M. Musso, G. Karsenty, and W. H. Klein, Development 113:1345-1355, 1991) also represents a high-affinity recognition site for suGF1. suGF1 may be a member of a family of G-string factors involved in the regulation of expression of unrelated genes during development of a number of different organisms.

  6. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  7. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  8. Protein families in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Copley, R R; Schultz, J; Ponting, C P; Bork, P

    1999-06-01

    The complete sequence of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans contains the genetic machinery that is required to undertake the core biological processes of single cells. However, the genome also encodes proteins that are associated with multicellularity, as well as others that are lineage-specific expansions of phylogenetically widespread families and yet more that are absent in non-nematodes. Ongoing analysis is beginning to illuminate the similarities and differences among human proteins and proteins that are encoded by the genomes of the multicellular worm and the unicellular yeast, and will be essential in determining the reliability of transferring experimental data among phylogenetically distant species. PMID:10361098

  9. Role of serum carrier proteins in the peripheral metabolism and tissue distribution of thyroid hormones in familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia and congenital elevation of thyroxine-binding globulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, R; Iervasi, G; Pilo, A; Vitek, F; Ferdeghini, M; Cazzuola, F; Giraudi, G

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the role of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and albumin in the availability of thyroid hormones to peripheral tissues, comprehensive kinetic studies of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were carried out in eight subjects with familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH), in four subjects with inherited TBG excess, and in 15 normals. In high-TBG subjects, the reduction of T4 and T3 plasma clearance rates (by 51% and 54%, respectively) was associated with normal daily productions; T4 and T3 distribution volumes were significantly reduced. In FDH subjects T4 clearance was less reduced (by 31%) than in high TBG; consequently T4 production rate was significantly increased (by 42%); T4 and T3 distribution volumes and T3 clearance rate were unchanged. Increased T3 peripheral production in FDH (by 24%) indicates that T4 bound to abnormal albumin is more available to tissues than T4 carried by TBG, thus suggesting an important role of albumin in T4 availability to the periphery. PMID:3112186

  10. Protein Kinase C (PKC)ζ Pseudosubstrate Inhibitor Peptide Promiscuously Binds PKC Family Isoforms and Disrupts Conventional PKC Targeting and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bogard, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    PKMζ is generated via an alternative transcriptional start site in the atypical protein kinase C (PKC)ζ isoform, which removes N-terminal regulatory elements, including the inhibitory pseudosubstrate domain, consequently rendering the kinase constitutively active. Persistent PKMζ activity has been proposed as a molecular mechanism for the long-term maintenance of synaptic plasticity underlying some forms of memory. Many studies supporting a role for PKMζ in synaptic plasticity and memory have relied on the PKCζ pseudosubstrate-derived ζ-inhibitory peptide (ZIP). However, recent studies have demonstrated that ZIP-induced impairments to synaptic plasticity and memory occur even in the absence of PKCζ, suggesting that ZIP exerts its actions via additional cellular targets. In this study, we demonstrated that ZIP interacts with conventional and novel PKC, in addition to atypical PKC isoforms. Moreover, when brain abundance of each PKC isoform and affinity for ZIP are taken into account, the signaling capacity of ZIP-responsive pools of conventional and novel PKCs may match or exceed that for atypical PKCs. Pseudosubstrate-derived peptides, like ZIP, are thought to exert their cellular action primarily by inhibiting PKC catalytic activity; however, the ZIP-sensitive catalytic core of PKC is known to participate in the enzyme’s subcellular targeting, suggesting an additional mode of ZIP action. Indeed, we have demonstrated that ZIP potently disrupts PKCα interaction with the PKC-targeting protein A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79 and interferes with ionomycin-induced translocation of conventional PKC to the plasma membrane. Thus, ZIP exhibits broad-spectrum action toward the PKC family of enzymes, and this action may contribute to its unique ability to impair memory. PMID:26199377

  11. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  12. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    PubMed

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  13. Chemokine binding proteins encoded by pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio; Saraiva, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Chemokines are chemoattractant cytokines that play an important role in immunity. The role of chemokines against invading pathogens is emphasized by the expression of chemokine inhibitors by many pathogens. A mechanims employed by poxviruses and herpesviruses is the secretion of chemokine bindingproteins unrelated to host receptors that bind chemokines with high affinity and block their activity. Soluble chemokine binding proteins have also been identified in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and in ticks. The binding specificity of these inhibitors of cell migration point at chemokines that contribute to host defense mechanisms against various pathogens. Chemokine binding proteins modulate the immune response and may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat inflamatory diseases.

  14. The Lepidoptera Odorant Binding Protein gene family: Gene gain and loss within the GOBP/PBP complex of moths and butterflies.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Richard G; Große-Wilde, Ewald; Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Butterflies and moths differ significantly in their daily activities: butterflies are diurnal while moths are largely nocturnal or crepuscular. This life history difference is presumably reflected in their sensory biology, and especially the balance between the use of chemical versus visual signals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBP) are a class of insect proteins, at least some of which are thought to orchestrate the transfer of odor molecules within an olfactory sensillum (olfactory organ), between the air and odor receptor proteins (ORs) on the olfactory neurons. A Lepidoptera specific subclass of OBPs are the GOBPs and PBPs; these were the first OBPs studied and have well documented associations with olfactory sensilla. We have used the available genomes of two moths, Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori, and two butterflies, Danaus plexippus and Heliconius melpomene, to characterize the GOBP/PBP genes, attempting to identify gene orthologs and document specific gene gain and loss. First, we identified the full repertoire of OBPs in the M. sexta genome, and compared these with the full repertoire of OBPs from the other three lepidopteran genomes, the OBPs of Drosophila melanogaster and select OBPs from other Lepidoptera. We also evaluated the tissue specific expression of the M. sexta OBPs using an available RNAseq databases. In the four lepidopteran species, GOBP2 and all PBPs reside in single gene clusters; in two species GOBP1 is documented to be nearby, about 100 kb from the cluster; all GOBP/PBP genes share a common gene structure indicating a common origin. As such, the GOBP/PBP genes form a gene complex. Our findings suggest that (1) the lepidopteran GOBP/PBP complex is a monophyletic lineage with origins deep within Lepidoptera phylogeny, (2) within this lineage PBP gene evolution is much more dynamic than GOBP gene evolution, and (3) butterflies may have lost a PBP gene that plays an important role in moth pheromone detection, correlating with a shift from

  15. The Lepidoptera Odorant Binding Protein gene family: Gene gain and loss within the GOBP/PBP complex of moths and butterflies.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Richard G; Große-Wilde, Ewald; Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Butterflies and moths differ significantly in their daily activities: butterflies are diurnal while moths are largely nocturnal or crepuscular. This life history difference is presumably reflected in their sensory biology, and especially the balance between the use of chemical versus visual signals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBP) are a class of insect proteins, at least some of which are thought to orchestrate the transfer of odor molecules within an olfactory sensillum (olfactory organ), between the air and odor receptor proteins (ORs) on the olfactory neurons. A Lepidoptera specific subclass of OBPs are the GOBPs and PBPs; these were the first OBPs studied and have well documented associations with olfactory sensilla. We have used the available genomes of two moths, Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori, and two butterflies, Danaus plexippus and Heliconius melpomene, to characterize the GOBP/PBP genes, attempting to identify gene orthologs and document specific gene gain and loss. First, we identified the full repertoire of OBPs in the M. sexta genome, and compared these with the full repertoire of OBPs from the other three lepidopteran genomes, the OBPs of Drosophila melanogaster and select OBPs from other Lepidoptera. We also evaluated the tissue specific expression of the M. sexta OBPs using an available RNAseq databases. In the four lepidopteran species, GOBP2 and all PBPs reside in single gene clusters; in two species GOBP1 is documented to be nearby, about 100 kb from the cluster; all GOBP/PBP genes share a common gene structure indicating a common origin. As such, the GOBP/PBP genes form a gene complex. Our findings suggest that (1) the lepidopteran GOBP/PBP complex is a monophyletic lineage with origins deep within Lepidoptera phylogeny, (2) within this lineage PBP gene evolution is much more dynamic than GOBP gene evolution, and (3) butterflies may have lost a PBP gene that plays an important role in moth pheromone detection, correlating with a shift from

  16. The Pfam protein families database.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alex; Birney, Ewan; Cerruti, Lorenzo; Durbin, Richard; Etwiller, Laurence; Eddy, Sean R; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Howe, Kevin L; Marshall, Mhairi; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2002-01-01

    Pfam is a large collection of protein multiple sequence alignments and profile hidden Markov models. Pfam is available on the World Wide Web in the UK at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Pfam/, in Sweden at http://www.cgb.ki.se/Pfam/, in France at http://pfam.jouy.inra.fr/ and in the US at http://pfam.wustl.edu/. The latest version (6.6) of Pfam contains 3071 families, which match 69% of proteins in SWISS-PROT 39 and TrEMBL 14. Structural data, where available, have been utilised to ensure that Pfam families correspond with structural domains, and to improve domain-based annotation. Predictions of non-domain regions are now also included. In addition to secondary structure, Pfam multiple sequence alignments now contain active site residue mark-up. New search tools, including taxonomy search and domain query, greatly add to the functionality and usability of the Pfam resource.

  17. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  18. Antibacterial properties of the sperm-binding proteins and peptides of human epididymis 2 (HE2) family; salt sensitivity, structural dependence and their interaction with outer and cytoplasmic membranes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yenugu, Suresh; Hamil, Katherine G; Birse, Charles E; Ruben, Steven M; French, Frank S; Hall, Susan H

    2003-01-01

    During passage through the epididymis, sperm interact with secreted epididymal proteins that promote maturation, including the acquisition of motility and fertilization competence. Viewed previously as distinct from sperm maturation, host defence capabilities are now recognized functions of the human epididymis 2 (HE2) family of sperm-binding proteins. We analysed the potent dose and time-dependent bactericidal activity of recombinant HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 and found that the full-length proteins (10 microg/ml or approximately 1 microM) caused more than a 50% decrease in Escherichia coli colony forming units within 15 min. By contrast, human beta-defensin-1, at a similar concentration, required more than 90 min to exhibit similar antibacterial activity. The epididymis-specific lipocalin, LCN6, failed to kill bacteria. Higher concentrations (25-100 microg/ml) of HE2 proteins and a longer duration of treatment resulted in near total inhibition of bacterial growth. The C-terminal peptides of HE2alpha, HEbeta1 and HEbeta2 proteins exhibited antibacterial activity similar to their full-length counterparts, indicating that the antibacterial activity of HE2 proteins resides in these C-terminal regions. Antibacterial activities of HE2 proteins and peptides were slightly inhibited by NaCl concentrations of up to 150 mM, while human beta-defensin-1 activity was nearly eliminated. Reduction and alkylation of disulphide bonds in HE2 proteins and their C-terminal peptides abolished their antibacterial activity. Consistent with the ability to kill bacteria, full-length HE2 proteins and C-terminal peptides caused rapid dose-dependent permeabilization of outer and cytoplasmic E. coli membranes. A much longer exposure time was required for human beta-defensin-1-mediated permeabilization of membranes, suggesting a possible difference in mode of action compared with the HE2 antibacterial peptides. PMID:12628001

  19. Two Novel Mutations in Myosin Binding Protein C Slow Causing Distal Arthrogryposis Type 2 in Two Large Han Chinese Families May Suggest Important Functional Role of Immunoglobulin Domain C2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuefu; Zhong, Bomeng; Han, Weitian; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Wei; Sui, Yu; Wang, Yawen; Lu, Yongping; Wang, Hong; Li, Jianxin; Jiang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are a group of disorders that mainly involve the distal parts of the limbs and at least ten different DAs have been described to date. DAs are mostly described as autosomal dominant disorders with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance, but recently autosomal recessive pattern was reported in distal arthrogryposis type 5D. Mutations in the contractile genes are found in about 50% of all DA patients. Of these genes, mutations in the gene encoding myosin binding protein C slow MYBPC1 were recently identified in two families with distal arthrogryposis type 1B. Here, we described two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant distal arthrogryposis type 2(DA2) with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Some unique overextension contractures of the lower limbs and some distinctive facial features were present in our DA2 pedigrees. We performed follow-up DNA sequencing after linkage mapping and first identified two novel MYBPC1 mutations (c.1075G>A [p.E359K] and c.956C>T [p.P319L]) responsible for these Chinese DA2 families of which one introduced by germline mosacism. Each mutation was found to cosegregate with the DA2 phenotype in each family but not in population controls. Both substitutions occur within C2 immunoglobulin domain, which together with C1 and the M motif constitute the binding site for the S2 subfragment of myosin. Our results expand the phenotypic spectrum of MYBPC1-related arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). We also proposed the possible molecular mechanisms that may underlie the pathogenesis of DA2 myopathy associated with these two substitutions in MYBPC1. PMID:25679999

  20. Members of the PpaA/AerR Antirepressor Family Bind Cobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Arjan J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PpaA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a member of a family of proteins that are thought to function as antirepressors of PpsR, a widely disseminated repressor of photosystem genes in purple photosynthetic bacteria. PpaA family members exhibit sequence similarity to a previously defined SCHIC (sensor containing heme instead of cobalamin) domain; however, the tetrapyrrole-binding specificity of PpaA family members has been unclear, as R. sphaeroides PpaA has been reported to bind heme while the Rhodobacter capsulatus homolog has been reported to bind cobalamin. In this study, we reinvestigated tetrapyrrole binding of PpaA from R. sphaeroides and show that it is not a heme-binding protein but is instead a cobalamin-binding protein. We also use bacterial two-hybrid analysis to show that PpaA is able to interact with PpsR and activate the expression of photosynthesis genes in vivo. Mutations in PpaA that cause loss of cobalamin binding also disrupt PpaA antirepressor activity in vivo. We also tested a number of PpaA homologs from other purple bacterial species and found that cobalamin binding is a conserved feature among members of this family of proteins. IMPORTANCE Cobalamin (vitamin B12) has only recently been recognized as a cofactor that affects gene expression by interacting in a light-dependent manner with transcription factors. A group of related antirepressors known as the AppA/PpaA/AerR family are known to control the expression of photosynthesis genes in part by interacting with either heme or cobalamin. The specificity of which tetrapyrroles that members of this family interact with has, however, remained cloudy. In this study, we address the tetrapyrrole-binding specificity of the PpaA/AerR subgroup and establish that it preferentially binds cobalamin over heme. PMID:26055116

  1. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  2. Two novel mouse genes--Nubp2, mapped to the t-complex on chromosome 17, and Nubp1, mapped to chromosome 16--establish a new gene family of nucleotide-binding proteins in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, H; Grahovac, M J; Mazzarella, R; Fujiwara, H; Kitchen, J R; Threat, T A; Ko, M S

    1999-09-01

    Two novel mouse genes and one novel human gene that define distinctive eukaryotic nucleotide-binding proteins (NUBP) and are related to the mrp gene of prokaryotes are characterized. Phylogenetic analyses of the genes, encoding a short form (Nubp2) and a long form (Nubp1) of NUBP, clearly establish them as a new NUBP/MRP gene family that is well conserved throughout phylogeny. In addition to conserved ATP/GTP-binding motifs A (P-loop) and A', members of this family share at least two highly conserved sequence motifs, NUBP/MRP motifs alpha and beta. Only one type of NUBP/MRP gene has been observed thus far in prokaryotes, but there are two types in eukaryotes. One group includes mouse Nubp1, human NBP, yeast NBP35, and Caenorhabditis elegans F10G8.6 and is characterized by a unique N-terminal sequence with four cysteine residues that is lacking in the other group, which includes mouse Nubp2, human NUBP2, and yeast YIA3w. Northern blot analyses of the two mouse genes show distinctive patterns consistent with this classification. Mouse Nubp2 is mapped to the t-complex region of mouse Chromosome 17, whereas Nubp1 is mapped to the proximal region of mouse Chromosome 16. Interestingly, both regions are syntenic with human chromosome 16p13.1-p13.3, suggesting that a chromosomal breakage between Nubp2 and Nubp1 probably occurred during the evolution of mouse chromosomes.

  3. Molecular beacons for detecting DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Tomasz; Heyduk, Ewa

    2002-02-01

    We report here a simple, rapid, homogeneous fluorescence assay, the molecular beacon assay, for the detection and quantification of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. The central feature of the assay is the protein-dependent association of two DNA fragments each containing about half of a DNA sequence defining a protein-binding site. Protein-dependent association of DNA fragments can be detected by any proximity-based spectroscopic signal, such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorochromes introduced into these DNA molecules. The assay is fully homogeneous and requires no manipulations aside from mixing of the sample and the test solution. It offers flexibility with respect to the mode of signal detection and the fluorescence probe, and is compatible with multicolor simultaneous detection of several proteins. The assay can be used in research and medical diagnosis and for high-throughput screening of drugs targeted to DNA-binding proteins.

  4. New dimension in therapeutic targeting of BCL-2 family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, Samaher; Mirshahi, Massoud; Pocard, Marc; Billard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the BCL-2 family control the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Targeting these proteins proves to be an attractive strategy for anticancer therapy. The biological context is based on the fact that BH3-only members of the family are specific antagonists of prosurvival members. This prompted the identification of “BH3 mimetic” compounds. These small peptides or organic molecules indeed mimic the BH3 domain of BH3-only proteins: by selectively binding and antagonizing prosurvival proteins, they can induce apoptosis in malignant cells. Some small-molecule inhibitors of prosurvival proteins have already entered clinical trials in cancer patients and two of them have shown significant therapeutic effects. The latest developments in the field of targeting BCL-2 family proteins highlight several new antagonists of prosurvival proteins as well as direct activators of proapoptotic proteins. These compounds open up novel prospects for the development of BH3 mimetic anticancer drugs. PMID:25970783

  5. Phage display of engineered binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; Spruijt, Ruud B; Winkel, Ingrid Nolla; Kengen, Servé W M; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather inefficient. A separation technology based on a very selective high-affinity binding may overcome these problems. Proteins in their natural environment manifest functionality by interacting specifically and often with relatively high affinity with other molecules, such as substrates, inhibitors, activators, or other proteins. At present, antibodies are the most commonly used binding proteins in numerous applications. However, antibodies do have limitations, such as high production costs, low stability, and a complex patent landscape. A novel approach is therefore to use non-immunoglobulin engineered binding proteins in affinity purification. In order to obtain engineered binders with a desired specificity, a large mutant library of the new to-be-developed binding protein has to be created and screened for potential binders. A powerful technique to screen and select for proteins with desired properties from a large pool of variants is phage display. Here, we indicate several criteria for potential binding protein scaffolds and explain the principle of M13 phage display. In addition, we describe experimental protocols for the initial steps in setting up a M13 phage display system based on the pComb3X vector, including construction of the phagemid vector, production of phages displaying the protein of interest, and confirmation of display on the M13 phage.

  6. Specific binding of gibberellic acid by cytokinin-specific binding proteins: a new aspect of plant hormone-binding proteins with the PR-10 fold.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Sliwiak, Joanna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Barciszewski, Jakub; Sikorski, Michal; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins of class 10 (PR-10) are a family of plant proteins with the same fold characterized by a large hydrophobic cavity that allows them to bind various ligands, such as phytohormones. A subfamily with only ~20% sequence identity but with a conserved canonical PR-10 fold have previously been recognized as Cytokinin-Specific Binding Proteins (CSBPs), although structurally the binding mode of trans-zeatin (a cytokinin phytohormone) was found to be quite diversified. Here, it is shown that two CSBP orthologues from Medicago truncatula and Vigna radiata bind gibberellic acid (GA3), which is an entirely different phytohormone, in a conserved and highly specific manner. In both cases a single GA3 molecule is found in the internal cavity of the protein. The structural data derived from high-resolution crystal structures are corroborated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), which reveals a much stronger interaction with GA3 than with trans-zeatin and pH dependence of the binding profile. As a conclusion, it is postulated that the CSBP subfamily of plant PR-10 proteins should be more properly linked with general phytohormone-binding properties and termed phytohormone-binding proteins (PhBP).

  7. Pfam: the protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Bateman, Alex; Clements, Jody; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y.; Eddy, Sean R.; Heger, Andreas; Hetherington, Kirstie; Holm, Liisa; Mistry, Jaina; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Tate, John; Punta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pfam, available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/) and the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/), is a widely used database of protein families, containing 14 831 manually curated entries in the current release, version 27.0. Since the last update article 2 years ago, we have generated 1182 new families and maintained sequence coverage of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) at nearly 80%, despite a 50% increase in the size of the underlying sequence database. Since our 2012 article describing Pfam, we have also undertaken a comprehensive review of the features that are provided by Pfam over and above the basic family data. For each feature, we determined the relevance, computational burden, usage statistics and the functionality of the feature in a website context. As a consequence of this review, we have removed some features, enhanced others and developed new ones to meet the changing demands of computational biology. Here, we describe the changes to Pfam content. Notably, we now provide family alignments based on four different representative proteome sequence data sets and a new interactive DNA search interface. We also discuss the mapping between Pfam and known 3D structures. PMID:24288371

  8. Characterization of RNA-Protein Interactions: Lessons from Two RNA-Binding Proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2.

    PubMed

    Skrdlant, Lindsey; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins whose RNA-binding ability is required for both constitutive and alternative splicing. While members of the SR protein family were once thought to have redundant functions, in-depth biochemical analysis of their RNA-binding abilities has revealed distinct binding profiles for each SR protein, that often lead to either synergistic or antagonistic functions. SR protein family members SRSF1 and SRSF2 are two of the most highly studied RNA-binding proteins. Here we examine the various methods used to differentiate SRSF1 and SRSF2 RNA-binding ability. We discuss the benefits and type of information that can be determined using each method. PMID:26965252

  9. Characterization of RNA-Protein Interactions: Lessons from Two RNA-Binding Proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2.

    PubMed

    Skrdlant, Lindsey; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins whose RNA-binding ability is required for both constitutive and alternative splicing. While members of the SR protein family were once thought to have redundant functions, in-depth biochemical analysis of their RNA-binding abilities has revealed distinct binding profiles for each SR protein, that often lead to either synergistic or antagonistic functions. SR protein family members SRSF1 and SRSF2 are two of the most highly studied RNA-binding proteins. Here we examine the various methods used to differentiate SRSF1 and SRSF2 RNA-binding ability. We discuss the benefits and type of information that can be determined using each method.

  10. The Pfam protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Mistry, Jaina; Tate, John; Coggill, Penny; Heger, Andreas; Pollington, Joanne E.; Gavin, O. Luke; Gunasekaran, Prasad; Ceric, Goran; Forslund, Kristoffer; Holm, Liisa; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Eddy, Sean R.; Bateman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Pfam is a widely used database of protein families and domains. This article describes a set of major updates that we have implemented in the latest release (version 24.0). The most important change is that we now use HMMER3, the latest version of the popular profile hidden Markov model package. This software is ∼100 times faster than HMMER2 and is more sensitive due to the routine use of the forward algorithm. The move to HMMER3 has necessitated numerous changes to Pfam that are described in detail. Pfam release 24.0 contains 11 912 families, of which a large number have been significantly updated during the past two years. Pfam is available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/), the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/) and Sweden (http://pfam.sbc.su.se/). PMID:19920124

  11. Correlated rigid modes in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegel, D. A.; Wojtowicz, D.; Przytycka, T. M.; Periwal, V.

    2016-04-01

    A great deal of evolutionarily conserved information is contained in genomes and proteins. Enormous effort has been put into understanding protein structure and developing computational tools for protein folding, and many sophisticated approaches take structure and sequence homology into account. Several groups have applied statistical physics approaches to extracting information about proteins from sequences alone. Here, we develop a new method for sequence analysis based on first principles, in information theory, in statistical physics and in Bayesian analysis. We provide a complete derivation of our approach and we apply it to a variety of systems, to demonstrate its utility and its limitations. We show in some examples that phylogenetic alignments of amino-acid sequences of families of proteins imply the existence of a small number of modes that appear to be associated with correlated global variation. These modes are uncovered efficiently in our approach by computing a non-perturbative effective potential directly from the alignment. We show that this effective potential approaches a limiting form inversely with the logarithm of the number of sequences. Mapping symbol entropy flows along modes to underlying physical structures shows that these modes arise due to correlated compensatory adjustments. In the protein examples, these occur around functional binding pockets.

  12. Detection of GTP-binding proteins in barley aleurone protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Sedee, N J; Heidekamp, F; Snaar-Jagalska, B E

    1993-08-30

    We report the existence of several families of GTP-binding proteins in barley aleurone protoplasts. Partial purified plasma membrane proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE, transferred to a nitrocellulose filter and incubated with either antisera raised against a highly conserved animal G protein alpha subunit peptide/or Ras protein, or with [alpha-32P]GTP. Two sets of proteins of M(r) = 32-36 kDa and 22-24 kDa were strongly recognized by the antisera. Binding of [alpha-32P]GTP was detected on Western blots with proteins of M(r) = 22-24 kDa and 16 kDa. Binding was inhibited by 10(-7)-10(-6) M GTP gamma S, GTP or GDP; binding was not affected by 10(-6)-10(-5) M ATP gamma S or ADP. The kinetics, specificity and the effects of phytohormones in a [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay were also studied in isolated plasma membranes of barley aleurone protoplasts.

  13. Review: the liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Hugo L

    2009-12-01

    The liver bile acid-binding proteins, L-BABPs, formerly called the liver "basic" fatty acid-binding proteins, are a subfamily of the fatty acid-binding proteins, FABPs. All the members of this protein group share the same fold: a 10 stranded beta barrel in which two short helices are inserted in between the first and the second strand of antiparallel beta sheet. The barrel encloses the ligand binding cavity of the protein while the two helices are believed to be involved in ligand accessibility to the binding site. The L-BABP subfamily has been found to be present in the liver of several vertebrates: fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds but not in mammals. The members of the FABP family present in mammals that appear to be more closely related to the L-BABPs are the liver FABPs and the ileal BABPs, both very extensively studied. Several L-BABP X-ray structures are available and chicken L-BABP has also been studied using NMR spectroscopy. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for bile acids, first determined by X-ray crystallography for the chicken liver protein, is of two cholates per protein molecule with the only exception of zebrafish L-BABP which, due to the presence of a disulfide bridge, has a stoichiometry of 1:1. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for fatty acids, determined with several different techniques, is 1:1. An unanswered question of great relevance is the identity of the protein that in mammals performs the function that in other vertebrates is carried out by the L-BABPS.

  14. Copper binding in the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Millhauser, Glenn L

    2004-02-01

    A conformational change of the prion protein is responsible for a class of neurodegenerative diseases called the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies that include mad cow disease and the human afflictions kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Despite the attention given to these diseases, the normal function of the prion protein in healthy tissue is unknown. Research over the past few years, however, demonstrates that the prion protein is a copper binding protein with high selectivity for Cu(2+). The structural features of the Cu(2+) binding sites have now been characterized and are providing important clues about the normal function of the prion protein and perhaps how metals or loss of protein function play a role in disease. The link between prion protein and copper may provide insight into the general, and recently appreciated, role of metals in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:14967054

  15. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  16. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  17. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  18. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  19. Genome-wide identification of members in the YTH domain-containing RNA-binding protein family in apple and expression analysis of their responsiveness to senescence and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Yue, Zhiyong; Liang, Dong; Ma, Fengwang

    2014-04-01

    YT521-homology (YTH) domain-containing RNA-binding proteins (YTPs) are a small gene family involved in post-transcriptional regulation. We identified 26 putative YTP gene models in the apple genome. Although plant YTPs have been classified into three groups, those in multi-cellular organisms belong only to Groups A and B. The apple genome contains 22 YTP gene models in Group A and four in Group B. Duplication analysis showed that tandem and segmental duplications contributed only partially to an expansion in apple YTP numbers. YTH was the only recognizable domain in apple YTPs; its three-dimensional structure implied possible motifs for RNA-binding. After the assembly of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and gene-cloning, we were able to identify 14 apple YTPs that were expressed in various tissues, especially senescing leaves. Expression analysis showed that these YTPs also responded to several abiotic stresses. Taken together, our genome-wide evaluation provides new insight for further research on the effects of those stresses.

  20. Functions and Regulation of the APOBEC Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harold C.; Bennett, Ryan P.; Kizilyer, Ayse; McDougall, William M.; Prohaska, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC1 is a cytidine deaminase that edits messenger RNAs and was the first enzyme in the APOBEC family to be functionally characterized. Under appropriate conditions APOBEC1 also deaminates deoxycytidine in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The other ten members of the APOBEC family have not been fully characterized however several have deoxycytidine deaminase activity on ssDNAs. Despite the nucleic acid substrate preferences of different APOBEC proteins, a common feature appears to be their intrinsic ability to bind to RNA as well as to ssDNA. RNA binding to APOBEC proteins together with protein-protein interactions, post-translation modifications and subcellular localization serve as biological modulators controlling the DNA mutagenic activity of these potentially genotoxic proteins. PMID:22001110

  1. Plasma protein binding of zomepirac sodium.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P J

    1981-07-01

    The plasma protein binding of zomepirac, a new nonnarcotic analgesic, was studied using equilibrium dialysis. Experiments were performed using human plasma and plasma from mice, rats, and rhesus monkeys, all species of pharmacological or toxicological interest. At concentrations approximating those achieved in vivo, the binding was fairly constant at 98-99% in all species except the rhesus monkey, where binding was decreased from 98 to approximately 96% at higher concentrations (greater then 50 microgram/ml). Zomepirac (10 microgram/ml) did not appear to displace or to be displaced by warfarin (10 microgram/ml) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in zomepirac (10 microgram/ml) binding. Zomepirac did not affect salicylate binding.

  2. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  3. Sequence analysis of the AAA protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    The AAA protein family, a recently recognized group of Walker-type ATPases, has been subjected to an extensive sequence analysis. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the existence of a region of sequence similarity, the so-called AAA cassette. The borders of this cassette were localized and within it, three boxes of a high degree of conservation were identified. Two of these boxes could be assigned to substantial parts of the ATP binding site (namely, to Walker motifs A and B); the third may be a portion of the catalytic center. Phylogenetic trees were calculated to obtain insights into the evolutionary history of the family. Subfamilies with varying degrees of intra-relatedness could be discriminated; these relationships are also supported by analysis of sequences outside the canonical AAA boxes: within the cassette are regions that are strongly conserved within each subfamily, whereas little or even no similarity between different subfamilies can be observed. These regions are well suited to define fingerprints for subfamilies. A secondary structure prediction utilizing all available sequence information was performed and the result was fitted to the general 3D structure of a Walker A/GTPase. The agreement was unexpectedly high and strongly supports the conclusion that the AAA family belongs to the Walker superfamily of A/GTPases. PMID:9336829

  4. Protein-protein binding site identification by enumerating the configurations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ability to predict protein-protein binding sites has a wide range of applications, including signal transduction studies, de novo drug design, structure identification and comparison of functional sites. The interface in a complex involves two structurally matched protein subunits, and the binding sites can be predicted by identifying structural matches at protein surfaces. Results We propose a method which enumerates “all” the configurations (or poses) between two proteins (3D coordinates of the two subunits in a complex) and evaluates each configuration by the interaction between its components using the Atomic Contact Energy function. The enumeration is achieved efficiently by exploring a set of rigid transformations. Our approach incorporates a surface identification technique and a method for avoiding clashes of two subunits when computing rigid transformations. When the optimal transformations according to the Atomic Contact Energy function are identified, the corresponding binding sites are given as predictions. Our results show that this approach consistently performs better than other methods in binding site identification. Conclusions Our method achieved a success rate higher than other methods, with the prediction quality improved in terms of both accuracy and coverage. Moreover, our method is being able to predict the configurations of two binding proteins, where most of other methods predict only the binding sites. The software package is available at http://sites.google.com/site/guofeics/dobi for non-commercial use. PMID:22768846

  5. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    PubMed

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities. PMID:27145844

  6. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  7. Information flow through calcium binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous mode of biological communication, which regulates a great variety of vital processes in living systems. Such a signal typically begins with an elementary event, in which calcium ions bind to a protein, inducing a change in the protein's structure. Information can only be lost, from what was conveyed through this initial event, as the signal is further transduced through the downstream networks. In the present work we analyze and optimize the information flow in the calcium binding process. We explicitly calculate the mutual information between the calcium concentration and the states of the protein, using a simple model for allosteric regulation in a dimeric protein. The optimal solution depends on the dynamic range of the input as well as on the timescale of signal integration. According to our result, the optimizing strategy involves allowing the calcium-binding protein to be ``activated'' by a partial occupation of its sites, and tuning independently the strengths of cooperative interactions in the binding and unbinding processes.

  8. Cadmium-binding protein (metallothionein) in carp

    SciTech Connect

    Kito, H.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-03-01

    When carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to 5 and 30 ppm Cd in the water, the contents of Cd-binding protein, which has low molecular weight, increased in the hepatopancreas, kidney, gills and gastrointestinal tract with duration of exposure. This Cd-binding protein was purified from hepatopancreas, kidney, gills, and spleen of carp administered 2 mg/kg Cd (as CdCl/sub 2/), intraperitoneally for 6 days. Two Cd-binding proteins were separated by DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column chromatography. These proteins had Cd-mercaptide bond, high cysteine contents (ca. 29-34%), but no aromatic amino acids or histidine. From these characteristics the Cd-binding proteins were identified as metallothionein. By using antiserum obtained from a rabbit to which carp hepatopancreas MT-II had been administered, immunological characteristics between hepatopancreas MT-I, II and kidney MT-II were studied, and a slight difference in antigenic determinant was observed among them. By immunological staining techniques with horseradish peroxidase, the localization of metallothionein was investigated. Carp were bred in 1 ppm Cd, 5 ppm Zn solution, and tap water for 14 days, following transfer to 15 ppm Cd solution, respectively. The survival ratio was the highest in the Zn group followed by Cd-treated and control groups.

  9. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  10. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Courtney B.; Talib, M. Faiz; McCabe, Clare; Bu, Lintao; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3–6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function. PMID:22147693

  11. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei; Jensen, K.G.; Sjolund, R.D. ); Krause, K.H.; Campbell, K.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca{sup 2+} within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein.

  12. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  13. DAZ Family Proteins, Key Players for Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Wang, Lin-Qing; Yin, Shen; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    DAZ family proteins are found almost exclusively in germ cells in distant animal species. Deletion or mutations of their encoding genes usually severely impair either oogenesis or spermatogenesis or both. The family includes Boule (or Boll), Dazl (or Dazla) and DAZ genes. Boule and Dazl are situated on autosomes while DAZ, exclusive of higher primates, is located on the Y chromosome. Deletion of DAZ gene is the most common causes of infertility in humans. These genes, encoding for RNA binding proteins, contain a highly conserved RNA recognition motif and at least one DAZ repeat encoding for a 24 amino acids sequence able to bind other mRNA binding proteins. Basically, Daz family proteins function as adaptors for target mRNA transport and activators of their translation. In some invertebrate species, BOULE protein play a pivotal role in germline specification and a conserved regulatory role in meiosis. Depending on the species, DAZL is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and/or pre-meiotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes. Daz is found in fetal gonocytes, spermatogonia and spermatocytes of adult testes. Here we discuss DAZ family genes in a phylogenic perspective, focusing on the common and distinct features of these genes, and their pivotal roles during gametogenesis evolved during evolution. PMID:26327816

  14. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1: The Outsider

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Michael; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is one of the first characterized proteins that bind auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses. Early studies characterized its auxin binding properties and focused on rapid electrophysiological and cell expansion responses, while subsequent work indicated a role in cell cycle and cell division control. Very recently, ABP1 has been ascribed a role in modulating endocytic events at the plasma membrane and RHO OF PLANTS-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements during asymmetric cell expansion. The exact molecular function of ABP1 is still unresolved, but its main activity apparently lies in influencing events at the plasma membrane. This review aims to connect the novel findings with the more classical literature on ABP1 and to point out the many open questions that still separate us from a comprehensive model of ABP1 action, almost 40 years after the first reports of its existence. PMID:21719690

  15. Protein Binding Studies with Zero Mode Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiee, K.; Foquet, M.; Cox, E. C.; Craighead, H. G.

    2004-03-01

    Single protein molecules binding to their DNA operator site are observed using zero mode waveguides, novel quasi one-dimensional optical nanostructures. The subwavelength features of the waveguides allow the formation of a focal volume smaller than those allowed by classical diffraction limited optics. The small observation volume allows the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure diffusion constants at fluorophore concentrations as high as10uM. Binding is observed between a DNA oligomer containing OR1, an operator site on the Lambda genome, and CI, the repressor protein that inhibits the bacteriophage's lytic growth cycle. The dimensions of the waveguide should allow a single DNA fragment to be fixed at the bottom where its binding dynamics can be characterized on a single molecule basis.

  16. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Suraya A; Martin, Stephen R; Howell, Steven A; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  17. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Suraya A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  18. Periplasmic Binding Proteins in Thermophiles: Characterization and Potential Application of an Arginine-Binding Protein from Thermotoga maritima: A Brief Thermo-Story.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Alessio; Staiano, Maria; Dattelbaum, Jonathan; Varriale, Antonio; Capo, Alessandro; D'Auria, Sabato

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima is a 27.7 kDa protein possessing the typical two-domain structure of the periplasmic binding proteins family. The protein is characterized by a very high specificity and affinity to bind to arginine, also at high temperatures. Due to its features, this protein could be taken into account as a potential candidate for the design of a biosensor for arginine. It is important to investigate the stability of proteins when they are used for biotechnological applications. In this article, we review the structural and functional features of an arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima with a particular eye on its potential biotechnological applications. PMID:25371336

  19. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  20. Computational characterization of TTHA0379: A potential glycerophosphocholine binding protein of Ugp ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed

    Chandravanshi, Monika; Gogoi, Prerana; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-11-01

    For the de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids, byproducts such as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) of glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway are imported inside the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter known as UgpABCE. Of which, UgpA and UgpE constitutes the transmembrane domains (TMDs), UgpC forms the dimer of ATP-hydrolyzing component and UgpB is the periplasmic substrate binding protein. Structurally, UgpABCE transporter displays similarity to the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli; thus, has been grouped into the CUT1 (Carbohydrate Uptake Transporter-1) family of bacterial ABC transporters. Being a member of CUT1 family, several Ugp (Uptake glycerol phosphate) protein sequences in biological database(s) exhibit sequence and structure similarity to sugar ABC transporters and have been annotated as sugar binding proteins; one of such proteins is TTHA0379 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Here, in this study, we used computational method(s) to distinguish UgpB and sugar binding proteins based on their primary and tertiary structure features. A comprehensive analysis of these proteins indicates that they are evolutionarily related to each other having common conserved features at their primary and tertiary structure levels. However, they display differences at their active sites owing to the dissimilarity in their ligand preferences. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of TTHA0379 along with UgpB and sugar binding proteins reveals that both the groups of proteins forms two distinct clades and TTHA0379 groups with UgpB proteins. Furthermore, analysis of the ligand binding pocket shows that all the essential features of glycerophosphocholine binding protein i.e. UgpB, are conserved in TTHA0379 as well. Combining these features, here, we designate TTHA0379 to be a GPC binding protein.

  1. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  2. Solution structure of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of the filamentous Pseudomonas phage Pf3: similarity to other proteins binding to single-stranded nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Folmer, R H; Nilges, M; Konings, R N; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the homodimeric single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous Pseudomonas bacteriophage Pf3 has been determined using heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques and restrained molecular dynamics. NMR experiments and structure calculations have been performed on a mutant protein (Phe36 --> His) that was successfully designed to reduce the tendency of the protein to aggregate. The protein monomer is composed of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet from which two beta-hairpins and a large loop protrude. The structure is compared with the single-stranded DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous Escherichia coli phage Ff, a protein with a similar biological function and DNA binding properties, yet quite different amino acid sequence, and with the major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli, a single-stranded DNA binding protein with an entirely different sequence, biological function and binding characteristics. The amino acid sequence of the latter is highly homologous to the nucleic acid binding domain (i.e. the cold shock domain) of proteins belonging to the Y-box family. Despite their differences in amino acid sequence and function, the folds of the three proteins are remarkably similar, suggesting that this is a preferred folding pattern shared by many single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Images PMID:7556054

  3. The Archaeal Lsm Protein Binds to Small RNAs*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Susan; Benz, Juliane; Späth, Bettina; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Straub, Julia; Granzow, Michaela; Raabe, Monika; Urlaub, Henning; Hoffmann, Jan; Brutschy, Bernd; Allers, Thorsten; Soppa, Jörg; Marchfelder, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Proteins of the Lsm family, including eukaryotic Sm proteins and bacterial Hfq, are key players in RNA metabolism. Little is known about the archaeal homologues of these proteins. Therefore, we characterized the Lsm protein from the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii using in vitro and in vivo approaches. H. volcanii encodes a single Lsm protein, which belongs to the Lsm1 subfamily. The lsm gene is co-transcribed and overlaps with the gene for the ribosomal protein L37e. Northern blot analysis shows that the lsm gene is differentially transcribed. The Lsm protein forms homoheptameric complexes and has a copy number of 4000 molecules/cell. In vitro analyses using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and ultrasoft mass spectrometry (laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption) showed a complex formation of the recombinant Lsm protein with oligo(U)-RNA, tRNAs, and an small RNA. Co-immunoprecipitation with a FLAG-tagged Lsm protein produced in vivo confirmed that the protein binds to small RNAs. Furthermore, the co-immunoprecipitation revealed several protein interaction partners, suggesting its involvement in different cellular pathways. The deletion of the lsm gene is viable, resulting in a pleiotropic phenotype, indicating that the haloarchaeal Lsm is involved in many cellular processes, which is in congruence with the number of protein interaction partners. PMID:20826804

  4. hebp3, a novel member of the heme-binding protein gene family, is expressed in the medaka meninges with higher abundance in females due to a direct stimulating action of ovarian estrogens.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Kiyoshi; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Okubo, Kataaki

    2013-02-01

    The brains of teleost fish exhibit remarkable sexual plasticity throughout their life span. To dissect the molecular basis for the development and reversal of sex differences in the teleost brain, we screened for genes differentially expressed between sexes in the brain of medaka (Oryzias latipes). One of the genes identified in the screen as being preferentially expressed in females was found to be a new member of the heme-binding protein gene family that includes hebp1 and hebp2 and was designated here as hebp3. The medaka hebp3 is expressed in the meninges with higher abundance in females, whereas there is no expression within the brain parenchyma. This female-biased expression of hebp3 is not attributable to the direct action of sex chromosome genes but results from the transient and reversible action of estrogens derived from the ovary. Moreover, estrogens directly activate the transcription of hebp3 via a palindromic estrogen-responsive element in the hebp3 promoter. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that hebp3 is a novel transcriptional target of estrogens, with female-biased expression in the meninges. The definite but reversible sexual dimorphism of the meningeal hebp3 expression may contribute to the development and reversal of sex differences in the teleost brain.

  5. The dynamics of ligands binding to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    2001-03-01

    The static structures of many proteins have been solved, and this has revealed much about how they function. On the other hand, although the importance of atomic motion to how proteins function has been conjectured for several decades, the characterization of protein dynamics on multiple time scales is scant. This is because of severe experimental and theoretical difficulties, particularly characterizing the nanosecond to millisecond time scales. Recently, several new techniques have been introduced that make it possible to initiate chemical reactions on fast time scales. We have applied advanced laser induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with nanosecond resolution to examine the binding kinetics of ligands to several enzymes. The observed kinetics take place over multiple time scales. The results reveal the dynamical nature of the binding process and show that there are substantial populations of many structures that are in a constant dynamic equilibrium in some cases. Some of these structures lie quite far from the static structure defined in crystallographic studies, which suggest that the conventional thermodynamical picture of binding (an equilibrium between ligand free in solution and bound) is far off the mark. Moreover, the results suggest that the dynamics can certainly play a crucial role in kinetic control of protein function as in, for example, affecting the rates of enzymatic catalysis. This work is a collaborative project with Hong Deng and Nick Zhadin, also at Albert Einstein. Work supported by the NSF and NIH.

  6. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Graether, Steffen P.; Boddington, Kelly F.

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  7. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Boddington, Kelly F

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  8. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    PubMed

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency for MTLE

  9. Neisseria meningitis GNA1030 is a ubiquinone-8 binding protein.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Danilo; Golfieri, Giacomo; Brier, Sébastien; Castagnini, Marta; Veggi, Daniele; Bottomley, Matthew James; Delany, Isabel; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Bexsero, a new vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB), is composed of 3 main recombinant proteins and an outer membrane vesicle component. One of the main bactericidal antigens, neisseria heparin binding antigen (NHBA), is present as a fusion protein with the accessory protein genome-derived neisserial antigen (GNA) 1030 to further increase its immunogenicity. The gene encoding for GNA1030 is present and highly conserved in all Neisseria strains, and although orthologs are present in numerous species, its biologic function is unknown. Native mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate that GNA1030 forms a homodimer associated with 2 molecules of ubiquinone-8 (Ub8), a cofactor mainly involved in the electron transport chain and with antioxidant properties. Disc diffusion assays on the wild-type and knockout mutant of GNA1030, in the presence of various compounds, suggested that GNA1030 is not involved in oxidative stress or electron chain transport per se, although it contributes to constitutive refilling of the inner membrane with Ub8. These studies shed light on an accessory protein present in Bexsero and reveal functional insights into the family of related proteins. On the basis of our findings, we propose to name the protein neisseria ubiquinone binding protein (NUbp).

  10. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  11. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression.

  12. Fathers and families: forging ties that bind.

    PubMed

    Lurie, T

    1992-01-01

    26% of all babies in the US are born to unmarried mothers and nearly 50% of all families headed by a single mother live in poverty. A growing number of programs across the US are seeking the most effective ways to help young unmarried fathers take legal, financial, and emotional responsibility for their children. For example, the Ford Foundation is supporting research and pilot projects that improve the employment opportunities of unwed mothers and fathers of children on welfare. A major obstacle to responsible fatherhood is that many men lack the education, training, and jobs they need to provide for their children. Often, young men are ordered to pay a child support amount that does not take into account their fluctuating employment history. Many programs are providing low-income fathers with the education and job opportunities they need to become consistent providers. Before they can become good fathers, many young men require guidance in dealing with feelings of anger and low self-esteem. Support groups connected with these programs address topics such as male-female relationships, child rearing, decision-making, racism, how to control anger, and what it means to take responsibility for your life. Evaluations are underway to determine what happens to young fathers once they leave these programs.

  13. Sterol carrier protein-2: binding protein for endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Liedhegner, Elizabeth Sabens; Vogt, Caleb D; Sem, Daniel S; Cunningham, Christopher W; Hillard, Cecilia J

    2014-08-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, consisting of eCB ligands and the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), subserves retrograde, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the brain. eCB signaling occurs "on-demand," thus the processes regulating synthesis, mobilization and degradation of eCBs are also primary mechanisms for the regulation of CB1R activity. The eCBs, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are poorly soluble in water. We hypothesize that their aqueous solubility, and, therefore, their intracellular and transcellular distribution, are facilitated by protein binding. Using in silico docking studies, we have identified the nonspecific lipid binding protein, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP-2), as a potential AEA binding protein. The docking studies predict that AEA and AM404 associate with SCP-2 at a putative cholesterol binding pocket with ∆G values of -3.6 and -4.6 kcal/mol, respectively. These values are considerably higher than cholesterol (-6.62 kcal/mol) but consistent with a favorable binding interaction. In support of the docking studies, SCP-2-mediated transfer of cholesterol in vitro is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AEA; and heterologous expression of SCP-2 in HEK 293 cells increases time-related accumulation of AEA in a temperature-dependent fashion. These results suggest that SCP-2 facilitates cellular uptake of AEA. However, there is no effect of SCP-2 transfection on the cellular accumulation of AEA determined at equilibrium or the IC50 values for AEA, AM404 or 2-AG to inhibit steady state accumulation of radiolabelled AEA. We conclude that SCP-2 is a low affinity binding protein for AEA that can facilitate its cellular uptake but does not contribute significantly to intracellular sequestration of AEA.

  14. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  15. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  16. The STAR RNA binding proteins GLD-1, QKI, SAM68 and SLM-2 bind bipartite RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, André; Richard, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Background SAM68, SAM68-like mammalian protein 1 (SLM-1) and 2 (SLM-2) are members of the K homology (KH) and STAR (signal transduction activator of RNA metabolism) protein family. The function of these RNA binding proteins has been difficult to elucidate mainly because of lack of genetic data providing insights about their physiological RNA targets. In comparison, genetic studies in mice and C. elegans have provided evidence as to the physiological mRNA targets of QUAKING and GLD-1 proteins, two other members of the STAR protein family. The GLD-1 binding site is defined as a hexanucleotide sequence (NACUCA) that is found in many, but not all, physiological GLD-1 mRNA targets. Previously by using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX), we defined the QUAKING binding site as a hexanucleotide sequence with an additional half-site (UAAY). This sequence was identified in QKI mRNA targets including the mRNAs for myelin basic proteins. Results Herein we report using SELEX the identification of the SLM-2 RNA binding site as direct U(U/A)AA repeats. The bipartite nature of the consensus sequence was essential for SLM-2 high affinity RNA binding. The identification of a bipartite mRNA binding site for QKI and now SLM-2 prompted us to determine whether SAM68 and GLD-1 also bind bipartite direct repeats. Indeed SAM68 bound the SLM-2 consensus and required both U(U/A)AA motifs. We also confirmed that GLD-1 also binds a bipartite RNA sequence in vitro with a short RNA sequence from its tra-2 physiological mRNA target. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the STAR proteins QKI, GLD-1, SAM68 and SLM-2 recognize RNA with direct repeats as bipartite motifs. This information should help identify binding sites within physiological RNA targets. PMID:19457263

  17. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  18. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  19. Glutamate regulates kainate-binding protein expression in cultured chick Bergmann glia through an activator protein-1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, A; López, T; López-Bayghen, E; Ortega, A

    2000-12-15

    The expression of the chick kainate-binding protein, a member of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, is restricted to the cerebellum, specifically to Bergmann glia. Glutamate induces a membrane to nuclei signaling involved in gene expression regulation. Exposure of cultured chick Bergmann glia cells to glutamate leads to an increase in kainate binding protein and mRNA levels, suggesting a transcriptional level of regulation. The 5' proximal region of the chick kainate binding gene was cloned and transfected 4into Bergmann glia cells. Three main regulatory regions could be defined, a minimal promoter region, a negative regulatory region, and interestingly, a glutamate-responsive element. Deletion of this element abolishes the agonist effect. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, cotransfection experiments, and site-directed mutagenesis clearly suggest that the glutamate effect is mediated through an AP-1 site by a Fos/Jun heterodimer. The present results favor the notion of a functional role of kainate-binding protein in glutamatergic cerebellar neurotransmission.

  20. Evidence for carbohydrate recognition and homotypic and heterotypic binding by the TIM family.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Peter R; Sedy, John R; Grigura, Vadim; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2007-06-01

    The T cell Ig domain and mucin domain (TIM) proteins form a conserved family of transmembrane cell-surface glycoproteins expressed by a variety of tissues. Each TIM protein contains a single V-type Ig domain, a glycosylated mucin-like domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain. TIM proteins recognize a diverse array of ligands, including H-ferritin, galectin-9 as well as other TIM family members. In this study, we demonstrate that the Ig domains of murine TIM-1, -3 and -4 display calcium-dependent binding to ligands expressed by murine splenocytes and several non-murine cell lines, indicating non-species-specific ligand recognition. Further, the intrafamilial interaction of various TIM family Ig domains with surface-expressed TIM-1 and TIM-4 requires an intact TIM-1 and TIM-4 glycosylated mucin stalk. Importantly, we also uncovered the previously unrecognized potential for homotypic TIM interactions in forming ligand-receptor pairs. Using a glycan array screen, we identified the novel capacity of the TIM-3 Ig domain to recognize specific carbohydrate moieties, suggesting a role for carbohydrate modification along with protein epitopes in TIM ligand recognition. Identification of the carbohydrate-binding capacity of TIM proteins helps explain the diversity of ligands recognized by this family and adds to our understanding of homotypic and heterotypic interactions between TIM family members.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a monocot mannose-binding lectin from Crocus vernus (family Iridaceae).

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Astoul, C H; Barre, A; Rougé, P; Peumans, W J

    2000-08-01

    The molecular structure and carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectin from bulbs of spring crocus (Crocus vernus) has been determined unambiguously using a combination of protein analysis and cDNA cloning. Molecular cloning revealed that the lectin called C. vernus agglutinin (CVA) is encoded by a precursor consisting of two tandemly arrayed lectin domains with a reasonable sequence similarity to the monocot mannose-binding lectins. Post-translational cleavage of the precursor yields two equally sized polypeptides. Mature CVA consists of two pairs of polypeptides and hence is a heterotetrameric protein. Surface plasmon resonance studies of the interaction of the crocus lectin with high mannose-type glycans showed that the lectin interacts specifically with exposed alpha-1,3-dimannosyl motifs. Molecular modelling studies confirmed further the close relationships in overall fold and three-dimensional structure of the mannose-binding sites of the crocus lectin and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. However, docking experiments indicate that only one of the six putative mannose-binding sites of the CVA protomer is active. These results can explain the weak carbohydrate-binding activity and low specific agglutination activity of the lectin. As the cloning and characterization of the spring crocus lectin demonstrate that the monocot mannose-binding lectins occur also within the family Iridaceae a refined model of the molecular evolution of this lectin family is proposed.

  2. Novel stereospecificity of the L-arabinose-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiocho, Florante A.; Vyas, Nand K.

    1984-08-01

    Tertiary structure refinement at 1.7 Å resolution of the liganded form of L-arabinose-binding protein from Escherichia coli has revealed a novel binding site geometry which accommodates both α- and β-anomers of L-arabinose. This detailed structure analysis provides new understanding of protein-sugar interaction, the process by which the binding protein minimizes the difference in the stability of the two bound sugar anomers, and the roles of periplasmic binding proteins in active transport

  3. Systematic discovery of Xist RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ci; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Flynn, Ryan A; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Calabrese, J Mauro; Magnuson, Terry; Heard, Edith; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-04-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function with associated proteins to effect complex structural and regulatory outcomes. To reveal the composition and dynamics of specific noncoding RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) in vivo, we developed comprehensive identification of RNA binding proteins by mass spectrometry (ChIRP-MS). ChIRP-MS analysis of four ncRNAs captures key protein interactors, including a U1-specific link to the 3' RNA processing machinery. Xist, an essential lncRNA for X chromosome inactivation (XCI), interacts with 81 proteins from chromatin modification, nuclear matrix, and RNA remodeling pathways. The Xist RNA-protein particle assembles in two steps coupled with the transition from pluripotency to differentiation. Specific interactors include HnrnpK, which participates in Xist-mediated gene silencing and histone modifications but not Xist localization, and Drosophila Split ends homolog Spen, which interacts via the A-repeat domain of Xist and is required for gene silencing. Thus, Xist lncRNA engages with proteins in a modular and developmentally controlled manner to coordinate chromatin spreading and silencing.

  4. Systematic discovery of Xist RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ci; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Flynn, Ryan A.; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Calabrese, J. Mauro; Magnuson, Terry; Heard, Edith; Chang, Howard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function with associated proteins to effect complex structural and regulatory outcomes. To reveal the composition and dynamics of specific noncoding RNA- protein complexes (RNPs) in vivo, we developed comprehensive identification of RNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry (ChIRP-MS). ChIRP-MS analysis of four ncRNAs captures key protein interactors, including a U1-specific link to the 3′ RNA processing machinery. Xist, an essential lncRNA for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), interacts with 81 proteins from chromatin modification, nuclear matrix, and RNA remodeling pathways. The Xist RNA-protein particle assembles in two steps coupled with the transition from pluripotency to differentiation. Specific interactors include HnrnpK that participates in Xist-mediated gene silencing and histone modifications, but not Xist localization and Drosophila Split ends homolog Spen that interacts via the A-repeat domain of Xist and is required for gene silencing. Thus, Xist lncRNA engages with proteins in a modular and developmentally controlled manner to coordinate chromatin spreading and silencing. PMID:25843628

  5. Vaccinia Virus N1l Protein Resembles a B Cell Lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) Family Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, M.; Zhai, D.; Jin, C.; Aleshin, A.E.; Stec, B.; Reed, J.C.; Liddington, R.C.; /Burnham Inst.

    2007-07-03

    Poxviruses encode immuno-modulatory proteins capable of subverting host defenses. The poxvirus vaccinia expresses a small 14-kDa protein, N1L, that is critical for virulence. We report the crystal structure of N1L, which reveals an unexpected but striking resemblance to host apoptotic regulators of the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family. Although N1L lacks detectable Bcl-2 homology (BH) motifs at the sequence level, we show that N1L binds with high affinity to the BH3 peptides of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in vitro, consistent with a role for N1L in modulating host antiviral defenses.

  6. Association of polymorphisms in solute carrier family 27, isoform A6 (SLC27A6) and fatty acid-binding protein-3 and fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP3 and FABP4) with fatty acid composition of bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Nafikov, R A; Schoonmaker, J P; Korn, K T; Noack, K; Garrick, D J; Koehler, K J; Minick-Bormann, J; Reecy, J M; Spurlock, D E; Beitz, D C

    2013-09-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop tools for genetic selection of animals producing milk with a lower concentration of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and a higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). The reasons for changing milk fatty acid (FA) composition were to improve milk technological properties, such as for production of more spreadable butter, and milk nutritional value with respect to the potentially adverse effects of SFA on human health. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in solute carrier family 27, isoform A6 (SLC27A6) fatty acid transport protein gene and fatty acid binding protein (FABP)-3 and FABP-4 (FABP3 and FABP4) would affect the selectivity of FA uptake into, and FA redistribution inside, mammary epithelial cells, resulting in altered FA composition of bovine milk. The objectives of our study were to discover genetic polymorphisms in SLC27A6, FABP3, and FABP4, and to test those polymorphisms for associations with milk FA composition. The results showed that after pairwise comparisons between SLC27A6 haplotypes for significantly associated traits, haplotype H3 was significantly associated with 1.37 weight percentage (wt%) lower SFA concentration, 0.091 lower SFA:UFA ratio, and 0.17 wt% lower lauric acid (12:0) concentration, but 1.37 wt% higher UFA and 1.24 wt% higher monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) concentrations compared with haplotype H1 during the first 3 mo of lactation. Pairwise comparisons between FABP4 haplotypes for significantly associated traits showed that haplotype H3 was significantly associated with 1.04 wt% lower SFA concentration, 0.079 lower SFA:UFA ratio, 0.15 wt% lower lauric acid (12:0), and 0.27 wt% lower myristic acid (14:0) concentrations, but 1.04 wt% higher UFA and 0.91 wt% higher MUFA concentrations compared with haplotype H1 during the first 3 mo of lactation. Percentages of genetic variance explained by H3 versus H1 haplotype substitutions for SLC27A6 and FABP4 ranged from 2.50 to 4.86% and

  7. Engineering a uranyl specific binding protein from NikR.

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, S. V.; Boyaci, H.; Chen, H.; Jensen, M. P.; He, C.

    2009-03-16

    The first uranyl-selective DNA-binding protein is designed using the E. coli nickel(II)-responsive protein NikR as the template. The resulting NikR? protein binds uranyl (see picture) with a dissociation constant Kd=53?nM and selectively binds to DNA in the presence of uranyl.

  8. Copper-binding protein in Mimulus guttatus

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.J.; Thurman, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    A Cu-binding protein has been purified from the roots of Mimulus guttatus using gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-75 and anion exchange chromatography on DEAE Biogel A. The protein has similar properties to putative metallothioneins (MTS) purified from other angiosperms. Putative MT was estimated by measuring the relative percentage incorporation of (/sup 35/S) into fractions containing the protein after HPLC on SW 3000-gel. In the roots of both Cu-tolerant and non tolerant plants synthesis of putative MT is induced by increased Cu concentration in the nutrient solution. The relative percentage incorporation of (/sup 35/S) into putative MT is significantly higher in extracts from the roots of Cu-tolerant than non tolerant M. guttatus after growth in 1 ..mu..M Cu suggesting involvement in the mechanism of tolerance. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Identification of DNA-binding and protein-binding proteins using enhanced graph wavelet features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Zhou, Weiqiang; Dai, Dao-Qing; Yan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between biomolecules play an essential role in various biological processes. For predicting DNA-binding or protein-binding proteins, many machine-learning-based techniques have used various types of features to represent the interface of the complexes, but they only deal with the properties of a single atom in the interface and do not take into account the information of neighborhood atoms directly. This paper proposes a new feature representation method for biomolecular interfaces based on the theory of graph wavelet. The enhanced graph wavelet features (EGWF) provides an effective way to characterize interface feature through adding physicochemical features and exploiting a graph wavelet formulation. Particularly, graph wavelet condenses the information around the center atom, and thus enhances the discrimination of features of biomolecule binding proteins in the feature space. Experiment results show that EGWF performs effectively for predicting DNA-binding and protein-binding proteins in terms of Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) score and the area value under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). PMID:24334394

  10. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity.

  11. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  12. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  13. Are odorant-binding proteins involved in odorant discrimination?

    PubMed

    Steinbrecht, R A

    1996-12-01

    Pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea of nine moth species belonging to six families and three superfamilies of Lepidoptera were immunolabelled with an antiserum against the pheromone-binding protein of Antheraea polyphemus. Strong immunolabelling of the sensillum lymph was observed in all long sensilla trichodea of A. polyphemus, A. pernyi (Saturniidae), Bombyx mori (Bombycidae) and Manduca sexta (Sphingidae). Very weak labelling was found with all sensilla trichodea of Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lasiocampidae) and Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae). In three noctuid species, some long sensilla trichodea were labelled strongly, some only weakly and some were not labelled at all. The fraction of long sensilla trichodea that were strongly labelled was large in Helicoverpa armigera, but small in Spodoptera littoralis and Autographa gamma. The observed cross-reactivity was not correlated with taxonomic relatedness of the species but rather with chemical relatedness of the pheromones used by these species, as a high labelling density was consistently observed in sensilla tuned to pheromones with an alcyl chain of 16 carbon atoms. The highly divergent specificity of pheromone-receptor cells in Noctuidae appears to be mirrored by a similar diversity of the pheromone-binding proteins in the sensilla trichodea. These data support the notion that pheromone-binding proteins participate in odorant discrimination.

  14. Are odorant-binding proteins involved in odorant discrimination?

    PubMed

    Steinbrecht, R A

    1996-12-01

    Pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea of nine moth species belonging to six families and three superfamilies of Lepidoptera were immunolabelled with an antiserum against the pheromone-binding protein of Antheraea polyphemus. Strong immunolabelling of the sensillum lymph was observed in all long sensilla trichodea of A. polyphemus, A. pernyi (Saturniidae), Bombyx mori (Bombycidae) and Manduca sexta (Sphingidae). Very weak labelling was found with all sensilla trichodea of Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lasiocampidae) and Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae). In three noctuid species, some long sensilla trichodea were labelled strongly, some only weakly and some were not labelled at all. The fraction of long sensilla trichodea that were strongly labelled was large in Helicoverpa armigera, but small in Spodoptera littoralis and Autographa gamma. The observed cross-reactivity was not correlated with taxonomic relatedness of the species but rather with chemical relatedness of the pheromones used by these species, as a high labelling density was consistently observed in sensilla tuned to pheromones with an alcyl chain of 16 carbon atoms. The highly divergent specificity of pheromone-receptor cells in Noctuidae appears to be mirrored by a similar diversity of the pheromone-binding proteins in the sensilla trichodea. These data support the notion that pheromone-binding proteins participate in odorant discrimination. PMID:8985600

  15. Mechanical unfolding of ribose binding protein and its comparison with other periplasmic binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Narayan, Satya; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2014-10-01

    Folding and unfolding studies on large, multidomain proteins are still rare despite their high abundance in genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the unfolding properties of a 271 residue, two-domain ribose binding protein (RBP) from the bacterial periplasm using single-molecule force spectroscopy. We observe that RBP predominately unfolds via a two-state pathway with an unfolding force of ∼80 pN and an unfolding contour length of ∼95 nm. Only a small population (∼15%) of RBP follows three-state pathways. The ligand binding neither increases the mechanical stability nor influences the unfolding flux of RBP through different pathways. The kinetic partitioning between two-state and three-state pathways, which has been reported earlier for other periplasmic proteins, is also observed in RBP, albeit to a lesser extent. These results provide important insights into the mechanical stability and unfolding processes of large two-domain proteins and highlight the contrasting features upon ligand binding. Protein structural topology diagrams are used to explain the differences in the mechanical unfolding behavior of RBP with other periplasmic binding proteins.

  16. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  17. Human complement protein C99 is a calcium binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Thielens, N.M.; Lohner, K.; Esser, A.F.

    1988-05-15

    Human complement protein C9 is shown to be a metalloprotein that binds 1 mol of Ca/sup 2 +//mol of C9 with a dissociation constant of 3 ..mu..m as measured by equilibrium dialysis. Incubation with EDTA removes the bound calcium, resulting in a apoprotein with decreased thermal stability. This loss in stability leads to aggregation and, therefore, to loss of hemolytic activity upon heating to a few degrees above the physiological temperature. Heat-induced aggregation of apoC9 can be prevented by salts that stabilize proteins according to the Hofmeister series of lyotropic ions, suggesting that the ion in native C9 may ligand with more than one structural element of domain of the protein. Ligand blotting indicates that the calcium binding site is located in the amino-terminal half of the protein. Removal of calcium by inclusion of EDTA in assay mixtures has no effect on the hemolytic activity of C9, and its capacity to bind to C8 in solution, or to small unilamellar lipid vesicles at temperatures at or below the physiological range. Although the precise structural and functional role of the bound calcium is not know, it is clear that it provides thermal stability to C9 and it may have a function in regulation of membrane insertion.

  18. Computational Study on Hemoglobin Protein Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, Dana; Isvoran, Adriana; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2009-05-01

    We have analyzed 19 proteins belonging to hemoglobin protein family: 3 for plants, 4 for invertebrates and the others for vertebrates. For every protein we have determined the following parameters: the fractal dimension of its backbone, the fractal dimension of its surface, the radius of gyration, the area of its molecular surface and the area of the surface of its cavities. At global level, we did not notice significant differences for the fractal parameters for proteins belonging to different organisms and it underlines that all these proteins perform the same biological function. We have obtained different values of the local and global surface fractal dimensions reflecting distinct roughness of protein pockets in comparison to the entire surface, also in good correlation with the biological function. The geometric characteristics are distinct for the three investigated families of proteins.

  19. Regulation of Pluripotency by RNA Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Julia; Blelloch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Establishment, maintenance, and exit from pluripotency require precise coordination of a cell’s molecular machinery. Substantial headway has been made in deciphering many aspects of this elaborate system, particularly with respect to epigenetics, transcription, and noncoding RNAs. Less attention has been paid to posttranscriptional regulatory processes such as alternative splicing, RNA processing and modification, nuclear export, regulation of transcript stability, and translation. Here, we introduce the RNA binding proteins that enable the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, summarizing current and ongoing research on their roles at different regulatory points and discussing how they help script the fate of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25192462

  20. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  1. Computational Design of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer; Song, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of engineered and naturally occurring sequence perturbations to protein-DNA interfaces requires accurate computational modeling technologies. It has been well established that computational design to accommodate small numbers of DNA target site substitutions is possible. This chapter details the basic method of design used in the Rosetta macromolecular modeling program that has been successfully used to modulate the specificity of DNA-binding proteins. More recently, combining computational design and directed evolution has become a common approach for increasing the success rate of protein engineering projects. The power of such high-throughput screening depends on computational methods producing multiple potential solutions. Therefore, this chapter describes several protocols for increasing the diversity of designed output. Lastly, we describe an approach for building comparative models of protein-DNA complexes in order to utilize information from homologous sequences. These models can be used to explore how nature modulates specificity of protein-DNA interfaces and potentially can even be used as starting templates for further engineering. PMID:27094297

  2. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  3. Two hypervariable minisatellite DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Swenson, G; Moore, P D

    1991-06-25

    Hypervariable minisatellite DNA sequences are short, tandemly repeated sequences present at numerous loci in eukaryotes. They stimulate intermolecular homologous recombination up to 13-fold in human cells in culture and may be specific sites for the initiation of recombination in the eukaryotic genome (Wahls, W.P., Wallace, L.J., & Moore, P.D. (1990) Cell 60, 95-103). Reported here is the detection and partial purification of two hypervariable minisatellite DNA binding proteins, called Msbp-2 and Msbp-3, present in the nuclear extracts of human HeLa cells. The proteins elute from a gel filtration column with a native mass of 200-250 kDa and have sizes of 77 kDa and 115 kDa respectively. PMID:2062643

  4. Alternative polyadenylation and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the extent of microRNA-based gene regulation has expanded in an impressive pace over the past decade. Now, we are beginning to better appreciate the role of 3'-UTR (untranslated region) cis-elements which harbor not only microRNA but also RNA-binding protein (RBP) binding sites that have significant effect on the stability and translational rate of mRNAs. To add further complexity, alternative polyadenylation (APA) emerges as a widespread mechanism to regulate gene expression by producing shorter or longer mRNA isoforms that differ in the length of their 3'-UTRs or even coding sequences. Resulting shorter mRNA isoforms generally lack cis-elements where trans-acting factors bind, and hence are differentially regulated compared with the longer isoforms. This review focuses on the RBPs involved in APA regulation and their action mechanisms on APA-generated isoforms. A better understanding of the complex interactions between APA and RBPs is promising for mechanistic and clinical implications including biomarker discovery and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27208003

  5. Amyloid Beta A4 Precursor Protein-binding Family B Member 1 (FE65) Interactomics Revealed Synaptic Vesicle Glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) and Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) as New Binding Proteins in the Human Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Nensa, Fabian M.; Neumann, Martin H. D.; Schrötter, Andreas; Przyborski, Andre; Mastalski, Thomas; Susdalzew, Sergej; Looβe, Christina; Helling, Stefan; El Magraoui, Fouzi; Erdmann, Ralf; Meyer, Helmut E.; Uszkoreit, Julian; Eisenacher, Martin; Suh, Jaehong; Guénette, Suzanne Y.; Röhner, Nelli; Kögel, Donat; Theiss, Carsten; Marcus, Katrin; Müller, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    FE65 is a cytosolic adapter protein and an important binding partner of amyloid precursor protein. Dependent on Thr668 phosphorylation in amyloid precursor protein, which influences amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing, FE65 undergoes nuclear translocation, thereby transmitting a signal from the cell membrane to the nucleus. As this translocation may be relevant in Alzheimer disease, and as FE65 consists of three protein–protein interaction domains able to bind and affect a variety of other proteins and downstream signaling pathways, the identification of the FE65 interactome is of central interest in Alzheimer disease research. In this study, we identified 121 proteins as new potential FE65 interacting proteins in a pulldown/mass spectrometry approach using human post-mortem brain samples as protein pools for recombinantly expressed FE65. Co-immunoprecipitation assays further validated the interaction of FE65 with the candidates SV2A and SERCA2. In parallel, we investigated the whole cell proteome of primary hippocampal neurons from FE65/FE65L1 double knockout mice. Notably, the validated FE65 binding proteins were also found to be differentially abundant in neurons derived from the FE65 knockout mice relative to wild-type control neurons. SERCA2 is an important player in cellular calcium homeostasis, which was found to be up-regulated in double knockout neurons. Indeed, knock-down of FE65 in HEK293T cells also evoked an elevated sensitivity to thapsigargin, a stressor specifically targeting the activity of SERCA2. Thus, our results suggest that FE65 is involved in the regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Whereas transfection of FE65 alone caused a typical dot-like phenotype in the nucleus, co-transfection of SV2A significantly reduced the percentage of FE65 dot-positive cells, pointing to a possible role for SV2A in the modulation of FE65 intracellular targeting. Given that SV2A has a signaling function at the presynapse, its effect on

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of the VQ Protein Family and VQ Protein Variants from Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Xinjian; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing the FxxxVQxhTG or VQ motif interact with WRKY transcription factors. Although VQ proteins have been reported in several plants, knowledge about their structures, functions and evolution is still very limited. Here, we report structural and functional analysis of the VQ protein family from soybean. Like Arabidopsis homologues, soybean VQ proteins bind only Group I and IIc WRKY proteins and a substantial number of their genes are responsive to stress-associated phytohormones. Overexpression of some soybean VQ genes in Arabidopsis had strong effects on plant growth, development, disease resistance and heat tolerance. Phylogenetic analysis, sequence alignment and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the region immediately upstream of the FxxxVQxhTG motif also affects binding to WRKY proteins. Consistent with a larger WRKY-binding VQ domain, soybean VQ22 protein from cultivated soybean contains a 4-amino acid deletion in the region preceding its VQ motif that completely abolishes its binding to WRKY proteins. By contrast, the 4-amino acid deletion is absent in the VQ22 protein from wild soybean species (Glycine soja). Overexpression of wild soybean VQ22 in cultivated soybean inhibited growth, particularly after cold treatment. Thus, the mutation of soybean VQ22 is associated with advantageous phenotypes and may have been positively selected during evolution. PMID:27708406

  7. Arylfluorosulfates Inactivate Intracellular Lipid Binding Protein(s) through Chemoselective SuFEx Reaction with a Binding Site Tyr Residue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wentao; Dong, Jiajia; Plate, Lars; Mortenson, David E; Brighty, Gabriel J; Li, Suhua; Liu, Yu; Galmozzi, Andrea; Lee, Peter S; Hulce, Jonathan J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique; Powers, Evan T; Wilson, Ian A; Sharpless, K Barry; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-06-15

    Arylfluorosulfates have appeared only rarely in the literature and have not been explored as probes for covalent conjugation to proteins, possibly because they were assumed to possess high reactivity, as with other sulfur(VI) halides. However, we find that arylfluorosulfates become reactive only under certain circumstances, e.g., when fluoride displacement by a nucleophile is facilitated. Herein, we explore the reactivity of structurally simple arylfluorosulfates toward the proteome of human cells. We demonstrate that the protein reactivity of arylfluorosulfates is lower than that of the corresponding aryl sulfonyl fluorides, which are better characterized with regard to proteome reactivity. We discovered that simple hydrophobic arylfluorosulfates selectively react with a few members of the intracellular lipid binding protein (iLBP) family. A central function of iLBPs is to deliver small-molecule ligands to nuclear hormone receptors. Arylfluorosulfate probe 1 reacts with a conserved tyrosine residue in the ligand-binding site of a subset of iLBPs. Arylfluorosulfate probes 3 and 4, featuring a biphenyl core, very selectively and efficiently modify cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), both in vitro and in living cells. The X-ray crystal structure of the CRABP2-4 conjugate, when considered together with binding site mutagenesis experiments, provides insight into how CRABP2 might activate arylfluorosulfates toward site-specific reaction. Treatment of breast cancer cells with probe 4 attenuates nuclear hormone receptor activity mediated by retinoic acid, an endogenous client lipid of CRABP2. Our findings demonstrate that arylfluorosulfates can selectively target single iLBPs, making them useful for understanding iLBP function. PMID:27191344

  8. Variant-specific surface proteins of Giardia lamblia are zinc-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nash, T E; Mowatt, M R

    1993-01-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes surface antigenic variation. The variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) are a distinct family of cysteine-rich proteins. Characteristically, cysteine residues occur mostly as CXXC tetrapeptides. Four of the reported five VSPs contain a putative metal-binding domain that resembles other metal-binding motifs; the fifth is closely related but lacks an essential histidine. Three different native VSPs bound Zn2+. Co2+, Cu2+, and Cd2+ inhibited Zn2+ binding. Analysis of recombinant VSP fusion proteins showed that the putative binding motif bound Zn2+. Surprisingly, peptide fragments from other regions of the VSP contain numerous CXXCXnCXXC motifs that also bound Zn2+. Analysis of deduced amino acid sequences showed well-conserved CXXC spacing in three out of five VSPs, suggesting conservation of structure despite amino acid sequence divergence. The function of VSPs is unknown, but by binding Zn2+ or other metals in the intestine, VSPs may contribute to Zn2+ malnutrition or inhibition of metal-dependent intestinal enzymes, which would lead to malabsorption, a well-known consequence of giardiasis. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8516291

  9. Flies expand the repertoire of protein structures that bind ice.

    PubMed

    Basu, Koli; Graham, Laurie A; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-01-20

    An antifreeze protein (AFP) with no known homologs has been identified in Lake Ontario midges (Chironomidae). The midge AFP is expressed as a family of isoforms at low levels in adults, which emerge from fresh water in spring before the threat of freezing temperatures has passed. The 9.1-kDa major isoform derived from a preproprotein precursor is glycosylated and has a 10-residue tandem repeating sequence xxCxGxYCxG, with regularly spaced cysteines, glycines, and tyrosines comprising one-half its 79 residues. Modeling and molecular dynamics predict a tightly wound left-handed solenoid fold in which the cysteines form a disulfide core to brace each of the eight 10-residue coils. The solenoid is reinforced by intrachain hydrogen bonds, side-chain salt bridges, and a row of seven stacked tyrosines on the hydrophobic side that forms the putative ice-binding site. A disulfide core is also a feature of the similar-sized beetle AFP that is a β-helix with seven 12-residue coils and a comparable circular dichroism spectrum. The midge and beetle AFPs are not homologous and their ice-binding sites are radically different, with the latter comprising two parallel arrays of outward-pointing threonines. However, their structural similarities is an amazing example of convergent evolution in different orders of insects to cope with change to a colder climate and provide confirmation about the physical features needed for a protein to bind ice.

  10. Flies expand the repertoire of protein structures that bind ice

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Graham, Laurie A.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    An antifreeze protein (AFP) with no known homologs has been identified in Lake Ontario midges (Chironomidae). The midge AFP is expressed as a family of isoforms at low levels in adults, which emerge from fresh water in spring before the threat of freezing temperatures has passed. The 9.1-kDa major isoform derived from a preproprotein precursor is glycosylated and has a 10-residue tandem repeating sequence xxCxGxYCxG, with regularly spaced cysteines, glycines, and tyrosines comprising one-half its 79 residues. Modeling and molecular dynamics predict a tightly wound left-handed solenoid fold in which the cysteines form a disulfide core to brace each of the eight 10-residue coils. The solenoid is reinforced by intrachain hydrogen bonds, side-chain salt bridges, and a row of seven stacked tyrosines on the hydrophobic side that forms the putative ice-binding site. A disulfide core is also a feature of the similar-sized beetle AFP that is a β-helix with seven 12-residue coils and a comparable circular dichroism spectrum. The midge and beetle AFPs are not homologous and their ice-binding sites are radically different, with the latter comprising two parallel arrays of outward-pointing threonines. However, their structural similarities is an amazing example of convergent evolution in different orders of insects to cope with change to a colder climate and provide confirmation about the physical features needed for a protein to bind ice. PMID:25561557

  11. Helical Defects in MicroRNA Influence Protein Binding by TAR RNA Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Roderico; Orench-Rivera, Nichole; Quarles, Kaycee A.; Showalter, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Their precursors have a globally A-form helical geometry, which prevents most proteins from identifying their nucleotide sequence. This suggests the hypothesis that local structural features (e.g., bulges, internal loops) play a central role in specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) selection from cellular RNA pools by dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) containing proteins. Furthermore, the processing enzymes in the miRNA maturation pathway require tandem-dsRBD cofactor proteins for optimal function, suggesting that dsRBDs play a key role in the molecular mechanism for precise positioning of the RNA within these multi-protein complexes. Here, we focus on the tandem-dsRBDs of TRBP, which have been shown to bind dsRNA tightly. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a combination of dsRNA binding assays demonstrating that TRBP binds dsRNA in an RNA-length dependent manner. Moreover, circular dichroism data shows that the number of dsRBD moieties bound to RNA at saturation is different for a tandem-dsRBD construct than for constructs with only one dsRBD per polypeptide, revealing another reason for the selective pressure to maintain multiple domains within a polypeptide chain. Finally, we show that helical defects in precursor miRNA alter the apparent dsRNA size, demonstrating that imperfections in RNA structure influence the strength of TRBP binding. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that TRBP is responsible for recognizing structural imperfections in miRNA precursors, in the sense that TRBP is unable to bind imperfections efficiently and thus is positioned around them. We propose that once positioned around structural defects, TRBP assists Dicer and the rest of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) in providing efficient and homogenous conversion of substrate precursor miRNA into mature miRNA downstream. PMID:25608000

  12. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  13. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  14. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated. PMID:27283515

  15. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated.

  16. Interaction of Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) with septin family proteins in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Mayu; Shinoda, Yo; Hirano, Touko; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Furuichi, Teiichi; Sadakata, Tetsushi

    2016-03-23

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) protein plays a regulatory role in the dense-core vesicle exocytosis pathway. To clarify the functions of this protein in the brain, we searched for novel interaction partners of CAPS1 by mass spectrometry. We identified a specific interaction of CAPS1 with septin family proteins. We also demonstrated that the C-terminal region of the CAPS1 protein binds to part of the deduced GTP-binding domain of septin proteins. It is possible that a tertiary complex of septin, CAPS, and syntaxin contributes to dense-core vesicle trafficking and exocytosis in neurons.

  17. Ion Binding Energies Determining Functional Transport of ClC Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Guo, Xu; Zou, Xian-Wu; Sang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    The ClC-type proteins, a large family of chloride transport proteins ubiquitously expressed in biological organisms, have been extensively studied for decades. Biological function of ClC proteins can be reflected by analyzing the binding situation of Cl- ions. We investigate ion binding properties of ClC-ec1 protein with the atomic molecular dynamics simulation approach. The calculated electrostatic binding energy results indicate that Cl- at the central binding site Scen has more binding stability than the internal binding site Sint. Quantitative comparison between the latest experimental heat release data isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and our calculated results demonstrates that chloride ions prefer to bind at Scen than Sint in the wild-type ClC-ec1 structure and prefer to bind at Sext and Scen than Sint in mutant E148A/E148Q structures. Even though the chloride ions make less contribution to heat release when binding to Sint and are relatively unstable in the Cl- pathway, they are still part contributors for the Cl- functional transport. This work provides a guide rule to estimate the importance of Cl- at the binding sites and how chloride ions have influences on the function of ClC proteins.

  18. Roles for RNA-binding proteins in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Brinegar, Amy E; Cooper, Thomas A

    2016-09-15

    RNA-binding protein activities are highly regulated through protein levels, intracellular localization, and post-translation modifications. During development, mRNA processing of specific gene sets is regulated through manipulation of functional RNA-binding protein activities. The impact of altered RNA-binding protein activities also affects human diseases in which there are either a gain-of-function or loss-of-function causes pathogenesis. We will discuss RNA-binding proteins and their normal developmental RNA metabolism and contrast how their function is disrupted in disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease.

  19. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-01-01

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence. PMID:26612539

  20. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-01-01

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence. PMID:26612539

  1. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-11-27

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence.

  2. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  3. The SYSTERS Protein Family Database in 2005.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Thomas; Krause, Antje; Luz, Hannes; Vingron, Martin; Staub, Eike

    2005-01-01

    The SYSTERS project aims to provide a meaningful partitioning of the whole protein sequence space by a fully automatic procedure. A refined two-step algorithm assigns each protein to a family and a superfamily. The sequence data underlying SYSTERS release 4 now comprise several protein sequence databases derived from completely sequenced genomes (ENSEMBL, TAIR, SGD and GeneDB), in addition to the comprehensive Swiss-Prot/TrEMBL databases. The SYSTERS web server (http://systers.molgen.mpg.de) provides access to 158 153 SYSTERS protein families. To augment the automatically derived results, information from external databases like Pfam and Gene Ontology are added to the web server. Furthermore, users can retrieve pre-processed analyses of families like multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees. New query options comprise a batch retrieval tool for functional inference about families based on automatic keyword extraction from sequence annotations. A new access point, PhyloMatrix, allows the retrieval of phylogenetic profiles of SYSTERS families across organisms with completely sequenced genomes.

  4. Latent TGF-β-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ian B.; Horiguchi, Masahito; Zilberberg, Lior; Dabovic, Branka; Hadjiolova, Krassimira; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The LTBPs (or latent transforming growth factor β binding proteins) are important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that interact with fibrillin microfibrils and have a number of different roles in microfibril biology. There are four LTBPs isoforms in the human genome (LTBP-1, -2, -3, and -4), all of which appear to associate with fibrillin and the biology of each isoform is reviewed here. The LTBPs were first identified as forming latent complexes with TGFβ by covalently binding the TGFβ propeptide (LAP) via disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum. LAP in turn is cleaved from the mature TGFβ precursor in the trans golgi network but LAP and TGFβ remain strongly bound through non-covalent interactions. LAP, TGFβ, and LTBP together form the large latent complex (LLC). LTBPs were originally thought to primarily play a role in maintaining TGFβ latency and targeting the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but it has also been shown that LTBP-1 participates in TGFβ activation by integrins and may also regulate activation by proteases and other factors. LTBP-3 appears to have a role in skeletal formation including tooth development. As well as having important functions in TGFβ regulation, TGFβ-independent activities have recently been identified for LTBP-2 and LTBP-4 in stabilizing microfibril bundles and regulating elastic fiber assembly. PMID:25960419

  5. Molecular cloning of bullfrog saxiphilin: a unique relative of the transferrin family that binds saxitoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, M A; Moczydlowski, E

    1994-01-01

    Plasma and tissue of certain vertebrates contain a protein called saxiphilin that specifically binds the neurotoxin saxitoxin with nanomolar affinity. We describe the isolation of a cDNA clone of saxiphilin from liver of the North American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). The cDNA sequence encodes a protein that is evolutionarily related to members of the transferrin family of Fe(3+)-binding proteins. Pairwise sequence alignment of saxiphilin with various transferrins reveals amino acid identity as high as 51% and predicts 14 disulfide bonds that are highly conserved. The larger size of saxiphilin (91 kDa) versus serum transferrin (approximately 78 kDa) is primarily due to a unique insertion of 144 residues. This insertion contains a 49-residue domain classified as a type 1 repetitive element of thyroglobulin, which is shared by a variety of membrane, secreted, and extracellular matrix proteins. Saxiphilin also differs from transferrins in 9 of 10 highly conserved amino acids in the two homologous Fe3+/HCO3-binding sites of transferrin. Identification of saxiphilin implies that transferrin-like proteins comprise a diverse superfamily with functions other than iron binding. Images PMID:8146142

  6. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  7. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  8. Serum amyloid A is a retinol binding protein that transports retinol during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Derebe, Mehabaw G; Zlatkov, Clare M; Gattu, Sureka; Ruhn, Kelly A; Vaishnava, Shipra; Diehl, Gretchen E; MacMillan, John B; Williams, Noelle S; Hooper, Lora V

    2014-07-29

    Retinol plays a vital role in the immune response to infection, yet proteins that mediate retinol transport during infection have not been identified. Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization, but their exact functions remain unclear. Here we show that mouse and human SAAs are retinol binding proteins. Mouse and human SAAs bound retinol with nanomolar affinity, were associated with retinol in vivo, and limited the bacterial burden in tissues after acute infection. We determined the crystal structure of mouse SAA3 at a resolution of 2 Å, finding that it forms a tetramer with a hydrophobic binding pocket that can accommodate retinol. Our results thus identify SAAs as a family of microbe-inducible retinol binding proteins, reveal a unique protein architecture involved in retinol binding, and suggest how retinol is circulated during infection.

  9. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  10. Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins (ACBPs) in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) play a pivotal role in fatty acid metabolism because they can transport medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. In eukaryotic cells, ACBPs are involved in intracellular trafficking of acyl-CoA esters and formation of a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool. In addition to these ubiquitous functions, more specific non-redundant roles of plant ACBP subclasses are implicated by the existence of multigene families with variable molecular masses, ligand specificities, functional domains (e.g. protein-protein interaction domains), subcellular locations and gene expression patterns. In this chapter, recent progress in the characterization of ACBPs from the model dicot plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the model monocot, Oryza sativa, and their emerging roles in plant growth and development are discussed. The functional significance of respective members of the plant ACBP families in various developmental and physiological processes such as seed development and germination, stem cuticle formation, pollen development, leaf senescence, peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and phloem-mediated lipid transport is highlighted.

  11. Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins (ACBPs) in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) play a pivotal role in fatty acid metabolism because they can transport medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. In eukaryotic cells, ACBPs are involved in intracellular trafficking of acyl-CoA esters and formation of a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool. In addition to these ubiquitous functions, more specific non-redundant roles of plant ACBP subclasses are implicated by the existence of multigene families with variable molecular masses, ligand specificities, functional domains (e.g. protein-protein interaction domains), subcellular locations and gene expression patterns. In this chapter, recent progress in the characterization of ACBPs from the model dicot plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the model monocot, Oryza sativa, and their emerging roles in plant growth and development are discussed. The functional significance of respective members of the plant ACBP families in various developmental and physiological processes such as seed development and germination, stem cuticle formation, pollen development, leaf senescence, peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and phloem-mediated lipid transport is highlighted. PMID:27023243

  12. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, R. Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L.; Saini, Harpreet K.; Tickle, Ian J.; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-01-01

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26655740

  13. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  14. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  15. Minimalistic predictor of protein binding energy: contribution of solvation factor to protein binding.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Mo; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Murphy, Sean; Lucarelli, Dennis; Lofranco, Leo L; Feldman, Andrew; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-02-17

    It has long been known that solvation plays an important role in protein-protein interactions. Here, we use a minimalistic solvation-based model for predicting protein binding energy to estimate quantitatively the contribution of the solvation factor in protein binding. The factor is described by a simple linear combination of buried surface areas according to amino-acid types. Even without structural optimization, our minimalistic model demonstrates a predictive power comparable to more complex methods, making the proposed approach the basis for high throughput applications. Application of the model to a proteomic database shows that receptor-substrate complexes involved in signaling have lower affinities than enzyme-inhibitor and antibody-antigen complexes, and they differ by chemical compositions on interfaces. Also, we found that protein complexes with components that come from the same genes generally have lower affinities than complexes formed by proteins from different genes, but in this case the difference originates from different interface areas. The model was implemented in the software PYTHON, and the source code can be found on the Shakhnovich group webpage: http://faculty.chemistry.harvard.edu/shakhnovich/software.

  16. Multimerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and familial chylomicronemia from a serine-to-cysteine substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain.

    PubMed

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P

    2014-07-11

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24847059

  17. Multimerization of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and Familial Chylomicronemia from a Serine-to-Cysteine Substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G.; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S.; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G.; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2014-01-01

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24847059

  18. Multimerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and familial chylomicronemia from a serine-to-cysteine substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain.

    PubMed

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P

    2014-07-11

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  19. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  20. Role of the catalytic serine in the interactions of serine proteinases with protein inhibitors of the serpin family. Contribution of a covalent interaction to the binding energy of serpin-proteinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Olson, S T; Bock, P E; Kvassman, J; Shore, J D; Lawrence, D A; Ginsburg, D; Björk, I

    1995-12-15

    The contribution of a covalent bond to the stability of complexes of serine proteinases with inhibitors of the serpin family was evaluated by comparing the affinities of beta-trypsin and the catalytic serine-modified derivative, beta-anhydrotrypsin, for several serpin and non-serpin (Kunitz) inhibitors. Kinetic analyses showed that anhydrotrypsin had little or no ability to compete with trypsin for binding to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), antithrombin (AT), or AT-heparin complex when present at up to a 100-fold molar excess over trypsin. By contrast, equimolar levels of anhydrotrypsin blocked trypsin binding to non-serpin inhibitors. Equilibrium binding studies of inhibitor-enzyme interactions monitored by inhibitor displacement of the fluorescence probe, p-aminobenzamidine, from the enzyme active site, confirmed that the binding of serpins to anhydrotrypsin was undetectable in the case of alpha 1PI or AT (KI > 10(-5) M), of low affinity in the case of AT-heparin complex (KI 7-9 x 10(-6) M), and of moderate affinity in the case of PAI-1 (KI 2 x 10(-7) M). This contrasted with the stoichiometric high affinity binding of the serpins to trypsin as well as of the non-serpin inhibitors to both trypsin and anhydrotrypsin. Maximal KI values for serpin-trypsin interactions of 1 to 8 x 10(-11) M, obtained from kinetic analyses of association and dissociation rate constants, indicated that the affinity of serpins for trypsin was minimally 4 to 6 orders of magnitude greater than that of anhydrotrypsin. Anhydrotrypsin, unlike trypsin, failed to induce the characteristic fluorescence changes in a P9 Ser-->Cys PAI-1 variant labeled with a nitrobenzofuran fluorescent probe (NBD) which were shown previously to report the serpin conformational change associated with active enzyme binding. These results demonstrate that a covalent interaction involving the proteinase catalytic serine contributes a major fraction of the binding

  1. Regulation of intestinal microbiota by the NLR protein family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse microbial community consisting of a large number of bacteria and other micro-organisms that have co-evolved with the host intestinal immune system. During this process, microbiota and the host immune system shape one another by various mechanisms to achieve a successful symbiotic relationship. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that dysbiosis—the breakdown of such harmonized colonization—may result in infectious and inflammatory disorders, and recent advances in our studies indicate that receptors such as Toll-like receptors and NLR (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor; or nucleotide-binding domain- and leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor) proteins that detect micro-organisms and their products play a critical role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the role of NLR proteins in the regulation of intestinal microbiota. NLR proteins belong to a diverse family of cytoplasmic microbial sensors, mutations of which are involved in various disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases. Understanding of the different roles of NLR family proteins in the intestine is, therefore, an important step towards the development of therapeutics against digestive diseases. PMID:23325116

  2. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  3. Circular Permutation Provides an Evolutionary Link between Two Families of Calcium-dependent Carbohydrate Binding Modules*

    PubMed Central

    Montanier, Cedric; Flint, James E.; Bolam, David N.; Xie, Hefang; Liu, Ziyuan; Rogowski, Artur; Weiner, David P.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Nurizzo, Didier; Roberts, Shirley M.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial deconstruction of the plant cell wall is a critical biological process, which also provides important substrates for environmentally sustainable industries. Enzymes that hydrolyze the plant cell wall generally contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that contribute to plant cell wall degradation. Here we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of a family of CBMs (CBM60) that are located in xylanases. Uniquely, the proteins display broad ligand specificity, targeting xylans, galactans, and cellulose. Some of the CBM60s display enhanced affinity for their ligands through avidity effects mediated by protein dimerization. The crystal structure of vCBM60, displays a β-sandwich with the ligand binding site comprising a broad cleft formed by the loops connecting the two β-sheets. Ligand recognition at site 1 is, exclusively, through hydrophobic interactions, whereas binding at site 2 is conferred by polar interactions between a protein-bound calcium and the O2 and O3 of the sugar. The observation, that ligand recognition at site 2 requires only a β-linked sugar that contains equatorial hydroxyls at C2 and C3, explains the broad ligand specificity displayed by vCBM60. The ligand-binding apparatus of vCBM60 displays remarkable structural conservation with a family 36 CBM (CBM36); however, the residues that contribute to carbohydrate recognition are derived from different regions of the two proteins. Three-dimensional structure-based sequence alignments reveal that CBM36 and CBM60 are related by circular permutation. The biological and evolutionary significance of the mechanism of ligand recognition displayed by family 60 CBMs is discussed. PMID:20659893

  4. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jongerius, Ilse; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Lionel; Ruivo, Nicola; Exley, Rachel M; Caesar, Joseph J E; Lea, Susan M; Johnson, Steven; Tang, Christoph M

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH), a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp), providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp) which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups.

  5. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jongerius, Ilse; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Lionel; Ruivo, Nicola; Exley, Rachel M; Caesar, Joseph J E; Lea, Susan M; Johnson, Steven; Tang, Christoph M

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH), a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp), providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp) which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups. PMID:23935503

  6. Sensory properties of the PII signalling protein family.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl; Lüddecke, Jan

    2016-02-01

    PII signalling proteins constitute one of the largest families of signalling proteins in nature. An even larger superfamily of trimeric sensory proteins with the same architectural principle as PII proteins appears in protein structure databases. Large surface-exposed flexible loops protrude from the intersubunit faces, where effector molecules are bound that tune the conformation of the loops. Via this mechanism, PII proteins control target proteins in response to cellular ATP/ADP levels and the 2-oxoglutarate status, thereby coordinating the cellular carbon/nitrogen balance. The antagonistic (ATP versus ADP) and synergistic (2-oxoglutarate and ATP) mode of effector molecule binding is further affected by PII -receptor interaction, leading to a highly sophisticated signalling network organized by PII . Altogether, it appears that PII is a multitasking information processor that, depending on its interaction environment, differentially transmits information on the energy status and the cellular 2-oxoglutarate level. In addition to the basic mode of PII function, several bacterial PII proteins may transmit a signal of the cellular glutamine status via covalent modification. Remarkably, during the evolution of plant chloroplasts, glutamine signalling by PII proteins was re-established by acquisition of a short sequence extension at the C-terminus. This plant-specific C-terminus makes the interaction of plant PII proteins with one of its targets, the arginine biosynthetic enzyme N-acetyl-glutamate kinase, glutamine-dependent.

  7. Functional characterization of the Cdc42p binding domain of yeast Ste20p protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Wu, C; Leeuw, T; Fourest-Lieuvin, A; Segall, J E; Thomas, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Ste20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ste20p/p65PAK family of protein kinases which are highly conserved from yeast to man and regulate conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Ste20p fulfills multiple roles in pheromone signaling, morphological switching and vegetative growth and binds Cdc42p, a Rho-like small GTP binding protein required for polarized morphogenesis. We have analyzed the functional consequences of mutations that prevent binding of Cdc42p to Ste20p. The complete amino-terminal, non-catalytic half of Ste20p, including the conserved Cdc42p binding domain, was dispensable for heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated pheromone signaling. However, the Cdc42p binding domain was necessary for filamentous growth in response to nitrogen starvation and for an essential function that Ste20p shares with its isoform Cla4p during vegetative growth. Moreover, the Cdc42p binding domain was required for cell-cell adhesion during conjugation. Subcellular localization of wild-type and mutant Ste20p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that the Cdc42p binding domain is needed to direct localization of Ste20p to regions of polarized growth. These results suggest that Ste20p is regulated in different developmental pathways by different mechanisms which involve heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins. PMID:9009270

  8. Topological Analyses of Protein-Ligand Binding: a Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be conveniently represented as networks of interacting residues, thus allowing the study of several network parameters that can shed light onto several of their structural and functional aspects. With respect to the binding of ligands, which are central for the function of many proteins, network analysis may constitute a possible route to assist the identification of binding sites. As the bulk of this review illustrates, this has generally been easier for enzymes than for non-enzyme proteins, perhaps due to the different topological nature of the binding sites of the former over those of the latter. The article also illustrates how network representations of binding sites can be used to search PDB structures in order to identify proteins that bind similar molecules and, lastly, how codifying proteins as networks can assist the analysis of the conformational changes consequent to ligand binding.

  9. Nonagonal cadherins: A new protein family found within the Stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kyle I G; van West, Pieter; Gachon, Claire M M

    2016-11-15

    Cadherins, a group of molecules typically associated with planar cell polarity and Wnt signalling, have been little reported outside of the animal kingdom. Here, we identify a new family of cadherins in the Stramenopiles, termed Nonagonal after their 9 transmembrane passes, which contrast to the one or seven passes found in other known cadherin families. Manual curation and experimental validation reveal two subclasses of nonagonal cadherins, depending on the number of uninterrupted extracellular cadherin (EC) modules presented. Firstly, shorter mono-exonic, unimodular, protein models, with 3 to 12 EC domains occur as duplicate paralogs in the saprotrophic Labyrinthulomycetes Aurantiochytrium limanicum and Schizochytrium aggregatum, the gastrointestinal Blastocystis hominis (Blastocystae) and as a single copy gene in the autotrophic Pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferens. Larger, single copy, multi-exonal, tri-modular protein models, with up to 72 EC domain in total, are found in the Oomycete genera Albugo, Phytophthora, Pythium and Eurychasma. No homolog was found in the closely related autotrophic Phaeophyceae (brown algae) or Bacillariophyceae (diatoms), nor in several genera of plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes (Aphanomyces, Saprolegnia and Hyaloperonospora). This potential absence was further investigated by synteny analysis of the genome regions flanking the cadherin gene models, which are found to be highly variable. Novel to this new cadherin family is the presence of intercalated laminin and putative carbohydrate binding in tri-modular oomycete cadherins and at the N-terminus of thraustochytrid proteins. As we were unable to detect any homologs of proteins involved in signalling pathways where other cadherin families are involved, we present a conceptual hypothesis on the function of nonagonal cadherin based around the presence of putative carbohydrate binding domains. PMID:27498181

  10. Structural Plasticity Underpins Promiscuous Binding of the Prosurvival Protein A1

    SciTech Connect

    Smits,C.; Czabotar, P.; Hinds, M.; Day, C.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic pathways are regulated by protein-protein interactions. Interaction of the BH3 domains of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins with the hydrophobic groove of prosurvival proteins is critical. Whereas some BH3 domains bind in a promiscuous manner, others exhibit considerable selectivity and the sequence characteristics that distinguish these activities are unclear. In this study, crystal structures of complexes between the prosurvival protein A1 and the BH3 domains from Puma, Bmf, Bak, and Bid have been solved. The structure of A1 is similar to that of other prosurvival proteins, although features, such as an acidic patch in the binding groove, may allow specific therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. Significant conformational plasticity was observed in the intermolecular interactions and these differences explain some of the variation in affinity. This study, in combination with published data, suggests that interactions between conserved residues demarcate optimal binding.

  11. A Computational Model of the LGI1 Protein Suggests a Common Binding Site for ADAM Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Emanuela; Andreazza, Simonetta; Vanin, Stefano; Busolin, Giorgia; Nobile, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations of human leucine-rich glioma inactivated (LGI1) gene encoding the epitempin protein cause autosomal dominant temporal lateral epilepsy (ADTLE), a rare familial partial epileptic syndrome. The LGI1 gene seems to have a role on the transmission of neuronal messages but the exact molecular mechanism remains unclear. In contrast to other genes involved in epileptic disorders, epitempin shows no homology with known ion channel genes but contains two domains, composed of repeated structural units, known to mediate protein-protein interactions. A three dimensional in silico model of the two epitempin domains was built to predict the structure-function relationship and propose a functional model integrating previous experimental findings. Conserved and electrostatic charged regions of the model surface suggest a possible arrangement between the two domains and identifies a possible ADAM protein binding site in the β-propeller domain and another protein binding site in the leucine-rich repeat domain. The functional model indicates that epitempin could mediate the interaction between proteins localized to different synaptic sides in a static way, by forming a dimer, or in a dynamic way, by binding proteins at different times. The model was also used to predict effects of known disease-causing missense mutations. Most of the variants are predicted to alter protein folding while several other map to functional surface regions. In agreement with experimental evidence, this suggests that non-secreted LGI1 mutants could be retained within the cell by quality control mechanisms or by altering interactions required for the secretion process. PMID:21479274

  12. FIGfams : yet another set of protein families.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.; Overbeek, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes

    2009-11-01

    We present FIGfams, a new collection of over 100,000 protein families that are the product of manual curation and close strain comparison. Using the Subsystem approach the manual curation is carried out, ensuring a previously unattained degree of throughput and consistency. FIGfams are based on over 950,000 manually annotated proteins and across many hundred Bacteria and Archaea. Associated with each FIGfam is a two-tiered, rapid, accurate decision procedure to determine family membership for new proteins. FIGfams are freely available under an open source license. These can be downloaded at ftp://ftp.theseed.org/FIGfams/. The web site for FIGfams is http://www.theseed.org/wiki/FIGfams/.

  13. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Gaffney, Jean P; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  14. Minisatellite binding protein Msbp-1 is a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Collick, A; Dunn, M G; Jeffreys, A J

    1991-01-01

    Msbp-1 is a minisatellite-specific DNA-binding protein. Using synthetic binding substrates, we now show that Msbp-1 binds not to double-stranded DNA, but exclusively to single-stranded DNA. Binding is specific to the guanine-rich strand of the minisatellite duplex, interactions with the cytosine-rich strand being undetectable by southwestern analysis. Furthermore, the binding site required for successful DNA-protein interactions appears to be two or more minisatellite repeat units. We have also isolated, by whole-genome PCR and cloning, one Msbp-1 binding site from the human genome. Again, the binding strand of this molecule contains a repetitive G-rich structure equivalent to that of a small minisatellite. These observations are discussed with respect to other single-stranded DNA-binding proteins known to play a role in recombination processes. Images PMID:1754375

  15. Conformity of RNAs that interact with tetranucleotide loop binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Zwieb, C

    1992-01-01

    A group of RNA binding proteins, termed tetraloop binding proteins, includes ribosomal protein S15 and protein SRP19 of signal recognition particle. They are primary RNA binding proteins, recognize RNA tetranucleotide loops with a GNAR consensus motif, and require a helical region located adjacent to the tetraloop. Closely related RNA structures that fit these criteria appear in helix 6 of SRP RNA, in helices 22 and 23A of 16 S ribosomal RNA, and, as a pseudoknot, in the regulatory region of the rpsO gene. Images PMID:1329024

  16. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    PubMed

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  17. SdrI of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a multifunctional protein: localization of the fibronectin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Sakinç, Türkân; Kleine, Britta; Michalski, Nadine; Kaase, Martin; Gatermann, Sören G

    2009-11-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus, an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women, expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family. Here we analyse the fibronectin-binding ability of SdrI, as S. saprophyticus is known to bind fibronectin and there is no known SD protein with this function. This protein does not contain the binding motif typical for fibronectin-binding proteins. Using recombinant fragments of SdrI, we localized the binding domain in the A region and show that SdrI bound to the N-terminal 30-kDa fragment of fibronectin. The fibronectin-binding function was shown in the natural host using an SdrI knockout mutant that showed decreased binding to fibronectin compared with wild-type strain 7108.

  18. A β-hairpin-binding protein for three different disease-related amyloidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Mirecka, Ewa A; Gauhar, Aziz; Grüning, Clara S R; Willbold, Dieter; Härd, Torleif; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins share a propensity to convert to the β-structure-rich amyloid state that is associated with the progression of several protein-misfolding disorders. Here we show that a single engineered β-hairpin-binding protein, the β-wrapin AS10, binds monomers of three different amyloidogenic proteins, that is, amyloid-β peptide, α-synuclein, and islet amyloid polypeptide, with sub-micromolar affinity. AS10 binding inhibits the aggregation and toxicity of all three proteins. The results demonstrate common conformational preferences and related binding sites in a subset of the amyloidogenic proteins. These commonalities enable the generation of multispecific monomer-binding agents.

  19. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  20. Protein Binding: Do We Ever Learn?▿

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlinger, Markus A.; Derendorf, Hartmut; Mouton, Johan W.; Cars, Otto; Craig, William A.; Andes, David; Theuretzbacher, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Although the influence of protein binding (PB) on antibacterial activity has been reported for many antibiotics and over many years, there is currently no standardization for pharmacodynamic models that account for the impact of protein binding of antimicrobial agents in vitro. This might explain the somewhat contradictory results obtained from different studies. Simple in vitro models which compare the MIC obtained in protein-free standard medium versus a protein-rich medium are prone to methodological pitfalls and may lead to flawed conclusions. Within in vitro test systems, a range of test conditions, including source of protein, concentration of the tested antibiotic, temperature, pH, electrolytes, and supplements may influence the impact of protein binding. As new antibiotics with a high degree of protein binding are in clinical development, attention and action directed toward the optimization and standardization of testing the impact of protein binding on the activity of antibiotics in vitro become even more urgent. In addition, the quantitative relationship between the effects of protein binding in vitro and in vivo needs to be established, since the physiological conditions differ. General recommendations for testing the impact of protein binding in vitro are suggested. PMID:21537013

  1. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M; Wong, Elissa W P; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-06-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby arriving the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium beyond stage VIII of the epithelial cycle will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come.

  2. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  3. Moesin, ezrin, and p205 are actin-binding proteins associated with neutrophil plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestonjamasp, K; Amieva, M R; Strassel, C P; Nauseef, W M; Furthmayr, H; Luna, E J

    1995-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins in bovine neutrophil plasma membranes were identified using blot overlays with 125I-labeled F-actin. Along with surface-biotinylated proteins, membranes were enriched in major actin-binding polypeptides of 78, 81, and 205 kDa. Binding was specific for F-actin because G-actin did not bind. Further, unlabeled F-actin blocked the binding of 125I-labeled F-actin whereas other acidic biopolymers were relatively ineffective. Binding also was specifically inhibited by myosin subfragment 1, but not by CapZ or plasma gelsolin, suggesting that the membrane proteins, like myosin, bind along the sides of the actin filaments. The 78- and 81-kDa polypeptides were identified as moesin and ezrin, respectively, by co-migration on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation with antibodies specific for moesin and ezrin. Although not present in detectable amounts in bovine neutrophils, radixin (a third and closely related member of this gene family) also bound 125I-labeled F-actin on blot overlays. Experiments with full-length and truncated bacterial fusion proteins localized the actin-binding site in moesin to the extreme carboxy terminus, a highly conserved sequence. Immunofluorescence micrographs of permeabilized cells and cell "footprints" showed moesin co-localization with actin at the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, consistent with a role as a membrane-actin-linking protein. Images PMID:7612961

  4. Odorant-Binding Protein: Localization to Nasal Glands and Secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevsner, Jonathan; Sklar, Pamela B.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1986-07-01

    An odorant-binding protein (OBP) was isolated from bovine olfactory and respiratory mucosa. We have produced polyclonal antisera to this protein and report its immunohistochemical localization to mucus-secreting glands of the olfactory and respiratory mucosa. Although OBP was originally isolated as a pyrazine binding protein, both rat and bovine OBP also bind the odorants [3H]methyldihydrojasmonate and 3,7-dimethyl-octan-1-ol as well as 2-isobutyl-3-[3H]methoxypyrazine. We detect substantial odorant-binding activity attributable to OBP in secreted rat nasal mucus and tears but not in saliva, suggesting a role for OBP in transporting or concentrating odorants.

  5. On the Entropy of Protein Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, John P.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Cocco, Simona; Jacquin, Hugo; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    Proteins are essential components of living systems, capable of performing a huge variety of tasks at the molecular level, such as recognition, signalling, copy, transport, ... The protein sequences realizing a given function may largely vary across organisms, giving rise to a protein family. Here, we estimate the entropy of those families based on different approaches, including Hidden Markov Models used for protein databases and inferred statistical models reproducing the low-order (1- and 2-point) statistics of multi-sequence alignments. We also compute the entropic cost, that is, the loss in entropy resulting from a constraint acting on the protein, such as the mutation of one particular amino-acid on a specific site, and relate this notion to the escape probability of the HIV virus. The case of lattice proteins, for which the entropy can be computed exactly, allows us to provide another illustration of the concept of cost, due to the competition of different folds. The relevance of the entropy in relation to directed evolution experiments is stressed.

  6. TIGRFAMS: The TIGRFAMs database of protein families

    DOE Data Explorer

    TIGRFAMs are protein families based on Hidden Markov Models or HMMs. Use this page to see the curated seed alignmet for each TIGRFam, the full alignment of all family members and the cutoff scores for inclusion in each of the TIGRFAMs. Also use this page to search through the TIGRFAMs and HMMs for text in the TIGRFAMs Text Search or search for specific sequences in the TIGRFAMs Sequence Search.[Copied from the Overview at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/tigrfams/overview/] See also TIGRFAMs ordered by the roles they play at http://cmr.jcvi.org/tigr-scripts/CMR/shared/EvidenceList.cgi?ev_type=TIGRFAM&order_type=role.

  7. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  8. Therapeutic and analytical applications of arsenic binding to proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Beibei; Liu, Qingqing; Popowich, Aleksandra; Shen, Shengwen; Yan, Xiaowen; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xing-Fang; Weinfeld, Michael; Cullen, William R; Le, X Chris

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic binding to proteins plays a pivotal role in the health effects of arsenic. Further knowledge of arsenic binding to proteins will advance the development of bioanalytical techniques and therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes recent work on arsenic-based drugs, imaging of cellular events, capture and purification of arsenic-binding proteins, and biosensing of arsenic. Binding of arsenic to the promyelocytic leukemia fusion oncoprotein (PML-RARα) is a plausible mode of action leading to the successful treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Identification of other oncoproteins critical to other cancers and the development of various arsenicals and targeted delivery systems are promising approaches to the treatment of other types of cancers. Techniques for capture, purification, and identification of arsenic-binding proteins make use of specific binding between trivalent arsenicals and the thiols in proteins. Biarsenical probes, such as FlAsH-EDT2 and ReAsH-EDT2, coupled with tetracysteine tags that are genetically incorporated into the target proteins, are used for site-specific fluorescence labelling and imaging of the target proteins in living cells. These allow protein dynamics and protein-protein interactions to be studied. Arsenic affinity chromatography is useful for purification of thiol-containing proteins, and its combination with mass spectrometry provides a targeted proteomic approach for studying the interactions between arsenicals and proteins in cells. Arsenic biosensors evolved from the knowledge of arsenic resistance and arsenic binding to proteins in bacteria, and have now been developed into analytical techniques that are suitable for the detection of arsenic in the field. Examples in the four areas, arsenic-based drugs, imaging of cellular events, purification of specific proteins, and arsenic biosensors, demonstrate important therapeutic and analytical applications of arsenic protein binding. PMID:25356501

  9. Immobilized purified folate-binding protein: binding characteristics and use for quantifying folate in erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Nexo, E.

    1987-08-01

    Purified folate-binding protein from cow's milk was immobilized on monodisperse polymer particles (Dynospheres) activated by rho-toluenesulfonyl chloride. Leakage from the spheres was less than 0.1%, and the binding properties were similar to those of the soluble protein with regard to dissociation, pH optimum for binding pteroylglutamic acid, and specificity for binding various folate derivatives. We used the immobilized folate-binding protein as binding protein in an isotope-dilution assay for quantifying folate in erythrocytes. The detection limit was 50 nmol/L and the CV over a six-month period was 2.3% (means = 1.25 mumol/L, n = 15). The reference interval, for folate measured in erythrocytes of 43 blood donors, was 0.4-1.5 mumol/L.

  10. Affinity Purification of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadonaga, James T.; Tjian, Robert

    1986-08-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed through the DNA-Sepharose resin. The desired sequence-specific DNA binding protein is purified because it preferentially binds to the recognition sites in the affinity resin rather than to the nonspecific competitor DNA in solution. For example, a protein fraction that is enriched for transcription factor Sp1 can be further purified 500- to 1000-fold by two sequential affinity chromatography steps to give Sp1 of an estimated 90% homogeneity with 30% yield. In addition, the use of tandem affinity columns containing different protein binding sites allows the simultaneous purification of multiple DNA binding proteins from the same extract. This method provides a means for the purification of rare sequence-specific DNA binding proteins, such as Sp1 and CAAT-binding transcription factor.

  11. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  12. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  13. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  14. Mutation analysis of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA) has been previously shown to mediate the interaction between crystalline cellulose substrates and the cellulase enzyme complex of Clostridium cellulovorans. CbpA contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) which, when expressed independently, binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. A series of N- and C-terminal deletions and a series of small internal deletions of the CBD were created to determine whether the entire region previously described as a CBD is required for the cellulose-binding function. The N- and C-terminal deletions reduced binding affinity by 10- to 100-fold. Small internal deletions of the CBD resulted in substantial reduction of CBD function. Some, but not all, point mutations throughout the sequence had significant disruptive effects on the binding ability of the CBD. Thus, mutations in any region of the CBD had effects on the binding of the fragment to cellulose. The results indicate that the entire 163-amino-acid region of the CBD is required for maximal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:7961505

  15. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  16. The APSES family proteins in fungi: Characterizations, evolution and functions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Su, Hao; Zhou, Jing; Feng, Huihua; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2015-08-01

    The APSES protein family belongs to transcriptional factors of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class, the originally described members (APSES: Asm1p, Phd1p, Sok2p, Efg1p and StuAp) are used to designate this group of proteins, and they have been identified as key regulators of fungal development and other biological processes. APSES proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (APSES domain) of about 100 amino acids, whose central domain is predicted to form a typical bHLH structure. Besides APSES domain, several APSES proteins also contain additional domains, such as KilA-N and ankyrin repeats. In recent years, an increasing number of APSES proteins have been identified from diverse fungi, and they involve in numerous biological processes, such as sporulation, cellular differentiation, mycelial growth, secondary metabolism and virulence. Most fungi, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Candida albicans, Fusarium graminearum, and Neurospora crassa, contain five APSES proteins. However, Cryptococcus neoformans only contains two APSES proteins, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six APSES proteins. The phylogenetic analysis showed the APSES domains from different fungi were grouped into four clades (A, B, C and D), which is consistent with the result of homologous alignment of APSES domains using DNAman. The roles of APSES proteins in clade C have been studied in detail, while little is known about the roles of other APSES proteins in clades A, B and D. In this review, the biochemical properties and functional domains of APSES proteins are predicted and compared, and the phylogenetic relationship among APSES proteins from various fungi are analyzed based on the APSES domains. Moreover, the functions of APSES proteins in different fungi are summarized and discussed.

  17. Members of the Drosophila HSP 70 family share ATP-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J F; Tanguay, R M

    1988-03-01

    In Drosophila, the hsp 70 family consists of a group of proteins of similar molecular masses (hsps 68, 70 and 72) that exist as multiple isoforms. In this report, it is shown that hsps 68, 70 and 72 from Drosophila cells can be purified by affinity chromatography on ATP-agarose. Furthermore it is demonstrated that the multiple members of the hsp 70 family, which accumulate in large amounts in the nucleus during a heat shock, can be specifically solubilized from the isolated nuclei fraction by ATP. One of the major cognate proteins (hsc 70) also shows similar behavior. These data suggest that most, if not all, of the related Drosophila hsps 70 possess, like their mammalian counterparts, an ATP-binding site which could be related to their function in the stress response.

  18. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  19. Proteome-wide Identification of Novel Ceramide-binding Proteins by Yeast Surface cDNA Display and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Ha, Kevin; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Although the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide is an important cell signaling molecule, relatively few direct ceramide-interacting proteins are known. We used an approach combining yeast surface cDNA display and deep sequencing technology to identify novel proteins binding directly to ceramide. We identified 234 candidate ceramide-binding protein fragments and validated binding for 20. Most (17) bound selectively to ceramide, although a few (3) bound to other lipids as well. Several novel ceramide-binding domains were discovered, including the EF-hand calcium-binding motif, the heat shock chaperonin-binding motif STI1, the SCP2 sterol-binding domain, and the tetratricopeptide repeat region motif. Interestingly, four of the verified ceramide-binding proteins (HPCA, HPCAL1, NCS1, and VSNL1) and an additional three candidate ceramide-binding proteins (NCALD, HPCAL4, and KCNIP3) belong to the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF hand-containing proteins. We used mutagenesis to map the ceramide-binding site in HPCA and to create a mutant HPCA that does not bind to ceramide. We demonstrated selective binding to ceramide by mammalian cell-produced wild type but not mutant HPCA. Intriguingly, we also identified a fragment from prostaglandin D2synthase that binds preferentially to ceramide 1-phosphate. The wide variety of proteins and domains capable of binding to ceramide suggests that many of the signaling functions of ceramide may be regulated by direct binding to these proteins. Based on the deep sequencing data, we estimate that our yeast surface cDNA display library covers ∼60% of the human proteome and our selection/deep sequencing protocol can identify target-interacting protein fragments that are present at extremely low frequency in the starting library. Thus, the yeast surface cDNA display/deep sequencing approach is a rapid, comprehensive, and flexible method for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, particularly for the study of non-protein ligands. PMID

  20. Search for Amyloid-Binding Proteins by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Miguel; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    ‘Amyloid binging proteins’ is a generic term used to designate proteins that interact with different forms of amyloidogenic peptides or proteins and that, as a result, may modulate their physiological and pathological functions by altering solubility, transport, clearance, degradation, and fibril formation. We describe a simple affinity chromatography protocol to isolate and characterize amyloid-binding proteins based on the use of sequential elution steps that may provide further information on the type of binding interaction. As an example, we depict the application of this protocol to the study of Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) peptide-binding proteins derived from human plasma. Biochemical analysis of the proteins eluted under different conditions identified serum amyloid P component (SAP) and apolipoprotein J (clusterin) as the main plasma Aβ-binding proteins while various apolipoproteins (apoA-IV, apoE, and apoA-I), as well as albumin (HSA) and fibulin were identified as minor contributors. PMID:22528093

  1. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  2. Anticalins small engineered binding proteins based on the lipocalin scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Michaela; Skerra, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Anticalins are a novel class of small, robust proteins with designed ligand-binding properties derived from the natural lipocalin scaffold. Due to their compact molecular architecture, comprising a single polypeptide chain, they provide several benefits as protein therapeutics, such as high target specificity, good tissue penetration, low immunogenicity, tunable plasma half-life, efficient Escherichia coli expression, and suitability for furnishing with additional effector functions via genetic fusion or chemical conjugation. The lipocalins are a widespread family of proteins that naturally serve in many organisms, including humans, for the transport, storage, or sequestration of small biological compounds like vitamins and hormones. Their fold is dominated by an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel, which is open to the solvent at one end. There, four loops connect the β-strands in a pairwise manner and, altogether, they form the entry to a ligand-binding site. This loop region can be engineered via site-directed random mutagenesis in combination with genetic library selection techniques to yield "Anticalins" with exquisite specificities-and down to picomolar affinities-for prescribed molecular targets of either hapten or antigen type. Several Anticalins directed against medically relevant disease targets have been successfully engineered and can be applied, for example, for the blocking of soluble signaling factors or cell surface receptors or for tissue-specific drug targeting. While natural lipocalins were already subject to clinical studies in the past, a first Anticalin has completed Phase I trials in 2011, thus paving the way for the broad application of Anticalins as a promising novel class of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22230569

  3. Concentration-dependent Cu(II) binding to prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    The prion protein plays a causative role in several neurodegenerative diseases, including mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of the prion protein is unknown, but it has been linked to its ability to bind copper ions. Experimental evidence suggests that copper can be bound in three distinct modes depending on its concentration, but only one of those binding modes has been fully characterized experimentally. Using a newly developed hybrid DFT/DFT method [1], which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with orbital-free DFT, we have examined all the binding modes and obtained their detailed binding geometries and copper ion binding energies. Our results also provide explanation for experiments, which have found that when the copper concentration increases the copper binding mode changes, surprisingly, from a stronger to a weaker one. Overall, our results indicate that prion protein can function as a copper buffer. 1. Hodak, Lu, Bernholc, JCP, in press.

  4. Identification of Position-Specific Correlations between DNA-Binding Domains and Their Binding Sites. Application to the MerR Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Andrey A.; Rakhmaininova, Alexandra B.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    The large and increasing volume of genomic data analyzed by comparative methods provides information about transcription factors and their binding sites that, in turn, enables statistical analysis of correlations between factors and sites, uncovering mechanisms and evolution of specific protein-DNA recognition. Here we present an online tool, Prot-DNA-Korr, designed to identify and analyze crucial protein-DNA pairs of positions in a family of transcription factors. Correlations are identified by analysis of mutual information between columns of protein and DNA alignments. The algorithm reduces the effects of common phylogenetic history and of abundance of closely related proteins and binding sites. We apply it to five closely related subfamilies of the MerR family of bacterial transcription factors that regulate heavy metal resistance systems. We validate the approach using known 3D structures of MerR-family proteins in complexes with their cognate DNA binding sites and demonstrate that a significant fraction of correlated positions indeed form specific side-chain-to-base contacts. The joint distribution of amino acids and nucleotides hence may be used to predict changes of specificity for point mutations in transcription factors. PMID:27690309

  5. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  6. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  7. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qi; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Hui; Jiang, Hui-di; Yu, Lu-shan; Zeng, Su

    2013-01-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body. The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity, which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles. In this review, the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and lipoprotein, three most important proteins in human plasma, are detailed. Furthermore, the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed. Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding, enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described. Additionally, the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed. PMID:23852086

  8. Structural Similarities between Thiamin-Binding Protein and Thiaminase-I Suggest a Common Ancestor

    SciTech Connect

    Soriano, Erika V.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Hanes, Jeremiah W.; Bale, Shridhar; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-06-30

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are responsible for the transport of a wide variety of water-soluble molecules and ions into prokaryotic cells. In Gram-negative bacteria, periplasmic-binding proteins deliver ions or molecules such as thiamin to the membrane-bound ABC transporter. The gene for the thiamin-binding protein tbpA has been identified in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Here we report the crystal structure of TbpA from E. coli with bound thiamin monophosphate. The structure was determined at 2.25 {angstrom} resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments, despite the presence of nonmerohedral twinning. The crystal structure shows that TbpA belongs to the group II periplasmic-binding protein family. Equilibrium binding measurements showed similar dissociation constants for thiamin, thiamin monophosphate, and thiamin pyrophosphate. Analysis of the binding site by molecular modeling demonstrated how TbpA binds all three forms of thiamin. A comparison of TbpA and thiaminase-I, a thiamin-degrading enzyme, revealed structural similarity between the two proteins, especially in domain 1, suggesting that the two proteins evolved from a common ancestor.

  9. Structural similarities between thiamin-binding protein and thiaminase-I suggest a common ancestor.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Erika V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Hanes, Jeremiah W; Bale, Shridhar; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2008-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are responsible for the transport of a wide variety of water-soluble molecules and ions into prokaryotic cells. In Gram-negative bacteria, periplasmic-binding proteins deliver ions or molecules such as thiamin to the membrane-bound ABC transporter. The gene for the thiamin-binding protein tbpA has been identified in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Here we report the crystal structure of TbpA from E. coli with bound thiamin monophosphate. The structure was determined at 2.25 A resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments, despite the presence of nonmerohedral twinning. The crystal structure shows that TbpA belongs to the group II periplasmic-binding protein family. Equilibrium binding measurements showed similar dissociation constants for thiamin, thiamin monophosphate, and thiamin pyrophosphate. Analysis of the binding site by molecular modeling demonstrated how TbpA binds all three forms of thiamin. A comparison of TbpA and thiaminase-I, a thiamin-degrading enzyme, revealed structural similarity between the two proteins, especially in domain 1, suggesting that the two proteins evolved from a common ancestor.

  10. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  11. Vaccinia virus protein A49 is an unexpected member of the B-cell Lymphoma (Bcl)-2 protein family.

    PubMed

    Neidel, Sarah; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Mansur, Daniel S; Strnadova, Pavla; Smith, Geoffrey L; Graham, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes several proteins that inhibit activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). VACV protein A49 prevents translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus by sequestering cellular β-TrCP, a protein required for the degradation of the inhibitor of κB. A49 does not share overall sequence similarity with any protein of known structure or function. We solved the crystal structure of A49 from VACV Western Reserve to 1.8 Å resolution and showed, surprisingly, that A49 has the same three-dimensional fold as Bcl-2 family proteins despite lacking identifiable sequence similarity. Whereas Bcl-2 family members characteristically modulate cellular apoptosis, A49 lacks a surface groove suitable for binding BH3 peptides and does not bind proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax or Bak. The N-terminal 17 residues of A49 do not adopt a single well ordered conformation, consistent with their proposed role in binding β-TrCP. Whereas pairs of A49 molecules interact symmetrically via a large hydrophobic surface in crystallo, A49 does not dimerize in solution or in cells, and we propose that this hydrophobic interaction surface may mediate binding to a yet undefined cellular partner. A49 represents the eleventh VACV Bcl-2 family protein and, despite these proteins sharing very low sequence identity, structure-based phylogenetic analysis shows that all poxvirus Bcl-2 proteins are structurally more similar to each other than they are to any cellular or herpesvirus Bcl-2 proteins. This is consistent with duplication and diversification of a single BCL2 family gene acquired by an ancestral poxvirus.

  12. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14, a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 binding partner

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chen; Yao, Guangyin; Zou, Minji; Chen, Guangyu; Wang, Min; Liu, Jingqian; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang . E-mail: xudg@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2007-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, but the mechanism underlying IGF-independent effects is not yet clear. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, IGFBP-3 was used as the bait to screen a human fetal liver cDNA library for it interactors that may potentially mediate IGFBP-3-regulated functions. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14), a member of the GalNAc-Tases family, was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. This interaction involved the ricin-type beta-trefoil domain of GalNAc-T14. The interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 was reconfirmed in vitro and in vivo, using GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays. Our findings may provide new clues for further study on the mechanism behind the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-3 promoting apoptosis. The role of GalNAc-T14 as an intracellular mediator of the effects of IGFBP-3 need to be verified in future studies.

  13. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  14. Guanine Nucleotide-binding Protein (Gα) Endocytosis by a Cascade of Ubiquitin Binding Domain Proteins Is Required for Sustained Morphogenesis and Proper Mating in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Gauri; Baker, Rachael; Sacks, Carly M.; Torres, Matthew P.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known to transmit signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effector proteins. There is growing appreciation that G proteins are also present at endomembrane compartments, where they can potentially interact with a distinct set of signaling proteins. Here, we examine the cellular trafficking function of the G protein α subunit in yeast, Gpa1. Gpa1 contains a unique 109-amino acid insert within the α-helical domain that undergoes a variety of posttranslational modifications. Among these is monoubiquitination, catalyzed by the NEDD4 family ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. Using a newly optimized method for G protein purification together with biophysical measures of structure and function, we show that the ubiquitination domain does not influence enzyme activity. By screening a panel of 39 gene deletion mutants, each lacking a different ubiquitin binding domain protein, we identify seven that are necessary to deliver Gpa1 to the vacuole compartment including four proteins (Ede1, Bul1, Ddi1, and Rup1) previously not known to be involved in this process. Finally, we show that proper endocytosis of the G protein is needed for sustained cellular morphogenesis and mating in response to pheromone stimulation. We conclude that a cascade of ubiquitin-binding proteins serves to deliver the G protein to its final destination within the cell. In this instance and in contrast to the previously characterized visual system, endocytosis from the plasma membrane is needed for proper signal transduction rather than for signal desensitization. PMID:24722989

  15. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gα) endocytosis by a cascade of ubiquitin binding domain proteins is required for sustained morphogenesis and proper mating in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Gauri; Baker, Rachael; Sacks, Carly M; Torres, Matthew P; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2014-05-23

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known to transmit signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effector proteins. There is growing appreciation that G proteins are also present at endomembrane compartments, where they can potentially interact with a distinct set of signaling proteins. Here, we examine the cellular trafficking function of the G protein α subunit in yeast, Gpa1. Gpa1 contains a unique 109-amino acid insert within the α-helical domain that undergoes a variety of posttranslational modifications. Among these is monoubiquitination, catalyzed by the NEDD4 family ubiquitin ligase Rsp5. Using a newly optimized method for G protein purification together with biophysical measures of structure and function, we show that the ubiquitination domain does not influence enzyme activity. By screening a panel of 39 gene deletion mutants, each lacking a different ubiquitin binding domain protein, we identify seven that are necessary to deliver Gpa1 to the vacuole compartment including four proteins (Ede1, Bul1, Ddi1, and Rup1) previously not known to be involved in this process. Finally, we show that proper endocytosis of the G protein is needed for sustained cellular morphogenesis and mating in response to pheromone stimulation. We conclude that a cascade of ubiquitin-binding proteins serves to deliver the G protein to its final destination within the cell. In this instance and in contrast to the previously characterized visual system, endocytosis from the plasma membrane is needed for proper signal transduction rather than for signal desensitization.

  16. Function of RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 in stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Hideyuki . E-mail: hidokano@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp; Kawahara, Hironori; Toriya, Masako; Nakao, Keio; Shibata, Shinsuke; Imai, Takao

    2005-06-10

    Musashi is an evolutionarily conserved family of RNA-binding proteins that is preferentially expressed in the nervous system. The first member of the Musashi family was identified in Drosophila. This protein plays an essential role in regulating the asymmetric cell division of ectodermal precursor cells known as sensory organ precursor cells through the translational regulation of target mRNA. In the CNS of Drosophila larvae, however, Musashi is expressed in proliferating neuroblasts and likely has a different function. Its probable mammalian homologue, Musashi-1, is a neural RNA-binding protein that is strongly expressed in fetal and adult neural stem cells (NSCs). Mammalian Musashi-1 augments Notch signaling through the translational repression of its target mRNA, m-Numb, thereby contributing to the self-renewal of NSCs. In addition to its functions in NSCs, the role of mammalian Musashi-1 protein in epithelial stem cells, including intestinal and mammary gland stem cells, is attracting increasing interest.

  17. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  18. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  19. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-01-01

    RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26751491

  20. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Perry E.; Tansey, John T.; Welte, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kiloDaltons (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  1. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  2. Identification of AOSC-binding proteins in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Nie, Qin; Xin, Xianliang; Geng, Meiyu

    2008-11-01

    Acidic oligosaccharide sugar chain (AOSC), a D-mannuronic acid oligosaccharide, derived from brown algae polysaccharide, has been completed Phase I clinical trial in China as an anti-Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) drug candidate. The identification of AOSC-binding protein(s) in neurons is very important for understanding its action mechanism. To determine the binding protein(s) of AOSC in neurons mediating its anti-AD activities, confocal microscopy, affinity chromatography, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis were used. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that AOSC binds to SH-SY5Y cells in concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent fashions. The AOSC binding proteins were purified by affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. The results showed that there are 349 proteins binding AOSC, including clathrin, adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). These results suggest that the binding/entrance of AOSC to neurons is probably responsible for anti-AD activities.

  3. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes.

  4. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  5. Protein surface-distribution and protein-protein interactions in the binding of peripheral proteins to charged lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1995-01-01

    The binding of native cytochrome c to negatively charged lipid dispersions of dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths. Not only is the strength of protein binding found to decrease rapidly with increasing ionic strength, but also the binding curves reach an apparent saturation level that decreases rapidly with increasing ionic strength. Analysis of the binding isotherms with a general statistical thermodynamic model that takes into account not only the free energy of the electrostatic double layer, but also the free energy of the surface distribution of the protein, demonstrates that the apparent saturation effects could arise from a competition between the out-of-plane binding reaction and the lateral in-plane interactions between proteins at the surface. It is found that association with nonlocalized sites results in binding isotherms that display the apparent saturation effect to a much more pronounced extent than does the Langmuir adsorption isotherm for binding to localized sites. With the model for nonlocalized sites, the binding isotherms of native cytochrome c can be described adequately by taking into account only the entropy of the surface distribution of the protein, without appreciable enthalpic interactions between the bound proteins. The binding of cytochrome c to dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol dispersions at a temperature at which the bound protein is denatured on the lipid surface, but is nondenatured when free in solution, has also been studied. The binding curves for the surface-denatured protein differ from those for the native protein in that the apparent saturation at high ionic strength is less pronounced. This indicates the tendency of the denatured protein to aggregate on the lipid surface, and can be described by the binding isotherms for nonlocalized sites only if attractive interactions between the surface-bound proteins are included in addition to the distributional entropic terms. Additionally

  6. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  7. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, H; Jacobsson, K; Frykberg, L; Guss, B

    1996-01-01

    By screening a genomic lambda library of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, we have cloned and sequenced a gene, termed fnz, encoding a fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein called FNZ. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence of FNZ, the mature protein has a molecular mass of approximately 61 kDa. Analysis of FNZ reveals a structural organization similar to that of other cell surface proteins from streptococci and staphylococci. The Fn-binding activity is localized to two domains in the C-terminal part of FNZ. One domain is composed of five repeats, which contain a motif similar to what has earlier been found in other Fn-binding proteins in streptococci and staphylococci. The first and second repeats are separated by a short stretch of amino acids, including the motif LAGESGET, which is an important part of the second Fn-binding domain. This motif is also present in an Fn-binding domain (UR) in protein F of Streptococcus pyogenes. A fusion protein covering the Fn-binding domain of FNZ inhibits the binding of the 29-kDa N-terminal fragment of Fn to cells of various streptococcal species as well as to Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:8926060

  8. Heparin binding preference and structures in the fibroblast growth factor family parallel their evolutionary diversification

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Wilkinson, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of a large number of extracellular proteins with heparan sulfate (HS) regulates their transport and effector functions, but the degree of molecular specificity underlying protein–polysaccharide binding is still debated. The 15 paracrine fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are one of the paradigms for this interaction. Here, we measure the binding preferences of six FGFs (FGF3, FGF4, FGF6, FGF10, FGF17, FGF20) for a library of modified heparins, representing structures in HS, and model glycosaminoglycans, using differential scanning fluorimetry. This is complemented by the identification of the lysine residues in the primary and secondary binding sites of the FGFs by a selective labelling approach. Pooling these data with previous sets provides good coverage of the FGF phylogenetic tree, deduced from amino acid sequence alignment. This demonstrates that the selectivity of the FGFs for binding structures in sulfated polysaccharides and the pattern of secondary binding sites on the surface of FGFs follow the phylogenetic relationship of the FGFs, and so are likely to be the result of the natural selection pressures that led to the expansion of the FGF family in the course of the evolution of more complex animal body plans. PMID:27030175

  9. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  10. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  11. Cold shock domain protein from Philosamia ricini prefers single-stranded nucleic acids binding.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ashutosh; Yadava, P K; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock proteins are evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid-binding proteins. Their eukaryotic homologs are present as cold shock domain (CSD) in Y-box proteins. CSDs too share striking similarity among different organisms and show nucleic acid binding properties. The purpose of the study was to investigate the preferential binding affinity of CSD protein for nucleic acids in Philosamia ricini. We have cloned and sequenced the first cDNA coding for Y-box protein in P. ricini; the sequence has been deposited in GenBank. Comparative genomics and phylogenetic analytics further confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence belongs to the CSD protein family. A comparative study employing molecular docking was performed with P. ricini CSD, human CSD, and bacterial cold shock protein with a range of nucleic acid entities. The results indicate that CSD per se exhibits preferential binding affinity for single-stranded RNA and DNA. Possibly, the flanking N- and C-terminal domains are additionally involved in interactions with dsDNA or in conferring extra stability to CSD for improved binding.

  12. Known Turnover and Translation Regulatory RNA-Binding Proteins Interact with the 3’ UTR of SECIS-Binding Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Bubenik, Jodi; Ladd, Andrea; Gerber, Carri A.; Budiman, Michael; Driscoll, Donna

    2008-01-01

    The human selenoproteome is composed of ~25 selenoproteins, which cotranslationally incorporate selenocysteine, the 21st amino acid. Selenoprotein expression requires an unusual translation mechanism, as selenocysteine is encoded by the UGA stop codon. SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2) is an essential component of the selenocysteine insertion machinery. SBP2 is also the only factor known to differentiate among selenoprotein mRNAs, thereby modulating the relative expression of the individual selenoproteins. Here, we show that expression of SBP2 protein varies widely across tissues and cell types examined, despite previous observations of only modest variation in SBP2 mRNA levels. This discrepancy between SBP2 mRNA and protein levels implies translational regulation, which is often mediated via untranslated regions (UTRs) in regulated transcripts. We have identified multiple sequences in the SBP2 3’ UTR that are highly conserved. The proximal short conserved region is GU rich and was subsequently shown to be a binding site for CUG-BP1. The distal half of the 3’ UTR is largely conserved, and multiple proteins interact with this region. One of these proteins was identified as HuR. Both CUG-BP1 and HuR are members of the Turnover and Translation Regulatory RNA-Binding Protein family (TTR-RBP). Members of this protein family are linked by the common ability to rapidly effect gene expression through alterations in the stability and translatability of target mRNAs. The identification of CUG-BP1 and HuR as factors that bind to the SBP2 3’ UTR suggests that TTR-RBPs play a role in the regulation of SBP2, which then dictates the expression of the selenoproteome. PMID:19106619

  13. The protein hSnm1B is stabilized when bound to the telomere-binding protein TRF2.

    PubMed

    Freibaum, Brian D; Counter, Christopher M

    2008-08-29

    hSnm1B is member of the SNM family of exonucleases involved in DNA processing and is known to be localized to telomeres via binding to the telomere-binding protein TRF2. Here we demonstrate that the C terminus of hSnm1B facilitates the concentration of hSnm1B on telomeres by promoting ubiquitin-mediated degradation of hSnm1B that is not localized to telomeres, as well as by blocking protein degradation and fostering localization to telomeres via binding of TRF2. Finally, a mutant of hSnm1B stabilized independently of exogenous TRF2-induced cell death. Taken together, we speculate that sequestering hSnm1B at telomeres by a combination of stabilizing the protein when bound to telomeres and degrading it when not bound to telomeres may be a means to prevent potentially lethal effects of unregulated hSnm1B activity.

  14. Structural insights into the DNA-binding specificity of E2F family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Yin, Yimeng; Jolma, Arttu; Dave, Kashyap; Schmierer, Bernhard; Popov, Alexander; Eremina, Nadejda; Nilsson, Lennart; Taipale, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cell cycle is controlled by the E2F family of transcription factors. Typical E2Fs bind to DNA as heterodimers with the related dimerization partner (DP) proteins, whereas the atypical E2Fs, E2F7 and E2F8 contain two DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and act as repressors. To understand the mechanism of repression, we have resolved the structure of E2F8 in complex with DNA at atomic resolution. We find that the first and second DBDs of E2F8 resemble the DBDs of typical E2F and DP proteins, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, biochemical affinity measurements and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further show that both atypical and typical E2Fs bind to similar DNA sequences in vitro and in vivo. Our results represent the first crystal structure of an E2F protein with two DBDs, and reveal the mechanism by which atypical E2Fs can repress canonical E2F target genes and exert their negative influence on cell cycle progression. PMID:26632596

  15. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site.

  16. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  17. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-07-28

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27605879

  18. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Caleosins: Ca2+-binding proteins associated with lipid bodies.

    PubMed

    Naested, H; Frandsen, G I; Jauh, G Y; Hernandez-Pinzon, I; Nielsen, H B; Murphy, D J; Rogers, J C; Mundy, J

    2000-11-01

    We have previously identified a rice gene encoding a 27 kDa protein with a single Ca2+-binding EF-hand and a putative membrane anchor. We report here similar genes termed caleosins, CLO, in other plants and fungi; they comprise a multigene family of at least five members in Arabidopsis (AtClo1-5). Northern hybridization demonstrated that AtClo2-4 mRNAs levels were low in various tissues, while AtClo1 mRNA levels were high in developing embryos and mature seeds. Analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the GUS reporter under control of the AtClo1 promoter showed strong levels of expression in developing embryos and also in root tip cells. Antibodies raised against AtCLO1 were used to detect caleosin in cellular fractions of Arabidopsis and rapeseed. This indicated that caleosins are a novel class of lipid body proteins, which may also be associated with an ER subdomain. PMID:11197322

  20. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27605879

  1. The cytoskeletal protein α-catenin unfurls upon binding to vinculin.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Izard, Tina

    2012-05-25

    Adherens junctions (AJs) are essential for cell-cell contacts, morphogenesis, and the development of all higher eukaryotes. AJs are formed by calcium-dependent homotypic interactions of the ectodomains of single membrane-pass cadherin family receptors. These homotypic interactions in turn promote binding of the intracellular cytoplasmic tail domains of cadherin receptors with β-catenin, a multifunctional protein that plays roles in both transcription and AJs. The cadherin receptor-β-catenin complex binds to the cytoskeletal protein α-catenin, which is essential for both the formation and the stabilization of these junctions. Precisely how α-catenin contributes to the formation and stabilization of AJs is hotly debated, although the latter is thought to involve its interactions with the cytoskeletal protein vinculin. Here we report the crystal structure of the vinculin binding domain (VBD) of α-catenin in complex with the vinculin head domain (Vh1). This structure reveals that α-catenin is in a unique unfurled mode allowing dimer formation when bound to vinculin. Finally, binding studies suggest that vinculin must be in an activated state to bind to α-catenin and that this interaction is stabilized by the formation of a ternary α-catenin-vinculin-F-actin complex, which can be formed via the F-actin binding domain of either protein. We propose a feed-forward model whereby α-catenin-vinculin interactions promote their binding to the actin cytoskeleton to stabilize AJs. PMID:22493458

  2. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  3. Estradiol binding to nuclear matrix protein of pig adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Ungar, F.; Johnson, S.R.; Johnston, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of TH-estradiol can be shown in vitro after incubation with purified washed nuclei of sow adrenal cortex or with the insoluble nuclear matrix protein isolated from nuclei. The procedure modified after Berezney and Coffey treated washed nuclei sequentially with 1% Triton-X100, DNase, RNase and 2M NaCl to give an insoluble nuclear matrix protein preparation in which most of the phospholipid, DNA, RNA and protein was removed. Reagents were added to 10 mM Tris buffer containing 1 mM phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride, dithiothreitol and 0.2 mM or 5.0 mM MgCl2. Each treatment and washes were centrifuged at 4C. Suspensions of nuclei and nuclear matrix protein were incubated at 4C for 24 hrs. with 0.25 to 3.0 ng of TH-estradiol in 0.5 ml 10 mM Tris buffer with 5 mM MgCl2. Scatchard analysis of binding in duplicate or triplicate tubes with or without excess unlabeled estradiol gave specific binding for sow adrenal nuclei and for nuclear matrix protein. Total binding sites varied between 780 to 1380 fmoles/mg protein. Estradiol binding was not shown in the fetal adrenal matrix nor in mitochondria. Noncompetitive controls included progesterone and pregnenolone. Nuclear matrix protein binding of estradiol may have significance in functional or morphological changes of the adrenal cortex in fetal, neonatal, or pubertal development.

  4. General RNA binding proteins render translation cap dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Svitkin, Y V; Ovchinnikov, L P; Dreyfuss, G; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate is relatively independent of the presence of the mRNA m7G cap structure and the cap binding protein, eIF-4E. In addition, initiation occurs frequently at spurious internal sites. Here we show that a critical parameter which contributes to cap-dependent translation is the amount of general RNA binding proteins in the extract. Addition of several general RNA binding proteins, such as hnRNP A1, La autoantigen, pyrimidine tract binding protein (hnRNP I/PTB) and the major core protein of cytoplasmic mRNP (p50), rendered translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cap dependent. These proteins drastically inhibited the translation of an uncapped mRNA, but had no effect on translation of a capped mRNA. Based on these and other results, we suggest that one function of general mRNA binding proteins in the cytoplasm is to promote ribosome binding by a 5' end, cap-mediated mechanism, and prevent spurious initiations at aberrant translation start sites. Images PMID:9003790

  5. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  6. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  7. Analysis of Arf GTP-binding Protein Function in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lee Ann; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2010-01-01

    This unit describes techniques and approaches that can be used to study the functions of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTP-binding proteins in cells. There are 6 mammalian Arfs and many more Arf-like proteins (Arls) and these proteins are conserved in eukaryotes from yeast to man. Like all GTPases, Arfs cycle between GDP-bound, inactive and GTP-bound active conformations, facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that catalyze GTP binding and hydrolysis respectively. Here we describe approaches that can be taken to examine the localization and function of Arf and Arl proteins in cells (Protocol 1). We also provide a simple protocol for measuring activation (GTP-binding) of specific Arf proteins in cells using a pull-down assay (Protocol 2). We then discuss approaches that can be taken to assess function of GEFs and GAPs in cells (Protocol 3). PMID:20853342

  8. PUB1 is a major nuclear and cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA-binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J T; Paddy, M R; Swanson, M S

    1993-01-01

    Proteins that directly associate with nuclear polyadenylated RNAs, or heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs), and those that associate with cytoplasmic mRNAs, or mRNA-binding proteins (mRNPs), play important roles in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Previous work with a variety of eukaryotic cells has demonstrated that hnRNPs are localized predominantly within the nucleus whereas mRNPs are cytoplasmic. While studying proteins associated with polyadenylated RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we discovered an abundant polyuridylate-binding protein, PUB1, which appears to be both an hnRNP and an mRNP. PUB1 and PAB1, the polyadenylate tail-binding protein, are the two major proteins cross-linked by UV light to polyadenylated RNAs in vivo. The deduced primary structure of PUB1 indicates that it is a member of the ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence family of RNA-binding proteins and is structurally related to the human hnRNP M proteins. Even though the PUB1 protein is a major cellular polyadenylated RNA-binding protein, it is nonessential for cell growth. Indirect cellular immunofluorescence combined with digital image processing allowed a detailed comparison of the intracellular distributions of PUB1 and PAB1. While PAB1 is predominantly, and relatively uniformly, distributed within the cytoplasm, PUB1 is localized in a nonuniform pattern throughout both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic distribution of PUB1 is considerably more discontinuous than that of PAB1. Furthermore, sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis demonstrates that PAB1 cofractionates with polyribosomes whereas PUB1 does not. These results suggest that PUB1 is both an hnRNP and an mRNP and that it may be stably bound to a translationally inactive subpopulation of mRNAs within the cytoplasm. Images PMID:8413212

  9. Using Centromere Mediated Genome Elimination to Elucidate the Functional Redundancy of Candidate Telomere Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Nick; Riha, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Proteins that bind to telomeric DNA form the key structural and functional constituents of telomeres. While telomere binding proteins have been described in the majority of organisms, their identity in plants remains unknown. Several protein families containing a telomere binding motif known as the telobox have been previously described in Arabidopsis thaliana. Nonetheless, functional evidence for their involvement at telomeres has not been obtained, likely due to functional redundancy. Here we performed genetic analysis on the TRF-like family consisting of six proteins (TRB1, TRP1, TRFL1, TRFL2, TRFL4, and TRF9) which have previously shown to bind telomeric DNA in vitro. We used haploid genetics to create multiple knock-out plants deficient for all six proteins of this gene family. These plants did not exhibit changes in telomere length, or phenotypes associated with telomere dysfunction. This data demonstrates that this telobox protein family is not involved in telomere maintenance in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis in major plant lineages revealed early diversification of telobox proteins families indicating that telomere function may be associated with other telobox proteins. PMID:26779251

  10. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  11. A new aspect of serum protein binding of tolbutamide.

    PubMed

    Ayanoğlu, G; Uihlein, M; Grigoleit, H G

    1986-02-01

    Tolbutamide is known to bind highly to serum proteins. Quite different values have, however, been reported for binding, ranging from 80 to 99 percent. In this study, in vivo and in vitro binding of increasing concentrations of tolbutamide to human serum proteins were evaluated. In vitro studies were done serum from three healthy males and for in vivo studies serum samples from eight healthy males who had received 1,000 mg tolbutamide were used. Protein binding was determined by equilibrium dialysis, using DIANORM system. Tolbutamide concentrations were determined by HPLC method of Uihlein and Hack. The results suggest that there is an increase in percent tolbutamide bound with increasing concentrations of tolbutamide. Generally, an inverse relationship between the total concentration of a drug in serum and its bound fraction is observed. Our findings seem to be contrary to this, at least within the concentration range studied. There exist at least two binding sites on albumin with different affinities for tolbutamide and most probably, at low concentrations, the drug binds mainly to the high affinity sites, whereas at higher concentrations additional drug will bind to the lower affinity sites leading to the observed increase in fraction bound with concentration. In conclusion it may be said that serum protein binding is a much more complicated phenomenon than generally stated and that the normal observations are only true for some ideal compounds where only one site of adsorption has to be taken into account.

  12. Conformational thermodynamics of metal-ion binding to a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-08-01

    Conformational changes in proteins induced by metal-ions play extremely important role in various cellular processes and technological applications. Dihedral angles are suitable conformational variables to describe microscopic conformations of a biomacromolecule. Here, we use the histograms of the dihedral angles to study the thermodynamics of conformational changes of a protein upon metal-ion binding. Our method applied to Ca2+ ion binding to an important metalloprotein, Calmodulin, reveals different thermodynamic changes in different metal-binding sites. The ligands coordinating to Ca2+ ions also play different roles in stabilizing the metal-ion coordinated protein-structure. Metal-ion binding induce remarkable thermodynamic changes in distant part of the protein via modification of secondary structural elements.

  13. Gene Models, Expression Repertoire, and Immune Response of Plasmodium vivax Reticulocyte Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, Jenni; Chim-Ong, Anongruk; Chiramanewong, Thanprakorn; Gruszczyk, Jakub; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Tham, Wai-Hong; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Nguitragool, Wang

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding protein (PvRBP) family are believed to mediate specific invasion of reticulocytes by P. vivax. In this study, we performed molecular characterization of genes encoding members of this protein family. Through cDNA sequencing, we constructed full-length gene models and verified genes that are protein coding and those that are pseudogenes. We also used quantitative PCR to measure their in vivo transcript abundances in clinical P. vivax isolates. Like genes encoding related invasion ligands of P. falciparum, Pvrbp expression levels vary broadly across different parasite isolates. Through antibody measurements, we found that host immune pressure may be the driving force behind the distinctly high diversity of one of the family members, PvRBP2c. Mild yet significant negative correlation was found between parasitemia and the PvRBP2b antibody level, suggesting that antibodies to the protein may interfere with invasion. PMID:26712206

  14. Crystal structure of CbpF, a bifunctional choline-binding protein and autolysis regulator from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Stelter, Meike; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Kahn, Richard; Morales, María; Campuzano, Susana; Campillo, Nuria E; Mobashery, Shahriar; García, José L; García, Pedro; Hermoso, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylcholine, a crucial component of the pneumococcal cell wall, is essential in bacterial physiology and in human pathogenesis because it binds to serum components of the immune system and acts as a docking station for the family of surface choline-binding proteins. The three-dimensional structure of choline-binding protein F (CbpF), one of the most abundant proteins in the pneumococcal cell wall, has been solved in complex with choline. CbpF shows a new modular structure composed both of consensus and non-consensus choline-binding repeats, distributed along its length, which markedly alter its shape, charge distribution and binding ability, and organizing the protein into two well-defined modules. The carboxy-terminal module is involved in cell wall binding and the amino-terminal module is crucial for inhibition of the autolytic LytC muramidase, providing a regulatory function for pneumococcal autolysis. PMID:19165143

  15. SIENA: Efficient Compilation of Selective Protein Binding Site Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Bietz, Stefan; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-01-25

    Structural flexibility of proteins has an important influence on molecular recognition and enzymatic function. In modeling, structure ensembles are therefore often applied as a valuable source of alternative protein conformations. However, their usage is often complicated by structural artifacts and inconsistent data annotation. Here, we present SIENA, a new computational approach for the automated assembly and preprocessing of protein binding site ensembles. Starting with an arbitrarily defined binding site in a single protein structure, SIENA searches for alternative conformations of the same or sequentially closely related binding sites. The method is based on an indexed database for identifying perfect k-mer matches and a recently published algorithm for the alignment of protein binding site conformations. Furthermore, SIENA provides a new algorithm for the interaction-based selection of binding site conformations which aims at covering all known ligand-binding geometries. Various experiments highlight that SIENA is able to generate comprehensive and well selected binding site ensembles improving the compatibility to both known and unconsidered ligand molecules. Starting with the whole PDB as data source, the computation time of the whole ensemble generation takes only a few seconds. SIENA is available via a Web service at www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/siena .

  16. Oxysterol binding protein-related protein 8 mediates the cytotoxicity of 25-hydroxycholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiwei; Zheng, Xiuting; Lou, Ning; Zhong, Wenbin; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterols are 27-carbon oxidized derivatives of cholesterol or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis that can induce cell apoptosis in addition to a number of other bioactions. However, the mechanisms underlying this cytotoxicity are not completely understood. ORP8 is a member of the oxysterol binding protein-related protein (ORP) family, implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, we report that 25-hydroxycholesterol (OHC) induced apoptosis of the hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7, via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response pathway, and ORP8 overexpression resulted in a similar cell response as 25-OHC, indicating a putative functional relationship between oxysterol cytotoxicity and ORP8. Further experiments demonstrated that ORP8 overexpression significantly enhanced the 25-OHC effect on ER stress and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. A truncated ORP8 construct lacking the ligand-binding domain or a closely related protein, ORP5, was devoid of this activity, evidencing for specificity of the observed effects. Importantly, ORP8 knockdown markedly dampened such responses to 25-OHC. Taken together, the present study suggests that ORP8 may mediate the cytotoxicity of 25-OHC. PMID:27530118

  17. Subcellular distribution of small GTP binding proteins in pancreas: Identification of small GTP binding proteins in the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.K. )

    1990-02-01

    Subfractionation of a canine pancreatic homogenate was performed by several differential centrifugation steps, which gave rise to fractions with distinct marker profiles. Specific binding of guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S)) was assayed in each fraction. Enrichment of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding was greatest in the interfacial smooth microsomal fraction, expected to contain Golgi and other smooth vesicles. There was also marked enrichment in the rough microsomal fraction. Electron microscopy and marker protein analysis revealed the rough microsomes (RMs) to be highly purified rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The distribution of small (low molecular weight) GTP binding proteins was examined by a ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot-overlay assay. Several apparent GTP binding proteins of molecular masses 22-25 kDa were detected in various subcellular fractions. In particular, at least two such proteins were found in the Golgi-enriched and RM fractions, suggesting that these small GTP binding proteins were localized to the Golgi and RER. To more precisely localize these proteins to the RER, native RMs and RMs stripped of ribosomes by puromycin/high salt were subjected to isopycnic centrifugation. The total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding, as well as the small GTP binding proteins detected by the ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot overlay, distributed into fractions of high sucrose density, as did the RER marker ribophorin I. Consistent with a RER localization, when the RMS were stripped of ribosomes and subjected to isopycnic centrifugation, the total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding and the small GTP binding proteins detected in the blot-overlay assay shifted to fractions of lighter sucrose density along with the RER marker.

  18. Characterization of the Carbohydrate Binding Module 18 gene family in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis responsible for worldwide decline in amphibian populations. Previous analysis of the Bd genome revealed a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18) predicted to be a sub-class of chitin recognition domains. CBM expansions have been linked to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungal species by protecting the fungus from the host. Based on phylogenetic analysis and presence of additional protein domains, the gene family can be classified into 3 classes: Tyrosinase-, Deacetylase-, and Lectin-like. Examination of the mRNA expression levels from sporangia and zoospores of nine of the cbm18 genes found that the Lectin-like genes had the highest expression while the Tyrosinase-like genes showed little expression, especially in zoospores. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged copies of four CBM18 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that two copies containing secretion signal peptides are trafficked to the cell boundary. The Lectin-like genes cbm18-ll1 and cbm18-ll2 co-localized with the chitinous cell boundaries visualized by staining with calcofluor white. In vitro assays of the full length and single domain copies from CBM18-LL1 demonstrated chitin binding and no binding to cellulose or xylan. Expressed CBM18 domain proteins were demonstrated to protect the fungus, Trichoderma reeseii, in vitro against hydrolysis from exogenously added chitinase, likely by binding and limiting exposure of fungal chitin. These results demonstrate that cbm18 genes can play a role in fungal defense and expansion of their copy number may be an important pathogenicity factor of this emerging infectious disease of amphibians. PMID:25819009

  19. Characterization of the Carbohydrate Binding Module 18 gene family in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis responsible for worldwide decline in amphibian populations. Previous analysis of the Bd genome revealed a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18) predicted to be a sub-class of chitin recognition domains. CBM expansions have been linked to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungal species by protecting the fungus from the host. Based on phylogenetic analysis and presence of additional protein domains, the gene family can be classified into 3 classes: Tyrosinase-, Deacetylase-, and Lectin-like. Examination of the mRNA expression levels from sporangia and zoospores of nine of the cbm18 genes found that the Lectin-like genes had the highest expression while the Tyrosinase-like genes showed little expression, especially in zoospores. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged copies of four CBM18 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that two copies containing secretion signal peptides are trafficked to the cell boundary. The Lectin-like genes cbm18-ll1 and cbm18-ll2 co-localized with the chitinous cell boundaries visualized by staining with calcofluor white. In vitro assays of the full length and single domain copies from CBM18-LL1 demonstrated chitin binding and no binding to cellulose or xylan. Expressed CBM18 domain proteins were demonstrated to protect the fungus, Trichoderma reeseii, in vitro against hydrolysis from exogenously added chitinase, likely by binding and limiting exposure of fungal chitin. These results demonstrate that cbm18 genes can play a role in fungal defense and expansion of their copy number may be an important pathogenicity factor of this emerging infectious disease of amphibians.

  20. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as “vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins”, behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. PMID:21236284

  1. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5765 - Retinol-binding protein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retinol-binding protein immunological test system....5765 Retinol-binding protein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A retinol-binding protein... the retinol-binding protein that binds and transports vitamin A in serum and urine. Measurement...

  6. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already

  7. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  8. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  9. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  10. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  11. Structural insight into gene transcriptional regulation and effector binding by the Lrp/AsnC family

    PubMed Central

    Thaw, Paul; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Muranova, Tatyana; Wiese, Sebastian; Ayora, Sylvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Brinkman, Arie B.; Akerboom, Jasper; van der Oost, John; Rafferty, John B.

    2006-01-01

    The Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins is found in both archaea and bacteria. Members of the family influence cellular metabolism in both a global (Lrp) and specific (AsnC) manner, often in response to exogenous amino acid effectors. In the present study we have determined both the first bacterial and the highest resolution structures for members of the family. Escherichia coli AsnC is a specific gene regulator whose activity is triggered by asparagine binding. Bacillus subtilis LrpC is a global regulator involved in chromosome condensation. Our AsnC-asparagine structure is the first for a regulator–effector complex and is revealed as an octameric disc. Key ligand recognition residues are identified together with a route for ligand access. The LrpC structure reveals a stable octamer supportive of a topological role in dynamic DNA packaging. The structures yield significant clues to the functionality of Lrp/AsnC-type regulators with respect to ligand binding and oligomerization states as well as to their role in specific and global DNA regulation. PMID:16528101

  12. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Y.; Akino, T. )

    1991-02-15

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed.

  13. Wild-Type p53 Binds to the TATA-Binding Protein and Represses Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Edward; Usheva, Anny; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Momand, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Weinmann, Roberto; Levine, Arnold J.; Shenk, Thomas

    1992-12-01

    p53 activates transcription of genes with a p53 response element, and it can repress genes lacking the element. Here we demonstrate that wild-type but not mutant p53 inhibits transcription in a HeLa nuclear extract from minimal promoters. Wild-type but not mutant p53 binds to human TATA-binding protein (TBP). p53 does not bind to yeast TBP, and it cannot inhibit transcription in a HeLa extract where yeast TBP substitutes for human TBP. These results suggest a model in which p53 binds to TBP and interferes with transcriptional initiation.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Carpentier, Philippe; Morales, Renaud; Renault, Frédérique; Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure; Rochu, Daniel; Masson, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos; Chabrière, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported. HPBP is a new human apoprotein that is absent from the genomic database and is the first phosphate transporter characterized in human plasma. Human phosphate-binding protein (HPBP) was serendipitously discovered by crystallization and X-ray crystallography. HPBP belongs to a eukaryotic protein family named DING that is systematically absent from the genomic database. This apoprotein of 38 kDa copurifies with the HDL-associated apoprotein paraoxonase (PON1) and binds inorganic phosphate. HPBP is the first identified transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma. Thus, it may be regarded as a predictor of phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis. In addition, HPBP may be a potential therapeutic protein for the treatment of such diseases. Here, the purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported.

  15. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the "fly-casting" hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  16. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  17. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the "fly-casting" hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  18. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  19. GTP-binding proteins in rat liver nuclear envelopes.

    PubMed Central

    Rubins, J B; Benditt, J O; Dickey, B F; Riedel, N

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear transport as well as reassembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) after completion of mitosis are processes that have been shown to require GTP and ATP. To study the presence and localization of GTP-binding proteins in the NE, we have combined complementary techniques of [alpha-32P]GTP binding to Western-blotted proteins and UV crosslinking of [alpha-32P]GTP with well-established procedures for NE subfractionation. GTP binding to blotted NE proteins revealed five low molecular mass GTP-binding proteins of 26, 25, 24.5, 24, and 23 kDa, and [alpha-32P]GTP photoaffinity labeling revealed major proteins with apparent molecular masses of 140, 53, 47, 33, and 31 kDa. All GTP-binding proteins appear to localize preferentially to the inner nuclear membrane, possibly to the interface between inner nuclear membrane and lamina. Despite the evolutionary conservation between the NE and the rough endoplasmic reticulum, the GTP-binding proteins identified differed between these two compartments. Most notably, the 68- and 30-kDa GTP-binding subunits of the signal recognition particle receptor, which photolabeled with [alpha-32P]GTP in the rough endoplasmic reticulum fraction, were totally excluded from the NE fraction. Conversely, a major 53-kDa photolabeled protein in the NE was absent from rough endoplasmic reticulum. Whereas Western-blotted NE proteins bound GTP specifically, all [alpha-32P]GTP photolabeled proteins could be blocked by competition with ATP, although with a competition profile that differed from that obtained with GTP. In comparative crosslinking studies with [alpha-32P]ATP, we have identified three specific ATP-binding proteins with molecular masses of 160, 78, and 74 kDa. The localization of GTP- and ATP-binding proteins within the NE appears appropriate for their involvement in nuclear transport and in the GTP-dependent fusion of nuclear membrane vesicles required for reassembly of the nucleus after mitosis. Images PMID:2119502

  20. Structural Perspectives on the Evolutionary Expansion of Unique Protein-Protein Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-09-15

    Structures of protein complexes provide atomistic insights into protein interactions. Human proteins represent a quarter of all structures in the Protein Data Bank; however, available protein complexes cover less than 10% of the human proteome. Although it is theoretically possible to infer interactions in human proteins based on structures of homologous protein complexes, it is still unclear to what extent protein interactions and binding sites are conserved, and whether protein complexes from remotely related species can be used to infer interactions and binding sites. We considered biological units of protein complexes and clustered protein-protein binding sites into similarity groups based on their structure and sequence, which allowed us to identify unique binding sites. We showed that the growth rate of the number of unique binding sites in the Protein Data Bank was much slower than the growth rate of the number of structural complexes. Next, we investigated the evolutionary roots of unique binding sites and identified the major phyletic branches with the largest expansion in the number of novel binding sites. We found that many binding sites could be traced to the universal common ancestor of all cellular organisms, whereas relatively few binding sites emerged at the major evolutionary branching points. We analyzed the physicochemical properties of unique binding sites and found that the most ancient sites were the largest in size, involved many salt bridges, and were the most compact and least planar. In contrast, binding sites that appeared more recently in the evolution of eukaryotes were characterized by a larger fraction of polar and aromatic residues, and were less compact and more planar, possibly due to their more transient nature and roles in signaling processes.

  1. Metal-binding proteins as metal pollution indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, H.F.

    1986-03-01

    The fact that metal-binding proteins are a consequence of elevated metal concentration in organisms is well known. What has been overlooked is that the presence of these proteins provides a unique opportunity to reformulate the criteria of metal pollution. The detoxification effect of metal-binding proteins in animals from polluted areas has been cited, but there have been only very few studies relating metal-binding proteins to pollution. This lack is due partly to the design of most experiments, which were aimed at isolation of metal-binding proteins and hence were of too short duration to allow for correlation to adverse physiological effects on the organism. In this study metal-binding proteins were isolated and characterized from five different marine animals (rock lobster, Jasus lalandii; hermit crab, Diogenes brevirostris; sandshrimp, Palaemon pacificus; black mussel, Choromytilus meridionalis; and limpet, Patella granularis). These animals were kept under identical metal-enriched conditions, hence eliminating differences in method and seasons. The study animals belonged to different phyla; varied in size, mass, age, behavior, food requirements and life stages; and accumulated metals at different rates. It is possible to link unseasonal moulting in crustacea, a known physiological effect due to a metal-enriched environment, to the production of the metal-binding protein without evidence of obvious metal body burden. Thus a new concept of pollution is defined: the presence of metal-binding proteins confirms toxic metal pollution. This concept was then tested under field conditions in the whelk Bullia digitalis and in metal-enriched grass.

  2. Identification of Immunodominant B-cell Epitope Regions of Reticulocyte Binding Proteins in Plasmodium vivax by Protein Microarray Based Immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Hee; Li, Jian; Wang, Bo; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Na, Sunghun; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum can invade all stages of red blood cells, while Plasmodium vivax can invade only reticulocytes. Although many P. vivax proteins have been discovered, their functions are largely unknown. Among them, P. vivax reticulocyte binding proteins (PvRBP1 and PvRBP2) recognize and bind to reticulocytes. Both proteins possess a C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane domain, which drives adhesion to reticulocytes. PvRBP1 and PvRBP2 are large (> 326 kDa), which hinders identification of the functional domains. In this study, the complete genome information of the P. vivax RBP family was thoroughly analyzed using a prediction server with bioinformatics data to predict B-cell epitope domains. Eleven pvrbp family genes that included 2 pseudogenes and 9 full or partial length genes were selected and used to express recombinant proteins in a wheat germ cell-free system. The expressed proteins were used to evaluate the humoral immune response with vivax malaria patients and healthy individual serum samples by protein microarray. The recombinant fragments of 9 PvRBP proteins were successfully expressed; the soluble proteins ranged in molecular weight from 16 to 34 kDa. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to each recombinant PvRBP protein indicated a high antigenicity, with 38-88% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Of them, N-terminal parts of PvRBP2c (PVX_090325-1) and PvRBP2 like partial A (PVX_090330-1) elicited high antigenicity. In addition, the PvRBP2-like homologue B (PVX_116930) fragment was newly identified as high antigenicity and may be exploited as a potential antigenic candidate among the PvRBP family. The functional activity of the PvRBP family on merozoite invasion remains unknown.

  3. Using evolutionary and structural information to predict DNA-binding sites on DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor B; Gou, Zhenkun; Li, Run; Hwang, Seungwoo

    2006-07-01

    Proteins that interact with DNA are involved in a number of fundamental biological activities such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. A reliable identification of DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins is important for functional annotation, site-directed mutagenesis, and modeling protein-DNA interactions. We apply Support Vector Machine (SVM), a supervised pattern recognition method, to predict DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins using the following features: amino acid sequence, profile of evolutionary conservation of sequence positions, and low-resolution structural information. We use a rigorous statistical approach to study the performance of predictors that utilize different combinations of features and how this performance is affected by structural and sequence properties of proteins. Our results indicate that an SVM predictor based on a properly scaled profile of evolutionary conservation in the form of a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) significantly outperforms a PSSM-based neural network predictor. The highest accuracy is achieved by SVM predictor that combines the profile of evolutionary conservation with low-resolution structural information. Our results also show that knowledge-based predictors of DNA-binding sites perform significantly better on proteins from mainly-alpha structural class and that the performance of these predictors is significantly correlated with certain structural and sequence properties of proteins. These observations suggest that it may be possible to assign a reliability index to the overall accuracy of the prediction of DNA-binding sites in any given protein using its sequence and structural properties. A web-server implementation of the predictors is freely available online at http://lcg.rit.albany.edu/dp-bind/.

  4. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  5. Functional and receptor binding characterization of recombinant murine macrophage inflammatory protein 2: sequence analysis and mutagenesis identify receptor binding epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Jerva, L. F.; Sullivan, G.; Lolis, E.

    1997-01-01

    Murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a member of the alpha-chemokine family, is one of several proteins secreted by cells in response to lipopolysaccharide. Many of the alpha-chemokines, such as interleukin-8, gro-alpha/MGSA, and neutrophil activating peptide-2 (NAP-2), are associated with neutrophil activation and chemotaxis. We describe the expression, purification, and characterization of murine MIP-2 from Pichia pastoris. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that MIP-2 exhibits a highly ordered secondary structure consistent with the alpha/beta structures of other chemokines. Recombinant MIP-2 is chemotactic for human and murine neutrophils and up-regulates cell surface expression of Mac-1. MIP-2 binds to human and murine neutrophils with dissociation constants of 6.4 nM and 2.9 nM, respectively. We further characterize the binding of MIP-2 to the human types A and B IL-8 receptors and the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. MIP-2 displays low-affinity binding to the type A IL-8 receptor (Kd > 120 nM) and high-affinity binding to the type B IL-8 receptor (Kd 5.7 nM) and the murine receptor (Kd 6.8 nM). The three-dimensional structure of IL-8 and sequence analysis of six chemokines (IL-8, gro-alpha, NAP-2, ENA-78, KC, and MIP-2) that display high-affinity binding to the IL-8 type B receptor are used to identify an extended N-terminal surface that interacts with this receptor. Two mutants of MIP-2 establish that this region is also involved in binding and activating the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. Differences in the sequence between IL-8 and related chemokines identify a unique hydrophobic/aromatic region surrounded by charged residues that is likely to impart specificity to IL-8 for binding to the type A receptor. PMID:9260277

  6. Detecting O2 binding sites in protein cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Xue, Mengjun; Kameda, Tomoshi; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cavities are important elements in protein structure, dynamics, stability and function. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate the binding of molecular oxygen (O2) to cavities in a well-studied model for ligand binding, the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. On increasing the O2 concentration to 8.9 mM, changes in 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts and signal broadening were observed specifically for backbone amide and side chain methyl groups located around the two hydrophobic cavities of the protein. O2-induced longitudinal relaxation enhancements for amide and methyl protons could be adequately accounted for by paramagnetic dipolar relaxation. These data provide the first experimental demonstration that O2 binds specifically to the hydrophobic, and not the hydrophilic cavities, in a protein. Molecular dynamics simulations visualized the rotational and translational motions of O2 in the cavities, as well as the binding and egress of O2, suggesting that the channel consisting of helices D, E, G, H, and J could be the potential gateway for ligand binding to the protein. Due to strong paramagnetic relaxation effects, O2 gas-pressure NMR measurements can detect hydrophobic cavities when populated to as little as 1%, and thereby provide a general and highly sensitive method for detecting oxygen binding in proteins. PMID:26830762

  7. Binding profile of spiramycin to oviducal proteins of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, N

    2000-12-01

    In vitro protein binding of spiramycin (SP) in the plasma and oviducts of laying hens was studied. The data for SP were compared with those for oxytetracycline (OTC), sulphadimidine (SDD), sulphamonomethoxine (SMM) and sulphaquinoxaline (SQ). The two oviduct segments, magnum (M) and isthmus plus shell gland (IS), were collected. The soluble (cell sap) fractions from the magnum (M-S9) and the isthmus plus shell gland (IS-S9) were used as samples. Plasma protein binding was highest for SQ (81.4%) (P < 0.01), and lowest for SDD (30.9%) (P < 0.01). No M-S9 protein binding of OTC was found. The IS-S9 protein binding of SP (60.4%) was very much higher than those of OTC (0.8%), SDD (4.1%), SMM (4.0%) and SQ (12.3%) (P < 0.01). Biological half-lives of these drugs in egg albumen were directly correlated to the extent of their binding to IS proteins. Of plasma, M-S9 and IS-S9, variation in SP concentration in the ranges from 1 to 20 micrograms/ml did not alter the binding properties of the drug. PMID:11199206

  8. The variant STEVOR protein of Plasmodium falciparum is a red cell binding protein important for merozoite invasion and rosetting

    PubMed Central

    Niang, Makhtar; Bei, Amy Kristine; Madnani, Kripa Gopal; Pelly, Shaaretha; Dankwa, Selasi; Kanjee, Usheer; Gunalan, Karthigayan; Amaladoss, Anburaj; Yeo, Kim Pin; Bob, Ndeye Sakha; Malleret, Benoit; Duraisingh, Manoj; Preiser, Peter Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Variant surface antigens play an important role in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. To date, intensive work has mainly focused on the role in parasite virulence of the P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) encoded by the var multigene family. Two other multigene families coding for STEVOR and RIFIN have recently also been shown to be expressed in the invasive merozoite as well as on the surface of the infected erythrocyte, implicating them as potential parasite virulence factors. Here we report that STEVOR is an erythrocyte-binding protein recognizing Glycophorin C on the red blood cell (RBC) surface. STEVOR expression on the RBC leads to PfEMP1-independent rosette formation, while antibodies targeting STEVOR in the merozoite can effectively inhibit invasion. Our results suggest a novel role of STEVOR in enabling infected erythrocytes at the schizont stage to bind uninfected erythrocytes to form rosettes, thereby protecting released merozoites from immune detection. PMID:25011110

  9. Elucidation of Nonadditive Effects in Protein-Ligand Binding Energies: Thrombin as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Gaetano; Woods, Christopher J; Powlesland, Francis; Mey, Antonia S J S; Mulholland, Adrian J; Michel, Julien

    2016-06-23

    Accurate predictions of free energies of binding of ligands to proteins are challenging partly because of the nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions; i.e., the free energy of binding is the sum of numerous enthalpic and entropic contributions that cannot be separated into functional group contributions. In principle, molecular simulations methodologies that compute free energies of binding do capture nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions, but efficient protocols are necessary to compute well-converged free energies of binding that clearly resolve nonadditive effects. To this end, an efficient GPU-accelerated implementation of alchemical free energy calculations has been developed and applied to two congeneric series of ligands of the enzyme thrombin. The results show that accurate binding affinities are computed across the two congeneric series and positive coupling between nonpolar R(1) substituents and a X = NH3(+) substituent is reproduced, albeit with a weaker trend than experimentally observed. By contrast, a docking methodology completely fails to capture nonadditive effects. Further analysis shows that the nonadditive effects are partly due to variations in the strength of a hydrogen-bond between the X = NH3(+) ligands family and thrombin residue Gly216. However, other partially compensating interactions occur across the entire binding site, and no single interaction dictates the magnitude of the nonadditive effects for all the analyzed protein-ligand complexes. PMID:27248478

  10. A major integral protein of the plant plasma membrane binds flavin.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Astrid; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Hertel, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    Abundant flavin binding sites have been found in membranes of plants and fungi. With flavin mononucleotide-agarose affinity columns, riboflavin-binding activity from microsomes of Cucurbita pepoL. hypocotyls was purified and identified as a specific PIP1-homologous protein of the aquaporin family. Sequences such as gi|2149955 in Phaseolus vulgaris, PIP1b of Arabidopsis thaliana, and NtAQP1 of tobacco are closely related. The identification as a riboflavin-binding protein was confirmed by binding tests with an extract of Escherichia coli cells expressing the tobacco NtAQP1 as well as leaves of transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress NtAQP1 or were inhibited in PIP1 expression by antisense constructs. When binding was assayed in the presence of dithionite, the reduced flavin formed a relatively stable association with the protein. Upon dilution under oxidizing conditions, the adduct was resolved, and free flavin reappeared with a half time of about 30 min. Such an association can also be induced photochemically, with oxidized flavin by blue light at 450 nm, in the presence of an electron donor. Several criteria, localization in the plasma membrane, high abundance, affinity to roseoflavin, and photochemistry, argue for a role of the riboflavin-binding protein PIP1 as a photoreceptor. PMID:12768338

  11. HMP Binding Protein ThiY and HMP-P Synthase THI5 Are Structural Homologues

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Perry, Kay; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-10-14

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter system ThiXYZ transports N-formyl-4-amino-5-(aminomethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine (FAMP), a thiamin salvage pathway intermediate, into cells. FAMP is then converted to 4-amino-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) and recycled into the thiamin biosynthetic pathway. ThiY is the periplasmic substrate binding protein of the ThiXYZ system and delivers the substrate FAMP to the transmembrane domain. We report the crystal structure of Bacillus halodurans ThiY with FAMP bound at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. The crystal structure reveals that ThiY belongs to the group II periplasmic binding protein family. The closest structural homologues of ThiY are periplasmic binding proteins involved in alkanesulfonate/nitrate and bicarbonate transport. ThiY is also structurally homologous to thiamin binding protein (TbpA) and to thiaminase-I. THI5 is responsible for the synthesis of 4-amino-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway of eukaryotes and is approximately 25% identical in sequence with ThiY. A homology model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI5 was generated on the basis of the structure of ThiY. Many features of the thiamin pyrimidine binding site are shared between ThiY and THI5, suggesting a common ancestor.

  12. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  13. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages. PMID:25684408

  14. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages.

  15. Identification of a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules with broad ligand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Yu-Liang; Cao, Qi-Long; Huang, Ming-Yue; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Most enzymes that act on carbohydrates include non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that recognize and target carbohydrates. CBMs bring their appended catalytic modules into close proximity with the target substrate and increase the hydrolytic rate of enzymes acting on insoluble substrates. We previously identified a novel CBM (CBMC5614-1) at the C-terminus of endoglucanase C5614-1 from an uncultured microorganism present in buffalo rumen. In the present study, that the functional region of CBMC5614-1 involved in ligand binding was localized to 134 amino acids. Two representative homologs of CBMC5614-1, sharing the same ligand binding profile, targeted a range of β-linked polysaccharides that adopt very different conformations. Targeted substrates included soluble and insoluble cellulose, β-1,3/1,4-mixed linked glucans, xylan, and mannan. Mutagenesis revealed that three conserved aromatic residues (Trp-380, Tyr-411, and Trp-423) play an important role in ligand recognition and targeting. These results suggest that CBMC5614-1 and its homologs form a novel CBM family (CBM72) with a broad ligand-binding specificity. CBM72 members can provide new insight into CBM-ligand interactions and may have potential in protein engineering and biocatalysis. PMID:26765840

  16. The ATP-Binding Cassette Proteins of the Deep-Branching Protozoan Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, Karen; Self, Tim J.; Dyall, Sabrina D.; Kerr, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are a family of membrane transporters and regulatory proteins responsible for diverse and critical cellular process in all organisms. To date, there has been no attempt to investigate this class of proteins in the infectious parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. We have utilized a combination of bioinformatics, gene sequence analysis, gene expression and confocal microscopy to investigate the ABC proteins of T. vaginalis. We demonstrate that, uniquely among eukaryotes, T. vaginalis possesses no intact full-length ABC transporters and has undergone a dramatic expansion of some ABC protein sub-families. Furthermore, we provide preliminary evidence that T. vaginalis is able to read through in-frame stop codons to express ABC transporter components from gene pairs in a head-to-tail orientation. Finally, with confocal microscopy we demonstrate the expression and endoplasmic reticulum localization of a number of T. vaginalis ABC transporters. PMID:22724033

  17. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design. PMID:27399277

  18. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design.

  19. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  20. TALE proteins bind to both active and inactive chromatin.

    PubMed

    Scott, James N F; Kupinski, Adam P; Kirkham, Christopher M; Tuma, Roman; Boyes, Joan

    2014-02-15

    TALE (transcription activator-like effector) proteins can be tailored to bind to any DNA sequence of choice and thus are of immense utility for genome editing and the specific delivery of transcription activators. However, to perform these functions, they need to occupy their sites in chromatin. In the present study, we have systematically assessed TALE binding to chromatin substrates and find that in vitro TALEs bind to their target site on nucleosomes at the more accessible entry/exit sites, but not at the nucleosome dyad. We show further that in vivo TALEs bind to transcriptionally repressed chromatin and that transcription increases binding by only 2-fold. These data therefore imply that TALEs are likely to bind to their target in vivo even at inactive loci.

  1. The structural basis of germline-encoded VH3 immunoglobulin binding to staphylococcal protein A

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The ability of human VH3 immunoglobulins (Ig) to bind to staphylococcal protein A (SPA) via their Fab region is analogous to the binding of bacterial superantigens to T cell receptors. The present report establishes the structural basis for the interaction of SPA and VH3 Ig. We have studied a panel of 27 human monoclonal IgM that were derived from fetal B lymphocytes. As such, these IgM were expected to be encoded by unmutated germline genes. Binding to SPA in ELISA occurred with 15 of 15 VH3 IgM, but none of 12 IgM from the VH1, VH4, VH5, or VH6 families. The VH sequences of the 27 IgM were derived from 20 distinct VH elements, including 11 from the VH3 family. Use of D, JH, and CL genes was similar among VH3 and non-VH3 IgM. A comparison of the corresponding VH protein sequences, and those of previously studied IgM, identified a probable site for SPA binding that includes VH3 residues in framework region 3 (FR3), and perhaps FR1 and 3' complementary determining region 2. The results thus demonstrate that among human IgM, specificity for SPA is encoded by at least 11 different VH3 germline genes. Furthermore, like the T cell superantigens, SPA likely binds to residues in the VH framework region, outside the classical antigen-binding site of the hypervariable loops. PMID:8315388

  2. Characterization of EhCaBP, a calcium-binding protein of Entamoeba histolytica and its binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Yadava, N; Chandok, M R; Prasad, J; Bhattacharya, S; Sopory, S K; Bhattacharya, A

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein (EhCaBP) has been recently identified and characterized from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In order to decipher the function of this protein, a few basic properties were investigated and compared with the ubiquitous Ca(2+)-signal transducing protein calmodulin (CaM). Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analyses using specific antibodies against EhCaBP suggest that it is a soluble cytoplasmic protein with no major post-translational modification. EhCaBP did not stimulate cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity, differentiating it from all known CaMs. Affinity chromatography of [35S]methionine-labelled proteins of E. histolytica trophozoites using EhCaBP-sepharose column showed Ca(2+)-dependent binding of a group of proteins. Radiolabelled proteins from the same extract also bound to CaM-sepharose. However, the proteins bound to the two columns were different as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At least one of the EhCaBP-binding proteins became phosphorylated as revealed by in vivo phosphorylation analysis. The binding-proteins could not be detected in E. invadens (a species that is pathogenic in reptiles) and E. moshkovskii (which is found in the human gut but is not pathogenic), two species in which EhCaBP-like protein has not been found. Two distinct Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, which get activated by EhCaBP and CaM respectively, were detected in E. histolytica. These kinases require different levels of Ca2+ for their maximal activities. Affinity chromatography also showed the binding of protein kinase(s) to EhCaBP in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Our data suggest that there may be novel Ca(2+)-signal transduction pathway in E. histolytica mediated by EhCaBP.

  3. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  4. Visual short-term memory binding deficit in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuying; Pertzov, Yoni; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Henley, Susie M D; Crutch, Sebastian; Woodward, Felix; Leung, Kelvin; Fox, Nick C; Husain, Masud

    2016-05-01

    Long-term episodic memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are well characterised but, until recently, short-term memory (STM) function has attracted far less attention. We employed a recently-developed, delayed reproduction task which requires participants to reproduce precisely the remembered location of items they had seen only seconds previously. This paradigm provides not only a continuous measure of localization error in memory, but also an index of relational binding by determining the frequency with which an object is misplaced to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Such binding errors in STM have previously been found on this task to be sensitive to medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage in focal lesion cases. Twenty individuals with pathological mutations in presenilin 1 or amyloid precursor protein genes for familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) were tested together with 62 healthy controls. Participants were assessed using the delayed reproduction memory task, a standard neuropsychological battery and structural MRI. Overall, FAD mutation carriers were worse than controls for object identity as well as in gross localization memory performance. Moreover, they showed greater misbinding of object identity and location than healthy controls. Thus they would often mislocalize a correctly-identified item to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Significantly, asymptomatic gene carriers - who performed similarly to healthy controls on standard neuropsychological tests - had a specific impairment in object-location binding, despite intact memory for object identity and location. Consistent with the hypothesis that the hippocampus is critically involved in relational binding regardless of memory duration, decreased hippocampal volume across FAD participants was significantly associated with deficits in object-location binding but not with recall precision for object identity or localization. Object-location binding may therefore

  5. Visual short-term memory binding deficit in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuying; Pertzov, Yoni; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Henley, Susie M D; Crutch, Sebastian; Woodward, Felix; Leung, Kelvin; Fox, Nick C; Husain, Masud

    2016-05-01

    Long-term episodic memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are well characterised but, until recently, short-term memory (STM) function has attracted far less attention. We employed a recently-developed, delayed reproduction task which requires participants to reproduce precisely the remembered location of items they had seen only seconds previously. This paradigm provides not only a continuous measure of localization error in memory, but also an index of relational binding by determining the frequency with which an object is misplaced to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Such binding errors in STM have previously been found on this task to be sensitive to medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage in focal lesion cases. Twenty individuals with pathological mutations in presenilin 1 or amyloid precursor protein genes for familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) were tested together with 62 healthy controls. Participants were assessed using the delayed reproduction memory task, a standard neuropsychological battery and structural MRI. Overall, FAD mutation carriers were worse than controls for object identity as well as in gross localization memory performance. Moreover, they showed greater misbinding of object identity and location than healthy controls. Thus they would often mislocalize a correctly-identified item to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Significantly, asymptomatic gene carriers - who performed similarly to healthy controls on standard neuropsychological tests - had a specific impairment in object-location binding, despite intact memory for object identity and location. Consistent with the hypothesis that the hippocampus is critically involved in relational binding regardless of memory duration, decreased hippocampal volume across FAD participants was significantly associated with deficits in object-location binding but not with recall precision for object identity or localization. Object-location binding may therefore

  6. Visual short-term memory binding deficit in familial Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuying; Pertzov, Yoni; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Crutch, Sebastian; Woodward, Felix; Leung, Kelvin; Fox, Nick C.; Husain, Masud

    2016-01-01

    Long-term episodic memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are well characterised but, until recently, short-term memory (STM) function has attracted far less attention. We employed a recently-developed, delayed reproduction task which requires participants to reproduce precisely the remembered location of items they had seen only seconds previously. This paradigm provides not only a continuous measure of localization error in memory, but also an index of relational binding by determining the frequency with which an object is misplaced to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Such binding errors in STM have previously been found on this task to be sensitive to medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage in focal lesion cases. Twenty individuals with pathological mutations in presenilin 1 or amyloid precursor protein genes for familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) were tested together with 62 healthy controls. Participants were assessed using the delayed reproduction memory task, a standard neuropsychological battery and structural MRI. Overall, FAD mutation carriers were worse than controls for object identity as well as in gross localization memory performance. Moreover, they showed greater misbinding of object identity and location than healthy controls. Thus they would often mislocalize a correctly-identified item to the location of one of the other items held in memory. Significantly, asymptomatic gene carriers – who performed similarly to healthy controls on standard neuropsychological tests – had a specific impairment in object-location binding, despite intact memory for object identity and location. Consistent with the hypothesis that the hippocampus is critically involved in relational binding regardless of memory duration, decreased hippocampal volume across FAD participants was significantly associated with deficits in object-location binding but not with recall precision for object identity or localization. Object-location binding may

  7. Adeno-associated virus protects the retinoblastoma family of proteins from adenoviral-induced functional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Shammas, Masood A; Wang, Jing Yi; Freeman, John; Rosen, Nancy; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2002-05-15

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to inhibit virally mediated oncogenic transformation. One of the early events of adenovirus (Ad) infection is the functional inactivation of cell cycle regulatory retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins, which consists of retinoblastoma protein (pRB), p107, and p130. In an effort to understand the molecular basis of anti-oncogenic properties of AAV, we studied the effects of AAV expression on these proteins in cells infected with Ad. Western blot analysis showed that AAV interferes with the adenoviral-induced degradation and hyperphosphorylation of the pRB family of proteins in normal human fibroblasts as well as in HeLa and 293 cell lines. RNase protection assay showed enhanced expression of pocket protein gene by AAV expression. We also demonstrate that Rep proteins, the major AAV regulatory proteins, bind to E1A, the immediate early gene of Ad responsible for hyperphosphorylation and dissociation of pRB-E2F complex. This binding of AAV Rep proteins to E1A leads to decreased association between E1A and pRB leading to protection of pocket proteins from degradation, decreased expression of S phase genes and inhibition of cell cycle progression. These results suggest that the antiproliferative activity of AAV against Ad is mediated, at least in part, by effects of AAV Rep proteins on the Rb family of proteins.

  8. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1982-01-01

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with ..beta..-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to ..beta..-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants (lipids/detergents).

  9. Liver takes up retinol-binding protein from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoen, T.; Bjerkelund, T.; Blomhoff, H.K.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.; Blomhoff, R.

    1987-08-15

    Retinol is transported in plasma bound to a specific transport protein, retinol-binding protein. We prepared /sup 125/I-tyramine cellobiose-labeled rat retinol-binding protein and studied its tissue uptake 1, 5, and 24 h after intravenous injection into rats. The liver was the organ containing most radioactivity at all time points studied. After 5 and 24 h, 30 and 22% of the injected dose were recovered in liver, respectively. After separating the liver into parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the 5-h group, we found that both cell fractions contained approximately the same amount of radioactivity (per gram of liver). Most of the retinol-binding protein radioactivity in the nonparenchymal cell fraction was in the stellate cells. The implication of these results for a possible transfer mechanism for retinol between parenchymal and stellate cells is discussed.

  10. Structure and ligand-binding mechanism of a cysteinyl leukotriene-binding protein from a blood-feeding disease vector

    PubMed Central

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4) and D4 (LTD4) and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr 114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex leaving free glutathione, and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  11. Studies of Fibronectin-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Lannergård, Jonas; Flock, Margareta; Johansson, Staffan; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Guss, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is the causative agent of strangles, a disease of the upper respiratory tract in horses. The initiation of S. equi subsp. equi infection is likely to involve cell surface-anchored molecules mediating bacterial adhesion to the epithelium of the host. The present study describes the cloning and characterization of FNEB, a fibronectin-binding protein with cell wall-anchoring motifs. FNEB can thus be predicted as cell surface located, contrary to the two previously characterized fibronectin-binding proteins in S. equi subsp. equi, FNE and SFS. Assays of antibody titers in horses and in experimentally infected mice indicate that the protein is immunogenic and expressed in vivo during S. equi subsp. equi infection. Using Western ligand blotting, it was shown that FNEB binds to the N-terminal 29-kDa fragment of fibronectin, while SFS and FNE both bind to the adjacent 40-kDa fragment. S. equi subsp. equi is known to bind fibronectin to a much lower degree than the closely related S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus, but the binding is primarily directed to the 29-kDa fragment. Inhibition studies using S. equi subsp. equi cells indicate that FNEB mediates cellular binding to fibronectin in this species. PMID:16239519

  12. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, B. A.; Spencer, C.; Eberwine, J.

    1996-01-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington's disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to > 37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and UV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8751857

  13. Computational design of a PAK1 binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ramesh K; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Yin, Shuangye; Wu, Yibing; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Szyperski, Thomas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Kuhlman, Brian

    2010-07-01

    We describe a computational protocol, called DDMI, for redesigning scaffold proteins to bind to a specified region on a target protein. The DDMI protocol is implemented within the Rosetta molecular modeling program and uses rigid-body docking, sequence design, and gradient-based minimization of backbone and side-chain torsion angles to design low-energy interfaces between the scaffold and target protein. Iterative rounds of sequence design and conformational optimization were needed to produce models that have calculated binding energies that are similar to binding energies calculated for native complexes. We also show that additional conformation sampling with molecular dynamics can be iterated with sequence design to further lower the computed energy of the designed complexes. To experimentally test the DDMI protocol, we redesigned the human hyperplastic discs protein to bind to the kinase domain of p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). Six designs were experimentally characterized. Two of the designs aggregated and were not characterized further. Of the remaining four designs, three bound to the PAK1 with affinities tighter than 350 muM. The tightest binding design, named Spider Roll, bound with an affinity of 100 muM. NMR-based structure prediction of Spider Roll based on backbone and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts using the program CS-ROSETTA indicated that the architecture of human hyperplastic discs protein is preserved. Mutagenesis studies confirmed that Spider Roll binds the target patch on PAK1. Additionally, Spider Roll binds to full-length PAK1 in its activated state but does not bind PAK1 when it forms an auto-inhibited conformation that blocks the Spider Roll target site. Subsequent NMR characterization of the binding of Spider Roll to PAK1 revealed a comparably small binding 'on-rate' constant (<10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). The ability to rationally design the site of novel protein-protein interactions is an important step towards creating new proteins that are useful

  14. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  15. High Structural Resolution Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Reveals an Extended Robo1-Heparin Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  16. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

  17. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  18. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements. PMID:21087992

  19. Affinity labeling of GTP-binding proteins in cellular extracts.

    PubMed

    Löw, A; Faulhammer, H G; Sprinzl, M

    1992-05-25

    GTP-binding proteins in cellular extracts from Escherichia coli, Thermus thermophilus, yeast, wheat germ or calf thymus were identified using in situ periodate-oxidized [alpha-32P]GTP as affinity label. Site-specific reaction of individual GTP-binding proteins was achieved by cross-linking the protein-bound 2',3'-dialdehyde derivative of GTP with the single lysine residue of the conserved NKXD sequence through Schiff's base formation and subsequent cyanoborohydride reduction. Labeled GTP-binding proteins from prokaryotic or eukaryotic cell homogenates were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. In addition cross-linking of [alpha-32P]GTP with GTP-binding proteins was demonstrated in model systems using different purified GTPases, human c-H-ras p21, transducin from bovine retina, polypeptide elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) from T. thermophilus and initiation factor 2 (IF2) from T. thermophilus. The described affinity labeling technique can serve as an analytical method for the identification of GTPases belonging to the classes of ras-proteins, elongation and initiation factors, and heterotrimeric signal transducing G-proteins. PMID:1592117

  20. Binding-protein-dependent lactose transport in Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J A; Cornish, A; Jones, C W

    1990-04-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter NCIB 11883 was grown in lactose-limited continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.045/h. Washed cells transported [14C]lactose and [methyl-14C]beta-D-thiogalactoside, a nonmetabolisable analog of lactose, at similar rates and with similar affinities (Km for transport, less than 1 microM). Transport was inhibited to various extents by the uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, by unlabeled beta-galactosides and D-galactose, and by osmotic shock. The accumulation ratio for methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside was greater than or equal to 4,100. An abundant protein (molecular weight, 41,000) was purified from osmotic-shock fluid and shown by equilibrium dialysis to bind lactose and methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside, the former with very high affinity (binding constant, 0.14 microM). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this lactose-binding protein exhibited some homology with several other sugar-binding proteins from bacteria. Antiserum raised against the lactose-binding protein did not cross-react with two glucose-binding proteins from A. radiobacter or with extracts of other bacteria grown under lactose limitation. Lactose transport and beta-galactosidase were induced in batch cultures by lactose, melibiose [O-alpha-D-galactoside-(1----6)alpha-D-glucose], and isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside and were subject to catabolite repression by glucose, galactose, and succinate which was not alleviated by cyclic AMP. We conclude that lactose is transported into A. radiobacter via a binding protein-dependent active transport system (in contrast to the H+ symport and phosphotransferase systems found in other bacteria) and that the expression of this transport system is closely linked to that of beta-galactosidase.

  1. Isolation of two strong poly (U) binding proteins from moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina and their identification as cold shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Usha Kumari; Suryanarayana, Tangirala

    2012-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csp) are known to be expressed in response to sudden decrease in temperature. They are thought to be involved in a number of cellular processes viz., RNA chaperone activity, translation, transcription, nucleoid condensation. During our studies on ribosomal protein S1 in moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina, we observed the presence of two strong poly (U) binding proteins in abundance in cell extracts from cells grown under normal growth conditions. The proteins can be isolated in a single step using Poly (U) cellulose chromatography. The proteins were identified as major cold shock proteins belonging to Csp A family by MALDI-TOF and bioinformatic analysis. Csp 12 kDa was found in both exponential and stationary phases whereas Csp 8 kDa is found only in exponential phase.

  2. Antibiotic binding of STY3178, a yfdX protein from Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Paramita; Manna, Camelia; Das, Santasabuj; Ghosh, Mahua

    2016-01-01

    The yfdX family proteins are known for long time to occur in various virulent bacteria including their multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, without any direct assigned function for them. However, yfdX protein along with other proteins involved in acid tolerance response is reported to be up regulated by the multidrug response regulatory system in E. coli. Hence, molecular and functional characterization of this protein is important for understanding of key cellular processes in bacterial cells. Here we study STY3178, a yfdX protein from a MDR strain of typhoid fever causing Salmonella Typhi. Our experimental results indicate that STY3178 is a helical protein existing in a trimeric oligomerization state in solution. We also observe many small antibiotics, like ciprofloxacin, rifampin and ampicillin viably interact with this protein. The dissociation constants from the quenching of steady state fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry show that ciprofloxacin binding is stronger than rifampin followed by ampicillin. PMID:26892637

  3. Marsupial and monotreme serum immunoglobulin binding by proteins A, G and L and anti-kangaroo antibody.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Paola K; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-12-01

    Serological studies are often conducted to examine exposure to infectious agents in wildlife populations. However, specific immunological reagents for wildlife species are seldom available and can limit the study of infectious diseases in these animals. This study examined the ability of four commercially available immunoglobulin-binding reagents to bind serum immunoglobulins from 17 species within the Marsupialia and Monotremata. Serum samples were assessed for binding, using immunoblots and ELISAs (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), to three microbially-derived proteins - staphylococcal protein A, streptococcal protein G and peptostreptococcal protein L. Additionally, an anti-kangaroo antibody was included for comparison. The inter- and intra-familial binding patterns of the reagents to serum immunoglobulins varied and evolutionary distance between animal species was not an accurate predictor of the ability of reagents to bind immunoglobulins. Results from this study can be used to inform the selection of appropriate immunological reagents in future serological studies in these clades.

  4. Marsupial and monotreme serum immunoglobulin binding by proteins A, G and L and anti-kangaroo antibody.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Paola K; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-12-01

    Serological studies are often conducted to examine exposure to infectious agents in wildlife populations. However, specific immunological reagents for wildlife species are seldom available and can limit the study of infectious diseases in these animals. This study examined the ability of four commercially available immunoglobulin-binding reagents to bind serum immunoglobulins from 17 species within the Marsupialia and Monotremata. Serum samples were assessed for binding, using immunoblots and ELISAs (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), to three microbially-derived proteins - staphylococcal protein A, streptococcal protein G and peptostreptococcal protein L. Additionally, an anti-kangaroo antibody was included for comparison. The inter- and intra-familial binding patterns of the reagents to serum immunoglobulins varied and evolutionary distance between animal species was not an accurate predictor of the ability of reagents to bind immunoglobulins. Results from this study can be used to inform the selection of appropriate immunological reagents in future serological studies in these clades. PMID:26523413

  5. PRBP: Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins Using a Random Forest Algorithm Combined with an RNA-Binding Residue Predictor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Xiao, Ke; Sun, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of RNA-binding proteins is an incredibly challenging problem in computational biology. Although great progress has been made using various machine learning approaches with numerous features, the problem is still far from being solved. In this study, we attempt to predict RNA-binding proteins directly from amino acid sequences. A novel approach, PRBP predicts RNA-binding proteins using the information of predicted RNA-binding residues in conjunction with a random forest based method. For a given protein, we first predict its RNA-binding residues and then judge whether the protein binds RNA or not based on information from that prediction. If the protein cannot be identified by the information associated with its predicted RNA-binding residues, then a novel random forest predictor is used to determine if the query protein is a RNA-binding protein. We incorporated features of evolutionary information combined with physicochemical features (EIPP) and amino acid composition feature to establish the random forest predictor. Feature analysis showed that EIPP contributed the most to the prediction of RNA-binding proteins. The results also showed that the information from the RNA-binding residue prediction improved the overall performance of our RNA-binding protein prediction. It is anticipated that the PRBP method will become a useful tool for identifying RNA-binding proteins. A PRBP Web server implementation is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/PRBP/.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in three mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Xu, Yongyu; Cui, Feng

    2016-09-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family functions in the ATP-dependent transportation of various substrates across biological membranes. ABC proteins participate in various biological processes and insecticide resistance in insects, and are divided into eight subfamilies (A-H). Mosquitoes are important vectors of human diseases, but the mechanism by which the ABC transporter family evolves in mosquitoes is unknown. In this study, we classified and compared the ABC transporter families of three mosquitoes, namely, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus. The three mosquitoes have 55, 69, and 70 ABC genes, respectively. The C. p. quinquefasciatus had approximately 40% and 65% expansion in the ABCG subfamily, mainly in ABCG1/G4, compared with the two other mosquito species. The ABCB, ABCD, ABCE, and ABCF subfamilies were conserved in the three mosquito species. The C. p. quinquefasciatus transcriptomes during development showed that the ABCG and ABCC genes were mainly highly expressed at the egg and pupal stages. The pigment-transport relative brown, white, and scarlet, as well as the ABCF subfamily, were highly expressed at the egg stage. The highly expressed genes in larvae included three ABCA3 genes. The majority of the highly expressed genes in adults were ABCG1/4 genes. These results provided insights into the evolution of the ABC transporter family in mosquitoes. PMID:27521922

  7. Calmodulin and calmodulin binding proteins in amphibian rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, S.; Yamazaki, A.; Bitensky, M.W.

    1987-03-24

    The calmodulin (CaM) content of fully intact frog rod outer segments (ROS) has been measured using radioimmunoassay. The molar ratio between rhodopsin and total CaM in ROS is 800:1. In the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/, the ROS membrane fraction contains only 4% of total ROS CaM. In contrast, in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, 15% of total ROS CaM is found in the membrane fraction. For half-maximal binding of CaM to CaM-depleted ROS membranes, 3 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ is required. This CaM binding is inhibited by trifluoperazine. CaM binding proteins in the ROS membrane fraction are identified by using two different methods: the overlay method and the use of 3,3'-dithiobis(sulfosuccinimidyl propionate) (DTSSP), a bifunctional cross-linking reagent. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of 240,000, 140,000, 53,000, and 47,000 are detected in the ROS membrane fraction by the overlay method. Anomalous, Ca/sup 2 +/-independent CaM binding to rhodopsin is also detected with this method, and this CaM binding is inhibited by the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. With the bifunctional cross-linking reagent, DTSSP, three discrete proteins with molecular weights of 240,000, 53,000, and 47,000 are detected in the native ROS membrane fraction. CaM binding to rhodopsin is not detected with this method. These data suggest that both the Ca/sup 2 +/-independent binding of CaM to rhodopsin and the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of CaM to the M/sub r/ 140,000 protein represent binding of CaM to a site(s) which is (are) exposed only after denaturation. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in the cytoplasmic fraction is also evaluated with the overlay method. These data suggest that CaM and its binding proteins participate in the regulation of Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive processes primarily on the ROS disk membranes.

  8. A DNA-binding protein factor recognizes two binding domains within the octopine synthase enhancer element.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Singh, K; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    1990-01-01

    A protein that binds to the enhancing element of the octopine synthase gene has been identified in nuclear extracts from maize cell suspension cultures. Two protein-DNA complexes are distinguishable by electrophoretic mobility in gel retardation assays. Footprint analyses of these low and high molecular weight complexes show, respectively, half and complete protection of the ocs-element DNA from cleavage by methidiumpropyl-EDTA.FE(II). Two lines of evidence indicate that the element has two recognition sites, each of which can bind identical protein units. Elements that are mutated in one or the other half and form only the low molecular weight complex interfere with the formation of both the low and high molecular weight complexes by the wild-type element. Protein isolated from a complex with only one binding site occupied can bind to the wild-type ocs-element and generate complexes with protein occupying one or both binding sites. Occupation of both sites of the ocs-element is a prerequisite for transcriptional enhancement. PMID:2152113

  9. Lactation-induced cadmium-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Solaiman, D.; Garvey, J.S.; Miyazaki, W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated an increase during midlactation in /sup 109/Cd adsorption and increased retention by the duodenum, kidney, and mammary tissue of mouse dams receiving environmental levels of cadmium//sup 109/Cd via drinking water, with little change in /sup 109/Cd retention in liver and jejunum compared to nonpregnant controls. Results are reported here of a study of cadmium deposition during midlactation as associated with induction of metallothionein (MT). A cadmium/hemoglobin (Cd/Hb) assay and radioimmunoassay for MT which measures heat-stable cadmium binding capacity in tissues was used to determine MT concentrations in fractions of kidney, liver, duodenum, and jejunum from female mice. Both assays demonstrated clear lactation-induced increases in MT concentrations in liver, kidney, and duodenum, with MT concentrations falling rapidly to control levels after weaning. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Zinc fingers, zinc clusters, and zinc twists in DNA-binding protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Coleman, J E; Auld, D S

    1991-01-01

    We now recognize three distinct motifs of DNA-binding zinc proteins: (i) zinc fingers, (ii) zinc clusters, and (iii) zinc twists. Until very recently, x-ray crystallographic or NMR three-dimensional structure analyses of DNA-binding zinc proteins have not been available to serve as standards of reference for the zinc binding sites of these families of proteins. Those of the DNA-binding domains of the fungal transcription factor GAL4 and the rat glucocorticoid receptor are the first to have been determined. Both proteins contain two zinc binding sites, and in both, cysteine residues are the sole zinc ligands. In GAL4, two zinc atoms are bound to six cysteine residues which form a "zinc cluster" akin to that of metallothionein; the distance between the two zinc atoms of GAL4 is approximately 3.5 A. In the glucocorticoid receptor, each zinc atom is bound to four cysteine residues; the interatomic zinc-zinc distance is approximately 13 A, and in this instance, a "zinc twist" is represented by a helical DNA recognition site located between the two zinc atoms. Zinc clusters and zinc twists are here recognized as two distinctive motifs in DNA-binding proteins containing multiple zinc atoms. For native "zinc fingers," structural data do not exist as yet; consequently, the interatomic distances between zinc atoms are not known. As further structural data become available, the structural and functional significance of these different motifs in their binding to DNA and other proteins participating in the transmission of the genetic message will become apparent. Images PMID:1846973

  11. Evaluation of silica nanoparticle binding to major human blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Katsutomo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials are used for various biomedical applications because they are often more effective than conventional materials. Recently, however, it has become clear that the protein corona that forms on the surface of nanomaterials when they make contact with biological fluids, such as blood, influences the pharmacokinetics and biological responses induced by the nanomaterials. Therefore, when evaluating nanomaterial safety and efficacy, it is important to analyze the interaction between nanomaterials and proteins in biological fluids and to evaluate the effects of the protein corona. Here, we evaluated the interaction of silica nanoparticles, a commonly used nanomaterial, with the human blood proteins albumin, transferrin, fibrinogen, and IgG. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the amount of albumin, transferrin, and IgG binding to the silica particles increased as the particle size decreased under conditions where the silica particle mass remained the same. However, under conditions in which the specific surface area remained constant, there were no differences in the binding of human plasma proteins to the silica particles tested, suggesting that the binding of silica particles with human plasma proteins is dependent on the specific surface area of the silica particles. Furthermore, the amount of albumin, transferrin, and IgG binding to silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 70 nm (nSP70) and a functional amino group was lower than that with unmodified nSP70, although there was no difference in the binding between nSP70 with the surface modification of a carboxyl functional group and nSP70. These results suggest that the characteristics of nanomaterials are important for binding with human blood proteins; this information may contribute to the development of safe and effective nanomaterials.

  12. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.

  13. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  14. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein. PMID:24878641

  15. Organic solvents identify specific ligand binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G

    1997-03-01

    Enzymes frequently recognize substrates and pharmaceutical drugs through specific binding interactions in deep pockets on the protein surface. We show how the specificity-determining substrate binding site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) can be readily identified in aqueous solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using small organic solvent molecules as detection probes. Exchange of magnetization between the 1H nuclei of the protein and the ligands through dipole-dipole interactions is observed which allows the modeling of their position and orientation at the binding site. Combined with site-specific binding constants measured by titration experiments with different organic solvents, the method can provide important information for rational drug design. In addition, the lifetime of nonspecific interactions of HEWL with organic solvents is shown to be in the sub-nanosecond time range. PMID:9062927

  16. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein.

  17. The human mannose-binding protein functions as an opsonin

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The human mannose-binding protein (MBP) is a multimeric serum protein that is divided into three domains: a cysteine-rich NH2-terminal domain that stabilizes the alpha-helix of the second collagen-like domain, and a third COOH-terminal carbohydrate binding region. The function of MBP is unknown, although a role in host defense is suggested by its ability to bind yeast mannans. In this report we show that native and recombinant human MBP can serve in an opsonic role in serum and thereby enhance clearance of mannose rich pathogens by phagocytes. MBP binds to wild-type virulent Salmonella montevideo that express a mannose-rich O- polysaccharide. Interaction of MBP with these organisms results in attachment, uptake, and killing of the opsonized bacteria by phagocytes. These results demonstrate that MBP plays a role in first line host defense against certain pathogenic organisms. PMID:2469767

  18. Characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Takagi, M; Hashida, S; Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H; Segel, I H

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA), a component of the cellulase complex of Clostridium cellulovorans, contains a unique sequence which has been demonstrated to be a cellulose-binding domain (CBD). The DNA coding for this putative CBD was subcloned into pET-8c, an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein produced under the direction of the recombinant plasmid, pET-CBD, had a high affinity for crystalline cellulose. Affinity-purified CBD protein was used in equilibrium binding experiments to characterize the interaction of the protein with various polysaccharides. It was found that the binding capacity of highly crystalline cellulose samples (e.g., cotton) was greater than that of samples of low crystallinity (e.g., fibrous cellulose). At saturating CBD concentration, about 6.4 mumol of protein was bound by 1 g of cotton. Under the same conditions, fibrous cellulose bound only 0.2 mumol of CBD per g. The measured dissociation constant was in the 1 microM range for all cellulose samples. The results suggest that the CBD binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. Chitin, which has a crystal structure similar to that of cellulose, also was bound by the CBD. The presence of high levels of cellobiose or carboxymethyl cellulose in the assay mixture had no effect on the binding of CBD protein to crystalline cellulose. This result suggests that the CBD recognition site is larger than a simple cellobiose unit or more complex than a repeating cellobiose moiety. This CBD is of particular interest because it is the first CBD from a completely sequenced nonenzymatic protein shown to be an independently functional domain. Images PMID:8376323

  19. A new zinc binding fold underlines the versatility of zinc binding modules in protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Belinda K; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kwan, Ann H Y; Newton, Anthea; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-05-01

    Many different zinc binding modules have been identified. Their abundance and variety suggests that the formation of zinc binding folds might be relatively common. We have determined the structure of CH1(1), a 27-residue peptide derived from the first cysteine/histidine-rich region (CH1) of CREB binding protein (CBP). This peptide forms a highly ordered zinc-dependent fold that is distinct from known folds. The structure differs from a subsequently determined structure of a larger region from the CH3 region of CBP, and the CH1(1) fold probably represents a nonphysiologically active form. Despite this, the fold is thermostable and tolerant to both multiple alanine mutations and changes in the zinc-ligand spacing. Our data support the idea that zinc binding domains may arise frequently. Additionally, such structures may prove useful as scaffolds for protein design, given their stability and robustness.

  20. Use of NMR saturation transfer difference spectroscopy to study ligand binding to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Venkitakrishnan, Rani Parvathy; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Max, Marianna; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2012-01-01

    Detection of weak ligand binding to membrane-spanning proteins, such as receptor proteins at low physiological concentrations, poses serious experimental challenges. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) spectroscopy offers an excellent way to surmount these problems. As the name suggests, magnetization transferred from the receptor to its bound ligand is measured by directly observing NMR signals from the ligand itself. Low-power irradiation is applied to a (1)H NMR spectral region containing protein signals but no ligand signals. This irradiation spreads quickly throughout the membrane protein by the process of spin diffusion and saturates all protein (1)H NMR signals. (1)H NMR signals from a ligand bound transiently to the membrane protein become saturated and, upon dissociation, serve to decrease the intensity of the (1)H NMR signals measured from the pool of free ligand. The experiment is repeated with the irradiation pulse placed outside the spectral region of protein and ligand, a condition that does not lead to saturation transfer to the ligand. The two resulting spectra are subtracted to yield the difference spectrum. As an illustration of the methodology, we review here STD-NMR experiments designed to investigate binding of ligands to the human sweet taste receptor, a member of the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Sweetener molecules bind to the sweet receptor with low affinity but high specificity and lead to a variety of physiological responses.

  1. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  2. Protein D of Haemophilus influenzae is not a universal immunoglobulin D-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, K; Munson, R S

    1993-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b and nontypeable H. influenzae have been reported to bind human immunoglobulin D (IgD). IgD myeloma sera from five patients were tested for the ability of IgD to bind to H. influenzae. Serotype b strains bound human IgD in four of the five sera tested. IgD in the fifth serum bound strongly to type b strain MinnA but poorly to other type b strains. Additionally, IgD binding was not observed when nontypeable strains were tested. The gene for protein D, the putative IgD-binding protein, was cloned from the IgD-binding H. influenzae type b strain MinnA and expressed in Escherichia coli. IgD binding to E. coli expressing protein D was not demonstrable. Recombinant protein D was purified, and antisera were generated in rabbits. Using these rabbit sera, we detected protein D in nontypeable as well as serotype b strains by Western blotting (immunoblotting). In contrast, IgD myeloma protein 4490, which was previously reported to bind to protein D by Ruan and coworkers (M. Ruan, M. Akkoyunlu, A. Grubb, and A. Forsgren, J. Immunol. 145:3379-3384), bound strongly to both type b and nontypeable H. influenzae as well as to E. coli expressing protein D. Thus, IgD binding is a general property of H. influenzae type b strains but not a general property of nontypeable strains, although both type b and nontypeable strains produce protein D. With the exception of IgD myeloma protein 4490 binding, we have no evidence for a role of protein D in IgD binding to H. influenzae. Images PMID:8514409

  3. Construction of a family of Cys2His2 zinc binding sites in the hydrophobic core of thioredoxin by structure-based design.

    PubMed

    Wisz, M S; Garrett, C Z; Hellinga, H W

    1998-06-01

    A semi-automated, rational design strategy has been used to introduce a family of seven single, mononuclear Cys2His2 zinc sites at various locations in the hydrophobic core of Escherichia colithioredoxin, a protein that is normally devoid of metal centers. The electronic absorption spectra of the CoII complexes show that five of these designed proteins bind metal with the intended tetrahedral geometry. The designed sites differ in their metal-binding constants and effects on protein stability. Since these designs are constructed within the same host protein framework, comparison of their behavior allows a qualitative evaluation of dominant factors that contribute to metal-binding and metal-mediated protein stabilization. Metal-binding constants are dominated by steric interactions between the buried, designed coordination sphere and the surrounding protein matrix. Metal-mediated stability is the consequence of differential binding to the native and unfolded states. Increased interactions with the unfolded state decrease the stabilizing effect of metal binding. The affinity for the unfolded state is dependent on the placement of the primary coordination sphere residues within the linear protein sequence. These results indicate that a protein fold can have a remarkably broad potential for accommodating metal-mediated cross-links and suggest strategies for engineering protein stability by constructing metal sites that maximize metal binding to the native state and minimize binding to the unfolded state.

  4. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  5. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  6. Predicting the Binding Patterns of Hub Proteins: A Study Using Yeast Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Andorf, Carson M.; Honavar, Vasant; Sen, Taner Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions are critical to elucidating the role played by individual proteins in important biological pathways. Of particular interest are hub proteins that can interact with large numbers of partners and often play essential roles in cellular control. Depending on the number of binding sites, protein hubs can be classified at a structural level as singlish-interface hubs (SIH) with one or two binding sites, or multiple-interface hubs (MIH) with three or more binding sites. In terms of kinetics, hub proteins can be classified as date hubs (i.e., interact with different partners at different times or locations) or party hubs (i.e., simultaneously interact with multiple partners). Methodology Our approach works in 3 phases: Phase I classifies if a protein is likely to bind with another protein. Phase II determines if a protein-binding (PB) protein is a hub. Phase III classifies PB proteins as singlish-interface versus multiple-interface hubs and date versus party hubs. At each stage, we use sequence-based predictors trained using several standard machine learning techniques. Conclusions Our method is able to predict whether a protein is a protein-binding protein with an accura